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Sample records for particles affects mouse

  1. Chronic Exposure to Ambient Levels of Urban Particles Affects Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Mauad, Thais; Rivero, Dolores Helena Rodriguez Ferreira; de Oliveira, Regiani Carvalho; de Faria Coimbra Lichtenfels, Ana Julia; Guimarães, Eliane Tigre; de Andre, Paulo Afonso; Kasahara, David Itiro; de Siqueira Bueno, Heloisa Maria; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic exposure to air pollution has been associated with adverse effects on children's lung growth. Objectives: We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to urban levels of particulate matter (PM) on selected phases of mouse lung development. Methods: The exposure occurred in two open-top chambers (filtered and nonfiltered) placed 20 m from a street with heavy traffic in São Paulo, 24 hours/day for 8 months. There was a significant reduction of the levels of PM2.5 inside the filtered chamber (filtered = 2.9 ± 3.0 μg/m3, nonfiltered = 16.8 ± 8.3 μg/m3; P = 0.001). At this exposure site, vehicular sources are the major components of PM2.5 (PM ≤ 2.5μm). Exposure of the parental generation in the two chambers occurred from the 10th to the 120th days of life. After mating and birth of offspring, a crossover of mothers and pups occurred within the chambers, resulting in four groups of pups: nonexposed, prenatal, postnatal, and pre+postnatal. Offspring were killed at the age of 15 (n = 42) and 90 (n = 35) days; lungs were analyzed by morphometry for surface to volume ratio (as an estimator of alveolization). Pressure–volume curves were performed in the older groups, using a 20-ml plethysmograph. Measurements and Main Results: Mice exposed to PM2.5 pre+postnatally presented a smaller surface to volume ratio when compared with nonexposed animals (P = 0.036). The pre+postnatal group presented reduced inspiratory and expiratory volumes at higher levels of transpulmonary pressure (P = 0.001). There were no differences among prenatal and postnatal exposure and nonexposed animals. Conclusions: Our data provide anatomical and functional support to the concept that chronic exposure to urban PM affects lung growth. PMID:18596224

  2. Microphysical processes affecting stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Kiang, C. S.

    1977-01-01

    Physical processes which affect stratospheric aerosol particles include nucleation, condensation, evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Quantitative studies of these mechanisms to determine if they can account for some of the observed properties of the aerosol are carried out. It is shown that the altitude range in which nucleation of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets can take place corresponds to that region of the stratosphere where the aerosol is generally found. Since heterogeneous nucleation is the dominant nucleation mechanism, the stratospheric solution droplets are mainly formed on particles which have been mixed up from the troposphere or injected into the stratosphere by volcanoes or meteorites. Particle growth by heteromolecular condensation can account for the observed increase in mixing ratio of large particles in the stratosphere. Coagulation is important in reducing the number of particles smaller than 0.05 micron radius. Growth by condensation, applied to the mixed nature of the particles, shows that available information is consistent with ammonium sulfate being formed by liquid phase chemical reactions in the aerosol particles. The upper altitude limit of the aerosol layer is probably due to the evaporation of sulfuric acid aerosol particles, while the lower limit is due to mixing across the tropopause.

  3. Particle size of airborne mouse crude and defined allergens.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Miyazawa, H; Kamimura, H; Kimura, M; Yamazaki, S

    1989-05-01

    Laboratory animal allergy is a serious occupational diseases of many workers and scientists engaged in animal experimentation. Control measures depend upon characterization of allergens including airborne particles. This study measured the particle size of crude mouse urine and pelt aeroallergens generated in mouse housing rooms and compared them with mouse serum albumin, a defined major allergen. Allergens were detected by specific immunological methods. Most crude and defined allergens (74.5-86.4%) concentrated on a filter with a retention size greater than 7 microns. In distrubed air, allergen concentration increased 1.4 (albumin) to 5 (crude) fold and the proportion of small particles increased from 1.4% in calm air to 4.5% in distrubed air. This information on the generation and size distribution of aeroallergens will be important in the development of effective counter measures. PMID:2724924

  4. Zearalenone exposure affects epigenetic modifications of mouse eggs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Hou, Yan-Jun; Han, Jun; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-11-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a mycotoxin produced by various Fusarium fungi, which has been shown to cause several cases of mycotoxicosis in farm animals and humans. However, there is no evidence regarding the effect of ZEA on mouse egg developmental competence. In this study, we found that the activation rate of maturated oocytes was affected in mice by ZEA treatment, indicating that ZEA affects egg developmental competence. And we explored possible mechanisms of low mouse maturated oocyte developmental competence after ZEA treatment from an epigenetic modification perspective. The fluorescence intensity analysis showed that 5-methyl cytosine level increased after ZEA treatment, indicating that the general DNA methylation level increased in the treated eggs. Moreover, histone methylations were also altered: H3K4me2 as well as H3K9me3 and H4K20me1, me2, me3 levels decreased in eggs that were cultured in high-dose ZEA medium. Thus, our results indicated that ZEA decreased egg developmental competence by affecting the epigenetic modifications. PMID:25155023

  5. Elasticity of vesicles affects hairless mouse skin structure and permeability.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, B A; Bouwstra, J A; Junginger, H E; Wertz, P W

    1999-12-01

    One of the possibilities for increasing the penetration rate of drugs through the skin is the use of vesicular systems. Currently, special attention is paid to the elastic properties of liquid-state vesicles, which are supposed to have superior properties compared to gel-state vesicles with respect to skin interactions. In this study, the effects of vesicles on hairless mouse skin, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied in relation to the composition of vesicles. The interactions of elastic vesicles containing the single chain surfactant octaoxyethylene laurate-ester (PEG-8-L) and sucrose laurate-ester (L-595) with hairless mouse skin were studied, in vivo, after non-occlusive application for 1, 3 and 6 h. The skin ultrastructure was examined by ruthenium tetroxide electron microscopy (TEM) and histology. The extent, to which vesicle constituents penetrated into the stratum corneum, was quantified by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The interactions of the elastic vesicles containing PEG-8-L and L-595 surfactants were compared with those observed after treatment with rigid vesicles containing the surfactant sucrose stearate-ester (Wasag-7). Furthermore, skin permeability experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of treatment with PEG-8-L micelles, elastic vesicles (containing PEG-8-L and L-595 surfactants) or rigid Wasag-7 vesicles on the 3H(2)O transport through hairless mouse skin, in vitro, after non-occlusive application. Treatment of hairless mouse skin with the elastic vesicles affected the ultrastructure of the stratum corneum: distinct regions with lamellar stacks derived from the vesicles were observed in intercellular spaces of the stratum corneum. These stacks disrupted the organization of skin bilayers leading to an increased skin permeability, whereas no changes in the ultrastructure of the underlying viable epidermis were observed. Treatment with rigid Wasag-7 vesicles did not affect the skin ultrastructure or skin permeability. TLC

  6. Gene Targeting of Mouse Tardbp Negatively Affects Masp2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Samar; Xiao, Shangxi; Miletic, Denise; Robertson, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease affecting both upper and lower motor neurons. TDP-43, encoded by the TARDBP gene, was identified as a component of motor neuron cytoplasmic inclusions in both familial and sporadic ALS and has become a pathological signature of the disease. TDP-43 is a nuclear protein involved in RNA metabolism, however in ALS, TDP-43 is mislocalized to the cytoplasm of affected motor neurons, suggesting that disease might be caused by TDP-43 loss of function. To investigate this hypothesis, we attempted to generate a mouse conditional knockout of the Tardbp gene using the classical Cre-loxP technology. Even though heterozygote mice for the targeted allele were successfully generated, we were unable to obtain homozygotes. Here we show that although the targeting vector was specifically designed to not overlap with Tardbp adjacent genes, the homologous recombination event affected the expression of a downstream gene, Masp2. This may explain the inability to obtain homozygote mice with targeted Tardbp. PMID:24740308

  7. Dry deposition of pollutant and marker particles onto live mouse airway surfaces enhances monitoring of individual particle mucociliary transit behaviour.

    PubMed

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S; Siu, Karen K W; Parsons, David W

    2012-07-01

    Particles suspended in the air are inhaled during normal respiration and unless cleared by airway defences, such as the mucociliary transit (MCT) system, they can remain and affect lung and airway health. Synchrotron phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) methods have been developed to non-invasively monitor the behaviour of individual particles in live mouse airways and in previous studies the MCT behaviour of particles and fibres in the airways of live mice after deposition in a saline carrier fluid have been examined. In this study a range of common respirable pollutant particles (lead dust, quarry dust and fibreglass fibres) as well as marker particles (hollow glass micro-spheres) were delivered into the trachea of live mice using a dry powder insufflator to more accurately mimic normal environmental particulate exposure and deposition via inhalation. The behaviour of the particles once delivered onto the airway surface was tracked over a five minute period via PCXI. All particles were visible after deposition. Fibreglass fibres remained stationary throughout while all other particle types transited the tracheal surface throughout the imaging period. In all cases the majority of the particle deposition and any airway surface activity was located close to the dorsal tracheal wall. Both the individual and bulk motions of the glass bead marker particles were visible and their behaviour enabled otherwise hidden MCT patterns to be revealed. This study verified the value of PCXI for examining the post-deposition particulate MCT behaviour in the mouse trachea and highlighted that MCT is not a uniform process as suggested by radiolabel studies. It also directly revealed the advantages of dry particle delivery for establishing adequate particulate presence for visualizing MCT behaviour. The MCT behaviour and rate seen after dry particle delivery was different from that in previous carrier-fluid studies. It is proposed that dry particle delivery is essential for producing

  8. Particle statistics affects quantum decay and Fano interference.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Andrea; Sansoni, Linda; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Ciamei, Alessio; Ramponi, Roberta; Sciarrino, Fabio; Mataloni, Paolo; Longhi, Stefano; Osellame, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Quantum mechanical decay, Fano interference, and bound states with energy in the continuum are ubiquitous phenomena in different areas of physics. Here we experimentally demonstrate that particle statistics strongly affects quantum mechanical decay in a multiparticle system. By considering propagation of two-photon states in engineered photonic lattices, we simulate quantum decay of two noninteracting particles in a multilevel Fano-Anderson model. Remarkably, when the system sustains a bound state in the continuum, fractional decay is observed for bosonic particles, but not for fermionic ones. Complete decay in the fermionic case arises because of the Pauli exclusion principle, which forbids the bound state to be occupied by the two fermions. Our experiment indicates that particle statistics can tune many-body quantum decay from fractional to complete. PMID:25793783

  9. Do plastic particles affect microalgal photosynthesis and growth?

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Sascha B; Redondo-Hasselerharm, Paula; Leslie, Heather A; Kraak, Michiel H S; Vethaak, A Dick

    2016-01-01

    The unbridled increase in plastic pollution of the world's oceans raises concerns about potential effects these materials may have on microalgae, which are primary producers at the basis of the food chain and a major global source of oxygen. Our current understanding about the potential modes and mechanisms of toxic action that plastic particles exert on microalgae is extremely limited. How effects might vary with particle size and the physico-chemical properties of the specific plastic material in question are equally unelucidated, but may hold clues to how toxicity, if observed, is exerted. In this study we selected polystyrene particles, both negatively charged and uncharged, and three different sizes (0.05, 0.5 and 6μm) for testing the effects of size and material properties. Microalgae were exposed to different polystyrene particle sizes and surface charges for 72h. Effects on microalgal photosynthesis and growth were determined by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry and flow cytometry, respectively. None of the treatments tested in these experiments had an effect on microalgal photosynthesis. Microalgal growth was negatively affected (up to 45%) by uncharged polystyrene particles, but only at high concentrations (250mg/L). Additionally, these adverse effects were demonstrated to increase with decreasing particle size. PMID:26675372

  10. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Gauny, Stacey; Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2016-06-01

    High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing (48)Ti ions (1GeV/amu, LET=107 keV/μm), (56)Fe ions (1GeV/amu, LET=151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1GeV, LET=0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for (48)Ti and (56)Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3-5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the (48)Ti and (56)Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest. PMID:27055360

  11. Zearalenone exposure affects mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Xu, Yin-Xue; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a metabolite of Fusarium and is a common contaminant of grains and foodstuffs. ZEN acts as a xenoestrogen and is considered to be cytotoxic, tissue toxic, and genotoxic, which causes abortions and stillbirths in humans and animals. Since estrogens affect oocyte maturation during meiosis, in this study we investigated the effects of ZEN on mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation. Our results showed that ZEN-treated oocyte maturation rates were decreased, which might be due to the disrupted cytoskeletons: (1) ZEN treatment resulted in significantly more oocytes with abnormal spindle morphologies; (2) actin filament expression and distribution were also disrupted after ZEN treatment, which was confirmed by the aberrant distribution of actin regulatory proteins. In addition, cortical granule-free domains (CGFDs) were disrupted after ZEN treatment, which indicated that ZEN may affect mouse oocyte fertilization capability. ZEN reduced mouse granulosa cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by MTT assay and TUNEL apoptosis analysis, which may be another cause for the decreased oocyte maturation. Thus, our results demonstrated that exposure to zearalenone affected oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation in mouse. PMID:24733567

  12. Functionally Charged Polystyrene Particles Activate Immortalized Mouse Microglia (BV2): Cellular and Genomic Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Same size (~850-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) with net negative (carboxyl, COOH-) or positive (dimethyl amino, CH3)2

  13. Netrin-1 Can Affect Morphogenesis and Differentiation of the Mouse Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Strizzi, Luigi; Mancino, Mario; Bianco, Caterina; Raafat, Ahmed; Gonzales, Monica; Booth, Brian W.; Watanabe, Kazuhide; Nagaoka, Tadahiro; Mack, David L.; Howard, Beatrice; Callahan, Robert; Smith, Gilbert H.; Salomon, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Netrin-1 has been shown to regulate the function of the EGF-like protein Cripto-1 (Cr-1) and affect mammary gland development. Since Cr-1 is a target gene of Nanog and Oct4, we investigated the relationship between Netrin-1 and Cr-1, Nanog and Oct4 during different stages of development in the mouse mammary gland. Results from histological analysis show that exogenous Netrin-1 was able to induce formation of alveolar-like structures within the mammary gland terminal end buds of virgin transgenic Cripto-1 mice and enhance mammary gland alveologenesis in early pregnant FVB/N mice. Results from immunostaining and Western blot analysis show that Netrin-1, Nanog and Oct4 are expressed in the mouse embryonic mammary anlage epithelium while Cripto-1 is predominantly expressed outside this structure in the surrounding mesenchyme. We find that in lactating mammary glands of postnatal FVB/N mice, Netrin-1 expression is highest while Cripto-1 and Nanog levels are lowest indicating that Netrin-1 may perform a role in the mammary gland during lactation. HC-11 mouse mammary epithelial cells stimulated with lactogenic hormones and exogenous soluble Netrin-1 showed increased beta-casein expression as compared to control thus supporting the potential role for Netrin-1 during functional differentiation of mouse mammary epithelial cells. Finally, mouse ES cells treated with exogenous soluble Netrin-1 showed reduced levels of Nanog and Cripto-1 and higher levels of beta-III tubulin during differentiation. These results suggest that Netrin-1 may facilitate functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells and possibly affect the expression of Nanog and/or Cripto-1 in multipotent cells that may reside in the mammary gland. PMID:18425773

  14. FACTORS AFFECTING THE DEPOSITION OF INHALED POROUS DRUG PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Recent findings indicate that the inhalation of large manufactured porous particles may be particularly effective for drug delivery. In this study, a mathematical model was employed to systematically investigate the effects of particle size, particle density, aerosol ...

  15. Genetic mapping of hph2, a mutation affecting amino acid transport in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Symula, D J; Shedlovsky, A; Dove, W F

    1997-02-01

    We describe the genetic mapping of hyperphenylal-aninemia 2 (hph2), a recessive mutation in the mouse that causes deficient amino acid transport similar to Hartnup disorder, a human genetic amino acid transport disorder. The hph2 locus was mapped in three separate crosses to identify candidate genes for hph2 and a region of homology in the human genome where we propose the Hartnup Disorder gene might lie. The mutation maps to mouse Chromosome (Chr) 7 distal of the simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) marker D7Mit140 and does not recombine with D7Nds4, an SSLP marker in the fibroblast growth factor 3 (Fgf3) gene. Unexpectedly, the mutant chromosome affects recombination frequency in the D7Mit12 to D7Nds4 interval. PMID:9060407

  16. Vanadium Inhalation in a Mouse Model for the Understanding of Air-Suspended Particle Systemic Repercussion

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, T. I.; Rodriguez-Lara, V.; Gonzalez-Villalva, A.; Rojas-Lemus, M.; Cano-Gutierrez, G.; Ustarroz-Cano, M.; Colin-Barenque, L.; Montaño, L. F.; García-Pelez, I.; Bizarro-Nevares, P.; Lopez-Valdez, N.; Falcon-Rodriguez, C. I.; Jimenez-Martínez, R. S.; Ruiz-Guerrero, M. L.; López-Zepeda, L. S.; Morales-Rivero, A.; Muñiz-Rivera-Cambas, A.

    2011-01-01

    There is an increased concern about the health effects that air-suspended particles have on human health which have been dissected in animal models. Using CD-1 mouse, we explore the effects that vanadium inhalation produce in different tissues and organs. Our findings support the systemic effects of air pollution. In this paper, we describe our findings in different organs in our conditions and contrast our results with the literature. PMID:21716674

  17. Proteomic and metabolomic profiling of a trait anxiety mouse model implicate affected pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaoyang; Filiou, Michaela D; Reckow, Stefan; Gormanns, Philipp; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Kessler, Melanie S; Frank, Elisabeth; Hambsch, Boris; Holsboer, Florian; Landgraf, Rainer; Turck, Christoph W

    2011-12-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders affect a great number of people worldwide. Whereas singular factors have been associated with the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, growing evidence emphasizes the significance of dysfunctional neural circuits and signaling pathways. Hence, a systems biology approach is required to get a better understanding of psychiatric phenotypes such as depression and anxiety. Furthermore, the availability of biomarkers for these disorders is critical for improved diagnosis and monitoring treatment response. In the present study, a mouse model presenting with robust high versus low anxiety phenotypes was subjected to thorough molecular biomarker and pathway discovery analyses. Reference animals were metabolically labeled with the stable (15)N isotope allowing an accurate comparison of protein expression levels between the high anxiety-related behavior versus low anxiety-related behavior mouse lines using quantitative mass spectrometry. Plasma metabolomic analyses identified a number of small molecule biomarkers characteristic for the anxiety phenotype with particular focus on myo-inositol and glutamate as well as the intermediates involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In silico analyses suggested pathways and subnetworks as relevant for the anxiety phenotype. Our data demonstrate that the high anxiety-related behavior and low anxiety-related behavior mouse model is a valuable tool for anxiety disorder drug discovery efforts. PMID:21862759

  18. Exposure to heavy charged particles affects thermoregulation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.; Joseph, J.A.; Harris, A.H.; Rabin, B.M. |

    1994-09-01

    Rats exposed to 0.1-5 Gy of heavy particles ({sup 56}Fe, {sup 40}Ar, {sup 20}Ne or {sup 4}He) showed dose-dependent changes in body temperature. Lower doses of all particles produced hyperthermia, and higher doses of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 56}Fe produced hypothermia. Of the four HZE particles, {sup 56}Fe particles were the most potent and {sup 4}He particles were the least potent in producing changes in thermoregulation. The {sup 20}Ne and {sup 40}Ar particles produced an intermediate level of change in body temperature. Significantly greater hyperthermia was produced by exposure to 1 Gy of {sup 20}Ne, {sup 40}Ar and {sup 56}Fe particles than by exposure to 1 Gy of {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays. Pretreating rats with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin attenuated the hyperthermia produced by exposure to 1 Gy of {sup 56}Fe particles, indicating that prostaglandins mediate {sup 56}Fe-particle-induced hyperthermia. The hypothermia produced by exposure to 5 Gy of {sup 56}Fe particles is mediated by histamine and can be attenuated by treatment with the antihistamines mepyramine and cimetidine. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Computational Modeling of Nanoscale and Microscale Particle Deposition, Retention and Dosimetry in the Mouse Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, B.; Price, O.T.; Oldham, M.; Chen, L.C.; Saunders, E.L.; Gordon, T.; Mikheev, V.B.; Minard, K.R.; Teeguarden, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat, human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  20. Computational modeling of nanoscale and microscale particle deposition, retention and dosimetry in the mouse respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, B; Price, O T; Oldham, M; Chen, Lung-Chi; Saunders, E L; Gordon, T; Mikheev, V B; Minard, K R; Teeguarden, J G

    2014-12-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross-species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro- and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat and human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  1. Myotonic dystrophy CTG expansion affects synaptic vesicle proteins, neurotransmission and mouse behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Sicot, Géraldine; Huguet, Aline; Luilier, Sabrina; Steidl, Esther; Saenger, Stefanie; Marciniak, Elodie; Obriot, Hélène; Chevarin, Caroline; Nicole, Annie; Revillod, Lucile; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Takashi; Matsuura, Tohru; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Swanson, Maurice S.; Trovero, Fabrice; Buisson, Bruno; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hamon, Michel; Humez, Sandrine; Bassez, Guillaume; Metzger, Friedrich; Buée, Luc; Munnich, Arnold; Sergeant, Nicolas; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is a complex multisystemic inherited disorder, which displays multiple debilitating neurological manifestations. Despite recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in skeletal muscle and heart, the pathways affected in the central nervous system are largely unknown. To address this question, we studied the only transgenic mouse line expressing CTG trinucleotide repeats in the central nervous system. These mice recreate molecular features of RNA toxicity, such as RNA foci accumulation and missplicing. They exhibit relevant behavioural and cognitive phenotypes, deficits in short-term synaptic plasticity, as well as changes in neurochemical levels. In the search for disease intermediates affected by disease mutation, a global proteomics approach revealed RAB3A upregulation and synapsin I hyperphosphorylation in the central nervous system of transgenic mice, transfected cells and post-mortem brains of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. These protein defects were associated with electrophysiological and behavioural deficits in mice and altered spontaneous neurosecretion in cell culture. Taking advantage of a relevant transgenic mouse of a complex human disease, we found a novel connection between physiological phenotypes and synaptic protein dysregulation, indicative of synaptic dysfunction in myotonic dystrophy type 1 brain pathology. PMID:23404338

  2. Icariin protects against titanium particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory response in a mouse calvarial model.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongguo; Shen, Ji; Wang, Mingjun; Cui, Jingfu; Wang, Yijun; Zhu, Shijun; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Geng, Dechun

    2015-08-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening are common in implant failure, a complication with revision surgery being the only established treatment. Wear particle-induced inflammation and extensive osteoclastogenesis play critical roles in periprosthetic osteolysis. A recent approach in limiting osteolysis is therefore focused on inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. This study aimed to investigate the potential impact of icariin, the major ingredient of Epimedium, on titanium particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Eighty-four male C57BL/J6 mice were divided randomly into four groups. Mice in the sham group underwent sham surgery only, whereas animals in the vehicle, low- and high-concentration icariin groups received titanium particles. Mice in the low- and high-concentration icariin groups were gavage-fed with icariin at 0.1 or 0.3 mg/g/day, respectively, until sacrifice. Mice in the sham and vehicle groups received phosphate-buffered saline daily. After 2 weeks, mouse calvariae were collected for micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and molecular analysis. Icariin significantly reduced particle-induced bone resorption compared with the vehicle group. Icariin also prevented an increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio and subsequently suppressed osteoclast formation in titanium particle-charged calvariae. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed icariin significantly reduced expression and secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in the calvariae of titanium-stimulated mice. Collectively, these results suggest that icariin represents a potential treatment for titanium particle-induced osteolysis and could be developed as a new therapeutic candidate for the prevention and treatment of aseptic loosening. PMID:25985156

  3. Alveolar deposition of sized particles of /sup 239/Pu0/sub 2/ in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A.; Black, A; Moores, S.R.; Pritchard, J.N.; Walsh, M.; Lambert, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    Data on the alveolar deposition of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ particles in the mouse are presented. It is shown that alveolar deposition falls with increasing activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) over the range 0.6 to 2.4 ..mu..m. In the mouse, any peak in alveolar deposition must occur at an AMAD of less than 1 ..mu..m. Information is also provided on the relative lobar concentrations (RLCs) of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/. The RLC is greatest in the right apical lobe and increases quite sharply with AMAD. The RLCs of the other lobes of the right lung decline with AMAD. The RLC in the left lobe is relatively unaffected by AMAD.

  4. Alveolar deposition of sized particles of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A.; Black, A.; Moores, S.R.; Pritchard, J.N.; Walsh, M.; Lambert, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    Data on the alveolar deposition of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ particles in the mouse are presented. It is shown that alveolar deposition falls with increasing activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) over the range 0.6 to 2.4 microns. In the mouse, any peak in alveolar deposition must occur at an AMAD of less than 1 micron. Information is also provided on the relative lobar concentrations (RLCs) of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/. The RLC is greatest in the right apical lobe and increases quite sharply with AMAD. The RLCs of the other lobes of the right lung decline with AMAD. The RLC in the left lobe is relatively unaffected by AMAD.

  5. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  6. Factors affecting computer mouse use for young children: implications for AAC.

    PubMed

    Costigan, F Aileen; Light, Janice C; Newell, Karl M

    2012-06-01

    More than 12% of preschoolers receiving special education services have complex communication needs, including increasing numbers of children who do not have significant motor impairments (e.g., children with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, etc.). In order to meet their diverse communication needs (e.g., face-to-face, written, Internet, telecommunication), these children may use mainstream technologies accessed via the mouse, yet little is known about factors that affect the mouse performance of young children. This study used a mixed factorial design to investigate the effects of age, target size, and angle of approach on accuracy and time required for accurate target selection with a mouse for 20 3-year-old and 20 4-year-old children. The 4-year-olds were generally more accurate and faster than the 3-year-olds. Target size and angle mediated differences in performance within age groups. The 3-year-olds were more accurate and faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target, were faster in selecting the large relative to the medium target, and were faster in selecting targets along the vertical relative to the diagonal angle. The 4-year-olds were faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target. Implications for improving access to AAC include the preliminary suggestion of age-related threshold target sizes that support sufficient accuracy, the possibility of efficiency benefits when target size is increased up to an age-related threshold, and identification of the potential utility of the vertical angle as a context for training navigational input device use. PMID:22670726

  7. Effects of Solar Particle Event-Like Proton Radiation and/or Simulated Microgravity on Circulating Mouse Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts traveling in space missions outside of low Earth orbit will be exposed for longer times to a microgravity environment. In addition, the increased travel time involved in exploration class missions will result in an increased risk of exposure to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Both conditions could significantly affect the number of circulating blood cells. Therefore, it is critical to determine the combined effects of exposure to both microgravity and SPE radiation. The purpose of the present study was to assess these risks by evaluating the effects of SPE-like proton radiation and/or microgravity, as simulated with the hindlimb unloading (HU) system, on circulating blood cells using mouse as a model system. The results indicate that exposure to HU alone caused minimal or no significant changes in mouse circulating blood cell numbers. The exposure of mice to SPE-like proton radiation with or without HU treatment caused a significant decrease in the number of circulating lymphocytes, granulocytes and platelets. The reduced numbers of circulating lymphocytes, granulocytes, and platelets, resulting from the SPE-like proton radiation exposure, with or without HU treatment, in mice suggest that astronauts participating in exploration class missions may be at greater risk of developing infections and thrombotic diseases; thus, countermeasures may be necessary for these biological endpoints. PMID:25360441

  8. Effects of Solar Particle Event-Like Proton Radiation and/or Simulated Microgravity on Circulating Mouse Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Romero-Weaver, Ana L; Lin, Liyong; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Kennedy, Ann R

    2014-08-01

    Astronauts traveling in space missions outside of low Earth orbit will be exposed for longer times to a microgravity environment. In addition, the increased travel time involved in exploration class missions will result in an increased risk of exposure to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Both conditions could significantly affect the number of circulating blood cells. Therefore, it is critical to determine the combined effects of exposure to both microgravity and SPE radiation. The purpose of the present study was to assess these risks by evaluating the effects of SPE-like proton radiation and/or microgravity, as simulated with the hindlimb unloading (HU) system, on circulating blood cells using mouse as a model system. The results indicate that exposure to HU alone caused minimal or no significant changes in mouse circulating blood cell numbers. The exposure of mice to SPE-like proton radiation with or without HU treatment caused a significant decrease in the number of circulating lymphocytes, granulocytes and platelets. The reduced numbers of circulating lymphocytes, granulocytes, and platelets, resulting from the SPE-like proton radiation exposure, with or without HU treatment, in mice suggest that astronauts participating in exploration class missions may be at greater risk of developing infections and thrombotic diseases; thus, countermeasures may be necessary for these biological endpoints. PMID:25360441

  9. Particle film affects black pecan aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) on pecan.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Ted E; Wood, Bruce W; Reilly, Charles C

    2002-08-01

    Three species of aphids attack pecan foliage, Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch, and cause economic damage. We tested a kaolin-based particle film against one of these aphid species, black pecan aphid, Melanocallis caryaefoliae (Davis). Effect of particle film on host selection, adult mortality, and production of nymphs by M. caryaefoliae was tested on seedling pecans in the laboratory. Fewer M. caryaefoliae adults selected treated foliage compared with untreated foliage. A higher percentage of adults that did select treated foliage were recovered from upper leaf surfaces compared with the percentage of adults recovered from upper leaf surfaces of untreated leaves. Observations with a microscope revealed an accumulation of particle film on aphid body parts, especially on tarsi, and strongly suggests that aphid mobility was restricted. Adult mortality was higher on treated foliage and led to an overall decrease in production of nymphs on those seedlings. In addition, we measured spectral properties of treated seedling pecan foliage. Light reflectance by treated foliage was increased and absorptance decreased compared with control foliage whereas transmittance of light through control and particle film-treated leaves was similar. We did not detect any phytotoxic effect on pecan due to application of particle film. PMID:12216821

  10. Genetic loci that affect aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AA) are plant-derived nephrotoxins and carcinogens found in traditional medicines and herbal remedies. AA causes aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) and is a suspected environmental agent in Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and its associated upper urothelial cancer. Approximately 5–10% of individuals exposed to AA develop renal insufficiency and/or cancer; thus a genetic predisposition to AA sensitivity has been proposed. The mouse is an established animal model of AAN, and inbred murine strains vary in AA sensitivity, confirming the genetic predisposition. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) correlated with proximal tubule dysfunction after exposure to AA in an F2 population of mice, derived from breeding an AA-resistant strain (C57BL/6J) and an AA-sensitive strain (DBA/2J). A single main QTL was identified on chromosome 4 (Aanq1); three other interacting QTLs, (Aanq2–4) also were detected. The Aanq1 region was also detected in untreated mice, raising the possibility that preexisting differences in proximal tubule function may affect the severity of AA-elicited toxicity. This study lays the groundwork for identifying the genetic pathways contributing to AA sensitivity in the mouse and will further our understanding of human susceptibility to AA found widely in traditional medicines. PMID:21429970

  11. Inhibitory Effects of Lanthanum Chloride on Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis in a Mouse Calvarial Model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jiang-Yin-Zi; Zhan, Ping; Jiang, Chuan; Zou, Yang; Liu, Hucheng; Zhang, Bin; Dai, Min

    2016-02-01

    Osteolysis is a bone disorder associated with progressive destruction of bone tissues. However, the effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on osteolysis remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of LaCl3 on osteolysis in vivo. In a mouse calvarial model, C57BL/6J mice were injected with wear particles with or without LaCl3. Microcomputed tomography, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were performed for the pathological characterization of calvariae, and eight calvariae per group were prepared for the assay of TNF-α, IL-1β, and RANKL secretion using quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In mice treated with high-dose LaCl3, particle-induced osteolysis and inflammatory reaction were reduced compared with that in the vehicle-treated control. Moreover, treatment with high-dose LaCl3 suppressed the wear particle-induced decrease in bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and bone volume fraction. Bone destruction and resorption were higher in the LaCl3-treated group than in the saline-treated group but lower than those in the wear particle group. Finally, our results showed that treatment with a high dose of LaCl3 suppressed osteoclastogenesis. Thus, LaCl3 may represent a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of wear particle-induced osteolysis and aseptic loosening. PMID:26105543

  12. Effects of Low Dose Particle Radiation to Mouse Neonatal Neurons in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, K.; Vazquez, M. E.; Okayasu, R.; Nagaoka, S.

    To investigate effects of low dose heavy particle radiation to CNS system, we adopted mouse neonatal brain cells in culture being exposed to heavy ions by HIMAC at NIRS and NSRL at BNL. The applied dose varied from 0.05Gy up to 2.0Gy. The subsequent biological effectswere evaluated by an induction of apoptosis and neuron survival focusing on the dependencies of the animal strains, SCID, B6, B6C3F1, C3H, used for brain cell culture, SCID was the most sensitive and C3H the least sensitive to particle radiation as evaluated by 10% apoptotic criterion. The LET dependency was compared with using SCID and B6 cells exposing to different ions (H, C, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe). Although no detectable LET dependency was observed in the high LET (55 -200 keV/μ m) and low dose (<0.5 Gy) regions. The survivability profiles of the neurons were different in the mouse strains and ions. In this repot, a result of memory and learning function to adult mice after whole-body and brainlocal irradiation at carbon ion and iron ion.

  13. Exits in order: How crowding affects particle lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penington, Catherine J.; Baker, Ruth E.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    Diffusive processes are often represented using stochastic random walk frameworks. The amount of time taken for an individual in a random walk to intersect with an absorbing boundary is a fundamental property that is often referred to as the particle lifetime, or the first passage time. The mean lifetime of particles in a random walk model of diffusion is related to the amount of time required for the diffusive process to reach a steady state. Mathematical analysis describing the mean lifetime of particles in a standard model of diffusion without crowding is well known. However, the lifetime of agents in a random walk with crowding has received much less attention. Since many applications of diffusion in biology and biophysics include crowding effects, here we study a discrete model of diffusion that incorporates crowding. Using simulations, we show that crowding has a dramatic effect on agent lifetimes, and we derive an approximate expression for the mean agent lifetime that includes crowding effects. Our expression matches simulation results very well, and highlights the importance of crowding effects that are sometimes overlooked.

  14. Aspartoacylase deficiency does not affect N-acetylaspartylglutamate level or glutamate carboxypeptidase II activity in the knockout mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Sankar; Ezell, Edward L; Quast, Michael J; Wei, Jingna; Tyring, Stephen K; Michals-Matalon, Kimberlee; Matalon, Reuben

    2004-08-01

    Aspartoacylase (ASPA)-deficient patients [Canavan disease (CD)] reportedly have increased urinary excretion of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide abundant in the brain. Whether elevated excretion of urinary NAAG is due to ASPA deficiency, resulting in an abnormal level of brain NAAG, is examined using ASPA-deficient mouse brain. The level of NAAG in the knockout mouse brain was similar to that in the wild type. The NAAG hydrolyzing enzyme, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II), activity was normal in the knockout mouse brain. These data suggest that ASPA deficiency does not affect the NAAG or GCP II level in the knockout mouse brain, if documented also in patients with CD. PMID:15246864

  15. The Autism Diagnosis in Translation: Shared Affect in Children and Mouse Models of ASD

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Somer L.; Lahvis, Garet P.

    2013-01-01

    on dynamic social processes and clinical skill, scores from these measures do not necessarily lend themselves directly to experimental investigations into the causes of ASD. Studies of the neurobiology of autism require experimental animal models. Mice are particularly useful, in this regard, for elucidating genetic and toxicologjcal contributions to impairments in social function (Halladay et al., 2009). Behavioral tests have been developed that are relevant to autism (Crawley, 2004, 2007), including measures of repetitive behaviors (Lewis, Tanimura, Lee, & Bodfish, 2007; Moy et al., 2008), social behavior (Brodkin, 2007; Lijam et al., 1997; Moretti, Bouwknecht, Teague, Paylor, & Zoghbi, 2005), and vocal communication (Panksepp et al., 2007). Advances also include development of high-throughput measures of mouse sociability that can be used to reliably compare inbred mouse strains (Moy, et al., 2008; Nadler et al., 2004), as well as measures of social reward (Panksepp & Lahvis, 2007) and empathy (Chen, Panksepp, & Lahvis, 2009; Langford et al., 2006). With continued generation of mouse gene-targeted mice that are directly relevant to genetic linkages in ASD, there remains an urgent need to utilize a full suite of mouse behavioral tests that allows for a comprehensive assessment of the spectrum of social difficulties relevant to ASD. Using impairments in shared affect as an example, this paper explores potential avenues for collaboration between clinical and basic scientists, within an amply considered translational framework. PMID:21882361

  16. Effect of aerosol particles generated by ultrasonic humidifiers on the lung in mouse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic humidifiers silently generate water droplets as a cool fog and produce most of the dissolved minerals in the fog in the form of an aerosolized “white dust.” However, the health effect of these airborne particles is largely unknown. This study aimed to characterize the aerosol particles generated by ultrasonic humidifiers and to investigate their effect on the lung tissue of mice. Methods An ultrasonic humidifier was operated with tap water, high-silica water, ultrapure water, or other water types. In a chamber (0.765 m3, ventilation ratio 11.5 m3/hr), male ICR mice (10-week-old) were exposed by inhalation to an aerosol-containing vapor generated by the humidifier. After exposure for 7 or 14 days, lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected from each mouse and examined by microarray, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and light and electron microscopy. Results Particles generated from the humidifier operated with tap water had a mass concentration of 0.46 ± 0.03 mg/m3, number concentration of (5.0 ± 1.1) × 104/cm3, and peak size distribution of 183 nm. The particles were phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages in the lung of mice. Inhalation of particles caused dysregulation of genes related to mitosis, cell adhesion molecules, MHC molecules and endocytosis, but did not induce any signs of inflammation or tissue injury in the lung. Conclusion These results indicate that aerosol particles released from ultrasonic humidifiers operated with tap water initiated a cellular response but did not cause severe acute inflammation in pulmonary tissue. Additionally, high mineral content tap water is not recommended and de-mineralized water should be recommended in order to exclude any adverse effects. PMID:24359587

  17. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  18. Transcranial light affects plasma monoamine levels and expression of brain encephalopsin in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Flyktman, Antti; Mänttäri, Satu; Nissilä, Juuso; Timonen, Markku; Saarela, Seppo

    2015-05-15

    Encephalopsin (OPN3) belongs to the light-sensitive transmembrane receptor family mainly expressed in the brain and retina. It is believed that light affects mammalian circadian rhythmicity only through the retinohypothalamic tract, which transmits light information to the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. However, it has been shown that light penetrates the skull. Here, we present the effect of transcranial light treatment on OPN3 expression and monoamine concentrations in mouse brain and other tissues. Mice were randomly assigned to control group, morning-light group and evening-light group, and animals were illuminated transcranially five times a week for 8 min for a total of 4 weeks. The concentrations of OPN3 and monoamines were analysed using western blotting and HPLC, respectively. We report that transcranial light treatment affects OPN3 expression in different brain areas and plasma/adrenal gland monoamine concentrations. In addition, when light was administered at a different time of the day, the response varied in different tissues. These results provide new information on the effects of light on transmitters mediating mammalian rhythmicity. PMID:25805701

  19. Verifying of endocrine disruptor chemical affect to the mouse testes: can raman spectroscopy support histology study?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriana, Bibin B.; Oshima, Yusuke; Takanezawa, Sota; Tay, Tat W.; Rosawati Soeratman, Catherine Linda; Alam, Mohammad S.; Mitsuoka, Hiroki; Zhu, Xiao B.; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    One of suspect environmental endocrine disruptors that affect mouse male reproduction by altering the morphology of Sertoli cells and spermatogenic cells is phthalate. The effects of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP), one of metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate , on immature mouse testes in vivo were examined. We have recently shown that MEHP induced Sertoli cells necrosis and spermatogenic cells apoptosis in mice by TUNEL method, F-actin staining, and ultrastructural study, but there is no data for biochemical changing of testes due to those methods could not explore. To verify in detail of it, we conducted Raman spectroscopy study with 785 nm wavelength laser line, 50mW of laser power and 3 minutes of exposure time to analysis the MEHP-treated testicular tissue, which has been fixatived by 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA). Five weeks old (5 w.o) male mice were used in this experiment. As the results, the alterations were observed by Raman spectroscopy that there are significantly differences of DNA, actin filament, type IV collagen and amide I between control group (0 μM MEHP) and treatment group (100 μM MEHP). These results significantly support histology staining observation (such as the apoptotic spermatogenic cells which is associated with DNA fragmentation and F-actin disruption) and ultrastructural observation (such as mitochondria rupture and disintegration of nucleus membrane). Raman spectroscopy can be used for 4% PFA-fixatived tissue observation. However, we recommend that Raman spectroscopy may be able to be expanded as an armamentarium not just for the clarification of histology staining and ultrastructural study, but furthermore, it may be as a non-invasion assessment for screening animal tissue toxicity of chemical in future.

  20. Solar Sources of Earth-affecting Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Particle radiation from the Sun is one of the most important sources of hazardous space weather in the vicinity of Earth. Detailed studies of the origin of the so-called large solar energetic particle (SEP) events became possible only during the solar cycle 23, thanks to the availability of nearly continuous observation of the solar sources ofthese events. In particular, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which are found to be a key requirement for the occurrence of an SEP event, have been recorded continuously only starting in the 1990s. The physical connection between CMEs and SEPs is that the CMEs drive a fast-mode MHD shock, which accelerates SEPs in the corona and interplanetary medium. The earliest indication of a shock is the occurrence of a type II radio burst at frequencies anywhere from more than a hundred MHz to a few MHz. Recent investigations using STEREO observations have revealed that the shock forms very close to the Sun - a mere 100,000 km above the surface. The shock formation depends not only on the CME properties, but also on the physical conditions in the ambient medium that supports shock propagation. This paper considers extreme cases of SEP events and the associated CMEs and type II radio bursts to illustrate the variability observed in SEP event properties. Comparison will be made between the events of solar cycles 23 and 24.

  1. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations differentially affect large-scale functional networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Disha; Blockx, Ines; Keliris, Georgios A; Kara, Firat; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2016-07-01

    Resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) is a widely implemented technique used to investigate large-scale topology in the human brain during health and disease. Studies in mice provide additional advantages, including the possibility to flexibly modulate the brain by pharmacological or genetic manipulations in combination with high-throughput functional connectivity (FC) investigations. Pharmacological modulations that target specific neurotransmitter systems, partly mimicking the effect of pathological events, could allow discriminating the effect of specific systems on functional network disruptions. The current study investigated the effect of cholinergic and serotonergic antagonists on large-scale brain networks in mice. The cholinergic system is involved in cognitive functions and is impaired in, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, while the serotonergic system is involved in emotional and introspective functions and is impaired in, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, depression and autism. Specific interest goes to the default-mode-network (DMN), which is studied extensively in humans and is affected in many neurological disorders. The results show that both cholinergic and serotonergic antagonists impaired the mouse DMN-like network similarly, except that cholinergic modulation additionally affected the retrosplenial cortex. This suggests that both neurotransmitter systems are involved in maintaining integrity of FC within the DMN-like network in mice. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations also affected other functional networks, however, serotonergic modulation impaired the frontal and thalamus networks more extensively. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the utility of pharmacological rsfMRI in animal models to provide insights into the role of specific neurotransmitter systems on functional networks in neurological disorders. PMID:26195064

  2. Uptake of remnant like particles (RLP) in diabetic patients from mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tomono, S; Kawazu, S; Kato, N; Ono, T; Ishii, C; Ito, Y; Shimizu, M; Shimoyama, M; Nakano, T; Nakajima, K

    1994-01-01

    To investigate whether the remnant like particles (RLP), separated from serum by an immunoaffinity gel mixture of anti-apo B-100 and apo A-I monoclonal antibodies, are relevant to the initiation or progression of atherosclerosis, the incorporation of RLP into mouse macrophages was studied using histochemical and biochemical techniques. Remnant lipoproteins such as RLP are reported to contain a large quantity of chyloniron and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) remnants, especially in diabetic patients. The RLP separated from the sera of 32 diabetic patients were found to be predominantly taken up into macrophages harvested from mouse abdominal cavities by the staining method applying oil red O. Furthermore, using 14C-oleate to prove the uptake of lipoproteins by macrophages, the uptake of RLP-VLDL, a VLDL fraction of RLP by ultracentrifugation, was the next highest to that of the oxidized LDL, which suggests that RLP-VLDL is also aggressively taken up by macrophages. The degree of uptake of RLP-VLDL by macrophages was positively correlated with HbA1c of these diabetic patients (r = 0.556, p < 0.01), irrespective of the ways of the treatment of diabetes. In conclusion, RLP can contribute to the foaming of macrophages, which in turn may explain the acceleration of atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. PMID:9222876

  3. Factors Affecting the Intensity of Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    This paper updates the influence of environmental and source factors of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are likely to influence the solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The intensity variation due to CME interaction reported that is confirmed by expanding the investigation to all the large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The large SEP events are separated into two groups, one associated with CMEs running into other CMEs, and the other with CMEs running into the ambient solar wind. SEP events with CME interaction generally have a higher intensity. New possibilities such as the influence of coronal holes on the SEP intensity are also discussed. For example, the presence of a large coronal hole between a well-connected eruption and the solar disk center may render the shock poorly connected because of the interaction between the CME and the coronal hole. This point is illustrated using the 2004 December 3 SEP event delayed by about 12 hours from the onset of the associated CME. There is no other event at the Sun that can be associated with the SEP onset. This event is consistent with the possibility that the coronal hole interaction influences the connectivity of the CMEs that produce SEPs, and hence the intensity of the SEP event.

  4. Ovarian Stimulation Affects the Population of Mouse Uterine NK Cells at Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dorfeshan, Parvin; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of ovarian stimulation on endometrial mouse NK cell population. For superovulation, the female adult NMRI mice were injected i.p. with 10 IU of the pregnant mare serum gonadotropin followed 48 h later by an i.p. injection of 10 IU human chorionic gonadotropin hormone. Ovarian stimulated and nonstimulated mice were mated with fertile male. The presence of vaginal plug proved natural pregnancy, and this day was considered as day one of pregnancy. Tissue samples were prepared from the uterine horn and spleen of both groups of study on 7th day of pregnancy. Serum estradiol-17β and progesterone were measured at the same time. The tissue cryosections were prepared and double stained for CD 161 and CD3 markers, and NK cells population was analyzed. Relative frequency of NK cells was significantly lower in stroma and myometrium in hyperstimulated mice compared with the control group. However, no difference was seen in percentage of NK cells in spleen. The ovarian stimulation influences the proportion of uterine NK cells and may affect the embryo implantation. PMID:24350248

  5. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting body composition in a mouse intercross

    PubMed Central

    Vitarius, James A.; Sehayek, Ephraim; Breslow, Jan L.

    2006-01-01

    Gravimetric analysis and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry densitometry were used to determine lean, fat, and bone tissue traits in a F2 mouse population from a C57BL/6J and CASA/Rk intercross (B6CASAF2). These traits were used in a linkage analysis to identify quantitative trait loci that affect body composition. Linkage mapping showed that body weight (BW) loci on proximal chromosome 2 occurred in the same region as body length, lean tissue mass, and bone mineral content and on chromosome 13 in the same region as lean tissue mass, bone mineral density, and bone mineral content. Fat-related loci occurring on mid-chromosome 2 near 60 cM, proximal chromosome 6, and mid-chromosome 10 were distinct from BW, lean tissue, and bone tissue loci. In B6CASAF2 females, heterozygotes and CASA/Rk homozygotes at the chromosome 6 locus marker had higher body fat percentages, and this locus was responsible for 11% of the variance for body fat percentage. Female heterozygotes and C57BL/6J homozygotes at the chromosome 15 locus marker had higher bone mineral densities, and this locus could explain 8% of that trait's variance. A survey of the literature did not reveal any previous reports of fat-specific loci in the chromosomal 10 region near 42 cM reported in this study. The results of this study indicate that BW and BMI have limited usefulness as phenotypes in linkage or association studies when used as obesity phenotypes. PMID:17179051

  6. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  7. Modeling of mouse eye and errors in ocular parameters affecting refractive state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawa, Gurinder

    Rodents eye are particularly used to study refractive error state of an eye and development of refractive eye. Genetic organization of rodents is similar to that of humans, which makes them interesting candidates to be researched upon. From rodents family mice models are encouraged over rats because of availability of genetically engineered models. Despite of extensive work that has been performed on mice and rat models, still no one is able to quantify an optical model, due to variability in the reported ocular parameters. In this Dissertation, we have extracted ocular parameters and generated schematics of eye from the raw data from School of Medicine, Detroit. In order to see how the rays would travel through an eye and the defects associated with an eye; ray tracing has been performed using ocular parameters. Finally we have systematically evaluated the contribution of various ocular parameters, such as radii of curvature of ocular surfaces, thicknesses of ocular components, and refractive indices of ocular refractive media, using variational analysis and a computational model of the rodent eye. Variational analysis revealed that variation in all the ocular parameters does affect the refractive status of the eye, but depending upon the magnitude of the impact those parameters are listed as critical or non critical. Variation in the depth of the vitreous chamber, thickness of the lens, radius of the anterior surface of the cornea, radius of the anterior surface of the lens, as well as refractive indices for the lens and vitreous, appears to have the largest impact on the refractive error and thus are categorized as critical ocular parameters. The radii of the posterior surfaces of the cornea and lens have much smaller contributions to the refractive state, while the radii of the anterior and posterior surfaces of the retina have no effect on the refractive error. These data provide the framework for further refinement of the optical models of the rat and mouse

  8. Response of mouse epidermal cells to single doses of heavy-particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leith, J. T.; Schilling, W. A.; Welch, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    The survival of mouse epidermal cells to heavy-particles has been studied In Vivo by the Withers clone technique. Experiments with accelerated helium, lithium and carbon ions were performed. The survival curve for the helium ion irradiations used a modified Bragg curve method with a maximum tissue penetration of 465 microns, and indicated that the dose needed to reduce the original cell number to 1 surviving cell/square centimeters was 1525 rads with a D sub o of 95 rads. The LET at the basal cell layer was 28.6 keV per micron. Preliminary experiments with lithium and carbon used treatment doses of 1250 rads with LET's at the surface of the skin of 56 and 193 keV per micron respectively. Penetration depths in skin were 350 and 530 microns for the carbon and lithium ions whose Bragg curves were unmodified. Results indicate a maximum RBE for skin of about 2 using the skin cloning technique. An attempt has been made to relate the epidermal cell survival curve to mortality of the whole animal for helium ions.

  9. Hypoxia affects in vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse corneal epithelial progenitor cell.

    PubMed

    Dong, Nuo; Qin, Wenjuan; Xue, Yuhua; Li, Cheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2013-08-01

    This study was to investigate the proliferation and differentiation of mouse corneal epithelial progenitor cell in hypoxic airlift culture. Mouse corneal epithelial progenitor cell line progenitor cells were cultured under airlift with normoxic and hypoxic conditions for various durations up to 2 wk. Under normoxic conditions when exposed to air, the hyperproliferation and abnormal epidermal-like differentiation of mouse corneal epithelium was induced, whereas when exposed to air under hypoxic conditions, although we observed augmented proliferation, the abnormal differentiation was inhibited. The mechanism by which hypoxia prevents abnormal differentiation may involve downregulation of Wnt signaling pathways, which were inhibited in cells cultured with hypoxic airlift technique. In conclusion, hypoxia can prevent abnormal differentiation while enhancing the proliferation of corneal epithelial cells by blocking Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:23739874

  10. Particle manipulation affected by streaming flows in vertically actuated open rectangular chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Prashant; Gandhi, Prasanna S.; Neild, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Particle movement in vibration assisted microfluidic systems is significantly affected by time-averaged streaming flows. These flows can demonstrate either particle collection or dispersion characteristics, depending on the parameters used and system specifics. Here we investigate particle collection within streaming flows in vertically actuated open rectangular chambers at frequencies in the range of 100 Hz. Capillary waves, created at the water-air interface under the action of low frequency vibration, generate streaming fields in the liquid bulk. In addition, the spatial variation in the flow field gives rise to particle collection due to inertial effects. In order to understand the interplay between these effects, 2D simulations are employed to understand the first order field induced particle collection, while an experimental study is performed to investigate the effect of the 3D streaming fields on particle motion. By altering the chamber dimensions, two observations are presented: first by taking measures to reduce the strength of the streaming field, particles as small as 50 nm in diameter can be collected. Second, the streaming fields themselves can be used to trap particles, which in conjunction with the collection forces can cause particle separation.

  11. Folate supplementation differently affects uracil content in DNA in the mouse colon and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High folate intake may increase the risk of cancer, especially in the elderly. The present study examined the effects of ageing and dietary folate on uracil misincorporation into DNA, which has a mutagenic effect, in the mouse colon and liver. Old (18 months; n 42) and young (4 months; n 42) male C5...

