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1

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01

2

Alpha Particle Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect

The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

Fisher, Ray, K.

2009-05-13

3

Long range alpha particle detector  

DOEpatents

An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

1993-02-02

4

Long range alpha particle detector  

DOEpatents

An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); McAtee, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Unruh, Wesley P. (Los Alamos, NM); Cucchiara, Alfred L. (Los Alamos, NM); Huchton, Roger L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01

5

Alpha particle emitters in medicine  

SciTech Connect

Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Fisher, D.R.

1989-09-01

6

Alpha particle confinement in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of diffusive tokamak transport mechanisms of concern for alpha particles indicates that the ''stochastic regime'' is the only one which appears to pose a real danger for adequate alpha confinement. This fact, in conjunction with the threshold character of that mechanism, allows one to decide whether an alpha born at a given location will be lost or confined, according to a very simple criterion. Implementing this criterion numerically results in a new code for the assessment of alpha confinement, which is orders of magnitude faster than earlier codes used for this purpose. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

White, R.B.; Mynick, H.E.

1988-11-01

7

Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.  

PubMed

An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

2004-12-01

8

Alpha particle condensation and nuclear rainbow scattering  

E-print Network

It is shown that a dilute property of an $\\alpha$ particle condensate can be seen in the Airy structure of nuclear rainbow and prerainbow scattering. The dilute property of the Hoyle state of $^{12}$C with a developed $\\alpha$ cluster structure is discussed by studying refractive $^3$He+$^{12}$C and $\\alpha$+$^{12}$C scattering.

S Ohkubo; Y Hirabayashi

2011-02-09

9

Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles  

DOEpatents

This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

1983-11-23

10

Alpha particle haloes in chlorite and cordierite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Effects of the impact of natural long-term irradiation with alpha particles in one chamosite and one cordierite sample were\\u000a characterised in detail using electron microprobe, Raman microprobe, optical absorption spectroscopy (cordierite only), and\\u000a transmission electron microscopy (TEM; cordierite only) analysis. In both cases, the impact of 4He cores (alpha particles) that were emitted from actinide-bearing mineral inclusions has caused the

L. Nasdala; M. Wildner; R. Wirth; N. Groschopf; D. C. Pal; A. Möller

2006-01-01

11

Alpha-Particle Condensation in Nuclear Systems  

E-print Network

The onset of quartetting, i.e. alpha-particle condensation, in symmetric nuclear matter is studied with the help of an in-medium modified four nucleon equation. It is found that at very low density quartetting wins over pairing, because of the strong binding of the alpha-particles. The critical temperature can reach values up to around 6 MeV. Also the disappearance of alpha-particles with increasing density, i.e. the Mott transition, is investigated. In finite nuclei the Hoyle state, that is the 0_2^+ of 12C, is identified as an "alpha-particle condensate" state. It is conjectured that such states also exist in heavier n alpha-nuclei, like 16O, 20Ne, etc. For instance the 6-th 0^+ state of 16O at 15.1 MeV is identified from a theoretical analysis as being a strong candidate for an alpha condensate state. Exploratory calculations are performed for the density dependence of the alpha condensate fraction at zero temperature to address the suppression of the four-particle condensate below nuclear-matter density. Possible quartet condensation in other systems is discussed briefly

Y. Funaki; T. Yamada; H. Horiuchi; G. Röpke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki

2008-09-03

12

Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

1990-01-01

13

Alternating current long range alpha particle detector  

DOEpatents

An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

1993-02-16

14

Alternating current long range alpha particle detector  

DOEpatents

An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); McAtee, James L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01

15

Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles  

DOEpatents

Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

Grisham, Larry R. (Lawrence Township, Mercer County, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Belle Mead, NJ); Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA)

1986-01-01

16

Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

1998-12-14

17

Alpha-particle-induced soft errors in dynamic memories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new physical soft error mechanism in dynamic RAM's and CCD's is the upset of stored data by the passage of alpha particles through the memory array area. The alpha particles are emitted by the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium which are present in parts-per-million levels in packaging materials. When an alpha particle penetrates the die surface, it can

T. C. May; M. H. Woods

1979-01-01

18

Alpha particle diagnostics using impurity pellet injection  

SciTech Connect

We have proposed using impurity injection to measure the energy distribution of the fast confined alpha particles in a reacting plasma. The ablation cloud surrounding the injected pellet is thick enough that an equilibrium fraction F{sub o}{sup {infinity}}(E) of the incident alphas should be neutralized as they pass through the cloud. By observing neutrals created in the large spatial region of the cloud which is expected to be dominated by the helium-like ionization state, e.g., Li{sup +} ions, we can determine the incident alpha distribution dn{sub He}2+/dE from the measured energy distribution of neutral helium atoms. Initial experiments were performed on TEXT in which we compared pellet penetration with our impurity pellet ablation model, and measured the spatial distribution of various ionization states in carbon pellet clouds. Experiments have recently begun on TFTR with the goal of measuring the alpha particle energy distribution during D-T operation in 1993--94. A series of preliminary experiments are planned to test the diagnostic concept. The first experiments will observe neutrals from beam-injected deuterium ions and the high energy {sup 3}He tail produced during ICH minority heating on TFTR interacting with the cloud. We will also monitor by line radiation the charge state distributions in lithium, boron, and carbon clouds.

Fisher, R.K.; McChesney, J.M.; Howald, A.W.; Parks, P.B. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Snipes, J.A.; Terry, J.L.; Marmar, E.S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1992-05-01

19

Alpha particle loss in the TFTR DT experiments  

SciTech Connect

Alpha particle loss was measured during the TFTR DT experiments using a scintillator detector located at the vessel bottom in the ion grad-B drift direction. The DT alpha particle loss to this detector was consistent with the calculated first-orbit loss over the whole range of plasma current I=0.6-2.7 MA. In particular, the alpha particle loss rate per DT neutron did not increase significantly with fusion power up to 10.7 MW, indicating the absence of any new ``collective`` alpha particle loss processes in these experiments.

Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W. [and others

1995-01-01

20

Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of soalr particle events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Solar Particle Events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra in shielding are discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

1994-01-01

21

Analysis of radiation risk from alpha particle component of solar particle events  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The solar particle events (SPE) will contain a primary alpha particle component, representing a possible increase in the potential risk to astronauts during an SPE over the often studied proton component. We discuss the physical interactions of alpha particles important in describing the transport of these particles through spacecraft and body shielding. Models of light ion reactions are presented and their effects on energy and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra in shielding discussed. We present predictions of particle spectra, dose, and dose equivalent in organs of interest for SPE spectra typical of those occurring in recent solar cycles. The large events of solar cycle 19 are found to have substantial increase in biological risk from alpha particles, including a large increase in secondary neutron production from alpha particle breakup.

Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Golightly, M. J.; Weyland, M.

1994-01-01

22

A new alpha-particle irradiator with absolute dosimetric determination.  

PubMed

A new experimental setup for uniform alpha-particle irradiation of cells in vitro is described. The alpha-particle irradiator is based on a radioactive (212)Pb/(212)Bi source. In the experimental setup proposed, cells are grown directly on a polylysine-coated track-etch material that forms the base of custom-made cell dishes. Alpha-particle irradiation is done through the base of the dish. Immediately prior to irradiation, the cell dish is scanned under a microscope, and images of cells with the corresponding coordinates are saved. After irradiation and after the biological end point under study has been determined, the cell dish is etched to develop alpha-particle tracks in the dish base. A microscope image series of alpha-particle track images is obtained by accurately revisiting every original (preirradiation) cell position in the track-etched dish. The number of alpha-particle traversals of each individual cell is scored by mapping images of alpha-particle tracks onto the images of cells recorded prior to irradiation. The uncertainty of the alpha-particle hit determination is 0.9 microm. The procedure described thus presents a method for radiobiological experiments with absolute, rather than statistical, cell dosimetry. PMID:10630972

Soyland, C; Hassfjell, S P; Steen, H B

2000-01-01

23

particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

2014-05-01

24

A High-Throughput Screen for Alpha Particle Radiation Protectants  

PubMed Central

Abstract Alpha-particle-emitting elements are of increasing importance as environmental and occupational carcinogens, toxic components of radiation dispersal devices and accidents, and potent therapeutics in oncology. Alpha particle radiation differs from radiations of lower linear energy transfer in that it predominantly damages DNA via direct action. Because of this, radical scavengers effective for other radiations have had only limited effect in mitigating alpha particle toxicity. We describe here a simple assay and a pilot screen of 3,119 compounds in a high-throughput screen (HTS), using the alpha-particle-emitting isotope, 225Ac, for the discovery of compounds that might protect mammalian cells from alpha particles through novel mechanisms. The assay, which monitored the viability of a myeloid leukemic cell line upon alpha particle exposure, was robust and reproducible, yielding a Z' factor of 0.66 and a signal-to-noise ratio of nearly 10 to 1. Surprisingly, 1 compound emerged from this screen, epoxy-4,5-?-dihydroxysantonin (EDHS), that showed considerable protective activity. While the value of EDHS remains to be determined, its discovery is a proof of concept and validation of the utility of this HTS methodology. Further application of the described assay could yield compounds useful in minimizing the toxicity and carcinogenesis associated with alpha particle exposure. PMID:20658946

Seideman, Jonathan H.; Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

2010-01-01

25

Alpha particle nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) for device applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method developed for the proton NIEL calculation previously is extended to incident alpha particles in this study: ZBL screened potential for Coulomb interactions and MCNPX 'thin target approximation' for nuclear interactions.

Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoff; Jordan, Thomas

2004-01-01

26

Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

1972-01-01

27

Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

Patterson, J. H.

1967-01-01

28

Alpha-particle condensation in excited 12C  

E-print Network

The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction $^{40}Ca$+$^{12}C$ at 25 MeV/nucleon was used to produce excited states candidates to $\\alpha$-particle condensation. The methodology relies on high granularity 4$\\pi$ detection coupled to correlation function techniques. Under the assumption that the equality among the kinetic energies of the emitted $\\alpha$-particles and the emission simultaneity constitutes a reliable fingerprint of $\\alpha$ condensation, we identify several tens of events corresponding to the deexcitation of the Hoyle state of $^{12}$C which fulfill the condition.

Ad. R. Raduta; B. Borderie; E. Geraci; N. Le Neindre; P. Napolitani; M. F. Rivet; R. Alba; F. Amorini; G. Cardella; M. Chatterjee; E. De Filippo; D. Guinet; P. Lautesse; E. La Guidara; G. Lanzalone; G. Lanzano; I. Lombardo; O. Lopez; C. Maiolino; A. Pagano; S. Pirrone; G. Politi; F. Porto; F. Rizzo; P. Russotto; J. P. Wieleczko

2010-04-19

29

Actinium-225 in targeted alpha-particle therapeutic applications.  

PubMed

Alpha particle-emitting isotopes are being investigated in radioimmunotherapeutic applications because of their unparalleled cytotoxicity when targeted to cancer and their relative lack of toxicity towards untargeted normal tissue. Actinium- 225 has been developed into potent targeting drug constructs and is in clinical use against acute myelogenous leukemia. The key properties of the alpha particles generated by 225Ac are the following: i) limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters; ii) high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track; iii) a 10 day halflife; and iv) four net alpha particles emitted per decay. Targeting 225Ac-drug constructs have potential in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22202153

Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

2011-10-01

30

Scattering of alpha particles by 22Ne  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differential cross sections at a few angles for 22Ne(alpha,alphai)22Ne are reported for alphai=alpha0, alpha1, and alpha2 mainly in 10 keV steps for 22alpha,alpha), 13.4<=Ealpha (MeV)<=20,8, elastic and inelastic (2+, 1.27 MeV and 4+, 3.36 MeV). Measured sigma(theta,Ealpha) at one or two angles.

C. A. Davis

1981-01-01

31

Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 ?Ci/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

2014-01-01

32

{alpha} particles and the ''pasta'' phase in nuclear matter  

SciTech Connect

The effects of the {alpha} particles in nuclear matter at low densities are investigated within three different parametrizations of relativistic models at finite temperature. Both homogeneous and inhomogeneous matter (pasta phase) are described for neutral nuclear matter with fixed proton fractions and stellar matter subject to {beta} equilibrium and trapped neutrinos. In homogeneous matter, {alpha} particles are present only at densities below 0.02 fm{sup -3} and their presence decreases with increase of the temperature and, for a fixed temperature, the {alpha} particle fraction decreases for smaller proton fractions. A repulsive interaction is important to mimic the dissolution of the clusters in homogeneous matter. The effect of the {alpha} particles on the pasta structure is very small except close to the critical temperatures and/or proton fractions, when it may still predict a pasta phase while no pasta phase would occur in the absence of light clusters. It is shown that for densities above 0.01 fm{sup 3} the {alpha}-particle fraction in the pasta phase is much larger than that in homogeneous matter.

Avancini, S. S.; Barros, C. C. Jr.; Menezes, D. P. [Departamento de Fisica, CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Florianopolis SC, CP 476, CEP 88.040 900 (Brazil); Providencia, C. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, P 3004 516, Coimbra (Portugal)

2010-08-15

33

Performance of CVD diamond alpha particle detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The inherent properties of diamond can, in principle, make it an ideal material for radiation detectors with interesting capabilities. We have fabricated a particle detector using a free-standing CVD diamond film with a thickness of 300 ?m and area of 2 cm×2 cm and measured 5.5 MeV ? spectra from an 241Am source. The I-V characteristics indicate that a fine Ohmic contact is formed between the CVD diamond and electrode. At the external electric field 10 kV/cm, the collection efficiency reaches an average value of 41%, corresponding to a charge collection distance (CCD) of about 259 ?m and the energy resolution achieves 4.3%.

Minglong, Zhang; Yiben, Xia; Linjun, Wang; Hujiang, Shen; Beibei, Gu

2004-05-01

34

Radon monitor and control system based upon alpha particle detection  

SciTech Connect

A system is designed for monitoring or controlling the level of radon in indoor air, based upon measuring alpha particles due to the decay of radon or its daughter atoms. In one embodiment, the alpha particle decay of radon itself is detected and analyzed to control a vent in the heating and air conditioning system to automatically keep the radon level below a preselected level. In another embodiment, the daughter atoms {sub 218}Po and {sub 214}Po are collected from the indoor air and their alpha particle decays are analyzed to provide a sensitive monitor of radon levels or to control vents in the HVAC system to reduce radon concentrations to permissible levels. In addition, the system provides information on the quality of the air filter and indicates when it needs servicing.

Hurst, G.S.

1992-01-01

35

Alpha-particle radiobiological experiments using thin CR-39 detectors.  

PubMed

The present paper studied the feasibility of applying comet assay to evaluate the DNA damage in individual HeLa cervix cancer cells after alpha-particle irradiation. We prepared thin CR-39 detectors (<20 microm) as cell-culture substrates, with UV irradiation to shorten the track formation time. After irradiation of the HeLa cells by alpha particles, the tracks on the underside of the CR-39 detector were developed by chemical etching in (while floating on) a 14 N KOH solution at 37 degrees C. Comet assay was then applied. Diffusion of DNA out of the cells could be generally observed from the images of stained DNA. The alpha-particle tracks corresponding to the comets developed on the underside of the CR-39 detectors could also be observed by just changing the focal plane of the confocal microscope. PMID:17132662

Chan, K F; Siu, S Y M; McClella, K E; Tse, A K W; Lau, B M F; Nikezic, D; Richardson, B J; Lam, P K S; Fong, W F; Yu, K N

2006-01-01

36

226Ra determination in phosphogypsum by alpha-particle spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A radiochemical method for226Ra determination by alpha-particle spectrometry in environmental samples has been developed in our laboratory. The method has been validated by measurements in samples with known concentrations of this radionuclide and it has been applied in studies related to226Ra behaviour in phosphogypsum (the main by-product of producing phosphoric acid from phosphate rocks).

Aguado, J. L.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

1999-01-01

37

Effect of alpha particles on bacteriophage T4Br(+)  

SciTech Connect

The effects of heavy particle radiation, which is believed to be responsible for the high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space hadrons, on bacteriophages are investigated. Dry film cultures of bacteriophage T4 were irradiated with 5.3 MeV Po-210 alpha particles to doses from 5 to 60 Gray, and compared with cultures irradiated by Co-60 gamma radiation. Examination of the exponential dose-response curves for bacteriophage survival indicates an RBE of 4.68 for the alpha particles. The r-mutation frequency per 10,000 surviving phages is found to peak at 7.1 at doses between 65 and 85 Gray for gamma radiation, however it declines steadily from a level of 10.2 per 10,000 survivors with increasing dose of alpha radiation. Comparison of the mutation frequencies at the same levels of lethality and the spectra of mutations produced by the two types of radiation indicates alpha and gamma radiation to differ as well in the mechanisms of mutation production. It is concluded that the observed high RBE of space hadrons cannot be explained by the presence of high-energy particles in the secondary radiation. 13 references.

Leonteva, G.A.; Akoev, I.G.; Grigorev, A.E.

1983-01-01

38

Selective flow path alpha particle detector and method of use  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for monitoring alpha contamination are provided in which ions generated in the air surrounding the item, by the passage of alpha particles, are moved to a distant detector location. The parts of the item from which ions are withdrawn can be controlled by restricting the air flow over different portions of the apparatus. In this way, detection of internal and external surfaces separately, for instance, can be provided. The apparatus and method are particularly suited for use in undertaking alpha contamination measurements during the commissioning operations.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545)

2002-01-01

39

MHD-Induced Alpha Particle Loss in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

MHD-induced increases in alpha particle loss to the wall were observed for both coherent modes and transient reconnection events using an array of scintillator detectors near the wall of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The magnitude of the coherent MHD-induced alpha loss as seen by these detectors was normally comparable to the MHD-quiescent first-orbit or toroidal-field ripple loss, but the magnitude of the alpha loss during reconnection events was up to 1000 times higher than this for a short time. Modeling suggest that the coherent MHD loss mechanism will be even less significant for future reactor-scale deuterium-tritium tokamaks due to the smaller ratio of the alpha gyroradius to minor radius.

Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.; von Goeler, S.

1999-03-01

40

TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S. [and others

1995-08-01

41

Quality factors for alpha particles emitted in tissue  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept of a mean or dose averaged quality factor was defined in ICRP Publication 26 using relationships for quality factor as a function of LET. The concept of radiation weighting factors, wR, was introduced in ICRP Publication 60 in 1990. These are meant to be generalized factors that modify absorbed dose to reflect the risk of stochastic effects as a function of the quality of the radiation incident on the body or emitted by radioactivity within the body. The values of wr are equal to 20 for all alpha particles externally or internally emitted. This note compares the dose averaged quality factor for alpha particles originating in tissue using the old and revised recommendations for quality factor as a function of LET. The dose averaged quality factor never exceeds 20 using the old recommendations and is never less than 20 with the revised recommendations.

Borak, Thomas B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

2002-01-01

42

Fission studies with 140 MeV {alpha} particles  

SciTech Connect

Binary fission induced by 140 MeV {alpha} particles has been measured for {sup nat}Ag, {sup 139}La, {sup 165}Ho, and {sup 197}Au targets. The measured quantities are the total kinetic energies, fragment masses, and fission cross sections. The results are compared with other data and systematics. A minimum of the fission probability in the vicinity Z{sup 2}/A=24 is observed.

Buttkewitz, A.; Duhm, H. H.; Strauss, W. [I. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Goldenbaum, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Machner, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany)

2009-09-15

43

The (?,n) production rate of plutonium alpha particles on vermiculite  

Microsoft Academic Search

The (?,n) production rate for plutonium alpha particles on vermiculite relative to that on PuO2 is estimated within the framework of a homogeneous medium model using thick target elemental values evaluated at 5.5 MeV. The composition of the vermiculite is highly variable and the predicted relative (?,n) rate varies over a range of approximately 7–25, but this is in broad

S. Croft; A. R. Yates

1997-01-01

44

A Novel Experiment to Investigate the Attenuation of Alpha Particles in Air  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simple student experiment investigating dependence on air pressure of the attenuation of alpha particles in air is described. An equation giving the pressure needed to absorb all alpha particles of a given energy is derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Results are presented for the attenuation of alpha particles from americium 241 and radium…

Andrews, D. G. H.

2008-01-01

45

Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

1992-07-01

46

Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

1992-07-01

47

New concept for a wall detector for alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

A new concept for a wall-mounted detector is described here that would measure D-T alpha flux and corresponding pitch angle distribution in tokamaks (or related toroidal devices). The sensing element is a conical Micro Channel Ring (MCR) coated with 1 to 2..mu.. of ZnS scintillator (or possibly ZnO). The collimation of the ..cap alpha.. particles is provided by two circumferential slots at the wall surface. The alpha scintillation events on the MCR are transferred through the ring channels and coupled fiber optics bundle to an external processor. From the magnetic field vector at a given point on the device wall, a certain relation can be set up between the ..cap alpha..-induced scintillation position on the MCR and its original pitch angle (i.e., the angle between the ..cap alpha.. emission from the fusion reaction and the magnetic field vector) which is equal to the local pitch angle since the wall ..cap alpha.. flux is dominated by prompt losses.

Miley, G.H.; Kislev, H.; Micklich, B.J.

1985-01-01

48

Control of alpha-particle transport by ion cyclotron resonance heating  

SciTech Connect

In this paper control of radial alpha-particle transport by using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) waves is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak geometry. Spatially inhomogeneous ICRF wave energy with properly selected frequencies and wave numbers can induce fast convective transports of alpha particles at the speed of order v{sub {alpha}} {approximately} (P{sub RF}/n{sub {alpha}}{epsilon}{sub 0}){rho}{sup p}, where R{sub RF} is the ICRF wave power density, n{sub {alpha}} is the alpha-particle density, {epsilon}{sub 0} is the alpha-particle birth energy, and {rho}{sub p} is the poloidal gyroradius of alpha particles at the birth energy. Application to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) plasma is studied and possible antenna designs to control alpha-particle flux are discussed.

Chang, C.S.; Imre, K.; Weitzner, H.; Colestock, P. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1990-12-01

49

Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

Kenneth M. Young

2001-09-26

50

Alpha particle physics in a tokamak burning plasma experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Much is known about the behavior of energetic ions in tokamak devices but much remains to be understood. Single-particle effects are well understood and provide a firm basis for extrapolation to a burning plasma. In contrast, collective effects involving fast ions are more poorly understood and extrapolations are unreliable. Collective modes of concern include toroidicity-induced and ellipticity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes, kinetic ballooning modes, and internal kink modes. In addition to these magnetohydrodynamic normal modes, there are also energetic particle modes characterized by strong dependence on the fast-ion distribution function. Although many issues are important areas of study in current experiments, five issues distinguish burning plasma experiments. First, the energetic alphas are not the dominant source of free energy for the instabilities unless the fusion power exceeds the heating power by a factor of 10. Second, the damping of the instabilities depends sensitively on mode coupling to other heavily-damped waves. The magnitude of this coupling is expected to depend on the normalized thermal gyroradius, which is much smaller in a reactor. Third, in a reactor, both the radial extent of the instabilities and the fast-ion orbit contract relative to current experiments, so the fast-ion transport will change. Fourth, when instability occurs, a larger number of modes are unstable, so the mechanism of nonlinear saturation could shift from fast-ion transport to mode coupling. Fifth, because of the extreme sensitivity of energetic particle modes to the distribution function, an isotropic alpha particle distribution function differs from anisotropic fast-ion populations.

Heidbrink, W. W.

2002-05-01

51

Protons and alpha particles in the solar wind  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate energetic consequences of ion kinetic instabilitities in the solar wind connected with beam and core protons and alpha particles drifting with respect to each other. We compare theoretical predictions, simulations and observation results. For theoretical prediction we assume drifting bi-Maxwellian ion populations and we calculate theoretical quasilinear heating rates (Hellinger et al., 2013b). The nonlinear evolution of beam-core protons, and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind we investigate using hybrid expanding box system (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2013). The expansion leads to many different kinetic instabilities. In the simulation the beam protons and alpha particles are decelerated with respect to the core protons and all the populations are cooled in the parallel direction and heated in the perpendicular one in agreement with theoretical expectations. On the macroscopic level the kinetic instabilities cause large departures of the system evolution from the double adiabatic prediction and lead to a perpendicular heating and parallel cooling rates. The simulated heating rates are comparable to the heating rates estimated from the Helios observations (Hellinger et al., 2013a); furthermore, the differential velocity between core and beam protons observed by Ulysses exhibits apparent bounds which are compatible with the theoretical constaints imposed by the linear theory for the magnetosonic instability driven by beam-core differential velocity (Matteini et al., 2013). References Hellinger, P., P. M. Travnicek, S. Stverak, L. Matteini, and M. Velli (2013a), Proton thermal energetics in the solar wind: Helios reloaded, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 1351-1365, doi:10.1002/jgra.50107. Hellinger, P., T. Passot, P.-L. Sulem, and P. M. Travnicek (2013b), Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 20, 122306. Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2013), Protons and alpha particles in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 5421-5430, doi:10.1002/jgra.50540. Matteini, L., P. Hellinger, B. E. Goldstein, S. Landi, M. Velli, and M. Neugebauer (2013), Signatures of kinetic instabilities in the solar wind, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 2771-2782, doi:10.1002/jgra.50320.

Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Passot, Thierry; Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Matteini, Lorenzo; Landi, Simone

2014-05-01

52

Thick Source Alpha Particle Spectroscopy: Possibilities And Prospects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new technique for the calculation of U and Th concentration which is based on the alpha particle spectrum taken from a thick sample by using a silicon detector is briefly described. Within the present study two major advantages of the technique will also be presented: the potentiality for detecting and providing an estimation of disequilibrium in the U and Th series -when present- for especially young sediments, and the potential use of the technique as a new method for isotopic dating of speleothems and other materials. Also the validity of the basic equation and the accuracy of this technique is tested.

Michael, C. T.; Zacharias, N.; Hein, A.

53

Direct high-resolution alpha spectrometry from nuclear fuel particles in an outdoor air sample.  

PubMed

The potential use of direct high-resolution alpha spectrometry to identify the presence of transactinium elements in air samples is illustrated in the case when alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides are incorporated in nuclear fuel particles. Alpha particle energy spectra are generated through Monte Carlo simulations assuming a nuclide composition similar to RBMK (Chernobyl) nuclear fuel. The major alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides, in terms of activity, are 242Cm, 239Pu and 240Pu. The characteristics of the alpha peaks are determined by fuel particle properties as well as the type of the air filter. It is shown that direct alpha spectrometry can be readily applied to membrane filter samples containing nuclear fuel particles when rapid nuclide identification is of relevance. However, the development of a novel spectrum analysis code is a prerequisite for unfolding complex alpha spectra. PMID:17951235

Pöllänen, R; Siiskonen, T

2008-01-01

54

Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact  

PubMed Central

Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion–atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He+ ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne2). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation. PMID:21730184

Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

2011-01-01

55

Study of backscattering in alpha-particle sources with the new code AlfaMC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The activity of alpha-particle sources with negligible thickness can be absolutely determined using 2? counting geometry detectors, requiring corrections for backscattering from the source backing. The experimental determination of these corrections is subject to large uncertainties, because the contribution of the backscattered alpha particles to the total counting is generally very low. An interesting alternative is then to use Monte Carlo methods which simulate the transport of alpha-particles into the source. The programme AlfaMC, a new Monte Carlo code developed to simulate specifically the transport of alpha particles, was here applied to the study of the backscattering in alpha-particle sources. Energy and angular distributions for the backscattered alpha particles were deeply analysed based on a multiple scattering process, as a result of a large number of weak collisions with atomic electrons. Some calculated values for the backscattering coefficient were compared with experimental values, showing a good agreement.

Vargas, M. Jurado; Timón, A. Fernández

2015-01-01

56

Control of alpha particle transport by spatially inhomogeneous ion cyclotron resonance heating  

SciTech Connect

Control of the radial alpha particle transport by using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency waves is investigated in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak geometry. It is shown that spatially inhomogeneous ICRF-wave energy with properly selected frequencies and wave numbers can induce fast convective transport of alpha particles at the speed of order {upsilon}{sub alpha} {approximately} (P{sub RF}/n{sub {alpha}}{epsilon}{sub 0}) {rho}{sub p}, where P{sub RF} is the ICRF-wave power density, n{sub {alpha}} is the alpha density, {epsilon}{sub 0} is the alpha birth energy, and {rho}{sub p} is the poloidal gyroradius of alpha particles at the birth energy. Application to ITER plasmas is studied and possible antenna designs to control alpha particle flux are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

Chang, C.S.; Imre, K.; Weitzner, H. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Colestock, P. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1990-02-01

57

Mechanism and Rate of Long-Range alpha-Particle Emission in Fission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The statistical theory of fission has been used in previous works to calculate the energy and angular distributions of the long-range alpha particle emitted in fission. It is now applied to calculate the probability of long-range alpha-particle-accompanied fission relative to binary fission. For thermal-neutron fission of U235 the calculated rate is 1 alpha-particle-accompanied fission in 461 binary fissions, which agrees

Peter Fong

1971-01-01

58

Recent outgassing from the lunar surface: The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (APS) was designed to detect characteristic-energy alpha particles from the decay of Rn-222, Po-218, and Po-210 and to therefore map sites of radon release on the lunar surface. These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of U-238; hence the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal

Stefanie L. Lawson; William C. Feldman; David J. Lawrence; Kurt R. Moore; Richard C. Elphic; Richard D. Belian; Sylvestre Maurice

2005-01-01

59

Alpha particle diagnostics using impurity pellet injection (invited)  

SciTech Connect

We have proposed using impurity pellet injection to measure the energy distribution of the fast confined alpha particles in a reacting plasma (R. K. Fisher {ital et} {ital al}., Fusion Technol. {bold 13}, 536 (1988)). The ablation cloud surrounding the injected pellet is thick enough that an equilibrium fraction {ital F}{sup {infinity}}{sub 0}({ital E}) of the incident alphas should be neutralized as they pass through the cloud. By observing neutrals created in the large spatial region of the cloud which is expected to be dominated by the heliumlike ionization state, e.g., Li{sup +} ions, we can determine the incident alpha distribution {ital dn}{sub He}{sup 2+}/{ital dE} from the measured energy distribution of neutral helium atoms {ital dn}{sub He{sup 0}}/{ital dE} using {ital dn}{sub He{sup 0}}/{ital dE} = {ital dn}{sub He}{sup 2+}/{ital dE}{center dot}{ital F}{sup {infinity}}{sub 0} ({ital E},Li{sup +}). Initial experiments were performed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) in which we compared pellet penetration with our impurity pellet ablation model (P. B. Parks {ital et} {ital al}., Nucl. Fusion {bold 28}, 477 (1988)), and measured the spatial distribution of various ionization states in carbon pellet clouds (R. K. Fisher {ital et} {ital al}., Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 61}, 3196 (1990)). Experiments have recently begun on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with the goal of measuring the alpha particle energy distribution during D--T operation in 1993--94. A series of preliminary experiments are planned to test the diagnostic concept. The first experiments will observe neutrals from beam-injected deuterium ions and the high energy {sup 3}He tail produced during ion cyclotron (ICH) minority heating on TFTR interacting with the cloud. We will also monitor by line radiation the charge state distributions in lithium, boron, and carbon clouds.

Fisher, R.K.; McChesney, J.M.; Howald, A.W.; Parks, P.B. (General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 (United States)); Snipes, J.A.; Terry, J.L.; Marmar, E.S. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)); Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States))

1992-10-01

60

Breakup of {sup 12}C resonances into three alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

The reaction {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B->d+{sup 12}C* has been used to populate resonances in {sup 12}C up to an excitation energy of 15 MeV. The subsequent breakup to three alpha particles has been measured in complete kinematics. Dalitz plots are used to visualize and analyze the data. The Dalitz plot intensity distribution exhibits zero points characteristic of the total spin and parity of the 3alpha system allowing us to determine the spin and parity of a state in {sup 12}C at 13.35 MeV whose quantum numbers were hitherto not well established. The Dalitz plot intensity distributions of the 2{sup -} state at 11.83 MeV and the 1{sup +} state at 12.71 MeV are compared with the predictions of a recent three-body calculation as well as with simpler models. All are able to reproduce the gross structures seen in the Dalitz plot, but none give an accurate description of the detailed profile of the distributions.

Kirsebom, O. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hyldegaard, S.; Riisager, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cubero, M.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Madurga, M.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, ES-28006 Madrid (Spain); Diget, C. A.; Fulton, B. R. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Fraile, L. M. [PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G. [Fundamental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Munoz Martin, A. [CMAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, ES-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2010-06-15

61

Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.] [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)

1996-01-01

62

Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha-particle therapy applications  

PubMed Central

Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

2013-01-01

63

Realizing the potential of the Actinium-225 radionuclide generator in targeted alpha particle therapy applications.  

PubMed

Alpha particle-emitting isotopes have been proposed as novel cytotoxic agents for augmenting targeted therapy. Properties of alpha particle radiation such as their limited range in tissue of a few cell diameters and their high linear energy transfer leading to dense radiation damage along each alpha track are promising in the treatment of cancer, especially when single cells or clusters of tumor cells are targeted. Actinium-225 (225 Ac) is an alpha particle-emitting radionuclide that generates 4 net alpha particle isotopes in a short decay chain to stable 209 Bi, and as such can be described as an alpha particle nanogenerator. This article reviews the literature pertaining to the research, development, and utilization of targeted 225 Ac to potently and specifically affect cancer. PMID:18514364

Miederer, Matthias; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

2008-09-01

64

INSTABILITIES DRIVEN BY THE DRIFT AND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY OF ALPHA PARTICLES IN THE SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the conditions under which parallel-propagating Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) waves and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) waves are driven unstable by the differential flow and temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind. We focus on the limit in which w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} {approx}> 0.25v{sub A}, where w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}} is the parallel alpha-particle thermal speed and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed. We derive analytic expressions for the instability thresholds of these waves, which show, e.g., how the minimum unstable alpha-particle beam speed depends upon w{sub Parallel-To {alpha}}/v{sub A}, the degree of alpha-particle temperature anisotropy, and the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio. We validate our analytical results using numerical solutions to the full hot-plasma dispersion relation. Consistent with previous work, we find that temperature anisotropy allows A/IC waves and FM/W waves to become unstable at significantly lower values of the alpha-particle beam speed U{sub {alpha}} than in the isotropic-temperature case. Likewise, differential flow lowers the minimum temperature anisotropy needed to excite A/IC or FM/W waves relative to the case in which U{sub {alpha}} = 0. We discuss the relevance of our results to alpha particles in the solar wind near 1 AU.

Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Chandran, Benjamin D. G., E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu, E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu [Also at Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

2013-08-20

65

Intense alpha-particle emitting crystallites in uranium mill wastes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nuclear emulsion microscopy has demonstrated the presence of small, intense ??-particle emitting crystallites in laboratory-produced tailings derived from the sulfuric acid milling of uranium ores. The ??-particle activity is associated with the isotope pair 210Pb 210Po, and the host mineral appears to be PbSO4 occurring as inclusions in gypsum laths. These particles represent potential inhalation hazards at uranium mill tailings disposal areas. ?? 1994.