  12. Intracisternal A particle genes: Distribution in the mouse genome, active subtypes, and potential roles as species-specific mediators of susceptibility to cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunhua; Wang, Zhibin; Shang, Jin; Bekkari, Kavitha; Liu, Rong; Pacchione, Stephen; McNulty, Kathleen A; Ng, Alan; Barnum, John E; Storer, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Rodents, mice and rats in particular, are the species of choice for evaluating chemical carcinogenesis. However, different species and strains often respond very differently, undermining the logic of extrapolation of animal results to humans and complicating risk assessment. Intracisternal A particles (IAPs), endogenous retroviral sequences, are an important class of transposable elements that induce genomic mutations and cell transformation by disrupting gene expression. Several lines of evidence support a role of IAPs as mouse-specific genetic factors in responses to toxicity and expression of disease phenotypes. Since multiple subtypes and copies of IAPs are present in the mouse genome, their activity and locations relative to functional genes are of critical importance. This study identified the major "active" subtypes of IAPs (subtype 1/1a) that are responsible for newly transposed IAP insertions described in the literature, and confirmed that (1) polymorphisms for IAP insertions exist among different mouse strains and (2) promoter activity of the LTRs can be modulated by chemicals. This study further identified all the genes in the C57BL/6 mouse genome with IAP subtype 1 and 1a sequences inserted in their proximity, and the major biofunctional categories and cellular signaling networks of those genes. Since many "IAP-associated genes" play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell cycle, and cell death, the associated IAPs, upon activation, can affect cellular responses to xenobiotics and disease processes, especially carcinogenesis. This systemic analysis provides a solid foundation for further investigations of the role of IAPs as species- and strain-specific disease susceptibility factors. PMID:20025072

  13. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified. PMID:27399837

  14. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Michel G.; Moss, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified. PMID:27399837

  15. Concordance in Genomic Changes Between Mouse Lungs and Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to Diesel Exhaust Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human and animal toxicity studies have shown that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or their constituents affect multiple biological processes including immune and inflammatory pathways, mutagenesis and in some cases carcinogenesis. This study compared genomic changes by...

  16. Zebra pattern in rocks as a function of grain growth affected by second-phase particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel; Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    In this communication we present a simple microdynamic model which can explain the beginning of the zebra pattern formation in rocks. The two dimensional model consists of two main processes, mineral replacement along a reaction front, and grain boundary migration affected by impurities. In the numerical model we assume that an initial distribution of second-phase particles is present due to sedimentary layering. The reaction front percolates the model and redistributes second-phase particles by shifting them until the front is saturated and drops the particles again. This produces and enhances initial layering. Grain growth is hindered in layers with high second-phase particle concentrations whereas layers with low concentrations coarsen. Due to the grain growth activity in layers with low second-phase particle concentrations these impurities are collected at grain boundaries and the crystals become very clean. Therefore the white layers in the pattern contain large grains with low concentration of second-phase particles, whereas the dark layers contain small grains with a large second-phase particle concentration.

  17. Effect of atmospheric fine particles on epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in mouse skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liang, W L; Zhang, Y; Sun, L D; Liang, W Y

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of atmospheric fine particles on epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) mRNA expression in mouse skin tissue and explored the effect of atmospheric fine particles on skin aging. Forty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (each comprising 10 mice) as follows: a saline control group and low-, medium-, and high-dose atmospheric fine particle groups (1.6, 8.0, and 40.0 mg/kg, respectively) (fine particles were defined as those with a diameter of £2.5 mm, i.e., PM2.5). Each dose group was exposed to intratracheal instillation for 3 days. Twenty-four hours after the last exposure, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of Egfr mRNA in the skin tissue of each mouse. The expression levels of Egfr mRNA in the medium- and high-dose PM2.5 groups were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the control group, and were positively correlated with the dose. Medium and high concentrations of PM2.5 can induce the expression of Egfr mRNA and promote skin aging. PMID:27050971

  18. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. PMID:25016282

  19. Nanomorphology of Itokawa regolith particles: Application to space-weathering processes affecting the Itokawa asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Toru; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Uesugi, Kentaro; Nakano, Tsukasa; Uesugi, Masayuki; Matsuno, Junya; Nagano, Takashi; Shimada, Akira; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Tomoki; Nakamura, Michihiko; Gucsik, Arnold; Nagaki, Keita; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    The morphological properties of 26 regolith particles from asteroid Itokawa were observed using scanning electron microscopes in combination with an investigation of their three-dimensional shapes obtained through X-ray microtomography. Surface observations of a cross section of the LL5 chondrite, and of crystals of olivine and pyroxene, were also performed for comparison. Some Itokawa particles have surfaces corresponding to walls of microdruses in the LL chondrite, where concentric polygonal steps develop and euhedral or subhedral grains exist. These formed through vapor growth owing to thermal annealing, which might have been caused by thermal metamorphism or shock-induced heating in Itokawa's parent body. Most of the Itokawa particles have more or less fractured surfaces, indicating that they were formed by disaggregation, probably caused by impacts. Itokawa particles with angular and rounded edges observed in computed tomography images are associated with surfaces exhibiting clear and faint structures, respectively. These surfaces can be interpreted by invoking different degrees of abrasion after regolith formation. A possible mechanism for the abrasion process is grain migration caused by impact-driven seismic waves. Space-weathered rims with blisters are distributed heterogeneously across the Itokawa regolith particles. This heterogeneous distribution can be explained by particle motion and fracturing, combined with solar-wind irradiation of the particle surfaces. The regolith activity-including grain motion, fracturing, and abrasion-might effectively act as refreshing process of Itokawa particles against space-weathered rim formation. The space-weathering processes affecting Itokawa would have developed simultaneously with space-weathered rim formation and regolith particle refreshment.

  20. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue.

    PubMed

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  1. Direct measurement of the 3-dimensional DNA lesion distribution induced by energetic charged particles in a mouse model tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mirsch, Johanna; Tommasino, Francesco; Frohns, Antonia; Conrad, Sandro; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Löbrich, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Charged particles are increasingly used in cancer radiotherapy and contribute significantly to the natural radiation risk. The difference in the biological effects of high-energy charged particles compared with X-rays or γ-rays is determined largely by the spatial distribution of their energy deposition events. Part of the energy is deposited in a densely ionizing manner in the inner part of the track, with the remainder spread out more sparsely over the outer track region. Our knowledge about the dose distribution is derived solely from modeling approaches and physical measurements in inorganic material. Here we exploited the exceptional sensitivity of γH2AX foci technology and quantified the spatial distribution of DNA lesions induced by charged particles in a mouse model tissue. We observed that charged particles damage tissue nonhomogenously, with single cells receiving high doses and many other cells exposed to isolated damage resulting from high-energy secondary electrons. Using calibration experiments, we transformed the 3D lesion distribution into a dose distribution and compared it with predictions from modeling approaches. We obtained a radial dose distribution with sub-micrometer resolution that decreased with increasing distance to the particle path following a 1/r2 dependency. The analysis further revealed the existence of a background dose at larger distances from the particle path arising from overlapping dose deposition events from independent particles. Our study provides, to our knowledge, the first quantification of the spatial dose distribution of charged particles in biologically relevant material, and will serve as a benchmark for biophysical models that predict the biological effects of these particles. PMID:26392532

  2. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  3. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  4. Cell surface adhesiveness of mouse sarcoma lines evaluated by latex particle adherence assay: correlation with growth behavior and electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Jandlová, T; Suhajová, E; Malkovský, M

    1979-01-01

    Using the latex particle adherence assay and five mouse sarcoma cell lines of the identical origin, etiology and genotype but differing in malignancy we attempted to correlate the degree of cell surface adhesiveness with growth behavior and electrophoretic mobility of cells. Higher tumorigenicity of four of the cell lines (Mc11--Mc14) was associated with lower cell surface adhesiveness and, conversely, lower malignancy of the fifth line (Mc15) with higher cell surface adhesiveness. No simple correlation or causal relationship was found among the electrophoretic mobility of the lines and other cellular characteristics. PMID:522921

  5. Animal Slurry Acidification Affects Particle Size Distribution and Improves Separation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, I; Pociask, M; Coutinho, J; Fangueiro, D

    2016-05-01

    Solid-liquid separation is performed to improve slurry management, and acidification of the slurry is used to reduce ammonia emissions. Acidification is known to affect slurry characteristics, and we hypothesized that it may affect mechanical separation. Our objective in this study was to assess the effects of slurry acidification on particle size distribution and separation efficiency. Two types of slurry, aged pig and fresh dairy, and two different acidification additives, sulfuric acid and aluminum sulfate (alum), were studied. We found that acidification with sulfuric acid promoted phosphorus (P) solubilization for both slurries, but no change was observed with alum. More ammonium was found in the acidified dairy slurry compared with raw dairy slurry, but no difference was found in aged pig slurry. Acidification before separation increased the proportion of the solid fraction in the slurries, and the effect was significantly higher with alum. When alum was used to acidify the slurries, the proportion of particles larger than 100 μm increased significantly, as did the P concentration in this particle size range. The efficiency of P separation increased markedly in both slurries when alum was used, with the removal to the solid fraction of the dairy slurry being almost complete (90%). Because the priority in mechanical separation is to increase the P content in the solid fraction, the use of alum before centrifugation may be the most suitable option for enhancing its nutrient content. We conclude that separation efficiency and particle size distribution are significantly affected by acidification, but the extent of the effects depends on slurry type and on the type of additive used for acidification. PMID:27136179

  6. Gradient Index Microlens Implanted in Prefrontal Cortex of Mouse Does Not Affect Behavioral Test Performance over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon A.; Holly, Kevin S.; Voziyanov, Vladislav; Villalba, Stephanie L.; Tong, Rudi; Grigsby, Holly E.; Glasscock, Edward; Szele, Francis G.; Vlachos, Ioannis; Murray, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Implanted gradient index lenses have extended the reach of standard multiphoton microscopy from the upper layers of the mouse cortex to the lower cortical layers and even subcortical regions. These lenses have the clarity to visualize dynamic activities, such as calcium transients, with subcellular and millisecond resolution and the stability to facilitate repeated imaging over weeks and months. In addition, behavioral tests can be used to correlate performance with observed changes in network function and structure that occur over time. Yet, this raises the questions, does an implanted microlens have an effect on behavioral tests, and if so, what is the extent of the effect? To answer these questions, we compared the performance of three groups of mice in three common behavioral tests. A gradient index lens was implanted in the prefrontal cortex of experimental mice. We compared their performance with mice that had either a cranial window or a sham surgery. Three presurgical and five postsurgical sets of behavioral tests were performed over seven weeks. Behavioral tests included rotarod, foot fault, and Morris water maze. No significant differences were found between the three groups, suggesting that microlens implantation did not affect performance. The results for the current study clear the way for combining behavioral studies with gradient index lens imaging in the prefrontal cortex, and potentially other regions of the mouse brain, to study structural, functional, and behavioral relationships in the brain. PMID:26799938

  7. Soa genotype selectively affects mouse gustatory neural responses to sucrose octaacetate

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, MASASHI; LI, XIA; McCAUGHEY, STUART A.; BEAUCHAMP, GARY K.; BACHMANOV, ALEXANDER A.

    2013-01-01

    In mice, behavioral acceptance of the bitter compound sucrose octaacetate (SOA) depends on allelic variation of a single gene, Soa. The SW.B6-Soab congenic mouse strain has the genetic background of an “SOA taster” SWR/J strain and an Soa-containing donor chromosome fragment from an “SOA nontaster” C57BL/6J strain. Using microsatellite markers polymorphic between the two parental strains, we determined that the donor fragment spans 5–10 cM of distal chromosome 6. The SWR/J mice avoided SOA in two-bottle tests with water and had strong responses to SOA in two gustatory nerves, the chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (GL). In contrast, the SW.B6-Soab mice were indifferent to SOA in two-bottle tests and had very weak responses to SOA in both of these nerves. The SWR/J and SW.B6-Soab mice did not differ in responses of either nerve to sucrose, NaCl, HCl, or the bitter-tasting stimuli quinine, denatonium, strychnine, 6-n-propylthiouracil, phenylthiocarbamide, and MgSO4. Thus the effect of the Soa genotype on SOA avoidance is mediated by peripheral taste responsiveness to SOA, involving taste receptor cells innervated by both the CT and GL nerves. PMID:11328963

  8. Experimental parameters affecting the Morris water maze performance of a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stasko, Melissa R; Costa, Alberto C S

    2004-09-23

    The Ts65Dn mouse is the most studied and genetically the most complete animal model of Down syndrome (DS) available. These mice display many DS-like features, including performance deficits in different behavioral tasks, motor dysfunction, and age-dependent loss of cholinergic markers in the basal forebrain. At present, the only robust data demonstrating a behavioral deficit potentially associated with learning and memory in Ts65Dn mice less than 6 months old have come from studies that used some variation of the Morris water maze task. However, the specific features of the water maze deficits seen in these animals are still poorly defined. This study is an initial attempt to bridge this knowledge gap. We investigated three major factors potentially influencing the performance of Ts65Dn mice in the water maze: (1) order in which the test is executed; (2) age of the animals; and (3) levels of aversiveness associated with the test. Measurements of plasma corticosterone levels and core body temperature after swimming were also carried out in additional subsets of mice. Overall, we found that the behavioral phenotype of Ts65Dn mice was milder than previously described in the literature. Additionally, Ts65Dn mice were significantly more responsive to potential stressors and more prone to swim-induced hypothermia than euploid control animals. More studies are needed to tease out further the potential effects of confounding factors on the performance of Ts65Dn mice. PMID:15302106

  9. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-07-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  10. Vitrification affects the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors of mouse ovarian tissue

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Reza; Khosravi, Shima; Zavareh, Saeed; Ghorbanian, Mohammad Taghi; Paylakhi, Seyed Hassan; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the most major obstacles of ovarian tissue vitrification is suboptimal developmental competence of follicles. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 are involved in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in the ovaries. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 genes in the preantral follicles derived from vitrified mouse ovaries. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the gene expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in the isolated preantral follicles derived from fresh and vitrified ovaries of 14-16 days old female mice through real time qRT-PCR was evaluated. Developmental parameters, including survival rate, growth, antrum formation and metaphase II oocytes were also analyzed. Results: The developmental parameters of fresh preantral follicles were significantly higher than vitrified preantral follicles. The TIMP-1 and MMP-9 expression levels showed no differences between fresh and vitrified preantral follicles (p=0.22, p=0.11 respectively). By contrast, TIMP-2 expression significantly decreased (p=0.00) and MMP-2 expression increased significantly (p=0.00) in vitrified preantral follicles compared with to fresh ones. Conclusion: Changes in expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 after ovarian tissues vitrification is partially correlated with decrease in follicle development. PMID:27294215

  11. Plasticity-Related Gene 1 Affects Mouse Barrel Cortex Function via Strengthening of Glutamatergic Thalamocortical Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Baumgart, Jan; Roskoden, Thomas; Schneider, Patrick; Sommer, Angela; Horta, Guilherme; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Nitsch, Robert; Vogt, Johannes; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity-related gene-1 (PRG-1) is a brain-specific protein that modulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Here we investigated the functional role of PRG-1 in adolescent and adult mouse barrel cortex both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with wild-type (WT) animals, PRG-1-deficient (KO) mice showed specific behavioral deficits in tests assessing sensorimotor integration and whisker-based sensory discrimination as shown in the beam balance/walking test and sandpaper tactile discrimination test, respectively. At P25-31, spontaneous network activity in the barrel cortex in vivo was higher in KO mice compared with WT littermates, but not at P16-19. At P16-19, sensory evoked cortical responses in vivo elicited by single whisker stimulation were comparable in KO and WT mice. In contrast, at P25-31 evoked responses were smaller in amplitude and longer in duration in WT animals, whereas KO mice revealed no such developmental changes. In thalamocortical slices from KO mice, spontaneous activity was increased already at P16-19, and glutamatergic thalamocortical inputs to Layer 4 spiny stellate neurons were potentiated. We conclude that genetic ablation of PRG-1 modulates already at P16-19 spontaneous and evoked excitability of the barrel cortex, including enhancement of thalamocortical glutamatergic inputs to Layer 4, which distorts sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:26980613

  12. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  13. Abca7 deletion does not affect adult neurogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyun; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) is highly expressed in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ABCA7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk, however, the mechanisms by which ABCA7 may control AD risk remain to be fully elucidated. Based on previous research suggesting that certain ABC transporters may play a role in the regulation of neurogenesis, we conducted a study of cell proliferation and neurogenic potential using cellular bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in adult Abca7 deficient mice and wild-type-like (WT) littermates. In the present study counting of BrdU-positive and DCX-positive cells in an established adult neurogenesis site in the dentate gyrus (DG) indicated there were no significant differences when WT and Abca7 deficient mice were compared. We also measured the area occupied by immunohistochemical staining for BrdU and DCX in the DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the same mice and this confirmed that ABCA7 does not play a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation or neurogenesis in the adult mouse. PMID:26792809

  14. Meta-analysis of variables affecting mouse protection efficacy of whole organism Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaccine protection investigation includes three processes: vaccination, pathogen challenge, and vaccine protection efficacy assessment. Many variables can affect the results of vaccine protection. Brucella, a genus of facultative intracellular bacteria, is the etiologic agent of brucellosis in humans and multiple animal species. Extensive research has been conducted in developing effective live attenuated Brucella vaccines. We hypothesized that some variables play a more important role than others in determining vaccine protective efficacy. Using Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates as study models, this hypothesis was tested by meta-analysis of Brucella vaccine studies reported in the literature. Results Nineteen variables related to vaccine-induced protection of mice against infection with virulent brucellae were selected based on modeling investigation of the vaccine protection processes. The variable "vaccine protection efficacy" was set as a dependent variable while the other eighteen were set as independent variables. Discrete or continuous values were collected from papers for each variable of each data set. In total, 401 experimental groups were manually annotated from 74 peer-reviewed publications containing mouse protection data for live attenuated Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates. Our ANOVA analysis indicated that nine variables contributed significantly (P-value < 0.05) to Brucella vaccine protection efficacy: vaccine strain, vaccination host (mouse) strain, vaccination dose, vaccination route, challenge pathogen strain, challenge route, challenge-killing interval, colony forming units (CFUs) in mouse spleen, and CFU reduction compared to control group. The other 10 variables (e.g., mouse age, vaccination-challenge interval, and challenge dose) were not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The protection level of RB51 was sacrificed when the values of several variables (e.g., vaccination route, vaccine viability

  15. Airborne endotoxin associated with particles of different sizes and affected by water content in handled straw.

    PubMed

    Madsen, A M; Nielsen, S H

    2010-07-01

    High exposures to endotoxin are observed in environments where organic materials are handled and lower exposures are found in e.g. indoor air. Inhaled endotoxin contributes significantly to the induction of airway inflammation and dysfunction. The size of an inhaled particle influences the deposition in the airways and the following health symptoms. The objective is to characterise the distribution of endotoxin on airborne particles of different sizes in straw storage halls with high exposure and in other environments with lower exposure levels to endotoxin. Furthermore we have studied the influence of water content of handled straw on the size distribution of endotoxin containing particles. Total, inhalable, thoracic and respirable endotoxin and particles have each been quantified in aerosols from boiler rooms and straw storage halls at 24 power plants, including 21 biofuel plants. Inhalable, thoracic and respirable endotoxin have been quantified in aerosols from offices and outdoor air. The endotoxin concentration was higher in airborne thoracic dust than in airborne 'total dust'. The median respirable fraction in the straw storage halls, boiler rooms at biofuel plants, boiler rooms at conventional plants, offices and outdoors was respectively 42%, 9%, 19%, 24% and 34%. Thoracic endotoxin per number of thoracic particles was higher than respirable endotoxin per number of respirable particles at the biofuel plants. In straw storage halls the fraction of endotoxin of respirable size was highest on the days with lowest water content in the received straw. Furthermore the exposures to all endotoxin fractions were highest on days with the lowest water content in the received straw. In conclusion the highest exposures and concentrations of endotoxin occur or tend to occur from thoracic dust. A high variation in endotoxin concentrations and in fractions of respirable or thoracic size is found in the different working areas. This is important in the risk assessment and

  16. Geraniin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and ameliorates wear particle-induced osteolysis in mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fei; Zhai, Zanjing; Jiang, Chuan; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Qu, Xinhua; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Gu, Dongyun

    2015-01-01

    Wear particle-induced osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening remains the most common complication that limits the longevity of prostheses. Wear particle-induced osteoclastogenesis is known to be responsible for extensive bone erosion that leads to prosthesis failure. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption may serve as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that geraniin, an active natural compound derived from Geranium thunbergii, ameliorated particle-induced osteolysis in a Ti particle-induced mouse calvaria model in vivo. We also investigated the mechanism by which geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclasts. Geraniin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, evidenced by reduced osteoclast formation and suppressed osteoclast specific gene expression. Specially, geraniin inhibited actin ring formation and bone resorption in vitro. Further molecular investigation demonstrated geraniin impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of the RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways, as well as suppressed the expression of key osteoclast transcriptional factors NFATc1 and c-Fos. Collectively, our data suggested that geraniin exerts inhibitory effects on osteoclast differentiation in vitro and suppresses Ti particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. Geraniin is therefore a potential natural compound for the treatment of wear particle induced osteolysis in prostheses failure. - Highlights: • Geraniin suppresses osteoclasts formation and function in vitro. • Geraniin impairs RANKL-induced nuclear factor-κB and ERK signaling pathway. • Geraniin suppresses osteolysis in vivo. • Geraniin may be used for treating osteoclast related diseases.

  17. Absence of Neuroplastin-65 Affects Synaptogenesis in Mouse Inner Hair Cells and Causes Profound Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Carrott, Leanne; Aguilar, Carlos; Johnson, Stuart L.; Chessum, Lauren; West, Melissa; Morse, Susan; Dorning, Joanne; Smart, Elizabeth; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Ball, Greg; Parker, Andrew; Barnard, Alun R.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Wells, Sara; Marcotti, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The Neuroplastin gene encodes two synapse-enriched protein isoforms, Np55 and Np65, which are transmembrane glycoproteins that regulate several cellular processes, including the genesis, maintenance, and plasticity of synapses. We found that an absence of Np65 causes early-onset sensorineural hearing loss and prevented the normal synaptogenesis in inner hair cells (IHCs) in the newly identified mouse mutant pitch. In wild-type mice, Np65 is strongly upregulated in the cochlea from around postnatal day 12 (P12), which corresponds to the onset of hearing. Np65 was specifically localized at the presynaptic region of IHCs. We found that the colocalization of presynaptic IHC ribbons and postsynaptic afferent terminals is greatly reduced in pitch mutants. Moreover, IHC exocytosis is also reduced with mutant mice showing lower rates of vesicle release. Np65 appears to have a nonessential role in vision. We propose that Np65, by regulating IHC synaptogenesis, is critical for auditory function in mammals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the mammalian cochlea, the sensory inner hair cells (IHCs) encode auditory information. They do this by converting sound wave-induced mechanical motion of their hair bundles into an electrical current. This current generates a receptor potential that controls release of glutamate neurotransmitter from their ribbon synapses onto the auditory afferent fiber. We show that the synapse-enriched protein Np65, encoded by the Neuroplastin gene, is localized at the IHC presynaptic region. In mutant mice, absence of Np65 causes early-onset sensorineural hearing loss and prevents normal neurotransmitter release in IHCs and colocalization of presynaptic ribbons with postsynaptic afferents. We identified Neuroplastin as a novel deafness gene required for ribbon synapse formation and function, which is critical for sound perception in mammals. PMID:26740663

  18. CDK2 activation in mouse epidermis induces keratinocyte proliferation but does not affect skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; De Siervi, Adriana; Conti, Claudio J; Senderowicz, Adrian M; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2008-08-01

    It has been widely assumed that elevated CDK2 kinase activity plays a contributory role in tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that mice overexpressing CDK4 under control of the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK4 mice) develop epidermal hyperplasia and increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. In this model, CDK4 overexpression results in increased CDK2 activity associated with the noncatalytic function of CDK4, sequestration of p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Furthermore, we have shown that ablation of Cdk2 reduces Ras-Cdk4 tumorigenesis, suggesting that increased CDK2 activity plays an important role in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we generated two transgenic mouse models of elevated CDK2 kinase activity, K5Cdk2 and K5Cdk4(D158N) mice. The D158N mutation blocks CDK4 kinase activity without interfering with its binding capability. CDK2 activation via overexpression of CDK4(D158N), but not of CDK2, resulted in epidermal hyperplasia. We observed elevated levels of p21(Cip1) in K5Cdk2, but not in K5Cdk4(D158N), epidermis, suggesting that CDK2 overexpression elicits a p21(Cip1) response to maintain keratinocyte homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that neither CDK2 overexpression nor the indirect activation of CDK2 enhanced skin tumor development. Thus, although the indirect activation of CDK2 is sufficient to induce keratinocyte hyperproliferation, activation of CDK2 alone does not induce malignant progression in Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:18599613

  19. Does bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) affect female fertility in the mouse?

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Koji; Su, You-Qiang; Eppig, John J

    2010-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) is a transforming growth factor beta superfamily member produced by mammalian oocytes as well as other cell types. Despite well-characterized effects of recombinant BMP6 on granulosa cells in vitro, the function of BMP6 in vivo has been ill-defined. Therefore, the effects of genetic deletion of the Bmp6 gene on female mouse fertility were assessed. The mean litter size of Bmp6(-/-) females was reduced by 22% (P < 0.05) compared to Bmp6(+/+) controls. Not only did Bmp6(-/-) females naturally ovulate 24% fewer eggs, but competence of in vitro-matured oocytes to complete preimplantation development after fertilization in vitro was decreased by 50%. No apparent effect of Bmp6 deletion on either the morphology or the dynamics of follicular development was apparent. Nevertheless, levels of luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced transcripts, which encode proteins required for cumulus expansion (HAS2, PTGS2, PTX3, and TNFAIP6), and of epidermal growth factor-like peptides (AREG, BTC, and EREG) were lower in Bmp6(-/-) mice than in controls after administration of a reduced dose of hCG (1 IU) in vivo. LH receptor (Lhcgr) transcript levels were not significantly lower in Bmp6(-/-) granulosa cells, suggesting that BMP6 is required for processes downstream of LH receptors. To assess whether another oocyte-derived BMP, BMP15, could have BMP6-redundant functions in vivo, the fertility of Bmp15/Bmp6 double mutants was assessed. Fertility was not significantly reduced in double-homozygous mutants compared with that in double-heterozygous controls. Therefore, BMP6 promotes normal fertility in female mice, at least in part, by enabling appropriate responses to LH and normal oocyte quality. Thus, Bmp6 probably is part of the complex genetic network that determines female fertility. PMID:20702851

  20. Affective dysfunction in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: Therapeutic effects of environmental stimulation and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Mari A; Gray, Laura J; Pelka, Gregory J; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Christodoulou, John; Tam, Patrick P L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and consequent dysregulation of brain maturation. Patients suffer from a range of debilitating physical symptoms, however, behavioral and emotional symptoms also severely affect their quality of life. Here, we present previously unreported and clinically relevant affective dysfunction in the female heterozygous Mecp2(tm1Tam) mouse model of RTT (129sv and C57BL6 mixed background). The affective dysfunction and aberrant anxiety-related behavior of the Mecp2(+/-) mice were found to be reversible with environmental enrichment (EE) from 4 weeks of age. The effect of exercise alone (via wheel running) was also explored, providing the first evidence that increased voluntary physical activity in an animal model of RTT is beneficial for some phenotypes. Mecp2(+/-) mutants displayed elevated corticosterone despite decreased Crh expression, demonstrating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. EE of Mecp2(+/-) mice normalized basal serum corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF protein levels. The enrichment-induced rescue appears independent of the transcriptional regulation of the MeCP2 targets Bdnf exon 4 and Crh. These findings provide new insight into the neurodevelopmental role of MeCP2 and pathogenesis of RTT, in particular the affective dysfunction. The positive outcomes of environmental stimulation and physical exercise have implications for the development of therapies targeting the affective symptoms, as well as behavioral and cognitive dimensions, of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26019053

  1. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  2. Factors affecting the survival, fertilization, and embryonic development of mouse oocytes after vitrification using glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiuwen; Song, Enliang; Liu, Xiaomu; You, Wei; Wan, Fachun

    2009-09-01

    Cryopreservation of mammalian oocytes is an important way to provide a steady source of materials for research and practice of parthenogenetic activation, in vitro fertilization, and nuclear transfer. However, oocytes cryopreservation has not been common used, as there still are some problems waiting to be solved on the repeatability, safety, and validity. Then, it is necessary to investigate the damage occurred from vitrification and find a way to avoid or repair it. In this study, mouse mature oocytes were firstly pretreated in different equilibrium media, such as 5% ethylene glycol (EG) + 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 10% EG + 10% DMSO, and 15% EG + 15% DMSO in TCM199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS), for 1, 3, and 5 min, respectively, and then oocytes were transferred into vitrification solution (20% EG, 20% DMSO, 0.3 M sucrose, and 20% FCS in TCM199, M2, Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline, and 0.9% saline medium, respectively) and immediately loaded into glass capillaries to be plunged into liquid nitrogen. After storage from 1 h to 1 wk, they were diluted in stepwise sucrose solutions. The surviving oocytes were stained for cortical granule, meiotic spindles, and chromosomes. Oocytes without treatments were used as controls. The results showed that oocytes pretreated in 5% EG +5% DMSO group for 3-5 min or in 10% EG + 10% DMSO group for 1-3 min were better than other treatments. Oocytes vitrified in TCM199 as basic medium showed higher survival and better subsequent embryonic development than other groups. When the concentration of FCS in vitrification solution reduced below 15%, the rates of survival, fertilization, and developing to blastocyst declined dramatically. The inner diameter (0.6 mm) of glass capillaries and amount of vitrification solution (1-3 microl) achieved more rapid cooling and warming and so reduce the injury to oocytes. Cropreservation led to the exocytosis of cortical granule of oocytes (about 10%) and serious disturbance of

  3. Rotational diffusion affects the dynamical self-assembly pathways of patchy particles.

    PubMed

    Newton, Arthur C; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2015-12-15

    Predicting the self-assembly kinetics of particles with anisotropic interactions, such as colloidal patchy particles or proteins with multiple binding sites, is important for the design of novel high-tech materials, as well as for understanding biological systems, e.g., viruses or regulatory networks. Often stochastic in nature, such self-assembly processes are fundamentally governed by rotational and translational diffusion. Whereas the rotational diffusion constant of particles is usually considered to be coupled to the translational diffusion via the Stokes-Einstein relation, in the past decade it has become clear that they can be independently altered by molecular crowding agents or via external fields. Because virus capsids naturally assemble in crowded environments such as the cell cytoplasm but also in aqueous solution in vitro, it is important to investigate how varying the rotational diffusion with respect to transitional diffusion alters the kinetic pathways of self-assembly. Kinetic trapping in malformed or intermediate structures often impedes a direct simulation approach of a kinetic network by dramatically slowing down the relaxation to the designed ground state. However, using recently developed path-sampling techniques, we can sample and analyze the entire self-assembly kinetic network of simple patchy particle systems. For assembly of a designed cluster of patchy particles we find that changing the rotational diffusion does not change the equilibrium constants, but significantly affects the dynamical pathways, and enhances (suppresses) the overall relaxation process and the yield of the target structure, by avoiding (encountering) frustrated states. Besides insight, this finding provides a design principle for improved control of nanoparticle self-assembly. PMID:26621742

  4. Rotational diffusion affects the dynamical self-assembly pathways of patchy particles

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Arthur C.; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the self-assembly kinetics of particles with anisotropic interactions, such as colloidal patchy particles or proteins with multiple binding sites, is important for the design of novel high-tech materials, as well as for understanding biological systems, e.g., viruses or regulatory networks. Often stochastic in nature, such self-assembly processes are fundamentally governed by rotational and translational diffusion. Whereas the rotational diffusion constant of particles is usually considered to be coupled to the translational diffusion via the Stokes–Einstein relation, in the past decade it has become clear that they can be independently altered by molecular crowding agents or via external fields. Because virus capsids naturally assemble in crowded environments such as the cell cytoplasm but also in aqueous solution in vitro, it is important to investigate how varying the rotational diffusion with respect to transitional diffusion alters the kinetic pathways of self-assembly. Kinetic trapping in malformed or intermediate structures often impedes a direct simulation approach of a kinetic network by dramatically slowing down the relaxation to the designed ground state. However, using recently developed path-sampling techniques, we can sample and analyze the entire self-assembly kinetic network of simple patchy particle systems. For assembly of a designed cluster of patchy particles we find that changing the rotational diffusion does not change the equilibrium constants, but significantly affects the dynamical pathways, and enhances (suppresses) the overall relaxation process and the yield of the target structure, by avoiding (encountering) frustrated states. Besides insight, this finding provides a design principle for improved control of nanoparticle self-assembly. PMID:26621742

  5. Cardiac Metabolic Pathways Affected in the Mouse Model of Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W.; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  6. Cardiac metabolic pathways affected in the mouse model of barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K; Greis, Kenneth D; Haffey, Wendy D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  7. Factors Affecting Pathogen Survival in Finished Dairy Compost with Different Particle Sizes Under Greenhouse Conditions.

    PubMed

    Diao, Junshu; Chen, Zhao; Gong, Chao; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in finished dairy compost with different particle sizes during storage as affected by moisture content and temperature under greenhouse conditions. The mixture of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium strains was inoculated into the finished composts with moisture contents of 20, 30, and 40%, separately. The finished compost samples were then sieved into 3 different particle sizes (>1000, 500-1000, and <500 μm) and stored under greenhouse conditions. For compost samples with moisture contents of 20 and 30%, the average Salmonella reductions in compost samples with particle sizes of >1000, 500-1000, and <500 μm were 2.15, 2.27, and 2.47 log colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) within 5 days of storage in summer, respectively, as compared with 1.60, 2.03, and 2.26 log CFU g(-1) in late fall, respectively, and 2.61, 3.33, and 3.67 log CFU g(-1) in winter, respectively. The average E. coli O157:H7 reductions in compost samples with particle sizes of >1000, 500-1000, and <500 μm were 1.98, 2.30, and 2.54 log CFU g(-1) within 5 days of storage in summer, respectively, as compared with 1.70, 2.56, and 2.90 log CFU g(-1) in winter, respectively. Our results revealed that both Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in compost samples with larger particle size survived better than those with smaller particle sizes, and the initial rapid moisture loss in compost may contribute to the fast inactivation of pathogens in the finished compost. For the same season, the pathogens in the compost samples with the same particle size survived much better at the initial moisture content of 20% compared to 40%. PMID:26153914

  8. Reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and neurotransmitter content affects synaptic vesicle distribution and shape in mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hermann A; Fonseca, Matheus de C; Camargo, Wallace L; Lima, Patrícia M A; Martinelli, Patrícia M; Naves, Lígia A; Prado, Vânia F; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, nerve muscle communication is mediated by the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine packed inside synaptic vesicles by a specific vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Here we used a mouse model (VAChT KD(HOM)) with 70% reduction in the expression of VAChT to investigate the morphological and functional consequences of a decreased acetylcholine uptake and release in neuromuscular synapses. Upon hypertonic stimulation, VAChT KD(HOM) mice presented a reduction in the amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials, FM 1-43 staining intensity, total number of synaptic vesicles and altered distribution of vesicles within the synaptic terminal. In contrast, under electrical stimulation or no stimulation, VAChT KD(HOM) neuromuscular junctions did not differ from WT on total number of vesicles but showed altered distribution. Additionally, motor nerve terminals in VAChT KD(HOM) exhibited small and flattened synaptic vesicles similar to that observed in WT mice treated with vesamicol that blocks acetylcholine uptake. Based on these results, we propose that decreased VAChT levels affect synaptic vesicle biogenesis and distribution whereas a lower ACh content affects vesicles shape. PMID:24260111

  9. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G. J. M.; Mitchell, G.; Bailie, N.; Thornhill, D.; Watterson, J.; Kimbell, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  10. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile. PMID:21281223

  11. Thioglycolic acid inhibits mouse oocyte maturation and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration.

    PubMed

    Hou, S Y; Zhang, L; Wu, K; Xia, L

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that thioglycolic acid (TGA) leads to potential reproductive toxicology. To clarify the exact effects of this compound on reproduction, mice oocytes were treated with different TGA doses. At the end of the culture period, the nuclear status of mice oocytes was assessed under an inverted microscope. After immunofluorescence staining, the chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration of oocytes were evaluated. The results indicated that TGA decreases the percentage of first polar body formation but does not influence that of germinal vesicle breakdown. TGA induces abnormal chromosomal arrangement and spindle elongation. In conclusion, TGA inhibits in-vitro maturation of mice oocytes and affects chromosomal arrangement and spindle configuration. Furthermore, it probably interferes with biochemical changes that occur during meiosis, resulting in aberrant development. PMID:19022875

  12. Methyl-donor deficiency in adolescence affects memory and epigenetic status in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, H; Matsuzawa, D; Ishii, D; Matsuda, S; Kawai, K; Mashimo, Y; Sutoh, C; Shimizu, E

    2015-03-01

    DNA methylation is one of the essential factors in the control of gene expression. Alteration of the DNA methylation pattern has been linked to various neurological, behavioral and neurocognitive dysfunctions. Recent studies have pointed out the importance of epigenetics in brain development and functions including learning and memory. Nutrients related to one-carbon metabolism are known to play important roles in the maintenance of genomic DNA methylation. Previous studies have shown that the long-term administration of a diet lacking essential one-carbon nutrients such as methionine, choline and folic acid (methyl donors) caused global DNA hypermethylation in the brain. Therefore, the long-term feeding of a methyl-donor-deficient diet may cause abnormal brain development including learning and memory. To confirm this hypothesis, 3-week-old mice were maintained on a folate-, methionine- and choline-deficient (FMCD) or control (CON) diet for 3 weeks. We found that the methyl-donor deficiency impaired both novel object recognition and fear extinction after 3 weeks of treatment. The FMCD group showed spontaneous recovery of fear that differed from that in CON. In addition, we found decreased Gria1 gene expression and specific CpG hypermethylation of the Gria1 promoter region in the FMCD hippocampus. Our data suggest that a chronic dietary lack of methyl donors in the developmental period affects learning, memory and gene expressions in the hippocampus. PMID:25704122

  13. Cellular Intrinsic Mechanism Affecting the Outcome of AML Treated with Ara-C in a Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dongming; Su, Guangsong; Zheng, Yanwen; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei J.; Singleton, Timothy P.; Yin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment failure are not clear. Here, we established a mouse model of AML by syngeneic transplantation of BXH-2 derived myeloid leukemic cells and developed an efficacious Ara-C-based regimen for treatment of these mice. We proved that leukemic cell load was correlated with survival. We also demonstrated that the susceptibility of leukemia cells to Ara-C could significantly affect the survival. To examine the molecular alterations in cells with different sensitivity, genome-wide expression of the leukemic cells was profiled, revealing that overall 366 and 212 genes became upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the resistant cells. Many of these genes are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Some of them were further validated by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, the Ara-C resistant cells retained the sensitivity to ABT-737, an inhibitor of anti-apoptosis proteins, and treatment with ABT-737 prolonged the life span of mice engrafted with resistant cells. These results suggest that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C. Incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors, such as ABT-737, into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. This work provided direct in vivo evidence that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C, suggesting that incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. PMID:25314317

  14. Phenotypic integration of skeletal traits during growth buffers genetic variants affecting the slenderness of femora in inbred mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Karl J.; Hu, Bin; Tommasini, Steven M.; Courtland, Hayden-William; Price, Christopher; Cordova, Matthew; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2009-01-01

    Compensatory interactions among adult skeletal traits are critical for establishing strength but complicate the search for fracture susceptibility genes by allowing many genetic variants to exist in a population without loss of function. A better understanding of how these interactions arise during growth will provide new insight into genotype-phenotype relationships and the biological controls that establish skeletal strength. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variants affecting growth in width relative to growth in length (slenderness) are coordinated with movement of the inner bone surface and matrix mineralization to match stiffness with weight-bearing loads during postnatal growth. Midshaft femoral morphology and tissue-mineral density were quantified at ages of 1 day and at 4, 8, and 16 weeks for a panel of 20 female AXB/BXA recombinant inbred mouse strains. Path Analyses revealed significant compensatory interactions among outer-surface expansion rate, inner-surface expansion rate, and tissue-mineral density during postnatal growth, indicating that genetic variants affecting bone slenderness were buffered mechanically by the precise regulation of bone surface movements and matrix mineralization. Importantly, the covariation between morphology and mineralization resulted from a heritable constraint limiting the amount of tissue that could be used to construct a functional femur. The functional interactions during growth explained 56-99% of the variability in adult traits and mechanical properties. These functional interactions provide quantitative expectations of how genetic or environmental variants affecting one trait should be compensated by changes in other traits. Variants that impair this process or that cannot be fully compensated are expected to alter skeletal growth leading to underdesigned (weak) or overdesigned (bulky) structures. PMID:19082857

  15. Understanding how hydrodynamics affects particle transport in saturated fractures using modelling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianflone, S.; Lakhian, V.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 35% of Canadians and Americans utilize groundwater for drinking water and as such, it is essential to understand the mechanisms which may jeopardize this resource. Porous media aquifers typically provide significant removal of particulate contaminants (eg. viruses, bacteria); however, fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards often provide pathways for particles to move in greater numbers and speed than in porous media. Thus, understanding flow and transport in fractures is important for the preservation and use of groundwater sources. Models based on coupling flow and transport equations can be used in understanding transport in fractures. Both experiments and simulations have shown that there are inconsistencies in current transport, attachment and detachment theory, particularly when particle size is varied. The assumption that hydrodynamic effects do not significantly affect transport of particles is likely untrue. As well, it has been shown that preferential flow paths occur in fractures, but the effects of path specific properties such as fracture geometry have yet to be thoroughly explored. It has been observed that eddies caused by local changes in geometry exist in fractures in the environment and models have demonstrated that such eddies will retard the flow of particles. In this work, two 2D fractures were randomly generated with a mean aperture of approximately 2mm. Finite element software, COMSOL Multiphysics, generated flow fields through the fractures by numerically solving the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation for varied flow rates. Eddies were observed in one of the fractures at both low (~1 m/day) and high (>100 m/day) velocities. A program was written using random walk particle tracking to simulate transport. Theories of attachment, detachment and matrix flow are not included in this model in order to isolate hydrodynamic forces. In combination with the modelling procedure, the two fractures were inscribed into pieces of

  16. Targeted disruption of the mouse testis-enriched gene Znf230 does not affect spermatogenesis or fertility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunqiang; Tao, Dachang; Lu, Yongjie; Yang, Yuan; Ma, Yongxin; Zhang, Sizhong

    2014-01-01

    The mouse testis-enriched Znf230 gene, which encodes a type of RING finger protein, is present primarily in the nuclei of spermatogonia, the acrosome and the tail of spermatozoa. To investigate the role of Znf230 in spermatogenesis, we generated Znf230-deficient mice by disrupting Znf230 exon-5 and exon-6 using homologous recombination. The homozygous Znf230-knockout (KO) mice did not exhibit Znf230 mRNA expression and Znf230 protein production. Znf230 KO mice exhibited no obvious impairment in body growth or fertility. Male Znf230 KO mice had integral reproductive systems and mature sperm that were regular in number and shape. The developmental stages of male germ cells of Znf230 KO mice were also normal. We further examined variations in the transcriptomes of testicular tissue between Znf230 KO and wild-type mice through microarray analysis. The results showed that the mRNA level of one unclassified transcript 4921513I08Rik was increased and that the mRNA levels of three other transcripts, i.e., 4930448A20Rik, 4931431B13Rik and potassium channel tetramerisation domain containing 14(Kctd14), were reduced more than two-fold in Znf230 KO mice compared with wild-type mice. Using our current examination techniques, these findings suggested that Znf230 deficiency in mice may not affect growth, fertility or spermatogenesis. PMID:25505846

  17. Conditional Knockout of Tumor Overexpressed Gene in Mouse Neurons Affects RNA Granule Assembly, Granule Translation, LTP and Short Term Habituation

    PubMed Central

    Barbarese, Elisa; Ifrim, Marius F.; Hsieh, Lawrence; Guo, Caiying; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Maggipinto, Michael J.; Korza, George; Tutolo, Jessica W.; Giampetruzzi, Anthony; Le, Hien; Ma, Xin-Ming; Levine, Eric; Bishop, Brian; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Carson, John H.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, specific RNAs are assembled into granules, which are translated in dendrites, however the functional consequences of granule assembly are not known. Tumor overexpressed gene (TOG) is a granule-associated protein containing multiple binding sites for heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2, another granule component that recognizes cis-acting sequences called hnRNP A2 response elements (A2REs) present in several granule RNAs. Translation in granules is sporadic, which is believed to reflect monosomal translation, with occasional bursts, which are believed to reflect polysomal translation. In this study, TOG expression was conditionally knocked out (TOG cKO) in mouse hippocampal neurons using cre/lox technology. In TOG cKO cultured neurons granule assembly and bursty translation of activity-regulated cytoskeletal associated (ARC) mRNA, an A2RE RNA, are disrupted. In TOG cKO brain slices synaptic sensitivity and long term potentiation (LTP) are reduced. TOG cKO mice exhibit hyperactivity, perseveration and impaired short term habituation. These results suggest that in hippocampal neurons TOG is required for granule assembly, granule translation and synaptic plasticity, and affects behavior. PMID:23936366

  18. Neonatal Phytoestrogen Exposure Alters Oviduct Mucosal Immune Response to Pregnancy and Affects Preimplantation Embryo Development in the Mouse1

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Wendy N.; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Phelps, Jazma Y.; Cantor, Amy M.; Williams, Carmen J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatment of neonatal mice with the phytoestrogen genistein (50 mg/kg/day) results in complete female infertility caused in part by preimplantation embryo loss in the oviduct between Days 2 and 3 of pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that oviducts of genistein-treated mice are “posteriorized” as compared to control mouse oviducts because they express numerous genes normally restricted to posterior regions of the female reproductive tract (FRT), the cervix and vagina. We report here that neonatal genistein treatment resulted in substantial changes in oviduct expression of genes important for the FRT mucosal immune response, including immunoglobulins, antimicrobials, and chemokines. Some of the altered immune response genes were chronically altered beginning at the time of neonatal genistein treatment, indicating that these alterations were a result of the posteriorization phenotype. Other alterations in oviduct gene expression were observed only in early pregnancy, immediately after the FRT was exposed to inflammatory or antigenic stimuli from ovulation and mating. The oviduct changes affected development of the surviving embryos by increasing the rate of cleavage and decreasing the trophectoderm-to-inner cell mass cell ratio at the blastocyst stage. We conclude that both altered immune responses to pregnancy and deficits in oviduct support for preimplantation embryo development in the neonatal genistein model are likely to contribute to infertility phenotype. PMID:22553218

  19. Accumulative Difference Image Protocol for Particle Tracking in Fluorescence Microscopy Tested in Mouse Lymphonodes

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Carlo E.; Caccia, Michele; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Rivolta, Ilaria; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Gorletta, Tatiana; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done. PMID:20808918

  20. RESPIRABLE PARTICLES AND MISTS IN MOUSE PULMONARY INFECTIVITY MODEL. EFFECT OF CHRONIC OR INTERMITTENT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of respirable-sized sulfuric acid mist or mixtures containing acid mist and carbon particles (A-C) on the susceptibility to bacterial and viral respiratory infection were studied in mice and hamsters. Both species showed mortalities upon single 3-hour exposure to 600 ...

  1. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  2. A mouse model of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: focus on pharmacological interventions targeting affective dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Masini, Débora; Fisone, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, are increasingly recognized as a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). These ailments, which often appear in the early stage of the disease, affect a large number of patients and are only partly resolved by conventional antiparkinsonian medications, such as L-DOPA. Here, we investigated non-motor symptoms of PD in a mouse model based on bilateral injection of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal striatum. This model presented only subtle gait modifications, which did not affect horizontal motor activity in the open-field test. Bilateral 6-OHDA lesion also impaired olfactory discrimination, in line with the anosmia typically observed in early stage parkinsonism. The effect of 6-OHDA was then examined for mood-related dysfunctions. Lesioned mice showed increased immobility in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, two behavioral paradigms of depression. Moreover, the lesion exerted anxiogenic effects, as shown by reduced time spent in the open arms, in the elevated plus maze test, and by increased thigmotaxis in the open-field test. L-DOPA did not modify depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, which were instead counteracted by the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole. Reboxetine, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, was also able to revert the depressive and anxiogenic effects produced by the lesion with 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pre-treatment with desipramine prior to injection of 6-OHDA, which is commonly used to preserve noradrenaline neurons, did not modify the effect of the lesion on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, in the present model, mood-related conditions are independent of the reduction of noradrenaline caused by 6-OHDA. Based on these findings we propose that the anti-depressive and anxiolytic action of reboxetine is mediated by promoting dopamine transmission through blockade of dopamine uptake from residual noradrenergic terminals. PMID

  3. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  4. Stanniocalcin-1 Protects a Mouse Model from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Affecting ROS-Mediated Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dajun; Shang, Huiping; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). However, the molecular mechanisms remain widely unknown. STC-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas most ROS-mediated pathways are associated with ischemic injury. Therefore, to explore the mechanism, the effects of STC-1 on ROS-medicated pathways were studied. Non-traumatic vascular clamps were used to establish RIRI mouse models. The serum levels of STC-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon (IFN) γ, P53, and capase-3 were measured by ELISA kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by fluorescence spectrofluorometer. All these molecules changed significantly in a RIRI model mouse when compared with those in a sham control. Kidney cells were isolated from sham and model mice. STC-1 was overexpressed or knockout in these kidney cells. The molecules in ROS-medicated pathways were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The results showed that STC-1 is an effective ROS scavenger. The serum levels of STC-1, MDA and SOD activity were increased while the serum levels of IL-6, iIFN-γ, P53, and capase-3 were decreased in a model group when compared with a sham control (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of STC-1,p53, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (p-MEKK-1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), IkB kinase (p-IKK), nuclear factor (NF) κB, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) and caspase-3 changed significantly in kidney cells isolated from a RIRI model when compared to those isolated from a sham control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, STC-1 overexpression or silence caused significant changes of the levels of these ROS-mediated molecules. Therefore, STC-1 maybe improve anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis activities by affecting ROS-mediated pathways, especially the phospho-modifications of the respective proteins, resulting in the increase of SOD and

  5. Effect of Exposure to Atmospheric Ultrafine Particles on Production of Free Fatty Acids and Lipid Metabolites in the Mouse Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Navab, Kaveh; Hough, Greg; Daher, Nancy; Zhang, Min; Mittelstein, David; Lee, Katherine; Pakbin, Payam; Saffari, Arian; Bhetraratana, May; Sulaiman, Dawoud; Beebe, Tyler; Wu, Lan; Jen, Nelson; Wine, Eytan; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Araujo, Jesus A.; Fogelman, Alan; Sioutas, Constantinos; Navab, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ambient ultrafine particulate matter (UFP) is a well-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, little is known about the effects of air pollution on gastrointestinal disorders. Objective: We sought to assess whether exposure to ambient UFP (diameter < 180 nm) increased free fatty acids and lipid metabolites in the mouse small intestine. Methods: Ldlr-null mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or UFP collected at an urban Los Angeles, California, site that was heavily affected by vehicular emissions; the exposure was carried out for 10 weeks in the presence or absence of D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide with antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties on a high-fat or normal chow diet. Results: Compared with FA, exposure to UFP significantly increased intestinal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), including 15-HETE, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, as well as hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), including 13-HODE and 9-HODE. Arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) as well as some of the lysophosphatidic acids (LPA) in the small intestine were also increased in response to UFP exposure. Administration of D-4F significantly reduced UFP-mediated increase in HETEs, HODEs, AA, PGD2, and LPA. Although exposure to UFP further led to shortened villus length accompanied by prominent macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the intestinal villi, administration of D-4F mitigated macrophage infiltration. Conclusions: Exposure to UFP promotes lipid metabolism, villus shortening, and inflammatory responses in mouse small intestine, whereas administration of D-4F attenuated these effects. Our findings provide a basis to further assess the mechanisms underlying UFP-mediated lipid metabolism in the digestive system with clinical relevance to gut homeostasis and diseases. Citation: Li R, Navab K, Hough G, Daher N, Zhang M, Mittelstein D, Lee K, Pakbin P, Saffari A, Bhetraratana M, Sulaiman D, Beebe T, Wu L, Jen

  6. Hindered Diffusion of Inert Tracer Particles in the Cytoplasm of Mouse 3T3 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Castle, Philip E.; Lansing Taylor, D.; Lanni, Frederick

    1987-07-01

    Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we have studied the diffusion of fluorescein-labeled, size-fractionated Ficoll in the cytoplasmic space of living Swiss 3T3 cells as a probe of the physical chemical properties of cytoplasm. The results reported here corroborate and extend the results of earlier experiments with fluorescein-labeled, size-fractionated dextran: diffusion of nonbinding particles in cytoplasm is hindered in a size-dependent manner. Extrapolation of the data suggests that particles larger than 260 angstrom in radius may be completely nondiffusible in the cytoplasmic space. In contrast, diffusion of Ficoll in protein solutions of concentration comparable to the range reported for cytoplasm is not hindered in a size-dependent manner. Although we cannot at present distinguish among several physical chemical models for the organization of cytoplasm, these results make it clear that cytoplasm possesses some sort of higher-order intermolecular interactions (structure) not found in simple aqueous protein solutions, even at high concentration. These results also suggest that, for native cytoplasmic particles whose smallest radial dimension approaches 260 angstrom, size may be as important a determinant of cytoplasmic diffusibility as binding specificity. This would include most endosomes, polyribosomes, and the larger multienzyme complexes.

  7. Establishment of a method to determine the magnetic particles in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yifan; Zhang, Wuxu; Wang, Yuxia; Li, Qian; Gao, Guo; Dong, Na; Hu, Hengyao; Wang, Kan; Wu, Junhua; Gao, Zhongcai; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed to evaluate a method to detect the residual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in animal tissues. Ferric ions released from MNPs through acidification with hydrochloric acid can be measured by complexation with potassium thiocyanate. MNPs in saline could be well detected by this chemical colorimetric method, whereas the detected sensitivity decreased significantly when MNPs were mixed with mouse tissue homogenates. In order to check the MNPs in animal tissues accurately, three improvements have been made. Firstly, proteinase K was used to digest the proteins that might bind with iron, and secondly, ferrosoferric oxide (Fe3O4) was collected by a magnetic field which could capture MNPs and leave the bio-iron in the supernatant. Finally, the collected MNPs were carbonized in the muffle furnace at 420°C before acidification to ruin the groups that might bind with ferric ions such as porphyrin. Using this method, MNPs in animal tissues could be well measured while avoiding the disturbance of endogenous iron and iron-binding groups. PMID:23216680

  8. Establishment of a method to determine the magnetic particles in mouse tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yifan; Zhang, Wuxu; Wang, Yuxia; Li, Qian; Gao, Guo; Dong, Na; Hu, Hengyao; Wang, Kan; Wu, Junhua; Gao, Zhongcai; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-12-01

    This work is aimed to evaluate a method to detect the residual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in animal tissues. Ferric ions released from MNPs through acidification with hydrochloric acid can be measured by complexation with potassium thiocyanate. MNPs in saline could be well detected by this chemical colorimetric method, whereas the detected sensitivity decreased significantly when MNPs were mixed with mouse tissue homogenates. In order to check the MNPs in animal tissues accurately, three improvements have been made. Firstly, proteinase K was used to digest the proteins that might bind with iron, and secondly, ferrosoferric oxide (Fe3O4) was collected by a magnetic field which could capture MNPs and leave the bio-iron in the supernatant. Finally, the collected MNPs were carbonized in the muffle furnace at 420°C before acidification to ruin the groups that might bind with ferric ions such as porphyrin. Using this method, MNPs in animal tissues could be well measured while avoiding the disturbance of endogenous iron and iron-binding groups.

  9. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  10. Fluence-based relative biological effectiveness for charged particle carcinogenesis in mouse Harderian gland.

    PubMed

    Alpen, E L; Powers-Risius, P; Curtis, S B; DeGuzman, R; Fry, R J

    1994-10-01

    Neoplasia in the rodent Harderian gland has been used to determine the carcinogenic potential of irradiation by HZE particles. Ions from protons to lanthanum at energies up to 670 MeV/a have been used to irradiate mice, and prevalence of Harderian gland tumors has been measured 16 months after irradiation. The RBE for tumor induction has been expressed as the RBEmax, which is the ratio of the initial slopes of the dose vs prevalence curve. The RBEmax has been found to be approximately 30 for ions with LET values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer. Analysis on the basis of fluence as a substitute for dose has shown that on a per particle basis all of the ions with LET values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer have equal effectiveness. An analysis of the probabilities of ion traversals of the nucleus has shown that for these high stopping powers that a single hit is effective in producing neoplastic transformation. PMID:11539994

  11. Fluence-based relative biological effectiveness for charged particle carcinogenesis in mouse Harderian gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpen, E. L.; Power-Risius, P.; Curtis, S. B.; Deguzman, R.; Fry, R. J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Neoplasia in the rodent Harderian gland has been used to determine the carcinogenic potential of irradiation by HZE particles. Ions from protons to lanthanum at energies up to 670 MeV/a have been used to irradiate mice, and prevalence of Harderian gland tumors has been measured 16 months after irradiation. The Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for tumor induction has been expressed as the RBE(sub max), which is the ratio of the initial slopes of the dose vs prevalence curve. The RBE(sub max) has been found to be approximately 30 for ions with Linear Energy Transfer (LET) values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer. Analysis on the basis of fluence as a substitute for dose has shown that on a per particle basis all of the ions with LET values in excess of 100 keV/micrometer have equal effectiveness. An analysis of the probabilities of ion traversals of the nucleus has shown that for these high stopping powers that a single hit is effective in producing neoplastic transformation.

  12. A composite graft material containing bone particles and collagen in osteoinduction in mouse.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Chou, Ming-Yung; Jonas, Mecrehild; Tien, Yung-Tico; Chi, Emily Y

    2002-01-01

    Demineralized allogenic bone matrices (DABM) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) have been successfully used as bone-graft materials in the treatment of acquired and congenital cranio-maxillofacial defects and in some orthopedic surgery. However, these bone-graft "powders" have many shortcomings. For example, placement of particulate graft material in a hemorrhaging site can result in inadequacies or inaccurate attachment as well as loss of the graft materials. To minimize the inadequacies of powderlike graft materials, xenogenic collagen isolated from human tendon, skin, or bone was added to the bone-graft particles to form a composite spongelike implant. This material is commercially available and consists of 60% collagen and 40% DFDBA (DynaGraft, GenSci Co., Irvine, CA). The goal of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of composite graft implants in the mineralization process in an animal model in comparison with DFDBA powder and pure collagen. Seventy-two Swiss Webster mice were divided into three groups: an experimental group implanted with DynaGraft, two comparison groups implanted with either DFDBA or collagen only. All the graft materials were surgically implanted and inserted into the left thigh muscle. Mice were humanely killed at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks. Then the muscle tissues in the vicinity of the implants were excised and processed for histology. Paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), the Von Kossa method, and Masson's trichrome. Some selected specimens were processed for transmission electron microscopic observation. After 1 week of implantation, the DynaGraft group showed calcium deposition on the collagen material and on the periphery of the DFDBA particles. Increased calcification and bone-forming cells were observed at 4-6 weeks. After 8 weeks, the implant formed a calcified nodule and only heavily mineralized connective tissue was observed at the implanted site. The group implanted

  13. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Gillette, E. L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chaterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by gamma irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin immunoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid-remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

  14. Immunohistochemical evidence of rapid extracellular matrix remodeling after iron-particle irradiation of mouse mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhart, E.J.; Gillette, E.L.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1996-02-01

    High-LET radiation has unique physical and biological properties compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Recent studies demonstrate that sparsely ionizing radiation rapidly alters the pattern of extracellular matrix expression in several tissues, but little is known about the effect of heavy-ion radiation. This study investigates densely ionizing radiation-induced changes in extracellular matrix localization in the mammary glands of adult female BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy 600 MeV iron particles. The basement membrane and interstitial extracellular matrix proteins of the mammary gland stroma were mapped with respect to time postirradiation using immunofluorescence. Collagen III was induced in the adipose stroma within 1 day, continued to increase through day 9 and was resolved by day 14. Immunoreactive tenascin was induced in the epithelium by day 1, was evident at the epithelial-stromal interface by day 5-9 and persisted as a condensed layer beneath the basement membrane through day 14. These findings parallel similar changes induced by {gamma} irradiation but demonstrate different onset and chronicity. In contrast, the integrity of epithelial basement membrane, which was unaffected by sparsely ionizing radiation, was disrupted by iron-particle irradiation. Laminin inummoreactivity was mildly irregular at 1 h postirradiation and showed discontinuities and thickening from days 1 to 9. Continuity was restored by day 14. Thus high-LET radiation, like sparsely ionizing radiation, induces rapid remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix but also appears to alter the integrity of the epithelial basement membrane, which is an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Fractal Scaling of Particle Size Distribution and Relationships with Topsoil Properties Affected by Biological Soil Crusts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guang-Lei; Ding, Guo-Dong; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Qin, Shu-Gao; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Bao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Dong; Wan, Li; Deng, Ji-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust), as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05); and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01). Conclusions/Significance Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions. PMID:24516668

  16. Quantitative gene expression profiling of mouse brain regions reveals differential transcripts conserved in human and affected in disease models.

    PubMed

    Brochier, Camille; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Diguet, Elsa; Caudy, Nicolas; Dossat, Carole; Ségurens, Béatrice; Wincker, Patrick; Roze, Emmanuel; Caboche, Jocelyne; Hantraye, Philippe; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; de Chaldée, Michel

    2008-04-22

    Using serial analysis of gene expression, we collected quantitative transcriptome data in 11 regions of the adult wild-type mouse brain: the orbital, prelimbic, cingulate, motor, somatosensory, and entorhinal cortices, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the substantia nigra, and the ventral tegmental area. With >1.2 million cDNA tags sequenced, this database is a powerful resource to explore brain functions and disorders. As an illustration, we performed interregional comparisons and found 315 differential transcripts. Most of them are poorly characterized and 20% lack functional annotation. For 78 differential transcripts, we provide independent expression level measurements in mouse brain regions by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We also show examples where we used in situ hybridization to achieve infrastructural resolution. For 30 transcripts, we next demonstrated that regional enrichment is conserved in the human brain. We then quantified the expression levels of region-enriched transcripts in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington disease and the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson disease and observed significant alterations in the striatum, cerebral cortex, thalamus and substantia nigra of R6/2 mice and in the striatum of MPTP-treated mice. These results show that the gene expression data provided here for the mouse brain can be used to explore pathophysiological models and disclose transcripts differentially expressed in human brain regions. PMID:18252803

  17. Nano-sized and micro-sized polystyrene particles affect phagocyte function

    PubMed Central

    Prietl, B.; Meindl, C.; Roblegg, E.; Pieber, T. R.; Lanzer, G.; Fröhlich, E.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse effect of nanoparticles may include impairment of phagocyte function. To identify the effect of nanoparticle size on uptake, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, nitric oxide production and myeloperoxidase release, leukocytes isolated from human peripheral blood, monocytes and macrophages were studied. Carboxyl polystyrene (CPS) particles in sizes between 20 and 1,000 nm served as model particles. Twenty nanometers CPS particles were taken up passively, while larger CPS particles entered cells actively and passively. Twenty nanometers CPS were cytotoxic to all phagocytes, ≥500 nm CPS particles only to macrophages. Twenty nanometers CPS particles stimulated IL-8 secretion in human monocytes and induced oxidative burst in monocytes. Five hundred nanometers and 1,000 nm CPS particles stimulated IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in monocytes and macrophages, chemotaxis towards a chemotactic stimulus of monocytes and phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and provoked an oxidative burst of granulocytes. At very high concentrations, CPS particles of 20 and 500 nm stimulated myeloperoxidase release of granulocytes and nitric oxide generation in macrophages. Cytotoxic effect could contribute to some of the observed effects. In the absence of cytotoxicity, 500 and 1,000 nm CPS particles appear to influence phagocyte function to a greater extent than particles in other sizes. PMID:24292270

  18. Negligible clearance of ultrafine particles retained in healthy and affected human lungs.

    PubMed

    Wiebert, P; Sanchez-Crespo, A; Seitz, J; Falk, R; Philipson, K; Kreyling, W G; Möller, W; Sommerer, K; Larsson, S; Svartengren, M

    2006-08-01

    Ambient particles are believed to be a specific health hazard, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. There are data in the literature indicating fast and substantial systemic uptake of particles from the lung. The present authors have developed an improved method to produce ultrafine particles with more stable radiolabelling and defined particle size range. Fifteen subjects inhaled technetium 99m (99mTc)-labelled carbonaceous particles of 100 nm in size. Radioactivity over the lung was followed for 70 h. The clearance of these ultrafine particles from the lungs and specifically translocation to the circulation was tested. Lung retention for all subjects at 46 h was mean+/-sd 99+/-4.6%. Cumulative leaching of 99mTc activity from the particles was 2.6+/-0.96% at 70 h. The 24-h activity leaching in urine was 1.0+/-0.55%. No evidence of a quantitatively important translocation of 100-nm particles to the systemic circulation from the lungs was found. More research is needed to establish if the approximately 1% cleared activity originates from leached activity or insoluble translocated particles, and whether a few per cent of translocated particles is sufficient to cause harmful effects. PMID:16641121

  19. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    van Diepen, Janna A.; Verhoef, Daniël; Voshol, Peter J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events. Objective Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD) or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD) for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F) VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding. Results HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation. Conclusions Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby

  20. IDO1 Deficiency Does Not Affect Disease in Mouse Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Put, Karen; Brisse, Ellen; Avau, Anneleen; Imbrechts, Maya; Mitera, Tania; Janssens, Rik; Proost, Paul; Fallarino, Francesca; Wouters, Carine H.; Matthys, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) is an immune-modulatory enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan (Trp) to kynurenine (Kyn) and is strongly induced by interferon (IFN)-γ. We previously reported highly increased levels of IFN-γ and corresponding IDO activity in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a hyper-inflammatory syndrome. On the other hand, IFN-γ and IDO were low in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), an autoinflammatory syndrome. As HLH can occur as a complication of sJIA, the opposing levels of both IFN-γ and IDO are remarkable. In animal models for sJIA and HLH, the role of IFN-γ differs from being protective to pathogenic. In this study, we aimed to unravel the role of IDO1 in the pathogenesis of sJIA and HLH. Methods Wild-type and IDO1-knockout (IDO1-KO) mice were used in 3 models of sJIA or HLH: complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-injected mice developed an sJIA-like syndrome and secondary HLH (sHLH) was evoked by either repeated injection of unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide or by primary infection with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). An anti-CD3-induced cytokine release syndrome was used as a non-sJIA/HLH control model. Results No differences were found in clinical, laboratory and hematological features of sJIA/HLH between wild-type and IDO1-KO mice. As IDO modulates the immune response via induction of regulatory T cells and inhibition of T cell proliferation, we investigated both features in a T cell-triggered cytokine release syndrome. Again, no differences were observed in serum cytokine levels, percentages of regulatory T cells, nor of proliferating or apoptotic thymocytes and lymph node cells. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that IDO1 deficiency does not affect inflammation in sJIA, sHLH and a T cell-triggered cytokine release model. We hypothesize that other tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes like IDO2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) might compensate for the lack of IDO1

  1. Long-Term Effects of Diesel Exhaust Particles on Airway Inflammation and Remodeling in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Pureun-Haneul; Lee, Shin-Hwa; Kim, Young-En; Shin, Mee-Yong; Kang, Yena; Bae, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Min-Jung; Rhim, TaiYoun; Park, Choon-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) can induce and trigger airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term DEP exposure on AHR, inflammation, lung fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia in a mouse model. Methods BALB/c mice were exposed to DEPs 1 hour a day for 5 days a week for 3 months in a closed-system chamber attached to a ultrasonic nebulizer (low dose: 100 µg/m3 DEPs, high dose: 3 mg/m3 DEPs). The control group was exposed to saline. Enhanced pause was measured as an indicator of AHR. Animals were subjected to whole-body plethysmography and then sacrificed to determine the performance of bronchoalveolar lavage and histology. Results AHR was higher in the DEP group than in the control group, and higher in the high-dose DEP than in the low-dose DEP groups at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The numbers of neutrophils and lymphocytes were higher in the high-dose DEP group than in the low-dose DEP group and control group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, and interferon-γ were higher in the low-dose DEP group than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of IL-10 was higher in the high-dose DEP group than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of vascular endothelial growth factor was higher in the low-dose and high-dose DEP groups than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of IL-6 was higher in the low-dose DEP group than in the control group at 12 weeks. The level of transforming growth factor-β was higher in the high-dose DEP group than in the control group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The collagen content and lung fibrosis in lung tissue was higher in the high-dose DEP group at 8 and 12 weeks. Conclusions These results suggest that long-term DEP exposure may increase AHR, inflammation, lung fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia in a mouse model. PMID:26922935

  2. Interface evolution of a particle in a supersaturated solution affected by a far-field uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wen; Wang, Zi-Dong

    2013-09-01

    The effect of far-field uniform flow on the morphological evolution of a spherical particle in a supersaturated solution affected by a far-field uniform flow is studied by using the matched asymptotic expansion method. The analytical solution for the interface shape, concentration field, and interface velocity of the particle growth shows that the convection induced by the far-field uniform flow facilitates the growth of the spherical particle, the upstream flow imposed on the particle enhances the growth velocity of the interface when the flow comes in, the downstream flow lowers the growth velocity of the surface when the flow goes out, and the interface morphology evolves into a peach-like shape.

  3. Reciprocal mouse and human limb phenotypes caused by gain- and loss-of-function mutations affecting Lmbr1.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R M; Marker, P C; Roessler, E; Dutra, A; Schimenti, J C; Muenke, M; Kingsley, D M

    2001-01-01

    The major locus for dominant preaxial polydactyly in humans has been mapped to 7q36. In mice the dominant Hemimelic extra toes (Hx) and Hammertoe (Hm) mutations map to a homologous chromosomal region and cause similar limb defects. The Lmbr1 gene is entirely within the small critical intervals recently defined for both the mouse and human mutations and is misexpressed at the exact time that the mouse Hx phenotype becomes apparent during limb development. This result suggests that Lmbr1 may underlie preaxial polydactyly in both mice and humans. We have used deletion chromosomes to demonstrate that the dominant mouse and human limb defects arise from gain-of-function mutations and not from haploinsufficiency. Furthermore, we created a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse Lmbr1 gene that causes digit number reduction (oligodactyly) on its own and in trans to a deletion chromosome. The loss of digits that we observed in mice with reduced Lmbr1 activity is in contrast to the gain of digits observed in Hx mice and human polydactyly patients. Our results suggest that the Lmbr1 gene is required for limb formation and that reciprocal changes in levels of Lmbr1 activity can lead to either increases or decreases in the number of digits in the vertebrate limb. PMID:11606546

  4. Biopolymer nanoparticles from heat-treated electrostatic protein-polysaccharide complexes: factors affecting particle characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owen Griffith; McClements, David Julian

    2010-03-01

    Biopolymer nanoparticles can be formed by heating globular protein-ionic polysaccharide electrostatic complexes above the thermal denaturation temperature of the protein. This study examined how the size and concentration of biopolymer particles formed by heating beta-lactoglobulin-pectin complexes could be manipulated by controlling preparation conditions: pH, ionic strength, protein concentration, holding time, and holding temperature. Biopolymer particle size and concentration increased with increasing holding time (0 to 30 min), decreasing holding temperature (90 to 70 degrees C), increasing protein concentration (0 to 2 wt/wt%), increasing pH (4.5 to 5), and increasing salt concentration (0 to 50 mol/kg). The influence of these factors on biopolymer particle size was attributed to their impact on protein-polysaccharide interactions, and on the kinetics of nucleation and particle growth. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate the rational design of biopolymer particles with specific physicochemical and functional attributes. PMID:20492252

  5. Properties of retrovirus-like particles produced by a human breast carcinoma cell line: immunological relationship with mouse mammary tumor virus proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Keydar, I; Ohno, T; Nayak, R; Sweet, R; Simoni, F; Weiss, F; Karby, S; Mesa-Tejada, R; Spiegelman, S

    1984-01-01

    Clonal derivatives 8 and 11 of the T47D human breast carcinoma cell line release particles that have the biochemical characteristics of a retrovirus. Particles recovered from cultures of [3H]uridine-labeled clone 11 had a density of 1.18 g/ml and contained 60-70S and 35S RNAs associated with reverse transcriptase activity. The production of these particles was steroid-dependent. Clone 8 particles had a higher density, 1.195 g/ml, and their production was independent of steroid hormone. By RIA, antigens crossreactive with the 52,000-dalton envelope glycoprotein gp52, the major external protein of mouse mammary tumor virus, were found associated with these particles and in the media. Most of the gp52-related antigen was in soluble form, but it was enriched in the particle preparation. A lesser amount of antigen was distributed within the cultured cells. Absorption of rabbit antibody to gp52 with clone 11 particle preparations eliminated the ability of this antibody to detect immunocytochemically a crossreactive antigen previously localized in tissue sections of human breast carcinoma. These results indicate that the particle isolates from T47D contain the same gp52-related antigen found in human breast carcinomas and constitute an excellent source for the purification and characterization of this antigen. Images PMID:6330748

  6. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  7. MiRNA-320 in the human follicular fluid is associated with embryo quality in vivo and affects mouse embryonic development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Zhu, Yan; Fu, Wei; Liu, Miao; Xu, Yan; Shi, Huijuan; Xu, Yao; Qu, Ronggui; Chai, Renjie; Shao, Ruijin; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Sun, Xiaoxi; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated the existence of miRNAs in human follicular fluid. In the current study, we have sought to identify miRNAs that might affect oocyte/embryo quality in patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection and to investigate their roles in in vitro fertilization outcomes in mouse oocytes. 53 samples were classified as Group 1 (high quality) if the day-3 embryos had seven and more cells or as Group 2 (low quality) if the embryos had six and fewer cells. TaqMan Human microRNAs cards and qRT-PCR were performed to verify differently expressed miRNAs. The function of the corresponding miRNA was investigated in mouse oocytes by injecting them with miRNA-inhibitor oligonucleotides. We found that hsa-miR-320a and hsa-miR-197 had significantly higher expression levels in the Group 1 follicular fluids than in Group 2 (p = 0.0073 and p = 0.008, respectively). Knockdown of mmu-miR-320 in mouse oocytes strongly decreased the proportions of MII oocytes that developed into two-cell and blastocyst stage embryos (p = 0.0048 and p = 0.0069, respectively). Wnt signaling pathway components had abnormal expression level in miR-320 inhibitor-injected oocytes. This study provides the first evidence that miRNAs in human follicular fluid are indicative of and can influence embryo quality. PMID:25732513

  8. MiRNA-320 in the human follicular fluid is associated with embryo quality in vivo and affects mouse embryonic development in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Zhu, Yan; Fu, Wei; Liu, Miao; Xu, Yan; Shi, Huijuan; Xu, Yao; Qu, Ronggui; Chai, Renjie; Shao, Ruijin; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Sun, Xiaoxi; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated the existence of miRNAs in human follicular fluid. In the current study, we have sought to identify miRNAs that might affect oocyte/embryo quality in patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection and to investigate their roles in in vitro fertilization outcomes in mouse oocytes. 53 samples were classified as Group 1 (high quality) if the day-3 embryos had seven and more cells or as Group 2 (low quality) if the embryos had six and fewer cells. TaqMan Human microRNAs cards and qRT-PCR were performed to verify differently expressed miRNAs. The function of the corresponding miRNA was investigated in mouse oocytes by injecting them with miRNA-inhibitor oligonucleotides. We found that hsa-miR-320a and hsa-miR-197 had significantly higher expression levels in the Group 1 follicular fluids than in Group 2 (p = 0.0073 and p = 0.008, respectively). Knockdown of mmu-miR-320 in mouse oocytes strongly decreased the proportions of MII oocytes that developed into two-cell and blastocyst stage embryos (p = 0.0048 and p = 0.0069, respectively). Wnt signaling pathway components had abnormal expression level in miR-320 inhibitor-injected oocytes. This study provides the first evidence that miRNAs in human follicular fluid are indicative of and can influence embryo quality. PMID:25732513

  9. Detailed predictions of particle aspiration affected by respiratory inhalation and airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inthavong, Kiao; Ge, Qin Jiang; Li, Xiang Dong; Tu, Ji Yuan

    2012-12-01

    The effects of air pollution found in the atmosphere and exposure to airborne particles are an important problem in the interest of public health. Exposure to contaminated air under different flow conditions is studied using the latest computational fluid dynamics models. For the first time the upper respiratory airway is integrated into a human body and placed inside a room, facing different airflow speeds (0.05-0.35 m s-1). It was found that the airflow streamlines diverged as it approached the human body, at the torso and accelerated upwards past the face and head before separating at the rear of the head, forming recirculating regions in the wake behind the body. Inhaled particles were tracked backwards to determine its origins. At a plane upstream from the face the locations of particles inhaled form a region known as the critical area, which is presented. This study establishes a better understanding of particle inhalability and provides a step towards a more holistic approach in determining inhalation toxicology effects of exposure to atmospheric particles.

  10. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Peter; Smuth, James

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  11. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition.

    PubMed

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C; Bauer, Susanne E; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1-1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models. PMID:27580627

  12. CULTURE CONDITIONS AFFECT HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO DIESEL PARTICLE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant that may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter inhalation. In vitro studies have shown that DEP exposure induces pro-inflammatory proteins in human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) with varying...

  13. Primary particle size distribution of eroded material affected by degree of aggregate slaking and seal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Primary particle size distribution (PSD) of eroded sediments can be used to estimate potential nutrient losses from soil and pollution hazards to the environment. We studied eroded sediment PSDs from three saturated soils, packed in trays (20 x 40 x 4 cm), that had undergone either minimal aggregate...

  14. Navy bean flour particle size and protein content affect cake baking and batter quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole navy bean flour and its fine and coarse particle size fractions were used to completely replace wheat flour in cakes. Replacement of wheat flour with whole bean flour significantly increased the protein content. The protein content was adjusted to three levels with navy bean starch. The effect...

  15. The effect of local IL-4 delivery or CCL2 blockade on implant fixation and bone structural properties in a mouse model of wear particle induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Behn, Anthony; Jiang, Xinyi; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Yao, Zhenyu; Egashira, Kensuke; Yang, Fan; Goodman, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization and prevention of CCL2-induced macrophage chemotaxis are emerging strategies to reduce wear particle induced osteolysis and aseptic total joint replacement loosening. In this study, the effect of continuous IL-4 delivery or bioactive implant coating that constitutively releases a protein inhibitor of CCL2 signaling (7ND) on particle induced osteolysis were studied in the murine continuous femoral intramedullary particle infusion model. Polyethylene particles with or without IL-4 were infused into mouse distal femurs implanted with hollow titanium rods using subcutaneous infusion pumps. In another experimental group, particles were infused into the femur through a 7ND coated rod. After 4 weeks, fixation of the implant was assessed using a pullout test. The volume of trabecular bone and the geometry of the local cortical bone were assessed by µCT and the corresponding structural properties of the cortical bone determined by torsional testing. Continuous IL-4 delivery led to increased trabecular bone volume as well as enhanced local bone geometry and structural properties, while 7ND implant coating did not have effect on these parameters. The results suggest that local IL-4 treatment is a promising strategy to mitigate wear particle induced osteolysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2255-2262, 2016. PMID:27114284

  16. RNA Folding Affects the Recruitment of SR Proteins by Mouse and Human Polypurinic Enhancer Elements in the Fibronectin EDA Exon

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Muro, Andrés F.; Giombi, Maurizio; Gherbassi, Daniel; Iaconcig, Alessandra; Baralle, Francisco E.

    2004-01-01

    In humans, inclusion or exclusion of the fibronectin EDA exon is mainly regulated by a polypurinic enhancer element (exonic splicing enhancer [ESE]) and a nearby silencer element (exonic splicing silencer [ESS]). While human and mouse ESEs behave identically, mutations introduced into the homologous mouse ESS sequence result either in no change in splicing efficiency or in complete exclusion of the exon. Here, we show that this apparently contradictory behavior cannot be simply accounted for by a localized sequence variation between the two species. Rather, the nucleotide differences as a whole determine several changes in the respective RNA secondary structures. By comparing how the two different structures respond to homologous deletions in their putative ESS sequences, we show that changes in splicing behavior can be accounted for by a differential ESE display in the two RNAs. This is confirmed by RNA-protein interaction analysis of levels of SR protein binding to each exon. The immunoprecipitation patterns show the presence of complex multi-SR protein-RNA interactions that are lost with secondary-structure variations after the introduction of ESE and ESS variations. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the sequence context, in addition to the primary sequence identity, can heavily contribute to the making of functional units capable of influencing pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:14729981

  17. Gum tragacanth dispersions: Particle size and rheological properties affected by high-shear homogenization.

    PubMed

    Farzi, Mina; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeed; Safari, Mohammad; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2015-08-01

    The effect of high-shear homogenization on the rheological and particle size characteristics of three species of gum tragacanth (GT) was detected. Dispersions were subjected to 0-20 min treatment. Static light scattering techniques and rheological tests were used to study the effect of treatment. The results showed that the process caused a decrease in particle size parameters for all three species, but interestingly, the apparent viscosities increased. The highest increase of apparent viscosity was found for solutions containing Astragalus gossypinus, which possessed the highest insoluble fraction. The viscoelastic behaviors of dispersions were also significantly influenced by the process. Homogenization caused an increase in both G' and G″, in all three species. The alterations seem to be highly dependent on GT species and structure. The results could be of high importance in the industry, since the process will lead to textural modifications of food products containing GT. PMID:25987462

  18. Formation of vitamin E emulsion stabilized by octenylsuccinic starch: factors affecting particle size and oil load.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dan; Yang, Lei; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin E (VE) emulsions were formed by adding VE acetate in an octenylsuccinic (OS) starch solution with distilled water and homogenizing with a microfluidizer at 20000 psi. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of total concentration of starch and oil, ratio of oil to starch, pH value, and free OS content on emulsion properties. A method using HPLC was developed to analyze VE in emulsion, and the results were used to estimate the amount of surface VE oil. Lower total concentration of starch and oil and lower ratio of oil to starch resulted in more stable emulsions, whereas differences in the pH between 3 and 8 had little effect. Free OS content increased with greater particle size and decreased oil load. Increasing the number of passes reduced the initial particle size of the emulsion but increased free OS content. PMID:25808448

  19. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  20. Particle length of silages affects apparent ruminal synthesis of B vitamins in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Castagnino, D S; Kammes, K L; Allen, M S; Gervais, R; Chouinard, P Y; Girard, C L

    2016-08-01

    Effects of particle length of silages on apparent ruminal synthesis (ARS) and postruminal supply of B vitamins were evaluated in 2 feeding trials. Diets containing alfalfa (trial 1) or orchardgrass (trial 2) silages, chopped to either 19mm (long cut, LC) or 10mm (short cut, SC) theoretical particle length, as the sole forage were offered to ruminally and duodenally cannulated lactating Holstein cows in crossover design experiments. Forages chopped to a theoretical particle length of 19 and 10mm had mean particles sizes of 14.1 and 8.1mm, respectively, in trial 1, and 15.3 and 11.3mm, respectively, in trial 2. Trial 1 was conducted with 13 multiparous cows in two 19-d treatment periods; both diets contained approximately 20% forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF), 25% total NDF, and forage-to-concentrate ratios were approximately 47:53. Trial 2 was conducted with 15 cows in two 18-d treatment periods; both diets contained approximately 23% forage NDF, 28% total NDF, and had a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 50:50. Thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12 were measured in feed and duodenal content. Daily ARS was calculated as the duodenal flow minus the intake. In trial 1, daily intake of individual B vitamins was increased with the LC diet, but ARS of thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B6, and folates was reduced. In trial 2, except for folates, intakes of the other B vitamins were decreased with the LC diets, whereas ARS of riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6 was increased. Daily ARS of thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B6 were correlated negatively with their intake, suggesting that ruminal bacteria reduced their synthesis when dietary supply increased. Microbial activity could have also reduced degradation of thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin, which is supported by (1) the negative correlation between ARS of these vitamins and ruminal pH or microbial N duodenal flow; and (2) the positive correlation between ARS and ruminal concentrations

  1. Embryonic exposures of lithium and homocysteine and folate protection affect lipid metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation.

    PubMed

    Han, Mingda; Evsikov, Alexei V; Zhang, Lifeng; Lastra-Vicente, Rosana; Linask, Kersti K

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic exposures can increase the risk of congenital cardiac birth defects and adult disease. The present study identifies the predominant pathways modulated by an acute embryonic mouse exposure during gastrulation to lithium or homocysteine that induces cardiac defects. High dose periconceptional folate supplementation normalized development. Microarray bioinformatic analysis of gene expression demonstrated that primarily lipid metabolism is altered after the acute exposures. The lipid-related modulation demonstrated a gender bias with male embryos showing greater number of lipid-related Gene Ontology biological processes altered than in female embryos. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated significant change of the fatty acid oxidation gene Acadm with homocysteine exposure primarily in male embryos than in female. The perturbations resulting from the exposures resulted in growth-restricted placentas with disorganized cellular lipid droplet distribution indicating lipids have a critical role in cardiac-placental abnormal development. High folate supplementation protected normal heart-placental function, gene expression and lipid localization. PMID:26993217

  2. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE (UFCP) INHALATION AFFECTS CARDIOVASCULAR PERFORMANCE IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled UfCP affect cardiovascular performance in healthy rats (Harder et al. Inhal Toxicol 2005; 17:29-42) without apparent pulmonary damage. To assess whether geriatric cardiovascular compromised rats are more susceptible to UfCP effects, male adult (6months) and geriatric (13m...

  3. Flocculation and particle size analysis of expansive clay sediments affected by biological, chemical, and hydrodynamic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaoling; Hu, Liming; Reed, Allen H.; Furukawa, Yoko; Zhang, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Expansive clay sediments are abundant in riverine and estuarine waters and bottom beds, and their particle size distributions (PSD) are important for the analysis of sediment transport. This paper presents an experimental study to evaluate, using a laser particle size analyzer under varying flow conditions, the intrinsic PSD of two expansive clays, a Ca- and a Na-montmorillonite and the influence of biological, chemical, and hydrodynamic factors on their flocculation and PSD. The considered biological factor consists of three extracellular polymeric substances of varying polarity, including xanthan gum, guar gum, and chitosan; the chemical factor is the salinity; and the hydrodynamic factor is the types of flow indicated by the Reynolds number and shear rate. The intrinsic PSD of both clays show a multimodal lognormal distribution with sizes ranging from 0.2 to 50 μm. All three biopolymers, xanthan gum, guar gum, and chitosan, can facilitate flocculation through long-range polymer bridging and short-range ion-dipole interaction, hydrogen bonding, and Coulomb force. The influence of salinity is different for the two clays: the particle size of the Na-montmorillonite increases with salinity, which is caused by flocculation resulting from the suppressed electrical double layer, while that of the Ca-montmorillonite is slightly reduced owing to the decreased basal spacing and cation exchange. For different hydrodynamic conditions, higher shear rate promotes the flocculation of Ca-montmorillonite, but breaks the Na-montmorillonite flocs. The significance of understanding the flocculation and PSD of expansive clays is also discussed in terms of sediment transport under different aquatic environments.

  4. How does particle shape affect the near jamming properties of granular materials? Pentagons vs. disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiqiu; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Bob

    Understanding the role of particle shape in system-scale properties is a fundamental challenge in granular physics. We investigated the difference between the response of systems made of pentagons vs. more traditional disks. We performed isotropic compression experiments on 2D photoelastic pentagons and disks near the jamming transition. These experiments show qualitative and quantitative differences in the macroscopic responses of the two systems, such as shifts in the packing fraction at jamming onset and differences in the contact number evolution. Some of these differences are due to a reduction of packing order and the appearance of side-side contacts for the pentatons. We also examined the stress relaxation and dynamical heterogeneity of pentagon particles by performing cyclic compression to allow the system explore phase diagram. We contrast disk and pentagon evolution using four-point-susceptibility and G2 techniques. Work supported by NSF-DMR1206351, DMS1248071, NASA NNX15AD38G, and the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Physiological variables affecting surface film formation by native lamellar body-like pulmonary surfactant particles.

    PubMed

    Hobi, Nina; Siber, Gerlinde; Bouzas, Virginia; Ravasio, Andrea; Pérez-Gil, Jesus; Haller, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is a surface active complex of lipids and proteins that prevents the alveolar structures from collapsing and reduces the work of breathing by lowering the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface (ALI). Surfactant is synthesized by the alveolar type II (AT II) cells, and it is stored in specialized organelles, the lamellar bodies (LBs), as tightly packed lipid bilayers. Upon secretion into the alveolar lining fluid, a large fraction of these particles retain most of their packed lamellar structure, giving rise to the term lamellar body like-particles (LBPs). Due to their stability in aqueous media, freshly secreted LBPs can be harvested from AT II cell preparations. However, when LBPs get in contact with an ALI, they quickly and spontaneously adsorb into a highly organized surface film. In the present study we investigated the adsorptive capacity of LBPs at an ALI under relevant physiological parameters that characterize the alveolar environment in homeostatic or in pathological conditions. Adsorption of LBPs at an ALI is highly sensitive to pH, temperature and albumin concentration and to a relatively lesser extent to changes in osmolarity or Ca(2+) concentrations in the physiological range. Furthermore, proteolysis of LBPs significantly decreases their adsorptive capacity confirming the important role of surfactant proteins in the formation of surface active films. PMID:24582711

  6. Quantification of virus-like particles suggests viral infection in corals affected by Porites tissue loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Scott A.; Davy, Joanne E.; Aeby, Greta S.; Wilson, William H.; Davy, Simon K.

    2014-09-01

    Porites tissue loss is a common disease of Porites compressa on Hawaiian reefs. Despite its prevalence, to date, the aetiological agent of the disease has not been found. The apparent lack of a microbial causative agent in the similar disease Porites bleaching with tissue loss, as well as increasing evidence of viral infections in scleractinian corals and Symbiodinium, led us to hypothesise that a virus may be responsible. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous and varied virus-like particles (VLPs) in healthy and diseased P. compressa colonies. While overall virus numbers were similar in all samples, the abundance of a group of icosahedral VLPs differed significantly between healthy and diseased colonies. While not conclusive, these results suggest that viruses may play a role in this disease, and provide a basis for further studies.

  7. RBE and genetic susceptibility of mouse and rat spermatogonial stem cells to protons, heavy charged particles and 1.5 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kaltenboeck, B.

    The main purpose of the present study is to provide data on RBE and genetic susceptibility in the mouse and the rat when exposed to protons, HZE particles and neutrons. Genetic damage from exposure to 50 MeV and 9 GeV protons, 4 GeV/nucleon helium ions, 4 GeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1.5 MeV neutrons was studied in adult (CBA × C57Bl/6J) F1 mice. Damage from 9 GeV protons and 4 GeV helium ions was studied in adult Wistar rats. The incidence of reciprocal translocations (RT) induced in the spermatogonial stem cells of each species was recorded. RBE values were derived by comparing linear regression coefficients from dose-responses within the same dose-range for each of the radiation types tested and 60Co γ-rays or by means of a direct nonparametric method. RT yields measured after mouse and rat spermatogonial irradiation with protons, heavy charged particles and neutrons fit the linear model of the dose-response relationship. Relative to 60Co γ-rays, RBE values are as follows for mouse spermatogonia: 0.9 for 50 MeV protons; 1.3 for 9 GeV protons; 0.7 for 4 GeV helium ions; and 1.3 for 4 GeV carbon ions. For rat spermatogonia, values were: 1.7 for 9 GeV protons and 1.3 for helium ions. Compared to mice irradiated using the same experimental design, rats were more susceptible to high-LET radiations, with susceptibility assessed by genetic damage to their spermatogonial stem cells. The RBE of 1.5 MeV neutron is about 6.6.

  8. Navy Bean Flour Particle Size and Protein Content Affect Cake Baking and Batter Quality(1).

    PubMed

    Singh, Mukti; Byars, Jeffrey A; Liu, Sean X

    2015-06-01

    Whole navy bean flour and its fine and coarse particle size fractions were used to completely replace wheat flour in cakes. Replacement of wheat flour with whole bean flour significantly increased the protein content. The protein content was adjusted to 3 levels with navy bean starch. The effect of navy bean flour and its fractions at 3 levels of protein on cake batter rheology and cake quality was studied and compared with wheat flour samples. Batters prepared from navy bean flour and its fractions had higher viscosity than the cake flour. Reducing the protein content by addition of starch significantly lowered the viscosity of cake batters. The whole navy bean flour and coarse bean fraction cakes were softer than cakes made with wheat flour but had reduced springiness. Principal component analysis showed a clear discrimination of cakes according to protein. It also showed that low protein navy bean flour cakes were similar to wheat flour cakes. Navy bean flour with protein content adjusted to the level of cake (wheat) flour has potential as a healthy alternative in gluten-free cakes. PMID:25922214

  9. Meteorological phenomena affecting the presence of solid particles suspended in the air during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñanos, P.; Galán, C.; Alcázar, P.; Dominguez, E.

    Winter is not traditionally considered to be a risky season for people who suffer from pollen allergies. However, increasing numbers of people are showing symptoms in winter. This prompted our investigation into the levels of solid material in the air, and some of the meteorological phenomena that allow their accumulation. This study showed a possible relationship between the phenomenon of thermal inversion, which occurs when very low temperatures, cloudless skies and atmospheric calms coincide, and an increase in the concentration of solid material in the atmosphere. Frequently, this situation is associated with other predictable phenomena such as fog, dew and frost. This may allow a warning system to be derived for urban pollution episodes. The effect caused by parameters such as wind and rainfall was also analysed. Solid material was differentiated into non-biological material from natural and non-natural sources (e.g. soot, dust, sand, diesel exhaust particles, partially burnt residues) and biological material. The latter mainly comprises pollen grains and fungal spores. Owing to its abundance and importance as a causal agent of winter allergies, Cupressaceae pollen was considered separately.

  10. Acute over-the-counter pharmacological intervention does not adversely affect behavioral outcome following diffuse traumatic brain injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jordan L; Rowe, Rachel K; O'Hara, Bruce F; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients may self-treat symptoms of concussion, including post-traumatic headache, taking over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Administering one dose of OTC analgesics immediately following experimental brain injury mimics the at-home treated population of concussed patients and may accelerate the understanding of the relationship between brain injury and OTC pharmacological intervention. In the current study, we investigate the effect of acute administration of OTC analgesics on neurological function and cortical cytokine levels after experimental diffuse TBI in the mouse. Adult, male C57BL/6 mice were injured using a midline fluid percussion (mFPI) injury model of concussion (6-10 min righting reflex time for brain-injured mice). Experimental groups included mFPI paired with either ibuprofen (60 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 16), acetaminophen (40 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 9), or vehicle (15% ethanol (v/v) in 0.9% saline; n = 13) and sham injury paired OTC medicine or vehicle (n = 7-10 per group). At 24 h after injury, functional outcome was assessed using the rotarod task and a modified neurological severity score. Following behavior assessment, cortical cytokine levels were measured by multiplex ELISA at 24 h post-injury. To evaluate efficacy on acute inflammation, cortical cytokine levels were measured also at 6 h post-injury. In the diffuse brain-injured mouse, immediate pharmacological intervention did not attenuate or exacerbate TBI-induced functional deficits. Cortical cytokine levels were affected by injury, time, or their interaction. However, levels were not affected by treatment at 6 or 24 h post-injury. These data indicate that acute administration of OTC analgesics did not exacerbate or attenuate brain-injury deficits which may inform clinical recommendations for the at-home treated mildly concussed patient. PMID:24760409

  11. Enhancement of Heat-Affected Zone Toughness of a Low Carbon Steel by TiN Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Xiaobao; Ma, Han

    2015-11-01

    Enhancement of heat-affected zone toughness of a weight percentage of 0.014 pct Ti-bearing low carbon steel by TiN particle was investigated. An increase in nitrogen weight percentage from 0.0031 to 0.0083 pct results in increasing of number density of TiN precipitates from 4 × 103 to 3 × 105/mm2, and reduces prior austenite grain size from 850 to 350 μm with a soaking of 1673 K (1400 °C) for 2000 seconds. Effective refinement of austenite grain prohibits formation of ferrite side plate and/or upper bainite, and densely distributed TiN particles promote intra-granular ferrite formation, which is accompanied by an increase of 40 K to 60 K (40 °C to 60 °C) in austenite decomposition temperature during continuous cooling process. The changes in transformed products improved impact toughness of heat-affected zone efficiently, ex., increase absorbed energy of less than 42 J to more than 320 J with a simulated t 8/5 of 550 seconds.

  12. Enhancement of Heat-Affected Zone Toughness of a Low Carbon Steel by TiN Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Xiaobao; Ma, Han

    2016-08-01

    Enhancement of heat-affected zone toughness of a weight percentage of 0.014 pct Ti-bearing low carbon steel by TiN particle was investigated. An increase in nitrogen weight percentage from 0.0031 to 0.0083 pct results in increasing of number density of TiN precipitates from 4 × 103 to 3 × 105/mm2, and reduces prior austenite grain size from 850 to 350 μm with a soaking of 1673 K (1400 °C) for 2000 seconds. Effective refinement of austenite grain prohibits formation of ferrite side plate and/or upper bainite, and densely distributed TiN particles promote intra-granular ferrite formation, which is accompanied by an increase of 40 K to 60 K (40 °C to 60 °C) in austenite decomposition temperature during continuous cooling process. The changes in transformed products improved impact toughness of heat-affected zone efficiently, ex., increase absorbed energy of less than 42 J to more than 320 J with a simulated t 8/5 of 550 seconds.

  13. High Milk Consumption Does Not Affect Prostate Tumor Progression in Two Mouse Models of Benign and Neoplastic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Boutillon, Florence; Verkarre, Virginie; Camparo, Philippe; Viltard, Mélanie; Méjean, Arnaud; Oudard, Stéphane; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Friedlander, Gérard; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies that have investigated whether dairy (mainly milk) diets are associated with prostate cancer risk have led to controversial conclusions. In addition, no existing study clearly evaluated the effects of dairy/milk diets on prostate tumor progression, which is clinically highly relevant in view of the millions of men presenting with prostate pathologies worldwide, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) or high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). We report here a unique interventional animal study to address this issue. We used two mouse models of fully penetrant genetically-induced prostate tumorigenesis that were investigated at the stages of benign hyperplasia (probasin-Prl mice, Pb-Prl) or pre-cancerous PIN lesions (KIMAP mice). Mice were fed high milk diets (skim or whole) for 15 to 27 weeks of time depending on the kinetics of prostate tumor development in each model. Prostate tumor progression was assessed by tissue histopathology examination, epithelial proliferation, stromal inflammation and fibrosis, tumor invasiveness potency and expression of various tumor markers relevant for each model (c-Fes, Gprc6a, activated Stat5 and p63). Our results show that high milk consumption (either skim or whole) did not promote progression of existing prostate tumors when assessed at early stages of tumorigenesis (hyperplasia and neoplasia). For some parameters, and depending on milk type, milk regimen could even exhibit slight protective effects towards prostate tumor progression by decreasing the expression of tumor-related markers like Ki-67 and Gprc6a. In conclusion, our study suggests that regular milk consumption should not be considered detrimental for patients presenting with early-stage prostate tumors. PMID:25938513

  14. Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in mouse angiotensinogen does not affect AngII-dependent functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Congqing; Xu, Yinchuan; Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Cassis, Lisa A; Wang, Jian-an; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-04-01

    Renin cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) releases angiotensin I (AngI) in the initial step of producing all angiotensin peptides. It has been suggested recently that redox regulation of a disulfide bond in AGT involving Cys18-Cys137 may be important to its renin cleavage efficiency in vivo. The purpose of this study was to test this prediction in a mouse model by comparing AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice expressing wild-type AGT versus a mutated form of AGT lacking the disulfide bond. Wild-type (hepAGT+/+) and hepatocyte-specific AGT-deficient (hepAGT-/-) littermates were developed in an low-density lipoprotein receptor -/- background. hepAGT+/+ mice were injected intraperitoneally with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a null insert. hepAGT-/- mice were injected with AAV containing a null insert, wild-type AGT or Cys18Ser and Cys137Ser mutated AGT. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. Administration of AAV containing either form of AGT led to similar plasma AGT concentrations in hepAGT-/- mice. High plasma renin concentrations in hepAGT-/- mice were suppressed equally by both forms of AGT, which were accompanied by comparable increases of plasma AngII concentrations similar to hepAGT+/+ mice. AAV-driven expression of both forms of AGT led to equivalent increases of systolic blood pressure and augmentation of atherosclerotic lesion size in hepAGT-/- mice. These measurements were comparable to systolic blood pressure and atherosclerotic lesions in hepAGT+/+ mice. These data indicate that the Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in AGT is dispensable for AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice. PMID:25691624

  15. The Cys18-Cys137 Disulfide Bond in Mouse Angiotensinogen Does Not Affect AngII-dependent Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Congqing; Xu, Yinchuan; Lu, Hong; Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Wang, Jian-an; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Renin cleavage of angiotensinogen (AGT) releases angiotensin I (AngI) in the initial step of producing all angiotensin peptides. It has been suggested recently that redox regulation of a disulfide bond in AGT involving Cys18-Cys137 may be important to its renin cleavage efficiency in vivo. The purpose of this study was to test this prediction in a mouse model by comparing AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice expressing wild-type AGT versus a mutated form of AGT lacking the disulfide bond. Wild-type (hepAGT+/+) and hepatocyte-specific AGT deficient (hepAGT−/−) littermates were developed in an LDL receptor −/− background. hepAGT+/+ mice were injected intraperitoneally with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a null insert. hepAGT−/− mice were injected with AAV containing a null insert, wild-type AGT, or Cys18Ser and Cys137Ser mutated AGT. Two weeks after AAV injection, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. Administration of AAV containing either form of AGT led to similar plasma AGT concentrations in hepAGT−/− mice. High plasma renin concentrations in hepAGT−/− mice were suppressed equally by both forms of AGT, which were accompanied by comparable increases of plasma AngII concentrations similar to hepAGT+/+ mice. AAV-driven expression of both forms of AGT led to equivalent increases of systolic blood pressure and augmentation of atherosclerotic lesion size in hepAGT−/− mice. These measurements were comparable to systolic blood pressure and atherosclerotic lesions in hepAGT+/+ mice. These data indicate that the Cys18-Cys137 disulfide bond in AGT is dispensable for AngII production and AngII-dependent functions in mice. PMID:25691624

  16. Do Solar Coronal Holes Affect the Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Arge, C. N.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2013-01-01

    The intensities and timescales of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events at 1 AU may depend not only on the characteristics of shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), but also on large-scale coronal and interplanetary structures. It has long been suspected that the presence of coronal holes (CHs) near the CMEs or near the 1-AU magnetic footpoints may be an important factor in SEP events. We used a group of 41 E (is) approx. 20 MeV SEP events with origins near the solar central meridian to search for such effects. First we investigated whether the presence of a CH directly between the sources of the CME and of the magnetic connection at 1 AU is an important factor. Then we searched for variations of the SEP events among different solar wind (SW) stream types: slow, fast, and transient. Finally, we considered the separations between CME sources and CH footpoint connections from 1 AU determined from four-day forecast maps based on Mount Wilson Observatory and the National Solar Observatory synoptic magnetic-field maps and the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model of SW propagation. The observed in-situ magnetic-field polarities and SW speeds at SEP event onsets tested the forecast accuracies employed to select the best SEP/CH connection events for that analysis. Within our limited sample and the three analytical treatments, we found no statistical evidence for an effect of CHs on SEP event peak intensities, onset times, or rise times. The only exception is a possible enhancement of SEP peak intensities in magnetic clouds.