Landa, E.R.; Stieff, L.R.; Germani, M.S.; Tanner, A.B.; Evans, J.R.

1994-01-01

66

An alpha particle instrument with alpha, proton, and X-ray modes for planetary chemical analyses  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The interaction of alpha particles with matter is employed in a compact instrument that could provide rather complete in-situ chemical analyses of surfaces and thin atmospheres of extraterrestrial bodies. The instrument is a miniaturized and improved version of the Surveyor lunar instrument. The backscattering of alpha particles and (alpha, p) reactions provide analytical data on the light elements (carbon-iron). An X-ray mode that detects the photons produced by the alpha sources provides sensitivity and resolution for the chemical elements heavier than about silicon. The X-rays are detected by semiconductor detectors having a resolution between 150 and 250 eV at 5.9 keV. Such an instrument can identify and determine with good accuracy 99 percent of the atoms (except hydrogen) in rocks. For many trace elements, the detecting sensitivity is a few ppm. Auxiliary sources could be used to enhance the sensitivities for elements of special interest. The instrument could probably withstand the acceleration involved in semi-hard landings.

Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.

1976-01-01

67

The Ionization and Stopping Power of Various Gases for Alpha-Particles from Polonium: I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Determinations of the differential ionizations and stopping powers of hydrogen, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and methyl iodide have been made at intervals along the range of alpha-particles from polonium. From the results of these and other determinations it is shown that the energy lost by the alpha-particle per ion is nearly independent of the speed throughout the range. There are

G. E. Gibson; E. W. Gardiner

1927-01-01

68

Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

69

On interstitial dislocation loops in aluminium bombarded with alpha-particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electron transmission microscopy and selected area diffraction have shown that the dislocation loops in aluminium bombarded with 38 Mev alpha-particles lie generally upon the {110} planes with a [110] Burgers vector normal to the loop. These loops are only seen where the alpha-particles come to rest. The theory of diffraction contrast at dislocations (Hirsch et al. 1960) has been used

D. J. Mazey; R. S. Barnes; A. Howie

1962-01-01

70

Use of /sup 3/He/sup + +/ ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating  

DOEpatents

It is an object of the present invention to provide a better understanding of alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined, energetic plasma. Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved means and method for studying and measuring the energy distribution of heated alpha particles in a confined plasma. Yet another object of the present invention is to permit detailed analysis of energetic alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined plasma for use in near term fusion reactor experiments. A still further object of the present invention is to simulate energetic alpha particle behavior in a deuterium-tritium plasma confined in a fusion reactor without producing the neutron activation associated with the thus produced alpha particles.

Post, D.E. Jr.; Hwang, D.Q.; Hovey, J.

1983-11-16

71

Gamma-Rays of Lithium and Fluorine Under Alpha-Particle Bombardment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energies of the gamma-rays emitted from lithium and fluorine under bombardment by polonium alpha-particles are determined, and their variation with the energy of the incident particles is studied. In the case of lithium no change in gamma-ray energy is observed as the range of the incident alpha-particles is reduced from 3.9 cm to 2.5 cm. This is taken to

Karl C. Speh

1936-01-01

72

Simulation of Alpha Particles in Rotating Plasma Interacting with a Stationary Ripple  

SciTech Connect

Superthermal ExB rotation can provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and enhanced confinement to axisymmetric mirrors. However, the rotation speed has been limited by phenomena at end electrodes. A new prediction is that rotation might instead be produced using a magnetic ripple and alpha particle kinetic energy, in an extension of the alpha channeling concept. The interaction of alpha particles with the ripple results in visually interesting and practically useful orbits.

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-01-11

73

Energetic/alpha particle effects on MHD modes and transport  

SciTech Connect

A nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) has been employed to study TAE stability in TFRR D-T and DIII-D experiments and to achieve understanding of TAE instability drive and damping mechanism. Reasonably good agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained. In these experiments the dominant damping mechanism is due to both the thermal ion Landau damping and/or the beam ion Landau damping. Based on ITER EDA parameters, the TAE modes are expected to be unstable in normal ITER operations. Energetic particle transport has been studied using a test particle code (ORBIT). Energetic particle loss scales linearly with the TAE mode amplitude and can be large for TFRR and DIII-D for {delta}B{sub r}/B > 10{sup {minus}4} due to large banana orbit. From quasi-linear (ORBIT) and nonlinear kinetic-MHD (MH3D-K) simulations the saturation of TAE modes is due to nonlinear wave particle trapping and energetic particle profile modification in both radial and energy space. Finally, a convective bucket transport mechanism by MHD waves with time-dependent frequency is presented. Based on the energy-selective characteristics of the bucket transport mechanism, undesirable particles such as helium ash can be removed from the plasma core efficiently.

Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Chen, L. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-01-01

74

Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.  

PubMed

The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) ? radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET ? particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with ? particles emitted by the ²²?Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on ?-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated ? particles using a planar ²?¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five ?-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that ? particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

2011-10-01

75

Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of ?-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and ?-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the ?-particle source and its evolution in space and time, ?-particle energy distribution, and ?-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for ?-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential ?-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, ?-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Belli, F.; Cecil, F. E.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Darrow, D.; Ericsson, G.; Fernandes, A. M.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Von Thun, C. Perez; Popovichev, S.; Riva, M.; Santala, M.; Soare, S.; Sousa, J.; Syme, D. B.; Tardocchi, M.; Zoita, V. L.; Chugunov, I. N.; Gin, D. B.; Khilkevich, E.; Shevelev, A. E.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Yavorskij, V.; JET-EFDA contributors

2014-08-01

76

WIND measurements of proton and alpha particle flow and number density  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose to review measurements of the solar wind proton and alpha particle flow velocities and densities made since launch with the WIND SWE instrument. The SWE Faraday cup ion sensors are designed to be able to determine accurately flow vector directions, and thus can be used to detect proton-alpha particle differential flow. Instances of differential flow, and the solar wind features with which they are associated will be discussed. Additionally, the variability of the percentage of alpha particles as a fraction of the total solar wind ion density will be presented.

Steinberg, J. T.; Lazarus, A. J.; Ogilvie, J. T.; Lepping, R.; Byrnes, J.; Chornay, D.; Keller, J.; Torbert, R. B.; Bodet, D.; Needell, G. J.

1995-01-01

77

On the approximations of the distribution function of fusion alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

The solution of the drift-kinetic equation for fusion-born alpha particles is derived in the limit of dominant parallel streaming, and it is related to the usual slowing-down distribution function. The typical approximations of the fast tail of fusion-born alpha particles are briefly compared and discussed. In particular, approximating the distribution function of fast-alpha particles with an “equivalent” Maxwellian is inaccurate to describe absorption of radio-frequency waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies.

Bilato, R., E-mail: roberto.bilato@ipp.mpg.de; Brambilla, M.; Poli, E. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2014-10-15

78

Method for characterizing the upset response of CMOS circuits using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. A technique utilizing test structures to quickly and inexpensively characterize the SEU sensitivity of standard cell latches intended for use in a space environment. This bench-level approach utilizes alpha particles to induce upsets in a low LET sensitive 4-k bit test SRAM. This SRAM consists of cells that employ an offset voltage to adjust their upset sensitivity and an enlarged sensitive drain junction to enhance the cell's upset rate.

Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

1995-01-01

79

The interaction of energetic alpha-particles with intense lower hybrid waves  

SciTech Connect

Lower hybrid waves are a demonstrated, continuous means of driving toroidal current in a tokamak. When these waves propagate in a tokamak fusion reactor, in which there are energetic {alpha}- particles, there are conditions under which the {alpha}-particles do not appreciably damp, and may even amplify, the wave, thereby enhancing the current-drive effect. Waves traveling in one poloidal direction, in addition to being directed in one toroidal direction, are shown to be the most efficient drivers of current in the presence of the energetic {alpha}-particles.

Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

1992-06-01

80

Alpha Particles Induce Apoptosis through the Sphingomyelin Pathway  

PubMed Central

The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) ? radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET a particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with a particles emitted by the 225Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on ?-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated a particles using a planar 241Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five ?-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that a particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

Seideman, Jonathan H.; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Howell, Roger W.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Scheinberg, David A.

2011-01-01

81

Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source  

SciTech Connect

The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

2004-05-13

82

Feasibility studies of colorless LR 115 SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility of using the active layer of the colorless LR 115 SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments was studied. The track revelation time on the bottom side (the side attached to the polyester base) was much longer than that on the top side (the side not attached to the polyester base) of the active layer so track formation on the top side was more desirable. In relation to this, culture of HeLa cells on the bottom side of the active layer was found feasible although the cultured cell number was relatively smaller. The feasibility of using this SSNTD for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments was demonstrated by culturing cells on the bottom side while performing alpha-particle irradiation and chemical etching on the top side, and by taking photographs of the cells and alpha-particle tracks together under the optical microscope.

Chan, K. F.; Tse, A. K. W.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

2006-06-01

83

Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells  

E-print Network

The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01

84

Thermomechanical and Microstructural Characterization of Geopolymers with alpha-Al2O3 Particle Filler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geopolymers with different content of alpha-Al2O3 particle filler were prepared. The thermo-mechanical and microstructural characterization of the obtained geopolymers were systematically studied by flexural strength and thermal shrinkage measurements, TG-DTA (thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis), XRD (X-ray diffractometry), and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The results show that the addition of alpha-Al2O3 particle filler not only increases the onset crystalline temperature

T. S. Lin; D. C. Jia; P. G. He; M. R. Wang

2009-01-01

85

Feasibility of an alpha particle gas densimeter for stack sampling applications  

E-print Network

FEASIBILITY OF AN ALPHA PARTICLE GAS DENSIMETER FOR STACK SAMPLING APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RANDALL ~ JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May l983 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering FEASIBILITY OF AN ALPHA PARTICLE GAS DENSIMETER FOR STACK SAMPLING APPLICATIONS A Thesis by RANDALL MARK JO HN SON Approved as to style and content by: Ro ert A. F3e d (Ch irman of Committee...

Johnson, Randall Mark

2012-06-07

86

Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi  

SciTech Connect

Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Department, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B1090 Brussels (Belgium); Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z. [Atomki, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem Ter, H4001 Debrecen (Hungary)

2005-05-24

87

Alpha and beta particle induced scintillations in liquid and solid neon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scintillations induced by alpha and beta particles in liquid and solid neon are studied and their light yield measured. Charged particle scintillation in neon is primarily in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). We detect this EUV light by converting it to blue using a wavelength shifting fluor and detecting the blue light with a photomultiplier tube. It is observed that liquid

R. A. Michniak; R. Alleaume; D. N. McKinsey; J. M. Doyle

2002-01-01

88

Simple preparation of thin CR-39 detectors for alpha-particle radiobiological experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alpha-particle radiobiological experiments involve irradiating cells with alpha particles and require accurate positions where the alpha particles hit the cells. In the present work, we prepared thin CR-39 detectors from commercially available CR-39 SSNTDs with a thickness of 100 ?m by etching them in 1 N NaOH/ethanol at 40 °C to below 20 ?m. The desired final thickness was achieved within ˜8 h. Such etching conditions can provide relatively small roughness of the detector as revealed by atomic force microscope, and thus provide transparent detectors for radiobiological experiments. UV radiation was employed to shorten track formation time on these thin CR-39 detectors. After exposure to UV light (UVA + B radiation) for 2-3 h with doses from 259 to 389 W/cm 2, 5 MeV alpha-particle tracks can be seen to develop on these CR-39 detectors clearly under the optical microscope within 2 h in 14 N KOH at 37 °C. As an example for practical use, custom-made petri dishes, with a hole drilled at the bottom and covered with a thin CR-39 detector, were used for culturing HeLa cells. The feasibility of using these thin CR-39 detectors is demonstrated by taking photographs of the cells and alpha-particle tracks together under the optical microscope, which can allow the hit positions on the cells by the alpha particles to be determined accurately.

Chan, K. F.; Lau, B. M. F.; Nikezic, D.; Tse, A. K. W.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

2007-10-01

89

Measurements of geomagnetically trapped alpha particles, 1968-1970. I - Quiet time distributions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of observations of geomagnetically trapped alpha particles over the energy range from 1.18 to 8 MeV performed with the aid of the Injun 5 polar-orbiting satellite during the period from September 1968 to May 1970. Following a presentation of a time history covering this entire period, a detailed analysis is made of the magnetically quiet period from Feb. 11 to 28, 1970. During this period the alpha particle fluxes and the intensity ratio of alpha particles to protons attained their lowest values in approximately 20 months; the alpha particle intensity versus L profile was most similar to the proton profile at the same energy per nucleon interval; the intensity ratio was nearly constant as a function of L in the same energy per nucleon representation, but rose sharply with L when computed in the same total energy interval; the variation of alpha particle intensity with B suggested a steep angular distribution at small equatorial pitch angles, while the intensity ratio showed little dependence on B; and the alpha particle spectral parameter showed a markedly different dependence on L from the equivalent one for protons.

Krimigis, S. M.; Verzariu, P.

1973-01-01

90

Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium{endash}tritium plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium{endash}tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [K. M. McGuire {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 2176 (1995)] has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.; Budny, R.V.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Duong, H.H.; Fang, J.; Fisch, N.J.; Fischer, R.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Heeter, R.F.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Hill, K.; Jaeger, E.F.; James, R.; Majeski, R.; Medley, S.S.; Murakami, M.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Redi, M.H.; Ruskov, E.; Spong, D.A.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Wilson, J.R.; Wong, K.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

1996-05-01

91

LIMITS ON ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY AND DIFFERENTIAL FLOW FROM KINETIC INSTABILITIES: SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure and anisotropy driven instabilities such as the Alfvén/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this Letter, we use a long period of in situ measurements provided by the Wind spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha proton differential flow velocity and the alpha particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of T {sub ?}/T {sub p} (T {sub ??}/T {sub ?p}) when the alpha proton differential flow velocity is small, where T {sub ?} and T {sub p} (T {sub ??} and T {sub ?p}) are the perpendicular (parallel) temperatures of alpha particles and protons. We conjecture that this observed feature might arise from preferential alpha particle heating which can drive the alpha particles beyond the instability thresholds.

Bourouaine, Sofiane; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)] [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Maruca, Bennett A. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kasper, Justin C., E-mail: s.bourouaine@unh.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-11-01

92

Modification of alpha-particle emission spectrum in beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The alpha ({alpha})-particle and neutron emission spectra in a deuterium-tritium plasma accompanied with neutral-beam-injection (NBI) heating are evaluated in a consistent way by solving the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equations for deuteron, triton, and {alpha}-particle simultaneously. It is shown that owing to the existence of non-Maxwellian tail component in fuel-ion distribution function due to NBI and/or nuclear elastic scattering, the generation rate of the energetic ({>=}4 MeV) {alpha}-particle increases significantly. When 20 MW intense deuterium beam with 1 MeV beam-injection energy is injected into an 800 m{sup 3} plasma (T{sub e}=10 keV, n{sub e}=6.2x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}), the enhancement of the fraction of the power carried by {alpha}-particles with energy above 4 (3.9) MeV to total {alpha}-particle power is almost twice (1.5 times) as much from the value for Gaussian distribution. A verification scenario for the modification of the emission spectrum by using the gamma ({gamma})-ray-generating {sup 9}Be({alpha},n{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction is also presented.

Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y. [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

2009-04-15

93

Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

Shen, B. S. P.

1974-01-01

94

Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating  

DOEpatents

Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Belle Mead, NJ); Hwang, David Q. (Lawrencevill, NJ); Hovey, Jane (Plainsboro, NJ)

1986-04-22

95

Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

Ohkubo, S. [Department of Applied Science and Environment, Kochi Women's University, Kochi 780-8515 (Japan); Hirabayashi, Y. [Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

2004-10-01

96

Some alpha-particle heating and acceleration mechanisms in the solar wind - Prognoz 7 measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The solar wind alpha-particle and proton measurements made by the mass spectrometer on Prognoz 7 are discussed. Bulk velocity difference V(alpha) - Vp is a sign of relative helium abundance differential with increasing solar wind velocity. It may be the result of mixing of solar wind streams with different velocities and different relative abundances. The correlation T(alpha)\\/Tp and absolute value

Yu. I. Yermolaev; V. V. Stupin

1990-01-01

97

A survey of the physical processes which determine the response function of silicon detectors to alpha particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectra of monoenergetic alpha particles exhibit a well known asymmetric shape when measured with silicon detectors. The processes are described which determine the response of silicon detectors to alpha particles, particularly the energy dependence of the line shape. In this work particle implanted and passivated silicon (PIPS) detectors are assumed to have a thin dead layer at the front

E. Steinbauer; G. Bortels; P. Bauer; J. P. Biersack; P. Burger; I. Ahmad

1994-01-01

98

Open Problems in $?$ Particle Condensation  

E-print Network

$\\alpha$ particle condensation is a novel state in nuclear systems. We briefly review the present status on the study of $\\alpha$ particle condensation and address the open problems in this research field: $\\alpha$ particle condensation in heavier systems other than the Hoyle state, linear chain and $\\alpha$ particle rings, Hoyle-analogue states with extra neutrons, $\\alpha$ particle condensation related to astrophysics, etc.

Y. Funaki; M. Girod; H. Horiuchi; G. Roepke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki; T. Yamada

2010-03-05

99

Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes  

SciTech Connect

The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18?keV and 3.5?MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E?1?MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1?MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

Farengo, R. [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Centro Atómico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, 8400 Bariloche, RN (Argentina); Ferrari, H. E. [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Centro Atómico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, 8400 Bariloche, RN (Argentina); CONICET, 8400 Bariloche, RN (Argentina); Garcia-Martinez, P. L. [CONICET, 8400 Bariloche, RN (Argentina); Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128, Palaiseau cedex (France); Lifschitz, A. F. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91761 Palaiseau cedex (France)

2014-08-15

100

Alpha Particles Play a Relatively Minor Role in Magnetized Target Fusion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Two problems related to alpha particle physics in magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems are briefly discussed. First, we evaluate the pressure and density of alpha particles under the assumption that they are perfectly confined and have a classical slowing-down distribution. It turns out that because of a comparatively low plasma temperature in MTF systems, the relative pressure and density of alpha particles are more than an order of magnitude less than in fusion reactors based on ITER-type tokamaks. Therefore, one may expect that even in the extreme case of a perfect confinement of alpha particles, their presence will have a much weaker (than in the case of tokamaks) effect on plasma stability and transport. Second, we discuss the kinetics of plasma burn under the opposite extreme assumption that all the alpha particles are instantaneously lost, without leaving any energy in a plasma. It turns out that even in this case, the plasma energy yield in batch-burn systems is only weakly affected by burnout effects.

Ryutov, D.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

2002-03-15

101

Evaluation of ZnO(Ga)Coatings as Alpha Particle Transducers Within a Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect

We report investigations and preliminary results from efforts to develop a recoil alpha particle detector for use in a portable neutron generator. The associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) will be used as an interrogation source for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). With the emission of 14.1 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T reaction, associated 3.5 MeV alpha particles are emitted. These neutrons and alphas may then be correlated in time and direction, thus effectively ''tagging'' the neutrons of interest for subsequent use as an active nuclear materials interrogation source. The alpha particle detector uses a ZnO(Ga) scintillator coating applied to a fiber optic face plate. Gallium-doped zinc oxide is a fast (1.5 ns decay time), inorganic scintillator with a high melting point (1975C) and an absolute light yield of 1.5% of NaI(Tl). The scintillator is coated with a thin layer of nickel in order to screen out light produced in the tube and scattered deuterons and tritons. This coating also serves to prevent the buildup of charge on the detector surface. Results to date indicate promise as an effective alpha particle detector for the APSTNG for future use in the NMIS.

Mihalczo, J. T.; Neal, J. S.; Cooper, J. C.; Koltick, D. S.

2002-05-02

102

Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

1995-01-01

103

Folding model analysis of alpha-particle elastic scattering with a semirealistic density dependent effective interaction  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to examine the density dependent effective interaction, DDEI, applied in the double-folding model and to investigate whether folding model analyses of alpha particle elastic scattering could be used to calculate nuclear matter densities. Accordingly, differential cross-sections for the elastic scattering of alpha particles from (40)Ca, (46,48,50)Ti, (58)Ni, (90)Zr and (208)Pb at 140 MeV and from (58,60,62,64)Ni at 172 MeV were analyzed using the model with a semirealistic DDEI based on the M3Y interaction for the real potential and various phenomenological imaginary potentials. Good fits with consistent parameters of the model were obtained. The application of folding model analyses of alpha particle elastic scattering to the determination of nuclear matter density distribution was critically examined.

Kobos, A.M.; Brown, B.A.; Hodgson, P.E.; Satchler, G.R.; Budzanowski, A.

1982-01-01

104

On the correlation between the binding energies of the triton and the alpha-particle  

E-print Network

We consider the correlation between the binding energies of the triton and the alpha-particle which is empirically observed in calculations employing different phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. Using an effective quantum mechanics approach for short-range interactions with large scattering length |a| >> l, where l is the natural low-energy length scale, we construct the effective interaction potential at leading order in l/|a|. In order to renormalize the four-nucleon system, it is sufficient to include a SU(4)-symmetric one-parameter three-nucleon interaction in addition to the S-wave nucleon-nucleon interactions. The absence of a four-nucleon force at this order explains the empirically observed correlation between the binding energies of the triton and the alpha-particle. We calculate this correlation and obtain a prediction for the alpha-particle binding energy. Corrections to our results are suppressed by l/|a|.

L. Platter; H. -W. Hammer; U. -G. Meißner

2004-09-20

105

Alpha-particle condensation in 16O via a full four-body OCM calculation  

E-print Network

In order to explore the 4 \\alpha-particle condensate state in 16O, we solve a full four-body equation of motion based on the 4 \\alpha OCM (Orthogonality Condition Model) in a large 4 \\alpha model space spanned by Gaussian basis functions. A full spectrum up to the 0_6^+ state is reproduced consistently with the lowest six 0^+ states of the experimental spectrum. The 0^+_6 state is obtained at about 2 MeV above the 4 \\alpha breakup threshold and has a dilute density structure, with a radius of about 5 fm. The state has an appreciably large \\alpha condensate fraction of 61 %, and a large component of \\alpha+12C(0_2^+) configuration, both features being reliable evidence for this state to be of 4 \\alpha condensate nature.

Y. Funaki; T. Yamada; H. Horiuchi; G. Roepke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki

2008-02-22

106

Prediction of Lung Cells Oncogenic Transformation for Induced Radon Progeny Alpha Particles Using Sugarscape Cellular Automata  

PubMed Central

Background Alpha particle irradiation from radon progeny is one of the major natural sources of effective dose in the public population. Oncogenic transformation is a biological effectiveness of radon progeny alpha particle hits. The biological effects which has caused by exposure to radon, were the main result of a complex series of physical, chemical, biological and physiological interactions. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for radon-induced carcinogenesis have not been clear yet. Methods Various biological models, including cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenesis effects of radon progeny alpha particles. In this paper, sugars cape cellular automata have been presented for computational study of complex biological effect of radon progeny alpha particles in lung bronchial airways. The model has included mechanism of DNA damage, which has been induced alpha particles hits, and then formation of transformation in the lung cells. Biomarkers were an objective measure or evaluation of normal or abnormal biological processes. In the model, the metabolism rate of infected cell has been induced alpha particles traversals, as a biomarker, has been followed to reach oncogenic transformation. Results The model results have successfully validated in comparison with “in vitro oncogenic transformation data” for C3H 10T1/2 cells. This model has provided an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes, at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis, involving human cells. Conclusion It has become well known that simulation could be used to investigate complex biomedical systems, in situations where traditional methodologies were difficult or too costly to employ. PMID:25250147

Baradaran, Samaneh; Maleknasr, Niaz; Setayeshi, Saeed; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil

2014-01-01

107

Enhanced retention of the alpha-particle-emitting daughters of Actinium-225 by liposome carriers.  

PubMed

Targeted alpha-particle emitters hold great promise as therapeutics for micrometastatic disease. Because of their high energy deposition and short range, tumor targeted alpha-particles can result in high cancer-cell killing with minimal normal-tissue irradiation. Actinium-225 is a potential generator for alpha-particle therapy: it decays with a 10-day half-life and generates three alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Retention of (225)Ac daughters at the target increases efficacy; escape and distribution throughout the body increases toxicity. During circulation, molecular carriers conjugated to (225)Ac cannot retain any of the daughters. We previously proposed liposomal encapsulation of (225)Ac to retain the daughters, whose retention was shown to be liposome-size dependent. However, daughter retention was lower than expected: 22% of theoretical maximum decreasing to 14%, partially due to the binding of (225)Ac to the phospholipid membrane. In this study, Multivesicular liposomes (MUVELs) composed of different phospholipids were developed to increase daughter retention. MUVELs are large liposomes with entrapped smaller lipid-vesicles containing (225)Ac. PEGylated MUVELs stably retained over time 98% of encapsulated (225)Ac. Retention of (213)Bi, the last daughter, was 31% of the theoretical maximum retention of (213)Bi for the liposome sizes studied. MUVELs were conjugated to an anti-HER2/neu antibody (immunolabeled MUVELs) and were evaluated in vitro with SKOV3-NMP2 ovarian cancer cells, exhibiting significant cellular internalization (83%). This work demonstrates that immunolabeled MUVELs might be able to deliver higher fractions of generated alpha-particles per targeted (225)Ac compared to the relative fractions of alpha-particles delivered by (225)Ac-labeled molecular carriers. PMID:17935286

Sofou, Stavroula; Kappel, Barry J; Jaggi, Jaspreet S; McDevitt, Michael R; Scheinberg, David A; Sgouros, George

2007-01-01

108

Distributions of Alpha Particles Escaping to the Wall because of Sawtooth Oscillations in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

It has been observed experimentally in deuterium-tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. Namely, measurements with four detectors installed at the wall at 20°, 45°, 60°, and 90° below the midplane of the torus have shown that the alpha flux to the wall is strongly peaked at the 20° and 90° detectors and on the noise level at the 45° detector. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the "crash-induced prompt loss," i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux to the 90° and 60° detectors, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal at the 20° detector. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In addition to the integral flux, the flux of particles with given energy was calculated. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type.

Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Yu.V., Zweben, S.J.

1998-11-01

109

Range of Medium and High Energy Protons and Alpha Particles in NaI Scintillator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have calculated the range of protons and alpha particles in NaI scintillator which is a commonly used substance in scintillation detector manufacturing. The electronic stopping power of protons and alpha particles in NaI is calculated first by using the theoretical formulation of Montenegro et al. The range calculation has been performed by applying a technique that we developed in the earlier works. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulation program SRIM2003 and PRAL. It is found that the obtained results are in satisfactory agreement with the literature.

Kabadayi, Oe.

2006-06-01

110

Effects of q(r) on the Alpha Particle Ripple Loss in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was done with TFTR DT plasmas to determine the effect of the q(r) profile on the alpha particle ripple loss to the outer midplane. The alpha particle loss measurements were made using a radially movable scintillator detector 20 degrees below the outer midplane. The experimental results were compared with TF ripple loss calculations done using a Monte Carlo guiding center orbit following code, ORBIT. Although some of the experimental results are consistent with the ORBIT code modeling, the variation of the alpha loss with the q(r) profiles is not well explained by this code. Quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires a careful analysis of the limiter shadowing effect, which strongly determines the diffusion of alphas into the detector aperture.

D.S. Darrow; M. Diesso; R.V. Budny; S. Batha; S.J. Zweben; et al.

1997-09-01

111

Alpha particle condensation in {sup 12}C and nuclear rainbow scattering  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the large radius of the Hoyle state of {sup 12}C with a dilute density distribution in an {alpha} particle condensate can be clearly seen in the shift of the rainbow angle (therefore the Airy minimum) to a larger angle in {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering at the high energy region and prerainbow oscillations in {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C scattering at the lower energy region.

Ohkubo, S. [Department of Applied Science and Environment, Kochi Women's University, Kochi 780-8515 (Japan); Hirabayashi, Y. [Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0811 (Japan)

2008-05-12

112

Gene expression profile of human lymphocytes exposed to (211)At alpha particles.  

PubMed

In this study, the Whole Human Genome 44K DNA microarray assay was used for the first time to obtain gene expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes 2 h after exposure (in suspension) to 6.78 MeV mean energy alpha particles from extracellular (211)At. Lymphocytes were exposed to fluences of 0.3-9.6 x 10(6) alpha particles/cm(2) [corresponding to mean absorbed alpha-particle doses (D(alpha)) of 0.05-1.60 Gy] over 30 min. Significantly modulated expression was identified in 338 early-response genes. Up-regulated expression was evident in 183 early-response genes, while the remaining 155 were down-regulated. Over half of the up-regulated genes and 40% of the down-regulated genes had a known biological process related primarily to cell growth and maintenance and cell communication. Genes associated with cell death were found only in the up-regulated genes and those with development only in the down-regulated genes. Eight selected early-response genes that displayed a sustained up- or down-regulation (CD36, HSPA2, MS4A6A, NFIL3, IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1) were further validated in alpha-particle-irradiated lymphocytes of two human individuals using the TaqMan(R) RT-qPCR technique. The results confirmed the observed microarray gene expression patterns. The expression modulation profiles of IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1 genes demonstrated similar trends in the two individuals studied. However, no significant linear correlation between increasing relative gene expression and the alpha-particle dose was evident. The results suggest the possibility that a panel of genes that react to alpha-particle radiation does exist and that they merit further study in a greater number of individuals to determine their possible value regarding alpha-particle biodosimetry. PMID:20681779

Turtoi, A; Brown, I; Schläger, M; Schneeweiss, F H A

2010-08-01

113

Alpha-Particle Decay Branching Ratio Measurements for Excited States of NITROGEN-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reactions, ^{12 }C(^7Li,alpha)^{15}N and ^7Li(^{12 }C,^{15}Ntoalpha + ^{11}B)alpha at E_{rm cm} = 33.2 MeV, are used to measure the alpha-particle decay branching ratio, Gamma_alpha/Gamma, of states in ^{15}N produced at several excitation energies, rm E_{x}(^{15}N). Resonant Particle Decay Spectroscopy is applied to the sequential reaction to identify ^{15 }N states and construct their alpha-particle angular correlations from the kinematic reconstruction of the relative kinetic energy of the ^ {15}N break-up products (alpha and ^{11}B) detected in coincidence by use of two position sensitive detectors. It is shown that the symmetry observed in these correlations implies azimuthal isotropy, so that integration can be accomplished to yield Gamma_alpha/ Gamma in conjunction with the measured ^{15}N production cross sections. For excited states at rm E_{x}( ^{15}N) = 11.44, 12.56, 13.01, 13.18, 13.83 and 14.11 MeV, the measured values of Gamma_alpha/Gamma are 0.07 +/- 0.01, 0.60 +/- 0.04, 0.84 +/- 0.09, 0.34 +/- 0.04, 0.37 +/- 0.09 and 0.31 +/- 0.06 respectively (absolute uncertainty is ~15%). Reduced widths of some of these states are calculated under limiting approximations. Spectral analysis also yields: (a) New excited states at rm E_{x}(^ {15}N) = 12.67, 12.83, 15.15 and 22.58 MeV, (b) confirmation of previously questioned states at rm E_{x}(^{15 }N) = 15.87 and 21.37 MeV, (c) previously unknown alpha-particle decays for 17 excited states and (d) correction of previously reported energy widths for states at rm E_{x}(^{15}N) = 16.20, 16.46, 17.12, and 20.95 MeV. Probable spin-parity values are proposed for several ^ {15}N states based on a DWBA analysis carried out for the angular distributions of the ^{12}C(^7Li,alpha) ^{15}N reaction and the best theoretical descriptions of the alpha-particle angular correlations of the sequential reaction.

Liendo, Jacinto Alberto

114

1. INTRODUCTION High-energy fusion-product (fp) transport (e.g., alpha particle  

E-print Network

-T plasmas) is a central issue in fusion reactor de- velopment. Important effects dependent on fp transport by energetic, charged fusion products is a crucial issue for obtaining fusion reactor conditions. The evolution1 1. INTRODUCTION High-energy fusion-product (fp) transport (e.g., alpha particle transport in D

Hively, Lee M.

115

Can Bose condensation of alpha particles be observed in heavy ion collisions?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of alpha particles with a concomitant phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the signature of the onset of this phenomenon are made.

Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

1993-01-01

116

Depleted uranium-catalyzed oxidative DNA damage: absence of significant alpha particle decay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Published data from our laboratory have demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically transforming and genotoxic. DU possesses both a radiological (alpha particle) and a chemical (metal) component. Since DU has a low-specific activity in comparison to natural uranium,

Alexandra C. Miller; Michael Stewart; Kia Brooks; Lin Shi; Natalie Page

2002-01-01

117

RADON AND PROGENY ALPHA-PARTICLE ENERGY ANALYSIS USING NUCLEAR TRACK METHODOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary procedure for alpha energy analysis of radon and progeny using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) is described in this paper. The method is based on the relationship between alpha-particle energies deposited in polycarbonate material (CR-39) and the track size developed after a well-established chemical etching process. Track geometry, defined by parameters such as major or minor diameters, track area and overall track length, is shown to correlate with alpha-particle energy over the range 6.00 MeV (218Po) to 7.69 MeV (214Po). Track features are measured and the data analyzed automatically using a digital imaging system and commercial PC software. Examination of particle track diameters in CR-39 exposed to environmental radon reveals a multi-modal distribution. Locations of the maxima in this distribution are highly correlated with alpha particle energies of radon daughters, and the distributions are sufficiently resolved to identify the radioisotopes. This method can be useful for estimating the radiation dose from indoor exposure to radon and its progeny.

Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo [ORNL; Golzarri y Moreno, Dr. Jose Ignacio [Instituto de Fisica, Mexico; Bogard, James S [ORNL

2008-01-01

118

Experimental setup for studying the effects of alpha particles on zebrafish embryos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work, we have studied the feasibility to use an experimental setup based on polyallyldiglycol-carbonate (PADC) films to study effects of alpha particles on dechorionated zebrafish embryos. Thin PADC films with a thickness of 16 ?m were prepared from commercially available CR-39 films by chemical etching and used as support substrates for holding zebrafish embryos for alpha-particle irradiation. These films recorded alpha-particle hit positions, quantified the number and energy of alpha particles actually incident on the embryo cells, and thus enabled the calculation of the dose absorbed by the embryo cells. Irradiation was made at 4 h post fertilization (hpf) with absorbed doses up to 2.3 mGy. Images of the embryos at 48 hpf were examined for identification of morphologic abnormalities. The preliminary results showed that absorbed doses corresponding to the abnormally developed embryos ranged from 0.41 to 2.3 mGy, which was equivalent to 0.21-1.2 mGy in human.

Yum, E. H. W.; Ng, C. K. M.; Lin, A. C. C.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

2007-11-01

119

Nucleon-Alpha Particle Disequilibrium and Short-Lived r-Process Radioactivities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

r-Process yields can be extremely sensitive to expansion parameters when a persistent disequilibrium between free nucleons and alpha particles is present. This may provide a natural scenario for understanding the variation of heavy and light r-process isotopes in different r-process events. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Meyer, B. S.; Clayton, D. D.; Chellapilla, S.; The, L.-S.

2002-01-01

120

Variation of the track etch rates of alpha-particle trajectory in PADC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation of etched tracks in solid-state nuclear track detectors is usually described by assuming an unequivocal correlation of the etch-rate ratio with the energy loss of charged particles. For alpha particles, this assumption could be verified within the scatter of the experimental data. In this article, the dependence of the depth (x) on the track etch rate (V-T) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. It is found that the track etch rate as a function of the depth within the detector follows the Bragg curve. The track etch rate has been found to be described by a generalization of the restricted energy loss, in good approximation along the trajectories of alpha particles.

Zaki, M. F.; Hegazy, T. M.; Seddik, U.; Morsy, A. A.

2005-01-01

121

Lung cancer risk from exposure to alpha particles and inhalation of other pollutants in rats  

SciTech Connect

The goal of these experiments is to establish a quantitative correlation between early DNA damage and cancer incidence in a way that would be helpful for assessing the carcinogenic risk of radon alone or in combination with specific indoor pollutants. Rat tracheal epithelium has been exposed in vivo to {sup 210}Po alpha particles in the presence and absence of NO{sub 2} or cigarette smoke. The major accomplishments so far are: the design and implementation of a tracheal implant to simulate radon alpha particle exposure, the measurement of DNA breaks in a small 7.0 mm segment of the trachea exposed to external x-irradiation, the measurement of the rate of repair of the x-ray induced tracheal DNA strand breaks, the measurement of DNA strand breaks following inhalation of cigarette smoke or NO{sub 2}, the measurement of tracheal DNA stand breaks following exposure to high doses {sup 210}Po alpha particle radiation, the assessment of the amount of mucous in the goblet cells and in the underlying mucous glands. So far we have been unable to detect DNA strand breaks in the tracheal epithelium as a result of exposure to NO{sub 2} cigarette smoke or {sup 210}Po alpha particles. We have developed a simple artificial' trachea consisting of rat tracheal epithelial cells growing on a basement membrane coated millipore filter. Experiments are proposed to utilize these artificial tracheas to eliminate the potential interference of increased mucous secretion and/or inflammation that can significantly affect the radiation dose from the alpha particles. 61 refs., 17 figs.

Burns, F.J.

1990-01-01

122

Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.  

PubMed

Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of ?H2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

2014-04-21

123

Fast detection of alpha particles in DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fast detection of alpha particles in DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am sources were used for irradiating samples of DAM-ADC SSNTDs with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal temperature and pressure. A series of experimental chemical etching are carried out using new etching solution (8 ml of 10 N NaOH+ 1 ml CH3OH) at 60 °C to detect alpha particle in short time in DAM-ADC detectors. Suitable analyzing software has been used to analyze experimental data. From fission and alpha track diameters, the value of bulk etching rate is equal to 8.52 ?m/h. Both of the sensitivity and etching efficiency were found to vary with the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The DAM-ADC detectors represent the best efficiency applicable in detectors in the entire range of alpha energies (from 1 to 5 MeV). The activation energies of this etchant have been calculated; track activation energy, ET, has been found to be lower than the bulk activation energy, EB, for the DAM-ADC nuclear track detectors. These results are in more agreement with the previous work.

Rammah, Y. S.; Ashraf, O.; Abdalla, A. M.; Eisa, M.; Ashry, A. H.; Tsuruta, T.

2015-02-01

124

Age response for line CHO Chinese hamster cells exposed to x irradiation and alpha particles from plutonium  

Microsoft Academic Search

The age response of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) synchronized by ; mitotic selection and by mitotic selection with hydroxyurea resynchronization was ; studied for x rays and alpha particles from plutonium of 4.4-MeV residual energy. ; The age response for alpha particles when mitotically synchronized cells are used ; indicated that cells in S are slightly more sensitive but

M. R. Raju; R. A. Tobey; J. H. Jett; R. A. Walters

1975-01-01

125

Scattering of 42-MeV alpha particles from Cu-65  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The extended particle-core coupling model was used to predict the properties of low-lying levels of Cu-65. A 42-MeV alpha particle cyclotron beam was used for the experiment. The experiment included magnetic analysis of the incident beam and particle detection by lithium-drifted silicon semiconductors. Angular distributions were measured for 10 to 50 degrees in the center of mass system. Data was reduced by fitting the peaks with a skewed Gaussian function using a least squares computer program with a linear background search. The energy calibration of each system was done by pulsar, and the excitation energies are accurate to + or - 25 keV. The simple weak coupling model cannot account for the experimentally observed quantities of the low-lying levels of Cu-65. The extended particle-core calculation showed that the coupling is not weak and that considerable configuration mixing of the low-lying states results.

Stewart, W. M.; Seth, K. K.

1972-01-01

126

Plasma heating from alpha particle micro-instabilities  

SciTech Connect

Potential use of thermonuclear (i.e., fusion product) driven kinetic instabilities to heat the background plasma has long been recognized. Considerable research on velocity space micro-instabilities exists. Most work to date has focused upon the basic physics criteria for and characteristics of particular micro-instabilities. Kinetic instabilities resulting in spatial transport of fusion products have also received some attention, but the effects on reactor concepts and performance remain uncertain. We have developed an engineering model which scopes the effect of a velocity space relaxation of fast alphas on a quasi-linear time scale. This model includes the additional heating to background plasma ions under the assumptions of: ion damping of the plasma wave; heating to background plasma results predominantly from fusion products; and periodic hiccups of the instability.

Miley, G.H.; Sutton, W.R.; Choi, C.K.

1981-01-01

127

Alfven eigenmode and ion Bernstein wave studies for controlling fusion alpha particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In magnetic confinement fusion reactor plasmas, the charged fusion products (such as alpha particles in deuterium-tritium plasmas) will be the dominant power source, and by controlling these charged fusion products using wave-particle interactions the reactor performance could be optimized. This thesis studies two candidate waves: Mode-Converted Ion Bernstein Waves (MCIBWs) and Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs). Rates of MCIBW-driven losses of alpha-like fast deuterons, previously observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), are reproduced by a new model so that the wave-particle diffusion coefficient can be deduced. The MCIBW power in TFTR is found to be ~ 1/3 that needed for collisionless alpha particle control. A reasonable reactor power scaling is derived. To study AEs, existing magnetic fluctuation probes at the Joint European Torus (JET) have been absolutely calibrated from 30-500 kHz for the first time, allowing fluctuation measurements with |dBpol|/B0>10- 8 and toroidal mode numbers |n|<32 using an 8-channel, 4-second, 1-MHz digitizer. Data analysis and database tools have been developed and applied to 4280 JET discharges using hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and helium-3. Three classes of AEs (driven by fast ions from various ion cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ICRH) schemes) are identified. New AE phenomena are observed. AEs are less stable in ``Optimised Shear'' plasmas. AE ``pitchfork splitting'' (amplitude modulation) has been discovered. In other discharges, chaotic AE amplitude evolution and two types of explosive behavior have been discovered and found to be consistent with theoretical expectations. The strongest AEs appear to redistribute fast ions. No evidence for alpha-particle driven AEs has been found. ICRH beatwaves are studied as a potential AE driver. The beatwave spectrum has been discovered to include multiple beat-frequency harmonies plus sums and differences of beat frequencies. AE excitation with beatwaves remains an area for future work. Data obtained incidentally regarding other plasma instabilities, including some of possible use for alpha particle control, are included for completeness. Finally, an integrated alpha particle control experiment is suggested, including a candidate scenario for JET.

Heeter, Robert Franklin

1999-12-01

128

Sizing alpha emitting particles of aged plutonium on personal air sampler filters using CR-39 autoradiography.  

PubMed

Methods have been developed to assess the size distribution of alpha emitting particles of reactor fuel of known composition captured on air sampler filters. The sizes of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide particles were determined using a system based on CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors. The CR-39 plastic was exposed to the deposited particles across a 400 microm airgap. The exposed CR-39 was chemically etched to reveal clusters of tracks radially dispersed from central points. The number and location of the tracks were determined using an optical microscope with an XY motorised table and image analysis software. The sample mounting arrangement allowed individual particles to be simultaneously viewed with their respective track cluster. The predicted diameters correlated with the actual particle diameters, as measured using the optical microscope. The efficacy of the technique was demonstrated with particles of natural uranium oxide (natUO2) of known size, ranging from 4 to 150 microm in diameter. Two personal air sampler (PAS) filters contaminated with actinide particles were placed against CR-39 and estimated to have size distributions of 0.8 and 1.0 microm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). PMID:14526944

Richardson, R B; Hegyi, G; Starling, S C

2003-01-01

129

Identification of gene-based responses in human blood cells exposed to alpha particle radiation  

PubMed Central

Background The threat of a terrorist-precipitated nuclear event places humans at danger for radiological exposures. Isotopes which emit alpha (?)-particle radiation pose the highest risk. Currently, gene expression signatures are being developed for radiation biodosimetry and triage with respect to ionizing photon radiation. This study was designed to determine if similar gene expression profiles are obtained after exposures involving ?-particles. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to identify sensitive and robust gene-based biomarkers of ?-particle radiation exposure. Cells were isolated from healthy individuals and were irradiated at doses ranging from 0-1.5 Gy. Microarray technology was employed to identify transcripts that were differentially expressed relative to unirradiated cells 24 hours post-exposure. Statistical analysis identified modulated genes at each of the individual doses. Results Twenty-nine genes were common to all doses with expression levels ranging from 2-10 fold relative to control treatment group. This subset of genes was further assessed in independent complete white blood cell (WBC) populations exposed to either ?-particles or X-rays using quantitative real-time PCR. This 29 gene panel was responsive in the ?-particle exposed WBCs and was shown to exhibit differential fold-changes compared to X-irradiated cells, though no ?-particle specific transcripts were identified. Conclusion Current gene panels for photon radiation may also be applicable for use in ?-particle radiation biodosimetry. PMID:25017500

2014-01-01

130

M-FISH analysis shows that complex chromosome aberrations induced by alpha -particle tracks are cumulative products of localized rearrangements.  

PubMed

Complex chromosome aberrations are characteristically induced after exposure to low doses of densely ionizing radiation, but little is understood about their formation. To address this issue, we irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro with 0.5 Gy densely ionizing alpha-particles (mean of 1 alpha-particle/cell) and analyzed the chromosome aberrations produced by using 24-color multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH). Our data suggest that complex formation is a consequence of direct nuclear alpha-particle traversal and show that the likely product of illegitimate repair of damage from a single alpha-particle is a single complex exchange. From an assessment of the "cycle structure" of each complex exchange we predict alpha-particle-induced damage to be repaired at specific localized sites, and complexes to be formed as cumulative products of this repair. PMID:12205292

Anderson, Rhona M; Stevens, David L; Goodhead, Dudley T

2002-09-17

131

Deep UV emitting scintillators for alpha and beta particle detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several deep UV emitting scintillators, whose emission falls in the solar blind region of the spectrum (200-280 nm), are described and their scintillator properties are characterized. They include LaPO 4:Pr, YPO 4:Pr, YAlO 3:Pr, Pr(PO 3) 3, YPO 4:Bi and ScPO 4. These materials would facilitate the detection of ionizing radiation in open areas, even during the daylight hours, and could be used to support large area surveys that monitor for the presence of ionization radiation due, for example, to system leaks or transfer contamination. These materials can be used in the form of powders, thin films or paints for radiation detection. They are characterized for both beta radiation using electron beams (2-35 keV) and 137Cs and alpha radiations using 241Am sources. Their absolute light yields are estimated and are compared to that of Y 2SiO 5:Ce. Their light yields decrease as a function of electron energy but at 10 keV they approach 8000 ph/MeV.

Zhou, Y.; Jia, D. D.; Lewis, L. A.; Feofilov, S. P.; Meltzer, R. S.

2011-03-01

132

Further measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N  

SciTech Connect

We measured the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission spectrum of {sup 16}N with a sensitivity for {beta}-decay branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -10}. The {sup 16}N nuclei were produced using the d({sup 15}N,{sup 16}N)p reaction with 70 MeV {sup 15}N beams and a deuterium gas target 7.5 cm long at a pressure of 1250 torr. The {sup 16}N nuclei were collected (over 10 s) using a thin aluminum foil with an areal density of 180 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} tilted at 7 deg. with respect to the beam. The activity was transferred to the counting area by means of a stepping motor in less than 3 s with the counting carried out over 8 s. The {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particles were measured using a time-of-flight method to achieve a sufficiently low background. Standard calibration sources ({sup 148}Gd, {sup 241}Am, {sup 208,209}Po, and {sup 227}Ac) as well as {alpha} particles and {sup 7}Li from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction were used for an accurate energy calibration. The energy resolution of the catcher foil (180-220 keV) was calculated and the time-of-flight resolution (3-10 nsec) was measured using the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission from {sup 8}Li that was produced using the d({sup 7}Li,{sup 8}Li)p reaction with the same setup. The line shape was corrected to account for the variation in the energy and time resolution and a high statistics spectrum of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N is reported. However, our data (as well as earlier Mainz data and unpublished Seattle data) do not agree with an earlier measurement of the {beta}-delayed {alpha}-particle emission of {sup 16}N taken at TRIUMF after averaging over the energy resolution of our collection system. This disagreement, among other issues, prohibits accurate inclusion of the f-wave component in the R-matrix analysis.

France III, R. H.; Wilds, E. L.; McDonald, J. E.; Gai, M. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Campus Box 82, Georgia College and State University, Milledgeville, Georgia 31061 (United States); Division of Radiation Safety, Connecticut-DEP, 79 Elm Street, Hartford, Connecticut 06106 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Hartford, West Hartford, Connecticut 06117-1599 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Sciences at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, Connecticut 06340-6097 (United States) and Department of Physics, WNSL-102, P.O. Box 208124, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States)

2007-06-15

133

Production of actinium-225 for alpha particle mediated radioimmunotherapy.  

PubMed

The initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the alpha emitter (213)Bi in killing cancer cells. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-days (225)Ac parent. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both (213)Bi, and the (225)Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. This paper describes our five years of experience in production of (225)Ac in partial support of the on-going clinical trials. A four-step chemical process, consisting of both anion and cation exchange chromatography, is utilized for routine separation of carrier-free (225)Ac from a mixture of (228)Th, (229)Th and (232)Th. The separation of Ra and Ac from Th is achieved using the marcoporous anion exchange resin MP1 in 8M HNO(3) media. Two sequential MP1/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(6) for Ra and Ac from Th. The separation of Ac from Ra is accomplished on a low cross-linking cation exchange resin AG50-X4 using 1.2M HNO(3) as eluant. Two sequential AG50/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(2) for Ac from Ra. A 60-day processing schedule has been adopted in order to reduce the processing cost and to provide the highest levels of (225)Ac possible. Over an 8-week campaign, a total of approximately 100 mCi of (225)Ac (approximately 80% of the theoretical yield) is shipped in 5-6 batches, with the first batch typically consisting of approximately 50 mCi. After the initial separation and purification of Ac, the Ra pool is re-processed on a bi-weekly schedule or as needed to provide smaller batches of (225)Ac. The averaged radioisotopic purity of the (225)Ac was 99.6 +/- 0.7% with a (225)Ra content of < or =0.6%, and an average (229)Th content of (4(-4)(+5)) x 10(-5)%. PMID:15763472

Boll, Rose A; Malkemus, Dairin; Mirzadeh, Saed

2005-05-01

134

Mutagenic effects of a single and an exact number of alpha particles in mammalian cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the main uncertainties in risk estimation for environmental radon exposure using lung cancer data from underground miners is the extrapolation from high- to low-dose exposure where multiple traversal is extremely rare. The biological effects of a single alpha particle are currently unknown. Using the recently available microbeam source at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University, we examined the frequencies and molecular spectrum of S1- mutants induced in human-hamster hybrid (A(L)) cells by either a single or an exact number of alpha particles. Exponentially growing cells were stained briefly with a nontoxic concentration of Hoechst dye for image analysis, and the location of individual cells was computer-monitored. The nucleus of each cell was irradiated with either 1,2,4, or 8 alpha particles at a linear energy transfer of 90 keV/microm consistent with the energy spectrum of domestic radon exposure. Although single-particle traversal was only slightly cytotoxic to A(L) cells (survival fraction approximately 0.82), it was highly mutagenic, and the induced mutant fraction averaged 110 mutants per 10(5) survivors. In addition, both toxicity and mutant induction were dose-dependent. Multiplex PCR analysis of mutant DNA showed that the proportion of mutants with multilocus deletions increased with the number of particle traversals. These data provide direct evidence that a single a particle traversing a nucleus will have a high probability of resulting in a mutation and highlight the need for radiation protection at low doses.

Hei, T. K.; Wu, L. J.; Liu, S. X.; Vannais, D.; Waldren, C. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.

1997-01-01

135

Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in sup 24 Mg  

SciTech Connect

Many theoretical models have been employed to described the structure of the nucleus {sup 24}Mg. Among these are the Cranked Shell model (CSM), the Cranked Cluster Model (CCM), and calculations have also been performed using the Hartree-Fock formalism. One very striking prediction of these calculations is that in this nucleus there exist very unusual configurations, with structures reminiscent of linear chains of alpha particles. In the CSM, for instance, such a configuration is identified with a pronounced minimum in the potential energy energy at very large prolate deformation. In the CCM, several very different alpha-particle duster configurations are identified, many having rather large deformations. These cluster configurations can be associated with the different potential-energy minima obtained in the CSM results. In the case of the CCM, a 6{alpha} chain-like configuration is predicted to occur at excitation energies between 40 and 50 MeV, with predicted rotational spacing given by {Dirac h}{sup 2}/2I=22 keV. At this excitation energy, such a chain configuration would lie well above the threshold for the decay of {sup 24}Mg into 6 alpha particles, and its identification poses a difficult experimental challenge. This report discusses this challenge.

Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Ferre, M.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, P.G.; Happ, Th.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Bearden, I.G. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-01-01

136

Evidence for alpha-particle chain configurations in {sup 24}Mg  

SciTech Connect

Many theoretical models have been employed to described the structure of the nucleus {sup 24}Mg. Among these are the Cranked Shell model (CSM), the Cranked Cluster Model (CCM), and calculations have also been performed using the Hartree-Fock formalism. One very striking prediction of these calculations is that in this nucleus there exist very unusual configurations, with structures reminiscent of linear chains of alpha particles. In the CSM, for instance, such a configuration is identified with a pronounced minimum in the potential energy energy at very large prolate deformation. In the CCM, several very different alpha-particle duster configurations are identified, many having rather large deformations. These cluster configurations can be associated with the different potential-energy minima obtained in the CSM results. In the case of the CCM, a 6{alpha} chain-like configuration is predicted to occur at excitation energies between 40 and 50 MeV, with predicted rotational spacing given by {Dirac_h}{sup 2}/2I=22 keV. At this excitation energy, such a chain configuration would lie well above the threshold for the decay of {sup 24}Mg into 6 alpha particles, and its identification poses a difficult experimental challenge. This report discusses this challenge.

Wuosmaa, A.H.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Ferre, M.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, P.G.; Happ, Th.; Henderson, D.J.; Wilt, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I.G. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-09-01

137

Alpha-Particle Angular Distributions of At and Rn Isotopes and Their Relation to Nuclear Structure  

SciTech Connect

We report on an extensive on-line nuclear orientation study of the angular distribution of {alpha} particles emitted in the favored decay of neutron deficient At and Rn nuclei near the {ital N}=126 shell closure. Surprisingly large anisotropies were observed, showing pronounced changes from one isotope to another. Comparing these data with several theoretical models shows that anisotropic {alpha} emission in favored decays from near-spherical nuclei can well be explained within the shell model, implying that it is mainly determined by the structure of the decaying nucleus. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

NICOLE Collaboration and ISOLDE Collaboration

1996-12-01

138

New measurements of W-values for protons and alpha particles.  

PubMed

The increasing importance of ion beams in cancer therapy and the lack of experimental data for W-values for protons and heavy ions in air require new measurements. A new experimental set-up was developed at PTB and consistent measurements of W-values in argon, nitrogen and air for protons and alpha particles with energies from 0.7 to 3.5 MeV u(-1) at PTB, and for carbon ions between 3.6 and 7.0 MeV u(-1) at GSI were carried out. This publication concentrates on the measurements with protons and alpha particles at PTB. The experimental methods and the determination of corrections for recombination effects, beam-induced background radiation and additional effects are presented. PMID:24262925

Giesen, U; Beck, J

2014-10-01

139

Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.  

PubMed

An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

2007-10-01

140

Ionisation cross sections of Cd, Sn, Te, I and Ba for protons and alpha particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

K-shell X-ray production cross sections of 48Cd, 50Sn, 52Te, 53I and 56Ba have been measured for alpha particles with energies between 2.2 and 2.8 MeV. In addition, production cross sections for 52Te have been measured for protons between 1.6 and 3 MeV. The values have been compared with the earlier experiments and with the theoretical predictions given by four different

L. Avaldi; M. Milazzo; G. Trivia; I. V. Mitchell

1983-01-01

141

Fission studies with 140 MeV $\\bm{\\alpha}$-Particles  

E-print Network

Binary fission induced by 140 MeV $\\alpha$-particles has been measured for $^{\\rm nat}$Ag, $^{139}$La, $^{165}$Ho and $^{197}$Au targets. The measured quantities are the total kinetic energies, fragment masses, and fission cross sections. The results are compared with other data and systematics. A minimum of the fission probability in the vicinity $Z^2/A=24$ is observed.

Buttkewitz, A; Goldenbaum, F; Machner, H; Strauss, W

2009-01-01

142

The Ionization and Stopping Power of Various Gases for Alpha Particles from Polonium. II  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ionizations of nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, and air were found to be strictly proportional along the range, while methyl iodide shows definite systematic deviations. A method of determining differential stopping powers for alpha-particles has been applied to a number of gases. The results show that such unstable molecules as NO and H3C-N=NCH3 give strictly additive stopping powers. The stopping

G. E. Gibson; H. Eyring

1927-01-01

143

Critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation in asymmetric nuclear matter  

SciTech Connect

The critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation in nuclear matter with Fermi surface imbalance between protons and neutrons is determined. The in-medium four-body Schroedinger equation, generalizing the Thouless criterion of the BCS transition, is applied using a Hartree-Fock wave function for the quartet projected onto zero total momentum in matter with different chemical potentials for protons and neutrons.

Sogo, Takaaki; Roepke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS, UMR 8608, Orsay F-91406, France, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91505, France, and Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, Boite Postale 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2010-09-15

144

Fusion alpha-particle losses in a high-beta rippled tokamak  

SciTech Connect

In tokamak plasmas, the confinement of energetic ions depends on the magnetic field structure. If the plasma pressure is finite, the equilibrium current (i.e., the Pfirsch-Schlüter current and diamagnetic current) flows in the plasma to maintain the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium. These plasma currents generate poloidal and toroidal magnetic field and alter the field structure. Moreover, if we consider the non-axisymmetry of magnetic field structures such as toroidal field (TF) ripples, the non-axisymmetric component of the equilibrium current can alter TF ripples themselves. When the plasma beta becomes high, the changes in the field structure due to the equilibrium current might affect the confinement of energetic ions significantly. We intend to clarify how these currents alter the field structure and affect the confinement of alpha particles in high-beta plasma. The MHD equilibrium is calculated using VMEC and the orbits of fusion alpha particles are followed by using the fully three-dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte Carlo code. In relatively low-beta plasma (e.g., the volume-averaged beta value ?2%), the changes in the magnetic field component due to the plasma current negligibly affect the confinement of alpha particles except for the Shafranov shift effect. However, for ?3%, the diamagnetic effect reduces the magnetic field strength and significantly increases alpha-particle losses. In these high-beta cases, the non-axisymmetric field component generated by the equilibrium current also increases these losses, but not as effectively as compared to the diamagnetic effect.

Bunno, M.; Nakamura, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Tani, K. [Nippon Advanced Technology, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)] [Nippon Advanced Technology, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

2013-08-15

145

K Shell Ionizations of Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Fluorine and Neon by Proton and Alpha Particle Bombardments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The K Auger electron spectra have been measured for carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine and neon excited by protons and alpha particles of 0.5-2.6 MeV. In comparison with the spectra obtained by electron impact, the satellite lines have grown more intensively as projectiles become heavier. This indicates the presence of a contribution of simultaneous L shell ionization. A quantitative analysis has

Naoto Kobayashi; Nobuhiro Maeda; Hiroshi Hori; Masakatsu Sakisaka

1976-01-01

146

CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

Hudson, H. S. [SSL, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Woods, T. N., E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Dr., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2012-06-20

147

alpha-Particle and gamma-ray spectrometry of a plutonium solution for impurity determination.  

PubMed

A highly enriched (240)Pu solution was measured by alpha-particle and gamma-ray spectrometry to determine other radionuclides present in the material as impurities. Low activities of (238)Pu, (241)Am, (243)Cm and (244)Cm were determined by measuring thin sources, made from the original solution, in a high-resolution alpha-particle spectrometer. The sources were prepared by evaporating the plutonium solution on quartz plates in a vacuum chamber. From the ingrowth of (241)Am in the original solution, the amount of (241)Pu could be calculated. After radiochemical separation of (241)Am, the plutonium was measured by high-efficiency alpha-particle spectrometry to determine the amount of (238)Pu. The enriched (240)Pu material was also measured by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry, using two different HPGe detectors to determine the impurities of (239)Pu and (241)Am. The preparation of the sources and the measurement methods are described and discussed. The measured impurities, given in % of the (240)Pu activity, are compared with the values on the certificate. PMID:18356064

Sibbens, G; Altzitzoglou, T; Benedik, L; Pommé, S; Van Ammel, R

2008-01-01

148

Modeling energy deposition and cellular radiation effects in human bronchial epithelium by radon progeny alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

Energy deposition and cellular radiation effects arising from the interaction of single {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po alpha particles with basal and secretory cell nuclei were simulated for different target cell depths in the bronchial epithelium of human airway generations 2, 4, 6, and 10. To relate the random chord lengths of alpha particle tracks through spherical cell nuclei to the resulting biological endpoints, probabilities per unit track length for different cellular radiation effects as functions of LET were derived from in vitro experiments. The radiobiological data employed in the present study were inactivation and mutation (mutant frequency at the HPRT gen) in V70 Chinese hamster cells and inactivation and transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells. Based on computed LET spectra and relative frequencies of target cells, probabilities for transformation, mutation, and cell killing in basal and secretory cells were computed for a lifetime exposure of 20 WLM. While predicted transformation probabilities were about two orders of magnitude higher than mutation probabilities, they were still about two orders of magnitude lower than inactivation probabilities. Furthermore, transformation probabilities for basal cells are generally higher than those for secretory cells, and {sup 214}Po alpha particles are primarily responsible for transformation in bronchial target cells.

Hofmann, W.; Menache, M.G.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Caswell, R.S.; Karam, L.R.

2000-04-01

149

Energy loss of proton, alpha particle, and electron beams in hafnium dioxide films  

SciTech Connect

The electronic stopping power, S, of HfO{sub 2} films for proton and alpha particle beams has been measured and calculated. The experimental data have been obtained by the Rutherford backscattering technique and cover the range of 120-900 and 120-3000 keV for proton and alpha particle beams, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the energy loss for the same projectiles have been done by means of the dielectric formalism using the Mermin energy loss function--generalized oscillator strength (MELF-GOS) model for a proper description of the HfO{sub 2} target on the whole momentum-energy excitation spectrum. At low projectile energies, a nonlinear theory based on the extended Friedel sum rule has been employed. The calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement for protons and a quite good one for alpha particles. In particular, the experimental maximums of both stopping curves (around 120 and 800 keV, respectively) are well reproduced. On the basis of this good agreement, we have also calculated the inelastic mean-free path (IMFP) and the stopping power for electrons in HfO{sub 2} films. Our results predict a minimum value of the IMFP and a maximum value of the S for electrons with energies around 120 and 190 eV, respectively.

Behar, Moni; Fadanelli, Raul C.; Nagamine, Luiz C. C. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat dAlacant, Apartat 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica-CIOyN, Universidad de Murcia, Apartado 4021, E-30080 Murcia (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche, RA-8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

2009-12-15

150

Modeling energy deposition and cellular radiation effects in human bronchial epithelium by radon progeny alpha particles.  

PubMed

Energy deposition and cellular radiation effects arising from the interaction of single 218Po and 214Po alpha particles with basal and secretory cell nuclei were simulated for different target cell depths in the bronchial epithelium of human airway generations 2, 4, 6, and 10. To relate the random chord lengths of alpha particle tracks through spherical cell nuclei to the resulting biological endpoints, probabilities per unit track length for different cellular radiation effects as functions of LET were derived from in vitro experiments. The radiobiological data employed in the present study were inactivation and mutation (mutant frequency at the HPRT gene) in V79 Chinese hamster cells and inactivation and transformation in C3H 10T1/2 cells. Based on computed LET spectra and relative frequencies of target cells, probabilities for transformation, mutation, and cell killing in basal and secretory cells were computed for a lifetime exposure of 20 WLM. While predicted transformation probabilities were about two orders of magnitude higher than mutation probabilities, they were still about two orders of magnitude lower than inactivation probabilities. Furthermore transformation probabilities for basal cells are generally higher than those for secretory cells, and 214Po alpha particles are primarily responsible for transformations in bronchial target cells. PMID:10749522

Hofmann, W; Ménache, M G; Crawford-Brown, D J; Caswell, R S; Karam, L R

2000-04-01

151

Image processing tools for alpha-particle track-etch dosimetry.  

PubMed

In cases where both the source and cell geometry are well known, track-etch dosimetry allows the potential for individual cell dosimetry. However, analysis of track-etch images is both tedious and time-consuming. We describe here several image processing tools that we are using in conjunction with a track-etch based irradiator. Briefly, cells grown on LR 115 (a track-etch material) are irradiated from below by a collimated, planar alpha-particle source. Prior to irradiation, images of the cells are obtained. A computer program reads each image and automatically determines the location of individual cells. Next, the algorithm automatically identifies the cellular and nuclear boundaries. Following irradiation, and after the cells have reached their biological endpoint (e.g., cell survival), the cell dish is etched and images are obtained of alpha-particle tracks. Using the characteristic background pattern in the LR 115, the etched images are spatially registered to the original images. These two sets of images are then superimposed to create a composite image of the cells and associated alpha-particle tracks. Incorporating this tool into our irradiation scheme will enable more efficient analysis of the large amounts of data that are essential in assessing biological endpoints. PMID:12954129

Roeske, John C; Soyland, Christina; Wang, Steven J; Stinchcomb, Thomas G; Hassfjell, Sindre P; Whitlock, Jenny L; Reba, Richard C; Rotmensch, Jacob

2003-06-01

152

Radioluminescence of solid neodymium-doped laser materials excited by {alpha}-particles and fission fragments  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of radioluminescence of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses under excitation by plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) {alpha}-particles, as well as by {alpha}-particles and spontaneous fission fragments of californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf), are studied. The radioluminescence branching ratios {beta}{sub ij} for the transition from the {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2} level to the {sup 2S+1}L{sub J} levels in Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals are measured. Radioluminescence from the {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} level to low-lying levels is observed. The {beta}{sub ij} ratios for transitions from the high-lying {sup 2}F2{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}D{sub 3/2}, and {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} levels are theoretically calculated. The lifetimes of metastable levels of Nd{sup 3+} excited by {sup 252}Cf fission fragments are measured. The efficiency of the conversion of energy of {alpha}-particles and fission fragments to the energy of optical radiation of Nd{sup 3+} : Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} crystals and laser glasses is determined. (active media)

Seregina, E A; Seregin, A A [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation 'A.I. Leypunsky Institute for Physics and Power Engineering', Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

2013-02-28

153

Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor S.J. Zweben, R.V. Budny, D.S. Darrow, S.S. Medley, R. Nazikian,  

E-print Network

1 Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor S.J. Zweben, R.V. Budny, D Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08540 USA Abstract Alpha particle physics in a tokamak. A large number of alpha particle measurements and physics experiments were performed during

154

Spectroscopic studies on alpha particle-irradiated PADC (CR-39 detector)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectroscopic studies on a Poly Allyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC or CR-39) detector irradiated with 5 MeV ?-particles were carried out. The CR-39 samples were exposed to perpendicular incidence of ?-particles with different fluence ranging from 0.85 × 109 to 6.79 × 109 particles/cm2. The induced modifications in the CR-39 detectors were investigated using UV-Vis, FTIR, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results reveal that UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopic techniques are insensitive to detect the induced modifications in the irradiated CR-39 detector within the selected range of fluence. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra, on the other hand, showed a reasonable difference between the detected spectra of the irradiated samples. The integrated intensity (N) under the PL emission band and peak’s heights (P) exhibits a linear correlation with the alpha particles fluence. The fitting linear formula and the relevant parameters for both relations (N and P vs. fluence) were determined. The comparison study between the three spectroscopic techniques indicated that PL spectroscopy provides a sensitive method for ?-particles dosimetric applications using a CR-39 detector.

El Ghazaly, M.; Hassan, H. E.

155

A survey of the physical processes which determine the response function of silicon detectors to alpha particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectra of monoenergetic alpha particles exhibit a well known asymmetric shape when measured with silicon detectors. The processes are described which determine the response of silicon detectors to alpha particles, particularly the energy dependence of the line shape. In this work particle implanted and passivated silicon (PIPS) detectors are assumed to have a thin dead layer at the front contact and an infinite sensitive volume. The incoming monoenergetic alpha particles lose energy in the dead layer where they develop a Gaussian energy distribution due to electronic energy-loss straggling. In the sensitive volume the alpha particles transfer most of their energy to electronic excitation and ionization ( Es,e) and the remaining fraction to the production of lattice vibrations and crystal damage. The statistical distribution of Es,e has been calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and shown to be asymmetric. The energy Es,e is subsequently used for the creation of electron-hole pairs, which are measured by an amplifier system with a Gaussian contribution to the energy resolution due to electronic noise. This model permits a quantitative calculation of the detector response function to alpha particles, and the result is in excellent agreement with measured spectra. On the basis of this model the energy dependence of the alpha particle line shape is also discussed.

Steinbauer, E.; Bortels, G.; Bauer, P.; Biersack, J. P.; Burger, P.; Ahmad, I.