  17. Uromodulin Retention in Thick Ascending Limb of Henle's Loop Affects SCD1 in Neighboring Proximal Tubule: Renal Transcriptome Studies in Mouse Models of Uromodulin-Associated Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Rathkolb, Birgit; Wolf, Eckhard; Aigner, Bernhard; Kemter, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD) is a hereditary progressive renal disease which can lead to renal failure and requires renal replacement therapy. UAKD belongs to the endoplasmic reticulum storage diseases due to maturation defect of mutant uromodulin and its retention in the enlarged endoplasmic reticulum in the cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (TALH). Dysfunction of TALH represents the key pathogenic mechanism of UAKD causing the clinical symptoms of this disease. However, the molecular alterations underlying UAKD are not well understood. In this study, transcriptome profiling of whole kidneys of two mouse models of UAKD, UmodA227T and UmodC93F, was performed. Genes differentially abundant in UAKD affected kidneys of both Umod mutant lines at different disease stages were identified and verified by RT-qPCR. Additionally, differential protein abundances of SCD1 and ANGPTL7 were validated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. ANGPTL7 expression was down-regulated in TALH cells of Umod mutant mice which is the site of the mutant uromodulin maturation defect. SCD1 was expressed selectively in the S3 segment of proximal tubule cells, and SCD1 abundance was increased in UAKD affected kidneys. This finding demonstrates that a cross talk between two functionally distinct tubular segments of the kidney, the TALH segment and the S3 segment of proximal tubule, exists. PMID:25409434

  18. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Particles Produced in a Humanized Liver Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Calattini, Sara; Fusil, Floriane; Mancip, Jimmy; Dao Thi, Viet Loan; Granier, Christelle; Gadot, Nicolas; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F; Lavillette, Dimitri; Dreux, Marlène; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-09-18

    Lipoprotein components are crucial factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly and entry. As hepatoma cells producing cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) particles are impaired in some aspects of lipoprotein metabolism, it is of upmost interest to biochemically and functionally characterize the in vivo produced viral particles, particularly regarding how lipoprotein components modulate HCV entry by lipid transfer receptors such as scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI). Sera from HCVcc-infected liver humanized FRG mice were separated by density gradients. Viral subpopulations, termed HCVfrg particles, were characterized for their physical properties, apolipoprotein association, and infectivity. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the widely spread distribution of apolipoproteins across the different HCVcc subpopulations, the most infectious HCVfrg particles are highly enriched in apoE, suggesting that such apolipoprotein enrichment plays a role for entry of in vivo derived infectious particles likely via usage of apolipoprotein receptors. Consistent with this salient feature, we further reveal previously undefined functionalities of SR-BI in promoting entry of in vivo produced HCV. First, unlike HCVcc, SR-BI is a particularly limiting factor for entry of HCVfrg subpopulations of very low density. Second, HCVfrg entry involves SR-BI lipid transfer activity but not its capacity to bind to the viral glycoprotein E2. In conclusion, we demonstrate that composition and biophysical properties of the different subpopulations of in vivo produced HCVfrg particles modulate their levels of infectivity and receptor usage, hereby featuring divergences with in vitro produced HCVcc particles and highlighting the powerfulness of this in vivo model for the functional study of the interplay between HCV and liver components. PMID:26224633

  19. Developmental Exposure to Ethinylestradiol Affects Reproductive Physiology, the GnRH Neuroendocrine Network and Behaviors in Female Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Derouiche, Lyes; Keller, Matthieu; Martini, Mariangela; Duittoz, Anne H.; Pillon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    During development, environmental estrogens are able to induce an estrogen mimetic action that may interfere with endocrine and neuroendocrine systems. The present study investigated the effects on the reproductive function in female mice following developmental exposure to pharmaceutical ethinylestradiol (EE2), the most widespread and potent synthetic steroid present in aquatic environments. EE2 was administrated in drinking water at environmentally relevant (ENVIR) or pharmacological (PHARMACO) doses [0.1 and 1 μg/kg (body weight)/day respectively], from embryonic day 10 until postnatal day 40. Our results show that both groups of EE2-exposed females had advanced vaginal opening and shorter estrus cycles, but a normal fertility rate compared to CONTROL females. The hypothalamic population of GnRH neurons was affected by EE2 exposure with a significant increase in the number of perikarya in the preoptic area of the PHARMACO group and a modification in their distribution in the ENVIR group, both associated with a marked decrease in GnRH fibers immunoreactivity in the median eminence. In EE2-exposed females, behavioral tests highlighted a disturbed maternal behavior, a higher lordosis response, a lack of discrimination between gonad-intact and castrated males in sexually experienced females, and an increased anxiety-related behavior. Altogether, these results put emphasis on the high sensitivity of sexually dimorphic behaviors and neuroendocrine circuits to disruptive effects of EDCs. PMID:26696819

  20. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development. PMID:26918321

  1. Chronic exposure to simulated space conditions predominantly affects cytoskeleton remodeling and oxidative stress response in mouse fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michaël; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; El-Saghire, Hussein; Tabury, Kevin; Michaux, Arlette; Janssen, Ann; Neefs, Mieke; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; De Vos, Winnok H; Baatout, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity and cosmic rays as found in space are difficult to recreate on earth. However, ground-based models exist to simulate space flight experiments. In the present study, an experimental model was utilized to monitor gene expression changes in fetal skin fibroblasts of murine origin. Cells were continuously subjected for 65 h to a low dose (55 mSv) of ionizing radiation (IR), comprising a mixture of high‑linear energy transfer (LET) neutrons and low-LET gamma-rays, and/or simulated microgravity using the random positioning machine (RPM), after which microarrays were performed. The data were analyzed both by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and single gene analysis (SGA). Simulated microgravity affected fetal murine fibroblasts by inducing oxidative stress responsive genes. Three of these genes are targets of the nuclear factor‑erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which may play a role in the cell response to simulated microgravity. In addition, simulated gravity decreased the expression of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, which may have been caused by the downregulation of the serum response factor (SRF), possibly through the Rho signaling pathway. Similarly, chronic exposure to low-dose IR caused the downregulation of genes involved in cytoskeleton remodeling, as well as in cell cycle regulation and DNA damage response pathways. Many of the genes or gene sets that were altered in the individual treatments (RPM or IR) were not altered in the combined treatment (RPM and IR), indicating a complex interaction between RPM and IR. PMID:24859186

  2. Expression and activity of Rac1 is negatively affected in the dehydroepiandrosterone induced polycystic ovary of mouse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by the presence of multiple follicular cysts, giving rise to infertility due to anovulation. This syndrome affects about 10% of women, worldwide. The exact molecular mechanism leading to PCOS remains obscure. RhoGTPase has been associated with oogenesis, but its role in PCOS remains unexplored. Therefore, we attempted to elucidate the Vav-Rac1 signaling in PCOS mice model. Methods We generated a PCOS mice model by injecting dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) for a period of 20 days. The expression levels of Rac1, pRac1, Vav, pVav and Caveolin1 were analyzed by employing immuno-blotting and densitometry. The association between Vav and Rac1 proteins were studied by immuno-precipitation. Furthermore, we analyzed the activity of Rac1 and levels of inhibin B and 17β-estradiol in ovary using biochemical assays. Results The presence of multiple follicular cysts in ovary were confirmed by histology. The activity of Rac1 (GTP bound state) was significantly reduced in the PCOS ovary. Similarly, the expression levels of Rac1 and its phosphorylated form (pRac1) were decreased in PCOS in comparison to the sham ovary. The expression level and activity (phosphorylated form) of guanine nucleotide exchanger of Rac1, Vav, was moderately down-regulated. We observed comparatively increased expressions of Caveolin1, 17β-estradiol, and inhibin B in the polycystic ovary. Conclusion We conclude that hyperandrogenization (PCOS) by DHEA diminishes ovarian Rac1 and Vav expression and activity along with an increase in expression of Caveolin1. This is accompanied by an increase in the intra-ovarian level of '17 β-estradiol and inhibin B. PMID:24628852

  3. In Vitro Fertilization Affects Growth and Glucose Metabolism in a Sex-Specific Manner in an Outbred Mouse Model1

    PubMed Central

    Donjacour, Annemarie; Liu, Xiaowei; Lin, Wingka; Simbulan, Rhodel; Rinaudo, Paolo F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The preimplantation period is a time of reprogramming that may be vulnerable to disruption. This question has wide clinical relevance since the number of children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) is rising. To examine this question, outbred mice (CF1 × B6D2F1) conceived by IVF and cultured using Whitten medium and 20% O2 (IVFWM group, less optimal) or K simplex optimized medium with amino acids and 5% O2 (IVFKAA group, more optimal and similar to conditions used in human IVF) were studied postnatally. We found that flushed blastocysts transferred to recipient mice provided the best control group (FB group), as this accounted for the effects of superovulation, embryo transfer, and litter size. We observed that many physiological parameters were normal. Reassuringly, IVFKAA offspring did not differ significantly from FB offspring. However, male IVFWM mice (but not females) were larger during the first 19 wk of life and exhibited glucose intolerance. Male IVFWM mice also showed enlarged left heart despite normal blood pressure. Expression of candidate imprinted genes (H19, Igf2, and Slc38a4) in multiple adult tissues did not show differences among the groups; only Slc38a4 was down-regulated following IVF (in both culture conditions) in female adipose tissue. These studies demonstrate that adult metabolism is affected by the type of conditions encountered during the preimplantation stage. Further, the postnatal growth trajectory and glucose homeostasis following ex vivo manipulation may be sexual dimorphic. Future work on the long-term effects of IVF offspring should focus on glucose metabolism and the cardiovascular system. PMID:24621920

  4. Radiotoxicity of gadolinium-148 and radium-223 in mouse testes: relative biological effectiveness of alpha-particle emitters in vivo.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Goddu, S M; Narra, V R; Fisher, D R; Schenter, R E; Rao, D V

    1997-03-01

    The biological effects of radionuclides that emit alpha particles are of considerable interest in view of their potential for therapy and their presence in the environment. The present work is a continuation of our ongoing effort to study the radiotoxicity of alpha-particle emitters in vivo using the survival of murine testicular sperm heads as the biological end point. Specifically, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of very low-energy alpha particles (3.2 MeV) emitted by 148Gd is investigated and determined to be 7.4 +/- 2.4 when compared to the effects of acute external 120 kVp X rays. This datum, in conjunction with our earlier results for 210Po and 212Pb in equilibrium with its daughters, is used to revise and extend the range of validity of our previous RBE-energy relationship for alpha particles emitted by tissue-incorporated radionuclides. The new empirical relationship is given by RBE alpha = 9.14 - 0.510 E alpha where 3 < E alpha < 9 MeV. The validity of this empirical relationship is tested by determining the RBE of the prolific alpha-particle emitter 223Ra (in equilibrium with its daughters) experimentally in the same biological model and comparing the value obtained experimentally with the predicted value. The resulting RBE values are 5.4 +/- 0.9 and 5.6, respectively. This close agreement strongly supports the adequacy of the empirical RBE-E alpha relationship to predict the biological effects of alpha-particle emitters in vivo. PMID:9052681

  5. Stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation in mouse 3T3 cells by calcium phosphate and other extracellular particles.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D W; Colowick, S P

    1977-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the marked stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation by addition of extra Ca2+ to stationary phase mouse 3T3 cells in culture is phosphate dependent and due to the action of the calcium phosphate precipitate formed in the medium. The cells are similarly stimulated by a variety of particulate materials, including calcium pyrophosphate, barium sulfate, kaolin, and polystrene beads. The precipitate effects on sugar uptake are of the same magnitude as those seen with certain hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor) or with fresh 10% calf serum. The effect of barium sulfate on thymidine incorporation is also of the same magnitude as seen with these hormones, but much less than half that found with fresh calf serum. The stimulation by barium sulfate or hormones of thymidine incorporation is not phosphate dependent. PMID:202958

  6. Stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation in mouse 3T3 cells by calcium phosphate and other extracellular particles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D W; Colowick, S P

    1977-12-01

    Evidence is presented that the marked stimulation of sugar uptake and thymidine incorporation by addition of extra Ca2+ to stationary phase mouse 3T3 cells in culture is phosphate dependent and due to the action of the calcium phosphate precipitate formed in the medium. The cells are similarly stimulated by a variety of particulate materials, including calcium pyrophosphate, barium sulfate, kaolin, and polystrene beads. The precipitate effects on sugar uptake are of the same magnitude as those seen with certain hormones (insulin, epidermal growth factor) or with fresh 10% calf serum. The effect of barium sulfate on thymidine incorporation is also of the same magnitude as seen with these hormones, but much less than half that found with fresh calf serum. The stimulation by barium sulfate or hormones of thymidine incorporation is not phosphate dependent. PMID:202958

  7. Treatment with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline elevates monoamine neurotransmitter levels and improves affective phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Ooi, Jolene; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Tan, Liang Juin; George, Maya; Drum, Chester L; Lin, Rachel Yanping; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/B) activity and an imbalance in monoamine neurotransmitters have been suggested to underlie the pathobiology of depression, a major psychiatric symptom observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease (HD). Increased MAO-A/B activity has been observed in brain tissue from patients with HD and in human and rodent HD neural cells. Using the YAC128 mouse model of HD, we studied the effect of an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline, on the levels of select monoamine neurotransmitters associated with affective function. We observed a decrease in striatal levels of the MAO-A/B substrates, dopamine and norepinephrine, in YAC128 HD mice compared with wild-type mice, which was accompanied by increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour at five months of age. Treatment for 26 days with clorgyline restored dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in YAC128 HD mice. This study supports a potential therapeutic use for MAO-A inhibitors in the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients with HD. PMID:26825854

  8. Metabolic depression during warm torpor in the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus) does not affect mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide release.

    PubMed

    Grimpo, Kirsten; Kutschke, Maria; Kastl, Anja; Meyer, Carola W; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Exner, Cornelia; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Small mammals actively decrease metabolism during daily torpor and hibernation to save energy. Recently, depression of mitochondrial substrate oxidation in isolated liver mitochondria was observed and associated to hypothermic/hypometabolic states in Djungarian hamsters, mice and hibernators. We aimed to clarify whether hypothermia or hypometabolism causes mitochondrial depression during torpor by studying the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus), a desert rodent which performs daily torpor at high ambient temperatures of 32°C. Notably, metabolic rate but not body temperature is significantly decreased under these conditions. In isolated liver, heart, skeletal muscle or kidney mitochondria we found no depression of respiration. Moderate cold exposure lowered torpor body temperature but had minor effects on minimal metabolic rate in torpor. Neither decreased body temperature nor metabolic rate impacted mitochondrial respiration. Measurements of mitochondrial proton leak kinetics and determination of P/O ratio revealed no differences in mitochondrial efficiency. Hydrogen peroxide release from mitochondria was not affected. We conclude that interspecies differences of mitochondrial depression during torpor do not support a general relationship between mitochondrial respiration, body temperature and metabolic rate. In Golden spiny mice, reduction of metabolic rate at mild temperatures is not triggered by depression of substrate oxidation as found in liver mitochondria from other cold-exposed rodents. PMID:24021912

  9. Mouse model of rare TOR1A variant found in sporadic focal dystonia impairs domains affected in DYT1 dystonia patients and animal models.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Srishti L; Qiu, Sunny; Caffall, Zachary F; Wan, Yehong; Pan, Yuanji; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Badea, Alexandra; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Calakos, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Rare de novo mutations in genes associated with inherited Mendelian disorders are potential contributors to sporadic disease. DYT1 dystonia is an autosomal dominant, early-onset, generalized dystonia associated with an in-frame, trinucleotide deletion (n. delGAG, p. ΔE 302/303) in the Tor1a gene. Here we examine the significance of a rare missense variant in the Tor1a gene (c. 613T>A, p. F205I), previously identified in a patient with sporadic late-onset focal dystonia, by modeling it in mice. Homozygous F205I mice have motor impairment, reduced steady-state levels of TorsinA, altered corticostriatal synaptic plasticity, and prominent brain imaging abnormalities in areas associated with motor function. Thus, the F205I variant causes abnormalities in domains affected in people and/or mouse models with the DYT1 Tor1a mutation (ΔE). Our findings establish the pathological significance of the F205I Tor1a variant and provide a model with both etiological and phenotypic relevance to further investigate dystonia mechanisms. PMID:27168150

  10. Ketogenic diet delays the phase of circadian rhythms and does not affect AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Genzer, Yoni; Dadon, Maayan; Burg, Chen; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2015-12-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is used for weight loss or to treat epilepsy. KD leads to liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which would be expected to inhibit gluconeogenesis. However, KD leads to increased hepatic glucose output. As AMPK and its active phosphorylated form (pAMPK) show circadian oscillation, this discrepancy could stem from wrong-time-of-day sampling. The effect of KD was tested on mouse clock gene expression, AMPK, mTOR, SIRT1 and locomotor activity for 2 months and compared to low-fat diet (LFD). KD led to 1.5-fold increased levels of blood glucose and insulin. Brain pAMPK/AMPK ratio was 40% higher under KD, whereas that in liver was not affected. KD led to 40% and 20% down-regulation of the ratio of pP70S6K/P70S6K, the downstream target of mTOR, in the brain and liver, respectively. SIRT1 levels were 40% higher in the brain, but 40% lower in the liver of KD-fed mice. Clock genes showed delayed rhythms under KD. In the brain of KD-fed mice, amplitudes of clock genes were down-regulated, whereas 6-fold up-regulation was found in the liver. The metabolic state under KD indicates reduced satiety in the brain and reduced anabolism alongside increased gluconeogenesis in the liver. PMID:26408964

  11. "Flashes in eyes" at Space Flight are the Signals that Retina is under "Hard" Affecting of Cosmic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trukhanov, Kirill

    "Flashes in eyes" at Space Flight are the Signals that Retina is under "Hard" Affecting of Cosmic Charged Particles K.A. Trukhanov SSC RF - Institute of bio-medical problems RAS, Moscow The report is dedicated to the further development of the hypothesis that seeming streak images are caused by a "hard" action of cosmic ions passing through the multilayer structure of retinal ganglion cell axons. It is suggested that the axons are exсited or are blocked by a passage of charged particles through the retina. The simplified mathematical model has been developed to establish a relation of an exposure conditions and visual images of streaks. The hypothesis explains many peculiarities of streaks remaining without any explanations in the literature. For example, it explains the horizontal orientation of streaks, the sensation (feeling) of fast moving ("spreading") of streaks, etc. The total cross-section of the axon manyfold exceeds cross-section of a photoreceptor. The damage of the multilayer axon structure is equivalent to the damage of the tens of thousands of photoreceptors. The offered mechanism is not linked to photobiological processes and does not demand complete dark adaptation for flash sensations. Taking into account composite processes of visual perception, the necessity of some adaptation time, naturally, remains. Thus, the developed hypothesis requires a specification of retinal damage estimations at long-term flight (for example, to Mars). It is interesting to note that there is the surprising similarity of a loss in the visual field (the scotomata) at traumata of retinal nerve fibers to visual images of some streaks. It is not inconceivable that the retina will turn out to be one of critical structures at long interplanetary flight. Thus, there is return to an idea which belongs to Prof. C.A. Tobias that the visual tract can be one of critical structures in relation to the space radiation. The cataractogenesis must be taken into account too.

  12. Protective effect of enterovirus‑71 (EV71) virus‑like particle vaccine against lethal EV71 infection in a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Mao, Fengfeng; Pang, Zheng; Yi, Yao; Qiu, Feng; Tian, Ruiguang; Meng, Qingling; Jia, Zhiyuan; Bi, Shengli

    2015-08-01

    Enterovirus-71 (EV71) is a viral pathogen that causes severe cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among young children, with significant mortality. Effective vaccines against HFMD are urgently required. Several EV71 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine candidates were found to be protective in the neonatal mouse EV71 challenge model. However, to what extent the VLP vaccine protects susceptible organs against EV71 infection in vivo has remained elusive. In the present study, the comprehensive immunogenicity of a potential EV71 vaccine candidate based on VLPs was evaluated in a neonatal mouse model. Despite lower levels of neutralizing antibodies to EV71 in the sera of VLP-immunized mice compared with those in mice vaccinated with inactivated EV71, the VLP-based vaccine was shown to be able to induce immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA memory-associated cellular immune responses to EV71. Of note, the EV71 VLP vaccine candidate was capable of inhibiting viral proliferation in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, lung and intestine of immunized mice and provided effective protection against the pathological damage caused by viral attack. In particular, the VLP vaccine was able to inhibit the transportation of EV71 from the central nervous system to the muscle tissue and greatly protected muscle tissue from infection, along with recovery from the viral infection. This led to nearly 100% immunoprotective efficacy, enabling neonatal mice delivered by VLP-immunized female adult mice to survive and grow with good health. The present study provided valuable additional knowledge of the specific protective efficacy of the EV71 VLP vaccine in vivo, which also indicated that it is a promising potential candidate for being developed into an EV71 vaccine. PMID:25936344

  13. Protective effect of enterovirus-71 (EV71) virus-like particle vaccine against lethal EV71 infection in a neonatal mouse model

    PubMed Central

    CAO, LEI; MAO, FENGFENG; PANG, ZHENG; YI, YAO; QIU, FENG; TIAN, RUIGUANG; MENG, QINGLING; JIA, ZHIYUAN; BI, SHENGLI

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus-71 (EV71) is a viral pathogen that causes severe cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) among young children, with significant mortality. Effective vaccines against HFMD are urgently required. Several EV71 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine candidates were found to be protective in the neonatal mouse EV71 challenge model. However, to what extent the VLP vaccine protects susceptible organs against EV71 infection in vivo has remained elusive. In the present study, the comprehensive immunogenicity of a potential EV71 vaccine candidate based on VLPs was evaluated in a neonatal mouse model. Despite lower levels of neutralizing antibodies to EV71 in the sera of VLP-immunized mice compared with those in mice vaccinated with inactivated EV71, the VLP-based vaccine was shown to be able to induce immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA memory-associated cellular immune responses to EV71. Of note, the EV71 VLP vaccine candidate was capable of inhibiting viral proliferation in cardiac muscle, skeletal muscle, lung and intestine of immunized mice and provided effective protection against the pathological damage caused by viral attack. In particular, the VLP vaccine was able to inhibit the transportation of EV71 from the central nervous system to the muscle tissue and greatly protected muscle tissue from infection, along with recovery from the viral infection. This led to nearly 100% immunoprotective efficacy, enabling neonatal mice delivered by VLP-immunized female adult mice to survive and grow with good health. The present study provided valuable additional knowledge of the specific protective efficacy of the EV71 VLP vaccine in vivo, which also indicated that it is a promising potential candidate for being developed into an EV71 vaccine. PMID:25936344

  14. Nutrient demand interacts with legume particle length to affect digestion responses and rumen pool sizes in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Ying, Y; Allen, M S

    2012-05-01

    Effects of legume particle length on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, and digestion and passage kinetics, and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 19-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.8 to 32.4 kg/d (mean=26.5 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 22.9 to 62.4 kg/d (mean=35.1 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing alfalfa silage chopped to (1) 19 mm (long cut, LC) or (2) 10 mm (short cut, SC) theoretical length of cut as the sole forage. Alfalfa silages contained approximately 43% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diets contained approximately 47% forage and 20% forage NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period, when cows were fed a common diet, and used as a covariate. Main effects of legume particle length and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Alfalfa particle length and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield or rumen pH. The LC diet decreased milk fat concentration more per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet and increased yields of milk fat and fat-corrected milk less per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet, resulting in a greater benefit for LC at low pDMI and for SC at high pDMI. The LC diet tended to decrease DMI compared with the SC diet. Ruminal digestion and passage rates of feed fractions did not differ between LC and SC and were not related to level of intake. The LC diet tended to decrease the rate of ruminal turnover for NDF but increased NDF rumen pools at a slower rate than the SC diet as pDMI increased. This indicated that the faster NDF turnover rate did not counterbalance the higher DMI for SC, resulting in larger NDF rumen pools for SC than LC. As p

  15. Organic and inorganic fractions of diesel exhaust particles produce changes in mucin profile of mouse trachea explants.

    PubMed

    Seriani, Robson; Junqueira, Mara S; Toledo, Alessandra C; Corrêa, Aristides T; Silva, Luiz F F; Martins, Milton A; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Mauad, Thais; Macchione, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) contain organic and inorganic elements that produce damage to the respiratory epithelium. The aim of this study was to determine the mucus profile of tracheal explants exposed to either crude diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or DEP treated with nitric acid (DEP/NA), with hexane (DEP/HEX), or with methanol (DEP/MET) at concentrations of 50 and 100 μg/ml for 30 and 60 min. Tracheal explants were subjected to morphometric analyses to study acidic (AB+), neutral (PAS+), and mixed (AB+/PAS+) mucus production and vacuolization (V). Incubation with 50 μg/ml crude DEP resulted in a rise in acid mucus production, an increase in vacuolization at 30 min, and reduction in neutral mucus at 30 and 60 min. Tracheas exposed to DEP/MET at 50 μg/ml for 30 or 60 min resulted in a significant decrease in neutral mucus production and an elevation in acid mucus production. DEP/HEX increased vacuolization at both 50 and 100 μg/ml at 30 and 60 min of exposure. Treatment with 50 μg/ml for 30 or 60 min significantly elevated mixed mucus levels. These results suggest that DEP appear to be more toxic when administered in combination with HEX or MET. DEP/MET modified the mucus profile of the epithelium, while DEP/HEX altered mucus extrusion, and these responses might be due to bioavailability of individual elements in DEP fractions. PMID:25674825

  16. The effect of high energy (HZE) particle radiation (Ar-40) on aging parameters of mouse hippocampus and retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Corbett, R.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Miquel, J.; Lindseth, K. A.; Benton, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Eight month old C57BL6 mice were exposed (head only) to 0.5 rad or 50 rads of Argon particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Facility, CA. Neuromotor performance was assessed monthly for six months beginning twelve weeks post-irradiation using a 'string test'. The decline in motor performance was dose-related and none of the animals was able to complete the task after four months of testing. Morphological changes were monitored six and twelve months post-irradiation by light and electron microscopy. The synaptic density in the CA-1 area of the hippocampus decreased six and twelve months after irradiation. The decrease after twelve months was less than after six months. The width of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina increased with increasing dose. The number of blood vessels between the ONL and the ganglion layer decreased twelve months after irradiation and this area did not show significant accumulation of age pigment.

  17. Effect of high energy (HZE) particle radiation (40Ar) on aging parameters of mouse hippocampus and retina

    SciTech Connect

    Philpott, D.E.; Sapp, W.; Miquel, J.; Kato, K.; Corbett, R.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Lindseth, K.A.; Benton, E.V.

    1985-01-01

    Eight month old C57BL6 mice were exposed (head only) to 0.5 rad or 50 rads of Argon particles at the Lawrence Berkeley Radiation Facility, CA. Neuromotor performance was assessed monthly for six months beginning twelve weeks post-irradiation using a string test. The decline in motor performance was dose-related and none of the animals was able to complete the task after four months of testing. Morphological changes were monitored six and twelve months post-irradiation by light and electron microscopy. The synaptic density in the CA-1 area of the hippocampus decreased six and twelve months after irradiation. The decrease after twelve months was less than after six months. The width of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina increased with increasing dose. The number of blood vessels between the ONL and the ganglion layer decreased twelve months after irradiation and this area did not show significant accumulation of age pigment.

  18. Identification of the Bile Acid Transporter Slco1a6 as a Candidate Gene That Broadly Affects Gene Expression in Mouse Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianan; Keller, Mark P; Oler, Angie T; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathryn L; Stapleton, Donald S; Broman, Aimee Teo; Zhao, Wen; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Broman, Karl W; Attie, Alan D

    2015-11-01

    We surveyed gene expression in six tissues in an F2 intercross between mouse strains C57BL/6J (abbreviated B6) and BTBR T(+) tf/J (abbreviated BTBR) made genetically obese with the Leptin(ob) mutation. We identified a number of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) affecting the expression of numerous genes distal to the locus, called trans-eQTL hotspots. Some of these trans-eQTL hotspots showed effects in multiple tissues, whereas some were specific to a single tissue. An unusually large number of transcripts (∼8% of genes) mapped in trans to a hotspot on chromosome 6, specifically in pancreatic islets. By considering the first two principal components of the expression of genes mapping to this region, we were able to convert the multivariate phenotype into a simple Mendelian trait. Fine mapping the locus by traditional methods reduced the QTL interval to a 298-kb region containing only three genes, including Slco1a6, one member of a large family of organic anion transporters. Direct genomic sequencing of all Slco1a6 exons identified a nonsynonymous coding SNP that converts a highly conserved proline residue at amino acid position 564 to serine. Molecular modeling suggests that Pro564 faces an aqueous pore within this 12-transmembrane domain-spanning protein. When transiently overexpressed in HEK293 cells, BTBR organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1A6-mediated cellular uptake of the bile acid taurocholic acid (TCA) was enhanced compared to B6 OATP1A6. Our results suggest that genetic variation in Slco1a6 leads to altered transport of TCA (and potentially other bile acids) by pancreatic islets, resulting in broad gene regulation. PMID:26385979

  19. Nano-size scaling of alloy intra-particle vs. inter-particle separation transitions: prediction of distinctly interface-affected critical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Polak, M; Rubinovich, L

    2016-07-21

    Phase-separation second-order transitions in binary alloy particles consisting of ∼1000 up to ∼70 000 atoms (∼1-10 nm) are modeled focusing on the unexplored issue of finite-size scaling in such systems, particularly on evaluation of correlation-length critical exponents. Our statistical-thermodynamic approach is based on mean-field analytical expression for the Ising model free energy that facilitates highly efficient computations furnishing comprehensive data for fcc rectangular nanoparticles (NPs). These are summed up in intra- and inter-particle scaling plots as well as in nanophase separation diagrams. Temperature-induced variations in the interface thickness in Janus-type intra-particle configurations and NP size-dependent shifts in the critical temperature of their transition to solid-solution reflect power-law behavior with the same critical exponent, ν = 0.83. It is attributed to dominant interfacial effects that are absent in inter-particle transitions. Variations in ν with nano-size, as revealed by a refined analysis, are linearly extrapolated in order to bridge the gap to larger particles within and well beyond the nanoscale, ultimately yielding ν = 1.0. Besides these findings, the study indicates the key role of the surface-area to volume ratio as an effective linear size, revealing a universal, particle-shape independent, nanoscaling of the critical-temperature shifts. PMID:27338842

  20. Response of extracellular matrix regulators in mouse lung after exposure to photons, protons and simulated solar particle event protons.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Pecaut, Michael J; Coutrakon, George B; Slater, James M; Gridley, Daila S

    2009-07-01

    This study compared the effects of photons (gamma rays), protons and simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE) on the expression of profibrotic factors/extracellular matrix (ECM) regulators in lung tissue after whole-body irradiation. TGF-beta1, matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP-2, -9), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 and 2 (TIMP-1, -2) were assessed on days 4 and 21 in lungs from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 0 Gy or 2 Gy photons (0.7 Gy/min), protons (0.9 Gy/min) and sSPE (0.056 Gy/h). RT-PCR, histological and immunohistochemical techniques were used. The most striking changes included (1) up-regulation of TGF-beta1 by photons and sSPE, but not protons, at both times, (2) MMP-2 enhancement by photons and sSPEs, (3) TIMP-1 up-regulation by photons at both times, and (4) more collagen accumulation after exposure to either photons or sSPE than after exposure to protons. The findings demonstrate that expression of important ECM regulators was highly dependent upon the radiation regimen as well as the time after exposure. The data further suggest that irradiation during an SPE may increase an astronaut's risk for pulmonary complications. The greater perturbations after photon exposure compared to proton exposure have clinical implications and warrant further investigation. PMID:19580505

  1. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp = 50 nm) particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, S.; Korhonen, H.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Smith, J. N.; Joutsensaari, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hamed, A.; Breider, T. J.; Birmili, W.; Spindler, G.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Facchini, M. C.; Laaksonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of aerosol size distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp= 50 nm) particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm) to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP) indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  2. Meteorological and trace gas factors affecting the number concentration of atmospheric Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles in the continental boundary layer: parameterization using a multivariate mixed effects model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, S.; Korhonen, H.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Smith, J. N.; Joutsensaari, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Hamed, A.; Breider, T. J.; Birmili, W.; Spindler, G.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Facchini, M. C.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-01

    Measurements of aerosol size-distribution and different gas and meteorological parameters, made in three polluted sites in Central- and Southern Europe: Po Valley, Italy, Melpitz and Hohenpeissenberg in Germany, were analysed for this study to examine which of the meteorological and trace gas variables affect the number concentration of Aitken (Dp=50 nm) particles. The aim of our study was to predict the number concentration of 50 nm particles by a combination of in-situ meteorological and gas phase parameters. The statistical model needs to describe, amongst others, the factors affecting the growth of newly formed aerosol particles (below 10 nm) to 50 nm size, but also sources of direct particle emissions in that size range. As the analysis method we used multivariate nonlinear mixed effects model. Hourly averages of gas and meteorological parameters measured at the stations were used as predictor variables; the best predictive model was attained with a combination of relative humidity, new particle formation event probability, temperature, condensation sink and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and ozone. The seasonal variation was also taken into account in the mixed model structure. Model simulations with the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP) indicate that the parameterization can be used as a part of a larger atmospheric model to predict the concentration of climatically active particles. As an additional benefit, the introduced model framework is, in theory, applicable for any kind of measured aerosol parameter.

  3. Maneb-induced dopaminergic neuronal death is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity: Results from primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons cultured from individual Ndufs4+/+ and Ndufs4-/- mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-01-01

    Primary cultures from embryonic mouse ventral mesencephalon are widely used for investigating the mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease models. Specifically, single mouse or embryo cultures from littermates can be very useful for comparative studies involving transgenic mice when the neuron cultures are to be prepared before genotyping. However, preparing single mouse embryo culture is technically challenging because of the small number of cells present in the mesencephalon of each embryo (150,000-300,000), of which only 0.5-5% are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) -positive, dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we optimized the procedure for preparing primary mesencephalic neuron cultures from individual mouse embryos. Mesencephalic neurons that are dissociated delicately, plated on Aclar film coverslips, and incubated in DMEM supplemented with FBS for 5 days and then N2 supplement for 1 day resulted in the best survival of dopaminergic neurons from each embryo. Using this optimized method, we prepared mesencephalic neuron cultures from single Ndufs4+/+ or Ndufs4-/- embryos, and investigated the role of mitochondrial complex I in maneb-induced dopamine neuron death. Our results suggest that maneb toxicity to dopamine neurons is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity in Ndufs4-/- cultures. PMID:25275677

  4. Effects of particle size and coating on toxicologic parameters, fecal elimination kinetics and tissue distribution of acutely ingested silver nanoparticles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Wilding, Laura A; Morishita, Masako; Walacavage, Kim; Ault, Andrew P; Axson, Jessica L; Stark, Diana I; Hashway, Sara A; Capracotta, Sonja S; Leroueil, Pascale R; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNP) via ingestion can occur due to incorporation of AgNP into products such as food containers and dietary supplements. AgNP variations in size and coating may affect toxicity, elimination kinetics or tissue distribution. Here, we directly compared acute administration of AgNP of two differing coatings and sizes to mice, using doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight/day administered by oral gavage for 3 days. The maximal dose is equivalent to 2000× the EPA oral reference dose. Silver acetate at the same doses was used as ionic silver control. We found no toxicity and no significant tissue accumulation. Additionally, no toxicity was seen when AgNP were dosed concurrently with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. Between 70.5% and 98.6% of the administered silver dose was recovered in feces and particle size and coating differences did not significantly influence fecal silver. Peak fecal silver was detected between 6- and 9-h post-administration and <0.5% of the administered dose was cumulatively detected in liver, spleen, intestines or urine at 48 h. Although particle size and coating did not affect tissue accumulation, silver was detected in liver, spleen and kidney of mice administered ionic silver at marginally higher levels than those administered AgNP, suggesting that silver ion may be more bioavailable. Our results suggest that, irrespective of particle size and coating, acute oral exposure to AgNP at doses relevant to potential human exposure is associated with predominantly fecal elimination and is not associated with accumulation in tissue or toxicity. PMID:26305411

  5. Tmc1 Point Mutation Affects Ca2+ Sensitivity and Block by Dihydrostreptomycin of the Mechanoelectrical Transducer Current of Mouse Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corns, Laura F.; Johnson, Stuart L.; Kros, Corné J.

    2016-01-01

    transmembrane channel-like protein isoform 1 (TMC1) channels in the mammalian cochlea. Using a mutant mouse model (Beethoven) for progressive hearing loss in humans (DFNA36), which harbors a point mutation in the Tmc1 gene, we show that this mutation affects the MET channel pore, reducing its Ca2+ permeability and its affinity for the permeant blocker dihydrostreptomycin. A number of phenomena that we ascribe to Ca2+-dependent adaptation appear stronger, in compensation for the reduced Ca2+ entry. PMID:26758827

  6. Exposure for ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the related molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously we studied cardiovascular responses in healthy WKY rats following inhalation exposure to ultrafine carbon particles (UfCPs...

  7. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg−1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg−1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  8. How does vegetation affect sedimentation on tidal marshes? Investigating particle capture and hydrodynamic controls on biologically mediated sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Simon M.; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Morris, James T.

    2010-09-01

    Plants are known to enhance sedimentation on intertidal marshes. It is unclear, however, if the dominant mechanism of enhanced sedimentation is direct organic sedimentation, particle capture by plant stems, or enhanced settling due to a reduction in turbulent kinetic energy within flows through the plant canopy. Here we combine several previously reported laboratory studies with an 18 year record of salt marsh macrophyte characteristics to quantify these mechanisms. In dense stands of Spartina alterniflora (with projected plant areas per unit volume of >10 m-1) and rapid flows (>0.4 m s-1), we find that the fraction of sedimentation from particle capture can instantaneously exceed 70%. In most marshes dominated by Spartina alterniflora, however, we find particle settling, rather than capture, will account for the majority of inorganic sedimentation. We examine a previously reported 2 mm yr-1 increase in accretion rate following a fertilization experiment in South Carolina. Prior studies at the site have ruled out organic sedimentation as the cause of this increased accretion. We apply our newly developed models of particle capture and effective settling velocity to the fertilized and control sites and find that virtually all (>99%) of the increase in accretion rates can be attributed to enhanced settling brought about by reduced turbulent kinetic energy in the fertilized canopy. Our newly developed models of biologically mediated sedimentation are broadly applicable and can be applied to marshes where data relating biomass to stem diameter and projected plant area are available.

  9. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg‑1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg‑1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation.

  10. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed

    Yang, X M; Drury, C F; Reynolds, W D; Yang, J Y

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2-53 μm) and sand (53-2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg(-1) soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg(-1), but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  11. The functional effect of dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (R144W) in mouse cardiac troponin T is differently affected by α- and β-myosin heavy chain isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Tardiff, Jil C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the differential impact of α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on how troponin T (TnT) modulates contractile dynamics, we hypothesized that the effects of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) mutations in TnT would be altered differently by α- and β-MHC. We characterized dynamic contractile features of normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mouse cardiac muscle fibers reconstituted with a mouse TnT analog (TnTR144W) of the human DCM R141W mutation. TnTR144W did not alter maximal tension but attenuated myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (pCa50) to a similar extent in α- and β-MHC fibers. TnTR144W attenuated the speed of cross-bridge (XB) distortion dynamics (c) by 24% and the speed of XB recruitment dynamics (b) by 17% in α-MHC fibers; however, both b and c remained unaltered in β-MHC fibers. Likewise, TnTR144W attenuated the rates of XB detachment (g) and tension redevelopment (ktr) only in α-MHC fibers. TnTR144W also decreased the impact of strained XBs on the recruitment of new XBs (γ) by 30% only in α-MHC fibers. Because c, b, g, ktr, and γ are strongly influenced by thin filament-based cooperative mechanisms, we conclude that the TnTR144W- and β-MHC-mediated changes in the thin filament interact to produce a less severe functional phenotype, compared with that brought about by TnTR144W and α-MHC. These observations provide a basis for lower mortality rates of humans (β-MHC) harboring the TnTR141W mutant compared with transgenic mouse studies. Our findings strongly suggest that some caution is necessary when extrapolating data from transgenic mouse studies to human hearts. PMID:25681424

  12. Mouse ECG findings in aging, with conduction system affecting drugs and in cardiac pathologies: Development and validation of ECG analysis algorithm in mice.

    PubMed

    Merentie, Mari; Lipponen, Jukka A; Hedman, Marja; Hedman, Antti; Hartikainen, Juha; Huusko, Jenni; Lottonen-Raikaslehto, Line; Parviainen, Viktor; Laidinen, Svetlana; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-12-01

    Mouse models are extremely important in studying cardiac pathologies and related electrophysiology, but very few mouse ECG analysis programs are readily available. Therefore, a mouse ECG analysis algorithm was developed and validated. Surface ECG (lead II) was acquired during transthoracic echocardiography from C57Bl/6J mice under isoflurane anesthesia. The effect of aging was studied in young (2-3 months), middle-aged (14 months) and old (20-24 months) mice. The ECG changes associated with pharmacological interventions and common cardiac pathologies, that is, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and progressive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), were studied. The ECG raw data were analyzed with an in-house ECG analysis program, modified specially for mouse ECG. Aging led to increases in P-wave duration, atrioventricular conduction time (PQ interval), and intraventricular conduction time (QRS complex width), while the R-wave amplitude decreased. In addition, the prevalence of arrhythmias increased during aging. Anticholinergic atropine shortened PQ time, and beta blocker metoprolol and calcium-channel blocker verapamil increased PQ interval and decreased heart rate. The ECG changes after AMI included early JT elevation, development of Q waves, decreased R-wave amplitude, and later changes in JT/T segment. In progressive LVH model, QRS complex width was increased at 2 and especially 4 weeks timepoint, and also repolarization abnormalities were seen. Aging, drugs, AMI, and LVH led to similar ECG changes in mice as seen in humans, which could be reliably detected with this new algorithm. The developed method will be very useful for studies on cardiovascular diseases in mice. PMID:26660552

  13. How does breathing frequency affect the performance of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a surgical mask against surrogates of viral particles?

    PubMed

    He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing frequency (breaths/min) differs among individuals and levels of physical activity. Particles enter respirators through two principle penetration pathways: faceseal leakage and filter penetration. However, it is unknown how breathing frequency affects the overall performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and surgical masks (SMs) against viral particles, as well as other health-relevant submicrometer particles. A FFR and SM were tested on a breathing manikin at four mean inspiratory flows (MIFs) (15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min) and five breathing frequencies (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 breaths/min). Filter penetration (Pfilter) and total inward leakage (TIL) were determined for the tested respiratory protection devices against sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol particles in the size range of 20 to 500 nm. "Faceseal leakage-to-filter" (FLTF) penetration ratios were calculated. Both MIF and breathing frequency showed significant effects (p < 0.05) on Pfilter and TIL. Increasing breathing frequency increased TIL for the N95 FFR whereas no clear trends were observed for the SM. Increasing MIF increased Pfilter and decreased TIL resulting in decreasing FLTF ratio. Most of FLTF ratios were >1, suggesting that the faceseal leakage was the primary particle penetration pathway at various breathing frequencies. Breathing frequency is another factor (besides MIF) that can significantly affect the performance of N95 FFRs, with higher breathing frequencies increasing TIL. No consistent trend of increase or decrease of TIL with either MIF or breathing frequency was observed for the tested SM. To potentially extend these findings beyond the manikin/breathing system used, future studies are needed to fully understand the mechanism causing the breathing frequency effect on the performance of respiratory protection devices on human subjects. PMID:24521067

  14. Does Carbopol Elasticity affect its Yielding Dynamics? A study based on the Settling of a Particle in ``Plastic'' materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraggedakis, Dimitris; Dimakopoulos, Yiannis; Tsamopoulos, John

    2015-11-01

    For several decades, Carbopol is assumed to be the ideal plastic material, exhibiting only yield phenomena without viscoelastic effects in yielded regions. Recently, it has been shown that when stresses do not overcome the yield criterion, it behaves as an ideal Hookean solid, Piau (2007). Also, experiments (Putz et al. (2006); Holenberg et al. (2012)) reveal phenomena which can be attributed only to elastic properties of the fluidized region, such as the appearance of the so-called ``negative wake,'' Harlen (2002), downstream the sphere and the loss of fore-aft symmetry of the yield surface around a sedimenting particle. Our study is based on the sedimentation of a confined particle in materials which exhibit elastoviscoplastic behavior and proves that Carbopol cannot be considered as the ideal plastic material anymore. Moreover, when elasticity comes into play, the derived stoppage criterion for a sedimenting sphere by Beris et al. (1985) and experimentally confirmed by Tabuteau et al. (2007) is not satisfied, as a complex stress field is developed around the particle and fluidization near the rigid surface is favored. The existence of the yield surface near the sphere enhances the formation of shear layers, which are responsible for the formation of the negative wake, irrespectively of the position of the confinement in relation to the sphere. GSRT Greece-Israel bilateral projects PHARMAMUDS #3163.

  15. How the Hawking effect affects multipartite entanglement of Dirac particles in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuai; Song, Xue-ke; Shi, Jia-dong; Ye, Liu

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of Hawking radiation on the multipartite entanglement of Dirac particles in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole is investigated. It is shown that all the 1-tangles decrease as the Hawking temperature grows, and the Coffman-Kundu-Wootters monogamy inequality is always saturated in this system. It is also shown that the entanglement's status of subsystems, which have the same quantum state, depend on its detector's position, and this proposition can be generalized to a multipartite system. Then, we find that the Hawking effect does not change the entanglement structure of the quantum state in Schwarzschild space-time. In addition, we discuss the distributions of quantum information and find that not only is the entanglement redistributed, but also the mutual information is distributed to the physical inaccessible region. At last, we calculate the mutual information of a N-qubit multipartite system, 1ex" |Ψ⟩123…N=(β1ex" |0⟩⊗N+√1-β2 1ex" |1⟩⊗N)123…N, and draw a conclusion that when the black hole approximates to evaporate completely the mutual information of this system will be close to (N-1)/N of the original if a particle freely falls in toward a Schwarzschild black hole and locates near the event horizon, and the other particles remain in the asymptotically flat region.

  16. Freeze-drying of polycaprolactone and poly(D,L-lactic-glycolic) nanoparticles induce minor particle size changes affecting the oral pharmacokinetics of loaded drugs.

    PubMed

    Saez, A; Guzmán, M; Molpeceres, J; Aberturas, M R

    2000-11-01

    The present study was geared at identifying the conditions to stabilize poly (D,L-lactic-glycolic) (PLGA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) nanoparticles (NP) by freeze-drying with several cryoprotective agents. Differential scanning calorimetry and freeze-thawing studies were used to optimize the lyophilization process. These studies showed that all samples were totally frozen at -45 degrees C and evidenced the necessity of adding sucrose, glucose, trehalose or gelatine to preserve the properties of NP regardless of the freezing procedure. However, only 20% sucrose and 20% glucose exerted an acceptable lyoprotective effect on PLGA and PCL NP, respectively. Nonetheless, the final to initial size ratios ( approximately 1.5) indicated that particle size was slightly affected in both cases. In vivo studies with CyA-loaded PCL NP whose sizes matched those obtained after NP preparation (100 nm) and after being lyophilized (160 nm) showed that the changes of particle size might have some relevance on drug pharmacokinetics. The MRT was significantly (P<0.05) modified after an oral CyA dose of 5 mg/kg and the treatment with 160-nm sized CyA-loaded NP produced a higher drug partition into the liver of Wistar rats potentially affecting the toxic and immunosuppressive profile of the drug. Therefore, although the particle size changes induced by NP lyophilization were slight, they need to be carefully evaluated and cannot be neglected. PMID:11072195

  17. A nonsense mutation in mouse Tardbp affects TDP43 alternative splicing activity and causes limb-clasping and body tone defects.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas; McGoldrick, Philip; Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised Tardbp(Q101X) mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the Tardbp(Q101X) mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp(+/Q101X) ) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice were crossed with the SOD1(G93Adl) transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the Tardbp(Q101X) mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes

  18. A Nonsense Mutation in Mouse Tardbp Affects TDP43 Alternative Splicing Activity and Causes Limb-Clasping and Body Tone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M.; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised TardbpQ101X mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the TardbpQ101X mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp+/Q101X) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp+/Q101X mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp+/Q101X mice were crossed with the SOD1G93Adl transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the TardbpQ101X mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes. These mice are

  19. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  20. Vitamin D3 Deficiency Differentially Affects Functional and Disease Outcomes in the G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Jesse A.; Gianforcaro, Alexandro; Hamadeh, Mazen J.

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by motor neuron death in the central nervous system. Vitamin D supplementation increases antioxidant activity, reduces inflammation and improves motor neuron survival. We have previously demonstrated that vitamin D3 supplementation at 10× the adequate intake improves functional outcomes in a mouse model of ALS. Objective To determine whether vitamin D deficiency influences functional and disease outcomes in a mouse model of ALS. Methods At age 25 d, 102 G93A mice (56 M, 46 F) were divided into two vitamin D3 groups: 1) adequate (AI; 1 IU D3/g feed) and 2) deficient (DEF; 0.025 IU D3/g feed). At age 113 d, tibialis anterior (TA), quadriceps (quads) and brain were harvested from 42 mice (22 M and 20 F), whereas the remaining 60 mice (34 M and 26 F) were followed to endpoint. Results During disease progression, DEF mice had 25% (P = 0.022) lower paw grip endurance AUC and 19% (P = 0.017) lower motor performance AUC vs. AI mice. Prior to disease onset (CS 2), DEF mice had 36% (P = 0.016) lower clinical score (CS) vs. AI mice. DEF mice reached CS 2 six days later vs. AI mice (P = 0.004), confirmed by a logrank test which revealed that DEF mice reached CS 2 at a 43% slower rate vs. AI mice (HR = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.38, 1.74; P = 0.002). Body weight-adjusted TA (AI: r = 0.662, P = 0.001; DEF: r = 0.622, P = 0.006) and quads (AI: r = 0.661, P = 0.001; DEF: r = 0.768; P<0.001) weights were strongly correlated with age at CS 2. Conclusion Vitamin D3 deficiency improves early disease severity and delays disease onset, but reduces performance in functional outcomes following disease onset, in the high-copy G93A mouse. PMID:22216257

  1. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  2. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  3. Immune Status, Strain Background, and Anatomic Site of Inoculation Affect Mouse Papillomavirus (MmuPV1) Induction of Exophytic Papillomas or Endophytic Trichoblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Proctor, Mary; Ingle, Arvind; Silva, Kathleen A.; Dadras, Soheil S.; Jenson, A. Bennett; Ghim, Shin-je

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) induce papillomas, premalignant lesions, and carcinomas in a wide variety of species. PVs are classified first based on their host and tissue tropism and then their genomic diversities. A laboratory mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1 (formerly MusPV), was horizontally transmitted within an inbred colony of NMRI-Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu (nude; T cell deficient) mice of an unknown period of time. A ground-up, filtered papilloma inoculum was not capable of infecting C57BL/6J wild-type mice; however, immunocompetent, alopecic, S/RV/Cri-ba/ba (bare) mice developed small papillomas at injection sites that regressed. NMRI-Foxn1nu and B6.Cg-Foxn1nu, but not NU/J-Foxn1nu, mice were susceptible to MmuPV1 infection. B6 congenic strains, but not other congenic strains carrying the same allelic mutations, lacking B- and T-cells, but not B-cells alone, were susceptible to infection, indicating that mouse strain and T-cell deficiency are critical to tumor formation. Lesions initially observed were exophytic papillomas around the muzzle, exophytic papillomas on the tail, and condylomas of the vaginal lining which could be induced by separate scarification or simultaneous scarification of MmuPV1 at all four sites. On the dorsal skin, locally invasive, poorly differentiated tumors developed with features similar to human trichoblastomas. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences between the normal skin in these anatomic sites and in papillomas versus trichoblastomas. The primarily dysregulated genes involved molecular pathways associated with cancer, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell morphology, and connective tissue development and function. Although trichoepitheliomas are benign, aggressive tumors, few of the genes commonly associated with basal cell carcinoma or squamous cells carcinoma were highly dysregulated. PMID:25474466

  4. Investigations of the relationship between use of in vitro cell culture-quantitative PCR and a mouse-based bioassay for evaluating critical factors affecting the disinfection performance of pulsed UV light for treating Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saline.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Farrell, Hugh; Cormican, Martin; Rowan, Neil

    2010-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric coccidian parasite that is recognised as a frequent cause of water-borne disease in humans. We report for the first time on use of the in vitro HCT-8 cell culture-quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay and the in vivo SCID-mouse bioassay for evaluating critical factors that reduce or eliminate infectivity of C. parvum after irradiating oocysts in saline solution under varying operational conditions with pulsed UV light. Infections post UV treatments were detected by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy and by quantitative PCR in cell culture, and by IF staining of faeces and by hematoxylin and eosin staining of intestinal villi in mice. There was a good agreement between using cell culture-qPCR and the mouse assay for determining reduction or elimination of C. parvum infectivity as a consequence of varying UV operating conditions. Reduction in infectivity depended on the intensity of lamp discharge energy applied, amount of pulsing and population size of oocysts (P < or = 0.05). Conventional radiometer was unable to measure fluence or UV dose in saline samples due to the ultra-short non-continuous nature of the high-energy light pulses. Incorporation of humic acid at a concentration above that found in surface water (i.e., < or =10 ppm) did not significantly affect PUV disinfection capability irrespective of parameters tested (P < or = 0.05). These observations show that use of this HCT-8 cell culture assay is equivalent to using the 'gold standard' mouse-based infectivity assay for determining disinfection performances of PUV for treating C. parvum in saline solution. PMID:20096310

  5. Exposure to ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Swapna; Stoeger, Tobias; Harder, Volkar; Thomas, Ronald F; Schladweiler, Mette C; Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Takenaka, Shinji; Karg, Erwin; Reitmeir, Peter; Bader, Michael; Stampfl, Andreas; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Schulz, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study we sought to investigate the cardiopulmonary responses on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) following inhalation of UfCPs (24 h, 172 μg·m-3), to assess whether compromised animals (SHR) exhibit a different response pattern compared to the previously studied healthy rats (WKY). Methods Cardiophysiological response in SHRs was analyzed using radiotelemetry. Blood pressure (BP) and its biomarkers plasma renin-angiotensin system were also assessed. Lung and cardiac mRNA expressions for markers of oxidative stress (hemeoxygenase-1), blood coagulation (tissue factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), and endothelial function (endothelin-1, and endothelin receptors A and B) were analyzed following UfCPs exposure in SHRs. UfCPs-mediated inflammatory responses were assessed from broncho-alveolar-lavage fluid (BALF). Results Increased BP and heart rate (HR) by about 5% with a lag of 1–3 days were detected in UfCPs exposed SHRs. Inflammatory markers of BALF, lung (pulmonary) and blood (systemic) were not affected. However, mRNA expression of hemeoxygenase-1, endothelin-1, endothelin receptors A and B, tissue factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor showed a significant induction (~2.5-fold; p < 0.05) with endothelin 1 being the maximally induced factor (6-fold; p < 0.05) on the third recovery day in the lungs of UfCPs exposed SHRs; while all of these factors – except hemeoxygenase-1 – were not affected in cardiac tissues. Strikingly, the UfCPs-mediated altered BP is paralleled by the induction of renin-angiotensin system in plasma. Conclusion Our finding shows that UfCPs exposure at levels which does not induce detectable pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation, triggers distinct effects in the lung and also at the systemic level in compromised SHRs. These effects are characterized by

  6. High-resolution genetic localization of a modifying locus affecting disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidneys (jck) mouse model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Beier, David R

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a locus on proximal Chr 4 modifies disease severity in the juvenile cystic kidney (jck) mouse, a model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) that carries a mutation of the Nek8 serine-threonine kinase. In this study, we used QTL analysis of independently constructed B6.D2 congenic lines to confirm this and showed that this locus has a highly significant effect. We constructed sub-congenic lines to more specifically localize the modifier and have determined it resides in a 3.2 Mb interval containing 28 genes. These include Invs and Anks6, which are both excellent candidates for the modifier as mutations in these genes result in PKD and both genes are known to genetically and physically interact with Nek8. However, examination of strain-specific DNA sequence and kidney expression did not reveal clear differences that might implicate either gene as a modifier of PKD severity. The fact that our high-resolution analysis did not yield an unambiguous result highlights the challenge of establishing the causality of strain-specific variants as genetic modifiers, and suggests that alternative strategies be considered. PMID:27114383

  7. Cre recombinase expression or topical tamoxifen treatment do not affect retinal structure and function, neuronal vulnerability or glial reactivity in the mouse eye.

    PubMed

    Boneva, S K; Groß, T R; Schlecht, A; Schmitt, S I; Sippl, C; Jägle, H; Volz, C; Neueder, A; Tamm, E R; Braunger, B M

    2016-06-14

    Mice with a constitutive or tamoxifen-induced Cre recombinase (Cre) expression are frequently used research tools to allow the conditional deletion of target genes via the Cre-loxP system. Here we analyzed for the first time in a comprehensive and comparative way, whether retinal Cre expression or topical tamoxifen treatment itself would cause structural or functional changes, including changes in the expression profiles of molecular markers, glial reactivity and photoreceptor vulnerability. To this end, we characterized the transgenic α-Cre, Lmop-Cre and the tamoxifen-inducible CAGG-CreER™ mouse lines, all having robust Cre expression in the neuronal retina. In addition, we characterized the effects of topical tamoxifen treatment itself in wildtype mice. We performed morphometric analyses, immunohistochemical staining, in vivo ERG and angiography analyses and realtime RT-PCR analyses. Furthermore, the influence of Cre recombinase or topical tamoxifen exposure on neuronal vulnerability was studied by using light damage as a model for photoreceptor degeneration. Taken together, neither the expression of Cre, nor topical tamoxifen treatment caused detectable changes in retinal structure and function, the expression profiles of investigated molecular markers, glial reactivity and photoreceptor vulnerability. We conclude that the Cre-loxP system and its induction through tamoxifen is a safe and reliable method to delete desired target genes in the neural retina. PMID:27026593

  8. Long-term treatment with L-DOPA or pramipexole affects adult neurogenesis and corresponding non-motor behavior in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chiu, W-H; Depboylu, C; Hermanns, G; Maurer, L; Windolph, A; Oertel, W H; Ries, V; Höglinger, G U

    2015-08-01

    Non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia and depression are often observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and can precede the onset of motor symptoms for years. The underlying pathological alterations in the brain are not fully understood so far. Dysregulation of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb has been recently suggested to be implicated in non-motor symptoms of PD. However, there is so far no direct evidence to support the relationship of non-motor symptoms and the modulation of adult neurogenesis following dopamine depletion and/or dopamine replacement. In this study, we investigated the long-term effects of l-DOPA and pramipexole, a dopamine agonist, in a mouse model of bilateral intranigral 6-OHDA lesion, in order to assess the impact of adult neurogenesis on non-motor behavior. We found that l-DOPA and pramipexole can normalize decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the periglomerular layer of the olfactory bulb caused by a 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, pramipexole showed an antidepressant and anxiolytic effect in the forced swim test and social interaction test. However, there was no significant change in learning and memory function after dopamine depletion and dopamine replacement, respectively. PMID:25839898

  9. Differential proteomic analysis of mouse macrophages exposed to adsorbate-loaded heavy fuel oil derived combustion particles using an automated sample-preparation workflow.

    PubMed

    Kanashova, Tamara; Popp, Oliver; Orasche, Jürgen; Karg, Erwin; Harndorf, Horst; Stengel, Benjamin; Sklorz, Martin; Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf; Dittmar, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Ship diesel combustion particles are known to cause broad cytotoxic effects and thereby strongly impact human health. Particles from heavy fuel oil (HFO) operated ships are considered as particularly dangerous. However, little is known about the relevant components of the ship emission particles. In particular, it is interesting to know if the particle cores, consisting of soot and metal oxides, or the adsorbate layers, consisting of semi- and low-volatile organic compounds and salts, are more relevant. We therefore sought to relate the adsorbates and the core composition of HFO combustion particles to the early cellular responses, allowing for the development of measures that counteract their detrimental effects. Hence, the semi-volatile coating of HFO-operated ship diesel engine particles was removed by stepwise thermal stripping using different temperatures. RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to native and thermally stripped particles in submersed culture. Proteomic changes were monitored by two different quantitative mass spectrometry approaches, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and dimethyl labeling. Our data revealed that cells reacted differently to native or stripped HFO combustion particles. Cells exposed to thermally stripped particles showed a very differential reaction with respect to the composition of the individual chemical load of the particle. The cellular reactions of the HFO particles included reaction to oxidative stress, reorganization of the cytoskeleton and changes in endocytosis. Cells exposed to the 280 °C treated particles showed an induction of RNA-related processes, a number of mitochondria-associated processes as well as DNA damage response, while the exposure to 580 °C treated HFO particles mainly induced the regulation of intracellular transport. In summary, our analysis based on a highly reproducible automated proteomic sample-preparation procedure shows a diverse cellular response, depending on the

  10. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Karman, Bethany N. Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Craig, Zelieann R. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-05-15

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 h to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1–100 nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, and expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10 μM) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3–4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. -- Highlights: ►TCDD disrupts sex steroid hormone levels, but not growth of antral follicles. ►Pregnenolone co-treatment by-passes TCDD-induced steroid hormone disruption. ►TCDD affects steroid hormone levels through an AHR pathway in antral follicles.

  11. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  12. Deficiency of CDKN1A or Both CDKN1A and CDKN1B Affects the Pubertal Development of Mouse Leydig Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian; Zhu, Qiqi; Ge, Yufei; Wang, Guimin; Wang, Claire Q.F.; Mukai, Motoko; Holsberger, Denise R.; Cooke, Paul S.; Lian, Qing-Quan; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 (CDKN1A) and p27Kip1 (CDKN1B) are expressed in Leydig cells. Previously, we reported that Cdkn1b knockout in the mouse led to increased Leydig cell proliferative capacity and lower steroidogenesis. However, the relative importance of CDKN1A and CDKN1B in these regulations was unclear. In the present study, we examined the relative importance of CDKN1A and CDKN1B in regulation of Leydig cell proliferation and steroidogenesis by whole-body knockout of CDKN1A (Cdkn1a−/−) and CDKN1A/CDKN1B double knockout (DBKO). The cell number, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation rate, steroidogenesis, and steroidogenic enzyme mRNA levels and activities of Leydig cells were compared among wild-type (WT), Cdkn1a−/−, and DBKO mice. Relative to WT mice, Leydig cell number per testis was doubled in the DBKO and unchanged in the Cdkn1a−/− mice. Testicular testosterone levels and mRNA levels for luteinizing hormone receptor (Lhcgr), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (Cyp11a1), 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (Hsd17b3) and their respective proteins were significantly lower in the DBKO mice. However, testicular testosterone level was unchanged in the Cdkn1a−/− mice, although Lhcgr mRNA levels were significantly lower relative to those in the WT control. We conclude that Cdkn1a−/− did not increase Leydig cell numbers (although a defect of Leydig cell function was noted), whereas DBKO caused a significant increase of Leydig cell numbers but a decrease of steroidogenesis. PMID:25609837

  13. SUPPRESSION OF BASAL AND CYTOKINE INDUCED EXPRESSION OF ANTIGEN PRESENTATION MARKERS ON MOUSE LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) constitute a significant component of airborne particulates in urban environment. Exposure to DEP is known to enhance susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. We hypothesized that DEP could partially exert its effect on disease susceptibili...

  14. Anti-tumor effect of the alphavirus-based virus-like particle vector expressing prostate-specific antigen in a HLA-DR transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, V; Tretyakova, I; Alexander, R B; Pushko, P; Klyushnenkova, E N

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1(*)1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8 T cells (19.6 ± 7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA(65-73). In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4 ± 4.1% of CD8 T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2D(b)/PSA(65-73) dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8+ T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26319744

  15. Disruption of the ErbB signaling in adolescence increases striatal dopamine levels and affects learning and hedonic-like behavior in the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Golani, Idit; Tadmor, Hagar; Buonanno, Andres; Kremer, Ilana; Shamir, Alon

    2014-11-01

    The ErbB signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in schizophrenia. Numerous findings support the dysregulation of Neuregulin (NRG) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether alterations of these pathways in the adult brain or during development are involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Herein we characterized the behavioral profile and molecular changes resulting from pharmacologically blocking the ErbB signaling pathway during a critical period in the development of decision making, planning, judgments, emotions, social cognition and cognitive skills, namely adolescence. We demonstrate that chronic administration of the pan-ErbB kinase inhibitor JNJ-28871063 (JNJ) to adolescent mice elevated striatal dopamine levels and reduced preference for sucrose without affecting locomotor activity and exploratory behavior. In adulthood, adolescent JNJ-treated mice continue to consume less sucrose and needed significantly more correct-response trials to reach the learning criterion during the discrimination phase of the T-maze reversal learning task than their saline-injected controls. In addition, JNJ mice exhibited deficit in reference memory but not in working memory as measured in the radial arm maze. Inhibition of the pathway during adolescence did not affect exploratory behavior and locomotor activity in the open field, social interaction, social memory, and reversal learning in adult mice. Our data suggest that alteration of ErbB signaling during adolescence resulted in changes in the dopaminergic systems that emerge in pathological learning and hedonic behavior in adulthood, and pinpoints the possible role of the pathway in the development of cognitive skills and motivated behavior. PMID:25451700

  16. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and alters sex steroid hormone secretion without affecting growth of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karman, Bethany N.; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S.; Craig, Zelieann R.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    The persistent environmental contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an ovarian toxicant. These studies were designed to characterize the actions of TCDD on steroidogenesis and growth of intact mouse antral follicles in vitro. Specifically, these studies tested the hypothesis that TCDD exposure leads to decreased sex hormone production/secretion by antral follicles as well as decreased growth of antral follicles in vitro. Since TCDD acts through binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and the AHR has been identified as an important factor in ovarian function, we also conducted experiments to confirm the presence and activation of the AHR in our tissue culture system. To do so, we exposed mouse antral follicles for 96 hours to a series of TCDD doses previously shown to have effects on ovarian tissues and cells in culture, which also encompass environmentally relevant and pharmacological exposures (0.1-100nM), to determine a dose response for TCDD in our culture system for growth, hormone production, expression of the Ahr and Cyp1b1. The results indicate that TCDD decreases progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels in a non-monotonic dose response manner without altering growth of antral follicles. The addition of pregnenolone substrate (10μM) restores hormone levels to control levels. Additionally, Cyp1b1 levels were increased by 3-4 fold regardless of the dose of TCDD exposure, evidence of AHR activation. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD may act prior to pregnenolone formation and through AHR transcriptional control of Cyp1b1, leading to decreased hormone levels without affecting growth of antral follicles. PMID:22483799

  17. Type III Secretion System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Affects Matrix Metalloproteinase 12 (MMP-12) and MMP-13 Expression via Nuclear Factor κB Signaling in Human Carcinoma Epithelial Cells and a Pneumonia Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Yong-Jae; Shin, In-Sik; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Hong, Ju Mi; Shin, Na-Rae; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Ha, Un-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Hong; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-09-15

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to severe disease and poor clinical outcomes in animal and human studies. We aimed to investigate whether the ExoS and ExoT effector proteins of P. aeruginosa affect the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP-12) and MMP-13 via nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. To understand the T3SS, we used ΔExoS, ΔExoT, and ExsA::Ω mutants, as well as P. aeruginosa strain K (PAK)-stimulated NCI-H292 cells. We investigated the effects of ΔExoS, ΔExoT, and ExsA::Ω on the development of pneumonia in mouse models. We examined the effects of ΔExoS, ΔExoT, and ExsA::Ω on MMP-12 and MMP-13 production in NCI-H292 cells. ΔExoS and ΔExoT markedly decreased the neutrophil count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, with a reduction in proinflammatory mediators, MMP-12, and MMP-13. ΔExoS and ΔExoT reduced NF-κB phosphorylation, together with MMP-12 and MMP-13 expression in PAK-infected mouse models and NCI-H292 cells. To conclude, P. aeruginosa infection induced the expression of MMPs, and P. aeruginosa T3SS appeared to be a key player in MMP-12 and MMP-13 expression, which is further controlled by NF-κB signaling. These findings might be useful in devising a novel therapeutic approach to chronic pulmonary infections that involves decreasing the ExoS and ExoT levels. PMID:27377745

  18. Functional Interactions between BM88/Cend1, Ran-Binding Protein M and Dyrk1B Kinase Affect Cyclin D1 Levels and Cell Cycle Progression/Exit in Mouse Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsioras, Konstantinos; Papastefanaki, Florentia; Politis, Panagiotis K.; Matsas, Rebecca; Gaitanou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BM88/Cend1 is a neuronal-lineage specific modulator with a pivotal role in coordination of cell cycle exit and differentiation of neuronal precursors. In the current study we identified the signal transduction scaffolding protein Ran-binding protein M (RanBPM) as a BM88/Cend1 binding partner and showed that BM88/Cend1, RanBPM and the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1B (Dyrk1B) are expressed in mouse brain as well as in cultured embryonic cortical neurons while RanBPM can form complexes with either of the two other proteins. To elucidate a potential mechanism involving BM88/Cend1, RanBPM and Dyrk1B in cell cycle progression/exit, we transiently co-expressed these proteins in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro 2a cells. We found that the BM88/Cend1-dependent or Dyrk1B-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 is reversed following their functional interaction with RanBPM. More specifically, functional interaction of RanBPM with either BM88/Cend1 or Dyrk1B stabilizes cyclin D1 in the nucleus and promotes 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation as a measure of enhanced cell proliferation. However, the RanBPM-dependent Dyrk1B cytosolic retention and degradation is reverted in the presence of Cend1 resulting in cyclin D1 destabilization. Co-expression of RanBPM with either BM88/Cend1 or Dyrk1B also had a negative effect on Neuro 2a cell differentiation. Our results suggest that functional interactions between BM88/Cend1, RanBPM and Dyrk1B affect the balance between cellular proliferation and differentiation in Neuro 2a cells and indicate that a potentially similar mechanism may influence cell cycle progression/exit and differentiation of neuronal precursors. PMID:24312406

  19. The Lonely Mouse – Single Housing Affects Serotonergic Signaling Integrity Measured by 8-OH-DPAT-Induced Hypothermia in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, A. Charlotte; Jacobsen, Kirsten R.; Abelson, Klas S. P.; Hau, Jann

    2014-01-01

    Male BALB/c mice single-housed for a period of three weeks were found to respond with a more marked hypothermia to a challenge with a selective serotonergic agonist (8-OH-DPAT) than their group-housed counterparts. This effect of single housing was verified by screening a genetically heterogeneous population of male mice on a C57BL/6 background from a breeding colony. Enhanced activity of the implicated receptor (5-HT1A) leading to an amplified hypothermic effect is strongly associated with depressive states. We therefore suggest that the 8-OH-DPAT challenge can be used to demonstrate a negative emotional state brought on by e.g. long-term single housing in male laboratory mice. The study emphasizes the importance of social housing, and demonstrates that male mice deprived of social contact respond with altered serotonergic signaling activity. Male mice not only choose social contact when given the option, as has previously been shown, but will also, when it is deprived, be negatively affected by its absence. We propose that the 8-OH-DPAT challenge constitutes a simple, but powerful, tool capable of manifesting the effect of social deprivation in laboratory mice. It potentially allows not only for an unbiased, biochemical evaluation of psychological stressors, but may also allow for determining whether the effect of these can be counteracted. PMID:25436462

  20. Melatonin adjusts the expression pattern of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and induces antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andras David; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Kawai, Misato; Goda, Ryosei; Matsuo, Haruka; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that C57BL/6J mice exhibit depression-like behavior under short photoperiod and suggested them as an animal model for investigating seasonal affective disorder (SAD). In this study, we tested if manipulations of the circadian clock with melatonin treatment could effectively modify depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors and brain serotonergic system in C57BL/6J mice. Under short photoperiods (8-h light/16-h dark), daily melatonin treatments 2 h before light offset have significantly altered the 24-h patterns of mRNA expression of circadian clock genes (per1, per2, bmal1 and clock) within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) mostly by increasing amplitude in their expressional rhythms without inducing robust phase shifts in them. Melatonin treatments altered the expression of genes of serotonergic neurotransmission in the dorsal raphe (tph2, sert, vmat2 and 5ht1a) and serotonin contents in the amygdala. Importantly, melatonin treatment reduced the immobility in forced swim test, a depression-like behavior. As a key mechanism of melatonin-induced antidepressant-like effect, the previously proposed phase-advance hypothesis of the circadian clock could not be confirmed under conditions of our experiment. However, our findings of modest adjustments in both the amplitude and phase of the transcriptional oscillators in the SCN as a result of melatonin treatments may be sufficient to associate with the effects seen in the brain serotonergic system and with the improvement in depression-like behavior. Our study confirmed a predictive validity of C57BL/6J mice as a useful model for the molecular analysis of links between the clock and brain serotonergic system, which could greatly accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of SAD, as well as the search for new treatments. PMID:25515595

  1. P-glycoprotein differentially affects escitalopram, levomilnacipran, vilazodone and vortioxetine transport at the mouse blood-brain barrier in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, Christoffer; Eneberg, Elin; Sánchez, Connie

    2016-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated brain efflux of xenobiotics is a well-known process, which may result in suboptimal target engagement and consequently reduced efficacy of drugs exerting their therapeutic effects in the central nervous system. In the present study the role of P-gp in transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was investigated with a series of newer antidepressants (levomilnacipran, vilazodone and vortioxetine) and a control substrate (escitalopram) using P-gp knock-out (KO) and P-gp competent wild-type (WT) mice. Brain and plasma exposure time-courses were measured after an acute subcutaneous dose and at steady-state obtained after subcutaneous drug infusion by osmotic minipumps. Following acute dosing, the brain-to-plasma KO/WT exposure enhancement ratios ((AUCbrain ko/AUCplasma ko)/(AUCbrain WT/AUCplasma WT)) were 5.8 (levomilnacipran), 5.4 (vilazodone), 3.1 (escitalopram) and 0.9 (vortioxetine), respectively. At steady-state, assessment of Kp,uu (unbound brain concentrations/unbound plasma concentrations) revealed a restriction in the brain distribution in WT mice for all compounds except vortioxetine. Levomilnacipran exhibited the most pronounced efflux with a Kp,uu-value of 0.038 in WT mice which was increased to 0.37 in KO mice. Based on both the acute and steady-state distribution data, the results suggest that levomilnacipran, vilazodone and escitalopram are susceptible to P-gp mediated efflux at the BBB in vivo in mice, whereas vortioxetine was practically devoid of being affected by P-gp in vivo. The functional impact of the drug transport-controlling role of P-gp at the BBB was demonstrated by in vivo cortical serotonin transporter occupancy of vilazodone, which exhibited a 20-fold higher plasma EC50 in WT mice compared to KOs. PMID:26700248

  2. Disruption of the arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase gene in the mouse alters the phenotype for methylation of arsenic and affects distribution and retention of orally administered arsenate

    PubMed Central

    Drobna, Zuzana; Narenmandura, Hua; Kubachka, Kevin M.; Edwards, Brenda C.; Herbin-Davis, Karen; Styblo, Miroslav; Le, X. Chris; Creed, John T.; Maeda, Noboyu; Hughes, Michael F.; Thomas, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) gene encodes a 43 kDa protein that catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic. Altered expression of AS3MT in cultured human cells controls arsenic methylation phenotypes, suggesting a critical role in arsenic metabolism. Because methylated arsenicals mediate some toxic or carcinogenic effects linked to inorganic arsenic exposure, studies of the fate and effects of arsenicals in mice which cannot methylate arsenic could be instructive. This study compared retention and distribution of arsenic in As3mt knockout mice and in wild-type C57BL/6 mice in which expression of the As3mt gene is normal. Male and female mice of either genotype received an oral dose of 0.5 mg of arsenic as arsenate per kg containing [73As]-arsenate. Mice were radioassayed for up to 96 hours after dosing; tissues were collected at 2 and 24 hours after dosing. At 2 and 24 hours after dosing, livers of As3mt knockouts contained a greater proportion of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic than did livers of C57BL/6 mice. A similar predominance of inorganic and monomethylated arsenic was found in the urine of As3mt knockouts. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained significantly higher percentages of arsenic dose in liver, kidneys, urinary bladder, lungs, heart, and carcass than did C57BL/6 mice. Whole body clearance of [73As] in As3mt knockouts was substantially slower than in C57BL/6 mice. At 24 hours after dosing, As3mt knockouts retained about 50% and C57BL/6 mice about 6% of the dose. After 96 hours, As3mt knockouts retained about 20% and C57BL/6 mice retained less than 2% of the dose. These data confirm a central role for As3mt in metabolism of inorganic arsenic and indicate that phenotypes for arsenic retention and distribution are markedly affected by the null genotype for arsenic methylation, indicating a close linkage between the metabolism and retention of arsenicals. PMID:19691357

  3. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  4. Inhalable Particles for "Pincer Therapeutics" Targeting Nitazoxanide as Bactericidal and Host-Directed Agent to Macrophages in a Mouse Model of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anuradha; Meena, Jairam; Sharma, Deepak; Gupta, Pushpa; Gupta, Umesh Dutta; Kumar, Sadan; Sharma, Sharad; Panda, Amulya K; Misra, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) has moderate mycobactericidal activity and is also an inducer of autophagy in mammalian cells. High-payload (40-50% w/w) inhalable particles containing NTZ alone or in combination with antituberculosis (TB) agents isoniazid (INH) and rifabutin (RFB) were prepared with high incorporation efficiency of 92%. In vitro drug release was corrected for drug degradation during the course of study and revealed first-order controlled release. Particles were efficiently taken up in vitro by macrophages and maintained intracellular drug concentrations at one order of magnitude higher than NTZ in solution for 6 h. Dose-dependent killing of Mtb and restoration of lung and spleen architecture were observed in experimentally infected mice treated with inhalations containing NTZ. Adjunct NTZ with INH and RFB cleared culturable bacteria from the lung and spleen and markedly healed tissue architecture. NTZ can be used in combination with INH-RFB to kill the pathogen and heal the host. PMID:27463245

  5. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  6. Chikungunya virus-like particles are more immunogenic in a lethal AG129 mouse model compared to glycoprotein E1 or E2 subunits.

    PubMed

    Metz, Stefan W; Martina, Byron E; van den Doel, Petra; Geertsema, Corinne; Osterhaus, Albert D; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2013-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes acute illness characterized by fever and long-lasting arthritic symptoms. The need for a safe and effective vaccine against CHIKV infections is on the rise due to on-going vector spread and increasing severity of clinical complications. Here we report the results of a comparative vaccination-challenge experiment in mice using three different vaccine candidates produced in insect cells by recombinant baculoviruses: (i) secreted (s)E1 and (ii) sE2 CHIKV glycoprotein subunits (2 μg/immunization), and (iii) CHIKV virus-like particles (VLPs) (1 μg E2 equivalent/immunization). These experiments show that vaccination with two subsequent administrations of 1 μg of Matrix M adjuvanted CHIKV VLPs completely protected AG129 mice from lethal CHIKV challenge. Vaccination with E1 and E2 subunits provided partial protection, with half of the mice surviving but with significantly lower neutralizing antibody titres as compared to the VLP vaccinated mice. This study provides evidence that even a modest neutralizing antibody response is sufficient to protect mice from CHIKV infections. Neutralization was the prominent correlate of protection. In addition, CHIKV VLPs provide a superior immune response and protection against CHIKV-induced disease in mice as compared to individual CHIKV-sE1 and -sE2 subunits. PMID:24099875

  7. The method used to culture host cells (Sf9 cells) can affect the qualities of baculovirus budding particles expressing recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tomomi; Nakanishi, Kohei; Mori, Takaaki; Tomita, Masahiro; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2016-01-01

    Budded virus (BV) particles of baculovirus (Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcNPV) are harvested from the supernatant of liquid culture of Sf9 host cells by ultracentrifugation. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of BV samples fractionated closely by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, we observed that BVs exhibited different qualities depending on whether they had been harvested from the supernatant from a standing (static), shaking (suspension), or standing/shaking (pre-/post-infection) culture of Sf9 cells. The amount of BV protein apparently increased in the order of standing, standing/shaking, and shaking procedure, and the yield of intact particles showed an opposite trend. TEM observation clearly showed that appropriate fractions of the standing and standing/shaking cultures contained more intact BV particles than those from the shaking culture. These results suggest that the qualities of recombinant BV particles may be related to the culture conditions of the host cells. PMID:26498840

  8. MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Interaction between Leukemia/Lymphoma-related Factor (LRF) and Alternative Splicing Factor/Splicing Factor 2 (ASF/SF2) Affects Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Senescence and Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Verduci, Lorena; Simili, Marcella; Rizzo, Milena; Mercatanti, Alberto; Evangelista, Monica; Mariani, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Pitto, Letizia

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) is a transcriptional repressor, which by recruiting histone deacetylases specifically represses p19/ARF expression, thus behaving as an oncogene. Conversely, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), LRF inhibition causes aberrant p19ARF up-regulation resulting in proliferative defects and premature senescence. We have recently shown that LRF is controlled by microRNAs. Here we show that LRF acts on MEF proliferation and senescence/apoptosis by repressing miR-28 and miR-505, revealing a regulatory circuit where microRNAs (miRNAs) work both upstream and downstream of LRF. By analyzing miRNA expression profiles of MEF transfected with LRF-specific short interfering RNAs, we found that miR-28 and miR-505 are modulated by LRF. Both miRNAs are predicted to target alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2 (ASF/SF2), a serine/arginine protein essential for cell viability. In vertebrates, loss or inactivation of ASF/SF2 may result in genomic instability and induce G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We showed that miR-28 and miR-505 modulate ASF/SF2 by directly binding ASF/SF2 3′-UTR. Decrease in LRF causes a decrease in ASF/SF2, which depends on up-regulation of miR-28 and miR-505. Alteration of each of the members of the LRF/miR-28/miR-505/ASF/SF2 axis affects MEF proliferation and the number of senescent and apoptotic cells. Consistently, the axis is coordinately modulated as cell senescence increases with passages in MEF culture. In conclusion, we show that LRF-dependent miRNAs miR-28 and miR-505 control MEF proliferation and survival by targeting ASF/SF2 and suggest a central role of LRF-related miRNAs, in addition to the role of LRF-dependent p53 control, in cellular homeostasis. PMID:20923760

  9. Mouse brain responses to charged particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Gregory; Nelson, Gregory; Chang, Polly; Favre, Cecile; Fike, John; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Obenaus, Andre; Pecaut, Michael; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Spigelman, Igor; Stampanoni, Marco

    CHANGES IN DISEASE LATENCY AND HOMEOSTASIS: 1) APP23 transgenic mice exhibit many of the pathological features of Alzheimer's Disease, and the disease progression is continuous over several months. Electrophysiological measurements have shown that disease-related decreases in synaptic efficacy occur earlier in irradiated APP23 animals. 2) Using vascular polymer cast technology combined with micro-tomographic imaging, microvasculature changes following irradiation have been detected and are consistent with loss of vessels and an increased spacing between them. The time course of vessel changes to control and irradiated animals is being constructed. 3) In order to assess the ability of the brain to respond to external environmental shocks and restore orderly normal function (homeostasis), we apply a controlled septic shock by treating animals with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We find that in irradiated animals, the patterns of electrophysiological changes associated with reactions to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are complex and unlike those of either LPS or irradiation alone. They further suggest that the brain continues to remodel for up to 6 months following radiation. This is consistent with the idea that irradiation may potentiate the risks from late secondary insults.

  10. Particle and nuclear physics parameters—how do they affect the tracks of double beta events in a germanium detector, and their separation from gamma events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Krivosheina, I. V.; Titkova, I. V.

    2006-01-01

    The sizes of tracks of events of neutrinoless double beta decay in a germanium detector depend on particle physics and nuclear physics parameters such as neutrino mass, right-handed current parameters, etc., and nuclear matrix elements. The knowledge of this dependence is of importance, since the key to probe the existence of 0 νββ decay beyond observation of a signal at the Q value of the process, Qββ, is the discrimination of ββ events from background γ events (or other events), in almost any double beta decay experiment (see [H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, I.V. Krivosheina, A. Dietz, et al., Phys. Lett. B 586 (2004) 198; H.V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, A. Dietz, I.V. Krivosheina, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 522 (2004) 371]). In this Letter for the first time Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-accompanied (2 νββ) and neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) events, and of various kinds of background processes such as multiple and other γ interactions are reported for a Ge detector. The time history of the evolution of the individual events is followed and a systematic study has been performed of the sizes of the events (volumes in the detector inside which the energy of the event is released which determine the observed signals). Effects of the angular correlations of the two electrons in ββ decay, which again depend on the above nuclear and (for 0 νββ decay) particle physics parameters, are taken into account and have been calculated for this purpose for 76Ge for the first time on basis of the experimental half-life and of realistic nuclear matrix elements. A brief outlook is given on the potential of future experiments with respect to determination of the particle physics parameters , < λ >, < η >.

  11. Whole and Particle-Free Diesel Exhausts Differentially Affect Cardiac Electrophysiology, Blood Pressure, and Autonomic Balance in Heart Failure–Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies strongly link short-term exposures to vehicular traffic and particulate matter (PM) air pollution with adverse cardiovascular (CV) events, especially in those with preexisting CV disease. Diesel engine exhaust is a key contributor to urban ambient PM and gaseous pollutants. To determine the role of gaseous and particulate components in diesel exhaust (DE) cardiotoxicity, we examined the effects of a 4-h inhalation of whole DE (wDE) (target PM concentration: 500 µg/m3) or particle-free filtered DE (fDE) on CV physiology and a range of markers of cardiopulmonary injury in hypertensive heart failure–prone rats. Arterial blood pressure (BP), electrocardiography, and heart rate variability (HRV), an index of autonomic balance, were monitored. Both fDE and wDE decreased BP and prolonged PR interval during exposure, with more effects from fDE, which additionally increased HRV triangular index and decreased T-wave amplitude. fDE increased QTc interval immediately after exposure, increased atrioventricular (AV) block Mobitz II arrhythmias shortly thereafter, and increased serum high-density lipoprotein 1 day later. wDE increased BP and decreased HRV root mean square of successive differences immediately postexposure. fDE and wDE decreased heart rate during the 4th hour of postexposure. Thus, DE gases slowed AV conduction and ventricular repolarization, decreased BP, increased HRV, and subsequently provoked arrhythmias, collectively suggesting parasympathetic activation; conversely, brief BP and HRV changes after exposure to particle-containing DE indicated a transient sympathetic excitation. Our findings suggest that whole- and particle-free DE differentially alter CV and autonomic physiology and may potentially increase risk through divergent pathways. PMID:22543275

  12. Replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine affects the normal proton transfer pathways for the reduction of P680+ in oxygen-evolving photosystem II particles from Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Jeans, C; Schilstra, M J; Ray, N; Husain, S; Minagawa, J; Nugent, J H A; Klug, D R

    2002-12-31

    We have probed the electrostatics of P680(+) reduction in oxygenic photosynthesis using histidine-tagged and histidine-tagged Y(D)-less Photosystem II cores. We make two main observations: (i) that His-tagged Chlamydomonas cores show kinetics which are essentially identical to those of Photosystem II enriched thylakoid membranes from spinach; (ii) that the microsecond kinetics, previously shown to be proton/hydrogen transfer limited [Schilstra et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 3974-3981], are significantly different in Y(D)-less Chlamydomonas particles when compared with both the His-tagged Chlamydomonas particles and the spinach membranes. The oscillatory nature of the kinetics in both Chlamydomonas samples is normal, indicating that S-state cycling is unaffected by either the histidine-tagging or the replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine. We propose that the effects on the proton-coupled electron transfers of P680(+) reduction in the absence of Y(D) are likely to be due to pK shifts of residues in a hydrogen-bonded network of amino acids in the vicinity of Y(Z). Tyrosine D is 35 A from Y(Z) and yet has a significant influence on proton-coupled electron transfer events in the vicinity of Y(Z). This finding emphasizes the delicacy of the proton balance that Photosystem II has to achieve during the water splitting process. PMID:12501204

  13. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  14. Factors affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced Al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baisong; Yi, Jianhong; Ni, Song; Shen, Rujuan; Song, Min

    2016-04-01

    This work studied the effects of matrix powder and sintering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ formed Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced pure Al-based composites. It has been shown that both factors have significant effects on the morphology of the reinforcements and densification behaviour of the composites. Due to the strong interfacial bonding and the limitation of the crack propagation in the intermetallic shell during deformation by soft Al matrix and Ti core, the composite fabricated using fine spherical-shaped Al powder and sintered at 570 °C for 5 h has the optimal combination of the overall mechanical properties. The study provides a direction for the optimum combination of high strength and ductility of the composites by adjusting the fabrication parameters.

  15. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  16. Mouse models of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Ban, Joanne; Phillips, William D

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a muscle weakness disease characterized by autoantibodies that target components of the neuromuscular junction, impairing synaptic transmission. The most common form of myasthenia gravis involves antibodies that bind the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. Many of the remaining cases are due to antibodies against muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Recently, autoantibodies against LRP4 (another component of the MuSK signaling complex in the postsynaptic membrane) were identified as the likely cause of myasthenia gravis in some patients. Fatiguing weakness is the common symptom in all forms of myasthenia gravis, but muscles of the body are differentially affected, for reasons that are not fully understood. Much of what we have learnt about the immunological and neurobiological aspects of the pathogenesis derives from mouse models. The most widely used mouse models involve either passive transfer of autoantibodies, or active immunization of the mouse with acetylcholine receptors or MuSK protein. These models can provide a robust replication of many of the features of the human disease. Depending upon the protocol, acute fatiguing weakness develops 2 - 14 days after the start of autoantibody injections (passive transfer) or might require repeated immunizations over several weeks (active models). Here we review mouse models of myasthenia gravis, including what they have contributed to current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and their current application to the testing of therapeutics. PMID:25777761

  17. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  18. Accelerated (48)Ti Ions Induce Autosomal Mutations in Mouse Kidney Epithelium at Low Dose and Fluence.

    PubMed

    Hryciw, Gwen; Grygoryev, Dmytro; Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna; Dan, Cristian; Madhira, Ravi; Eckelmann, Bradley; Gauny, Stacey; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to high-energy charged particles (HZE ions) at low fluence could significantly affect astronaut health after prolonged missions in deep space by inducing mutations and related cancers. We tested the hypothesis that the mutagenic effects of HZE ions could be detected at low fluence in a mouse model that detects autosomal mutations in vivo. Aprt heterozygous mice were exposed to 0.2, 0.4 and 1.4 Gy of densely ionizing (48)Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm). We observed a dose-dependent increase in the Aprt mutant fraction in kidney epithelium at the two lowest doses (an average of 1 or 2 particles/cell nucleus) that plateaued at the highest dose (7 particles/cell nucleus). Mutant cells were expanded to determine mutation spectra and translocations affecting chromosome 8, which encodes Aprt. A PCR-based analysis for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) events on chromosome 8 demonstrated a significant shift in the mutational spectrum from Ti ion exposure, even at low fluence, by revealing "radiation signature" mutations in mutant cells from exposed mice. Likewise, a cytogenetic assay for nonreciprocal chromosome 8 translocations showed an effect of exposure. A genome-wide LOH assay for events affecting nonselected chromosomes also showed an effect of exposure even for the lowest dose tested. Considered in their entirety, these results show that accelerated (48)Ti ions induce large mutations affecting one or more chromosomes at low dose and fluence. PMID:26397174

  19. Mouse models of the laminopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Colin L. . E-mail: stewartc@ncifcrf.gov; Kozlov, Serguei; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G. . E-mail: sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu

    2007-06-10

    The A and B type lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins that comprise the bulk of the nuclear lamina, a thin proteinaceous structure underlying the inner nuclear membrane. The A type lamins are encoded by the lamin A gene (LMNA). Mutations in this gene have been linked to at least nine diseases, including the progeroid diseases Hutchinson-Gilford progeria and atypical Werner's syndromes, striated muscle diseases including muscular dystrophies and dilated cardiomyopathies, lipodystrophies affecting adipose tissue deposition, diseases affecting skeletal development, and a peripheral neuropathy. To understand how different diseases arise from different mutations in the same gene, mouse lines carrying some of the same mutations found in the human diseases have been established. We, and others have generated mice with different mutations that result in progeria, muscular dystrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy. To further our understanding of the functions of the lamins, we also created mice lacking lamin B1, as well as mice expressing only one of the A type lamins. These mouse lines are providing insights into the functions of the lamina and how changes to the lamina affect the mechanical integrity of the nucleus as well as signaling pathways that, when disrupted, may contribute to the disease.

  20. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  1. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  2. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  3. M2698 is a potent dual-inhibitor of p70S6K and Akt that affects tumor growth in mouse models of cancer and crosses the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Machl, Andreas; Wilker, Erik W; Tian, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong; Schroeder, Patricia; Clark, Anderson; Huck, Bayard R

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated PI3K/Akt/mTOR (PAM) pathway signaling occurs in ~30% of human cancers, making it a rational target for new therapies; however, the effectiveness of some PAM pathway inhibitors, such as mTORC rapalogs, may be compromised by a compensatory feedback loop leading to Akt activation. In this study, the p70S6K/Akt dual inhibitor, M2698 (previously MSC2363318A), was characterized as a potential anti-cancer agent through examination of its pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and metabolic properties, and anti-tumor activity. M2698 was highly potent in vitro (IC50 1 nM for p70S6K, Akt1 and Akt3 inhibition; IC50 17 nM for pGSK3β indirect inhibition) and in vivo (IC50 15 nM for pS6 indirect inhibition), and relatively selective (only 6/264 kinases had an IC50 within 10-fold of p70S6K). Orally administered M2698 crossed the blood-brain barrier in rats and mice, with brain tumor exposure 4-fold higher than non-disease brain. Dose-dependent inhibition of target substrate phosphorylation was observed in vitro and in vivo, indicating that M2698 blocked p70S6K to provide potent PAM pathway inhibition while simultaneously targeting Akt to overcome the compensatory feedback loop. M2698 demonstrated dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition in mouse xenograft models derived from PAM pathway-dysregulated human triple-negative (MDA-MB-468) and Her2-expressing breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-453 and JIMT-1), and reduced brain tumor burden and prolonged survival in mice with orthotopically implanted U251 glioblastoma. These findings highlight M2698 as a promising PAM pathway inhibitor whose unique mechanism of action and capacity to pass the blood-brain barrier warrant clinical investigation in cancers with PAM pathway dysregulation, and those with central nervous system involvement. PMID:27186432

  4. Translating Mouse Vocalizations: Prosody and Frequency Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Lahvis, Garet P.; Alleva, Enrico; Scattoni, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    Mental illness can include impaired abilities to express emotions or respond to the emotions of others. Speech provides a mechanism for expressing emotions, by both what words are spoken and by the melody or intonation of speech (prosody). Through the perception of variations in prosody, an individual can detect changes in another's emotional state. Prosodic features of mouse ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), indicated by changes in frequency and amplitude, also convey information. Dams retrieve pups that emit separation calls, females approach males emitting solicitous calls, and mice can become fearful of a cue associated with the vocalizations of a distressed conspecific. Since acoustic features of mouse USVs respond to drugs and genetic manipulations that influence reward circuits, USV analysis can be employed to examine how genes influence social motivation, affect regulation, and communication. The purpose of this review is to discuss how genetic and developmental factors influence aspects of the mouse vocal repertoire and how mice respond to the vocalizations of their conspecifics. To generate falsifiable hypotheses about the emotional content of particular calls, this review addresses USV analysis within the framework of affective neuroscience (e.g. measures of motivated behavior such as conditioned place preference tests, brain activity, and systemic physiology). Suggested future studies include employment of an expanded array of physiological and statistical approaches to identify the salient acoustic features of mouse vocalizations. We are particularly interested in rearing environments that incorporate sufficient spatial and temporal complexity to familiarize developing mice with a broader array of affective states. PMID:20497235

  5. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  6. Mouse models of congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Graw, J

    1999-06-01

    Mouse mutants affecting lens development are excellent models for corresponding human disorders. The mutant aphakia has been characterised by bilaterally aphakic eyes (Varnum and Stevens, J Hered 1968;59:147-50); the corresponding gene was mapped to chromosome 19 (Varnum and Stevens, Mouse News Lett 1975;53:35). Recent investigations in our laboratory refined the linkage of 0.6 cM proximal to the marker D19Mit10. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Chuk1, Fgf8, Lbp1, Npm3, Pax2, Pitx3). The Cat3 mutations are characterised by vacuolated lenses caused by alterations in the initial secondary lens fibre cell differentiation. Secondary malformations develop at the cornea and iris, but the retina remains unaffected. The mutation has been mapped to chromosome 10 close to the markers D10Mit41 and D10Mit95. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Dcn, Elk3, Ldc, Mell8, Tr2-11). The series of Cat2 mutations have been mapped close to the gamma-crystallin genes (Cryg; Löster et al., Genomics 1994;23:240-2). The Cat2nop mutation is characterised by a mutation in the third exon of Crygb leading to a truncated gamma B-crystallin and the termination of lens fibre cell differentiation. The Cat2 mutants are interesting models for human cataracts caused by mutations in the human CRYG genes at chromosome 2q32-35. PMID:10627821

  7. Spectral imaging of mouse calvaria undergoing craniosynstosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Wang, Wei; Ignelzi, Michael A., Jr.; Morris, Michael D.

    2003-07-01

    Craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of the skull bones at the sutures, is the second most common human birth defect that affects the face and skull. The top most flat bones that comprise the skull, or calvaria, are most often affected. We previously showed that treatment of mouse calvaria with FGF2-soaked beads leads to craniosynostosis. In this study we treated mouse calvaria with FGF2-soaked beads and then used Raman imaging to demonstrate the spatial distribution of apatitic mineral and matrix in the sutures. There was no difference between FGF2 treated and control calvaria in the type of mineral produced (a lightly carbonated apatite), however we did observe increased mineral deposition in FGF2 treated calvaria. Raman imaging has great promise to detect the earliest mineral and matrix changes that occur in craniosynostosis.

  8. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  9. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  10. Affective Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles T.

    This paper addresses itself to the question, "What does feeling have to do with knowing?" Two movements in affective education are discussed which have come into focus in recent years and which attempt to define the relationship between knowing and feeling. The first, a conscious application of the role of arousal in learning, emphasizes arousal…

  11. Chimeric HBcAg virus-like particles presenting a HPV 16 E7 epitope significantly suppressed tumor progression through preventive or therapeutic immunization in a TC-1-grafted mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiaojie; Li, Yang; Long, Qiong; Xia, Ye; Yao, Yufeng; Sun, Wenjia; Huang, Weiwei; Yang, Xu; Liu, Cunbao; Ma, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are currently being developed. However, no therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in clinical trials for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cancer. One of the important issues in increasing vaccine efficacy is determining the best way to enhance tumor antigen-specific cellular immune responses. This study aimed to explore the virus-like particles (VLPs) of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) as potential therapeutic vaccine carriers and to assess its immunological characteristics. Methods Chimeric VLPs presenting a HPV 16 cytotoxic T lymphocytes epitope E749–57 (amino acid 49–57 of the E7 protein) were prepared using recombinant genes. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with VLPs and grafted with tumor cells TC-1 which is an E7-expressing tumorigenic cell line. The dynamic tumor growth was monitored and anti-tumor immune responses were investigated. Results Using a preventive strategy, immunization with VLPs resulted in nearly complete suppression of tumor growth. In treatment studies, VLP immunization significantly suppressed the tumor progression in mice carrying 2–3 mm tumors and in those bearing even larger tumors with diameters up to 8–9 mm. The VLP structure was shown to be important to induce vigorous antitumor immunity and effects. In immunized mice, enhanced E749–57-specific cellular immune responses were evidenced by increased interferon (IFN)-γ expression and decreased interleukin (IL)-4 expression in splenic lymphocytes, as well as an elevated number of effector cells expressing IFN-γ in response to the in vitro stimulation of the specific peptide E749–57. In addition, effective immune memory after VLP immunization was maintained for at least 16 weeks, preventing significant tumor growth after subsequent TC-1 challenge. Conclusion While VLPs were highly immunogenic in stimulating humoral immunity, our results strongly indicated that VLPs, such as HBcAg particles, might

  12. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F; Parkinson, Fiona E

    2016-07-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73(+/+)) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73(-/-)) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73(+/+) mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73(+/+) mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg(2+) conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73(-/-) mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  13. Ethanol Tolerance Affects Endogenous Adenosine Signaling in Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dali; Xiong, Wei; Jackson, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol has many pharmacological effects, including increases in endogenous adenosine levels and adenosine receptor activity in brain. Ethanol consumption is associated with both positive and negative health outcomes, but tolerance to the behavioral effects of ethanol can lead to increased consumption, which increases the risk of negative health outcomes. The present study was performed to test whether a 7-day treatment with ethanol is linked to reduced adenosine signaling and whether this is a consequence of reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. Wild-type (CD73+/+) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase-deficient (CD73−/−) mice were treated with ethanol (2 g/kg) or saline for 7 days. In CD73+/+ mice, repeated ethanol treatment reduced the hypothermic and ataxic effects of acute ethanol, indicating the development of tolerance to the acute effects of ethanol. In CD73+/+ mice, this 7-day ethanol treatment led to increased hippocampal synaptic activity and reduced adenosine A1 receptor activity under both basal and low Mg2+ conditions. These effects of ethanol tolerance were associated with an 18% decrease in activity of ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity in hippocampal cell membranes. In contrast, ethanol treatment was not associated with changes in synaptic activity or adenosine signaling in hippocampus from CD73−/− mice. These data indicate that ethanol treatment is associated with a reduction in adenosine signaling through adenosine A1 receptors in hippocampus, mediated, at least in part, via reduced ecto-5′-nucleotidase activity. PMID:27189965

  14. Colonization, mouse-style

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325 PMID:20977781

  15. MOUSE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cost or risk analysis equations. t was especially intended for use by individuals with li...

  16. Rapid Measurements of Aerosol Ionic Composition and 3-10 nm Particle Size Distributions On The NASA P3 To Better Quantify Processes Affecting Aerosols Advected From East Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Rodney J.

    2004-01-01

    The Particle Into Liquid Sample (PILS) was deployed on the NASA P3 for airborne measurements of fine particle ionic chemical composition. The data have been quality assured and reside in the NASA data archive. We have analyzed our data to characterize the sources and atmospheric processing of fine aerosol particles advected from the region during the experiments. Fine particle water-soluble potassium was found to serve as a useful aerosol tracer for biomass smoke. Ratios of PILS potassium to sulfate are used as a means of estimating the percent contribution of biomass burning to fine particle mass in mixed plumes advecting from Asia. The high correlations between K+ and NO3(sup -) and NH4(sup +)' indicated that biomass burning was a significant source of these aerosol compounds in the region. It is noteworthy that the air mass containing the highest concentrations of fine particles recorded in all of ACE-Asia and TRACE-P appeared to be advecting from the Bejing/Tientsin urban region and also had the highest K(+), NO3(sup -) and NH4(sup +) concentrations of both studies. Based on K+/SO4(sup 2-) ratio's, we estimated that the plume was composed of approx. 60% biomass burning emissions, possibly from the use of bio-fuels in the urban regions.

  17. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  18. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  19. CD36 and Proteoglycan-Mediated Pathways for (n-3) Fatty Acid–Enriched Triglyceride-Rich Particle Blood Clearance in Mouse Models In Vivo and in Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro1,2

    PubMed Central

    Densupsoontorn, Narumon; Carpentier, Yvon A.; Racine, Radjini; Murray, Faith M.; Seo, Toru; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Deckelbaum, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Because the mechanisms of (n-3) fatty acid–enriched triglyceride-rich particle [(n-3)-TGRP] uptake are not well characterized, we questioned whether (n-3)-TGRP are removed via “nonclassical” pathways, e.g., pathways other than an LDL receptor and/or involving apolipoprotein E (apoE). Chylomicron-sized model (n-3)-TGRP labeled with [3H]cholesteryl ether were injected into wild-type (WT) and CD36 knockout (CD36−/−) mice at low, nonsaturating and high, saturating doses. Blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was determined by calculating fractional catabolic rates. At saturating doses, blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP was slower in CD36−/− mice relative to WT mice, suggesting that in part CD36 contributes to (n-3)-TGRP uptake. To further examine the potential nonclassical clearance pathways, peritoneal-elicited macrophages from WT and CD36−/− mice were incubated with (n-3)-TGRP in the presence of apoE, lactoferrin, and/or sodium chlorate. Cellular (n-3)-TGRP uptake was measured to test the roles of apoE-mediated pathways and/or proteoglycans. ApoE-mediated pathways compensated in part for defective (n-3)-TGRP uptake in CD36−/− cells. Lactoferrin decreased (n-3)-TGRP uptake in the presence of apoE. Inhibition of cell proteoglycan synthesis by chlorate reduced (n-3)-TGRP uptake in both groups of macrophages, and chlorate effects were independent of apoE. We conclude that although CD36 is involved, it is not the primary contributor to the blood clearance of (n-3)-TGRP. The removal of (n-3)-TGRP likely relies more on nonclassical pathways, such as proteoglycan-mediated pathways. PMID:18203888

  20. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  1. Mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Berns, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease and a major therapeutic burden with poor survival rates. It is responsible for 30% of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, although some subtypes are also seen in non-smokers. Tumors in the latter group are mostly adenocarcinomas with many carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Survival statistics of lung cancer are grim because of its late detection and frequent local and distal metastases. Although DNA sequence information from tumors has revealed a number of frequently occurring mutations, affecting well-known tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, many of the driver mutations remain ill defined. This is likely due to the involvement of numerous rather infrequently occurring driver mutations that are difficult to distinguish from the very large number of passenger mutations detected in smoking-related lung cancers. Therefore, experimental model systems are indispensable to validate putative driver lesions and to gain insight into their mechanisms of action. Whereas a large fraction of these analyzes can be performed in cell cultures in vitro, in many cases the consequences of the mutations have to be assessed in the context of an intact organism, as this is the context in which the Mendelian selection process of the tumorigenic process took place and the advantages of particular mutations become apparent. Current mouse models for cancer are very suitable for this as they permit mimicking many of the salient features of human tumors. The capacity to swiftly re-engineer complex sets of lesions found in human tumors in mice enables us to assess the contribution of defined combinations of lesions to distinct tumor characteristics such as metastatic behavior and response to therapy. In this review we will describe mouse models of lung cancer and how they are used to better understand the disease and how they are exploited to develop better intervention strategies

  2. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  3. Mouse phenome database.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Stephen C; Bult, Carol J; Bogue, Molly A

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  4. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  5. Sequence, molecular properties, and chromosomal mapping of mouse lumican

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funderburgh, J. L.; Funderburgh, M. L.; Hevelone, N. D.; Stech, M. E.; Justice, M. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Kao, W. W.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE. Lumican is a major proteoglycan of vertebrate cornea. This study characterizes mouse lumican, its molecular form, cDNA sequence, and chromosomal localization. METHODS. Lumican sequence was determined from cDNA clones selected from a mouse corneal cDNA expression library using a bovine lumican cDNA probe. Tissue expression and size of lumican mRNA were determined using Northern hybridization. Glycosidase digestion followed by Western blot analysis provided characterization of molecular properties of purified mouse corneal lumican. Chromosomal mapping of the lumican gene (Lcn) used Southern hybridization of a panel of genomic DNAs from an interspecific murine backcross. RESULTS. Mouse lumican is a 338-amino acid protein with high-sequence identity to bovine and chicken lumican proteins. The N-terminus of the lumican protein contains consensus sequences for tyrosine sulfation. A 1.9-kb lumican mRNA is present in cornea and several other tissues. Antibody against bovine lumican reacted with recombinant mouse lumican expressed in Escherichia coli and also detected high molecular weight proteoglycans in extracts of mouse cornea. Keratanase digestion of corneal proteoglycans released lumican protein, demonstrating the presence of sulfated keratan sulfate chains on mouse corneal lumican in vivo. The lumican gene (Lcn) was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10. The Lcn map site is in the region of a previously identified developmental mutant, eye blebs, affecting corneal morphology. CONCLUSIONS. This study demonstrates sulfated keratan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse cornea and describes the tools (antibodies and cDNA) necessary to investigate the functional role of this important corneal molecule using naturally occurring and induced mutants of the murine lumican gene.