1994-01-01

156

Comparison between different models for alpha-particle range determination and a new approach to CR-39 detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An extensive study was carried out to compare different models and a new approach for measuring the alpha-particle range in the CR-39 detector. The CR-39 samples were exposed perpendicularly to alpha particles with energies ranging from 2.5 MeV to 5.5 MeV emitted from 241Am. The CR-39 samples were etched in 7.25 N NaOH at (70 ± 0.5) °C for different durations. Both the track diameters and the track cone lengths were measured under an optical microscope. The new approach is based on measurement of the track etch rate along the particle's trajectory as a function of the removal thickness (h). A correlation was found to exist between the removal thickness at the maximum track etch rate ( V Tmax ) and the range of alpha particles in the CR-39 detector. The track etch rate data were fitted using the function V T ( h) = a 1 + [ a 2 - a 3 h]exp[ a 4 h]. The ranges of alpha particles were determined by setting the first order derivative of the fitting function equal to zero, where h is equal to the range of the alpha particles (R) in the CR-39 detector. Furthermore, the range of the alpha particle in the CR-39 detector was measured using the over-etched track diameter and the track cone length. The theoretical predictions of the alpha-particle ranges were calculated using the SRIM software. A well-known function, R( E) = b 1 E b2, was used to fit the experimental results and the theoretical predictions. Experiments showed that the determination of the alpha-particle range based on the cone length model was in a good agreement with the theoretical calculations, where the discrepancy was less than that for the over-etched track diameter and the maximum track etch rate models.

El Ghazaly, M.; Salama, T. T.; Khalil, E. I.; Abd El Raouf, Kh. M.

2012-08-01

157

Cryogenic microcalorimeter system for ultra-high resolution alpha-particle spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with {approx}15 uK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis, This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha spectrometer, and will show recent results.

Rabin, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bacrania, Mnesh K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croce, Mark P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoteling, N J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, S P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plionis, A A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dry, D E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ullom, J N [NIST; Bennett, D A [NIST; Horansky, R [NIST; Kotsubo, V [NIST; Cantor, R [STAR CRYOELECTRONICS

2009-01-01

158

Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ever since the discovery of X-rays was made by Rontgen more than a hundred years ago, it has always been accepted that the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation such as mutation and carcinogenesis are attributable mainly to direct damage to DNA. Although evidence based on microdosimetric estimation in support of a bystander effect appears to be consistent, direct proof of such extranuclear/extracellular effects are limited. Using a precision charged particle microbeam, we show here that irradiation of 20% of randomly selected A(L) cells with 20 alpha particles each results in a mutant fraction that is 3-fold higher than expected, assuming no bystander modulation effect. Furthermore, analysis by multiplex PCR shows that the types of mutants induced are significantly different from those of spontaneous origin. Pretreatment of cells with the radical scavenger DMSO had no effect on the mutagenic incidence. In contrast, cells pretreated with a 40 microM dose of lindane, which inhibits cell-cell communication, significantly decreased the mutant yield. The doses of DMSO and lindane used in these experiments are nontoxic and nonmutagenic. We further examined the mutagenic yield when 5-10% of randomly selected cells were irradiated with 20 alpha particles each. Results showed, likewise, a higher mutant yield than expected assuming no bystander effects. Our studies provide clear evidence that irradiated cells can induce a bystander mutagenic response in neighboring cells not directly traversed by alpha particles and that cell-cell communication process play a critical role in mediating the bystander phenomenon.

Zhou, H.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Waldren, C. A.; Vannais, D.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

2000-01-01

159

Beams of protons and alpha particles greater than approximately 30 keV/charge from the earth's bow shock  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two beamlike particle events (30 keV/charge to 160 keV/charge) upstream of the earth's bow shock have been investigated with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland ultralow energy and charge analyzer on ISEE 1. These beams consist of protons as well as of alpha particles, and the spectra are generally steep and are decreasing with increasing energy. During one event the spectra of both protons and alpha particles have a maximum at approximately 65 keV/charge. During these events, the interplanetary magnetic field through the satellite position was almost tangent to the bow shock, and application of the theory of acceleration predicts acceleration of a solar wind particle up to 60 keV/nucleon in a single reflection. The observation of reflected protons as well as alpha particles has implications for the physical reflection process usually not discussed in acceleration theories.

Scholer, M.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.

1981-01-01

160

Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry  

SciTech Connect

Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid nondestructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

Plionis, Alexander A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Dominic S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01

161

An Experiment to Measure Range, Range Straggling, Stopping Power, and Energy Straggling of Alpha Particles in Air  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Experiments to measure range, range straggling, stopping power, and energy straggling of alpha particles are discussed in this article. Commercially available equipment with simple modifications is used for these measurements. (Author/GA)

Ouseph, P. J.; Mostovych, Andrew

1978-01-01

162

Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

E-print Network

with measurements of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic burnup experiments at JT-60U [2]. Both these observations support the assertion that suprathermal ions

163

Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

E-print Network

with measurements of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic burnup experiments at JT­60U [2]. Both these observations support the assertion that suprathermal ions

164

Neoclassical simulations of fusion alpha particles in pellet charge exchange experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

E-print Network

of the alpha distribution function made with a sensitive active neutral particle diagnostic. The calculations products inferred from triton burnup experiments at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60

Redi, Martha H.

165

Secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with alpha track detection for isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium-bearing particles.  

PubMed

Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used in combination with alpha track detection for the efficient analysis of uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances in environmental samples. A polycarbonate film containing particles was prepared and placed in contact with a CR-39 plastic detector. After exposure for 28 days, the detector was etched in a NaOH solution and each uranium-bearing particle was identified through observation of the alpha tracks recorded in the detector. A portion of the film containing each uranium-bearing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The films on the planchet were decomposed through plasma ashing for subsequent uranium abundance ratio analysis with SIMS. The alpha track-SIMS analysis of 10 uranium-bearing particles in a sample taken from a nuclear facility enabled n((235)U)/n((238)U) abundance ratios in the range 0.0072-0.25 to be detected, which were significantly higher than those obtained by SIMS without alpha track detection. The duration of the whole analytical process for analysis of 10 particles was about 32 days. The detection efficiency was calculated to be 27.1±6.5%, based on the analysis of the particles in uranium reference materials. The detection limits, defined as the diameter of the particle which produces alpha tracks more than one for a 28-days exposure, were estimated to be 0.8, 0.9, 1.1, 2.1 and 3.0 ?m for the particles having the same uranium abundance ratios with NBL CRM U850, U500, U350, U050 and U010 reference materials, respectively. The use of alpha track detection for subsequent SIMS analysis is an inexpensive and an efficient way to measure uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances. PMID:24468381

Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki

2014-03-01

166

Exciton dynamics in alpha-particle tracks in organic crystals: Magnetic field study of the scintillation in tetracene crystals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanisms of scintillation of organic crystals bombarded by alpha particles are discussed in terms of the current knowledge of exciton dynamics, which has been derived from a study of the photofluorescence of crystals such as anthracene and tetracene. The scintillation of tetracene excited by 4.4-MeV alpha particles incident in a direction perpendicular to the ab plane has been studied

Nicholas E. Geacintov; Michael Binder; Charles E. Swenberg; Martin Pope

1975-01-01

167

Absolute determination of the energies of alpha particles emitted by 236Pu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The only two previous measurements of the energies of alpha particles emitted by 236Pu were relative determinations. They were in fair agreement with each other, except for the intensity ratios of the two strong lines. We now report an absolute energy measurement which was carried out using the 180° uniform-field magnetic spectrometer at BIPM on four sources prepared at AERE, Harwell with material formed by the reaction 238U( p, 3 n) 236Npå236Npå236Pu . The alpha particles were detected with aid of Kodak LR 115 (Type 2) cellulose-nitrate films which had considerable advantages over nuclear-track plates. Etching for seven hours in dilute NaOH at 40°C produced only weak and sufficiently reproducible distortions of the films reducing uncertainties to at most 50 eV. From six spectra the following mean values of particle energy E? and relative intensity I? were obtained: E? = (5767.66±0.08) keV, I? = (69.26±0.45) %; E? = (5721000±0.10) keV, I? = (30.56±0.45) %.

Rytz, A.; Wiltshire, R. A. P.

1984-06-01

168

Comparison of high-n instabilities including alpha-particle effects in BPX and TFTR  

SciTech Connect

Three distinct types of high toroidal mode number instabilities are obtained from a comprehensive kinetic calculation, using as input transport code results from the analysis of a recent design for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX). These instabilities are: the collisionless trapped-electron ion-temperature-gradient mode, the magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode, and a high toroidal mode number version of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode or gap'' mode. The dependence of the instability linear eigenfrequencies on minor radius, beta, and toroidal mode number are investigated, along with the effects of hot alpha particles. Relative quasilinear fluxes of particles and energy for each species are also obtained. In addition, the beta dependence of the magnetohydrodynamic ballooning mode is investigated for a case using as input the results of a transport code calculation for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in an extrapolation to a deuterium-tritium mixture. The effects of alpha particles and the relative quasilinear fluxes are also investigated for this case. 13 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

Rewoldt, G.

1991-07-01

169

Energy distribution of ternary {alpha} particles in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf  

SciTech Connect

The energy distribution of the ternary {alpha} particles in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf was measured. For the first time an energy threshold as low as 1 MeV was reached. The experiment used an array of unshielded silicon detectors measuring energy and time-of-flight (TOF) of ternary particles in coincidence with fission fragments. The TOF resolution of the system was sufficient for clear separation of {sup 6}He and tritons from {sup 4}He. The statistics were adequate to extract the {sup 6}He/{sup 4}He yield ratio. For both {sup 4}He and {sup 6}He, an excess in the yield (as compared to a Gaussian shape) was observed at energies below 9 MeV. The measured ternary {alpha} spectrum was corrected for the distortion induced by the detection geometry covering equatorial particle emission only. The emission angle was found to affect mainly the width of the energy distribution by up to 1 MeV.

Mutterer, M.; Kalben, J. von [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Technology, Darmstadt (Germany); Kopatch, Yu. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Yamaledtinov, S. R.; Lyapin, V. G.; Sillanpaeae, M.; Trzaska, W. H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Khlebnikov, S. V.; Tyurin, G. P. [V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15

170

Differential Effects of Alpha-Particle Radiation and X-Irradiation on Genes Associated with Apoptosis  

PubMed Central

This study examined differential effects of alpha-(?-) particle radiation and X-rays on apoptosis and associated changes in gene expression. Human monocytic cells were exposed to ?-particle radiation and X-rays from 0 to 1.5?Gy. Four days postexposure, cell death was measured by flow cytometry and 84 genes related to apoptosis were analyzed using real-time PCR. On average, 33% of the cells were apoptotic at 1.5?Gy of ?-particle radiation. Transcript profiling showed statistical expression of 15 genes at all three doses tested. Cells exposed to X-rays were <5% apoptotic at ~1.5?Gy and induced less than a 2-fold expression in 6 apoptotic genes at the higher doses of radiation. Among these 6 genes, Fas and TNF-? were common to the ?-irradiated cells. This data suggests that ?-particle radiation initiates cell death by TNF-? and Fas activation and through intermediate signalling mediators that are distinct from X-irradiated cells. PMID:22091383

Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Chen, Jeremy; Kutzner, Barbara; Wilkins, Ruth C.

2011-01-01

171

Track etch parameters in CR-39 detectors for proton and alpha particles of different energies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Etchable track formation in poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate (commercially known as CR-39) track detectors is a process directly related to density of damage produced along the charged particle path; it requires knowledge of the variation of bulk etch rate Vb and track etch rate Vt as a function of the initial particle energy and etching time. In this paper, the track etch parameters have been experimentally measured in CR-39 detectors irradiated with proton and alpha particles in the energy ranges 0.5-2.5 MeV and 1-5.8 MeV, respectively. Detectors were chemically etched in a hot hydroxide potassium solution for periods ranging from 1 to 32 h. The dependence of track diameters on the energy values, the correlation between the maximum track diameter and the Bragg peak and the variation of the track etch rate Vt as a function of the incident particle energy for different etching times are presented and discussed. Critical values of detection angles and optimal energies of the incident protons on the CR-39 have been deduced. The present results are compared with those given in recently published works.

Lounis, Z.; Djeffal, S.; Morsli, K.; Allab, M.

2001-09-01

172

A study of the scintillation light induced in liquid xenon by electrons and alpha particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The time dependence and the intensity of the primary scintillation light in liquid Xe excited by Am-241 alpha particles and Bi-207 internal-conversion electrons were measured at different electric-field strengths. High-purity liquid Xe was used to fill a parallel-plate ionization chamber equipped with a CaF2 window coupled to a UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube. The effect of the specific ionization density on the scintillation light and the time correlation between the light signal and the charge signal is reported. It is demonstrated that the fast scintillation signal produced in liquid Xe by an ionizing particle provides an ideal trigger in a detector aiming at a complete three-dimensional event reconstruction with an excellent background rejection capability.

Aprile, Elena; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Suzuki, Masayo

1990-01-01

173

Differential Velocity Between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high plasma beta feature in high latitude, high speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high latitude, high speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high speed, high latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

Yamauchi, Y.; Suess, S. T.; Steinberg, J. T.; Sakurai, T.

2003-01-01

174

Differential Velocity between Solar Wind Protons and Alpha Particles in Pressure Balance Structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common high-plasma beta feature in high-latitude, high-speed solar wind. They have been proposed as remnants of coronal plumes. If true, they should reflect the observation that plumes are rooted in unipolar magnetic flux concentrations in the photosphere and are heated as oppositely directed flux is advected into and reconnects with the flux concentration. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) of magnetic discontinuities in PBSs showed there is a larger proportion of tangential discontinuities than in the surrounding high-speed wind, supporting the hypothesis that plasmoids or extended current sheets are formed during reconnection at the base of plumes. To further evaluate the character of magnetic field discontinuities in PBSs, differential streaming between alpha particles and protons is analyzed here for the same sample of PBSs used in the MVA. Alpha particles in high-speed wind generally have a higher radial flow speed than protons. However, if the magnetic field is folded back on itself, as in a large-amplitude Alfven wave, alpha particles will locally have a radial flow speed less than protons. This characteristic is used here to distinguish between folded back magnetic fields (which would contain rotational discontinuities) and tangential discontinuities using Ulysses high-latitude, high-speed solar wind data. The analysis indicates that almost all reversals in the radial magnetic field in PBSs are folded back field lines. This is found to also be true outside PBSs, supporting existing results for typical high-speed, high-latitude wind. There remains a small number of cases that appear not to be folds in the magnetic field and which may be flux tubes with both ends rooted in the Sun. The distinct difference in MVA results inside and outside PBSs remains unexplained.

Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Steinberg, John T.; Sakurai, Takashi

2004-01-01

175

Mapping alpha-Particle X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (Map-X)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many planetary surface processes (like physical and chemical weathering, water activity, diagenesis, low-temperature or impact metamorphism, and biogenic activity) leave traces of their actions as features in the size range 10s to 100s of micron. The Mapping alpha-particle X-ray Spectrometer ("Map-X") is intended to provide chemical imaging at 2 orders of magnitude higher spatial resolution than previously flown instruments, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks.

Blake, D. F.; Sarrazin, P.; Bristow, T.

2014-01-01

176

Alpha-particle emission probabilities in the decay of 239Pu  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The alpha-particle emission probabilities ( P?) of 239Pu have been measured using material of highest enrichment and radiochemical purity, thin sources produced by vacuum sublimation, and high-resolution ? spectroscopy with ion-implanted Si detectors (PIPS). The results for the major emissions are P?0.07 = 0.7077±0.0014, P?13 = 0.1711 ± 0.0014 and P?51 = 0.1194±0.0007, which for the P?0.07 is about 3.6% lower than the recent evaluated value in the literature.

García-Toraño, E.; Aceña, M. L.; Bortels, G.; Mouchel, D.

1993-10-01

177

Chemistry of Rocks and Soils in Gusev Crater from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer on the Spirit rover determined major and minor elements of soils and rocks in Gusev crater in order to unravel the crustal evolution of planet Mars. The composition of soils is similar to those at previous landing sites, as a result of global mixing and distribution by dust storms. Rocks (fresh surfaces exposed by the rock abrasion tool) resemble volcanic rocks of primitive basaltic composition with low intrinsic potassium contents. High abundance of bromine (up to 170 parts per million) in rocks may indicate the alteration of surfaces formed during a past period of aqueous activity in Gusev crater.

Gellert, R.; Rieder, R.; Anderson, R. C.; Brueckner, J.; Clark, B. C.; Dreibus, G.; Economou, T.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lugmair, G. W.; Ming, D. W.

2005-01-01

178

Evidence for strong refraction of $^3$He in an alpha-particle condensate  

E-print Network

We have analyzed $^{3}$He scattering from $^{12}$C at 34.7 and 72 MeV in a coupled channel method with a double folding potential derived from the precise wave functions for the ground 0$^+$ state and $0_2^+$ (7.65 MeV) Hoyle state, which has been suggested to be an $\\alpha$ particle condensate. It is found that strong refraction of $^3$He in the Hoyle state can be clearly seen in the experimental angular distribution at {\\it low} incident energy region as an Airy minimum of the {\\it pre-rainbow oscillations}.

S. Ohkubo; Y. Hirabayashi

2011-02-09

179

Model of alpha particle diffusion in the outer limiter shadow of TFTR  

SciTech Connect

A new code, Monte Carlo Collisional Stochastic Orbit Retracing (MCCSOR), has been developed to model the alpha particle loss signal as measured by the outer midplane scintillator detector in TFTR. The shadowing effects due to the outer limiters and the detector itself have been included, along with a pitch angle scattering and stochastic ripple diffusion. Shadowing by the outer limiters has a strong effect on both the magnitude and pitch angle distribution of the calculated loss. There is at least qualitative agreement between the calculated results and the experimental data.

Wang, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)]|[Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

1996-05-01

180

Transcriptional and Secretomic Profiling of Epidermal Cells Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation  

PubMed Central

Alpha (?)-particle emitters are probable isotopes to be used in a terrorist attack. The development of biological assessment tools to identify those who have handled these difficult to detect materials would be an asset to our current forensic capacity. In this study, for the purposes of biomarker discovery, human keratinocytes were exposed to ?-particle and X-radiation (0.98 Gy/h at 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 Gy) and assessed for differential gene and protein expression using microarray and Bio-Plex technology, respectively. Secretomic analysis of supernatants showed expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and PDGF-bb) to be exclusively affected in ?-particle exposed cells. The highest dose of ?-particle radiation modulated a total of 67 transcripts (fold change>|1.5|, (False discovery rate) FDR<0.05) in exposed cells. Several genes which responded with high expression levels (>2 fold) included KIF20A, NEFM, C7orf10, HIST1H2BD, BMP6, and HIST1H2AC. Among the high expressing genes, five (CCNB2, BUB1, NEK2, CDC20, AURKA) were also differentially expressed at the medium (1.0 Gy) dose however, these genes were unmodulated following exposure to X-irradiation. Networks of these genes clustered around tumor protein-53 and transforming growth factor-beta signaling. This study has identified some potential gene /protein responses and networks that may be validated further to confirm their specificity and potential to be signature biomarkers of ?-particle exposure. PMID:23002402

Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Greene, Hillary Boulay; Wilkins, Ruth C

2012-01-01

181

Measurements of nonthermal confined alpha particles in Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor D{endash}T plasmas (invited)  

SciTech Connect

Experience with the {alpha} charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and pellet charge exchange confined, nonthermal alpha particle diagnostics over the first two years of Tokamak test fusion reactor (TFTR) D{endash}T operation is summarized. A brief summary of the concept, instrumentation, and analysis techniques for each diagnostic is given, followed by examples of alpha physics results. Issues important to further development of these diagnostic techniques for TFTR and ITER are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Stratton, B.C.; Budny, R.V.; Duong, H.H.; Mansfield, D.K.; Medley, S.S.; Redi, M.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Fonck, R.J.; McKee, G.R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Oedblom, A.; Wising, F. [Institute for Electromagnetic Field Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Institute for Electromagnetic Field Theory, Chalmers University of Technology, S-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Fisher, R.K.; McChesney, J.M.; Parks, P.B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)] [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Petrov, M.P. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russia)] [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russia); Gorelenkov, N.N. [TRINITI, Troitsk 14092 (Russia)] [TRINITI, Troitsk 14092 (Russia)

1997-01-01

182

Partition of cross sections in asymmetric nucleus-nucleus reactions and the origin of fast alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the mechanism of asymmetric nucleus-nucleus reactions from the Coulomb barrier to intermediate energies the /sup 14/N + /sup 159/Tb reaction was studied at five bombarding energies between 8 and 23 MeV/u via particle-particle correlations (at selected energies) and particle KX-ray coincidences to identify the specific reaction channels. With the KX-ray method partial cross sections for projectile-like fragments (PLF) as a function of the atomic number (Z/sub res/) of the residual nucleus can be determined. The charge balance yields the ''missing charge'' dZ = Z/sub proj/ + Z/sub targ/ - Z/sub PLF/ - Z/sub TLF/ that indicates whether, in addition to the PLF, other charged particles are emitted. A large fraction of the inclusive cross sections is found to originate from such channels with two or more fragments in the exit channel, and this fraction increases as the PLF is further removed in mass from the incident projectile, and with increasing bombarding energy. From the particle-particle correlation studies it is found that sequential decays of PLF's are dominant. ''Non-sequential'' processes, if present, are associated with inelastic reactions involving excitations of both projectile and target. The bulk of the large alpha-particle cross section at small angles is found to be associated with channels in which, in addition to the alpha particle, only nucleons and other alpha particles are emitted. From ..gamma..-ray multiplicity measurements and from the broad distribution of the strength with Z/sub res/ it is concluded that these alpha particles originate from inelastic (damped) processes. 27 refs., 10 figs.

Siemssen, R.H.

1985-01-01

183

Relative biological effectiveness of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for double-strand break induction in human fibroblasts.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to quantify and to determine the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells irradiated in vitro and to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for DSB induction. The influence of the irradiation temperature on the induction of DSBs was also investigated. Human fibroblasts were irradiated as intact cells with alpha particles from (211)At, (60)Co gamma rays and X rays. The numbers and distributions of DSBs were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with fragment analysis for separation of DNA fragments in sizes 10 kbp-5.7 Mbp. A non-random distribution was found for DSB induction after irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At, while irradiation with low-LET radiation led to more random distributions. The RBEs for DSB induction were 2.1 and 3.1 for (60)Co gamma rays and X rays as the reference radiation, respectively. In the experiments studying temperature effects, nuclear monolayers were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles or (60)Co gamma rays at 2 degrees C or 37 degrees C and intact cells were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles at the same temperatures. The dose-modifying factor (DMF(temp)) for irradiation of nuclear monolayers at 37 degrees C compared with 2 degrees C was 1.7 for (211)At alpha particles and 1.6 for (60)Co gamma rays. No temperature effect was observed for intact cells irradiated with (211)At. In conclusion, irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At induced two to three times more DSB than gamma rays and X rays. PMID:17316073

Claesson, Anna Kristina; Stenerlöw, Bo; Jacobsson, Lars; Elmroth, Kecke

2007-03-01

184

Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a 239Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available.

Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F.; Karamitros, M.; Brun, T.; Gordillo, N.; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S.; Seznec, H.

2012-04-01

185

Fission of THORIUM-232 and URANIUM-238 Induced by Inelastic Scattering of 120 Mev Alpha Particles.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis describes the inelastic scattering of 120 MeV alpha-particles from ('232)Th and ('238)U in coincidence with fission of the target nuclei. The fission probability and angular distribution of the fission fragments have been measured. The alpha-particles are detected with the Q3D magnetic spectrograph, for which instrument position sensitive focal plane detectors are built. For the fission fragments, position sensitive parallel plate avalanche detectors are developed. No evidence for the fission decay of the giant quadrupole resonance has been found. For ('238)U, however, a weakly excited structure with unknown multipolarity is seen at about 9.5 MeV excitation energy, similar to that which has been reported in inelastic scattering of lithium ions in coincidence with fission. The overall feature of the fission probability for excitation energies above the fission barrier is well reproduced by statistical calculations. At the barrier region, evidence for positive and negative subbarrier resonances has been found, the negative parity ones occurring at the same excitation energy where photofission resonances are located. The data are analyzed with the two-humped barrier model. For ('238)U the data are reasonably well fitted with the barriers known from literature. For ('232)Th, however, the outer barrier is found to be higher. Also, for ('232)Th, introducing an additional mass symmetric and axially asymmetric outer barrier, as was previously found necessary for ('238)U, does not result in a good fit to the data at higher excitation energies.

van der Plicht, Johannes

1980-12-01

186

Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

1999-04-01

187

Monte-Carlo dosimetry on a realistic cell monolayer geometry exposed to alpha particles.  

PubMed

The energy and specific energy absorbed in the main cell compartments (nucleus and cytoplasm) in typical radiobiology experiments are usually estimated by calculations as they are not accessible for a direct measurement. In most of the work, the cell geometry is modelled using the combination of simple mathematical volumes. We propose a method based on high resolution confocal imaging and ion beam analysis (IBA) in order to import realistic cell nuclei geometries in Monte-Carlo simulations and thus take into account the variety of different geometries encountered in a typical cell population. Seventy-six cell nuclei have been imaged using confocal microscopy and their chemical composition has been measured using IBA. A cellular phantom was created from these data using the ImageJ image analysis software and imported in the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation toolkit. Total energy and specific energy distributions in the 76 cell nuclei have been calculated for two types of irradiation protocols: a 3 MeV alpha particle microbeam used for targeted irradiation and a ²³?Pu alpha source used for large angle random irradiation. Qualitative images of the energy deposited along the particle tracks have been produced and show good agreement with images of DNA double strand break signalling proteins obtained experimentally. The methodology presented in this paper provides microdosimetric quantities calculated from realistic cellular volumes. It is based on open-source oriented software that is publicly available. PMID:22456322

Barberet, Ph; Vianna, F; Karamitros, M; Brun, T; Gordillo, N; Moretto, Ph; Incerti, S; Seznec, H

2012-04-21

188

Observation of lunar radon emanation with the Apollo 15 alpha particle spectrometer.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The alpha particle spectrometer, a component of the orbital Sim Bay group of 'geochemistry' experiments on Apollo 15, was designed to detect alpha particles emitted during the decay of isotopes of radon gas and her daughter products. The purpose was to measure the gross activity of radon on the lunar surface and to find possible regions of increased local activity. Results are presented from a partial analysis of Apollo 15 data. For the moon as a whole, Rn220 was not observed and the upper limit on its decay rate above the lunar surface is 0.00038 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. Rn222 was marginally observed. Possible variations of radon activity on the lunar surface are being investigated. Po210 (a daughter product of Rn222) has been detected in a broad region from west of Mare Crisium to the Van de Graaff-Orlov region. The observed count rate is (4.6 plus or minus 1.4) x 0.001 disintegrations/sq cm-sec. The observed level of Po210 activity is in excess of the amount that would be in equilibrium with Rn222 by about an order of magnitude. This implies that larger levels of radon emanation have occurred on the moon within a time scale of 10 to 100 years.

Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

1972-01-01

189

Results of the Alpha-Particle-X-Ray Spectrometer on Board of the Mars Exploration Rovers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity landed at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is part of the instrument suite on both rovers. It is equipped with six 244Cm sources which provide x-ray excitation with alpha-particles (PIXE) and x-ray radiation (XRF). This combination allows x-ray spectroscopy of elements from Na to Br in the energy range of 0.9 to 16 keV. X-ray detectors with a high energy resolution of 160 eV at Fe K allow us to separate even closely spaced energy peaks, such as Na, Mg, Al and Si. The APXS is attached to the rover s arm and provides in-situ measurements of the chemical composition of soils, surfaces of rocks and outcrops and their abraded surfaces. This abstract gives an overview of APXS results obtained during the first year of operation on both landing sites.

Geller, R.; Zipfel, J.; Brueckner, J.; Dreibus, G.; Lugmair, G.; Rieder, R.; Waenke, H.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.

2005-01-01

190

Bayesian analysis of nanodosimetric ionisation distributions due to alpha particles and protons.  

PubMed

Track-nanodosimetry has the objective to investigate the stochastic aspect of ionisation events in particle tracks, by evaluating the probability distribution of the number of ionisations produced in a nanometric target volume positioned at distance d from a particle track. Such kind of measurements makes use of electron (or ion) gas detectors with detecting efficiencies non-uniformly distributed inside the target volume. This fact makes the reconstruction of true ionisation distributions, which correspond to an ideal efficiency of 100%, non-trivial. Bayesian unfolding has been applied to ionisation distributions produced by 5.4 MeV alpha particles and 20 MeV protons in cylindrical volumes of propane of 20 nm equivalent size, positioned at different impact parameters with respect to the primary beam. It will be shown that a Bayesian analysis performed by subdividing the target volume in sub-regions of different detection efficiencies is able to provide a good reconstruction of the true nanodosimetric ionisation distributions. PMID:21112893

De Nardo, L; Ferretti, A; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

2011-02-01

191

Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the ? particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient ?{sub ?} of LH waves due to ? particles. Results show that, the ?{sub ?} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ?} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ?{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of ?{sub ?} when n{sub e}?8×10{sup 19}m{sup ?3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, ? ? 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

Wang, Jianbing, E-mail: zhangxm@ecust.edu.cn; Zhang, Xianmei, E-mail: zhangxm@ecust.edu.cn; Yu, Limin, E-mail: zhangxm@ecust.edu.cn; Zhao, Xiang, E-mail: zhangxm@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, East China University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 385, Shanghai 200237 (China)

2014-02-12

192

Density-induced suppression of the alpha-particle condensate in nuclear matter and the structure of alpha cluster states in nuclei  

E-print Network

At low densities, with decreasing temperatures, in symmetric nuclear matter alpha-particles are formed, which eventually give raise to a quantum condensate with four-nucleon alpha-like correlations (quartetting). Starting with a model of alpha-matter, where undistorted alpha particles interact via an effective interaction such as the Ali-Bodmer potential, the suppression of the condensate fraction at zero temperature with increasing density is considered. Using a Jastrow-Feenberg approach, it is found that the condensate fraction vanishes near saturation density. Additionally, the modification of the internal state of the alpha particle due to medium effects will further reduce the condensate. In finite systems, an enhancement of the S state wave function of the c.o.m. orbital of alpha particle motion is considered as the correspondence to the condensate. Wave functions have been constructed for self-conjugate 4n nuclei which describe the condensate state, but are fully antisymmetrized on the nucleonic level. These condensate-like cluster wave functions have been successfully applied to describe properties of low-density states near the n alpha threshold. Comparison with OCM calculations in 12C and 16O shows strong enhancement of the occupation of the S-state c.o.m. orbital of the alpha-particles. This enhancement is decreasing if the baryon density increases, similar to the density-induced suppression of the condensate fraction in alpha matter. The ground states of 12C and 16O show no enhancement at all, thus a quartetting condensate cannot be formed at saturation densities.

Y. Funaki; H. Horiuchi; G. Röpke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki; T. Yamada

2008-01-21

193

Selective Alpha-Particle Mediated Depletion of Tumor Vasculature with Vascular Normalization  

PubMed Central

Background Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature. Methodology and Principal Findings Actinium-225 (225Ac)-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, 225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in 225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. Conclusions The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy. PMID:17342201

Seshan, Surya V.; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; May, Chad; McDevitt, Michael R.; Nolan, Daniel; Mittal, Vivek; Benezra, Robert; Scheinberg, David A.

2007-01-01

194

Feasibility study on the use of polyallyldiglycol-carbonate cell dishes in TUNEL assay for alpha particle radiobiological experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present work, we have studied the feasibility of a method based on polyallyldiglycol-carbonate (PADC) films to investigate the effects of alpha particles on HeLa cervix cancer cells. Thin PADC films with thickness of about 20 ?m were prepared from commercially available CR-39 films by chemical etching to fabricate custom-made petri dishes for cell culture, which could accurately record alpha particle hit positions. A special method involving "base tracks" for aligning the images of cell nuclei and alpha particle hits has been proposed, so that alpha particle transversals of cell nuclei can be visually counted. Radiobiological experiments were carried out to induce DNA damages, with the TdT-mediated d UTP Nick- End Labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence method employed to detect DNA strand breaks. The staining results were investigated by flow cytometer. The preliminary results showed that more strand breaks occurred in cells hit by alpha particles with lower energies. Moreover, large TUNEL positive signals were obtained even with small percentages of cells irradiated and TUNEL signals were also obtained from non-targeted cells. These provided evidence for the bystander effect.

Chan, K. F.; Yum, E. H. W.; Wan, C. K.; Fong, W. F.; Yu, K. N.

2007-08-01

195

ON THE RELATIVE SPEED AND TEMPERATURE RATIO OF SOLAR WIND ALPHA PARTICLES AND PROTONS: COLLISIONS VERSUS WAVE EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

We study the relative flow speed and the temperature ratio of alpha particles and protons and their connections to the helium ion abundance, the collisional age, and the power of transverse fluctuations within the inertial range. It is found that the alpha-to-proton temperature ratio, T{sub {alpha}}/T{sub p} , anti-correlates with the helium ion abundance. Despite a relatively high collisional age and small wave power, the ratio T{sub {alpha}}/T{sub p} can reach comparatively high values (even above 2) whenever the helium ion abundance is below about 0.02. In contrast, the differential speed of alpha particles with respect to protons is correlated with the total wave power and anti-correlated with the collisional age. Ultimately, the individual heating of each ion species is positively correlated with the total wave power. Our findings suggest that a high-friction collision could be efficient in reducing the differential speed between alpha particles and protons, but appears not to be sufficient to equalize the alpha and proton temperatures, i.e., to make T{sub {alpha}} {approx_equal} T{sub p} . This is a hint that the local wave heating process is acting on a timescale shorter than the collision time.

Bourouaine, Sofiane; Marsch, Eckart [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Neubauer, Fritz M. [Institut fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie, Universitaet zu Koeln, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, Koeln 50923 (Germany)

2011-02-10

196

Bench-level characterization of a CMOS standard-cell D-latch using alpha-particle sensitive test circuits  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A methodology is described for predicting the SEU susceptibility of a standard-cell D-latch using an alpha-particle sensitive SRAM, SPICE critical charge simulation results, and alpha-particle interaction physics. Measurements were made on a 1.6-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM irradiated with an Am-241 alpha-particle source. A collection depth of 6.09 micron was determined using these results and TRIM computer code. Using this collection depth and SPICE derived critical charge results on the latch design, an LET threshold of 34 MeV sq cm/mg was predicted. Heavy ion tests were then performed on the latch and an LET threshold of 41 MeV sq cm/mg was determined.

Blaes, B. R.; Soli, G. A.; Buehler, M. G.