  6. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  7. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  8. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  9. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  10. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  11. Computational Multiscale Toxicodynamic Modeling of Silver and Carbon Nanoparticle Effects on Mouse Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Botelho, Danielle; Gow, Andrew J.; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2013-01-01

    A computational, multiscale toxicodynamic model has been developed to quantify and predict pulmonary effects due to uptake of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in mice. The model consists of a collection of coupled toxicodynamic modules, that were independently developed and tested using information obtained from the literature. The modules were developed to describe the dynamics of tissue with explicit focus on the cells and the surfactant chemicals that regulate the process of breathing, as well as the response of the pulmonary system to xenobiotics. Alveolar type I and type II cells, and alveolar macrophages were included in the model, along with surfactant phospholipids and surfactant proteins, to account for processes occurring at multiple biological scales, coupling cellular and surfactant dynamics affected by nanoparticle exposure, and linking the effects to tissue-level lung function changes. Nanoparticle properties such as size, surface chemistry, and zeta potential were explicitly considered in modeling the interactions of these particles with biological media. The model predictions were compared with in vivo lung function response measurements in mice and analysis of mice lung lavage fluid following exposures to silver and carbon nanoparticles. The predictions were found to follow the trends of observed changes in mouse surfactant composition over 7 days post dosing, and are in good agreement with the observed changes in mouse lung function over the same period of time. PMID:24312506

  12. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  13. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  14. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  15. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  16. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  17. Operant responding following exposure to HZE particles and its relationship to particle energy and LET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions astronauts will be exposed to range of heavy particles which differ in terms of particle energy and particle linear energy transfer. The present experiments were designed to evaluate how these physical characteristics of different particles affect cognitive performance...

  18. The Mouse Olfactory Peduncle

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C; Kay, Rachel B; Arrivillaga, J. P

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory peduncle, the region connecting the olfactory bulb with the basal forebrain, contains several neural areas that have received relatively little attention. The present work includes studies that provide an overview of the region in the mouse. An analysis of cell soma size in pars principalis (pP) of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) revealed considerable differences in tissue organization between mice and rats. An unbiased stereological study of neuron number in the cell-dense regions of pars externa (pE) and pP of the AON of 3, 12 and 24 month-old mice indicated that pE has about 16,500 cells in 0.043 mm3and pP about 58,300 cells in 0.307 mm3. Quantitative Golgi studies of pyramidal neurons in pP suggested that mouse neurons are similar though smaller to those of the rat. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that all peduncular regions (pE, pP, the dorsal peduncular cortex, ventral tenia tecta, and anterior olfactory tubercle and piriform cortex) have cells that express either calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, neuropeptide Y or cholecystokinin (antigens commonly co-expressed by subspecies of GABAergic neurons), though the relative numbers of each cell type differs between zones. Finally, an electron microscopic comparison of the organization of myelinated fibers in lateral olfactory tract in the anterior and posterior peduncle indicated that the region is less orderly in mice than in the rat. The results provide a caveat for investigators who generalize data between species as both similarities and differences between the laboratory mouse and rat were observed. PMID:21618219

  19. Mouse Models for Assessing Protein Immunogenicity: Lessons and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Jiskoot, Wim; Kijanka, Grzegorz; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F; Koulov, Atanas V; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Joubert, Marisa K; Jawa, Vibha; Narhi, Linda O

    2016-05-01

    The success of clinical and commercial therapeutic proteins is rapidly increasing, but their potential immunogenicity is an ongoing concern. Most of the studies that have been conducted over the past few years to examine the importance of various product-related attributes (in particular several types of aggregates and particles) and treatment regimen (such as dose, dosing schedule, and route of administration) in the development of unwanted immune responses have utilized one of a variety of mouse models. In this review, we discuss the utility and drawbacks of different mouse models that have been used for this purpose. Moreover, we summarize the lessons these models have taught us and some of the challenges they present. Finally, we provide recommendations for future research utilizing mouse models to improve our understanding of critical factors that may contribute to protein immunogenicity. PMID:27044944

  20. On Characterizing Particle Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennis, Bryan J.; Rickman, Douglas; Rollins, A. Brent; Ennis, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that particle shape affects flow characteristics of granular materials, as well as a variety of other solids processing issues such as compaction, rheology, filtration and other two-phase flow problems. The impact of shape crosses many diverse and commercially important applications, including pharmaceuticals, civil engineering, metallurgy, health, and food processing. Two applications studied here include the dry solids flow of lunar simulants (e.g. JSC-1, NU-LHT-2M, OB-1), and the flow properties of wet concrete, including final compressive strength. A multi-dimensional generalized, engineering method to quantitatively characterize particle shapes has been developed, applicable to both single particle orientation and multi-particle assemblies. The two-dimension, three dimension inversion problem is also treated, and the application of these methods to DEM model particles will be discussed. In the case of lunar simulants, flow properties of six lunar simulants have been measured, and the impact of particle shape on flowability - as characterized by the shape method developed here -- is discussed, especially in the context of three simulants of similar size range. In the context of concrete processing, concrete construction is a major contributor to greenhouse gas production, of which the major contributor is cement binding loading. Any optimization in concrete rheology and packing that can reduce cement loading and improve strength loading can also reduce currently required construction safety factors. The characterization approach here is also demonstrated for the impact of rock aggregate shape on concrete slump rheology and dry compressive strength.

  1. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle. PMID:27184881

  2. KRAS Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Rónán C.; Heyer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    KRAS is a potent oncogene and is mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. However, the biological context of KRAS-dependent oncogenesis is poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models of cancer provide invaluable tools to study the oncogenic process, and insights from KRAS-driven models have significantly increased our understanding of the genetic, cellular, and tissue contexts in which KRAS is competent for oncogenesis. Moreover, variation among tumors arising in mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to therapy in KRAS-dependent cancers. Hence, it is essential that models of KRAS-driven cancers accurately reflect the genetics of human tumors and recapitulate the complex tumor-stromal intercommunication that is manifest in human cancers. Here, we highlight the progress made in modeling KRAS-dependent cancers and the impact that these models have had on our understanding of cancer biology. In particular, the development of models that recapitulate the complex biology of human cancers enables translational insights into mechanisms of therapeutic intervention in KRAS-dependent cancers. PMID:21779503

  3. [Genetics of mouse-hole].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    The Oldfield mouse and the Deer mouse build very different burrows in nature and also in the laboratory. This behaviour is innate and, in a series of beautiful experiments making use of new generation sequencing for genetic mapping, the authors map the burrow architecture to a very small number of loci and demonstrate modular evolution of behaviour. PMID:23621941

  4. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  5. Elementary Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, R.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the text of a speech given to a conference of physics teachers in which the full spectrum of elementary particles is given, along with their classification. Also includes some teaching materials available on this topic. (PEB)

  6. Elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

  7. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  8. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  9. Mouse Models of Neurofibromatosis 1 and 21

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H; Giovannini, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The neurofibromatoses represent two of the most common inherited tumor predisposition syndromes affecting the nervous system. Individuals with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) are prone to the development of astrocytomas and peripheral nerve sheath tumors whereas those affected with neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) develop schwannomas and meningiomas. The development of traditional homozygous knockout mice has provided insights into the roles of the NF1 and NF2 genes during development and in differentiation, but has been less instructive regarding the contribution of NF1 and NF2 dysfunction to the pathogenesis of specific benign and malignant tumors. Recent progress employing novel mouse targeting strategies has begun to illuminate the roles of the NF1 and NF2 gene products in the molecular pathogenesis of NF-associated tumors. PMID:12082543

  10. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  11. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  12. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  13. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  14. Preclinical mouse models of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Segaliny, Aude; Botter, Sander; Santiago, Janice M; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common form of primary bone tumors with high prevalence in children. Survival rates of osteosarcoma are low, especially in the case of metastases. Mouse models of this disease have been very valuable in investigation of mechanisms of tumorigenesis, metastasis, as well as testing possible therapeutic options. In this chapter, we summarize currently available mouse models for osteosarcoma and provide detailed methodology for the isolation of cell lines from genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), gene modification and tumor cell injection methods, as well as imaging techniques. PMID:25987985

  15. Ultrastructural study of Rift Valley fever virus in the mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Christopher; Steele, Keith E.; Honko, Anna; Shamblin, Joshua; Hensley, Lisa E.; Smith, Darci R.

    2012-09-15

    Detailed ultrastructural studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in the mouse model are needed to develop and characterize a small animal model of RVF for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, the ultrastructural features of RVFV infection in the mouse model were analyzed. The main changes in the liver included the presence of viral particles in hepatocytes and hepatic stem cells accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. However, viral particles were observed rarely in the liver; in contrast, particles were extremely abundant in the CNS. Despite extensive lymphocytolysis, direct evidence of viral replication was not observed in the lymphoid tissue. These results correlate with the acute-onset hepatitis and delayed-onset encephalitis that are dominant features of severe human RVF, but suggest that host immune-mediated mechanisms contribute significantly to pathology. The results of this study expand our knowledge of RVFV-host interactions and further characterize the mouse model of RVF.

  16. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  17. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  18. Particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, B. |

    1992-12-31

    In the last few years, particle astrophysics has emerged as a new field at the frontier between high energy astrophysics, cosmology, and particle physics. Two spectacular achievements of this new field in the last decade have been the establishment of neutrino astronomy with the detection of solar neutrinos by two independent experiments and the spectacular observation of the neutrinos from the supernova SN1987A. In addition, the field has produced tantalizing hints of new physics beyond the standard models of astrophysics and particle physics, generating enthusiastic attempts to confirm these potential effects. This new field involves some two hundred experimentalists and a similar number of theorists, most of them coming from particle and nuclear physics, and as scientist will see, their effort is to a large extent complementary to accelerator based high energy physics. This review attempts, at the beginning of this workshop, to capture the excitement of this new field. Summary talks will describe in more detail some of the topics discussed in the study groups.

  19. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Neumann, A.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory.

  20. Functional colloidal particles for immunoresearch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Rembaum, A.; Molday, R. W.; Dreyer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of a new class of immunological reagents consisting of antibodies covalently bonded to polymeric microspheres to serve as convenient markers for detection of cell surface antigens by scanning electron and light microscopy. Attention is focused on the design and synthesis of spherical particles containing hydroxyl and carboxyl groups on their surface in a wide range of sizes (30-340 nm diam) by emulsion copolymerization, the preparation of spherical particles ranging from 300 nm to 3 microns and containing a variety of functional groups by means of ionizing radiation, and the experimental conditions for the covalent bonding of fluorescent molecules and antibodies to the spheres by means of the cyanogen bromide, carbodiimide and glutaraldehyde methods. These reagents are used to locate antigens on red blood cells, on mouse and human lymphocytes, and on the surface of photoreceptors. They offer a number of advantages and applications for the study of cell surfaces for immunodiagnosis.

  1. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and long term use. Potential Hazards: When the sensitivity for the input device is not appropriately set, ... provide adequate control. A mouse that has insufficient sensitivity may require large deviation of the wrist to ...

  2. Investigation of plasma particle interactions with variable particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In dusty plasmas, the dust particles are subjected to many forces of different origins. Both the gas and plasma directly affect the dust particles through electric fields, neutral drag, ion drag and thermophoretic forces, while the particles themselves interact with one another through a screened coulomb potential, which can be influenced by flowing ions. Recently, micron sized particles have been used as probes to analyze the electric fields in the plasma directly. A proper analysis of the resulting data requires a full understanding of the manner in which these forces couple to the dust particles. In most cases each of the forces exhibit unique characteristics, many of which are partially dependent on the particle size. In this study, five different particle sizes are used to investigate the forces resident in the sheath above the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell. The particles are tracked using a high-speed camera, yielding two-dimensional force maps allowing the force on the particles to be described as a polynomial series. It will be shown that the data collected can be analyzed to reveal information about the origins of the various forces. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Studying how flocculation affects acoustic reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-06-01

    In inland estuaries and shallow coastal waters, small particles of organic matter, such as organic waste and debris or bacteria, clump together to form an aggregate known as floc. Flocculated particles can span a range of sizes, from a few micrometers to a few millimeters, and the properties and concentration of floc have a strong influence on water quality. To infer the properties of floc particles, researchers have proposed using acoustic backscatter measurements, a common technique for estimating sediment concentrations. To do so, however, requires an understanding of how the properties of floc particles affect acoustic wave reflection.

  4. Training pathologists in mouse pathology.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Ward, J M; HogenEsch, H; Nikitin, A Yu; Treuting, P M; Macauley, J B; Schofield, P N

    2012-03-01

    Expertise in the pathology of mice has expanded from traditional regulatory and drug safety screening (toxicologic pathology) primarily performed by veterinary pathologists to the highly specialized area of mouse research pathobiology performed by veterinary and medical pathologists encompassing phenotyping of mutant mice and analysis of research experiments exploiting inbred mouse strains and genetically engineered lines. With increasing use of genetically modified mice in research, mouse pathobiology and, by extension, expert mouse research-oriented pathologists have become integral to the success of basic and translational biomedical research. Training for today's research-oriented mouse pathologist must go beyond knowledge of anatomic features of mice and strain-specific background diseases to the specialized genetic nomenclature, husbandry, and genetics, including the methodology of genetic engineering and complex trait analysis. While training can be accomplished through apprenticeships in formal programs, these are often heavily service related and do not provide the necessary comprehensive training. Specialty courses and short-term mentoring with expert specialists are opportunities that, when combined with active practice and publication, will lead to acquisition of the skills required for cutting-edge mouse-based experimental science. PMID:20817889

  5. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  6. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  7. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  8. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  9. Particle clustering in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Battista; F, Picano; G, Troiani; M, Casciola C.

    2011-12-01

    Transport of inertial particles in turbulent reacting flows is frequent in a number of engineering and natural systems. Aim of this work is to illustrate the effect of the fluctuating instantaneous flame front on the particle spatial distribution. To this purpose a Direct Numerical Simulation of a Bunsen premixed flame seeded with small inertial particles is performed. The flamelet Stokes number Stfl, defined as the ratio between the particle relaxation time and the flame front time scale, is found to be the proper parameter to characterize the particle dynamics in a premixed flame. Clustering of inertial particles is apparent, especially beyond the flame front. The amount of particle segregation is here quantified by the clustering index and two distinct contributions are found to interplay. The first is independent of the particle inertia and affects also tracers. Actually it is associated to the abrupt variation of the particle concentration induced by the fluid expansion across the flame front. The second effect is mainly due to the time lag associated to the particle inertia that, in proximity of the front, affects both the mean and the fluctuation of the particle number in a fixed volume. The global effect results in an intense clustering of the inertial particles in the flame brush region with a maximum for particles with flamelet Stokes number: Stfl = Script O(1).

  10. The Mouse House: a brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Liane B

    2013-01-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  11. Rabbit antiserum to mouse embryonic stem cells delays compaction of mouse preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yingli; Cui, Lifang; Zhang, Zhenhong; Xi, Jianzhong; Wang, Mianjuan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the preimplantation blastocysts. So it is suggested that ES and ICM cells should have similar cellular surface molecules and antiserum to ES cells can inhibit ICM development. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of rabbit antiserum to ES cells on mouse preimplantation embryo development and chimera production. Materials and Methods: Mouse 4-cell embryos were matured in vitro at 37.5oC, in humidified 5% CO2 atmosphere for 12-36 h. The embryos were cultured in KSOM medium with or without antiserum for 12-36 h. The ratios of in vitro embryo development of the blastocysts, cell division, attachment potential, alkaline phosphatase activity, post-implantation development, and chimera production were assessed and compared with the control group. P<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The rabbit antiserum to mouse ES cells showed delay in embryo compaction and induced decompaction at 8-cell stage. The development of 4-cell embryos in the presence of the antiserum for 36h did not lead to a reduced or absent ICM. These embryos still displayed positive alkaline phosphatase activity, normal cell division, embryo attachment, outgrowth formation, implantation and post-implantation development. In addition, decompaction induced by antiserum did not increase production and germline transmission of chimeric mice. Conclusion: The results showed that antiserum to ES cells delayed embryo compaction and did not affect post-implantation development and chimera production. PMID:24799859

  12. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  13. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Mouse BMD Quantitative Trait Loci Show Improved Concordance With Human Genome-wide Association Loci When Recalculated on a New, Common Mouse Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Karasik, David; Li, Qian; Smith, Randy V; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Churchill, Gary A; Paigen, Beverly J; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern

    2010-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a heritable trait, and in mice, over 100 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been reported, but candidate genes have been identified for only a small percentage. Persistent errors in the mouse genetic map have negatively affected QTL localization, spurring the development of a new, corrected map. In this study, QTLs for BMD were remapped in 11 archival mouse data sets using this new genetic map. Since these QTLs all were mapped in a comparable way, direct comparisons of QTLs for concordance would be valid. We then compared human genome-wide association study (GWAS) BMD loci with the mouse QTLs. We found that 26 of the 28 human GWAS loci examined were located within the confidence interval of a mouse QTL. Furthermore, 14 of the GWAS loci mapped to within 3 cM of a mouse QTL peak. Lastly, we demonstrated that these newly remapped mouse QTLs can substantiate a candidate gene for a human GWAS locus, for which the peak single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) fell in an intergenic region. Specifically, we suggest that MEF2C (human chromosome 5, mouse chromosome 13) should be considered a candidate gene for the genetic regulation of BMD. In conclusion, use of the new mouse genetic map has improved the localization of mouse BMD QTLs, and these remapped QTLs show high concordance with human GWAS loci. We believe that this is an opportune time for a renewed effort by the genetics community to identify the causal variants regulating BMD using a synergistic mouse-human approach. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200990

  15. Mouse models of long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Guy; London, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome is a rare inherited condition characterized by prolongation of action potential duration (APD) in cardiac myocytes, prolongation of the QT interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG), and an increased risk of syncope and sudden death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Mutations of cardiac ion channel genes that affect repolarization cause the majority of the congenital cases. Despite detailed characterizations of the mutated ion channels at the molecular level, a complete understanding of the mechanisms by which individual mutations may lead to arrhythmias and sudden death requires study of the intact heart and its modulation by the autonomic nervous system. Here, we will review studies of molecularly engineered mice with mutations in the genes (a) known to cause long QT syndrome in humans and (b) specific to cardiac repolarization in the mouse. Our goal is to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of mouse models with long QT syndrome and to emphasize the advantages and limitations of these models. PMID:17038432

  16. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  17. Mapping mouse hemangioblast maturation from headfold stages

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jerry M.; Iannaccone, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    The mouse posterior primitive streak at neural plate/headfold stages (NP/HF, ~7.5dpc–8dpc) represents an optimal window from which hemangioblasts can be isolated. We performed immunohistochemistry on this domain using established monoclonal antibodies for proteins that affect blood and endothelial fates. We demonstrate that HoxB4 and GATA1 are the first set of markers that segregate independently to endothelial or blood populations during NP/HF stages of mouse embryonic development. In a subset of cells, both proteins are co-expressed and immunoreactivities appear mutually excluded within nuclear spaces. We searched for this particular state at later sites of hematopoietic stem cell emergence, viz., the aorta-gonadmesonephros (AGM) and the fetal liver at 10.5–11.5dpc, and found that only a rare number of cells displayed this character. Based on this spatial-temporal argument, we propose that the earliest blood progenitors emerge either directly from the epiblast or through segregation within the allantoic core domain (ACD) through reduction of cell adhesion and pSmad1/5 nuclear signaling, followed by a stochastic decision toward a blood or endothelial fate that involves GATA1 and HoxB4, respectively. A third form in which binding distributions are balanced may represent a common condition shared by hemangioblasts and HSCs. We developed a heuristic model of hemangioblast maturation, in part, to be explicit about our assumptions. PMID:22426104

  18. Preparation of hemoglobin-loaded nano-sized particles with porous structure as oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Yuan, Yuan; Tao, Xin-Yi; Shan, Xiao-Qian; Sheng, Yan; Wu, Fan

    2007-03-01

    Hb (hemoglobin)-loaded particles (HbP) encapsulated by a biodegradable polymer used as oxygen carrier were prepared. A modified double emulsion and solvent diffusion/evaporation method was adopted. All experiments were performed based on two types of biodegradable polymers, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone-ethylene glycol) (PCL-PEG). The biodistribution and the survival time in blood of the particles were investigated in a mouse model. Encapsulation efficiency and pore-connecting efficiency were evaluated by a novel sulfocyanate potassium method. The influence of process parameters on the particle size and pore-connecting efficiency (PCE%) of nanoparticles have been discussed. The prepared conditions: solvent, external aqueous phase, pressure were discussed. The system utilizing dichloromethane (DCM)/ethyl acetate (EA) as a solvent with an unsaturated external aqueous phase yielded the highest encapsulation efficiency (87.35%) with a small mean particle size (153 nm). The formation of porous channels was attributed to the diffusion of solvent. The PCE% was more sensitive to the rate of solvent diffusion that was obviously affected by the preparation temperature. The PCE% reached 87.47% when PCL-PEG was employed at 25 degrees C. P(50) of HbP was 27 mmHg, which does not seem to be greatly affected by the encapsulation procedure. In vivo, following intravenous injection of 6-coumarin labeled HbP, the major organ accumulating Hb-loaded particles was the liver. The half-life of nano-sized PCL HbP was 3.1 times as long as the micro-sized PCL HbP. Also, Nano-sized as well as a PEGylated surface on HbP is beneficial for prolonged blood residence (7.2 fold increase). PMID:17126898

  19. A mouse model of in utero transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nijagal, Amar; Le, Tom; Wegorzewska, Marta; Mackenzie, Tippi C

    2011-01-01

    The transplantation of stem cells and viruses in utero has tremendous potential for treating congenital disorders in the human fetus. For example, in utero transplantation (IUT) of hematopoietic stem cells has been used to successfully treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. In several other conditions, however, IUT has been attempted without success. Given these mixed results, the availability of an efficient non-human model to study the biological sequelae of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy is critical to advance this field. We and others have used the mouse model of IUT to study factors affecting successful engraftment of in utero transplanted hematopoietic stem cells in both wild-type mice and those with genetic diseases. The fetal environment also offers considerable advantages for the success of in utero gene therapy. For example, the delivery of adenoviral, adeno-associated viral, retroviral, and lentiviral vectors into the fetus has resulted in the transduction of multiple organs distant from the site of injection with long-term gene expression. in utero gene therapy may therefore be considered as a possible treatment strategy for single gene disorders such as muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis. Another potential advantage of IUT is the ability to induce immune tolerance to a specific antigen. As seen in mice with hemophilia, the introduction of Factor IX early in development results in tolerance to this protein. In addition to its use in investigating potential human therapies, the mouse model of IUT can be a powerful tool to study basic questions in developmental and stem cell biology. For example, one can deliver various small molecules to induce or inhibit specific gene expression at defined gestational stages and manipulate developmental pathways. The impact of these alterations can be assessed at various timepoints after the initial transplantation. Furthermore, one can transplant pluripotent or lineage specific progenitor

  20. The activity-based anorexia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Klenotich, Stephanie J; Dulawa, Stephanie C

    2012-01-01

    Animals housed with running wheels and subjected to daily food restriction show paradoxical reductions in food intake and increases in running wheel activity. This phenomenon, known as activity-based anorexia (ABA), leads to marked reductions in body weight that can ultimately lead to death. Recently, ABA has been proposed as a model of anorexia nervosa (AN). AN affects about 8 per 100,000 females and has the highest mortality rate among all psychiatric illnesses. Given the reductions in quality of life, high mortality rate, and the lack of pharmacological treatments for AN, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying AN-like behavior is greatly needed. This chapter provides basic guidelines for conducting ABA experiments using mice. The ABA mouse model provides an important tool for investigating the neurobiological underpinnings of AN-like behavior and identifying novel treatments. PMID:22231828

  1. [Evaluation of imaging biomarker by transgenic mouse models].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Jun; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2009-04-01

    The invention of trangenic and gene knockout mice contributes to the understanding of various brain functions. With the previous-generation positron emission tomography (PET) camera it was impossible to visualize the mouse brain functions, while the newly developed small-animal PET camera with higher resolution is enough to visualize the mouse brain functions. In the present study, we investigated the visualization of functional brain images for a few transgenic mouse models using the small-animal PET. In neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer disease (AD), the relationship between etiopathology and main symptoms has been elucidated relatively well; therefore several transgenic mice have been already developed. We succeeded in visualizing amyloid images in human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice brains. This result suggested that small-animal PET enabled the quantitative analysis of pathologies in the Tg mouse brain. Psychiatric disorders are presumed to have underlying multiple neural dysfunctions. Despite some efficient medicinal therapies having been already established, the etiopathology of mental illness and its biological markers have not been clarified. Thus, we investigated in type II Ca-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase alpha (CaMKII alpha) heterozygous knockout (hKO) mouse, a major protein kinase in the brain. The CaMKII alpha hKO mice have several abnormal behavioral phenotypes, such as hyper aggression and lack of anxiogenic responses; therefore CaMKII alpha might involve in the pathogenesis of mood disorder and affect personal characterizations. Furthermore, serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptor density in the CaMKII alpha hKO mouse brain changed among various brain regions compared to wild mice. These mechanistic insights, PET assays of Tg mice that we have established here, provide an efficient methodology for preclinical evaluation of emerging diagnostic and therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative and psychiatric illnesses

  2. Mouse models of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Cha, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by immune cell infiltration and progressive injury to the salivary and lacrimal glands. As a consequence, patients with SjS develop xerostomia (dry mouth) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes). SjS is the third most common rheumatic autoimmune disorder, affecting 4 million Americans with over 90% of patients being female. Current diagnostic criteria for SjS frequently utilize histological examinations of minor salivary glands for immune cell foci, serology for autoantibodies, and dry eye evaluation by corneal or conjunctival staining. SjS can be classified as primary or secondary SjS, depending on whether it occurs alone or in association with other systemic rheumatic conditions, respectively. Clinical manifestations typically become apparent when the disease is relatively advanced in SjS patients, which poses a challenge for early diagnosis and treatment of SjS. Therefore, SjS mouse models, because of their close resemblance to the human SjS, have been extremely valuable to identify early disease markers and to investigate underlying biological and immunological dysregulations. However, it is important to bear in mind that no single mouse model has duplicated all aspects of SjS pathogenesis and clinical features, mainly due to the multifactorial etiology of SjS that includes numerous susceptibility genes and environmental factors. As such, various mouse models have been developed in the field to try to recapitulate SjS. In this review, we focus on recent mouse models of primary SjS and describe them under three categories of spontaneous, genetically engineered, and experimentally induced development of SjS-like disease. In addition, we discuss future perspectives of SjS mouse models highlighting pros and cons of utilizing mouse models and demands for improved models. PMID:25777752

  3. Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Necia Grant; West, Geoffrey B.

    1988-06-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Framework: 1. Scale and dimension - From animals to quarks Geoffrey B. West; 2. Particle physics and the standard model Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky and Geoffrey B. West; QCD on a Cray: the masses of elementary particles Gerald Guralnik, Tony Warnock and Charles Zemach; Lecture Notes - From simple field theories to the standard model; 3. Toward a unified theory: an essay on the role of supergravity in the search for unification Richard C. Slansky; 4. Supersymmetry at 100 GeV Stuart Raby; 5. The family problem T. Goldman and Michael Martin Nieto; Part II. Experimental Developments: 6. Experiments to test unification schemes Gary H. Sanders; 7. The march toward higher energies S. Peter Rosen; LAMPF II and the High-Intensity Frontier Henry A. Thiessen; The SSC - An engineering challenge Mahlon T. Wilson; 8. Science underground - the search for rare events L. M. Simmons, Jr; Part III. Personal Perspectives: 9. Quarks and quirks among friends Peter A. Carruthers, Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky, Geoffrey B. West and George Zweig; Index.

  4. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  5. Energetic solar particle behaviour in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of energetic solar flare particles in the magnetosphere is discussed. In the absence of magnetospheric motion, the problem of particle transport can be treated as simple propagation of charged particles in a stationary magnetic field configuration using, for instance, trajectory calculations in model fields. This single particle approach is the basis for the determination of intensity and anisotropy structures over the polar caps and in the geomagnetic tail from different interplanetary conditions. Particle transport on closed field lines is in addition strongly affected by resonant interaction processes as pitch angle scattering and radial diffusion.

  6. Mouse models of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Böck, Barbara C; Stein, Ulrike; Schmitt, Clemens A; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2014-09-01

    The Helmholtz Alliance Preclinical Comprehensive Cancer Center (PCCC; www.helmholtz-pccc.de) hosted the "1st International Kloster Seeon Meeting on Mouse Models of Human Cancer" in the Seeon monastery (Germany) from March 8 to 11, 2014. The meeting focused on the development and application of novel mouse models in tumor research and high-throughput technologies to overcome one of the most critical bottlenecks in translational bench-to-bedside tumor biology research. Moreover, the participants discussed basic molecular mechanisms underlying tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance, which are the prerequisite for the development of novel treatment strategies and clinical applications in cancer therapy. PMID:25136075

  7. Interpretation of the Moessbauer Spectra of the Magnetic Nanoparticles in Mouse Spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Chuev, Mikhail A.; Cherepanov, Valery M.; Polikarpov, Mikhail A.; Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Deyev, Sergey M.; Mischenko, Iliya N.; Nikitin, Maxim P.

    2010-12-02

    We have developed a stochastic model for description of relaxation effects in the system of homogeneously magnetized single-domain particles and applied the model to the analysis of Moessbauer spectra of magnetic nanoparticles (Chemicell ARA) and mouse spleen after i.v. injection into animals. We estimate that the fraction of exogenous iron in nanoparticles in the mouse spleen 3 months after injection was 0.27{+-}0.03. The spectra of the residual nanoparticles in the spleen had almost the same isomer shift but smaller mean hyperfine magnetic field values indicating decrease in the magnetic anisotropy energy (size) of the particles compared to the initial ones in the course of biodegradation. Concentration of ferritin-like iron was about three-fold higher than that in the spleen of untreated animals showing ferritin-like forms in the mouse spleen.

  8. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  9. Microphysical Processes Affecting the Pinatubo Volcanic Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Houben, Howard; Young, Richard; Turco, Richard; Zhao, Jingxia

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we consider microphysical processes which affect the formation of sulfate particles and their size distribution in a dispersing cloud. A model for the dispersion of the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic cloud is described. We then consider a single point in the dispersing cloud and study the effects of nucleation, condensation and coagulation on the time evolution of the particle size distribution at that point.

  10. Evaluation of in vivo low-dose mouse irradiation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H.; Kye, Y.-U.; Kim, J. K.; Son, T. G.; Lee, M. W.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Nam, S.-H.; Kang, Y.-R.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to develop a facility that can irradiate subjects with a desired low dose, which can be used to assess the biological effects of low-dose radiation. We develop a single-occupancy mouse-cage and shelf system with adjustable geometric parameters, such as the distances and angles of the cages relative to the collimator. We assess the irradiation-level accuracy using two measurement methods. First, we calculate the angle and distance of each mouse cage relative to the irradiator. We employ a Monte Carlo n-particle simulation for all of the cages at a given distance from the radiation source to calculate the air kerma and the relative absorbed dose in the in-house designed shelving system; these are found to be approximately 0.108 and 0.109 Gy, respectively. Second, we measure the relative absorbed dose using glass dosimeters inserted directly into the heads and bodies of the mice. For a conventional irradiation system, the irradiation measurements show a maximum discrepancy of 42% between the absorbed and desired doses, whereas a discrepancy of only 6% from the desired dose is found for the designed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi-mouse cages are shown to yield to significantly greater differences in the mouse head and body relative absorbed doses, compared to the discrepancies found for single-occupancy cages in the conventional irradiation system. Our findings suggest that the in-house shelving system has greater reliability for the biological analysis of the effects of low-dose radiation.

  11. Particle response analysis for particle image velocimetry in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Owen J. H.; Nguyen, Tue; Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Smits, Alexander J.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effects of compressibility, slip, and fluid inertia on the frequency response of particle-based velocimetry techniques for supersonic and hypersonic flows by solving the quasi-steady drag equation for solid, spherical particles. We demonstrate that non-continuum and fluid inertial effects significantly affect the particle response under all typical supersonic flow conditions. In particular, the particle frequency response obtained from a shock response test depends on the strength of the shock, decreasing with shock strength as non-continuum effects become more prominent. For weak disturbances, such as those typical of turbulence, the actual particle frequency response can therefore be much lower than that obtained from a typical shock response. The greatest variability in the response was found to occur at low supersonic Mach numbers. The results were found to be typical of solid particles used for velocimetry under a wide range of wind tunnel conditions, and so, previous particle frequency response analyses based solely on shock response tests may well have overestimated the response to turbulence.

  12. Exogenous retroelement integration in sperm and embryos affects preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Kitsou, C; Lazaros, L; Bellou, S; Vartholomatos, G; Sakaloglou, P; Hatzi, E; Markoula, S; Zikopoulos, K; Tzavaras, T; Georgiou, I

    2016-09-01

    Retroelement transcripts are present in male and female gametes, where they are typically regulated by methylation, noncoding RNAs and transcription factors. Such transcripts are required for occurrence of retrotransposition events, while failure of retrotransposition control may exert negative effects on cellular function and proliferation. In order to investigate the occurrence of retrotransposition events in mouse epididymal spermatozoa and to address the impact of uncontrolled retroelement RNA expression in early preimplantation embryos, we performed in vitro fertilization experiments using spermatozoa preincubated with plasmid vectors containing the human retroelements LINE-1, HERVK-10 or the mouse retroelement VL30, tagged with an enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP) gene-based cassette. Retrotransposition events in mouse spermatozoa and embryos were detected using PCR, FACS analysis and confocal microscopy. Our findings show that: (i) sperm cell incorporates exogenous retroelements and favors retrotransposition events, (ii) the inhibition of spermatozoa reverse transcriptase can decrease the retrotransposition frequency in sperm cells, (iii) spermatozoa can transfer exogenous human or mouse retroelements to the oocyte during fertilization and (iv) retroelement RNA overexpression affects embryo morphology and impairs preimplantation development. These findings suggest that the integration of exogenous retroelements in the sperm genome, as well as their transfer into the mouse oocyte, could give rise to new retrotransposition events and genetic alterations in mouse spermatozoa and embryos. PMID:27450800

  13. The mouse "xenotropic" gammaretroviruses and their XPR1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The xenotropic/polytropic subgroup of mouse leukemia viruses (MLVs) all rely on the XPR1 receptor for entry, but these viruses vary in tropism, distribution among wild and laboratory mice, pathogenicity, strategies used for transmission, and sensitivity to host restriction factors. Most, but not all, isolates have typical xenotropic or polytropic host range, and these two MLV tropism types have now been detected in humans as viral sequences or as infectious virus, termed XMRV, or xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. The mouse xenotropic MLVs (X-MLVs) were originally defined by their inability to infect cells of their natural mouse hosts. It is now clear, however, that X-MLVs actually have the broadest host range of the MLVs. Nearly all nonrodent mammals are susceptible to X-MLVs, and all species of wild mice and several common strains of laboratory mice are X-MLV susceptible. The polytropic MLVs, named for their apparent broad host range, show a more limited host range than the X-MLVs in that they fail to infect cells of many mouse species as well as many nonrodent mammals. The co-evolution of these viruses with their receptor and other host factors that affect their replication has produced a heterogeneous group of viruses capable of inducing various diseases, as well as endogenized viral genomes, some of which have been domesticated by their hosts to serve in antiviral defense. PMID:21118532

  14. [Habitat use of Williamson's Mouse-deer (Tragulus williamsoni) in Mengla area, southern Yunnan].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming; Zhou, Wei; Bai, Bing; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Bin; Chen, Min-Yong

    2010-06-01

    Combining line-transect method and sampling method, the geographic coordinates of footprint links for Williamson's Mouse-deer (Tragulus williamsoni) were collected in Mengman and Longmen regions of Mengla area, southern Yunnan, from June to December 2007. A distribution pattern map of the mouse-deer was produced by GIS software. Eleven ecological factors were measured in collected and available samples. The results indicated that the mouse-deer preferred valleys along banks of rivers or streams in low altitude, and were mainly distributed in Sanchahe of Mengman region and Darongshu of Longmen region. Comparing nominal factors between collected and available samples, the results showed that the mouse-deer tended to inhabit middle and lower slopes and favored the plant species of Ficus hirtal, Baccaurea samiflora, Alpinia kwangsiensis and Phrynium capitatum. These plants occur along banks of rivers or streams, one of the important reasons affecting distribution of the mouse-deer populations. Comparing quantitative factors between collected and available samples, the results showed that four factors including tall tree coverage, shrub coverage and herb coverage, and distance to water, were significantly different. These four factors were key in discriminating collected and available samples and main factors affecting the habitat use of the mouse-deer. The dense shrub with taller trees could form good shady condition for the mouse-deer, and greatly strengthen their security. Due to their preference for areas near water, there were more flourishing tall trees and dense shrubs at valleys in low altitude, which was one of important reasons affecting the distribution of the mouse-deer populations massing in valleys in low altitude. PMID:20672420

  15. Lipid Extraction from Mouse Feces

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Daniel; Yang, Qin; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of feces composition is important for the study of energy metabolism, which comprises various measurements of energy intake, energy expenditure, and energy wasting. The current protocol describes how to measure energy-dense lipids in mouse feces using a modification of the method proposed by Folch et al. (1957). PMID:27110587

  16. Rat spermatogenesis in mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    Clouthier, David E.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Maika, Shanna D.; Hammer, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, transplantation of mouse donor spermatogonial stem cells from a fertile testis to an infertile recipient mouse testis was described1,2. The donor cells established spermatogenesis in the seminiferous tubules of the host, and normal spermatozoa were produced. In the most successful transplants, the recipient mice were fertile and sired up to 80 per cent of progeny from donor cells2. Here we examine the feasibility of transplanting spermatogonial stem cells from other species to the mouse seminiferous tubule to generate spermatogenesis. Marked testis cells from transgenic rats were transplanted to the testes of immunodeficient mice, and in all of 10 recipient mice (in 19 of 20 testes), rat spermatogenesis occurred. Epididymides of eight mice were examined, and the three from mice with the longest transplants (≥110 days) contained rat spermatozoa with normal morphology. The generation of rat spermatogenesis in mouse testes suggests that spermatogonial stem cells of many species could be transplanted, and opens the possibility of xenogeneic spermatogenesis for other species. PMID:8632797

  17. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  18. Mouse Cochlear Whole Mount Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol comprises the entire process of immunofluorescence staining on mouse cochlea whole mount, starting from tissue preparation to the mounting of the tissue. This technique provides “three-dimensional” views of the stained components in order to determine the localization of a protein of interest in the tissue in its natural state and environment. PMID:27547786

  19. APOPTOSIS IN WHOLE MOUSE OVARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis in Whole Mouse Ovaries
    Robert M. Zucker Susan C. Jeffay and Sally D. Perreault
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27711.

  20. A comparison of the mouse and human lipoproteome: suitability of the mouse model for studies of human lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Scott M; Li, Hailong; Zhu, Xiaoting; Shah, Amy S; Lu, L Jason; Davidson, W Sean

    2015-06-01

    Plasma levels of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL) exhibit opposing associations with cardiovascular disease in human populations and mouse models have been heavily used to derive a mechanistic understanding of these relationships. In humans, recent mass spectrometry studies have revealed that the plasma lipoproteome is significantly more complex than originally appreciated. This is particularly true for HDL which contains some 90 distinct proteins, a majority of which play functional roles that go beyond those expected for simple lipid transport. Unfortunately, the mouse lipoproteome remains largely uncharacterized-a significant gap given the heavy reliance on the model. Using a gel filtration chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis that targets phospholipid-bound plasma proteins, we compared the mouse lipoproteome and its size distribution to a previous, identical human analysis. We identified 113 lipid associated proteins in the mouse. In general, the protein diversity in the LDL and HDL size ranges was similar in mice versus humans, though some distinct differences were noted. For the majority of proteins, the size distributions, that is, whether a given protein was associated with large versus small HDL particles, for example, were also similar between species. Again, however, there were clear differences exhibited by a minority of proteins that may reflect metabolic differences between species. Finally, by correlating the lipid and protein size profiles, we identified five proteins that closely track with the major HDL protein, apolipoprotein A-I across both species. Thus, mice have most of the minor proteins identified in human lipoproteins that play key roles in inflammation, innate immunity, proteolysis and its inhibition, and vitamin transport. This provides support for the continued use of the mouse as a model for many aspects of human lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:25894274

  1. Functionally charged nanosize particles differentially activate BV2 microglia.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Nanosize (860-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) were coated with carboxyl (COOH-) or dimethyl amino (CH3)2-N- groups to give a net negative or p...

  2. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  3. Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Complexes Containing Polyadenylate from Mouse Ascites Cells

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Thomas J.; Billings, Peter B.; Martin, Terence E.

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-containing RNA of mouse ascites cells can be extracted in the form of 15-17S ribonucleoprotein complexes under conditions in which the bulk of the heterogeneous nuclear RNA is released as 30S complexes. The poly(A)-containing fraction of nuclear extracts has been resolved into two distinct components, 15 and 17 S; neither contains the two polypeptides of 30S ribonucleoprotein. The 17S particle contains approximately six polypeptide species of molecular masses 17,000-30,000 daltons. The 15S complex has four distinct polypeptides of higher molecular mass, including a prominent 80,000-dalton species. PMID:4368966

  4. Affective processing requires awareness.

    PubMed

    Lähteenmäki, Mikko; Hyönä, Jukka; Koivisto, Mika; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    Studies using backward masked emotional stimuli suggest that affective processing may occur outside visual awareness and imply primacy of affective over semantic processing, yet these experiments have not strictly controlled for the participants' awareness of the stimuli. Here we directly compared the primacy of affective versus semantic categorization of biologically relevant stimuli in 5 experiments (n = 178) using explicit (semantic and affective discrimination; Experiments 1-3) and implicit (semantic and affective priming; Experiments 4-5) measures. The same stimuli were used in semantic and affective tasks. Visual awareness was manipulated by varying exposure duration of the masked stimuli, and subjective level of stimulus awareness was measured after each trial using a 4-point perceptual awareness scale. When participants reported no awareness of the stimuli, semantic and affective categorization were at chance level and priming scores did not differ from zero. When participants were even partially aware of the stimuli, (a) both semantic and affective categorization could be performed above chance level with equal accuracy, (b) semantic categorization was faster than affective categorization, and (c) both semantic and affective priming were observed. Affective categorization speed was linearly dependent on semantic categorization speed, suggesting dependence of affective processing on semantic recognition. Manipulations of affective and semantic categorization tasks revealed a hierarchy of categorization operations beginning with basic-level semantic categorization and ending with superordinate level affective categorization. We conclude that both implicit and explicit affective and semantic categorization is dependent on visual awareness, and that affective recognition follows semantic categorization. PMID:25559654

  5. Mouse Models of Rare Craniofacial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    A rare disease is defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 individuals. Currently more than 7000 rare diseases have been documented, and most are thought to be of genetic origin. Rare diseases primarily affect children, and congenital craniofacial syndromes and disorders constitute a significant proportion of rare diseases, with over 700 having been described to date. Modeling craniofacial disorders in animal models has been instrumental in uncovering the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous conditions and in some cases has even led to potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. In this chapter, we focus primarily on two general classes of rare disorders, ribosomopathies and ciliopathies, and the surprising finding that the disruption of fundamental, global processes can result in tissue-specific craniofacial defects. In addition, we discuss recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of an extremely rare and specific craniofacial condition known as syngnathia, based on the first mouse models for this condition. Approximately 1% of all babies are born with a minor or major developmental anomaly, and individuals suffering from rare diseases deserve the same quality of treatment and care and attention to their disease as other patients. PMID:26589934

  6. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 attenuates titanium particle-induced osteolysis by suppressing osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. RESULTS Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. CONCLUSIONS CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  7. Adenovirus-Mediated siRNA Targeting CXCR2 Attenuates Titanium Particle-Induced Osteolysis by Suppressing Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ran-Xi; He, Mi-Si; Chen, Liang; Wu, Ning-Ning; Liao, Yong; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening is the most common complication affecting long-term outcomes in patients who undergo total joint arthroplasty. Wear particles and by-products from joint replacements may cause chronic local inflammation and foreign body reactions, which can in turn lead to osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting the formation and activity of osteoclasts may improve the functionality and long-term success of total joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to interfere with CXC chemokine receptor type 2 (CXCR2) to explore its role in wear particle-induced osteolysis. Material/Methods Morphological and biochemical assays were used to assess osteoclastogenesis in vivo and in vitro. CXCR2 was upregulated in osteoclast formation. Results Local injection with adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting CXCR2 inhibited titanium-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model in vivo. Furthermore, siCXCR2 suppressed osteoclast formation both directly by acting on osteoclasts themselves and indirectly by altering RANKL and OPG expression in osteoblasts in vitro. Conclusions CXCR2 plays a critical role in particle-induced osteolysis, and siCXCR2 may be a novel treatment for aseptic loosening. PMID:26939934

  8. Hippocampal Damage in Mouse and Human Forms of Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.; Woulfe, John; Sur, Monalisa; Cyr, Michael; Sakic, Boris

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is frequently accompanied by neuropsychiatric (NP) and cognitive deficits of unknown etiology. By using autoimmune MRL-lpr mice as an animal model of NP-SLE, we examine the relationship between autoimmunity, hippocampal damage, and behavioral dysfunction. Fluoro Jade B (FJB) staining and anti-ubiquitin (anti-Ub) immunocytochemistry were used to assess neuronal damage in young (asymptomatic) and aged (diseased) mice, while spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) was used to estimate the severity of hippocampal dysfunction. The causal relationship between autoimmunity and neuropathology was tested by prolonged administration of the immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide (CY). In comparison to congenic MRL +/+ controls, SAB acquisition rates and performance in the “reversal” trial were impaired in diseased MRL-lpr mice, suggesting limited use of the spatial learning strategy. FJB-positive neurons and anti-Ub particles were frequent in the CA3 region. Conversely, CY treatment attenuated the SAB deficit and overall FJB staining. Similarly to mouse brain, the hippocampus from a patient who died from NP-SLE showed reduced neuronal density in the CA3 region and dentate gyrus, as well as increased FJB positivity in these regions. Gliosis and neuronal loss were observed in the gray matter, and T lymphocytes and stromal calcifications were common in the choroid plexus. Taken together, these results suggest that systemic autoimmunity induces significant hippocampal damage, which may underlie affective and cognitive deficits in NP-SLE. PMID:15301441

  9. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T.

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed—for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants’ responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants’ performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse’s approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  10. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Aya M; Szakmary, Akos; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is strongly associated with approximately one-fifth of all human cancers. Arising from combinations of factors such as environmental exposures, diet, inherited gene polymorphisms, infections, or from dysfunctions of the immune response, chronic inflammation begins as an attempt of the body to remove injurious stimuli; however, over time, this results in continuous tissue destruction and promotion and maintenance of carcinogenesis. Here, we focus on intestinal inflammation and its associated cancers, a group of diseases on the rise and affecting millions of people worldwide. Intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and celiac disease. Long-standing intestinal inflammation is associated with colorectal cancer and small-bowel adenocarcinoma, as well as extraintestinal manifestations, including lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. This article highlights potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel diseases and celiac disease, as well as those involved in the progression to associated cancers, most of which have been identified from studies utilizing mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Mouse models of intestinal inflammation can be widely grouped into chemically induced models; genetic models, which make up the bulk of the studied models; adoptive transfer models; and spontaneous models. Studies in these models have lead to the understanding that persistent antigen exposure in the intestinal lumen, in combination with loss of epithelial barrier function, and dysfunction and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses lead to chronic intestinal inflammation. Transcriptional changes in this environment leading to cell survival, hyperplasia, promotion of angiogenesis, persistent DNA damage, or insufficient repair of DNA damage due to an excess of proinflammatory mediators are then thought to lead to sustained malignant transformation. With

  11. The particles in town air

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, J. McK.

    1965-01-01

    Particles constitute an important part of air pollution, and their behaviour when suspended in air is very different from that of gas molecules: in particular, the mechanisms by which they become deposited on surfaces are different, and consequently the methods normally used for removing particles from the air, either for sampling or for cleaning it, rely mainly on mechanisms that do not enter into the behaviour of gas molecules. These mechanisms are described, and the ways in which they affect the problems of air pollution and its measurement are discussed. ImagesFIG. 8 PMID:14315713

  12. Live dynamic imaging and analysis of developmental cardiac defects in mouse models with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Wang, Shang; Garcia, Monica; Valladolid, Christian; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding mouse embryonic development is an invaluable resource for our interpretation of normal human embryology and congenital defects. Our research focuses on developing methods for live imaging and dynamic characterization of early embryonic development in mouse models of human diseases. Using multidisciplinary methods: optical coherence tomography (OCT), live mouse embryo manipulations and static embryo culture, molecular biology, advanced image processing and computational modeling we aim to understand developmental processes. We have developed an OCT based approach to image live early mouse embryos (E8.5 - E9.5) cultured on an imaging stage and visualize developmental events with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers (less than the size of an individual cell) and a frame rate of up to hundreds of frames per second and reconstruct cardiodynamics in 4D (3D+time). We are now using these methods to study how specific embryonic lethal mutations affect cardiac morphology and function during early development.

  13. Comprehensive Neurocognitive Endophenotyping Strategies for Mouse Models of Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for refinement of the current behavioral phenotyping methods for mouse models of genetic disorders. The current approach is to perform a behavioral screen using standardized tasks to define a broad phenotype of the model. This phenotype is then compared to what is known concerning the disorder being modeled. The weakness inherent in this approach is twofold: First, the tasks that make up these standard behavioral screens do not model specific behaviors associated with a given genetic mutation but rather phenotypes affected in various genetic disorders; secondly, these behavioral tasks are insufficiently sensitive to identify subtle phenotypes. An alternate phenotyping strategy is to determine the core behavioral phenotypes of the genetic disorder being studied and develop behavioral tasks to evaluate specific hypotheses concerning the behavioral consequences of the genetic mutation. This approach emphasizes direct comparisons between the mouse and human that facilitate the development of neurobehavioral biomarkers or quantitative outcome measures for studies of genetic disorders across species. PMID:22266125

  14. Development and testing of a mouse simulated space flight model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    The development and testing of a mouse model for simulating some aspects of weightlessness that occur during space flight, and the carrying out of immunological flight experiments on animals was discussed. The mouse model is an antiorthostatic, hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension model similar to the one used with rats. It is shown that this murine model yield similar results to the rat model of antiorthostatic suspension for simulating some aspects of weightlessness. It is also shown that mice suspended in this model have decreased interferon-alpha/beta production as compared to control, nonsuspended mice or to orthostatically suspended mice. It is suggested that the conditions occuring during space flight could possibly affect interferon production. The regulatory role of interferon in nonviral diseases is demonstrated including several bacterial and protozoan infections indicating the great significance of interferon in resistance to many types of infectious diseases.

  15. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  16. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    SciTech Connect

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  17. Genealogies of mouse inbred strains.