1991-01-01

197

Particle separation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

2011-01-01

198

Traversal of cells by radiation and absorbed fraction estimates for electrons and alpha particles  

SciTech Connect

Consideration of the pathlength which radiation traverses in a cell is central to algorithms for estimating energy deposition on a cellular level. Distinct pathlength distributions occur for radionuclides: (1) uniformly distributed in space about the cell (referred to as -randomness); (2) uniformly distributed on the surface of the cell (S-randomness); and (3) uniformly distributed within the cell volume (I-randomness). For a spherical cell of diameter d, the mean pathlengths are 2/3d, 1/2d, and 3/4d, respectively, for these distributions. Algorithms for simulating the path of radiation through a cell are presented and the absorbed fraction in the cell and its nucleus are tabulated for low energy electrons and alpha particles emitted on the surface of spherical cells. The algorithms and absorbed fraction data should be of interest to those concerned with the dosimetry of radionuclide-labeled monoclonal antibodies. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.; Taner, A.C.; Kerr, G.D.

1985-01-01

199

Etching characteristic studies for the detection of alpha particles in DAM-ADC nuclear track detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study reports the characteristic studies for the detection of alpha particles in DAM-ADC nuclear track detector. Several important parameters that control the track formation such as, the bulk etch rate (VB), track etching rate (VT), dependence of VB and VT on etching concentration and temperature have been extensively studied. The activation energy (Eb) of the bulk etching rate for the DAM-ADC sheets has been calculated, the dependence of etching efficiency and sensitivity upon etchant concentrations and temperature has been investigated, registration efficiency of DAM-ADC detector etched at the optimum etching condition has been examined. The detailed studied results presented in this study provide various useful information about the mechanism of track formation in polymers.

El-Samman, H.; Ashry, A. H.; Arafa, W.; Abou-leila, M.; Abdalla, A. M.; Tsuruta, T.

2014-09-01

200

Evaluation of uncertainty components associated with alpha-particle spectrometric measurements of uranium isotopes in water.  

PubMed

Qualifications of uncertainties associated with the measurement of specific activity concentration of uranium radioisotope ((238)U) in water samples by alpha-particle spectrometry are presented. Possible sources of uncertainty are identified and quantified in the activity concentration measurements of (238)U isotope; the major source being the statistical counting uncertainty as expected. The combined relative standard uncertainty [Formula: see text] of the measurement was calculated as 1.4Bq kg(-1) (7.9%) for the investigated NPL sample. The accuracy and precision of recommended procedure were checked analysing six spiked water samples supplied from IAEA-proficiency test exercises. The results were evaluated in terms of relative bias, z-score, u-score, trueness and precision. These results show that the activity values and their uncertainties are in good agreement with recommended values. PMID:25306402

Seferino?lu, Meryem; Dirican, Abdullah; Esra Erden, P?nar; Erçin, Demet

2014-12-01

201

Mitigation of radiation nephropathy after internal {alpha}-particle irradiation of kidneys  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Internal irradiation of kidneys as a consequence of radioimmunotherapy, radiation accidents, or nuclear terrorism can result in radiation nephropathy. We attempted to modify pharmacologically, the functional and morphologic changes in mouse kidneys after injection with the actinium ({sup 225}Ac) nanogenerator, an in vivo generator of {alpha}- and {beta}-particle emitting elements. Methods and Materials: The animals were injected with 0.35 {mu}Ci of the {sup 225}Ac nanogenerator, which delivers a dose of 27.6 Gy to the kidneys. Then, they were randomized to receive captopril (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), L-158,809 (angiotensin II receptor-1 blocker), spironolactone (aldosterone receptor antagonist), or a placebo. Results: Forty weeks after the {sup 225}Ac injection, the placebo-control mice showed a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (87.6 {+-} 6.9 mg/dL), dilated Bowman spaces, and tubulolysis with basement membrane thickening. Captopril treatment accentuated the functional (BUN 119.0 {+-} 4.0 mg/dL; p <0.01 vs. placebo controls) and histopathologic damage. In contrast, L-158,809 offered moderate protection (BUN 66.6 {+-} 3.9 mg/dL; p = 0.02 vs. placebo controls). Spironolactone treatment, however, significantly prevented the development of histopathologic and functional changes (BUN 31.2 {+-} 2.5 mg/dL; p <0.001 vs. placebo controls). Conclusions: Low-dose spironolactone and, to a lesser extent, angiotensin receptor-1 blockade can offer renal protection in a mouse model of internal {alpha}-particle irradiation.

Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Seshan, Surya V. [Department of Pathology, Cornell University Weill Medical College, New York, NY (United States); McDevitt, Michael R. [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sgouros, George [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Hyjek, Elizabeth [Department of Pathology, Cornell University Weill Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Scheinberg, David A. [Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States) and Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)]. E-mail: d-scheinberg@ski.mskcc.org

2006-04-01

202

Renal tubulointerstitial changes after internal irradiation with alpha-particle-emitting actinium daughters.  

PubMed

The effect of external gamma irradiation on the kidneys is well described. However, the mechanisms of radiation nephropathy as a consequence of targeted radionuclide therapies are poorly understood. The functional and morphologic changes were studied chronologically (from 10 to 40 wk) in mouse kidneys after injection with an actinium-225 (225Ac) nanogenerator, a molecular-sized, antibody-targeted, in vivo generator of alpha-particle-emitting elements. Renal irradiation from free, radioactive daughters of 225Ac led to time-dependent reduction in renal function manifesting as increase in blood urea nitrogen. The histopathologic changes corresponded with the decline in renal function. Glomerular, tubular, and endothelial cell nuclear pleomorphism and focal tubular cell injury, lysis, and karyorrhexis were observed as early as 10 wk. Progressive thinning of the cortex as a result of widespread tubulolysis, collapsed tubules, glomerular crowding, decrease in glomerular cellularity, interstitial inflammation, and an elevated juxtaglomerular cell count were noted at 20 to 30 wk after treatment. By 35 to 40 wk, regeneration of simplified tubules with tubular atrophy and loss with focal, mild interstitial fibrosis had occurred. A lower juxtaglomerular cell count with focal cytoplasmic vacuolization, suggesting increased degranulation, was also observed in this period. A focal increase in tubular and interstitial cell TGF-beta1 expression starting at 20 wk, peaking at 25 wk, and later declining in intensity with mild increase in the extracellular matrix deposition was noticed. These findings suggest that internally delivered alpha-particle irradiation-induced loss of tubular epithelial cells triggers a chain of adaptive changes that result in progressive renal parenchymal damage accompanied by a loss of renal function. These findings are dissimilar to those seen after gamma or beta irradiation of kidneys. PMID:15987754

Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Seshan, Surya V; McDevitt, Michael R; LaPerle, Krista; Sgouros, George; Scheinberg, David A

2005-09-01

203

Cancer Stem Cell Targeting Using the Alpha-Particle Emitter, 213Bi: Mathematical Modeling and Feasibility Analysis  

PubMed Central

There is increasing recognition that treatment failure in cancer may be associated with the failure to sterilize a small subpopulation of tumor cells that have been characterized as tumor stem cells. Defined as cells that are able to self-renew and also to replenish a phenotypically diverse tumor-cell population, such cells are also considered resistant to chemotherapy. These characteristics are optimal for targeting by using alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides. Because of their high-energy deposition density per track, alpha-particles are capable of targeting single cells or small clusters of cells with minimal normal organ toxicity. The DNA damage induced by alpha-particles is largely irreparable and, therefore, alpha-particle-induced damage is minimally susceptible to resistance mechanisms. In this work, theoretical modeling was performed to examine the potential of alpha-emitter targeting of such small clusters of cancer stem cells. Critical parameters influencing efficacy and toxicity were identified and their relationship elucidated. The results identify specific activity, antigen site density, and number of target cells as critical parameters for effective cell killing and demonstrate substantial efficacy gains by targeting a smaller number of stem cells, as opposed to the entire tumor-cell population. PMID:18298331

Sgouros, George; Song, Hong

2010-01-01

204

Alpha-particle-driven instability of alfven waves in a tandem mirror. Final summary report, 21 February-20 May 1985  

SciTech Connect

Alpha particles born at D-T fusion are mirror confined in the tandem mirror due to their relatively high energy. Therefore, they have a loss-cone type distribution in the velocity space. This anisotropy is susceptible to microinstability. The objective of this work is to study the possible instability that can be driven by the alpha loss-cone. The low frequency (at the order of the ion cyclotron frequency) wave spectrum is studied to seek the waves that can be destabilized by the alphas. The radial mode structure is found for the growth rate calculation. The alpha particle distribution with a loss-cone is obtained from a Legendre function expansion and a diffusion front method. The growth rate of the instability is formulated from linear stability theory and computed numerically. A marginal stability boundary in the ion density and temperature parameters is calculated.

Ho, S.K.

1985-08-20

205

Study of excitation functions of alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions on holmium for 167Tm production.  

PubMed

(167)Tm is a candidate radioisotope for both nuclear medicine diagnostics and therapy due to its emitted Auger-electrons, low energy X- and gamma-rays. In the frame of a systematic study of excitation functions for production of medically relevant radioisotopes by charged particle induced reactions on rare earths, the (165)Ho(alpha,2n)(167)Tm reaction and the (165)Ho(alpha,n)(168)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,3n)(166)Tm, (165)Ho(alpha,4n)(165)Tm side reactions were measured up to 40 MeV by the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured results were compared to the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II theoretical curves. Thick target yields, impurity levels and specific activities were deduced and compared with the same parameters for other charged particle production routes of (167)Tm. PMID:20022515

Tárkányi, F; Hermanne, A; Király, B; Takács, S; Ignatyuk, A V

2010-03-01

206

Polygamous particles  

PubMed Central

DNA is increasingly used as an important tool in programming the self-assembly of micrometer- and nanometer-scale particles. This is largely due to the highly specific thermoreversible interaction of cDNA strands, which, when placed on different particles, have been used to bind precise pairs in aggregates and crystals. However, DNA functionalized particles will only reach their true potential for particle assembly when each particle can address and bind to many different kinds of particles. Indeed, specifying all bonds can force a particular designed structure. In this paper, we present the design rules for multiflavored particles and show that a single particle, DNA functionalized with many different “flavors,” can recognize and bind specifically to many different partners. We investigate the cost of increasing the number of flavors in terms of the reduction in binding energy and melting temperature. We find that a single 2-?m colloidal particle can bind to 40 different types of particles in an easily accessible time and temperature regime. The practical limit of ?100 is set by entropic costs for particles to align complementary pairs and, surprisingly, by the limited number of distinct “useful” DNA sequences that prohibit subunits with nonspecific binding. For our 11 base “sticky ends,” the limit is 73 distinct sequences with no unwanted overlaps of 5 bp or more. As an example of phenomena enabled by polygamous particles, we demonstrate a three-particle system that forms a fluid of isolated clusters when cooled slowly and an elastic gel network when quenched. PMID:23100534

Wu, Kun-Ta; Feng, Lang; Sha, Ruojie; Dreyfus, Rémi; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Chaikin, Paul M.

2012-01-01

207

The measurement of 240Pu\\/239Pu and 238Pu\\/239Pu isotopic ratios by alpha-particle spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The measurement of the alpha-activity ratio of 238Pu\\/(239Pu + 240Pu) is a routine practice in the determination of the isotopic composition of plutonium. However, measurement of the atomic ratio of 240Pu\\/239Pu by alpha-particle spectrometry is hampered due to insufficient energy resolution for the set of closely spaced peaks of these two isotopes. Passivated and implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors have

W. Raab; J. L. Parus

1994-01-01

208

DNA complex lesions induced by protons and alpha-particles: track structure characteristics determining linear energy transfer and particle type dependence.  

PubMed

The yield of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and DNA complex lesions induced by protons and alpha-particles of various energies was simulated using a Monte Carlo track structure code (MOCA15) and a simple model of the DNA molecule. DNA breaks of different complexity were analysed. The linear energy transfer (LET) and particle-type dependence of lesions of higher complexity seems to confirm the importance of clustered damage in DNA as a relevant step leading to biological endpoints such as cell inactivation. The detailed structure of proton and alpha-particle tracks was analysed to identify the main characteristics possibly responsible for such a dependence. The role of the primary ion and of its secondary electrons in inducing dsb and complex lesions is described, showing that the relative contribution of secondary electron tracks alone in inducing clustered lesions is almost negligible at high LET, but tends to dominate below = 10 keV/micron. This is consistent with the observed similar effectiveness of low-LET fast particle radiation and sparsely ionizing radiation such as x-rays. The dependence on LET and particle type is mainly due to energy deposition events of the primary ion together with short range electrons surrounding the ion track; the yield of complex lesions due to secondary electron tracks alone is substantially LET independent. The radial distributions of the energy contributing to the induction of complex lesions were analyzed and compared with the radial distributions of energy deposition of the full tracks. The results suggest that the stochastic behaviour (i.e. cluster properties) of the energy deposition pattern within a radius of a few nanometers around the ion track plays a relevant role in determining the biological radiation effectiveness. PMID:9271797

Ottolenghi, A; Merzagora, M; Paretzke, H G

1997-06-01

209

Alpha-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Can Reverse The Catabolic Influence Of UHMWPE Particles On RANKL Expression In Primary Human Osteoblasts  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose: A linkage between the neurotransmitter alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (alpha-CGRP) and particle-induced osteolysis has been shown previously. The suggested osteoprotective influence of alpha-CGRP on the catabolic effects of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles is analyzed in this study in primary human osteoblasts. Methods: Primary human osteoblasts were stimulated by UHMWPE particles (cell/particle ratios 1:100 and 1:500) and different doses of alpha-CGRP (10-7 M, 10-9 M, 10-11 M). Receptor activator of nuclear factor-?B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA expression and protein levels were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Particle stimulation leads to a significant dose-dependent increase of RANKL mRNA in both cell-particle ratios and a significant down-regulation of OPG mRNA in cell-particle concentrations of 1:500. A significant depression of alkaline phosphatase was found due to particle stimulation. Alpha-CGRP in all tested concentrations showed a significant depressive effect on the expression of RANKL mRNA in primary human osteoblasts under particle stimulation. Comparable reactions of RANKL protein levels due to particles and alpha-CGRP were found by Western blot analysis. In cell-particle ratios of 1:100 after 24 hours the osteoprotective influence of alpha-CGRP reversed the catabolic effects of particles on the RANKL expression. Interpretation: The in-vivo use of alpha-CGRP, which leads to down-regulated RANKL in-vitro, might inhibit the catabolic effect of particles in conditions of particle induced osteolysis. PMID:20877694

Kauther, Max D.; Xu, Jie; Wedemeyer, Christian

2010-01-01

210

The Astrophysical S-Factor of CARBON-12(ALPHA Particle, Photon) OXYGEN-16 from the Beta-Delayed Alpha - Emission of NITROGEN-16 (helium Burning)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Helium burning plays a key role in both the formation of heavy elements and the collapse of massive stars. The result of the helium burning--the ^{12 }C/16O ratio, determines the abundance of heavy elements and the dynamics of a massive star at its final stages before a supernova explosion. One of the two reactions in the helium burning process, the 12C( alpha,gamma)16O capture reaction, is poorly understood despite intense theoretical and experimental work during the last two decades. The previously extracted p-wave 'S-factor' for the 12C(alpha,gamma) 16O capture reaction at 300 keV (SE1(300)) ranges in value from 0 to 500 keV-barn. On the other hand, the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission spectrum at low energy provides a very sensitive means to determine the reduced alpha-particle width of the bound 1^- state, hence the 'S-factor'. The spectrum of low energy beta-delayed alpha -particle emission 16N, was measured with high sensitivity; e.g., at E _sp?{L} ~ 1 MeV a sensitivity for a beta-decay branching ratio in the range of 10^{-9} (to 10^{-10}) was achieved. The branching ratio and spectrum of beta -decay of 16N to the relevant broad 1^- resonance were remeasured. The alpha-particle spectra were unfolded to remove effects of finite energy resolution (foil thickness). We used previous theoretical work of Ji, Filippone, Humblet and Koonin to extract from these data the astrophysical E1 S-factor for the 12C( alpha,gamma)16O capture reaction and find SE1(300) = 95 +/- 6 (stat) +/- 28 (syst) keV-barn.

Zhao, Zhiping

1993-01-01

211

Relative toxicity of chronic irradiation by 45Ca beta particles and 242Cm alpha particles with respect to the production of lung tumors in CBA/Ca mice.  

PubMed

Approximately 1800 female CBA/Ca mice were exposed by inhalation at three dose levels to beta particles from (45)Ca-labeled fused aluminosilicate particles (FAP), to alpha particles from (242)Cm-labeled FAP, or to carrier control FAP. Another group of mice inhaled no FAP and were designated as untreated cage controls. The FAP in combination with these radionuclides was used to achieve the same spatial and temporal distribution of alpha- and beta-particle dose within the irradiated mice. Some mice were killed to determine the clearance of radiolabeled FAP from their lungs, and the remainder were allocated to a life-span study. All animals were subjected to a detailed necropsy. To facilitate the identification of small tumors, the lungs were rendered transparent in methyl salicylate and examined under back illumination for the presence of lesions. Lung nodules and other microscopic lesions were excised for histological examination. The median survival of mice in all groups was approximately 910 days. The control animals lived longer than those that were irradiated, but it was difficult to determine a dose-response relationship for survival among the exposed mice. Benign adenomas and, less frequently, malignant adenocarcinomas were identified in all animal groups. The prevalence of these tumors was approximately 28.8% in the control mice, which is consistent with the results of other studies using the same strain of mouse. After exposure to radionuclide-labeled FAP, there was a significant dose-related increase in the prevalence of lung tumors in (242)Cm- (peak prevalence 55%) and (45)Ca-exposed (peak prevalence 48.6%) mice. The prevalence of tumors in the mice that received (242)Cm-labeled FAP was approximately twice that in the mice that inhaled (45)Ca-labeled FAP within the range of doses employed (0.55-4.69 Gy). Using the ratio of the slope of the linear component of the dose-response curves, the toxicity of the alpha particles relative to the beta particles was 1.5 (90% CI: 0.7, 9.0) for all adenomas and 9.4 (90% CI: 5.0, 23.0) for the less frequent adenocarcinomas. The relative toxicity for adenocarcinomas was found to decrease with increasing dose. PMID:17067209

Priest, N D; Hoel, D G; Brooks, P N

2006-11-01

212

Lower hybrid instability driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread in a plasma  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic formalism of lower hybrid wave instability, driven by mono-energy {alpha}-particles with finite pitch angle spread, is developed. The instability arises through cyclotron resonance interaction with high cyclotron harmonics of {alpha}-particles. The {alpha}-particles produced in D-T fusion reactions have huge Larmor radii ({approx}10 cm) as compared to the wavelength of the lower hybrid wave, whereas their speed is an order of magnitude smaller than the speed of light in vacuum. As a result, large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid waves, suitable for current drive in tokamak, are driven unstable via coupling to high cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate decreases with increase in pitch angle spread of the beam. At typical electron density of {approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, magnetic field {approx}4 Tesla and {alpha}-particle concentration {approx}0.1%, the large parallel phase velocity lower hybrid wave grows on the time scale of 20 ion cyclotron periods. The growth rate decreases with plasma density.

Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Vishwesh; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, IIT Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

2013-02-15

213

Particle Detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

2008-03-01

214

Particle Detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

2011-09-01

215

Stopping power and ranges of electrons, protons and alpha particles in liquid water using the Geant4-DNA package  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents stopping power and ranges of electrons, protons, and alpha particles in liquid water, calculated using the latest Geant4-DNA processes implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit. Inelastic cross sections are obtained using the first Born approximation and semi-empirical formulas like Rudd's model for ionisation and the Miller and Green formula for excitation. Elastic collisions and vibrational excitations are considered for tracking electrons until complete thermalisation (0.025 eV). A speed scaling procedure with an effective charge screening term was used to compute alpha particle and heavy ion cross sections. Geant4-DNA simulations were carried out using thin liquid water volumes to determine the linear energy loss (dE/dX), while larger volumes were used to obtain the particle range. While results converge for highly energetic particles, differences are observed for low energies when the applied theoretical models begin to diverge from each other. Results show a good agreement between the analytical calculations obtained from the models, the Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo simulation predictions and the data published in the ICRU reports. Geant4-DNA processes apply to the following energy ranges: 0.025 eV-1 MeV for electrons, 100 eV-100 MeV for protons and 1 keV-400 MeV for alpha particles in liquid water, however since experimental data for very low energies is scarce and very difficult to obtain these processes could not be thoroughly validated so they are recommended for energies above 1 eV for electrons, 1 keV for protons and 10 keV for alpha particles. Relativistic, highly charged ions were implemented in our own “house” version of the code and will be available in future releases of Geant4.

Francis, Z.; Incerti, S.; Karamitros, M.; Tran, H. N.; Villagrasa, C.

2011-10-01

216

Co-Cr-Mo Alloy Particles Induce Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in MLO-Y4 Osteocytes: A Role for Osteocytes in Particle Induced Inflammation  

PubMed Central

Wear debris-induced osteolysis is purportedly the limiting problem affecting the long term results of joint arthroplasty. Pathogenic effects of wear debris in peri-implant cells such as macrophages, osteoblasts and osteoclasts have been well studied. In contrast, the affects of wear-debris on osteocytes, which make up over 90% of all bone cells, remains unknown. We hypothesized that metal implant debris can induce the proinflammatory response in osteocytes. This study demonstrated the effects of cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) particles on a well-characterized MLO-Y4 osteocyte cell line. Co-Cr-Mo alloy particle treatment significantly (p<0.05) up-regulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) gene expression after 3 and 6 hr and TNF? protein production after 24 hr, but down-regulated interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene expression after 6 hr. Co-Cr-Mo alloy particle treatment also induced osteocyte apoptosis after 24 hr. This apoptotic effect was partially (40%) dependent on TNF?. Therefore, our results suggest that osteocytes play a role in particle induced inflammation and bone resorption following total hip arthroplasty by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducing osteocyte apoptosis. PMID:19497395

Kanaji, Arihiko; Caicedo, Marco S.; Virdi, Amarjit S.; Sumner, D. Rick; Hallab, Nadim J.; Sena, Kotaro

2009-01-01

217

An alpha-particle emitting antibody ([213Bi]J591) for radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer.  

PubMed

A novel alpha-particle emitting monoclonal antibody construct targeting the external domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The chelating agent, N-[2-amino-3-(p-isothiocyanatophen-yl)propyl]-trans-cyclohexane-1, 2-diamine-N,N',N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid, was appended to J591 monoclonal antibody to stably bind the 213Bi radiometal ion. Bismuth-213 is a short-lived (t 1/2 = 46 min) radionuclide that emits high energy alpha-particles with an effective range of 0.07-0.10 mm that are ideally suited to treating single-celled neoplasms and micrometastatic carcinomas. The LNCaP prostate cancer cell line had an estimated 180,000 molecules of PSMA per cell; J591 bound to PSMA with a 3-nM affinity. After binding, the radiolabeled construct-antigen complex was rapidly internalized into the cell, carrying the radiometal inside. [213Bi]J591 was specifically cytotoxic to LNCaP. The LD50 value of [213Bi]J591 was 220 nCi/ml at a specific activity of 6.4 Ci/g. The potency and specificity of [213Bi]J591 directed against LNCaP spheroids, an in vitro model for micrometastatic cancer, also was investigated. [213Bi]J591 effectively stopped growth of LNCaP spheroids relative to an equivalent dose of the irrelevant control [213Bi]HuM195 or unlabeled J591. Cytotoxicity experiments in vivo were carried out in an athymic nude mouse model with an i.m. xenograft of LNCaP cells. [213Bi]J591 was able to significantly improve (P < 0.0031) median tumor-free survival (54 days) in these experiments relative to treatment with irrelevant control [213Bi]HuM195 (33 days), or no treatment (31 days). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was also specifically reduced in treated animals. At day 51, mean PSA values were 104 ng/ml +/- 54 ng/ml (n = 4, untreated animals), 66 ng/ml +/- 16 ng/ml (n = 6, animals treated with [213Bi]HuM195), and 28 ng/ml +/- 22 ng/ml (n = 6, animals treated with [213Bi]J591). The reduction of PSA levels in mice treated with [213Bi]J591 relative to mice treated with [213Bi]HuM195 and untreated control animals was significant with P < 0.007 and P < 0.0136, respectively. In conclusion, a novel [213Bi]-radiolabeled J591 has been constructed that selectively delivers alpha-particles to prostate cancer cells for potent and specific killing in vitro and in vivo. PMID:11085533

McDevitt, M R; Barendswaard, E; Ma, D; Lai, L; Curcio, M J; Sgouros, G; Ballangrud, A M; Yang, W H; Finn, R D; Pellegrini, V; Geerlings, M W; Lee, M; Brechbiel, M W; Bander, N H; Cordon-Cardo, C; Scheinberg, D A

2000-11-01

218

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

SciTech Connect

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

2007-10-26

219

Deceleration of Alpha Particles in the Solar Wind by Instabilities and the Rotational Force: Implications for Heating, Azimuthal Flow, and the Parker Spiral Magnetic Field  

E-print Network

Protons and alpha particles in the fast solar wind are only weakly collisional and exhibit a number of non-equilibrium features, including relative drifts between particle species. Two non-collisional mechanisms have been proposed for limiting differential flow between alpha particles and protons: plasma instabilities and the rotational force. Both mechanisms decelerate the alpha particles. In this paper, we derive an analytic expression for the rate $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at which energy is released by alpha-particle deceleration, accounting for azimuthal flow and conservation of total momentum. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}} > 0 $ at $r r_{\\mathrm{crit}}$. We compare the value of $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ at $rwind streams from the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft. We find that $Q_{\\mathrm{flow}}$ exceeds $Q_{\\alpha}$ at $r < 1\\,\\mathrm{AU}$, $Q_{...

Verscharen, Daniel; Bourouaine, Sofiane; Hollweg, Joseph V

2014-01-01

220

Particle therapy  

SciTech Connect

Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

Raju, M.R.

1993-09-01

221

Particle astrophysics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

1991-01-01

222

Log Normal Distribution of Cellular Uptake of Radioactivity: Statistical Analysis of Alpha Particle Track Autoradiography  

PubMed Central

Recently, the distribution of radioactivity among a population of cells labeled with 210Po was shown to be well described by a log normal distribution function (J Nucl Med 47, 6 (2006) 1049-1058) with the aid of an autoradiographic approach. To ascertain the influence of Poisson statistics on the interpretation of the autoradiographic data, the present work reports on a detailed statistical analyses of these data. Methods The measured distributions of alpha particle tracks per cell were subjected to statistical tests with Poisson (P), log normal (LN), and Poisson – log normal (P – LN) models. Results The LN distribution function best describes the distribution of radioactivity among cell populations exposed to 0.52 and 3.8 kBq/mL 210Po-citrate. When cells were exposed to 67 kBq/mL, the P – LN distribution function gave a better fit, however, the underlying activity distribution remained log normal. Conclusions The present analysis generally provides further support for the use of LN distributions to describe the cellular uptake of radioactivity. Care should be exercised when analyzing autoradiographic data on activity distributions to ensure that Poisson processes do not distort the underlying LN distribution. PMID:16741316

Neti, Prasad V.S.V.; Howell, Roger W.

2008-01-01

223

Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.  

PubMed

The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents. PMID:15015582

Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

2004-01-01

224

Calibration of the Mars Science Laboratory Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The alpha-particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission was calibrated for routine analysis of: Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, and Y. The following elements were also calibrated, but may be too low to be measured (10s-100s ppm) for their usual abundance on Mars: V, Cu, Ga, As, Se and W. An extensive suite of geological reference materials, supplemented by pure chemical elements and compounds was used. Special attention was paid to include phyllosilicates, sulfates and a broad selection of basalts as these are predicted minerals and rocks at the Gale Crater landing site. The calibration approach is from first principles, using fundamental physics parameters and an assumed homogeneous sample matrix to calculate expected elemental signals for a given instrument setup and sample composition. Resulting concentrations for most elements accord with expected values. Deviations in elements of lower atomic number (Na, Mg, Al) indicate significant influences of mineral phases, especially in basalts, ultramafic rocks and trachytes. The systematics of these deviations help us to derive empirical, iterative corrections for different rock groups, based on a preliminary APXS analysis which assumes a homogeneous sample. These corrections have the potential to significantly improve the accuracy of APXS analyses, especially when other MSL instrument results, such as the X-ray diffraction data from CheMin, are included in the overall analysis process.

Campbell, John L.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Gellert, Ralf; Andrushenko, Stefan M.; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Maxwell, John A.; King, Penelope L.; Schofield, Céleste D. M.

2012-09-01

225

Linewidth measurements of the JET energetic ion and alpha particle collective Thomson scattering diagnostic gyrotron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectral purity of the transmitter source of a collective Thomson scattering (CTS) system is vitally important to insure that measured signals only originate from the plasma and not from stray source light. A number of high power (up to 500 kW), 140 GHz gyrotron tubes used with the Joint European Torus (JET) CTS system have been found to have one or more spurious modes and many harmonics in the output spectrum. The CTS diagnostic receiver system was used to make measurements of the gyrotron spectrum. It was comprised of a homodyne part from MIT for frequency sidebands <500 MHz, and a heterodyne part constructed at JET for frequency sidebands from 0.1 to 6 GHz. One tube at high power produced a strong 25 MHz mode and its harmonics to large frequency offsets, unsuitable for CTS measurements. Only at reduced power of approximately 100 kW was this tube's spectrum sufficiently clean for CTS. Another tube at JET operated at 500 kW output power with only low level parasitic modes, indicating that higher power gyrotrons may be available for future alpha particle measurements. The main receiver was tested with a low power test setup which simulated the gyrotron stray source light, the thermal ion feature and plasma electron cyclotron emission.

Machuzak, John S.; Woskov, Paul P.; Fessey, John A.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Egedal, Jan; Bindslev, Henrik; Roberts, Peter; Stevens, Andrew; Davies, Paul; Gatcombe, Christopher; Hughes, Thomas P.

1999-01-01

226

Particle cloud kinetics in microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data related to particle-particle agglomeration/deaglomeration and particle-wall attachment are discussed. Particle-cluster cloud interactions and particle-cluster agglomeration/deagglomeration kinetics are studied. An apparatus designed and constructed for examining the agglomeration/deagglomeration effects for lycopodium under the conditions of an acoustically energized mixing process and of alpha-particle-induced deagglomerative processes is described; characteristic features and applications for the apparatus are examined. Requirements for combustion experimentation are discussed.

Berlad, A. L.; Joshi, N. D.; Ross, H.; Klimek, R.

1987-01-01

227

Particle blender  

Microsoft Academic Search

An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a

Willey

1981-01-01

228

Particle preconcentrator  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

1998-12-29

229

Particle preconcentrator  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

2000-07-11

230

Particle preconcentrator  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Conrad, Frank J. (Russellville, SC); Custer, Chad A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01

231

Particle preconcentrator  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

Linker, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM); Conrad, Frank J. (Russellville, NM); Custer, Chad A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01

232

AIRBORNE PARTICLES  

EPA Science Inventory

The document summarizes the literature on airborne particles related to effects on man and his environment for consideration of the Environmental Protection Agency in updating the information in the Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter. Specific particles such as lead, ars...

233

Variations of the hydrodynamic parameters of solar wind protons and alpha particles from Prognoz-7 measurements.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The variations and relations between the hydrodynamic parameters of the proton and ? components of the solar wind have been investigated from the results of selective measurements of these components at the Prognoz-7 satellite. The parameter values averaged over the observation interval agree with their long-period variations during the solar cycle. With an increase in the solar wind velocity vp, the temperature Tp increases on the average as the power law v2.4p, while the concentration n decreases such that the momentum flux nvp2 is almost constant in the slow solar wind, but increases in the high-speed solar wind. The correlation observed between the temperature ratio T?/Tp and the magnitude of the difference of the ?-particle and proton velocities |v?-vp| suggests that the preferential heating of the ? particles is due not only to preferential acceleration of the ? particles, but also to any significant shift between the maxima of the ?-particle and proton distribution functions in velocity space. The conditions in the solar wind affecting the variation of the relative ?-particle abundance n?/np are investigated, along with the role of Coulomb viscosity of the components in balancing the difference in the velocities and temperatures of the protons and ? particles.

Ermolaev, Yu. I.; Stupin, V. V.; Zastenker, G. N.; Khamitov, G. P.; Kozak, I.

1990-09-01

234

Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors  

DOEpatents

Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Mendez, Victor P. (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1988-01-01

235

Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors  

DOEpatents

Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

1988-11-15

236

Neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei with $\\alpha$-particle correlations and the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy  

E-print Network

The formation of $\\alpha$-particle clusters on the surface of heavy nuclei is described in a generalized relativistic mean-field model with explicit cluster degrees of freedom. The effects on the size of the neutron skin of Sn nuclei and ${}^{208}$Pb are investigated as a function of the mass number and the isospin-dependent part of the effective interaction, respectively. The correlation of the neutron skin thickness with the difference of the neutron and proton numbers and with the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy is modified as compared to the mean-field calculation without alpha-cluster correlations.

Typel, Stefan

2014-01-01

237

Tetraethyl ammonium hydroxide (TEAH) as etchant of CR-39 for the determination of fluence of alpha particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Choice of chemical etchant and temperature are pivotal to the successful employment of organic/polymeric solid state nuclear track detectors for determining the fluence of charged particles like protons, alpha and other heavy ions. Poly(diethyleneglycol-bis-(allylcarbonate)) (CR-39) is one of the most sensitive detectors for monitoring the alpha particles but suffers from the drawback of long etching period. An attempt has been made in the present work to investigate a mixture, 20% (v/v) tetraethylammonium hydroxide (40%) - 80% NaOH (6 M) (TEAH-NaOH) at varying temperature as an alternate etchant. It was found that bulk/track etch rate increased and as a consequence etching time decreased significantly (about 10 times) when the mixture was used at 80 °C. Mechanistically, improved efficiency of TEAH-NaOH was attributed to its larger organophilicity and lower etching activation energy as compared to NaOH.

Joshirao, Pranav M.; Vyas, Chirag K.; Eappen, K. P.; Shin, Jae Won; Hong, Seung-Woo; Manchanda, Vijay K.

2014-04-01

238

The energy spectra of protons and alpha particles above 300 keV/nucleon during quiet times  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An unusual spectral feature and anomalously large abundance of helium between 0.6 and about 2 MeV/nucleon observed during the most quiet time periods in 1974 indicate the presence of low energy helium of an unknown origin. During these same quiet periods protons below 1.5 MeV and alphas below 0.6 MeV/nucleon have a power law energy spectrum with an index of -1.8 and the proton to alpha ratio is about 30. From these results and the measured anisotropy of these particles we conclude that the sun emits less than about 1 MeV particles continuously even during its most inactive periods.

Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Vollmer, O.; Fan, C. Y.

1975-01-01

239

Features of gas discharge in narrow-gap micropattern gas detectors at a high level of alpha-particle background  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preliminary results of research into electron multiplication in micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) at a high level of alpha-particle background are presented. This work has expanded the borders of understanding of the streamer mode nature. It is seen as a complex of electrostatic and electromagnetic interactions which begin the appearance of the precursor in plasma state. In an inter-electrode gap, plasma oscillations occur which are accompanied by longitudinal elastic waves of ionization, which can reach the cathode surface with an induced negative charge. With the release of this charge, due to the previously established conducting channel, there is a strong pulse accompanied by emission due to the recombination of positive and negative ions and a thin cord or streamer. With the aim of protecting the MPGDs from spark breakdown at a high-level alpha-particle background, the following gas composition of buffer, cooling, and electronegative components is offered: 70% He + 28% CF4 + 2% SF6.

Razin, V. I.; Reshetin, A. I.

2012-01-01

240

Studies of mass and energy correlations in thermal neutron fission of U-235 accompanied by long range alpha particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several characteristics of fission accompanied by long range alpha particles (LRA) have been studied in the thermal neutron\\u000a induced fission of235U. The kinetic energies of fission fragments and the LRA were measured with a back-to-back ionization chamber and semiconductor\\u000a detectors respectively. The kinetic energies of the two fragments and the LRA in LRA fission, along with the energies of pair

R K Choudhury; S S Kapoor; D M Nadkarni; P N Rama Rao; S R Srinivas Murthy

1976-01-01

241

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a

Hatsumi Nagasawa; Paul F. Wilson; David J. Chen; Larry H. Thompson; Joel S. Bedford; John B. Little

2008-01-01

242

Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a

H Nagasawa; P F Wilson; D J Chen; L H Thompson; J S Bedford; J B Little

2007-01-01

243

First evidence of collective alpha particle effect on toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes in the TFTR D-T experiment  

SciTech Connect

The alpha particle effect on the excitation of toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes (TAE) was investigated in deuterium-titrium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. rf power was used to position the plasma near the instability threshold, and the alpha particle effect was inferred from the reduction of rf power threshold for TAE instability in D-T plasmas. Initial calculations indicate that the alpha particles contribute 10{percent}{endash}30{percent} of the total drive in a D-T plasma with 3 MW of peak fusion power. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Wong, K.L.; Schmidt, G.L.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, R.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Darrow, D.S.; Duong, H.H.; Fu, G.Y.; Hammett, G.W.; Levinton, F.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Owens, D.K.; Petrov, M.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

1996-03-01

244

The measurement of 240Pu/ 239Pu and 238Pu/ 239Pu isotopic ratios by alpha-particle spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measurement of the alpha-activity ratio of {238Pu }/{( 239Pu + 240Pu) } is a routine practice in the determination of the isotopic composition of plutonium. However, measurement of the atomic ratio of 240Pu/ 239Pu by alpha-particle spectrometry is hampered due to insufficient energy resolution for the set of closely spaced peaks of these two isotopes. Passivated and implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors have recently become available with an energy resolution of 10 keV or better, which significantly improves the deconvolution of spectra from plutonium samples. A set of alpha sources was prepared on porcelain disks by ignition, and the spectra were accumulated at a gain of approximately 1 keV per channel. The GRPANL computer program as developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was used to analyze the spectra. The isotopic ratios were measured in parallel by mass spectrometry. It was found that the agreement on the ratios of 240Pu/ 239Pu and 238Pu/ 239Pu between mass spectrometry and measurements by PIPS detectors was within ±2%. Half-life values were obtained from the literature (M. Lammer and O. Schwerer, Handbook of Nuclear Data for Safeguards, Rep. INDC(NDS)-248, IAEA, Vienna, 1991; ref. [5]). Other factors were also studied to improve the accuracy of the data. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of highly enriched 239Pu and 240Pu have been measured. The alpha-particle energies obtained in the fitting were in agreement with those in ref. [5]. The fitted energy values were used throughout this work.

Raab, W.; Parus, J. L.

1994-01-01

245

A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays  

PubMed Central

Alpha- (?-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to ?-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5?Gy to either ?-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after ?-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to ?- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific. PMID:22619631

Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

2012-01-01

246

Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

2004-01-01

247

Dynamic radioactive particle source  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

2012-06-26

248

The emission probabilities of long range alpha particles from even-even 244-252Cm isotopes  

E-print Network

The alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even 244Cm, 246Cm, 248Cm, 250Cm and 252Cm isotopes have been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential with the fragments in equatorial configuration. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold reaction valley plot and by calculating the relative yield for the charge minimized fragments. In the alpha accompanied ternary fission of 244Cm isotope, the highest yield is found for the fragment combination 110Ru+4He+130Sn, which possess near doubly magic nuclei 130Sn. For the ternary fission of 246Cm, 248Cm, 250Cm and 252Cm isotopes with 4He as light charged particle, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination with doubly magic nuclei 132Sn as the heavier fragment. The emission probabilities and kinetic energies of long range alpha particle have been computed for the 242,244,246,248Cm isotopes and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The relative yields for the 4He accompanied ternary fission (equatorial and collinear) of 242-252Cm isotopes are compared with the corresponding yield for binary fission. The effect of deformation and orientation of fragments in the 4He accompanied ternary fission of 244-252Cm isotopes are studied. Our study reveals that the ground state deformation has an important role in the alpha accompanied ternary fission as that of shell effect.

K. P. Santhosh; Sreejith Krishnan; B. Priyanka

2014-09-02

249

The emission probabilities of long range alpha particles from even-even 244-252Cm isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even 244Cm, 246Cm, 248Cm, 250Cm and 252Cm isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of the Coulomb and proximity potential with the fragments in equatorial configuration. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold reaction valley plot and by calculating the relative yield for the charge minimized fragments. In the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the 244Cm isotope, the highest yield is found for the fragment combination 110Ru+4He+130Sn, which possess near doubly magic nuclei 130Sn. For the ternary fission of 246Cm, 248Cm, 250Cm and 252Cm isotopes with 4He as the light charged particle, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination with doubly magic nuclei 132Sn as the heavier fragment. The emission probabilities and kinetic energies of long range alpha particles have been computed for the 242,244,246,248Cm isotopes and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The relative yields for the 4He accompanied ternary fission (equatorial and collinear) of 242-252Cm isotopes are compared with the corresponding yield for binary fission. The effect of deformation and orientation of fragments in the 4He accompanied ternary fission of 244-252Cm isotopes are studied. Our study reveals that the ground state deformation has as an important role in the alpha accompanied ternary fission as that of the shell effect.

Santhosh, K. P.; Krishnan, Sreejith; Priyanka, B.

2014-10-01

250

Elementary particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

251

MCNPX alpha particle dose estimate to the skin tissue from a low-enriched uranium fuel fragment.  

PubMed

Three alpha volume sources (low-enriched uranium-U(3)Si) were analysed using Monte Carlo modelling in order to calculate the dose delivered to the dermis from a small embedded fuel fragment (sliver). Three shapes were analysed using MCNPX 2.6.0 code: sphere, cylinder and parallelepiped. Essentially, two kinds of runs were performed: count rate run and dosimetry run. The two results were combined to estimate dose coefficients that can be used for alpha dose assessments in the field. The two results were obtained for the 1 and 0 cm counting geometries. These results are very stable and show that the actual dose delivered to the skin per unit count rate for the recovered particle is independent of the shape of the volume alpha source. PMID:22003183

Atanackovic, J

2012-06-01

252

Auroral particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

Evans, David S.

1987-01-01

253

Stellar Helium Burning: a Further Measurement of the Beta-Delayed Alpha-Particle Emission of (16)N  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 12C(?,?)16O reaction is of critical importance for understanding stellar evolution. During helium burning this reaction competes with the triple-alpha reaction that forms carbon. The final carbon/oxygen ratio at the end of this burning stage largely determines the final stages of the star. The beta-delayed alpha-emission of 16N (i.e. prompt alpha-particles emitted from excited states of 16O populated by the slow beta-decay of 16N) has been predicted to provide a constraint on the cross section of this reaction, but requires a high sensitivity (B.R. ~ 10-9) measurement. The low energy portion of the alpha-particle spectrum has been predicted to provide a sensitive means to deduce the reduced alpha-particle width of the bound 1- state in 16O. In the past few years three attempts have been made to constrain the p-wave component of this cross section using the beta-delayed alpha-particle emission of 16N. In this work we have made a high statistics measurement of this spectrum as a continuation of our earlier low statistics Yale-UConn experiment. We have improved the statistics by a factor of more than 5, the energy resolution by 20%, and we demonstrate an understanding of our line shape from known and measured quantities. Our newly measured spectrum is compared to the three previous high statistics experiments and found to be consistent with the experimental results from Mainz and Seattle and inconsistent with those from TRIUMF. Our discrepancy with the TRIUMF results is in the width of the primary peak, with the largest differences (nearly a factor of two) near the region of the interference minimum. This region of the spectrum determines the size of the f-wave contribution to the low energy secondary maximum. This is crucial as the magnitude of the p-wave contribution only is of importance to astrophysics due to the low energy (~300 keV) that stellar helium burning occurs in massive stars. We conclude that with the current data sets the p-wave S-factor of the 12C(?,?)16O reaction cannot be determined at this stage with the accuracy (15-20%) required for the stellar evolution models developed by Woosley and Weaver.

France, Ralph Hayward, III

1997-11-01

254

A new real-time method for determining particles' sphericity and density: application to secondary organic aerosol formed by ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.  

PubMed

Particle volumes are most often obtained by measuring particle mobility size distributions and assuming that the particles are spherical. Particle volumes are then converted to mass loads by using particle densities that are commonly estimated from measured mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameters, assuming that the particles are spherical. For aspherical particles, these assumptions can introduce significant errors. We present in this work a new method that can be applied to any particle system to determine in real time whether the particles are spherical or not. We use our second-generation single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) to measure with extremely high precision the vacuum aerodynamic size distributions of particles that are classified by differential mobility analyzer and demonstrate that the line shape of these vacuum aerodynamic size distributions provide a way to unambiguously distinguish between spherical and aspherical particles. Moreover, the very same experimental system is used to obtain the size, density, composition, and dynamic shape factors of individual particles. We present an application of this method to secondary organic aerosols that are formed as a result of ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence and absence of an OH scavenger and find these particles to be spherical with densities of 1.198 +/- 0.004 and 1.213 +/- 0.003 g cm(-3), respectively. PMID:19031898

Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan

2008-11-01

255

Interaction of the human cytomegalovirus particle with the host cell induces hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha  

SciTech Connect

The cellular protein hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) was induced after infection of human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). HCMV irradiated with ultraviolet light (uv-HCMV) also elicited the effect, demonstrating that the response was provoked by interaction of the infecting virion with the cell and that viral gene expression was not required. Although induction of HIF-1{alpha} was initiated by an early event, accumulation of the protein was not detected until 9 hours post infection, with levels increasing thereafter. Infection with uv-HCMV resulted in increased abundance of HIF-1{alpha}-specific RNA, indicating stimulation of transcription. In addition, greater phosphorylation of the protein kinase Akt was observed, and the activity of this enzyme was required for induction of HIF-1{alpha} to occur. HIF-1{alpha} controls the expression of many cellular gene products; therefore the findings reveal new ways in which interaction of the HCMV particle with the host cell may cause significant alterations to cellular physiology.

McFarlane, Steven; Nicholl, Mary Jane; Sutherland, Jane S.; Preston, Chris M., E-mail: Christopher.preston@glasgow.ac.u

2011-05-25

256

Emission of Long-Range Alpha Particles in the Fission of U238 with 17.5MeV Protons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The angular distribution of long-range alpha particles from ternary fission induced by 17.5-MeV protons incident on U238 has been measured with respect to both the fission-fragment axis and the beam direction. For alpha particles emitted perpendicularly to the fragment direction, the distributions are found to be independent of the azimuthal angle about the fission-fragment separation axis and independent of the

R. A. Atneosen; T. D. Thomas; G. T. Garvey

1965-01-01

257

Alpha track analysis and fission track analysis for localizing actinide-bearing micro-particles in the Yenisey River bottom sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distribution of actinides in bottom sediment and flood land soil cores collected from the Yenisey River near the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC) were analyzed. Actinide-bearing micro-particles were localized using alpha track analysis (ATA) and fission track analysis (FTA). Different types of radioactive micro-particles were found by analysis of the ratios of fission tracks to ?-tracks from single particles.

I. E. Vlasova; St. N. Kalmykov; Yu. V. Konevnik; S. G. Simakin; I. S. Simakin; A. Yu. Anokhin; Yu. A. Sapozhnikov

2008-01-01

258

Use of infinitely thick source alpha particle pulse height distributions in the determination of individual specific alpha activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is presented in which material containing a complex mixture of alpha emitting radionuclides might be analyzed with minimal sample preparation and the individual specific activities of each alpha emitting species found. A theoretical relationship describing the pulse height distribution of an infinitely thick source of alpha activity is developed. This relationship is then fit to uranium and thorium

Kevin A. Phoenix

1997-01-01

259

Carbon particles  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1984-01-01

260

TEST PROCEDURE FOR GROSS ALPHA PARTICLE ACTIVITY IN DRINKING WATER: INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATIVE STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Gross alpha activity values were calculated with four different alpha emitting radionuclide standard counting efficiencies to see which standard was best for gross alpha activity determinations. Thorium-230, a pure alpha emitter, appeared to be the best standard for gross alpha c...

261

Automated image analysis of alpha-particle autoradiographs of human bone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Further techniques [4,5] for the analysis of CR-39 ?-particle autoradiographs have been developed for application to ?-autoradiography of autopsy bone at natural levels for exposure. The most significant new approach is the use of fully automated image analysis using a system developed in this laboratory. A 5 cm × 5 cm autoradiograph of tissue in which the activity is below 1 Bq kg -1 is scanned to both locate and measure the recorded ?-particle tracks at a rate of 5 cm 2/h. Improved methods of calibration have also been developed. The techniques are described and in order to illustrate their application, a bone sample contaminated with 239Pu is analysed. Results from natural levels are the subject of a separate publication.

Hatzialekou, Urania; Henshaw, Denis L.; Fews, A. Peter

1988-01-01

262

New particle formation during alpha- and beta-pinene oxidation by O3, OH and NO3, and the influence of water vapour: particle size distribution studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

New particle formation during the oxidation of a- and b-pinene (C10H16) by ozone, OH and NO3 was studied by measuring the particle size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer (TSI 3936). The results indicate a drastically higher nucleation potential of the ozonolysis than in the reaction with either OH or NO3. On the contrary, the contribution of the individual

B. Bonn; G. K. Moortgat

2002-01-01

263

Alpha-particle formation and decay rates from Skyrme-HFB wave functions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

? decay is treated microscopically, where the unstable mother nucleus and residual daughter nucleus are described using Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) wave functions, obtained with the Skyrme effective interaction. From these wave functions the amplitude for forming ? particles in the mother nucleus is computed. Two different Skyrme parametrizations with different pairing properties are compared, and we find good agreement with experiment for relative decay rates in both cases. The absolute values of the decay rates are underestimated.

Ward, D. E.; Carlsson, B. G.; Åberg, S.

2014-05-01

264

Radioimmunotherapy of Breast Cancer Metastases with Alpha-Particle-emitter 225Ac: Comparing Efficacy with 213Bi, 90Y  

PubMed Central

Alpha-particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. Alpha-particle-emitter 213Bi based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, prostate cancer and leukemia. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of 225Ac, the high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T1/2=45.6 mins) on site and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle-emitter 225Ac, parent of 213Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of 225Ac (400 nCi) labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in about 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to one year. Treatment with 225Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than 213Bi-7.16.4 (120 ?Ci) (median survival = 61 days, P=0.001), and 90Y-7.16.4 (120 ?Ci) (median survival = 50 days, P<0.001), as well as untreated control (median survival = 41 days, P=0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that 225Ac treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from 213Bi and 2.4 Gy from 90Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that 225Ac daughters, 221Fr and 213Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest 225Ac labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F.; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L.; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

2009-01-01

265

Radioimmunotherapy of breast cancer metastases with alpha-particle emitter 225Ac: comparing efficacy with 213Bi and 90Y.  

PubMed

alpha-Particles are suitable to treat cancer micrometastases because of their short range and very high linear energy transfer. alpha-Particle emitter (213)Bi-based radioimmunotherapy has shown efficacy in a variety of metastatic animal cancer models, such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Its clinical implementation, however, is challenging due to the limited supply of (225)Ac, high technical requirement to prepare radioimmunoconjugate with very short half-life (T(1/2) = 45.6 min) on site, and prohibitive cost. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac, parent of (213)Bi, in a mouse model of breast cancer metastases. A single administration of (225)Ac (400 nCi)-labeled anti-rat HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody (7.16.4) completely eradicated breast cancer lung micrometastases in approximately 67% of HER-2/neu transgenic mice and led to long-term survival of these mice for up to 1 year. Treatment with (225)Ac-7.16.4 is significantly more effective than (213)Bi-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 61 days; P = 0.001) and (90)Y-7.16.4 (120 microCi; median survival, 50 days; P < 0.001) as well as untreated control (median survival, 41 days; P < 0.0001). Dosimetric analysis showed that (225)Ac-treated metastases received a total dose of 9.6 Gy, significantly higher than 2.0 Gy from (213)Bi and 2.4 Gy from (90)Y. Biodistribution studies revealed that (225)Ac daughters, (221)Fr and (213)Bi, accumulated in kidneys and probably contributed to the long-term renal toxicity observed in surviving mice. These data suggest (225)Ac-labeled anti-HER-2/neu monoclonal antibody could significantly prolong survival in HER-2/neu-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:19920193

Song, Hong; Hobbs, Robert F; Vajravelu, Ravy; Huso, David L; Esaias, Caroline; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George

2009-12-01

266

Induction of linear tracks of DNA double-strand breaks by alpha-particle irradiation of cells.  

PubMed

Understanding how cells maintain genome integrity when challenged with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is of major importance, particularly since the discovery of multiple links of DSBs with genome instability and cancer-predisposition disorders. Ionizing radiation is the agent of choice to produce DSBs in cells; however, targeting DSBs and monitoring changes in their position over time can be difficult. Here we describe a procedure for induction of easily recognizable linear arrays of DSBs in nuclei of adherent eukaryotic cells by exposing the cells to alpha particles from a small Americium source (Box 1). Each alpha particle traversing the cell nucleus induces a linear array of DSBs, typically 10-20 DSBs per 10 mum track length. Because alpha particles cannot penetrate cell-culture plastic or coverslips, it is necessary to irradiate cells through a Mylar membrane. We describe setup and irradiation procedures for two types of experiments: immunodetection of DSB response proteins in fixed cells grown in Mylar-bottom culture dishes (Option A) and detection of fluorescently labeled DSB-response proteins in living cells irradiated through a Mylar membrane placed on top of the cells (Option B). Using immunodetection, recruitment of repair proteins to individual DSB sites as early as 30 s after irradiation can be detected. Furthermore, combined with fluorescence live-cell microscopy of fluorescently tagged DSB-response proteins, this technique allows spatiotemporal analysis of the DSB repair response in living cells. Although the procedures might seem a bit intimidating, in our experience, once the source and the setup are ready, it is easy to obtain results. Because the live-cell procedure requires more hands-on experience, we recommend starting with the fixed-cell application. PMID:18309310

Stap, Jan; Krawczyk, Przemek M; Van Oven, Carel H; Barendsen, Gerrit W; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Aten, Jacob A

2008-03-01

267

Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear generation of ozone and its photolysis into singlet delta oxygen. [Alpha Particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of measurements of Oâ yield in nuclear induced Oâ and Oâ-SFâ discharges created by bombardment with energetic particles from the ¹°B(n,..cap alpha..)⁷Li reaction are reported. Continuous irradiation at dose ratios of 10¹⁵⁻¹°sup 17\\/ eV.cm⁻³.s⁻¹ and pulsed irradiation (approx.10 ms FWHM) at a peak dose rate of approx.10²° eV.cm⁻³.s⁻¹ were conducted. At the lower dose rates, SFâ addition generally

Elsayed-Ali

1985-01-01

268

Development of sequence and regular band lasers for use as local oscillators in Thomson scattering alpha particle diagnostics (abstract)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heterodyne detection will be used to measure the scattered signal from a 100-MW pulsed CO2 laser Thomson scattered from energetic alpha particles. This measurement requires local oscillators displaced from the pump line by 6 to 21 GHz. We are developing cw sequence and regular band N2O and CO2 lasers which provide many lines in the required frequency range. The sequence lines are obtained by using a small in-cavity hot cell. Operating characteristics will be discussed for a variety of experimental arrangements.

Bennett, C. A.; Hutchinson, D. P.; Vander Sluis, K. L.; Staats, P. A.

1985-05-01

269

A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

2003-03-26

270

1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I  

SciTech Connect

We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.

K. Ghantous, N.N. Gorelenkov, C. Kessel, F. Poli

2013-01-30

271

Gamma-H2AX foci in cells exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the cellular effects of exposure to mixed beams of high and low linear energy transfer radiation. So far, the effects of combined exposures have mainly been assessed with clonogenic survival or cytogenetic methods, and the results are contradictory. The gamma-H2AX assay has up to now not been applied in this context, and it is a promising tool for investigating the early cellular response to mixed beam irradiation. Purpose To determine the dose response and repair kinetics of gamma-H2AX ionizing radiation-induced foci in VH10 human fibroblasts exposed to mixed beams of 241Am alpha particles and X-rays. Results VH10 human fibroblasts were irradiated with each radiation type individually or both in combination at 37°C. Foci were scored for repair kinetics 0.5, 1, 3 and 24 h after irradiation (one dose per irradiation type), and for dose response at the 1 h time point. The dose response effect of mixed beam was additive, and the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles (as compared to X-rays) was of 0.76 ± 0.52 for the total number of foci, and 2.54 ± 1.11 for large foci. The repair kinetics for total number of foci in cells exposed to mixed beam irradiation was intermediate to that of cells exposed to alpha particles and X-rays. However, for mixed beam-irradiated cells the frequency and area of large foci were initially lower than predicted and increased during the first 3 hours of repair (while the predicted number and area did not). Conclusions The repair kinetics of large foci after mixed beam exposure was significantly different from predicted based on the effect of the single dose components. The formation of large foci was delayed and they did not reach their maximum area until 1 h after irradiation. We hypothesize that the presence of low X-ray-induced damage engages the DNA repair machinery leading to a delayed DNA damage response to the more complex DNA damage induced by alpha particles. PMID:23121736

2012-01-01

272

Prerainbow Oscillations in $^3$He Scattering from the Hoyle State of $^{12}$c and Alpha Particle Condensation  

E-print Network

$^3$He+$^{12}$C scattering is studied in a coupled channel method by using a double folding model with microscopic wave functions of $^{12}$C. Experimental angular distributions in elastic and inelastic scattering to the $2^+$ (4.44 MeV), 0$^+_2$ (7.65 MeV) and 3$^-$ (9.63 MeV) states of $^{12}$C are well reproduced. It is found that the Airy minimum of the prerainbow oscillations for the Hoyle state is considerably shifted to a larger angle due to its dilute density distribution compared with that of the normal ground state in agreement with the idea of $\\alpha$ particle condensation.

S. Ohkubo; Y. Hirabayashi

2011-02-11

273

Redefining relative biological effectiveness in the context of the EQDX formalism: implications for alpha-particle emitter therapy.  

PubMed

Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (?RPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, ?RPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of ?-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by ?-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or ?-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(?/?), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(?/?), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(?/?), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the ? particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from irradiation of a breast cancer cell line. Radiobiological parameters are obtained using the linear quadratic model to fit cell survival data for MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that were irradiated with either ? particles or a single fraction of low-LET (137)Cs ? rays. From these, the linear coefficient for both the biologically effective dose (BED) and the EQD2(?/?) response lines were derived for fractionated irradiation. The standard RBE calculation, using the traditional single fraction reference radiation, gave RBE values that ranged from 2.4 for a surviving fraction of 0.82-6.0 for a surviving fraction of 0.02, while the dose-independent RBE2(4.6) value was 4.5 for all surviving fraction values. Furthermore, bioeffect modeling with RBE2(?/?) and EQD2(?/?) demonstrated the capacity to predict the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with acute and fractionated low-LET radiation, ? particles and chronic exponentially decreasing dose rates of low-LET radiation. RBE2(?/?) is independent of absorbed dose for ?-particle emitters and it provides a more logical framework for data reporting and conversion to equieffective dose than the conventional dose-dependent definition of RBE. Moreover, it provides a much needed foundation for the ongoing development of an ?-particle dosimetry paradigm and will facilitate the use of tolerance dose data available from external beam radiation therapy, thereby helping to develop ?RPT as a single modality as well as for combination therapies. PMID:24502376

Hobbs, Robert F; Howell, Roger W; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

2014-01-01

274

Redefining Relative Biological Effectiveness in the Context of the EQDX Formalism: Implications for Alpha-Particle Emitter Therapy.  

PubMed

Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (?RPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, ?RPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of ?-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by ?-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or ?-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(?/?), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(?/?), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(?/?), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the ? particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from irradiation of a breast cancer cell line. Radiobiological parameters are obtained using the linear quadratic model to fit cell survival data for MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that were irradiated with either ? particles or a single fraction of low-LET (137)Cs ? rays. From these, the linear coefficient for both the biologically effective dose (BED) and the EQD2(?/?) response lines were derived for fractionated irradiation. The standard RBE calculation, using the traditional single fraction reference radiation, gave RBE values that ranged from 2.4 for a surviving fraction of 0.82-6.0 for a surviving fraction of 0.02, while the dose-independent RBE2(4.6) value was 4.5 for all surviving fraction values. Furthermore, bioeffect modeling with RBE2(?/?) and EQD2(?/?) demonstrated the capacity to predict the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with acute and fractionated low-LET radiation, ? particles and chronic exponentially decreasing dose rates of low-LET radiation. RBE2(?/?) is independent of absorbed dose for ?-particle emitters and it provides a more logical framework for data reporting and conversion to equieffective dose than the conventional dose-dependent definition of RBE. Moreover, it provides a much needed foundation for the ongoing development of an ?-particle dosimetry paradigm and will facilitate the use of tolerance dose data available from external beam radiation therapy, thereby helping to develop ?RPT as a single modality as well as for combination therapies. PMID:24377718

Hobbs, Robert F; Howell, Roger W; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

2013-12-30

275

Redefining Relative Biological Effectiveness in the Context of the EQDX Formalism: Implications for Alpha-Particle Emitter Therapy  

PubMed Central

Alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy (?RPT) is currently enjoying increasing attention as a viable alternative to chemotherapy for targeting of disseminated micrometastatic disease. In theory, ?RPT can be personalized through pre-therapeutic imaging and dosimetry. However, in practice, given the particularities of ?-particle emissions, a dosimetric methodology that accurately predicts the thresholds for organ toxicity has not been reported. This is in part due to the fact that the biological effects caused by ?-particle radiation differ markedly from the effects caused by traditional external beam (photon or electron) radiation or ?-particle emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The concept of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used to quantify the ratio of absorbed doses required to achieve a given biological response with alpha particles versus a reference radiation (typically a beta emitter or external beam radiation). However, as conventionally defined, the RBE varies as a function of absorbed dose and therefore a single RBE value is limited in its utility because it cannot be used to predict response over a wide range of absorbed doses. Therefore, efforts are underway to standardize bioeffect modeling for different fractionation schemes and dose rates for both nuclear medicine and external beam radiotherapy. Given the preponderant use of external beams of radiation compared to nuclear medicine in cancer therapy, the more clinically relevant quantity, the 2 Gy equieffective dose, EQD2(?/?), has recently been proposed by the ICRU. In concert with EQD2(?/?), we introduce a new, redefined RBE quantity, named RBE2(?/?), as the ratio of the two linear coefficients that characterize the ? particle absorbed dose-response curve and the low-LET megavoltage photon 2 Gy fraction equieffective dose-response curve. The theoretical framework for the proposed new formalism is presented along with its application to experimental data obtained from irradiation of a breast cancer cell line. Radiobiological parameters are obtained using the linear quadratic model to fit cell survival data for MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that were irradiated with either ? particles or a single fraction of low-LET 137Cs ? rays. From these, the linear coefficient for both the biologically effective dose (BED) and the EQD2(?/?) response lines were derived for fractionated irradiation. The standard RBE calculation, using the traditional single fraction reference radiation, gave RBE values that ranged from 2.4 for a surviving fraction of 0.82–6.0 for a surviving fraction of 0.02, while the dose-independent RBE2(4.6) value was 4.5 for all surviving fraction values. Furthermore, bioeffect modeling with RBE2(?/?) and EQD2(?/?) demonstrated the capacity to predict the surviving fraction of cells irradiated with acute and fractionated low-LET radiation, ? particles and chronic exponentially decreasing dose rates of low-LET radiation. RBE2(?/?) is independent of absorbed dose for ?-particle emitters and it provides a more logical framework for data reporting and conversion to equieffective dose than the conventional dose-dependent definition of RBE. Moreover, it provides a much needed foundation for the ongoing development of an ?-particle dosimetry paradigm and will facilitate the use of tolerance dose data available from external beam radiation therapy, thereby helping to develop ?RPT as a single modality as well as for combination therapies. PMID:24502376

Hobbs, Robert F.; Howell, Roger W.; Song, Hong; Baechler, Sébastien; Sgouros, George

2014-01-01

276

Particle blender  

SciTech Connect

An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

Willey, M.G.

1981-06-09

277

Particle blender  

DOEpatents

An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

Willey, Melvin G. (Knoxville, TN)

1981-01-01

278

Determination of 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratio for a nuclear bomb particle using X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with gamma-ray spectrometry and non-destructive alpha-particle spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nuclear bomb particle from Thule containing Pu and U was analyzed using X-ray spectrometry in combination with gamma-ray spectrometry and non-destructive alpha-spectrometry. The main objective was to investigate the possibility to determine the 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratios. Previously, X-ray spectrometry together with the above-mentioned methods has been successfully applied for radiochemically processed samples, but not for individual particles.

R. Pöllänen; K. Ruotsalainen; H. Toivonen

2009-01-01

279

Use of infinitely thick source alpha particle pulse height distributions in the determination of individual specific alpha activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method is presented in which material containing a complex mixture of alpha emitting radionuclides might be analyzed with minimal sample preparation and the individual specific activities of each alpha emitting species found. A theoretical relationship describing the pulse height distribution of an infinitely thick source of alpha activity is developed. This relationship is then fit to uranium and thorium oxide pulse height distribution data obtained with a PIPS detector/MCA counting system, confirming the validity of the theoretical pulse height distribution. The method does not require complex and time consuming sample preparation common to conventional alpha spectroscopy. Results obtained from fits to the pulse height distributions are in agreement with the specific alpha activities of the oxides.

Phoenix, Kevin A.

1997-10-01

280

Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling

Alexander A Plionis; Dominic S Peterson; Lav Tandon; Stephen P Lamont

2009-01-01

281

Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling

A A Plionis; D S Peterson; L Tandon; S P LaMont

2010-01-01

282

ALPHA PARTICLE ENERGY RESPONSE OF 1-MM-THICK POLYCARBONATE TRACK DETECTORS BY 50 HZ-HV ELECTROCHEMICAL ETCHING METHOD.  

PubMed

The electrochemical etching (ECE) method enlarges charged particle tracks to enhance its applications in particular in health physics and radiation dosimetry. The ECE method is usually based on using a high frequency-high voltage (HF-HV) generator with 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs). The authors' recent studies on nitrogen and helium ions and alpha tracks in 1-mm-thick large-size PCTDs under a 50 Hz-HV ECE process provided promising results. In this study, alpha track efficiency and mean track diameter versus energy responses and registration energy range as well as alpha and background track shapes under three sets of 50 Hz-4, 5 and 6 kV applied field conditions have been studied and are reported. The efficiency versus alpha energy has a Bragg-type response from ?15 keV to ?4.5 MeV for the field conditions applied with an efficiency value of 40-50 % at the Bragg peak. The results are presented and discussed. PMID:25301970

Sohrabi, M; Ramezani, V

2014-10-01

283

Determination of plutonium isotopes in bilberry using liquid scintillation spectrometry and alpha-particle spectrometry.  

PubMed

This paper presents ?-particle spectrometry and liquid scintillation spectrometry methods to determine plutonium isotopes in bilberry. The analytical procedure involves sample preparation steps for ashing, digestion of bilberry samples, radiochemical separation of plutonium radioisotopes and their measurement. The validity of the method was checked for coherence using the ? test, z-test, relative bias and relative uncertainty outlier tests. The results indicated that the recommended procedures for both measurement systems could be successfully applied for the accurate determination of plutonium activities in bilberry samples. PMID:24359792

Seferino?lu, Meryem; Aslan, Nazife; Kurt, Aylin; Erden, P?nar Esra; Mert, Hülya

2014-05-01

284

Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Alpha-Particles and Protons from Sm-144  

E-print Network

to the second switching magnet were made of 0.29- mm tantalum in order to minimize slit-edge scat- tering. No slits were placed in the scattering chamber. All collimators were thus located such that slit-scattered n particles would have to tra- verse... from a 95/q en- riched isotope obtained from the Oak Ridge Nation- al Laboratory isotopes sales division. The Sm,O, was reduced in a tantalum-tube electron gun by heating in the presence of lanthanum metal to a temperature of approximately 1500'F...

Barker, J. H.; Hiebert, John C.

1971-01-01

285

Elastic and Inelastic-Scattering of Alpha-Particles from Ba-138  

E-print Network

PHYSI CA L R EVI EW C VOLUME 6, NUMBER 5 NOVEMB ER 1972 138Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of n Particles from Ba J. H. Barker* and J. C. Hiebert Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 8 June 1972) Differential cross... multiplets at 3.34 and 3.50 MeV. Values of P&R' are obtained for all observed levels. Reasonable agreement for excitation en- ergies and J~ assignments has been obtained between the present results and previous experi- mental measurements and with recent...

Barker, J. H.; Hiebert, John C.

1972-01-01

286

Gamma Rays from Li7, F19, Ne22, and Na22 Produced by Alpha-Particle Bombardment of Lithium and Fluorine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of the gamma radiation following the inelastic scattering of alpha particles in thin fluorine and lithium targets has led to the discovery of new levels in the compound nuclei Na23 and B11. The (alpha, p) and (alpha, n) reactions in F19 have led to the establishment of the 1.28-Mev level as first-excited state of Ne22, and the discovery

N. P. Heydenburg; G. M. Temmer

1954-01-01

287

Simulation of the alpha particle heating and the helium ash source in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A guiding center orbit following code, which incorporates a set of non-singular coordinates for orbit integration, was developed and applied to investigate the alpha particle heating in an ITER-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier. It is found that a relatively large q (safety factor) value can significantly broaden the alpha heating profile in comparison with the local heating approximation; this broadening is due to the finite orbit width effects; when the orbit width is much smaller than the scale length of the alpha particle source profile, the heating profile agrees with the source profile, otherwise, the heating profile can be significantly broadened. It is also found that the stagnation particles move to the magnetic axis during the slowing-down process, thus the effect of stagnation orbits is not beneficial to the helium ash removal. The source profile of helium ash is broadened in comparison with the alpha source profile, which is similar to the heating profile.

Ye, Lei; Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

2014-12-01

288

Characterisation of a setup for mixed beam exposures of cells to 241Am alpha particles and X-rays.  