    PubMed

    Beck, J A; Lloyd, S; Hafezparast, M; Lennon-Pierce, M; Eppig, J T; Festing, M F; Fisher, E M

    2000-01-01

    The mouse is a prime organism of choice for modelling human disease. Over 450 inbred strains of mice have been described, providing a wealth of different genotypes and phenotypes for genetic and other studies. As new strains are generated and others become extinct, it is useful to review periodically what strains are available and how they are related to each other, particularly in the light of available DNA polymorphism data from microsatellite and other markers. We describe the origins and relationships of inbred mouse strains, 90 years after the generation of the first inbred strain. Given the large collection of inbred strains available, and that published information on these strains is incomplete, we propose that all genealogical and genetic data on inbred strains be submitted to a common electronic database to ensure this valuable information resource is preserved and used efficiently. PMID:10615122

  18. Aging Research Using Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Anderson, Laura; Sheehan, Susan; Hill, Warren G.; Chang, Bo; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Korstanje, Ron; Peters, Luanne L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in human lifespan over the past century, there remains pronounced variability in “health-span”, or the period of time in which one is generally healthy and free of disease. Much of the variability in health-span and lifespan is thought to be genetic in origin. Understanding the genetic mechanisms of aging and identifying ways to boost longevity is a primary goal in aging research. Here, we describe a pipeline of phenotypic assays for assessing mouse models of aging. This pipeline includes behavior/cognition testing, body composition analysis, and tests of kidney function, hematopoiesis, immune function and physical parameters. We also describe study design methods for assessing lifespan and health-span, and other important considerations when conducting aging research in the laboratory mouse. The tools and assays provided can assist researchers with understanding the correlative relationships between age-associated phenotypes and, ultimately, the role of specific genes in the aging process. PMID:26069080

  19. Evaluation of dust respirators for elimination of mouse aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Miyazawa, H; Kamimura, H; Kimura, M; Yamazaki, S

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of various dust respirators for eliminating mouse allergens [mouse urine proteins (MUP), pelts proteins (MPP) and serum albumin (MSA)] were evaluated with use of low-volume air samplers and immunochemical methods. Three kinds of dust respirators from one manufacturer which have different efficacy in the exclusion of dust particles were put on the fiber glass filter in each air sampler. Then the air in a mouse housing room was sampled. The allergens passed through the respirators, were trapped in the fiber glass filters, and then extracted from the filters. The allergens of MUP and MPP in the extract were measured by an inhibition method of fluorometric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for IgE antibody and those of MSA measured by a fluorometric sandwich ELISA. The respirator with the lowest capability of exclusion was found to eliminate 65-86% of respective allergens. The other two respirators with higher powers eliminated 98% of MUP. MPP and MSA were eliminated to undetectable levels through these respirators. This study provided a means for the evaluation of dust respirators for animal aeroallergens. PMID:2918688

  20. Enhanced stopping of macro-particles in particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Ellis, I.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-15

    We derive an equation for energy transfer from relativistic charged particles to a cold background plasma appropriate for finite-size particles that are used in particle-in-cell simulation codes. Expressions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional particles are presented, with special attention given to the two-dimensional case. This energy transfer is due to the electric field of the wake set up in the background plasma by the relativistic particle. The enhanced stopping is dependent on the q{sup 2}/m, where q is the charge and m is the mass of the relativistic particle, and therefore simulation macro-particles with large charge but identical q/m will stop more rapidly. The stopping power also depends on the effective particle shape of the macro-particle. These conclusions are verified in particle-in-cell simulations. We present 2D simulations of test particles, relaxation of high-energy tails, and integrated fast ignition simulations showing that the enhanced drag on macro-particles may adversely affect the results of these simulations in a wide range of high-energy density plasma scenarios. We also describe a particle splitting algorithm which can potentially overcome this problem and show its effect in controlling the stopping of macro-particles.

  1. In vitro assessment of mouse fetal abdominal aortic vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, Mark R.; Greenwood, Susan L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Wareing, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) affects 3–8% of human pregnancies. Mouse models have provided important etiological data on FGR; they permit the assessment of treatment strategies on the physiological function of both mother and her developing offspring. Our study aimed to 1) develop a method to assess vascular function in fetal mice and 2) as a proof of principle ascertain whether a high dose of sildenafil citrate (SC; Viagra) administered to the pregnant dam affected fetal vascular reactivity. We developed a wire myography methodology for evaluation of fetal vascular function in vitro using the placenta-specific insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) knockout mouse (P0; a model of FGR). Vascular function was determined in abdominal aortas isolated from P0 and wild-type (WT) fetuses at embryonic day (E) 18.5 of gestation. A subset of dams received SC 0.8 mg/ml via drinking water from E12.5; data were compared with water-only controls. Using wire myography, we found that fetal aortic rings exhibited significant agonist-induced contraction, and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation. Sex-specific alterations in reactivity were noted in both strains. Maternal treatment with SC significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of fetal aortic rings. Mouse fetal abdominal aortas reproducibly respond to vasoactive agents. Study of these vessels in mouse genetic models of pregnancy complications may 1) help to delineate early signs of abnormal vascular reactivity and 2) inform whether treatments given to the mother during pregnancy may impact upon fetal vascular function. PMID:25056105

  2. Retinofugal Projections in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Studholme, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is increasingly a subject for visual system investigation, but there has been no comprehensive evaluation of this species’ visual projections. Here, projections were visualized and mapped following intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. Tissue was processed using standard procedures applied to 30 Am free floating sections with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The mouse retina projects to approximately 46 brain regions, including 14 not previously described in this species. These include two amygdaloid nuclei, the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, several visual thalamic nuclei, the paranigral nucleus, several pretectal nuclei, and the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus. Dense retinal patches were also observed in a narrow portion of the ipsilateral intermediate layer of the superior colliculus. The superior fasciculus of the accessory optic tract, which innervates the medial terminal nucleus, was also determined to be a terminal zone throughout its length. The results are compared with previous descriptions of projections from mouse intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, and with data from the hamster, Nile grass rat and laboratory rat. The retinal projection patterns are similar in all four species, although there are many differences with respect to the details. The specific visual functions of most retinorecipient areas are unknown, but there is substantial convergence of retinal projections onto regions concerned with olfaction and audition. PMID:24889098

  3. Turbulence attenuation by large neutrally buoyant particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, M.; Saw, E.-W.; Gibert, M.; Bodenschatz, E.; Bec, J.

    2015-06-01

    Turbulence modulation by inertial-range-size, neutrally buoyant particles is investigated experimentally in a von Kármán flow. Increasing the particle volume fraction Φv, maintaining constant impellers Reynolds number attenuates the fluid turbulence. The inertial-range energy transfer rate decreases as ∝ Φv 2 / 3 , suggesting that only particles located on a surface affect the flow. Small-scale turbulent properties, such as structure functions or acceleration distribution, are unchanged. Finally, measurements hint at the existence of a transition between two different regimes occurring when the average distance between large particles is of the order of the thickness of their boundary layers.

  4. The prevention of titanium-particle-induced osteolysis by OA-14 through the suppression of the p38 signaling pathway and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo; Jiang, Tao; Shao, Zhanying; Zhai, Zanjing; Li, Haowei; Fan, Qiming; Liu, Xuqiang; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Tang, Tingting; Jiang, Qing; Zheng, Minghao; Dai, Kerong; Qin, An; Yu, Yongping; Zhu, Zhenan

    2014-10-01

    Wear-particle-induced osteolysis leads to prosthesis loosening, which is one of the most common causes of joint-implant failure, a problem that must be fixed using revision surgery. Thus, a potential treatment for prosthetic loosening is focused on inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption, which prevents wear-particle-induced osteolysis. In this study, we synthesized a compound named OA-14 (N-(3- (dodecylcarbamoyl)phenyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide) and examined how OA-14 affects titanium (Ti)-particle-induced osteolysis and osteoclastogenesis. We report that OA-14 treatment protected against Ti-particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. Interestingly, the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts decreased after treatment with OA-14 in vivo, which suggested that OA-14 inhibits osteoclast formation. To test this hypothesis, we conducted in vitro studies, and our results revealed that OA-14 markedly diminished osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast-specific gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, OA-14 suppressed osteoclastic bone resorption and F-actin ring formation. Furthermore, we determined that OA-14 inhibited osteoclastogenesis by specifically blocking the p38-Mitf-c-fos-NFATc1 signaling cascade induced by RANKL (ligand of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB). Collectively, our results suggest that the compound OA-14 can be safely used for treating particle-induced peri-implant osteolysis and other diseases caused by excessive osteoclast formation and function. PMID:25086794

  5. Prevention of Wear Particle-Induced Osteolysis by a Novel V-ATPase Inhibitor Saliphenylhalamide through Inhibition of Osteoclast Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Cao, Lei; Chim, Shek M.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Xu, Jiake; Zheng, Ming Hao; Dai, Ke Rong

    2012-01-01

    Wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening (Aseptic prosthetic loosening) is one of the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty. It is well established that extensive bone destruction (osteolysis) by osteoclasts is responsible for wear particle-induced peri-implant loosening. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption should prevent wear particle induced osteolysis and may serve as a potential therapeutic avenue for prosthetic loosening. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that saliphenylhalamide, a new V-ATPase inhibitor attenuates wear particle-induced osteolysis in a mouse calvarial model. In vitro biochemical and morphological assays revealed that the inhibition of osteolysis is partially attributed to a disruption in osteoclast acidification and polarization, both a prerequisite for osteoclast bone resorption. Interestingly, the V-ATPase inhibitor also impaired osteoclast differentiation via the inhibition of RANKL-induced NF-κB and ERK signaling pathways. In conclusion, we showed that saliphenylhalamide affected multiple physiological processes including osteoclast differentiation, acidification and polarization, leading to inhibition of osteoclast bone resorption in vitro and wear particle-induced osteolysis in vivo. The results of the study provide proof that the new generation V-ATPase inhibitors, such as saliphenylhalamide, are potential anti-resorptive agents for treatment of peri-implant osteolysis. PMID:22509274

  6. Encapsulating contact allergens in liposomes, ethosomes, and polycaprolactone may affect their sensitizing properties.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jakob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2011-06-01

    Attempts to improve formulation of topical products are a continuing process and the development of micro- and nanovesicular systems as well as polymeric microparticles has led to marketing of topical drugs and cosmetics using these technologies. Encapsulation of some well-known contact allergens in ethanolic liposomes have been reported to enhance allergenicity compared with the allergens in similar vehicles without liposomes. The present report includes data on more sensitization studies using the mouse local lymph node assay with three contact allergens encapsulated in different dermal drug-delivery systems: liposomes, ethosomes, and polycaprolactone particles. The results show that the drug-delivery systems are not sensitizers in themselves. Encapsulating the hydrophilic contact allergen potassium dichromate in all three drug-delivery systems did not affect the sensitizing capacity of potassium dichromate compared with control solutions. However, encapsulating the lipophilic contact allergen dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in polycaprolactone reduced the sensitizing capacity to 1211 ± 449 compared with liposomes (7602 ± 2658) and in acetone:olive oil (4:1) (5633 ± 666). The same trend was observed for encapsulating isoeugenol in polycaprolactone (1100 ± 406) compared with a formulation in acetone:olive oil (4491 ± 819) and in liposomes (3668 ± 950). Further, the size of DNCB-loaded liposomes did not affect the sensitizing properties. These results suggest that modern dermal drug-delivery systems may in some cases magnify or decrease the sensitizing capacity of the encapsulated contact allergen. PMID:21198410

  7. Development of the mouse vestibular system in the absence of gravity perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael; Yuan Wang, Xiang; Wolgemuth, Debra J.; Murashov, Alexander K.

    2003-01-01

    The tilted mutant mouse, which lacks otoconia in the inner ear, was used to study development of the mouse vestibular system in the absence of gravity perception. Otoconia are dense particles composed of proteins and calcium carbonate crystals suspended in the gelatinous macular membrane. They enhance, and are largely responsible for, sensitivity to gravity. Morphometric analysis of the vestibular ganglion showed that the mutant developed more slowly than the normal controls, both in rate of development and cell number, particularly during the first week of post-natal development. The mutant ganglia also exhibited a reduction of cells during the first 6 days of post-natal development.

  8. Low Modulus Biomimetic Microgel Particles with High Loading of Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J.; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E.; Luft, J. Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei

    2012-01-01

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT® (Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates) technique. Low crosslinking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained, without a significant effect on particle stability, shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1,000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  9. Low modulus biomimetic microgel particles with high loading of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Merkel, Timothy J; Pandya, Ashish; Napier, Mary E; Luft, J Christopher; Daniel, Will; Sheiko, Sergei; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2012-09-10

    We synthesized extremely deformable red blood cell-like microgel particles and loaded them with bovine hemoglobin (Hb) to potentiate oxygen transport. With similar shape and size as red blood cells (RBCs), the particles were fabricated using the PRINT (particle replication in nonwetting templates) technique. Low cross-linking of the hydrogel resulted in very low mesh density for these particles, allowing passive diffusion of hemoglobin throughout the particles. Hb was secured in the particles through covalent conjugation of the lysine groups of Hb to carboxyl groups in the particles via EDC/NHS coupling. Confocal microscopy of particles bound to fluorescent dye-labeled Hb confirmed the uniform distribution of Hb throughout the particle interior, as opposed to the surface conjugation only. High loading ratios, up to 5 times the amount of Hb to polymer by weight, were obtained without a significant effect on particle stability and shape, though particle diameter decreased slightly with Hb conjugation. Analysis of the protein by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the secondary structure of Hb was unperturbed by conjugation to the particles. Methemoglobin in the particles could be maintained at a low level and the loaded Hb could still bind oxygen, as studied by UV-vis spectroscopy. Hb-loaded particles with moderate loading ratios demonstrated excellent deformability in microfluidic devices, easily deforming to pass through restricted pores half as wide as the diameter of the particles. The suspension of concentrated particles with a Hb concentration of 5.2 g/dL showed comparable viscosity to that of mouse blood, and the particles remained intact even after being sheared at a constant high rate (1000 1/s) for 10 min. Armed with the ability to control size, shape, deformability, and loading of Hb into RBC mimics, we will discuss the implications for artificial blood. PMID:22852860

  10. Solar Energetic Particle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    2003-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In fact, the highest proton intensities directly measured near Earth at energies up to approximately 1 GeV occur at the time of passage of shocks, which arrive about a day after the CMEs leave the Sun. CME-driven shocks expanding across magnetic fields can fill over half of the heliosphere with SEPs. Proton-generated Alfven waves trap particles near the shock for efficient acceleration but also throttle the intensities at Earth to the streaming limit early in the events. At high energies, particles begin to leak from the shock and the spectrum rolls downward to form an energy-spectral 'knee' that can vary in energy from approximately 1 MeV to approximately 1 GeV in different events. All of these factors affect the radiation dose as a function of depth and latitude in the Earth's atmosphere and the risk to astronauts and equipment in space. SEP ionization of the polar atmosphere produces nitrates that precipitate to become trapped in the polar ice. Observations of nitrate deposits in ice cores reveal individual large SEP events and extend back approximately 400 years. Unlike sunspots, SEP events follow the approximately 80-100-year Gleissberg cycle rather faithfully and are now at a minimum in that cycle. The largest SEP event in the last 400 years appears to be related to the flare observed by Carrington in 1859, but the probability of SEP events with such large fluences falls off sharply because of the streaming limit.

  11. Mouse embryonic stem cells with a multi-integrase mouse artificial chromosome for transchromosomic mouse generation.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuki; Nakamura, Kazuomi; Endo, Takeshi; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Ohbayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The mouse artificial chromosome (MAC) has several advantages as a gene delivery vector, including stable episomal maintenance of the exogenous genetic material and the ability to carry large and/or multiple gene inserts including their regulatory elements. Previously, a MAC containing multi-integration site (MI-MAC) was generated to facilitate transfer of multiple genes into desired cells. To generate transchromosomic (Tc) mice containing a MI-MAC with genes of interest, the desired genes were inserted into MI-MAC in CHO cells, and then the MI-MAC was transferred to mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT). However, the efficiency of MMCT from CHO to mES cells is very low (<10(-6)). In this study, we constructed mES cell lines containing a MI-MAC vector to directly insert a gene of interest into the MI-MAC in mES cells via a simple transfection method for Tc mouse generation. The recombination rate of the GFP gene at each attachment site (FRT, PhiC31attP, R4attP, TP901-1attP and Bxb1attP) on MI-MAC was greater than 50% in MI-MAC mES cells. Chimeric mice with high coat colour chimerism were generated from the MI-MAC mES cell lines and germline transmission from the chimera was observed. As an example for the generation of Tc mice with a desired gene by the MI-MAC mES approach, a Tc mouse strain ubiquitously expressing Emerald luciferase was efficiently established. Thus, the findings suggest that this new Tc strategy employing mES cells and a MI-MAC vector is efficient and useful for animal transgenesis. PMID:26055730

  12. Particle interactions in microemulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, W.M.; Nieuwenhuis, E.A.; Kops-Werkhoven, M.M.

    1983-03-01

    This study obtains information about the type of interactions between microemulsion particles as a function of their composition using time averaged and dynamic light scattering and sedimentation measurements and checks the consistency of the experimental data with respect to the generalized Einstein relation. Interactions between microemulsion particles are affected by the flexibility of the soap chains. The more flexible the soap chains, the lesser the attraction forces between the particles. The lack of consistency in the interaction behavior as obtained from different experimental techniques is an important observation, which leads to the conclusion that care should be taken in the determination of the interaction behavior in microemulsion systems from one or 2 experimental techniques. 24 referernces.

  13. TOXICITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA NANOPARTICLES IN MOUSE KERATINOCYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Hussain, Saber

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the uptake, localization and the cytotoxic effects of well-dispersed amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes (HEL-30). Mouse keratinocytes were exposed for 24h to various concentrations of amorphous silica nanoparticles in homogeneous suspensions of average size distribution (30, 48, 118 and 535 nm SiO2) then assessed for uptake and biochemical changes. Results of transmission electron microscopy revealed all sizes of silica were taken up into the cells and localized into the cytoplasm. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay shows LDH leakage was dose- and size-dependent with exposure to 30 and 48 nm nanoparticles. However, no LDH leakage was observed for either 118 or 535 nm nanoparticles. The mitochondrial viability assay (MTT) showed significant toxicity for 30 and 48 nm at high concentrations (100 g/mL) compare to the 118 and 535 nm particles. Further studies were carried out to investigate if cellular reduced GSH and mitochondria membrane potential are involved in the mechanism of SiO2 toxicity. The redox potential of cells (GSH) was reduced significantly at concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 g/mL at 30 nm nanoparticle exposures. However, silica nanoparticles larger than 30 nm showed no changes in GSH levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation did not show any significant change between controls and the exposed cells. In summary, amorphous silica nanoparticles below 100 nm induced cytotoxicity suggest size-of the particles is critical to produce biological effects.

  14. EFFECTS OF TUMORS ON INHALED PHARMACOLOGIC DRUGS: II. PARTICLE MOTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Computer simulations were conducted to describe drug particle motion in human lung bifurcations with tumors. The computations used FIDAP with a Cray T90 supercomputer. The objective was to better understand particle behavior as affected by particle characteristics...

  15. Affective Dynamics in Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Lane, Sean P.; Koval, Peter; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss three varieties of affective dynamics (affective instability, emotional inertia, and emotional differentiation). In each case, we suggest how these affective dynamics should be operationalized and measured in daily life using time-intensive methods, like ecological momentary assessment or ambulatory assessment, and recommend time-sensitive analyses that take into account not only the variability but also the temporal dependency of reports. Studies that explore how these affective dynamics are associated with psychological disorders and symptoms are reviewed, and we emphasize that these affective processes are within a nexus of other components of emotion regulation.

  16. Manipulation of particles by weak forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, M. S.; Savkar, S. D.; Summerhayes, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative relations between various force fields and their effects on the motion of particles of various sizes and physical characteristics were studied. The forces considered were those derived from light, heat, microwaves, electric interactions, magnetic interactions, particulate interactions, and sound. A physical understanding is given of the forces considered as well as formulae which express how the size of the force depends on the physical and electrical properties of the particle. The drift velocity in a viscous fluid is evaluated as a function of initial acceleration and the effects of thermal random motion are considered. A means of selectively sorting or moving particles by choosing a force system and/or environment such that the particle of interest reacts uniquely was developed. The forces considered and a demonstration of how the initial acceleration, drift velocity, and ultimate particle density distribution is affected by particle, input, and environmental parameters are tabulated.

  17. Soft particles at a fluid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabian, Hadi; Harting, Jens; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2015-11-01

    Particles added to a fluid interface can be used as a surface stabilizer in the food, oil and cosmetic industries. As an alternative to rigid particles, it is promising to consider highly deformable particles that can adapt their conformation at the interface. In this study, we compute the shapes of soft elastic particles using molecular dynamics simulations of a cross-linked polymer gel, complemented by continuum calculations based on the linear elasticity. It is shown that the particle shape is not only affected by the Young's modulus of the particle, but also strongly depends on whether the gel is partially or completely wetting the fluid interface. We find that the molecular simulations for the partially wetting case are very accurately described by the continuum theory. By contrast, when the gel is completely wetting the fluid interface the linear theory breaks down and we reveal that molecular details have a strong influence on the equilibrium shape.

  18. [The identification of mouse cloned SFA DNA].

    PubMed

    Yi, Ning; Wu, Weng Qing; Ni, Zu Mei; Shi, Lu Ji

    2002-12-01

    For some basic investigation and the construction of artificial chromosomes, cloned centromeric DNAs identified on a firm ground are required. Thus, in the present work a preliminary screened clone of 13.5 kb DNA, 6# clone, form a mouse centromeric library contructed previously in our library was futher investigated by FISH and PCR. It was found that mouse 6# cloned SFA DNA, as shown by FISH is a fragment of mouse centromeric DNA. Evidence was also observed that 6# cloned SFA DNA consists of mouse minor satellite DNA and other DNA sequences. PMID:15346991

  19. Mouse mammary tumor biology: a short history.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Kenney, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    For over a century, mouse mammary tumor biology and the associated Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) have served as the foundation for experimental cancer research, in general, and, in particular, experimental breast cancer research. Spontaneous mouse mammary tumors were the basis for studies of the natural history of neoplasia, oncogenic viruses, host responses, endocrinology, and neoplastic progression. However, lacking formal proof of a human mammary tumor virus, the preeminence of the mouse model faded in the 1980s. Since the late 1980s, genetically engineered mice (GEM) have proven extremely useful for studying breast cancer and have become the animal model for human breast cancer. Hundreds of mouse models of human breast cancer have been developed since the first demonstration, in 1984, that the mouse mammary gland could be molecularly targeted and used to test the oncogenicity of candidate human genes. Now, very few scientists can avoid using a mouse model to test the biology of their favorite gene. The GEM have attracted a new generation of molecular and cellular biologists eager to apply their skills to these surrogates of the human disease. Newcomers often enter the field without an appreciation of the origins of mouse mammary tumor biology and the basis for many of the prevailing concepts. Our purpose in writing this short history of mouse mammary tumor biology is to provide a historical perspective for the benefit of the newcomers. If Einstein was correct in that "we stand on the shoulders of giants," the neophytes should meet their giants. PMID:17433908

  20. Mitochondrial viability in mouse and human postmortem brain

    PubMed Central

    Barksdale, Keri A.; Perez-Costas, Emma; Gandy, Johanna C.; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Bijur, Gautam N.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal function in the brain requires energy in the form of ATP, and mitochondria are canonically associated with ATP production in neurons. The electrochemical gradient, which underlies the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨmem), is harnessed for ATP generation. Here we show that ΔΨmem and ATP-production can be engaged in mitochondria isolated from human brains up to 8.5 h postmortem. Also, a time course of postmortem intervals from 0 to 24 h using mitochondria isolated from mouse cortex reveals that ΔΨmem in mitochondria can be reconstituted beyond 10 h postmortem. It was found that complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was affected adversely with increasing postmortem intervals. Mitochondria isolated from postmortem mouse brains maintain the ability to produce ATP, but rates of production decreased with longer postmortem intervals. Furthermore, we show that postmortem brain mitochondria retain their ΔΨmem and ATP-production capacities following cryopreservation. Our finding that ΔΨmem and ATP-generating capacity can be reinitiated in brain mitochondria hours after death indicates that human postmortem brains can be an abundant source of viable mitochondria to study metabolic processes in health and disease. It is also possible to archive these mitochondria for future studies.—Barksdale, K. A., Perez-Costas, E., Gandy, J. C., Melendez-Ferro, M., Roberts, R. C., Bijur, G. N. Mitochondrial viability in mouse and human postmortem brain. PMID:20466876

  1. Neuroanatomical changes in a mouse model of early life neglect.

    PubMed

    Duque, Alvaro; Coman, Daniel; Carlyle, Becky C; Bordner, Kelly A; George, Elizabeth D; Papademetris, Xenophon; Hyder, Fahmeed; Simen, Arthur A

    2012-04-01

    Using a novel mouse model of early life neglect and abuse (ENA) based on maternal separation with early weaning, George et al. (BMC Neurosci 11:123, 2010) demonstrated behavioral abnormalities in adult mice, and Bordner et al. (Front Psychiatry 2(18):1-18, 2011) described concomitant changes in mRNA and protein expression. Using the same model, here we report neuroanatomical changes that include smaller brain size and abnormal inter-hemispheric asymmetry, decreases in cortical thickness, abnormalities in subcortical structures, and white matter disorganization and atrophy most severely affecting the left hemisphere. Because of the similarities between the neuroanatomical changes observed in our mouse model and those described in human survivors of ENA, this novel animal model is potentially useful for studies of human ENA too costly or cumbersome to be carried out in primates. Moreover, our current knowledge of the mouse genome makes this model particularly suited for targeted anatomical, molecular, and pharmacological experimentation not yet possible in other species. PMID:21984312

  2. Neuroanatomical changes in a mouse model of early life neglect

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Alvaro; Coman, Daniel; Carlyle, Becky C.; Bordner, Kelly A.; George, Elizabeth D.; Papademetris, Xenophon; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Using a novel mouse model of early life neglect and abuse (ENA) based on maternal separation with early weaning, George et al. (BMC Neurosci 11:123, 2010) demonstrated behavioral abnormalities in adult mice, and Bordner et al. (Front Psychiatry 2(18):1–18, 2011) described concomitant changes in mRNA and protein expression. Using the same model, here we report neuroanatomical changes that include smaller brain size and abnormal inter-hemispheric asymmetry, decreases in cortical thickness, abnormalities in subcortical structures, and white matter disorganization and atrophy most severely affecting the left hemisphere. Because of the similarities between the neuroanatomical changes observed in our mouse model and those described in human survivors of ENA, this novel animal model is potentially useful for studies of human ENA too costly or cumbersome to be carried out in primates. Moreover, our current knowledge of the mouse genome makes this model particularly suited for targeted anatomical, molecular, and pharmacological experimentation not yet possible in other species. PMID:21984312

  3. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn S.; Fields, Natasha R.; Chaudoin, Tammy R; Epstein, Adrian A.; Makarov, Edward; Akhter, Sidra P.; Gorantla, Santhi; Bonasera, Stephen J.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization. PMID:26353862

  4. Detection of Intraplaque Hemorrhage in Mouse Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Sluimer, Judith C; Gijbels, Marion J; Heeneman, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Intraplaque hemorrhage is defined as the presence of fresh or lysed erythrocytes, iron deposits in macrophages, and/or a fibrin clot in an atherosclerotic plaque. These features can be detected by hematoxylin and eosin, Martius scarlet Blue, and Perl's iron histological stainings. It is noteworthy that intraplaque hemorrhage is only present in murine atherosclerotic plaques after additional interventions or additional genetic traits affecting matrix degradation or thrombosis. In this chapter, we describe methods to detect intraplaque hemorrhage in mouse atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26445801

  5. Monodisperse Block Copolymer Particles with Controllable Size, Shape, and Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, Yongjoo; Kim, Bumjoon; PNEL Team

    Shape-anisotropic particles are important class of novel colloidal building block for their functionality is more strongly governed by their shape, size and nanostructure compared to conventional spherical particles. Recently, facile strategy for producing non-spherical polymeric particles by interfacial engineering received significant attention. However, achieving uniform size distribution of particles together with controlled shape and nanostructure has not been achieved. Here, we introduce versatile system for producing monodisperse BCP particles with controlled size, shape and morphology. Polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) self-assembled to either onion-like or striped ellipsoid particle, where final structure is governed by amount of adsorbed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant at the particle/surrounding interface. Further control of molecular weight and particle size enabled fine-tuning of aspect ratio of ellipsoid particle. Underlying physics of free energy for morphology formation and entropic penalty associated with bending BCP chains strongly affects particle structure and specification.

  6. Ultrasonic vocalizations: a tool for behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Crawley, Jacqueline; Ricceri, Laura

    2009-01-01

    In neonatal mice ultrasonic vocalizations have been studied both as an early communicative behavior of the pup-mother dyad and as a sign of an aversive affective state. Adult mice of both sexes produce complex ultrasonic vocalization patterns in different experimental/social contexts. All these vocalizations are becoming an increasingly valuable assay for behavioral phenotyping throughout the mouse life-span and alterations of the ultrasound patterns have been reported in several mouse models of neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we also show that the modulation of vocalizations by maternal cues (maternal potentiation paradigm) – originally identified and investigated in rats - can be measured in C57Bl/6 mouse pups with appropriate modifications of the rat protocol and can likely be applied to mouse behavioral phenotyping. In addition we suggest that a detailed qualitative evaluation of neonatal calls together with analysis of adult mouse vocalization patterns in both sexes in social settings, may lead to a greater understanding of the communication value of vocalizations in mice. Importantly, both neonatal and adult USV altered patterns can be determined during the behavioural phenotyping of mouse models of human neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, starting from those in which deficits in communication are a primary symptom. PMID:18771687

  7. VPS54 and the wobbler mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-John, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The wobbler mouse is an animal model for human motor neuron disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The spontaneous, recessive wobbler mutation causes degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons leading to progressive muscle weakness with striking similarities to the ALS pathology. The wobbler mutation is a point mutation affecting Vps54, a component of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex. The GARP complex is a ubiquitously expressed Golgi-localized vesicle tethering complex, tethering endosome-derived vesicles to the trans Golgi network. The wobbler point mutation leads to a destabilization of the Vps54 protein and thereby the whole GARP complex. This effectuates impairments of the retrograde vesicle transport, mis-sorting of Golgi- and endosome localized proteins and on the long run defects in Golgi morphology and function. It is currently largely unknown how the destabilization of the GARP complex interferes with the pathological hallmarks, reported for the wobbler motor neuron degeneration, like neurofilament aggregation, axonal transport defects, hyperexcitability, mitochondrial dysfunction, and how these finally lead to motor neuron death. However, the impairments of the retrograde vesicle transport and the Golgi-function appear to be critical phenomena in the molecular pathology of the wobbler motor neuron disease. PMID:26539077

  8. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  9. Particle shape variations within a Luvisol profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Szalai, Zoltán; Ringer, Marianna; Zacháry, Dóra; Szabó, Judit; Varga, György

    2016-04-01

    Particle size distribution has crucial importance in soil physics. On the other hand particle shape properties were only taken into account in case of transport process investigations. Eolic or fluvial translocations have an effective impact on particle shape changes of loose sediment grains. Pedogenic processes also affect soil particle shape, however, this type of degradation and reformation based on chemical interactions. Moreover soil particles are strongly associated with each other and organic components hence the preparation of individual grains is difficult. Present study aims to compare particle size and shape data among several horizons of a Luvisol. The theoretically uniform initial sediment profile was differentiated due to pedogenesis and particle migration within the solum. Shape properties was estimated using two dimensional static image analysis. The applied device was Morphologi G3 by Malvern Instruments. Sample dispersion was made by high pressured air injection that scatters the particles onto a glass plate. The images are taken via a set of optics with various magnifications. Low (10 times) magnification was used for particles > 10 μ and high (50 times) magnification for particles < 10 μ. Particle size distribution was measured using the Fritch Analysette 22 MicroTec Plus laser diffraction device. Preliminary results suggest that the clay size particles are more rounded compared to the bigger grains in each horizon. Most angular particles are in the parent material and on the surface, while the most rounded are in the "B" horizons. This result could be the effect of particle size distribution differences among the horizons, however size distribution results seems to be a function of the applied method, eg. image analysis or laser diffraction. Present study was supported by National Hungarian Research Found K100180, G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai fellowship of the HAS.

  10. Effect of diffusional creep on particle morphology of polycrystalline alloys strengthened by second phase particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittenberger, J. D.; Behrendt, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Diffusional creep in a polycrystalline alloy containing second-phase particles can disrupt the particle morphology. For alloys which depend on the particle distribution for strength, changes in the particle morphology can affect the mechanical properties. Recent observations of diffusional creep in alloys containing soluble particles (gamma-prime strengthened Ni base alloys) and inert particles have been reexamined in light of the basic mechanisms of diffusional creep, and a generalized model of this effect is proposed. The model indicates that diffusional creep will generally result in particle-free regions in the vicinity of grain boundaries serving as net vacancy sources. The factors which control the changes in second-phase morphology have been identified, and methods of reducing the effects of diffusional creep are suggested.

  11. Silver Nanoparticles: A study of dissolution, kinetics, and factors affecting pulmonary inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Eric L.

    The growing use of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NP) in consumer and industrial goods has led to an increase in interest in the health effects associated with exposure, both occupationally and environmentally. The aim of this research is to examine the contribution of size, shape, and dissolution of AgNP, with its corresponding effect on pulmonary inflammation and clearance. In addition this study looks at metallothionein (MT) and the role it plays as an inflammatory modulator. A nose only exposure method was used to expose three strains of mouse (two inbred, one knockout) to two different sizes of AgNP (˜25 nm and ˜100 nm). This research demonstrates that size, chemistry, and dissolution play key roles in NP deposition and inflammatory response, while no conclusions could be drawn about shape. Additionally, this study found that the main factors affecting the deposition of NP in mice both acutely and sub-chronically are particle size and mouse strain. The results of this study also indicate a relationship between MT2 and inflammation. It was found that the mRNA levels of MT2 were greatly up-regulated in the livers and lungs of mice exposed to AgNP, while MT protein levels were not significantly altered to correlate with the altered regulation of mRNA. Finally, this study showed that, for AgNP, the mechanisms of pulmonary clearance and dissolution happened rapidly and that they, combined, likely represent a major pathway of AgNP transport out of the lung. Taken as a whole, the data in this study show that dissolution, coupled with protein interaction, is a significant mediator of pulmonary inflammation and translocation of AgNP.

  12. Particle Tracks in Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment using a special air gun, particles are shot into aerogel at high velocities. Closeup of particles that have been captured in aerogel are shown here. The particles leave a carrot-shaped trail in the aerogel. Aerogel was used on the Stardust spacecraft to capture comet particles from Comet Wild 2.

  13. Particle capture by aquatic vegetation modeled in flume experiments: the effects of particle size, stem density, biofilm, and flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwin, R.; Fauria, K.; Nover, D.; Schladow, G.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands can trap and remove particles from suspension thereby affecting water quality, land accretion, and wetland functioning. However, the rate of particle removal by vegetation remains poorly characterized, especially for fine particles. In this study, we monitored particle concentration and size distribution (1.25 - 250 µm diameter suspended road dust) in a laboratory flume as flow velocity, plant stem density, initial particle concentration, and the presence of biofilm on vegetation were varied. We characterized change in particle concentration through time by calculating decay constants, termed capture rates. Based on our experiments, we found that suspended particle concentration decayed more rapidly in the presence, rather than in the absence, of vegetation. Additionally, particle capture rates increased with stem density, particle size, and the presence of biofilm, while decreasing with flow velocity. These results demonstrate that low flow velocities and the presence of biofilm optimize particle capture by vegetation. Our results are relevant to floodplain and wetland restoration efforts.

  14. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  15. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients. PMID:26922998

  16. Mouse models for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related cell death in human and the fifth in women worldwide. The incidence of HCC is increasing despite progress in identifying risk factors, understanding disease etiology and developing anti-viral strategies. Therapeutic options are limited and survival after diagnosis is poor. Therefore, better preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic tools are urgently needed, in particular given the increased contribution from systemic metabolic disease to HCC incidence worldwide. In the last three decades, technological advances have facilitated the generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to mimic the alterations frequently observed in human cancers or to conduct intervention studies and assess the relevance of candidate gene networks in tumor establishment, progression and maintenance. Because these studies allow molecular and cellular manipulations impossible to perform in patients, GEMMs have improved our understanding of this complex disease and represent a source of great potential for mechanism-based therapy development. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of HCC modeling in the mouse, highlighting successes, current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:23428636

  17. Angiogenesis in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Mitzner, W; Lee, W; Georgakopoulos, D; Wagner, E

    2000-07-01

    When pulmonary arterial blood flow is obstructed in all mammals studied, there is a compensatory growth of the bronchial vasculature. This angiogenesis normally occurs through a proliferation of the systemic circulation to the intraparenchymal airways. It is an important pathophysiological process, not only in pulmonary vascular disease, but also in lung cancer, because the blood flow that supplies primary lung tumors arises from the systemic circulation. In the mouse, however, the systemic blood vessels that supply the trachea and mainstem bronchi do not penetrate into the intraparenchymal airways, as they do in all other larger species. In this study, we attempted to generate a new functional bronchial circulation in the mouse by permanently obstructing 40% of the pulmonary circulation. We quantified the systemic blood flow to the lung with fluorescent microspheres for 3 months after left pulmonary artery ligation. Results demonstrated that a substantial systemic blood flow to the lung that can eventually supply up to 15% of the normal pulmonary flow can be generated beginning 5-6 days after ligation. These new angiogenic vessels do not arise from the extraparenchymal bronchial circulation. Rather they enter the lung directly via a totally new vasculature that develops between the visceral and parietal pleuras, supplied by several intercostal arteries. This unique model of angiogenesis occurs in the absence of any hypoxic stimulus and mimics the vascular source of many lung tumors. PMID:10880380

  18. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance. PMID:19735697

  19. Mouse Behavior: Conjectures about Adaptations for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rop, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Presents an experiment on mouse behavior in which students learn to observe, pay attention to details, record field notes, and ask questions about their observations. Uses a white mouse to eliminate the risk of disease that a wild rodent might carry. Lists materials, set up, and procedure. (YDS)

  20. Measuring Viscoelastic Deformation with an Optical Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using an optical mouse to track the viscoelastic deformation of low-density polyethylene films that have a fixed attached load is presented. It is seen that using an optical mouse and with rudimentary experiment paraphernalia and arrangement, it is possible to get good measurements of viscoelastic deformation.

  1. Establishment of a novel method without sequence modification for developing NoV P particle-based chimeric vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingnan; Fu, Lu; Hu, Yue; Jin, Hao; Zheng, Yayuan; Yin, Yuhe; Wu, Hui; Yu, Xianghui; Kong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The Norovirus (NoV) P particle (PP) is a subviral particle formed by 24 copies of the protruding (P) domain of the capsid protein. Each P domain has three surface loops that can be used for foreign antigen presentation. Hence, PPs have been demonstrated to be an excellent platform for vaccine development against many pathogens. However, current processes for preparing those chimeric PP vaccines vary and would change the original sequence of the PP. A detailed strategy also has not been reported for inserting a foreign antigen into all three loops. In order to develop a novel method for preparing distinct types of PP-based protein vaccines, we created two restriction enzyme sites (EagI and KpnI) in the P domain by site-directed mutagenesis without changing its original sequence. A synthesized gene with three copies of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) immunogen Aβ1-6 was then incorporated in loop2 of the P domain. Additionally, a synthesized gene with one copy of Aβ1-6 was inserted into each loop of the P domain. Furthermore, two recombinant proteins PP-3 copy-Aβ1-6-loop2 and PP-1 copy-Aβ1-6-loop123 were successfully purified without affecting PP formation. Particle size analysis and TEM observations demonstrated that the two chimeric P particles were still able to form 24-mer nanoparticles. Moreover, the two chimeric PP-based AD vaccines could both efficiently elicit strong immune responses in the mouse model. In conclusion, we have successfully established a novel method for preparing vaccines based on the NoV PP which would not affect PP sequence and function. PMID:26773744

  2. Assessing Student Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Student affect--the attitudes, interests, and values that students exhibit and acquire in school--can play a profoundly important role in students' postschool lives, possibly an even more significant role than that played by students' cognitive achievements. If student affect is so crucial, then why don't teachers assess it? One deterrent is that…

  3. Affective Involvement Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemlech, Johanna K.

    1970-01-01

    The Affective Involvement Instrument (AII) describes and classifies affective involvement in the process of decision-making as it occurs during classroom activities such as role-playing or group discussions. The thirty-celled instrument behaviorizes the six processes involved in decision-making and combines them with the taxonomic levels of the…

  4. Affectional Patterns of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, William J.

    1979-01-01

    This study sought to determine if there is a shift with age in affection (1) from parents to friends, (2) from one parent to the other, and (3) from same-sex to opposite-sex friends. Subjects, eighth graders and eleventh graders, completed the Measurement of Family Affective Structure. (Author)

  5. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  6. The effect of particle size, location and season on the toxicity of urban and rural particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Mirowsky, Jaime; Hickey, Christina; Horton, Lori; Blaustein, Martin; Galdanes, Karen; Peltier, Richard E.; Chillrud, Steven; Chen, Lung Chi; Ross, James; Nadas, Arthur; Lippmann, Morton; Gordon, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) varies in chemical composition and mass concentration based on a number of factors including location, season, source and particle size. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo toxicity of coarse and fine PM simultaneously collected at three rural and two urban sites within the metropolitan New York City (NYC) region during two seasons, and to assess how particle size and elemental composition affect toxicity. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial (HPMEC-ST1.6R) and bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines were exposed to PM (50 μg/mL) and analyzed for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mice (FVB/N) were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 50 μg PM, and lavage fluid was analyzed for total protein and PMN influx. The ROS response was greater in the HPMEC-ST1.6R cell line compared to BEAS-2B cells, but the responses were significantly correlated (p<0.01). The ROS response was affected by location, locale and the location:size interaction in both cell lines, and an additional association for size was observed from HPMEC-ST1.6R cells. Urban fine PM generated the highest ROS response. In the mouse model, inflammation was associated with particle size and by a season:size interaction, with coarse PM producing greater PMN inflammation. This study showed that the aerodynamic size, locale (i.e. urban versus rural), and site of PM samples affected the ROS response in pulmonary endothelial and epithelial cells and the inflammatory response in mice. Importantly, these responses were dependent upon the chemical composition of the PM samples. PMID:24255952

  7. On the response of mouse peritoneal macrophages to titanium dioxide pigments in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nuuja, I.J.; Arstila, A.U.

    1982-10-01

    Acid phosphatase activity and cell morphology were followed using mouse peritoneal macrophages as a toxicity test model in vitro. The cells were given titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and five titanium pigments with different coating materials in 100 ..mu..g/ml of culture medium. The cell reactions were studied from 1 to 17 days. Titanium particles inhibited the acid phosphatase activity of the cells compared to controls. In comparison to untreated cells the activity of this enzyme increased in most groups studied, being highest in the control cells (2-3.5 times) after 7 days. The titanium pigments did not cause the drastic alterations in these cells as seen with quartz and asbestos particles, but the titanium pigments were not harmless to the mouse peritoneal macrophages with the doses and culture times used.

  8. Mineral metabolism in isolated mouse long bones: Opposite effects of microgravity on mineralization and resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuijzen, Jean Paul; Vanloon, Jack J. W. A.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment using isolated skeletal tissues under microgravity, is reported. Fetal mouse long bones (metatarsals) were cultured for 4 days in the Biorack facility of Spacelab during the IML-1 (International Microgravity Laboratory) mission of the Space Shuttle. Overall growth was not affected, however glucose consumption was significantly reduced under microgravity. Mineralization of the diaphysis was also strongly reduced under microgravity as compared to the on-board 1 g group. In contrast, mineral resorption by osteoclasts was signficantly increased. These results indicate that these fetal mouse long bones are a sensitive and useful model to further study the cellular mechanisms involved in the changed mineral metabolism of skeletal tissues under microgravity.

  9. Particle capture device

    DOEpatents

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  10. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, John C.; Buican, Tudor N.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

  11. Laser particle sorter

    DOEpatents

    Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

    1987-11-30

    Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

  12. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.; Lal, Nand; McGuire, Robert E.; Szabo, Adam; Narock, Thomas W.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Manweiler, Jerry W.; Patterson, J. Douglas; Hill, Matthew E.; Vandergriff, Jon D.; McKibben, Robert B.; Lopate, Clifford; Tranquille, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events. acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  13. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Lal, N.; McGuire, R. E.; Szabo, A.; Narock, T. W.; Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.; Hill, M. E.; Vandergriff, J. D.; McKibben, R. B.; Lopate, C.; Tranquille, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) focuses on improved discovery, access, and usability of heliospheric energetic particle and ancillary data products from selected spacecraft and sub-orbital instruments of the heliophysics data environment. The energy range of interest extends over the full range of particle acceleration from keV energies of suprathermal seed particles to GeV energies of galactic cosmic ray particles. Present spatial coverage is for operational and legacy spacecraft operating from the inner to the outer heliosphere, e.g. from measurements by the two Helios spacecraft to 0.3 AU to the inner heliosheath region now being traversed by the two Voyager spacecraft. This coverage will eventually be extended inward to ten solar radii by the planned NASA solar probe mission and at the same time beyond the heliopause into the outer heliosheath by continued Voyager operations. The geospace fleet of spacecraft providing near-Earth interplanetary measurements, selected magnetospheric spacecraft providing direct measurements of penetrating interplanetary energetic particles, and interplanetary cruise measurements from planetary spacecraft missions further extend VEPO resources to the domain of geospace and planetary interactions. Ground-based (e.g., neutron monitor) and high-altitude suborbital measurements can expand coverage to the highest energies of galactic cosmic rays affected by heliospheric interaction and of solar energetic particles. Science applications include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events, acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. Robotic and human exploration, and eventual habitation, of planetary and space environments beyond the Earth require knowledge of radiation

  14. Diffusion of Particles in Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liheng; Rubinstein, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We use scaling theory to derive the time dependence of the mean-square-displacement <δr^2> of a probe particle of size d in an entangled semidilute polymer solution. Particles with size smaller than solution correlation length ξ undergo ordinary diffusion (<δr^2 (t)>˜t) with diffusion coefficient determined by the solvent viscosity. The motion of particles with intermediate sizes (ξ˜t^1/2) at short time scales since their motion is affected by sub-sections of polymer chains. At long time scales the motion of these particles is diffusive and their diffusion coefficient is determined by effective viscosity of a polymer solution with chains of size comparable to particle diameter d. The motion of particles larger than tube diameter (d>a) at time scales shorter than the relaxation time of an entanglement strand τe is similar to the motion of particles with intermediate sizes. At longer time scales (t>τe) large particles (d>a) are trapped by entanglement mesh and cannot move until the surrounding chains relax at the reptation time scale τrep. At longer times t>τrep, the motion of large particles becomes diffusive with diffusion coefficient determined by the bulk viscosity of the entangled polymer solution.

  15. [Affect and mimetic behavior].

    PubMed

    Zepf, S; Ullrich, B; Hartmann, S

    1998-05-01

    The relationship between facial expression and experienced affect presents many problems. The two diametrically opposed positions proposing solutions to this problem are exemplified using the conceptions of Mandler u. Izard. The underlying premises of both conceptions still prevail in various forms. The authors reject the concepts according to which facial expression is merely correlated to the affects (see Mandler 1975) as well as the view that facial expression controls the affects (see Izard 1977). The relationship between affect and facial expression is reexamined, subjecting it to a semiotic, essentially semantic analysis similar to the Ogden and Richards' language and meaning approach. This analysis involves a critical discussion of Scherer's attempt of a purely communicational interpretation using Bühler's organon model. In the author's approach, facial expression is seen not simply as a system of signals, but as a system of representative signs which signify the affects and refer to the emotive meaning of things for the subject. The authors develop the thesis that human beings are not born simply with the ability to speak, but also with the abstract possibility of performing facial expressions. This ability develops by way of coordinating patterns of expressions, which are presumably phylogenetically determined, with affects that take on a socially determined individual form, similar to language acquisition during socialisation. The authors discuss the methodological implications arising for studies investigating the affective meaning of facial expressions. PMID:9632951

  16. Mouse models of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miriam R; Sweasy, Joann B

    2012-12-01

    In 1956, Arthur Kornberg discovered the mechanism of the biological synthesis of DNA and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1959 for this contribution, which included the isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Now there are 15 known DNA polymerases in mammalian cells that belong to four different families. These DNA polymerases function in many different cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA repair, and damage tolerance. Several biochemical and cell biological studies have provoked a further investigation of DNA polymerase function using mouse models in which polymerase genes have been altered using gene-targeting techniques. The phenotypes of mice harboring mutant alleles reveal the prominent role of DNA polymerases in embryogenesis, prevention of premature aging, and cancer suppression. PMID:23001998

  17. Subpopulations of mouse spleen lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mugraby, Lea; Gery, I.; Sulitzeanu, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fractionation on bovine serum albumin (BSA) continuous gradients or passage through anti-immunoglobulin-coated (RaMIg) columns were used to separate the populations of mouse spleen cells which react against mitogens specific for B (E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) or T cells (concanavalin A (Con A) or phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)). These manipulations could distinguish the subsets of T cells reacting toward PHA or Con A. Fractionation on BSA gradients yielded two fractions, one light and the other dense, with high reactivity toward Con A; the cells reactive to LPS were concentrated in a fraction located between these two fractions, whereas the response to PHA was distributed irregularly throughout the gradient, without any apparent correlation with the response against Con A. Lymphocytes eluted from the RaMIg columns did not react to LPS, showed increased reactivity to PHA and decreased response to Con A, as compared to the unfractionated cells. PMID:4605183

  18. Energetic Particle-induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.

    2008-09-12

    A new energetic particle-induced Geodesic Acoustic Mode (EGAM) is shown to exist. The mode frequency, mode structure, and mode destabilization are determined non-perturbatively by energetic particle kinetic effects. In particular the EGAM frequency is found to be substantially lower than the standard GAM frequency. The radial mode width is determined by the energetic particle drift orbit width and can be fairly large for high energetic particle pressure and large safety factor. These results are consistent with the recent experimental observation of the beam- driven n=0 mode in DIII-D. The new mode is important since it can degrade energetic particle confinement as shown in the DIII-D experiments. The new mode may also affect the thermal plasma confinement via its interaction with plasma micro-turbulence.

  19. Particles with changeable topology in nematic colloids.

    PubMed

    Ravnik, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-09-01

    We show that nematic colloids can serve as a highly variable and controllable platform for studying inclusions with changeable topology and their effects on the surrounding ordering fields. We explore morphing of toroidal and knotted colloidal particles into effective spheres, distinctively changing their Euler characteristic and affecting the surrounding nematic field, including topological defect structures. With toroidal particles, the inner nematic defect eventually transitions from a wide loop to a point defect (a small loop). Trefoil particles become linked with two knotted defect loops, mutually forming a three component link, that upon tightening transform into a two-component particle-defect loop link. For more detailed topological analysis, Pontryagin-Thom surfaces are calculated and visualised, indicating an interesting cascade of defect rewirings caused by the shape morphing of the knotted particles. PMID:26291540

  20. Particles with changeable topology in nematic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-09-01

    We show that nematic colloids can serve as a highly variable and controllable platform for studying inclusions with changeable topology and their effects on the surrounding ordering fields. We explore morphing of toroidal and knotted colloidal particles into effective spheres, distinctively changing their Euler characteristic and affecting the surrounding nematic field, including topological defect structures. With toroidal particles, the inner nematic defect eventually transitions from a wide loop to a point defect (a small loop). Trefoil particles become linked with two knotted defect loops, mutually forming a three component link, that upon tightening transform into a two-component particle-defect loop link. For more detailed topological analysis, Pontryagin-Thom surfaces are calculated and visualised, indicating an interesting cascade of defect rewirings caused by the shape morphing of the knotted particles.

  1. Energetic Particle Influence on the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, Irina A.; Aplin, Karen L.; Arnold, Frank; Bazilevskaya, Galina A.; Harrison, R. Giles; Krivolutsky, Alexei A.; Nicoll, Keri A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Turunen, Esa; Usoskin, Ilya G.

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript gives an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the effects of energetic particle precipitation (EPP) onto the whole atmosphere, from the lower thermosphere/mesosphere through the stratosphere and troposphere, to the surface. The paper summarizes the different sources and energies of particles, principally galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), solar energetic particles (SEPs) and energetic electron precipitation (EEP). All the proposed mechanisms by which EPP can affect the atmosphere are discussed, including chemical changes in the upper atmosphere and lower thermosphere, chemistry-dynamics feedbacks, the global electric circuit and cloud formation. The role of energetic particles in Earth's atmosphere is a multi-disciplinary problem that requires expertise from a range of scientific backgrounds. To assist with this synergy, summary tables are provided, which are intended to evaluate the level of current knowledge of the effects of energetic particles on processes in the entire atmosphere.