PubMed

Exposure of humans to mixed fields of high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation occurs in many situations-for example, in urban areas with high levels of indoor radon as well as background gamma radiation, during airplane flights or certain forms of radiation therapy. From the perspective of health risk associated with exposure to mixed fields, it is important to understand the interactions between different radiation types. In most cellular investigations on mixed beams, two types of irradiations have been applied sequentially. Simultaneous irradiation is the desirable scenario but requires a dedicated irradiation facility. The authors have constructed a facility where cells can be simultaneously exposed to (241)Am alpha particles and 190-kV X-rays at 37°C. This study presents the technical details and the dosimetry of the setup, as well as validates the performance of the setup for clonogenic survival in AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. No significant synergistic effect was observed. The relative biological effectiveness of the alpha particles was 2.56 for 37 % and 1.90 for 10 % clonogenic survival. PMID:22434924

Staaf, Elina; Brehwens, Karl; Haghdoost, Siamak; Pachnerová-Brabcová, Katerina; Czub, Joanna; Braziewicz, Janusz; Nievaart, Sander; Wojcik, Andrzej

2012-09-01

289

Determination of alpha-particle track depths in CR-39 detector from their cross-sections and replica heights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A challenging task in the application of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) is the measurement of depths of the tracks. One approach involves breaking and polishing the side of SSNTDs to reveal the cross-sections of the tracks for direct measurements. Recently, surface profilometry was used to measure the heights of the replicas of alpha-particle tracks to give the track depths. In the present work, systematic comparisons among the track depths for alpha-particles with normal incidence and different incident energies were made for these two methods. After irradiation, the detectors were etched in a 6.25 N aqueous solution of NaOH at 70 °C. Both long etching time of 15 h (to produce spherical-phase tracks) and short etching time from 1 to 8 h (to produce sharp-phase tracks) were used. Good agreement was achieved between the two methods for spherical-phase tracks but not for sharp-phase tracks. It has been found that the surface profilometry method only works for replicas for spherical-phase tracks. Replicas for sharp-phase tracks are easier to collapse or deform, so the surface profilometry method may not give correct results.

Ng, F. M. F.; Luk, K. Y.; Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

2007-10-01

290

Non-gyrotropic proton and alpha-particle velocity distributions in the solar wind: TAUS observations and stability analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ion velocity distribution functions have been measured with high time resolution by the TAUS plasma instrument on the PHOBOS mission to Mars in 1989. The unambiguous separation of protons and alpha-particles by TAUS enabled us to study the nonthermal features of their distributions separately and to analyze the stability of the distributions against excitation of waves in the cyclotron-frequency domain. Typical nonthermal features include temperature anisotropies, with T(sub perpendicular) larger than T(sub parallel), and ion beam populations drifting along the local magnetic field direction. Also, distinctly non-gyrotropic alpha-particle velocity distributions were sometimes found. Non-gyrotropy strongly changes the wave dispersion and gives rise to new growing modes, related to the coupling of the standard wave modes existing in gyrotropic plasma. It is found that for the measured non-gyrotropic ion distributions the right-hand polarized wave can also be excited by a temperature anistropy instead of the usual beam drift.

Astudillo, H. F.; Marsch, E.; Livi, S.; Rosenbauer, H.

1995-01-01

291

Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

2001-01-01

292

Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1) Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation  

PubMed Central

This study examined alpha (?-) particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1) for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to ?-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of ?-particle exposure. PMID:23097634

Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew

2012-01-01

293

Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In tokamaks, fusion generated ? particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient ?? of LH waves due to ? particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that ?? increases with the parallel refraction index n ?, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ? over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient ?? increases with n e when n e ? 8 × 1019 m-3, while decreases with n e when n e becomes larger, and there is a peak value of ?? when n e ? 8 × 1019 m-1 for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of ?? with n ? being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n ? being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

Wang, J.; Zhang, X.; Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

2014-12-01

294

Particle aggregation.  

PubMed

A basic problem in marine biogeochemistry is understanding material and elemental distributions and fluxes in the oceans, and a key part of this problem is understanding the processes that affect particulate material in the ocean. Aggregation of particulate material is a primary process because it alters the transport properties of particulate material and provides a mechanism for transferring material from the dissolved into the particulate pools. Aggregation theory not only provides a framework for understanding these processes, but it also provides a means for making predictions and has been successfully used to predict maximum particle concentrations in the oceans and the fate of diatom blooms (including those from iron fertilization), the size spectra of particles in the oceans, and the size distributions of trace metals. Here we review the basic theory involved, summarize recent developments, and explore unresolved issues. PMID:21141030

Burd, Adrian B; Jackson, George A

2009-01-01

295

Particle acceleration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

1986-01-01

296

Applications of 211At and 223Ra in Targeted Alpha-Particle Radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with ?-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used ?-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted ?-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

2012-01-01

297

Applications of 211At and 223Ra in targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.  

PubMed

Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with ?-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used ?-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted ?-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

2011-10-01

298

Alpha-Particle Emitting 213Bi-Anti-EGFR Immunoconjugates Eradicate Tumor Cells Independent of Oxygenation  

PubMed Central

Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET ?-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound ?-particle emitting 213Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1?. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml–1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5–12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that ?-particle emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:23724085

Gaertner, Florian C.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

2013-01-01

299

Improve the catalytic activity of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in decomposition of ammonium perchlorate by coating amorphous carbon on their surface  

SciTech Connect

Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value of the designed synthetic system, respectively. The sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with diameter about 25 nm on average were encapsulated into carbon shells to fabricate a novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C) through the coating experiments. The catalytic performance of the products on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which show that {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell composites have higher catalytic activity than that of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. -- Graphical abstract: The catalytic performance of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Sphere- and pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles have been selectively synthesized using NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O and NaOH solution to adjust the pH value. {yields} A novel core-shell composite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C core-shell structured composite) has been successfully synthesized using sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles as the cores and glucose as the source of carbon. {yields} The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of pod-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, sphere-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-C are reduced by 72, 81 and 109 {sup o}C, respectively, which shows that these materials have high catalytic activity.

Zhang Yifu [Engineering Research Center of Organosilicon Compound and Material, Ministry of Education of China, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu Xinghai, E-mail: liuxh@whu.edu.c [School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nie Jiaorong [Jianghe Chemical Factory of CSSG, Yuan'an 444200 (China); Yu Lei; Zhong Yalan [Engineering Research Center of Organosilicon Compound and Material, Ministry of Education of China, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Huang Chi, E-mail: chihuang@whu.edu.c [Engineering Research Center of Organosilicon Compound and Material, Ministry of Education of China, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2011-02-15

300

Transcriptional Response of Human Cells to Microbeam Irradiation with 2.1 MeV Alpha Particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the next decades an increasing number of human beings in space will be simultaneously exposed to different stimuli especially microgravity and radiation To assess the risks for humans during long-duration space missions the complex interplay of these parameters at the cellular level must be understood Cellular stress protection responses lead to increased transcription of several genes via modulation of transcription factors Activation of the Nuclear Factor kappa B NF- kappa B pathway as a possible anti-apoptotic route represents such an important cellular stress response A screening assay for detection of NF- kappa B-dependent gene activation using the destabilized variant of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein d2EGFP as reporter protein had been developed It consists of Human Embryonic Kidney HEK 293 Cells stably transfected with a receptor-reporter-construct carrying d2EGFP under the control of a NF- kappa B response element Clones positive for Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha TNF- alpha inducible d2EGFP expression were selected as cellular reporters Irradiation was performed either with X-rays 150 kV 19 mA at DLR Cologne or with 2 1 MeV alpha particles LET sim 160 keV mu m at PTB Braunschweig After irradiation the following biological endpoints were determined i cell survival via the colony forming ability test ii time-dependent activation of NF- kappa B dependent d2EGFP gene expression using flow cytometry iii quantitative RT-PCR

Hellweg, C. E.; Bogner, S.; Spitta, L.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.; Greif, K. D.; Giesen, U.

301

Characterization of alpha-particle tracks in cellulose nitrate LR-115 detectors at various incident energies and angles.  

PubMed

Cellulose nitrate LR-115 detectors were irradiated with alpha particles in the energy range from 1 to 5 MeV at incident angles from 20° to 90°, using an (241)Am source. After etching in a 2.5 N NaOH solution kept at 60 °C for various periods, the diameters of the major and minor axes of the track openings, track growing rate, track etch rate, etching ratio, and track length were found as a function of energies and incident angles. The measured track parameters were compared to calculated values, and the etching ratio was formulated as a Durrani-Green's function of the incident energy and angle. PMID:23727556

Mheemeed, A K; Hussein, A Kh; Kheder, R B

2013-09-01

302

Development of a strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source for a confined alpha particle measurement at ITER.  

PubMed

A strongly focusing high-intensity He(+) ion source has been designed and constructed as a beam source for a high-energy He(0) beam probe system for diagnosis of fusion produced alpha particles in the thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The He(+) beam was extracted from the ion source at an acceleration voltage of 18-35 kV. Temperature distributions of the beam target were observed with an IR camera. The 1/e-holding beam profile half-width was about 15 mm at optimum perveance (Perv) of 0.03 (I(beam)=2.4 A). A beam current about 3 A was achieved at an acceleration voltage of 26.7 kV with an arc power of 10 kW (Perv=0.023). PMID:18315239

Kisaki, M; Shinto, K; Kobuchi, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Tsumori, K; Nishiura, M; Kaneko, O; Matsuda, Y; Wada, M; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Hirano, Y

2008-02-01

303

A comparison of the effects of ultraviolet radiation on CR-39 and lexan plastics irradiated by alpha particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study of the effects of UV radiation on the damaged tracks of alpha particles and fission fragments in CR-39 and Lexan plastic detectors is reported. The increase in the track-density caused by UV exposure was found to be less than 40%. While the track-diameter in CR-39 plastics could be enhanced by 100%, the increase in Lexan was found to be more than 40%. Both the increase in the track-diameter and the track-density tend to saturate after the samples were exposed to the carbon are source for 3 h or to sunlight for 5 d approximately. Based on the large increase in the track-diameter, an application to measure personal doses of UV radiation using CR-39 track detectors is proposed.

Wong, C. F.; Hoberg, P.

1982-12-01

304

Coincidence measurements between alpha particles and gamma rays in reactions induced by 85 and 155 MeV ¹²C on ¹??Sm  

E-print Network

COINCIDENCE MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN ALPHA PARTICLES AND GAMMA RAYS 12 154 IN REACTIONS INDUCED BY 85 AND 155 MEV C ON Sm A Thesis by STEVEN EDWARD CALA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1978 Major Subject: Chemistry COINCIDENCE MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN ALPHA PARTICLES AND GAMMA RAYS 12 154 IN REACTIONS INDUCED BY 85 AND 155 MEV C ON Sm A Thesis by STEVEN EDWARD CALA Approved...

Cala, Steven Edward

2012-06-07

305

Complex aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to mixed beams of (241)Am alpha particles and X-rays.  

PubMed

Modern radiotherapy treatment modalities are associated with undesired out-of-field exposure to complex mixed beams of high and low energy transfer (LET) radiation that can give rise to secondary cancers. The biological effectiveness of mixed beams is not known. The aim of the investigation was the analysis of chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) exposed to a mixed beam of X-rays and alpha particles. Using a dedicated exposure facility PBL were exposed to increasing doses of alpha particles (from (241)Am), X-rays and a mixture of both. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed in chromosomes 2, 8 and 14 using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The found and expected frequencies of simple and complex aberrations were compared. Simple aberrations showed linear dose-response relationships with doses. A higher than expected frequency of simple aberrations was only observed after the highest mixed beam dose. A linear-quadratic dose response curve for complex aberrations was observed after mixed-beam exposure. Higher than expected frequencies of complex aberrations were observed for the two highest doses. Both the linear-quadratic dose-response relationship and the calculation of expected frequencies show that exposure of PBL to mixed beams of high and low LET radiation leads to a higher than expected frequency of complex-type aberrations. Because chromosomal changes are associated with cancer induction this result may imply that the cancer risk of exposure to mixed beams in radiation oncology may be higher than expected based on the additive action of the individual dose components. PMID:23669292

Staaf, Elina; Deperas-Kaminska, Marta; Brehwens, Karl; Haghdoost, Siamak; Czub, Joanna; Wojcik, Andrzej

2013-08-30

306

Final Report (1994 to 1996) Diagnostic of the Spatial and Velocity Distribution of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Fusion Reactor using Beat-wave Generated Lower Hybrid Wave  

SciTech Connect

The alpha particles in a fusion reactor play a key role in the sustaining the fusion reaction. It is the heating provided by the alpha particles that help a fusion reactor operating in the ignition regime. It is, therefore, essential to understand the behavior of the alpha population both in real space and velocity space in order to design the optimal confinement device for fusion application. Moreover, the alphas represent a strong source of free energy that may generate plasma instabilities. Theoretical studies has identified the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) as an instability that can be excited by the alpha population in a toroidal device. Since the alpha has an energy of 3.5 MeV, a good confinement device will retain it in the interior of the plasma. Therefore, alpha measurement system need to probe the interior of a high density plasma. Due to the conducting nature of a plasma, wave with frequencies below the plasma frequency can not penetrate into the interior of the plasma where the alphas reside. This project uses a wave that can interact with the perpendicular motion of the alphas to probe its characteristics. However, this wave (the lower hybrid wave) is below the plasma frequency and can not be directly launched from the plasma edge. This project was designed to non-linearly excite the lower hybrid in the interior of a magnetized plasma and measure its interaction with a fast ion population.

Hwang, D.Q.; Horton, R.D.; Evans, R.W.

1999-06-03

307

Inner heliosphere spatial gradients of GCR protons and alpha particles in the low GeV range  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spacecraft Ulysses was launched in October 1990 in the maximum phase of solar cycle 22, reached its final, highly inclined (80.2°) Keplerian orbit around the Sun in February 1992, and was finally switched off in June 2009. The Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) aboard Ulysses measures electrons from 3 MeV to a few GeV and protons and helium in the energy range from 6 MeV/nucleon to above 2 GeV/nucleon. In order to investigate the radial and latitudinal gradients of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), it is essential to know their intensity variations for a stationary observer in the heliosphere because the Ulysses measurements reflect not only the spatial but also the temporal variation of the energetic particle intensities. This was accomplished in the past with the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-J (IMP 8) until it was lost in 2006. Fortunately, the satellite-borne experiment PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) was launched in June 2006 and can be used as a reliable 1 AU baseline for measurements of the KET aboard Ulysses. With these tools at hand, we have the opportunity to determine the spatial gradients of GCR protons and alpha particles at about 0.1 to 1 GeV/n in the inner heliosphere during the extended minimum of solar cycle 23. We then compare these A<0 magnetic epoch results with previous Ulysses/KET findings from the preceding A>0 cycle.

Gieseler, J.; Boezio, M.; Casolino, M.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Heber, B.; Martucci, M.; Picozza, P.

2013-12-01

308

Calculation of absorbed fractions to human skeletal tissues due to alpha particles using the Monte Carlo and 3-D chord-based transport techniques.  

PubMed

Absorbed fraction (AF) calculations to the human skeletal tissues due to alpha particles are of interest to the internal dosimetry of occupationally exposed workers and members of the public. The transport of alpha particles through the skeletal tissue is complicated by the detailed and complex microscopic histology of the skeleton. In this study, both Monte Carlo and chord-based techniques were applied to the transport of alpha particles through 3-D microCT images of the skeletal microstructure of trabecular spongiosa. The Monte Carlo program used was 'Visual Monte Carlo--VMC'. VMC simulates the emission of the alpha particles and their subsequent energy deposition track. The second method applied to alpha transport is the chord-based technique, which randomly generates chord lengths across bone trabeculae and the marrow cavities via alternate and uniform sampling of their cumulative density functions. This paper compares the AF of energy to two radiosensitive skeletal tissues, active marrow and shallow active marrow, obtained with these two techniques. PMID:17569685

Hunt, J G; Watchman, C J; Bolch, W E

2007-01-01

309

Correct Identification of Energetic Alpha and Proton Tracks in Experiments on CR-39 Charged Particle Detection during Hydrogen Desorption from Pd/PdO:Hx Heterostructure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of correct identification of energetic alpha and proton tracks, observed after hydrogen desorption from Pd/PdO:Hx samples, are presented. Using CR-39 plastic track detector we unambiguously identified tracks of as minimum two groups of alpha particles with energies 10-13 and 15-17.5 MeV. It was also confirmed the emission of protons with energies ~1.7-1.9 MeV.

Roussetski, A. S.; Lipson, A. G.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Saunin, E. I.

310

Rejoining of double strand breaks in normal human and ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts after exposure to 60Co gamma-rays, 241Am alpha-particles or bleomycin.  

PubMed

The rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (dsb) induced by 60Co gamma-rays, 241Am alpha-particles or bleomycin was measured by neutral filter elution. In agreement with their colony-forming ability, ataxia-telangiectasia cells (AT2BE) and normal fibroblasts exhibited similar dsb rejoining capacity following alpha-irradiation, but showed marked differences in the rejoining kinetics of dsb induced by gamma-rays or bleomycin. PMID:2435666

Coquerelle, T M; Weibezahn, K F; Lücke-Huhle, C

1987-02-01

311

Microfabricated particle focusing device  

DOEpatents

A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

2013-04-23

312

Targeting Aberrant DNA double strand break repair in triple negative breast cancer with alpha particle emitter radiolabeled anti-EGFR antibody  

PubMed Central

The higher potential efficacy of alpha-particle radiopharmaceutical therapy lies in the 3 to 8-fold greater biological effectiveness (RBE) of alpha particles relative to photon or beta-particle radiation. This greater RBE, however, also applies to normal tissue, thereby reducing the potential advantage of high RBE. Since alpha particles typically cause DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), targeting tumors that are defective in DSB repair effectively increases the RBE, yielding a secondary, RBE-based differentiation between tumor and normal tissue that is complementary to conventional, receptor-mediated tumor targeting. In some triple negative breast cancers (TNBC, ER?/PR?/HER-2?), germline mutation in BRCA-1, a key gene in homologous recombination (HR) DSB repair, predisposes patients to early onset of breast cancer. These patients have few treatment options once the cancer has metastasized. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of alpha particle emitter, 213Bi labeled anti-EGFR antibody, Cetuximab, in BRCA-1 defective TNBC. 213Bi-Cetuximab was found to be significantly more effective in the BRCA-1 mutated TNBC cell line HCC1937 than BRCA-1 competent TNBC cell MDA-MB-231. siRNA knockdown of BRCA-1 or DNA-PKcs, a key gene in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DSB repair pathway, also sensitized TNBC cells to 213Bi-Cetuximab. Furthermore, the small molecule inhibitor of DNA-PKcs, NU7441, sensitized BRCA-1 competent TNBC cells to alpha particle radiation. Immunofluorescent staining of ?H2AX foci and comet assay confirmed that enhanced RBE is caused by impaired DSB repair. These data offer a novel strategy for enhancing conventional receptor-mediated targeting with an additional, potentially synergistic radiobiological targeting that could be applied to TNBC. PMID:23873849

Song, Hong; Hedayati, Mohammad; Hobbs, Robert F.; Shao, Chunbo; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Sgouros, George

2013-01-01

313

Nickel-59 in Surface Layers of Lunar Basalt 74275: Implications for the Solar Alpha Particle Flux  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

By using AMS we have profiled 59 Ni/Ni ratios in lunar basalt 74275. Activities (dpm 59 Ni/[kg Fe]) range from 120 to 10 at depths (mg/cm 2) from about 30 to 650. Modeling results hint at higher solar alpha fluxes during the last about 0.5 My than during the last approximately 1 My.

Schnabel, C.; Xue, S.; Ma, P.; Herzog, G. F.; Fifield, K.; Cresswell, R. G.; diTada, M. L.; Hausladen, Paul; Reedy, R. C.

2000-01-01

314

Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm2 or 1800 cm2 counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of 210Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing 222Rn progenies from the samples.

Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Rielage, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.

2013-08-01

315

Screening materials with the XIA UltraLo alpha particle counter at Southern Methodist University  

SciTech Connect

Southern Methodist University houses one of five existing commercially available UltraLo 1800 production model alpha counters made by XIA LLC. The instrument has an electron drift chamber with a 707 cm{sup 2} or 1800 cm{sup 2} counting region which is determined by selecting the inner electrode size. The SMU team operating this device is part of the SuperCDMS screening working group, and uses the alpha counter to study the background rates from the decay of radon in materials used to construct the SuperCDMS experiment. We have studied four acrylic samples obtained from the MiniCLEAN direct dark matter search with the XIA instrument demonstrating its utility in low background experiments by investigating the plate-out of {sup 210}Pb and comparing the effectiveness of cleaning procedures in removing {sup 222}Rn progenies from the samples.

Nakib, M. Z.; Cooley, J.; Kara, B.; Qiu, H.; Scorza, S. [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX (United States)] [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX (United States); Guiseppe, V. E. [Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schnee, R. W. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States)

2013-08-08

316

Quark matter or new particles?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

Michel, F. Curtis

1988-01-01

317

A Method of Measuring Hydrogen Isotopes in Surface Layers of Planetary Soils by Spectroscopy of Recoil Protons in Alpha Particle Elastic Scattering  

Microsoft Academic Search

A theoretical and experimental feasibility study of possible determination of the hydrogen and deuterium concentrations in the surface layers of planetary bodies is presented. The method under study is the recoil proton and deuteron spectrometry of forward scattering in the course of elastic interaction of alpha particles with the nuclei of hydrogen isotopes. The spectra of recoil protons and deuterons

B. N. Korchuganov; G. G. Dol'nikov; M. V. Gerasimov; O. F. Prilutskii; R. Rider; G. Waenke; T. Economou

2004-01-01

318

Evidence of DNA double strand breaks formation in Escherichia coli bacteria exposed to alpha particles of different LET assessed by the SOS response.  

PubMed

Ionizing radiation produces a plethora of lesion upon DNA which sometimes is generated among a relatively small region due to clustered energy deposition events, the so called locally multiply damaged sites that could change to DSB. Such clustered damages are more likely to occur in high LET radiation exposures. The effect of alpha particles of different LET was evaluated on the bacterium Escherichia coli either by survival properties or the SOS response activity. Alpha radiation and LET distribution was controlled by means of Nuclear Track Detectors. The results suggest that alpha particles produce two types of lesion: lethal lesions and SOS inducing-mutagenic, a proportion that varies depending on the LET values. The SOS response as a sensitive parameter to assess RBE is mentioned. PMID:22705051

Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Breña-Valle, Matilde; Aguilar-Moreno, Magdalena; Balcázar, Miguel

2012-12-01

319

Sol-gel derived carbon ceramic electrode containing methylene blue-intercalated alpha-zirconium phosphate micro particles.  

PubMed

Methylene blue-intercalated alpha-zirconium phosphate (MBZrP) micro particles in deionized water were deposited onto the surface of graphite powder to prepare graphite powder-supported MBZrP, which was subsequently dispersed into methyltrimethoxysilane-derived gels to yield a conductive composite. The composite was used as electrode material to fabricate a surface-renewable, rigid, leak-free carbon ceramic composite electrode, bulk-modified with methylene blue (MB). In the configuration, alpha-zirconium phosphate was employed as a solid host for MB, which acted as a catalyst. Graphite powder ensured conductivity by percolation, the silicate provided a rigid porous backbone and the methyl groups endowed hydrophobicity and thus limited the wetting section of the modified electrode. Peak currents of the MBZrP-modified electrode were surface-confined at low scan rates but diffusion-controlled at high scan rates. Square-wave voltammetric study revealed that MBZrP immobilized in carbon ceramic matrix presented a two-electron, three-proton redox process in acidic aqueous solution with pH ranged from 0.44 to 2.94. In addition, the chemically modified electrode showed an electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite reduction at +0.15 V ( vs. Ag/AgCl) in acidic aqueous solution (pH=0.44). The linear range and detection limit are 1x10(-6)-4x10(-3) mol x L(-1) and 1.5x10(-7) mol x L(-1), respectively. PMID:11941443

Yuan, Yi; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guoyi

2002-03-01

320

Production of the therapeutic radionuclides 193mPt and 195mPt with high specific activity via alpha-particle-induced reactions on 192Os.  

PubMed

For the production of therapy-relevant radionuclides (193m)Pt (T(1/2)=4.33 d) and (195m)Pt (T(1/2)=4.03 d) with a high specific activity, the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt and (192)Os(alpha,3n)(193m)Pt nuclear reactions were investigated for the first time from their respective thresholds up to 28 MeV. Thin samples of enriched (192)Os were prepared by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross-section measurements. The calculated thick target yields were found to be 0.013 MBq/microA h for the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt reaction in the energy range of E(alpha)=24-->18 MeV, and 0.25 MBq/microA h for the (192)Os(alpha,3n)(193m)Pt reaction in the energy range of E(alpha)=28-->24 MeV. The two radionuclides could not be detected in the interactions of (3)He particles with (192)Os. A production method involving high-current alpha-particle irradiation of enriched (192)Os and efficient chemical separation of radioplatinum was developed. Batch yields of about 1 MBq (195m)Pt and 8.7 MBq (193m)Pt were achieved. Compared to the reactor production these batch yields are very low, but the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt and (192)Os(alpha,3n)(193m)Pt reactions are superior with respect to the specific activity of the products which is higher by two orders of magnitude. PMID:18083038

Hilgers, K; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

2008-04-01

321

The use of CH3OH additive to NaOH for etching alpha particle tracks in a CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fast detection of alpha particles in CR-39 detectors was investigated using a new chemical etchant. 252Cf and 241Am sources were used for irradiating samples of CR-39 SSNTDs with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal temperature and pressure. A series of experimental chemical etching are carried out using new etching solution (8 ml of 10N NaOH+1 ml CH3OH) at 60 °C to detect alpha particle in short time in CR-39 detectors. Suitable analyzing software has been used to analyze experimental data. From fission and alpha track diameters, the value of bulk etching rate is equal to 2.73 ?m/h. Both the sensitivity and etching efficiency were found to vary with the amount of methanol in the etching solution. Pure NaOH was used as a control to compare with the result from etching in NaOH with different concentrations of CH3OH. The etching efficiency is determined and compared with conventional aqueous solution of 6.25N NaOH at 70 °C for etching time equals 5 h. In this study, the obtained etching efficiency shows a considerable agreement with the previous work.

Ashry, A. H.; Abdalla, A. M.; Rammah, Y. S.; Eisa, M.; Ashraf, O.

2014-08-01

322

Particle theory and cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report discusses research of professor at Bartol Research Institute in the following general areas: particle phenomenology and non-accelerator physics; particle physics and cosmology; theories with higher symmetry; and particle astrophysics and cosmology.

Gaisser, T. K.; Shafi, Q.; Barr, S. M.; Seckel, D.; Rusjan, E.; Fletcher, R. S.

1991-07-01

323

Combined application of alpha-track and fission-track techniques for detection of plutonium particles in environmental samples prior to isotopic measurement using thermo-ionization mass spectrometry.  

PubMed

The fission track technique is a sensitive detection method for particles which contain radio-nuclides like (235)U or (239)Pu. However, when the sample is a mixture of plutonium and uranium, discrimination between uranium particles and plutonium particles is difficult using this technique. In this study, we developed a method for detecting plutonium particles in a sample mixture of plutonium and uranium particles using alpha track and fission track techniques. The specific radioactivity (Bq/g) for alpha decay of plutonium is several orders of magnitude higher than that of uranium, indicating that the formation of the alpha track due to alpha decay of uranium can be disregarded under suitable conditions. While alpha tracks in addition to fission tracks were detected in a plutonium particle, only fission tracks were detected in a uranium particle, thereby making the alpha tracks an indicator for detecting particles containing plutonium. In addition, it was confirmed that there is a linear relationship between the numbers of alpha tracks produced by plutonium particles made of plutonium certified standard material and the ion intensities of the various plutonium isotopes measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. Using this correlation, the accuracy in isotope ratios, signal intensity and measurement errors is presumable from the number of alpha tracks prior to the isotope ratio measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. It is expected that this method will become an effective tool for plutonium particle analysis. The particles used in this study had sizes between 0.3 and 2.0 ?m. PMID:21645753

Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

2011-07-15

324

Production of the Alpha-Particle Emitting Radionuclide Astatine-211 at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute  

E-print Network

all possible particles emitted. This information is extremely useful when performing gamma-ray spectroscopy. Tables 9 ? 11 presents the output from TALYS for the Bi-209(?,x) reactions at 28 MeV. 20 Table 9. Total particle production cross...-MDM beam line of the K500 cyclotron. These calculations were corroborated using Monte Carlo simulation within the computer code SRIM (Table 12 and Table 13). The foils utilized were based on available thickness of the copper and aluminum foils along...

Bhakta, Viharkumar Satish

2011-10-21

325

The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to alpha-particle irradiation.  

PubMed

Ion beams are used in radiotherapy to deliver a more precise dose to the target volume while minimizing dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. For optimum dose monitoring in ion-beam therapy, it is essential to be able to measure the delivered dose with a sensitivity, spatial resolution and dynamic range that is sufficient to meet the demands of the various therapy situations. Optical fibres have been demonstrated by this group to show promising thermoluminescence properties with respect to photon, electron and proton irradiation. In particular, and also given the flexibility and small size of optical fibre cores, for example 125.0+/-0.1 microm for the Al- and Ge-doped fibres used in this study, these fibres have the potential to fulfill the above requirements. This study investigates the thermoluminescence dosimetric characteristics of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres irradiated with alpha particles from (241)Am. Following subtraction of the gamma contribution from the above source, the thermoluminescence characteristics of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres have been compared with that of TLD-100 rods. The irradiations were performed in a bell jar. Of related potential significance is the effective atomic number, Z(eff) of the fibre, modifying measured dose from that deposited in tissues; in the present work, a scanning electron microscope and associated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy facility have been used to provide evaluation of Z(eff). For Ge-doped fibres, the effective atomic numbers value was 11.4, the equivalent value for Al-doped fibres was 12.3. This paper further presents results on dose response and the glow curves obtained. The results obtained indicate there to be good potential for use of variously doped SiO(2) optical fibres in measuring ion-beam doses in radiotherapeutic applications. PMID:18693114

Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Bradley, D A; Hashim, Suhairul; Wagiran, Husin

2009-03-01

326

Engineered Modular Recombinant Transporters: Application of New Platform for Targeted Radiotherapeutic Agents to {alpha}-Particle Emitting {sup 211}At  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To generate and evaluate a modular recombinant transporter (MRT) for targeting {sup 211}At to cancer cells overexpressing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Methods and Materials: The MRT was produced with four functional modules: (1) human epidermal growth factor as the internalizable ligand, (2) the optimized nuclear localization sequence of simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen, (3) a translocation domain of diphtheria toxin as an endosomolytic module, and (4) the Escherichia coli hemoglobin-like protein (HMP) as a carrier module. MRT was labeled using N-succinimidyl 3-[{sup 211}At]astato-5-guanidinomethylbenzoate (SAGMB), its {sup 125}I analogue SGMIB, or with {sup 131}I using Iodogen. Binding, internalization, and clonogenic assays were performed with EGFR-expressing A431, D247 MG, and U87MG.wtEGFR human cancer cell lines. Results: The affinity of SGMIB-MRT binding to A431 cells, determined by Scatchard analysis, was 22 nM, comparable to that measured before labeling. The binding of SGMIB-MRT and its internalization by A431 cancer cells was 96% and 99% EGFR specific, respectively. Paired label assays demonstrated that compared with Iodogen-labeled MRT, SGMIB-MRT and SAGMB-MRT exhibited more than threefold greater peak levels and durations of intracellular retention of activity. SAGMB-MRT was 10-20 times more cytotoxic than [{sup 211}At]astatide for all three cell lines. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated the initial proof of principle for the MRT approach for designing targeted {alpha}-particle emitting radiotherapeutic agents. The high cytotoxicity of SAGMB-MRT for cancer cells overexpressing EGFR suggests that this {sup 211}At-labeled conjugate has promise for the treatment of malignancies, such as glioma, which overexpress this receptor.

Rosenkranz, Andrey A. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics of Intracellular Transport, Institute of Gene Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Biophysics, Biological Faculty, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Pozzi, Oscar R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Lunin, Vladimir G. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics of Intracellular Transport, Institute of Gene Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gamaleya Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zalutsky, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)], E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu; Sobolev, Alexander S. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics of Intracellular Transport, Institute of Gene Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Department of Biophysics, Biological Faculty, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: sobolev@igb.ac.ru

2008-09-01

327

The particle invariance in particle physics  

E-print Network

Since the particles such as molecules, atoms and nuclei are composite particles, it is important to recognize that physics must be invariant for the composite particles and their constituent particles, this requirement is called particle invariance in this paper. But difficulties arise immediately because for fermion we use Dirac equation, for meson we use Klein-Gordon equation and for classical particle we use Newtonian mechanics, while the connections between these equations are quite indirect. Thus if the particle invariance is held in physics, i.e., only one physical formalism exists for any particle, we can expect to find out the differences between these equations by employing the particle invariance. As the results, several new relationships between them are found, the most important result is that the obstacles that cluttered the path from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics are found, it becomes possible to derive the quantum wave equations from relativistic mechanics after the obstacles are removed. An improved model is proposed to gain a better understanding on elementary particle interactions. This approach offers enormous advantages, not only for giving the first physically reasonable interpretation of quantum mechanics, but also for improving quark model.

H. Y. Cui

2002-05-08

328

Cumulative genetic damage in hematopoietic stem cells in a patient with a 40-year exposure to alpha particles emitted by thorium dioxide.  

PubMed

Thorotrast, a colloidal suspension of the long-lived radionuclide, thorium-232, was widely used as a radiographic contrast medium for several decades. Due to the poor excretion of the sol, however, Thorotrast would deposit in the liver, bone marrow and other tissue, and patients would receive alpha-particle irradiation for life. To gauge the cumulative genetic damage to hematopoietic stem cells due to chronic exposure to alpha particles, we conducted a multi-end-point evaluation in a 72-year-old man who had been administered a 32-ml bolus of Thorotrast during cerebral angiography performed over 40 years ago in 1950. Peripheral T lymphocytes were cultured to quantify the frequencies and cellular distributions of asymmetrical and symmetrical types of chromosome aberrations in first-division metaphases and micronuclei in cytokinesis-arrested interphase II cells. Aberrations were scored using classical chromosome group analysis methods and chromosome painting techniques. Assays of glycophorin-A (GPA) mutations in red blood cells were also performed to obtain a relative measurement of damage sustained by the erythroid stem cell population. Results revealed that approximately 30% of the lymphocytes in this patient contained one or more chromosome aberrations, the majority of which were of the "stable" type. About one-third of the lymphocytes with chromosome damage carried multiple aberrations, suggesting that significant numbers of stem cells survive exposures to alpha-particle radiation that induce complex genomic alterations. Increased frequencies of GPA mutations were observed, demonstrating that genomic damage is also induced in erythroid progenitors. The numbers of micronuclei in lymphocytes were only moderately increased compared to expected values for persons of comparable age, and thus this end point was not useful for quantifying exposure level. Despite the relatively severe burden of somatic cell damage induced by 40 years of internal alpha-particle irradiation, the patient remains surprisingly free of any serious illness. PMID:9254732

Littlefield, L G; Travis, L B; Sayer, A M; Voelz, G L; Jensen, R H; Boice, J D

1997-08-01

329

Accurate determination of lithium, boron, fluorine and sodium in some matrices using low energy alpha-particles induced gamma-rays  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for analyzing some light elements with high accuracy. Prompt gamma-ray spectrometry with 3.5 MeV alpha-particles\\u000a from a Van de Graaff accelerator was used: this technique is non-destructive, rapid and experimentally simple. Sensitivities\\u000a are indicated and factors affecting the accuracy of analysis are considered. A range of different materials has been analyzed\\u000a and analytical results are presented.