  2. Prion infection of mouse neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Ranjit K.; Young, Rebecca; Pitstick, Rose; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Carlson, George A.

    2006-01-01

    Only a few cell lines have been infected with prions, offering limited genetic diversity and sensitivity to several strains. Here we report that cultured neurospheres expressing cellular prion protein (PrPC) can be infected with prions. Neurosphere lines isolated from the brains of mice at embryonic day 13–15 grow as aggregates and contain CNS stem cells. We produced neurosphere cultures from FVB/NCr (FVB) mice, from transgenic (Tg) FVB mice that overexpress mouse PrP-A (Tg4053), and from congenic FVB mice with a targeted null mutation in the PrP gene (Prnp0/0) and incubated them with the Rocky Mountain Laboratory prion strain. While monitoring the levels of disease-causing PrP (PrPSc) at each passage, we observed a dramatic rise in PrPSc levels with time in the Tg4053 neurosphere cells, whereas the level of PrPSc decayed to undetectable levels in cell cultures lacking PrP. PrPSc levels in cultures from FVB mice initially declined but then increased with passage. Prions produced in culture were transmissible to mice and produced disease pathology. Intracellular aggregates of PrPSc were present in cells from infected cultures. The susceptibility of neurosphere cultures to prions mirrored that of the mice from which they were derived. Neurosphere lines from Tg4053 mice provide a sensitive in vitro bioassay for mouse prions; neurosphere lines from other Tg mice overexpressing PrP might be used to assay prions from other species, including humans. PMID:16495413

  3. Mouse model of intracerebellar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tijjani Salihu, Abubakar; Muthuraju, Sangu; Aziz Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul; Ahmad, Farizan; Zulkifli Mustafa, Mohd; Jaafar, Hasnan; Idris, Zamzuri; Rahman Izaini Ghani, Abdul; Malin Abdullah, Jafri

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the behavior and neuronal morphological changes in the perihaemorrhagic tissue of the mouse intracerebellar haemorrhage experimental model. Adult male Swiss albino mice were stereotactically infused with collagenase type VII (0.4U/μl of saline) unilaterally in to the cerebellum, following anaesthesia. Motor deficits were assessed using open field and composite score for evaluating the mouse model of cerebellar ataxia at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after collagenase infusion. The animals were sacrificed at the same time interval for evaluation of perihaematomal neuronal degeneration using haematoxylin and eosin staining and Annexin V-FITC/Propidium iodide assay. At the end of the study, it was found that infusion of 0.4U collagenase produces significant locomotor and ataxic deficit in the mice especially within the first week post surgery, and that this gradually improved within three weeks. Neuronal degeneration evident by cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear pyknosis was observed at the perihaematomal area after one day; especially at 3 and 7 days post haemorrhage. By 21 days, both the haematoma and degenerating neurons in the perihaematomal area were phagocytosed and the remaining neuronal cells around the scar tissue appeared normal. Moreover, Annexin-V/propidium iodide-positive cells were observed at the perihaematomal area at 3 and 7 days implying that the neurons likely die via apoptosis. It was concluded that a population of potentially salvageable neurons exist in the perihaematomal area after cerebellar haemorrhage throughout a wide time window that could be amenable to treatment. PMID:27327104

  4. Two orthogonal cleavages separate subunit RNAs in mouse ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Anikin, Leonid; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a dynamic multistep process, many features of which are still incompletely documented. Here, we show that changes in this pathway can be captured and annotated by means of a graphic set of pre-rRNA ratios, a technique we call Ratio Analysis of Multiple Precursors (RAMP). We find that knocking down a ribosome synthesis factor produces a characteristic RAMP profile that exhibits consistency across a range of depletion levels. This facilitates the inference of affected steps and simplifies comparative analysis. We applied RAMP to examine how endonucleolytic cleavages of the mouse pre-rRNA transcript in the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) are affected by depletion of factors required for maturation of the small ribosomal subunit (Rcl1, Fcf1/Utp24, Utp23) and the large subunit (Pes1, Nog1). The data suggest that completion of early maturation in a subunit triggers its release from the common pre-rRNA transcript by stimulating cleavage at the proximal site in ITS1. We also find that splitting of pre-rRNA in the 3′ region of ITS1 is prevalent in adult mouse tissues and quiescent cells, as it is in human cells. We propose a model for subunit separation during mammalian ribosome synthesis and discuss its implications for understanding pre-rRNA processing pathways. PMID:25190460

  5. The Particle Hunters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ne'eman, Yuval; Kirsh, Yoram

    1996-04-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; 1. The building blocks of the atom; 2. Physical laws for small particles; 3. The discoveries of the 1930s and 1940s; 4. Particle accelerators - or from hunters to farmers; 5. Strange particles; 6. Basic forces and the classification of particles; 7. Conservation laws; 8. Short-lived particles; 9. To the quarks - via the eightfold way; 10. More quarks - or charm, truth and beauty; 11. The standard model and beyond; Appendix 1. Properties of semi-stable particles; Appendix 2. The Greek alphabet; Name index; Subject index.

  6. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  7. Quantitative image analysis of laminin immunoreactivity in skin basement membrane irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon iron particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, S.; Streuli, C. H.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that laminin immunoreactivity in mouse mammary epithelium is altered shortly after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy from 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions but is unaffected after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. This observation led us to propose that the effect could be due to protein damage from the high ionization density of the ion tracks. If so, we predicted that it would be evident soon after radiation exposure in basement membranes of other tissues and would depend on ion fluence. To test this hypothesis, we used immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and image segmentation techniques to quantify changes in the basement membrane of mouse skin epidermis. At 1 h after exposure to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions with doses from 0.03 to 1.6 Gy, neither the visual appearance nor the mean pixel intensity of laminin in the basement membrane of mouse dorsal skin epidermis was altered compared to sham-irradiated tissue. This result does not support the hypothesis that particle traversal directly affects laminin protein integrity. However, the mean pixel intensity of laminin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in epidermal basement membrane at 48 and 96 h after exposure to 0.8 Gy 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. We confirmed this effect with two additional antibodies raised against affinity-purified laminin 1 and the E3 fragment of the long-arm of laminin 1. In contrast, collagen type IV, another component of the basement membrane, was unaffected. Our studies demonstrate quantitatively that densely ionizing radiation elicits changes in skin microenvironments distinct from those induced by sparsely ionizing radiation. Such effects may might contribute to the carcinogenic potential of densely ionizing radiation by altering cellular signaling cascades mediated by cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  8. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2001-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  9. Partial structure of the mouse glucokinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura-Oka, Kazumi; Chu, Mei-Jin; Sullivan, M.; Oka, Kazuhiro

    1995-10-10

    A complementary DNA for glucokinase (GK) was cloned from mouse liver total RNA by a combination of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mouse liver cDNA library screening. Liver- and {beta}-cell-specific exons 1 were isolated by PCR using mouse and rat genomic DNAs. These clones were then used to screen a mouse genomic library; three genomic clones were isolated and characterized. The mouse GK gene spans over 20 kb, containing 11 exons including a liver- or {beta}-cell-specific exon 1, which encodes a tissue-specific 15-aa peptide at the N-terminus of the protein. Both types of GK contain 465 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of mouse {beta}-cell-specific GK showed 98 and 96% identity to the rat and human enzymes, respectively; the corresponding values are 98 and 95% respectively, for the liver-specific GK. Several transcription factor-binding consensus sequences are identified in the 5{prime} flanking region of the mouse GK gene. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Forests play a key role in removal of particles from the atmosphere but may also significantly contribute to formation and growth of ultrafine particles. Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate substantial capture of nucleation mode particles by the foliage. Concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that nucleation mode number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual BVOC emissions by drought and thus reduced production of condensable products (and thus particle growth) during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) modeled based on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and PAR, but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide direct evidence for the importance of canopy capture in atmospheric particle budgets and indirect evidence that drought-stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  11. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  12. Particle Segregation at Contact Lines of Evaporating Colloidal Drops: Influence of the Substrate Wettability and Particle Charge-Mass Ratio.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Marín, Diego; Moraila-Martínez, Carmen L; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A

    2015-06-23

    Segregation of particles during capillary/convective self-assembly is interesting for self-stratification in colloidal deposits. In evaporating drops containing colloidal particles, the wettability properties of substrate and the sedimentation of particles can affect their accumulation at contact lines. In this work we studied the size segregation and discrimination of charged particles with different densities. We performed in-plane particle counting at evaporating triple lines by using fluorescence confocal microscopy. We studied separately substrates with very different wettability properties and particles with different charge-mass ratios at low ionic strength. We used binary colloidal suspensions to compare simultaneously the deposition of two different particles. The particle deposition rate strongly depends on the receding contact angle of the substrate. We further observed a singular behavior of charged polystyrene particles in binary mixtures under "salt-free" conditions explained by the "colloidal Brazil nut" effect. PMID:26000909

  13. Expression of Superparamagnetic Particles on FORC Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, A. M.; Kumari, M.; Crippa, F.; Petri-Fink, A.

    2015-12-01

    Identification of superparamagnetic (SP) particles in natural materials provides information on processes that lead to the new formation or dissolution of iron oxides. SP particles express themselves on first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams as a distribution centered near the origin of the diagram. Pike et al. (2001, GJI, 145, 721) demonstrated that thermal relaxation produces an upward shift in the FORC distribution, and attributed this to a pause encountered at each reversal field. In this study we examine the relationship between this upward shift and particles size on two sets of synthetic iron oxide nanoparticles. One set of coated magnetite particles have well-constrained particles size with 9, 16 and 20 nm as their diameter. A second set from the FeraSpin™ Series, consisting of FeraSpinXS, M and XL, were evaluated. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that the first set of samples is exclusively magnetite, whereas the FeraSpin samples contain predominantly magnetite with some degree of oxidation. Samples from both sets show that the upward shift of the FORC distribution at the origin increases with decreasing particle size. The amount of shift in the FeraSpin series is less when compared to the samples from the first set. This is attributed to the effect of interaction that counteracts the effect of thermal relaxation behavior of the SP particles. The FeraSpin series also shows a broader FORC distribution on the vertical axis that appears to be related to non-saturation of the hysteresis curve at maximum applied field. This non-saturation behavior can be due to spins of very fine particles or oxidation to hematite. AC susceptibility at low temperature indicates that particle interaction may affect the effective magnetic particle size. Our results suggest that the FORC distribution in pure SP particle systems provides information on the particle size distribution or oxidation, which can be further evaluated with low temperature techniques.

  14. Clementine RRELAX SRAM Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Soli, G.; Blaes, B.; Ratliff, J.; Garrett, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine RRELAX radiation monitor chip consists of a p-FET total dose monitor and a 4-kbit SRAM particle spectrometer. Eight of these chips were included in the RRELAX and used to detect the passage of the Clementine (S/C) and the innerstage adapter (ISA) through the earth's radiation belts and the 21-Feb 1994 solar flare. This is the first space flight for this 1.2 micron rad-soft custom CMOS radiation monitor. This paper emphasizes results from the SRAM particle detector which showed that it a) has a detection range of five orders of magnitude relative to the 21-Feb solar flare, b) is not affected by electrons, and c) detected microflares occurring with a 26.5 day period.

  15. Cancer gene discovery in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Jenny; van der Weyden, Louise; Hubbard, Tim; Adams, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The elucidation of the human and mouse genome sequence and developments in high-throughput genome analysis, and in computational tools, have made it possible to profile entire cancer genomes. In parallel with these advances mouse models of cancer have evolved into a powerful tool for cancer gene discovery. Here we discuss the approaches that may be used for cancer gene identification in both human and mouse and discuss how a cross-species ‘oncogenomics’ approach to cancer gene discovery represents a powerful strategy for finding genes that drive tumourigenesis. PMID:19285540

  16. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  17. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  18. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  19. Composite powder particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Donald S. (Inventor); MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid coating composition including a coating vehicle and composite powder particles disposed within the coating vehicle. Each composite powder particle may include a magnesium component, a zinc component, and an indium component.

  20. Is the Mouse a Good Model of Human PPARγ-Related Metabolic Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Pap, Attila; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Peloquin, Matthew; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients affected with metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies are eager to better understand metabolic syndrome and develop new drugs for its treatment. Many studies have focused on the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), which plays a crucial role in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. These studies have been able to connect this transcription factor to several human metabolic diseases. Due to obvious limitations concerning experimentation in humans, animal models—mainly mouse models—have been generated to investigate the role of PPARγ in different tissues. This review focuses on the metabolic features of human and mouse PPARγ-related diseases and the utility of the mouse as a model. PMID:27483259

  1. The mouse dead-end gene isoform alpha is necessary for germ cell and embryonic viability.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Aggarwal, Sita; Zhu, Rui; Kumar, Madhu; Zhao, Ming; Meistrich, Marvin L; Matin, Angabin

    2007-03-30

    Inactivation of the dead-end (Dnd1) gene in the Ter mouse strain results in depletion of primordial germ cells (PGCs) so that mice become sterile. However, on the 129 mouse strain background, loss of Dnd1 also increases testicular germ cell tumor incidence in parallel to PGC depletion. We report that inactivation of Dnd1 also affects embryonic viability in the 129 strain. Mouse Dnd1 encodes two protein isoforms, DND1-isoform alpha (DND1-alpha) and DND1-isoform beta (DND1-beta). Using isoform-specific antibodies, we determined DND1-alpha is expressed in embryos and embryonic gonads whereas DND1-beta expression is restricted to germ cells of the adult testis. Our data implicate DND1-alpha isoform to be necessary for germ cell viability and therefore its loss in Ter mice results in PGC depletion, germ cell tumor development and partial embryonic lethality in the 129 strain. PMID:17291453

  2. The effect on rhino mouse skin of agents which influence keratinization and exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Kligman, A M

    1979-11-01

    The skin of the rhino mouse, an allelic variant of the hariless mouse, contains deep dermal cysts and huge numbers of hornfilled utriculi which resemble comedones. Chemicals which influence either differentiation or desquamation of horny cells were applied topically twice daily for up to 6 weeks. Except for the dermal cysts, the gross epithelial abnormalities were almost completely corrected by retinoic acid in a dose-dependent fashion. Salicylic acid caused partial emptying of the horny masses, but the utriculi did not regress. Lactic acid, propylene glycol and benzoyl peroxide had minor effects on keratinization and exfoliation. The rhino mouse is a suitable model for assessing chemicals which affect epithelial differentiation (retinoids)or which promote loss of cohesion between horny cells (descaling agents). PMID:501133

  3. Is the Mouse a Good Model of Human PPARγ-Related Metabolic Diseases?

    PubMed

    Pap, Attila; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Peloquin, Matthew; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of patients affected with metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies are eager to better understand metabolic syndrome and develop new drugs for its treatment. Many studies have focused on the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), which plays a crucial role in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism. These studies have been able to connect this transcription factor to several human metabolic diseases. Due to obvious limitations concerning experimentation in humans, animal models-mainly mouse models-have been generated to investigate the role of PPARγ in different tissues. This review focuses on the metabolic features of human and mouse PPARγ-related diseases and the utility of the mouse as a model. PMID:27483259

  4. Onset of aquaporin-4 expression in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Vollmer, Jörg P; Bauer, Hans-C; Noell, Susan; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mack, Andreas F

    2014-08-01

    The main water channel in the brain, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is involved in maintaining homeostasis and water exchange in the brain. In adult mammalian brains, it is expressed in astrocytes, mainly, and in high densities in the membranes of perivascular and subpial endfeet. Here, we addressed the question how this polarized expression is established during development. We used immunocytochemistry against AQP4, zonula occludens protein-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and β-dystroglycan to follow astrocyte development in E15 to P3 NMRI mouse brains, and expression of AQP4. In addition we used freeze-fracture electron microscopy to detect AQP4 in the form of orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) on the ultrastructural level. We analyzed ventral, lateral, and dorsal regions in forebrain sections and found AQP4 immunoreactivity to emerge at E16 ventrally before lateral (E17) and dorsal (E18) areas. AQP4 staining was spread over cell processes including radial glial cells in developing cortical areas and became restricted to astroglial endfeet at P1-P3. This was confirmed by double labeling with GFAP. In freeze-fracture replicas OAPs were found with a slight time delay but with a similar ventral to dorsal gradient. Thus, AQP4 is expressed in the embryonic mouse brain starting at E16, earlier than previously reported. However a polarized expression necessary for homeostatic function and water balance emerges at later stages around and after birth. PMID:24915007

  5. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  6. Magnetospheric particle populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    Significant results of magnetospheric charged particle measurements conducted within the past two years are reviewed in an attempt to provide a general description of relationships among particle populations in the magnetosheath, plasma sheet, extraterrestrial ring current region, electron trough, pseudotrapping region, and stable-trapping region. Special attention is given to the characteristics of protons, electrons, alpha particles, and particles with charge greater than three in the stable trapping region.

  7. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  8. The International Mouse Strain Resource (IMSR): cataloging worldwide mouse and ES cell line resources.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Motenko, Howie; Richardson, Joel E; Richards-Smith, Beverly; Smith, Cynthia L

    2015-10-01

    The availability of and access to quality genetically defined, health-status known mouse resources is critical for biomedical research. By ensuring that mice used in research experiments are biologically, genetically, and health-status equivalent, we enable knowledge transfer, hypothesis building based on multiple data streams, and experimental reproducibility based on common mouse resources (reagents). Major repositories for mouse resources have developed over time and each has significant unique resources to offer. Here we (a) describe The International Mouse Strain Resource that offers users a combined catalog of worldwide mouse resources (live, cryopreserved, embryonic stem cells), with direct access to repository sites holding resources of interest and (b) discuss the commitment to nomenclature standards among resources that remain a challenge in unifying mouse resource catalogs. PMID:26373861

  9. Entrapment into nanoemulsions potentiates the anticancer activity of tocotrienols against the highly malignant (+SA) mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Ayoub, Nehad M; Malaviya, Abhita; Sylvester, Paul W; Nazzal, Sami

    2014-05-01

    The highly malignant +SA mouse mammary epithelial cells were used as the model cell line over the years to establish the anticancer activity of tocotrienols. Tocotrienols, however, have poor oral bioavailability and were therefore entrapped into parenteral nanoemulsions for parenteral administration. The objective of this work was to test whether the activity of tocotrienols in lipid nanoemulsions against the +SA cells was retained. A secondary objective was to test whether stabilizing the nanoemulsions with poloxamer or sodium oleate would affect their activity. Nanoemulsions were found to be significantly more potent than tocotrienol/albumin conjugate. The IC50 values of the poloxamer and sodium oleate nanoemulsions were 3 and 6 microM, respectively, whereas the IC50 value of the conjugate was 10 microM. The antiproliferative activity of the nanoemulsions was also found to inversely correlate with particle size. No activity was observed with nanoemulsions loaded with alpha-tocopherol or vehicle, which confirmed the cytotoxic activity of tocotrienols and the potential use of nanoemulsions in cancer therapy. PMID:24734680

  10. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  11. High energy particle astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

  12. Review of particle properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl; Cahn, R.N.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Porter, F.; Hernandez, J.J.; Montanet, L.; Hendrick, R.E.; Crawford, R.L.

    1984-04-01

    This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of the Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group (Phys. Lett. 111B (1982)). Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available.

  13. Atmospheric particle sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Positive and/or negative pressure is used to trap airborne particles against a filter. Positive pressure is provided by low molecular weight gas (He or H) to achieve high particle velocity and high capture percentage. Trapped particles are examined under electron microscope.

  14. When is a Particle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drell, Sidney D.

    1978-01-01

    Gives a new definition for the concept of the elementary particle in nuclear physics. Explains why the existance of the quark as an elementary particle could be an accepted fact even though it lacks what traditionally identifies a particle. Compares this with the development which took place during the discovery of the neutrino in the early…

  15. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  16. Particle film technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Particle Film Technology involves establishing a mineral particle film on the surface of a plant or plant product that: (1) is chemically inert, (2) has a mean particle diameter < 2 um, (3) is formulated to spread and create a uniform film, (4) does not physically disrupt gas exchange from the le...

  17. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  18. Nanoparticle transport from mouse vagina to adjacent lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Ballou, Byron; Andreko, Susan K; Osuna-Highley, Elvira; McRaven, Michael; Catalone, Tina; Bruchez, Marcel P; Hope, Thomas J; Labib, Mohamed E

    2012-01-01

    To test the feasibility of localized intravaginal therapy directed to neighboring lymph nodes, the transport of quantum dots across the vaginal wall was investigated. Quantum dots instilled into the mouse vagina were transported across the vaginal mucosa into draining lymph nodes, but not into distant nodes. Most of the particles were transported to the lumbar nodes; far fewer were transported to the inguinal nodes. A low level of transport was evident at 4 hr after intravaginal instillation, and transport peaked at about 36 hr after instillation. Transport was greatly enhanced by prior vaginal instillation of Nonoxynol-9. Hundreds of micrograms of nanoparticles/kg tissue (ppb) were found in the lumbar lymph nodes at 36 hr post-instillation. Our results imply that targeted transport of microbicides or immunogens from the vagina to local lymph organs is feasible. They also offer an in vivo model for assessing the toxicity of compounds intended for intravaginal use. PMID:23284844

  19. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.

  20. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more » and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  1. Coordinate secretion of mouse alphafetoprotein, mouse albumin and rat albumin by mouse hepatoma-rat hepatoma hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Cassio, D; Hassoux, R; Dupiers, M; Uriel, J; Weiss, M C

    1980-09-01

    Mouse heptoma cells that secrete large amounts of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin have been crossed with rat hepatoma cells that secret only albumin, and in relatively small amounts, to investigate the influence of each parental genome upon the expression of serum proteins. All of the ten independent hybrid clones examined produce mouse AFP and both mouse and rat albumin; none produces rat AFP. The absence of production of rat AFP by the hybrids suggests that different mechanisms are involved in the initiation and in the maintenance of expression of this function. The secretion of the three proteins by the hybrid cells is coordinate: Whatever the growth phase (exponential or stationary) and irrespective of the amounts produced over a wide range, the ratio secreted of mouse AFP to mouse albumin is near to one, and that of mouse albumin to rat albumin is near to five. In addition, even though the pattern of protein secretion during the growth cycle of hybrid cells is different from those of both parents, the products of both parental genomes conform to the new hybrid pattern. Finally, some hybrids secrete less of the proteins with increasing numbers of cell generations, yet all three continue to be secreted in coordinate fashion. Since the rates of secretion of serum proteins probably reflect their rates of synthesis, we conclude that coordinate secretion indicates coordinate synthesis, and may reflect coordinate transcription of the relevant genes. PMID:6158520

  2. Mechanically loaded myotubes affect osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Juffer, Petra; Jaspers, Richard T; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bakker, Astrid D

    2014-03-01

    In response to mechanical loading skeletal muscle produces numerous growth factors and cytokines that enter the circulation. We hypothesized that myotubes produce soluble factors that affect osteoclast formation and aimed to identify which osteoclastogenesis-modulating factors are differentially produced by mechanically stimulated myotubes. C2C12 myotubes were subjected to mechanical loading by cyclic strain for 1 h, and postincubated with or without cyclic strain for 24 h. The effect of cyclic strain on gene expression in myotubes was determined by PCR. Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from cultures of unloaded and loaded myotubes and from MLO-Y4 osteocytes. CM was added to mouse bone marrow cells containing osteoclast precursors, and after 6 days osteoclasts were counted. Compared to unconditioned medium, CM from unloaded osteocytes increased osteoclast formation, while CM from unloaded myotubes decreased osteoclast formation. Cyclic strain strongly enhanced IL-6 expression in myotubes. CM from cyclically strained myotubes increased osteoclast formation compared to CM from unloaded myotubes, but this effect did not occur in the presence of an IL-6 antibody. In conclusion, mechanically loaded myotubes secrete soluble factors, among others IL-6, which affect osteoclast formation. These results suggest that muscle could potentially affect bone homeostasis in vivo via production of growth factors and/or cytokines. PMID:24264813

  3. The composition of cigarette smoke determines inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung in COPD mouse models

    PubMed Central

    John, Gerrit; Kohse, Katrin; Orasche, Jürgen; Reda, Ahmed; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Önder

    2013-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is caused by exposure to toxic gases and particles, most often CS (cigarette smoke), leading to emphysema, chronic bronchitis, mucus production and a subsequent decline in lung function. The disease pathogenesis is related to an abnormal CS-induced inflammatory response of the lungs. Similar to active (mainstream) smoking, second hand (sidestream) smoke exposure severely affects respiratory health. These processes can be studied in vivo in models of CS exposure of mice. We compared the acute inflammatory response of female C57BL/6 mice exposed to two concentrations [250 and 500 mg/m3 TPM (total particulate matter)] of sidestream and mainstream CS for 3 days and interpreted the biological effects based on physico-chemical differences in the gas and particulate phase composition of CS. BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) was obtained to perform differential cell counts and to measure cytokine release. Lung tissue was used to determine mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory genes and to assess tissue inflammation. A strong acute inflammatory response characterized by neutrophilic influx, increased cytokine secretion [KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor α), MIP-2 (macrophage inflammatory protein 2), MIP-1α and MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1)], pro-inflammatory gene expression [KC, MIP-2 and MMP12 (matrix metalloproteinase 12)] and up-regulated GM-CSF (granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) production was observed in the mainstream model. After sidestream exposure there was a dampened inflammatory reaction consisting only of macrophages and diminished GM-CSF levels, most likely caused by elevated CO concentrations. These results demonstrate that the composition of CS determines the dynamics of inflammatory cell recruitment in COPD mouse models. Different initial inflammatory processes might contribute to COPD pathogenesis in significantly varying ways, thereby

  4. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25348401

  5. Integration of Mouse Phenome Data Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, John M; Adams, Neils; Aidinis, Vassilis; Blake, Judith A; Bogue, Molly; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Davidson, Duncan; Duran, Christopher; Eppig, Janan T; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Greenaway, Simon; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Kollias, George; Leblanc, Sophie; Lee, Kirsty; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Masuya, Hiroshi; Melvin, David; Muller, Werner; Parkinson, Helen; Proctor, Glenn; Reuveni, Eli; Schofield, Paul; Shukla, Aadya; Smith, Cynthia; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Vasseur, Laurent; Wakana, Shigeharu; Walling, Alison; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; Zouberakis, Michalis

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the functions encoded in the mouse genome will be central to an understanding of the genetic basis of human disease. To achieve this it will be essential to be able to characterise the phenotypic consequences of variation and alterations in individual genes. Data on the phenotypes of mouse strains are currently held in a number of different forms (detailed descriptions of mouse lines, first line phenotyping data on novel mutations, data on the normal features of inbred lines, etc.) at many sites worldwide. For the most efficient use of these data sets, we have set in train a process to develop standards for the description of phenotypes (using ontologies), and file formats for the description of phenotyping protocols and phenotype data sets. This process is ongoing, and needs to be supported by the wider mouse genetics and phenotyping communities to succeed. We invite interested parties to contact us as we develop this process further.

  6. New mouse primary retinal degeneration (rd-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.; Hawes, N.L.; Roderick, T.H. ); Heckenlively, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    A new mouse retinal degeneration that appears to be an excellent candidate for modeling human retinitis pigmentosa is reported. In this degeneration, called rd-3, differentiation proceeds postnatally through 2 weeks, and photoreceptor degeneration starts by 3 weeks. The rod photoreceptor loss is essentially complete by 5 weeks, whereas remnant cone cells are seen through 7 weeks. This is the only mouse homozygous retinal degeneration reported to date in which photoreceptors are initially normal. Crosses with known mouse retinal degenerations rd, Rds, nr, and pcd are negative for retinal degeneration in offspring, and linkage analysis places rd-3 on mouse chromosome 1 at 10 [+-]2.5 cM distal to Akp-1. Homology mapping suggests that the homologous human locus should be on chromosome 1q. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha; Sonne, Si Brask; Xia, Zhongkui; Qiu, Xinmin; Li, Xiaoping; Long, Hua; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Dongya; Liu, Chuan; Fang, Zhiwei; Chou, Joyce; Glanville, Jacob; Hao, Qin; Kotowska, Dorota; Colding, Camilla; Licht, Tine Rask; Wu, Donghai; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Junhua; Jia, Huijue; Lan, Zhou; Tremaroli, Valentina; Dworzynski, Piotr; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Doré, Joël; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Lin, John C; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Wang, Jun; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human counterpart, with 95.2% of its Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) orthologous groups in common. However, only 4.0% of the mouse gut microbial genes were shared (95% identity, 90% coverage) with those of the human gut microbiome. This catalog provides a useful reference for future studies. PMID:26414350

  8. Melatonin receptors: latest insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Tosini, Gianluca; Owino, Sharon; Guillame, Jean-Luc; Jockers, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the neuro-hormone synthesized during the night, has recently seen an unexpected extension of its functional implications towards type 2 diabetes development, visual functions, sleep disturbances and depression. Transgenic mouse models were instrumental for the establishment of the link between melatonin and these major human diseases. Most of the actions of melatonin are mediated by two types of G protein-coupled receptors, named MT1 and MT2, which are expressed in many different organs and tissues. Understanding the pharmacology and function of mouse MT1 and MT2 receptors, including MT1/MT2 heteromers, will be of crucial importance to evaluate the relevance of these mouse models for future therapeutic developments. This review will critically discuss these aspects, and give some perspectives including the generation of new mouse models. PMID:24903552

  9. Multimodal, multidimensional models of mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie-Graham, Allan J; Lee, Erh-Fang; Dinov, Ivo D; Yuan, Heng; Jacobs, Russell E; Toga, Arthur W

    2007-01-01

    Naturally occurring mutants and genetically manipulated strains of mice are widely used to model a variety of human diseases. Atlases are an invaluable aid in understanding the impact of such manipulations by providing a standard for comparison and to facilitate the integration of anatomic, genetic, and physiologic observations from multiple subjects and experiments. We have developed digital atlases of the C57BL/6J mouse brain (adult and neonate) as comprehensive frameworks for storing and accessing the myriad types of information about the mouse brain. Along with raw and annotated images, these contain database management systems and a set of tools for comparing information from different techniques and different animals. Each atlas establishes a canonical representation of the mouse brain and provides the tools for the manipulation and analysis of new data. We describe both these atlases and discuss how they may be put to use in organizing and analyzing data from mouse models of epilepsy. PMID:17767578

  10. Constituent Particle Clustering and Pitting Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, D. Gary

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a primary degradation mechanism that affects the durability and integrity of structures made of aluminum alloys, and it is a concern for commercial transport and military aircraft. In aluminum alloys, corrosion results from local galvanic coupling between constituent particles and the metal matrix. Due to variability in particle sizes, spatial location, and chemical composition, to name a few critical variables, corrosion is a complex stochastic process. Severe pitting is caused by particle clusters that are located near the material surface, which, in turn, serve as nucleation sites for subsequent corrosion fatigue crack growth. These evolution processes are highly dependent on the spatial statistics of particles. The localized corrosion growth rate is primarily dependent on the galvanic process perpetuated by particle-to-particle interactions and electrochemical potentials. Frequently, severe pits are millimeters in length, and these pits have a dominant impact on the structural prognosis. To accommodate large sizes, a model for three-dimensional (3-D) constituent particle microstructure is proposed. To describe the constituent particle microstructure in three dimensions, the model employs a fusion of classic stereological techniques, spatial point pattern analyses, and qualitative observations. The methodology can be carried out using standard optical microscopy and image analysis techniques.

  11. Unraveling the genetics of otitis media: from mouse to human and back again.

    PubMed

    Rye, Marie S; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Cheeseman, Michael T; Burgner, David; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Brown, Steve D M; Jamieson, Sarra E

    2011-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is among the most common illnesses of early childhood, characterised by the presence of inflammation in the middle ear cavity. Acute OM and chronic OM with effusion (COME) affect the majority of children by school age and have heritability estimates of 40-70%. However, the majority of genes underlying this susceptibility are, as yet, unidentified. One method of identifying genes and pathways that may contribute to OM susceptibility is to look at mouse mutants displaying a comparable phenotype. Single-gene mouse mutants with OM have identified a number of genes, namely, Eya4, Tlr4, p73, MyD88, Fas, E2f4, Plg, Fbxo11, and Evi1, as potential and biologically relevant candidates for human disease. Recent studies suggest that this "mouse-to-human" approach is likely to yield relevant data, with significant associations reported between polymorphisms at the FBXO11, TLR4, and PAI1 genes and disease in humans. An association between TP73 and chronic rhinosinusitis has also been reported. In addition, the biobanks of available mouse mutants provide a powerful resource for functional studies of loci identified by future genome-wide association studies of OM in humans. Mouse models of OM therefore are an important component of current approaches attempting to understand the complex genetic susceptibility to OM in humans, and which aim to facilitate the development of preventative and therapeutic interventions for this important and common disease. PMID:21107580

  12. Constitutive Overexpression of Human Erythropoietin Protects the Mouse Retina against Induced But Not Inherited Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Christian; Wenzel, Andreas; Stanescu, Dinu; Samardzija, Marijana; Hotop, Svenja; Groszer, Mathias; Naash, Muna; Gassmann, Max; Remé, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Elevation of erythropoietin (Epo) concentrations by hypoxic preconditioning or application of recombinant human Epo (huEpo) protects the mouse retina against light-induced degeneration by inhibiting photoreceptor cell apoptosis. Because photoreceptor apoptosis is also the common path to cell loss in retinal dystrophies such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), we tested whether high levels of huEpo would reduce apoptotic cell death in two mouse models of human RP. We combined the two respective mutant mouse lines with a transgenic line (tg6) that constitutively overexpresses huEpo mainly in neural tissues. Transgenic expression of huEpo caused constitutively high levels of Epo in the retina and protected photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration; however, the presence of high levels of huEpo did not affect the course or the extent of retinal degeneration in a light-independent (rd1) and a light-accelerated (VPP) mouse model of RP. Similarly, repetitive intraperitoneal injections of recombinant huEpo did not protect the retina in the rd1 and the VPP mouse. Lack of neuroprotection by Epo in the two models of inherited retinal degeneration was not caused by adaptational downregulation of Epo receptor. Our results suggest that apoptotic mechanisms during acute, light-induced photoreceptor cell death differ from those in genetically based retinal degeneration. Therapeutic intervention with cell death in inherited retinal degeneration may therefore require different drugs and treatments. PMID:15215287

  13. Dust particle velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thielman, L. O.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

  14. Mouse homologues of human hereditary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Searle, A G; Edwards, J H; Hall, J G

    1994-01-01

    Details are given of 214 loci known to be associated with human hereditary disease, which have been mapped on both human and mouse chromosomes. Forty two of these have pathological variants in both species; in general the mouse variants are similar in their effects to the corresponding human ones, but exceptions include the Dmd/DMD and Hprt/HPRT mutations which cause little, if any, harm in mice. Possible reasons for phenotypic differences are discussed. In most pathological variants the gene product seems to be absent or greatly reduced in both species. The extensive data on conserved segments between human and mouse chromosomes are used to predict locations in the mouse of over 50 loci of medical interest which are mapped so far only on human chromosomes. In about 80% of these a fairly confident prediction can be made. Some likely homologies between mapped mouse loci and unmapped human ones are also given. Sixty six human and mouse proto-oncogene and growth factor gene homologies are also listed; those of confirmed location are all in known conserved segments. A survey of 18 mapped human disease loci and chromosome regions in which the manifestation or severity of pathological effects is thought to be the result of genomic imprinting shows that most of the homologous regions in the mouse are also associated with imprinting, especially those with homologues on human chromosomes 11p and 15q. Useful methods of accelerating the production of mouse models of human hereditary disease include (1) use of a supermutagen, such as ethylnitrosourea (ENU), (2) targeted mutagenesis involving ES cells, and (3) use of gene transfer techniques, with production of 'knockout mutations'. PMID:8151633

  15. Mouse models of Inherited Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jahid, Sohail; Lipkin, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Animal models of cancer have been instrumental in understanding the progression and therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes. The ability to alter the genome of individual mouse cell types in both constitutive and inducible approaches has led to many novel insights into their human disease counterparts. In this review, conventional, conditional and inducible knockout mouse models of inherited human cancer syndromes are presented and insights from the study of these models are highlighted. PMID:21075289

  16. Drugs affecting glycosaminoglycan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Giancarlo; Maccarana, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are charged polysaccharides ubiquitously present at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. GAGs are crucial for cellular homeostasis, and their metabolism is altered during pathological processes. However, little consideration has been given to the regulation of the GAG milieu through pharmacological interventions. In this review, we provide a classification of small molecules affecting GAG metabolism based on their mechanism of action. Furthermore, we present evidence to show that clinically approved drugs affect GAG metabolism and that this could contribute to their therapeutic benefit. PMID:27217160

  17. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  18. Size Effects on the Magnetic Properties of Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianping

    %, and 10% by quinuclidine, pyridine and carbon monoxide, respectively. The ligands affects the core and shell of the particles in different ways. Quinuclidine and pyridine only affected the shell phase while carbon monoxide affects both. The quenching effect was qualitatively explained by the interaction between ligand and surface Co atoms, which in turn changes the electron configuration in the 3d band of the Co particles.

  19. Optical mouse acting as biospeckle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Michel Melo; Nozela, Jose Roberto de Almeida; Chaves, Marcio Jose; Alves Braga, Roberto; Rabal, Hector Jorge

    2011-04-01

    In this work we propose some experiments with the use of optical computer mouse, associated to low cost lasers that can be used to perform several measurements with applications in industry and in human health monitoring. The mouse was used to grab the movements produced by speckle pattern changes and to get information through the adaptation of its structure. We measured displacements in wood samples under strain, variations of the diameter of an artery due to heart beat and, through a hardware simulation, the movement of an eye, an experiment that could be of low cost help for communication to severely handicapped motor patients. Those measurements were done in spite of the fact that the CCD sensor of the mice is monolithically included into an integrated circuit so that the raw image cannot be accessed. If, as was the case with primitive optical mouse, that signal could be accessed, the quality and usefulness of the measurements could be significantly increased. As it was not possible, a webcam sensor was used for measuring the drying of paint, a standard phenomenon for testing biospeckle techniques, in order to prove the usefulness of the mouse design. The results showed that the use of the mouse associated to a laser pointer could be the way to get metrological information from many phenomena involving the whole field spatial displacement, as well as the use of the mouse as in its prime version allowed to get images of the speckle patterns and to analyze them.

  20. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  1. Ethical Considerations in Mouse Experiments.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, Bernard; Gyger, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Mice count morally because they can be harmed. This raises a moral issue in animal experimentation. Three main ethical attitudes towards animals are reviewed here. The Kantian view denies moral value to animals because they lack reason. The second view, by Singer, considers animals as sentient creatures (i.e., able to suffer). Finally, Regan considers that animals are subjects of their own life; they are autonomous and therefore have moral rights. Singer is a reformist and allows animal experimentation under certain conditions. Regan is abolitionist, saying that animals have moral rights that cannot be negotiated. Current animal protection legislation strives to put in balance the human and animal interests to decide whether an animal experiment is morally justified or not. An ethical evaluation process is conducted based on the harm-benefit assessment of the experiment. The researcher has to implement the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction, Refinement) to minimize the harms to the animals and make sure that the outcomes are scientifically significant and that the quality of the science is high, in order to maximize benefits to humans and animals. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 1:155-167. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26068990

  2. Mouse Models for Filovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bradfute, Steven B.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Bray, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The filoviruses marburg- and ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever (HF) in humans and nonhuman primates. Because many cases have occurred in geographical areas lacking a medical research infrastructure, most studies of the pathogenesis of filoviral HF, and all efforts to develop drugs and vaccines, have been carried out in biocontainment laboratories in non-endemic countries, using nonhuman primates (NHPs), guinea pigs and mice as animal models. NHPs appear to closely mirror filoviral HF in humans (based on limited clinical data), but only small numbers may be used in carefully regulated experiments; much research is therefore done in rodents. Because of their availability in large numbers and the existence of a wealth of reagents for biochemical and immunological testing, mice have become the preferred small animal model for filovirus research. Since the first experiments following the initial 1967 marburgvirus outbreak, wild-type or mouse-adapted viruses have been tested in immunocompetent or immunodeficient mice. In this paper, we review how these types of studies have been used to investigate the pathogenesis of filoviral disease, identify immune responses to infection and evaluate antiviral drugs and vaccines. We also discuss the strengths and weaknesses of murine models for filovirus research, and identify important questions for further study. PMID:23170168

  3. In Vitro Infection with Dengue Virus Induces Changes in the Structure and Function of the Mouse Brain Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Jaime E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The neurological manifestations of dengue disease are occurring with greater frequency, and currently, no information is available regarding the reasons for this phenomenon. Some viruses infect and/or alter the function of endothelial organs, which results in changes in cellular function, including permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which allows the entry of infected cells or free viral particles into the nervous system. Methods In the present study, we standardized two in vitro models, a polarized monolayer of mouse brain endothelial cells (MBECs) and an organized co-culture containing MBECs and astrocytes. Using these cell models, we assessed whether DENV-4 or the neuro-adapted dengue virus (D4MB-6) variant infects cells or induces changes in the structure or function of the endothelial barrier. Results The results showed that MBECs, but not astrocytes, were susceptible to infection with both viruses, although the percentage of infected cells was higher when the neuro-adapted virus variant was used. In both culture systems, DENV infection changed the localization of the tight junction proteins Zonula occludens (ZO-1) and Claudin-1 (Cln1), and this process was associated with a decrease in transendothelial resistance, an increase in macromolecule permeability and an increase in the paracellular passing of free virus particles. MBEC infection led to transcriptional up-regulation of adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and PECAM) and immune mediators (MCP-1 and TNF- α) that are associated with immune cell transmigration, mainly in D4MB-6-infected cells. Conclusion These results indicate that DENV infection in MBECs altered the structure and function of the BBB and activated the endothelium, affecting its transcellular and paracellular permeability and favoring the passage of viruses and the transmigration of immune cells. This phenomenon can be harnessed for neurotropic and neurovirulent strains to infect and induce alterations in the CNS. PMID

  4. COMMENTS ON RECENT DATA FOR PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN HUMAN NASAL PASSAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The deposition of inhaled particles within human nasal passages has important toxicologic and pharmacologic applications. owever, experimental data quantitating factors affecting particle deposition are rare. e have evaluated findings from investigations employing either replica ...

  5. On the Interaction Between Highly Energetic Charged Particles and the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Zeitlin, C.; Spence, H. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-03-01

    In this study we explore how galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles contribute to deep dielectric charging within the lunar regolith and how these particles affect lunar surface charging in tenuous plasma environments.

  6. Heme synthesis in normal mouse liver and mouse liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F. )

    1990-04-15

    Hepatic cancers from mice and rats demonstrate decreased levels of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme synthetic pathway, and increased heme oxygenase, the heme-catabolizing enzyme. These findings suggest that diminution of P-450, b5, and catalase in these lesions may result from a heme supply that is limited by decreased heme synthesis and increased heme catabolism. Heme synthesis was measured in mouse liver tumors (MLT) and adjacent tumor-free lobes (BKG) by administering the radiolabeled heme precursors {sup 55}FeCl3 and (2-{sup 14}C)glycine and subsequently extracting the heme for determination of specific activity. Despite reduced delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase activity in MLT, both tissues incorporated (2-14C)glycine into heme at similar rates. At early time points, heme extracted from MLT contained less 55Fe than that from BKG. This was attributed to the findings that MLT took up 55Fe at a slower rate than BKG and had larger iron stores than BKG. The amount of heme per milligram of protein was also similar in both tissues. These findings militate against the hypothesis that diminished hemoprotein levels in MLT result from limited availability of heme. It is probable, therefore, that decreased hemoprotein levels in hepatic tumors are linked to a general program of dedifferentiation associated with the cancer phenotype. Diminution of hemoprotein in MLT may result in a relatively increased intracellular heme pool. delta-Aminolevulinic acid synthase and heme oxygenase are, respectively, negatively and positively regulated by heme. Thus, their alteration in MLT may be due to the regulatory influences of the heme pool.

  7. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate that nucleation mode particle concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by drought and thus a reduction in the production of condensable products during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of BVOC modeled on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide indirect evidence that drought stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  8. The Role of Zic Genes in Inner Ear Development in the Mouse: Exploring Mutant Mouse Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chervenak, Andrew P.; Bank, Lisa M.; Thomsen, Nicole; Glanville-Jones, Hannah C; Skibo, Jonathan; Millen, Kathleen J.; Arkell, Ruth M.; Barald, Kate F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Murine Zic genes (Zic1-5) are expressed in the dorsal hindbrain and in periotic mesenchyme (POM) adjacent to the developing inner ear. Zic genes are involved in developmental signaling pathways in many organ systems, including the ear, although their exact roles haven't been fully elucidated. This report examines the role of Zic1, Zic2, and Zic4 during inner ear development in mouse mutants in which these Zic genes are affected Results Zic1/Zic4 double mutants don't exhibit any apparent defects in inner ear morphology. By contrast, inner ears from Zic2kd/kd and Zic2Ku/Ku mutants have severe but variable morphological defects in endolymphatic duct/sac and semicircular canal formation and in cochlear extension in the inner ear. Analysis of otocyst patterning in the Zic2Ku/Ku mutants by in situ hybridization showed changes in the expression patterns of Gbx2 and Pax2. Conclusions The experiments provide the first genetic evidence that the Zic genes are required for morphogenesis of the inner ear. Zic2 loss-of-function doesn't prevent initial otocyst patterning but leads to molecular abnormalities concomitant with morphogenesis of the endolymphatic duct. Functional hearing deficits often accompany inner ear dysmorphologies, making Zic2 a novel candidate gene for ongoing efforts to identify the genetic basis of human hearing loss. PMID:25178196

  9. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Alters Mouse Intestinal Architecture during Development.

    PubMed

    Fung, Camille M; White, Jessica R; Brown, Ashley S; Gong, Huiyu; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Frey, Mark R; McElroy, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are at increased risk for neonatal and lifelong morbidities affecting multiple organ systems including the intestinal tract. The underlying mechanisms for the risk to the intestine remain poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IUGR affects the development of goblet and Paneth cell lineages, thus compromising the innate immunity and barrier functions of the epithelium. Using a mouse model of maternal thromboxane A2-analog infusion to elicit maternal hypertension and resultant IUGR, we tested whether IUGR alters ileal maturation and specifically disrupts mucus-producing goblet and antimicrobial-secreting Paneth cell development. We measured body weights, ileal weights and ileal lengths from birth to postnatal day (P) 56. We also determined the abundance of goblet and Paneth cells and their mRNA products, localization of cellular tight junctions, cell proliferation, and apoptosis to interrogate cellular homeostasis. Comparison of the murine findings with human IUGR ileum allowed us to verify observed changes in the mouse were relevant to clinical IUGR. At P14 IUGR mice had decreased ileal lengths, fewer goblet and Paneth cells, reductions in Paneth cell specific mRNAs, and decreased cell proliferation. These findings positively correlated with severity of IUGR. Furthermore, the decrease in murine Paneth cells was also seen in human IUGR ileum. IUGR disrupts the normal trajectory of ileal development, particularly affecting the composition and secretory products of the epithelial surface of the intestine. We speculate that this abnormal intestinal development may constitute an inherent "first hit", rendering IUGR intestine susceptible to further injury, infection, or inflammation. PMID:26745886

  10. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Alters Mouse Intestinal Architecture during Development

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley S.; Gong, Huiyu; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Frey, Mark R.; McElroy, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are at increased risk for neonatal and lifelong morbidities affecting multiple organ systems including the intestinal tract. The underlying mechanisms for the risk to the intestine remain poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IUGR affects the development of goblet and Paneth cell lineages, thus compromising the innate immunity and barrier functions of the epithelium. Using a mouse model of maternal thromboxane A2-analog infusion to elicit maternal hypertension and resultant IUGR, we tested whether IUGR alters ileal maturation and specifically disrupts mucus-producing goblet and antimicrobial-secreting Paneth cell development. We measured body weights, ileal weights and ileal lengths from birth to postnatal day (P) 56. We also determined the abundance of goblet and Paneth cells and their mRNA products, localization of cellular tight junctions, cell proliferation, and apoptosis to interrogate cellular homeostasis. Comparison of the murine findings with human IUGR ileum allowed us to verify observed changes in the mouse were relevant to clinical IUGR. At P14 IUGR mice had decreased ileal lengths, fewer goblet and Paneth cells, reductions in Paneth cell specific mRNAs, and decreased cell proliferation. These findings positively correlated with severity of IUGR. Furthermore, the decrease in murine Paneth cells was also seen in human IUGR ileum. IUGR disrupts the normal trajectory of ileal development, particularly affecting the composition and secretory products of the epithelial surface of the intestine. We speculate that this abnormal intestinal development may constitute an inherent “first hit”, rendering IUGR intestine susceptible to further injury, infection, or inflammation. PMID:26745886

  11. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative velocity measurement technique for measuring instantaneous planar cross sections of a flow field. The technique offers very high precision (1%) directionally resolved velocity vector estimates, but its use has been limited by high equipment costs and complexity of operation. Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) is an all-electronic PIV data acquisition and reduction procedure which is simple, fast, and easily implemented. The procedure uses a low power, continuous wave laser and a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) camera to electronically record the particle images. A frame grabber board in a PC is used for data acquisition and reduction processing. PDT eliminates the need for photographic processing, system costs are moderately low, and reduced data are available within seconds of acquisition. The technique results in velocity estimate accuracies on the order of 5%. The software is fully menu-driven from the acquisition to the reduction and analysis of the data. Options are available to acquire a single image or 5- or 25-field series of images separated in time by multiples of 1/60 second. The user may process each image, specifying its boundaries to remove unwanted glare from the periphery and adjusting its background level to clearly resolve the particle images. Data reduction routines determine the particle image centroids and create time history files. PDT then identifies the velocity vectors which describe the particle movement in the flow field. Graphical data analysis routines are included which allow the user to graph the time history files and display the velocity vector maps, interpolated velocity vector grids, iso-velocity vector contours, and flow streamlines. The PDT data processing software is written in FORTRAN 77 and the data acquisition routine is written in C-Language for 80386-based IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS v3.0 or higher. Machine requirements include 4 MB RAM (3 MB Extended), a single or

  12. Affective Factors: Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasnimi, Mahshad

    2009-01-01

    Affective factors seem to play a crucial role in success or failure in second language acquisition. Negative attitudes can reduce learners' motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse. Discovering students' attitudes about language will help both teacher and student in teaching learning process. Anxiety is…

  13. How Technology Affects Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiske, Martha Stone; And Others

    This study presents composite profiles of teachers who were interviewed in order to assess how they are being affected by the challenges and opportunities presented by computer technology use. In-depth interviews were held with 76 teachers from 10 sites around the country, and the interview data were analyzed to identify themes and to construct…

  14. Factors affecting soil cohesion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erodibility is a measure of a soil’s resistance against erosive forces and is affected by both intrinsic (or inherent) soil property and the extrinsic condition at the time erodibility measurement is made. Since soil erodibility is usually calculated from results obtained from erosion experimen...

  15. What Variables Affect Solubility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Leyva, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Helps middle school students understand the concept of solubility through hands-on experience with a variety of liquids and solids. As they explore factors that affect solubility and saturation, students gain content mastery and an understanding of the inquiry process. Also enables teachers to authentically assess student performance on several…

  16. How Body Affects Brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wendy A

    2016-08-01

    Studies show that physical exercise can affect a range of brain and cognitive functions. However, little is known about the peripheral signals that initiate these central changes. Moon et al. (2016) provide exciting new evidence that a novel myokine, cathepsin B (CTSB), released with exercise is associated with improved memory. PMID:27508865

  17. Food Affects Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A conference on whether food and nutrients affect human behavior was held on November 9, 1982 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Various research studies on this topic are reviewed, including the effects of food on brain biochemistry (particularly sleep) and effects of tryptophane as a pain reducer. (JN)

  18. Allele, phenotype and disease data at Mouse Genome Informatics: improving access and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bello, Susan M; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-08-01

    A core part of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource is the collection of mouse mutations and the annotation phenotypes and diseases displayed by mice carrying these mutations. These data are integrated with the rest of data in MGI and exported to numerous other resources. The use of mouse phenotype data to drive translational research into human disease has expanded rapidly with the improvements in sequencing technology. MGI has implemented many improvements in allele and phenotype data annotation, search, and display to facilitate access to these data through multiple avenues. For example, the description of alleles has been modified to include more detailed categories of allele attributes. This allows improved discrimination between mutation types. Further, connections have been created between mutations involving multiple genes and each of the genes overlapping the mutation. This allows users to readily find all mutations affecting a gene and see all genes affected by a mutation.