B. Borderie; M. Basutcu; J. N. Barrandon; J. L. Pinault

1980-01-01

330

Review of Particle Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This biennial Review summarizes much of particle physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2778 new measurements from 645 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed

C. Amsler; M. Doser; M. Antonelli; D. M. Asner; K. S. Babu; H. Baer; H. R. Band; R. M. Barnett; E. Bergren; J. Beringer; G. Bernardi; W. Bertl; H. Bichsel; O. Biebel; P. Bloch; E. Blucher; S. Blusk; R. N. Cahn; M. Carena; C. Caso; A. Ceccucci; D. Chakraborty; M.-C. Chen; R. S. Chivukula; G. Cowan; O. Dahl; G. D'Ambrosio; T. Damour; A. de Gouvêa; T. DeGrand; B. Dobrescu; M. Drees; D. A. Edwards; S. Eidelman; V. D. Elvira; J. Erler; V. V. Ezhela; J. L. Feng; W. Fetscher; B. D. Fields; B. Foster; T. K. Gaisser; L. Garren; H.-J. Gerber; G. Gerbier; T. Gherghetta; G. F. Giudice; M. Goodman; C. Grab; A. V. Gritsan; J.-F. Grivaz; D. E. Groom; M. Grünewald; A. Gurtu; T. Gutsche; H. E. Haber; K. Hagiwara; C. Hagmann; K. G. Hayes; J. J. Hernández-Rey; K. Hikasa; I. Hinchliffe; A. Höcker; J. Huston; P. Igo-Kemenes; J. D. Jackson; K. F. Johnson; T. Junk; D. Karlen; B. Kayser; D. Kirkby; S. R. Klein; I. G. Knowles; C. Kolda; R. V. Kowalewski; P. Kreitz; B. Krusche; Yu. V. Kuyanov; Y. Kwon; O. Lahav; P. Langacker; A. Liddle; Z. Ligeti; C.-J. Lin; T. M. Liss; L. Littenberg; J. C. Liu; K. S. Lugovsky; H. Mahlke; M. L. Mangano; T. Mannel; A. V. Manohar; W. J. Marciano; A. D. Martin; A. Masoni; D. Milstead; R. Miquel; K. Mönig; H. Murayama; K. Nakamura; M. Narain; P. Nason; S. Navas; P. Nevski; Y. Nir; K. A. Olive; L. Pape; C. Patrignani; J. A. Peacock; G. Punzi; A. Quadt; S. Raby; G. Raffelt; B. N. Ratcliff; B. Renk; P. Richardson; S. Roesler; A. Romaniouk; L. J. Rosenberg; C. T. Sachrajda; Y. Sakai; S. Sarkar; F. Sauli; O. Schneider; D. Scott; W. G. Seligman; M. H. Shaevitz; T. Sjöstrand; J. G. Smith; S. Spanier; H. Spieler; A. Stahl; T. Stanev; S. L. Stone; T. Sumiyoshi; M. Tanabashi; J. Terning; M. Titov; N. P. Tkachenko; N. A. Törnqvist; D. Tovey; G. H. Trilling; T. G. Trippe; G. Valencia; K. van Bibber; M. G. Vincter; P. Vogel; D. R. Ward; T. Watari; B. R. Webber; G. Weiglein; J. D. Wells; M. Whalley; A. Wheeler; C. G. Wohl; L. Wolfenstein; J. Womersley; C. L. Woody; R. L. Workman; A. Yamamoto; W.-M. Yao; O. V. Zenin; J. Zhang; R.-Y. Zhu; P. A. Zyla; G. Harper; V. S. Lugovsky; P. Schaffner

2008-01-01

331

Review of Particle Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This biennial review summarizes much of Particle Physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 1900 new measurements from 700 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed

R. M. Barnett; C. D. Carone; D. E. Groom; T. G. Trippe; C. G. Wohl; B. Armstrong; P. S. Gee; G. S. Wagman; F. James; M. Mangano; K. Mönig; L. Montanet; J. L. Feng; H. Murayama; J. J. Hernández; A. Manohar; M. Aguilar-Benitez; C. Caso; R. L. Crawford; M. Roos; N. A. Törnqvist; K. G. Hayes; K. Hagiwara; K. Nakamura; M. Tanabashi; K. Olive; K. Honscheid; P. R. Burchat; R. E. Shrock; S. Eidelman; R. H. Schindler; A. Gurtu; K. Hikasa; G. Conforto; R. L. Workman; C. Grab; C. Amsler

1996-01-01

332

Review of Particle Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This biennial Review summarizes much of particle physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2633 new measurements from 689 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed

2006-01-01

333

Review of Particle Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This biennial Review summarizes much of particle physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2158 new measurements from 551 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed

K. Nakamura

2010-01-01

334

ADVANCED ULTRAFINE PARTICLE ACCELERATOR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conceptual design of an Ultrafine Particle Radio Frequency Quadrupole (UFP-RFQ) accelerator is discussed. The results indicate that it is possible to accelerate 1 pm radius Al particles to velocities around 100 km\\/s in 100 m RFQ length. This accelerator can provide variable output particle velocity, with capability of handling different particle materials with different sizes. There are scientific, industrial

D. A. Swenson; A. E. Dabiri; Z. Mikic; D. B. McCall; M. F. Scharff

335

A Multi-port Low-Fluence Alpha-Particle Irradiator: Fabrication, Testing and Benchmark Radiobiological Studies  

PubMed Central

A new multi-port irradiator, designed to facilitate the study of the effects of low fluences of ? particles on monolayer cultures, has been developed. The irradiator consists of four individual planar 241Am ?-particle sources that are housed inside a helium-filled Lucite chamber. Three of the radioactive sources consist of 20 MBq of 241Am dioxide foil. The fourth source, used to produce higher dose rates, has an activity of 500 MBq. The four sources are mounted on rotating turntables parallel to their respective 1.5-?m-thick Mylar exit windows. A stainless steel honeycomb collimator is placed between the four sources and their exit windows by a cantilever attachment to the platform of an orbital shaker that moves its table in an orbit of 2 cm. Each exit window is equipped with a beam delimiter to optimize the uniformity of the beam and with a high-precision electronic shutter. Opening and closing of the shutters is controlled with a high-precision timer. Custom-designed stainless steel Mylar-bottomed culture dishes are placed on an adapter on the shutter. The ? particles that strike the cells have a mean energy of 2.9 MeV. The corresponding LET distribution of the particles has a mean value of 132 keV/?m. Clonogenic cell survival experiments with AG1522 human fibroblasts indicate that the RBE of the ? particles compared to 137Cs ? rays is about 7.6 for this biological end point. PMID:15161346

Neti, Prasad V. S. V.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Perumal, Venkatachalam; Azzam, Edouard I.; Howell, Roger W.

2011-01-01

336

Particle sensor array  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A particle sensor array which in a preferred embodiment comprises a static random access memory having a plurality of ion-sensitive memory cells, each such cell comprising at least one pull-down field effect transistor having a sensitive drain surface area (such as by bloating) and at least one pull-up field effect transistor having a source connected to an offset voltage. The sensitive drain surface area and the offset voltage are selected for memory cell upset by incident ions such as alpha-particles. The static random access memory of the present invention provides a means for selectively biasing the memory cells into the same state in which each of the sensitive drain surface areas is reverse biased and then selectively reducing the reversed bias on these sensitive drain surface areas for increasing the upset sensitivity of the cells to ions. The resulting selectively sensitive memory cells can be used in a number of applications. By way of example, the present invention can be used for measuring the linear energy transfer of ion particles, as well as a device for assessing the resistance of CMOS latches to Cosmic Ray induced single event upsets. The sensor of the present invention can also be used to determine the uniformity of an ion beam.

Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor); Blaes, Brent R. (Inventor); Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

1994-01-01

337

Laser particle sorter  

DOEpatents

Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

1987-11-30

338

Laser particle sorter  

DOEpatents

Method and apparatus for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser defines an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam interrogates the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam intersects the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis.

Martin, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01

339

The Particle Adventure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation (NSF), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) cosponsor the Particle Data Group. This group makes available the Particle Adventure Website, an "interactive tour of the inner workings of the atom." This site provides a very brief introduction to the theory of fundamental particles and forces, and particle decay. Different paths such as Particle Adventure Preview Movie (QuickTime format), Standard Model Path, Experimental Evidence Path, and Beyond the Standard Model Path explain how the matter of the universe interacts. Other features included at the site are the Complete Menu (table of contents and search tools), Why do Atoms and Particles Decay, Classroom Particle Physics Activities, and the History of Particle Physics, among others. Links to other educational particle physics educational sites are also available. This site is also available in Spanish, Polish, and French.

340

Radium-223 dichloride bone-targeted alpha particle therapy for hormone-refractory breast cancer metastatic to bone  

PubMed Central

Background Hormone-refractory breast cancer metastatic to bone is a clinically challenging disease associated with high morbidity, poor prognosis, and impaired quality of life owing to pain and skeletal-related events. In a preclinical study using a mouse model of breast cancer and bone metastases, Ra-223 dichloride was incorporated into bone matrix and inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells and differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts (all P values?alpha-particle therapy for the treatment of symptomatic bone metastases in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. On the basis of a strong preclinical rationale, we used Ra-223 dichloride to treat bone metastases in a patient with breast cancer. Results A 44-year-old white woman with metastatic breast cancer who was estrogen receptor–positive, BRCA1-negative, BRCA2-negative, PIK3CA mutation (p.His1047Arg) positive presented with diffuse bony metastases and bone pain. She had hormone refractory and chemotherapy refractory breast cancer. After Ra-223 therapy initiation her bone pain improved, with corresponding decrease in tumor markers and mixed response in 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-NaF bone PET/CT. The patient derived clinical benefit from therapy. Conclusion We have shown that Ra-223 dichloride can be safely administered in a patient with hormone-refractory bone metastasis from breast cancer at the US FDA–approved dose for prostate cancer. Furthermore, because the treatment did not cause any drop in hematologic parameters, it has the potential to be combined with other radiosensitizing therapies, which may include chemotherapy or targeted therapies. Given that Ra-223 dichloride is already commercially available, this case report may help future patients and provide a rationale for initiating clinical research in the use of Ra-223 dichloride to treat bone metastasis from breast cancer. A randomized clinical trial is needed to provide evidence of efficacy, safety, and good outcomes. PMID:25243101

2014-01-01

341

Effects of alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide on osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor-?B ligand expression in MG-63 osteoblast-like cells exposed to polyethylene particles  

PubMed Central

Background Recent studies demonstrated an impact of the nervous system on particle-induced osteolysis, the major cause of aseptic loosening of joint replacements. Methods In this study of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells we analyzed the influence of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles and the neurotransmitter alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on the osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-?B ligand/receptor activator of nuclear factor?B (OPG/RANKL/RANK) system. MG-63 cells were stimulated by different UHMWPE particle concentrations (1:100, 1:500) and different doses of alpha-CGRP (10-7 M, 10-9 M, 10-11 M). RANKL and OPG mRNA expression and protein levels were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Results Increasing particle concentrations caused an up-regulation of RANKL after 72 hours. Alpha-CGRP showed a dose-independent depressive effect on particle-induced expression of RANKL mRNA in both cell-particle ratios. RANKL gene transcripts were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased by alpha-CGRP treatment after 48 and 72 hours. OPG mRNA was significantly down-regulated in a cell-particle ratio of 1:500 after 72 hours. Alpha-CGRP concentrations of 10-7 M lead to an up-regulation of OPG protein. Conclusion In conclusion, a possible osteoprotective influence of the neurotransmitter alpha-CGRP on particle stimulated osteoblast-like cells could be shown. Alpha-CGRP might be important for bone metabolism under conditions of particle-induced osteolysis. PMID:21050480

2010-01-01

342

Relative drifts and temperature anisotropies of protons and $\\alpha$ particles in the expanding solar wind -- 2.5D hybrid simulations  

E-print Network

We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations to investigate the origin and evolution of relative drift speeds between protons and $\\alpha$ particles in the collisionless turbulent low-$\\beta$ solar wind plasma. We study the generation of differential streaming by wave-particle interactions and absorption of turbulent wave spectra. Next we focus on the role of the relative drifts for the turbulent heating and acceleration of ions in the collisionless fast solar wind streams. The energy source is given by an initial broad-band spectrum of parallel propagating Alfv\\'en-cyclotron waves, which co-exists with the plasma and is self-consistently coupled to the perpendicular ion bulk velocities. We include the effect of a gradual solar wind expansion, which cools and decelerates the minor ions. This paper for the first time considers the combined effect of self-consistently initialized dispersive turbulent Alfv\\'enic spectra with differentially streaming protons and $\\alpha$ particles in the expanding solar wind outflows withi...

Maneva, Y G; Viñas, A

2014-01-01

343

Hygroscopicity of particles generated from photooxidation of alpha-pinene under different oxidation conditions in the presence of sulfate seed aerosols.  

PubMed

Smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the hygroscopicity of particles generated from photooxidation of alpha-pinene/NO(x) with different sulfate seed aerosols or oxidation conditions. Hygroscopicity of particles was measured by a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) in terms of hygroscopic growth factor (Gf), with a relative humidity of 85%. With sulfate seed aerosols present, Gf of the aerosols decreased very fast before notable secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation was observed, indicating a heterogeneous process between inorganic seeds and organic products might take place as soon as oxidation begins, rather than only happening after gas-aerosol partition of organic products starts. The final SOA-coated sulfate particles had similar or lower Gf than seed-free SOA. The hygroscopicity of the final particles was not dependent on the thickness but on the hygroscopicity properties of the SOA, which were influenced by the initial sulfate seed particles. In the two designed aging processes, Gf of the particles increased more significantly with introduction of OH radical than with ozone. However, the hygroscopicity of SOA was very low even after a long time of aging, implying that either SOA aging in the chamber was very slow or the Gf of SOA did not change significantly in aging. Using an aerosol composition speciation monitor (ACSM) and matrix factorization (PMF) method, two factors for the components of SOA were identified, but the correlation between SOA hygroscopicity and the proportion of the more highly oxidized factor could be either positive or negative depending on the speciation of seed aerosols present. PMID:24649698

Chu, Biwu; Wang, Kun; Takekawa, Hideto; Li, Junhua; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Jingkun; Ma, Qinxing; He, Hong; Hao, Jiming

2014-01-01

344

Energetic particle physics issues for ITER  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes our present understanding of the following energetic/alpha particle physics issues for the 21 MA, 20 TF coil ITER Interim Design configuration and operational scenarios: (a) toroidal field ripple effects on alpha particle confinement, (b) energetic particle interaction with low frequency MHD modes, (c) energetic particle excitation of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes, and (d) energetic particle transport due to MHD modes. TF ripple effects on alpha loss in ITER under a number of different operating conditions are found to be small with a maximum loss of 1%. With careful plasma control in ITER reversed-shear operation, TF ripple induced alpha loss can be reduced to below the nominal ITER design limit of 5%. Fishbone modes are expected to be unstable for {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 1%, and sawtooth stabilization is lost if the ideal kink growth rate exceeds 10% of the deeply trapped alpha precessional drift frequency evaluated at the q = 1 surface. However, it is expected that the fishbone modes will lead only to a local flattening of the alpha profile due to small banana size. MHD modes observed during slow decrease of stored energy after fast partial electron temperature collapse in JT-60U reversed-shear experiments may be resonant type instabilities; they may have implications on the energetic particle confinement in ITER reversed-shear operation. From the results of various TAE stability code calculations, ITER equilibria appear to lie close to TAE linear stability thresholds. However, the prognosis depends strongly on q profile and profiles of alpha and other high energy particles species. If TAE modes are unstable in ITER, the stochastic diffusion is the main loss mechanism, which scales with ({delta}B{sub r}/B){sup 2}, because of the relatively small alpha particle banana orbit size. For isolated TAE modes the particle loss is very small, and TAE modes saturate via the resonant wave-particle trapping process at very small amplitude.

Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Fu, G.Y. [and others

1996-12-31

345

Benchmarking the Geant4 full system simulation of an associated alpha-particle detector for use in a D-T neutron generator.  

PubMed

The position-sensitive alpha-particle detector used to provide the starting time and initial direction of D-T neutrons in a fast-neutron imaging system was simulated with a Geant4-based Monte Carlo program. The whole detector system, which consists of a YAP:Ce scintillator, a fiber-optic faceplate, a light guide, and a position-sensitive photo-multiplier tube (PSPMT), was modeled, starting with incident D-T alphas. The scintillation photons, whose starting time follows the distribution of a scintillation decay curve, were produced and emitted uniformly into a solid angle of 4? along the track segments of the alpha and its secondaries. Through tracking all photons and taking into account the quantum efficiency of the photocathode, the number of photoelectrons and their time and position distributions were obtained. Using a four-corner data reconstruction formula, the flood images of the alpha detector with and without optical grease between the YAP scintillator and the fiber-optic faceplate were obtained, which show agreement with the experimental results. The reconstructed position uncertainties of incident alpha particles for both cases are 1.198 mm and 0.998 mm respectively across the sensitive area of the detector. Simulation results also show that comparing with other faceplates composed of 500 ?m, 300 ?m, and 100 ?m fibers, the 10-?m-fiber faceplate is the best choice to build the detector for better position performance. In addition, the study of the background originating inside the D-T generator suggests that for 500-?m-thick YAP:Ce coated with 1-?m-thick aluminum, and very good signal-to-noise ratio can be expected through application of a simple threshold. PMID:22728838

Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P; Cates, Joshua W; Hausladen, Paul A; Laubach, Mitchell A; Sparger, Johnathan E; Donnald, Samuel B

2012-08-01

346

Gas particle radiator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A gas particle radiator adapted to operate in a microgravity space environment having a transparent boundary which transmits energy in the infrared spectrum, and a gas particle mixture that yields high absorption and emittances are described.

Chubb, Donald L. (inventor)

1988-01-01

347

Composite powder particles  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A liquid coating composition including a coating vehicle and composite powder particles disposed within the coating vehicle. Each composite powder particle may include a magnesium component, a zinc component, and an indium component.

Parker, Donald S. (Inventor); MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor)

2009-01-01

348

Particle Detection Activity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive demonstration explains how the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft uses its particle detectors to collect and sort particles that come from the boundary of the Solar System.

Bartolone, Lindsay

2008-01-01

349

Mobile associated particle imaging system  

SciTech Connect

Associated Particle Imaging (API) is a technique that employs a small deuterium accelerator to accelerate deuterons into a tritium-impregnated target, producing coincident neutrons (at 14.1 MeV) and alpha particles (at 3.5 MeV) that travel in opposite directions. By detecting the arrival of an alpha particle on a phosphor, and its position in two dimensions (x and y), the time and direction of the neutron emission is determined. Neutrons that interact with material in their paths produce a gamma ray whose energy is characteristic of that material. From the arrival time and energy of these gammas, the elemental composition of an object can be deduced as a function of position. The authors have built a portable API system and conducted field tests. In these tests, they have identified a quantity of fertilizer hidden in a closed vehicle and the contents of some common military munition casings.

Tinsley, J.; Drake, L.; Guerrier, J.; Headley, G.; Hudson, C.; Hurley, P.; Tunnell, L. [Special Technologies Lab., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

350

TAK1-MAPK-NFkappaB Signaling Pathways Regulates Induction of TNF-alpha by Wear Particles In Vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Wear particles may induce inflammatory osteolysis by activating the nuclear factor kB (NFkB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Previous studies have shown that transforming growth factor-beta activated kinase 1 (TAK1) functions as an adaptor molecule in the interaction between tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6(TRAF6) and downstream molecules such as NF-kappaB, p38MAPK signaling cascades. This study investigated the

Tao Cheng; Xiaochun Peng; Xianlong Zhang

2009-01-01

351

When is a Particle?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Gives a new definition for the concept of the elementary particle in nuclear physics. Explains why the existance of the quark as an elementary particle could be an accepted fact even though it lacks what traditionally identifies a particle. Compares this with the development which took place during the discovery of the neutrino in the early…

Drell, Sidney D.

1978-01-01

352

High energy particle astronomy.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Discussion of techniques currently used in high energy particle astronomy for measuring charged and neutral cosmic rays and their isotope and momentum distribution. Derived from methods developed for accelerator experiments in particle physics, these techniques help perform important particle astronomy experiments pertaining to nuclear cosmic ray and gamma ray research, electron and position probes, and antimatter searches.

Buffington, A.; Muller, R. A.; Smith, L. H.; Smoot, G. F.

1972-01-01

353

Anatomy of Particle Diffusion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

Bringuier, E.

2009-01-01

354

Time scales for gas-particle partitioning equilibration of secondary organic aerosol formed from alpha-pinene ozonolysis.  

PubMed

Most chemical transport models assume instantaneous equilibrium to represent gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic aerosol. This approach has been challenged by recent studies suggesting that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) cannot reach equilibrium within atmospheric time scales. The emergent hypothesis is that gas-particle partitioning rates are limited by diffusion within the condensed phase, which is thought to be "glassy." Here, we investigate the equilibration time scales of SOA formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis by measuring the dynamic response to a modest step-change in temperature. Upon heating, equilibrium is disturbed, and the particles evaporate to restore equilibrium at the new temperature, which is attained when evaporation ceases. The SOA was formed at 10 °C and then heated to near room temperature (30 °C) so that the phase state (viscosity) of the condensed-phase after heating is similar to how it would be in the atmosphere. Experiments were performed in both a thermodenuder, with SOA loading of 350 ?g/m(3), and in a smog chamber, with SOA loading of 2-12 ?g/m(3). Both experiments show, contrary to previous findings, that the SOA achieves equilibrium with dynamic responses consistent with a mass accommodation coefficient of order 0.1. For typical atmospheric conditions, this translates into equilibration time scales on the order of minutes to tens of minutes, supporting the use of equilibrium partitioning in chemical transport models. PMID:23647198

Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

2013-06-01

355

Dust particle velocity measurement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to measure the velocity distributions for particles entering a vacuum chamber from the atmosphere through calibrated leaks. The relative number of particles per velocity interval was obtained for particulates of three size distributions and two densities passing through six different leak geometries. The velocity range 15 to 320 meters per second was investigated. Peak particle velocities were found to occur in the 15 to 150 meters per second range depending upon type of particle and leak geometry. A small fraction of the particles were found to have velocities in the 150 to 320 meters per second range.

Thielman, L. O.

1976-01-01

356

The Particle Adventure  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This award-winning site from the Particle Data Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory abounds with information on particle physics. Featuring interactive tours of quarks, neutrinos, antimatter, extra dimensions, dark matter, accelerators, and particle detectors, the content can be read in 16 languages, including Chinese, Norwegian, and Czech. From the homepage, navigate to one of five main categories - The Standard Model, Higgs Boson, Accelerators and Particle Detectors, Exploring Unsolved Mysteries, and Particle Decays and Annihilations. Within each of the five categories, scroll through interactive slide shows to beef up your knowledge of everything subatomic.

357

Interaction and Deformation of Viscoelastic Particles. 2. Adhesive Particles  

E-print Network

Interaction and Deformation of Viscoelastic Particles. 2. Adhesive Particles Phil Attard Ian Wark, 2001. In Final Form: April 30, 2001 Analyzed is the mutual deformation of adhesive particles the particles' adhesion. An analytic

Attard, Phil

358

Comparison of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and mobile phone GSM 900 radiation in the Allium cepa test.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and GSM 900 modulated mobile phone (model Sony Ericsson K550i) radiation in the Allium cepa test. Three groups of bulbs were exposed to mobile phone radiation during 0 (sham), 3 and 9h. A positive control group was treated during 20min with plutonium-239 alpha-radiation. Mitotic abnormalities, chromosome aberrations, micronuclei and mitotic index were analyzed. Exposure to alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 and exposure to modulated radiation from mobile phone during 3 and 9h significantly increased the mitotic index. GSM 900 mobile phone radiation as well as alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 induced both clastogenic and aneugenic effects. However, the aneugenic activity of mobile phone radiation was more pronounced. After 9h of exposure to mobile phone radiation, polyploid cells, three-groups metaphases, amitoses and some unspecified abnormalities were detected, which were not registered in the other experimental groups. Importantly, GSM 900 mobile phone radiation increased the mitotic index, the frequency of mitotic and chromosome abnormalities, and the micronucleus frequency in a time-dependent manner. Due to its sensitivity, the A. cepa test can be recommended as a useful cytogenetic assay to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. PMID:23059817

Pesnya, Dmitry S; Romanovsky, Anton V

2013-01-20

359

Radiochemical determination of cross sections of alpha-particle induced reactions on 192Os for the production of the therapeutic radionuclide 193mPt.  

PubMed

For determination of cross sections of alpha-particle induced reactions on 99.65% enriched (192)Os, the methods for electrolytic preparation of thin samples and radiochemical separation of radioplatinum were optimized. The excitation functions of the (192)Os(alpha,n)(195m)Pt and (192)Os(alpha,3n) (193m)Pt reactions were measured from 20 to 39 MeV. The cross section of the latter reaction reaches a maximum value of about 1.5b at an energy around 36 MeV. The results of nuclear model calculations using the codes TALYS and STAPRE agreed well with the measured data. The optimum energy range for the production of no-carrier-added (193m)Pt (T(1/2)=4.33 d) was found to be E(alpha)=40-->30 MeV. The thick target yield amounts to 10 MBq/microA h and a possible batch yield of 2 GBq should be sufficient for Auger electron therapy on a wide scale. PMID:20538474

Uddin, M S; Scholten, B; Hermanne, A; Sudár, S; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

2010-10-01

360

Experiments with particle damping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High cycle fatigue in jet engines is a current military concern. The vibratory stresses that cause fatigue can be reduced by adding damping. However, the high temperatures that occur in the gas turbine greatly hinder the application of mature damping technologies. One technology which may perform in the harsh environment is particle damping. Particle damping involves placing metallic or ceramic particles inside structural cavities. As the cavity vibrates, energy is dissipated through particle collisions. Performance is influenced by many parameters including the type, shape, and size of the particles; the amount of free volume for the particles to move in; density of the particles; and the level of vibration. This paper presents results from a series of experiments designed to gain an appreciation of the important parameters. The experimental setup consists of a cantilever beam with drilled holes. These holes are partially filled with particles. The types of particles, location of the particles, fill level, and other parameters are varied. Damping is estimated for each configuration. Trends in the results are studied to determine the influence of the varied parameter.

Hollkamp, Joseph J.; Gordon, Robert W.

1998-06-01

361

The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta lander Philae to explore the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Rosetta Mission was launched in 2004 with the main objectives to gain a better under-standing of the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After 10 years of cruise the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko will be reached in 2014 and the lander Philae will be deployed on the surface. As a part of the lander payload the APXS will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and it's changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS combines an alpha mode for alpha backscattering spectroscopy and an x-ray mode for alpha particle/x-ray induced x-ray spectroscopy (XRF) in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. The comet surface will be irradiated by a Curium 244 source exciting characteristic x-rays of the elements present in the surface material. The alpha mode will allow detection of elements like C and O and groups of elements with higher Z. The x-ray-SD-detector will allow the detection of most of the elements from Na up to Ni and above. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload are performed at regular intervals. These are used to opti-mise and improve the quality of the x-ray and alpha-spectra of the APXS. Soon the Rosetta probe will go into a 3 year long hibernation mode. It will awake when approaching it's target, providing us with new exiting data that will shed light on state, evolution and origin of comets and the solar system. Acknowledgements: This project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G. Klingelhüfer, J. Brückner, C. d'Uston, R. Gellert, and R. Rieder, The Rosetta Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), Space Science Reviews, Vol.128 (2007) 383-396; doi:10.1007/s11214-006-9137-3

Girones-Lopez, Jordi; Schmanke, Dirk; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Maul, Jasmine; Brueckner, Johannes; Duston, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Klingelhöfer, Göstar

362

Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined {alpha} particles and tritons on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Radially resolved energy and density distributions of the confined {alpha} particles in D{endash}T experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are being measured with the pellet charge exchange (PCX) diagnostic. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons produced in D{endash}D plasmas and H, He{sup 3}, or tritium rf-driven minority ion tails. The ablation cloud formed by injected low-{ital Z} impurity pellets provides the neutralization target for this active charge exchange technique. Because the cloud neutralization efficiency is uncertain, the PCX diagnostic is not absolutely calibrated so only relative density profiles are obtained. A mass and energy resolving {ital E}{parallel}{ital B} neutral particle analyzer (NPA) is used which has eight energy channels covering the energy range of 0.3{endash}3.7 MeV for {alpha} particles with energy resolution ranging from 5.8{percent} to 11.3{percent} and a spatial resolution of {approximately}5 cm. The PCX diagnostic views deeply trapped ions in a narrow pitch angle range around a mean value of {ital v}{parallel}/{ital v}={minus}0.048{plus_minus}10{sup {minus}3}. For D{endash}T operation, the NPA was shielded by a polyethylene{endash}lead enclosure providing 100{times} attenuation of ambient {gamma} radiation and 14 MeV neutrons. The PCX diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Medley, S.S.; Mansfield, D.K.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Fisher, R.K.; Duong, H.H.; McChesney, J.M.; Parks, P.B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)] [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Petrov, M.P.; Khudoleev, A.V. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russia)] [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russia); Gorelenkov, N.N. [TRINITI, Troisk 142092 (Russia)] [TRINITI, Troisk 142092 (Russia)

1996-09-01

363

Elementary Analysis of a Cometary Surface - the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer APXS on the Rosetta Mission to Comet 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After a 10 years cruise the Rosetta probe will reach its final target in the middle of this year, the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main objectives of the mission are to gain more knowledge of the composition, the origin and formation of comets and the solar system. After extensive remote examination of the comet the lander Philae will be separated to land on the comet surface. It will start immediately examining the landing site with its scientific payload. A part of this payload is the APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), it will measure in situ the chemical composition of the comet's surface and its changes during the journey of the comet towards the sun. APXS is a combination of two spectrometers in one single instrument, being low in mass and power consumption. It will irradiate the cometary surface with Curium 244 sources, which are emitting alpha-particle and X-rays. In the alpha-mode the instrument uses alpha backscattering spectroscopy to detect lower Z elements like C, N and O and groups of elements with higher Z. In the X-ray mode alpha particle/X-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy (XRF) will allow the detection of most of the higher Z elements from Na up to Ni and above. Both modes will be always run in parallel allowing to determine lower and higher Z elements simultaneously. During the long duration travel to the comet checkouts and software updates of the Rosetta probe and its payload were performed at regular intervals. In recent 3 years the solar powered Rosetta probe had to pass a hibernation phase because of a long passage far away from the sun. After the successful wakeup in January 2014 an extensive test phase of all instruments and subsystems has to be performed, including the APXS. After the landing on the comet an intense long measurement phase of all instruments is planned, the First Science Sequence (FSS). It will be followed by a long term science phase (LTS), determined by periodical changes between measurements and forced breaks to recharge the lander batteries. During these operations the Rosetta probe will escort the comet and the lander along the comets trajectory around the sun. As long as possible APXS and the other instruments will continue to repeat their measurements to monitor the changes and rising activity of the comet. This will shed light on state, composition, evolution and the origin of comets and the solar system. Acknowledgements: This project is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under contracts 50 QP 0404 and 50 QP 0902. References: G. Klingelhöfer, J. Brückner, C. d'Uston, R. Gellert, and R. Rieder, The Rosetta Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), Space Science Reviews, Vol.128 (2007) 383-396; doi:10.1007/s11214-006-9137-3

Schmanke, Dirk; Economou, Thanasis; Brueckner, Johannes; Gellert, Ralf; Rodionov, Daniel; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Girones Lopez, Jordi; Uston, Lionel D.

364

Charged-particle optics for neutral particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electromagnetic manipulation of charged and of neutral particles generally requires very different field geometries due to the orthogonality between charge monopoles and neutral dipoles. This has led to a natural separation between the fields of charged- and neutral-particle optics. We show however that the additional rotational degree of freedom of neutral dipoles can lead to an equivalence between the forces on charge monopoles and neutral dipoles under the action of axially/cylindrically symmetric fields. In this way, we show how to extend and exploit the large set of already developed cylindrically symmetric charged particle optics for use on neutral dipolar particles. The result is a large new class of focusing optics for all neutral particles of non-zero magnetic dipole moments, including neutrons, neutral atoms, and neutral molecules. Apart from the increased variety of focusing optics, such systems possess many advantages over previously existing magnetic neutral particles lenses, including lens strength, accessible aperture area, accuracy, robustness, and much improved ease of fabrication and use. We construct a neutral Rubidium atomic beam with which we experimentally demonstrate three such new focusing lenses, including annular permanent magnetic rings, a "magnetostatic aperture" lens, and a magnetizable lenslet array. As an extension of this result we propose a dynamically variable superconducting lens system for neutrons that is able to focus neutrons with a wide range of energies (from ultra-cold through to thermal). The proposed neutron system compares favorably with existing neutron optics, being in particular substantially more powerful than similar existing refraction-based neutron lenses.

Zabow, Gary

365

Modeling an HIV Particle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity helps learners visualize the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) by constructing three-dimensional HIV particle models from paper. The model to be used is a 20-sided polyhedron (icosahedron) and represents a complete viral particle. Learners combine their finished models into one mass. This is a first step toward estimating how many HIV particles could be contained inside a white blood cell before being released into the blood stream to attack new cells.

2013-05-15

366

Vaporizing particle velocimeter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A velocimeter measures flow characteristics of a flow traveling through a chamber in a given direction. Tracer particles are entrained in the flow and a source of radiant energy produces an output stream directed transversely to the chamber, having a sufficient intensity to vaporize the particles as they pass through the output stream. Each of the vaporized particles explodes to produce a shock wave and a hot core, and a flow visualization system tracks the motion of the hot cores and shock waves to measure the velocity of each tracer particle and the temperature of the flow around the tracer.

Weinstein, Leonard M. (inventor)

1992-01-01

367

GR Schwarzschild Particle Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The GR Schwarzschild Particle program simulates orbits of objects around a black hole using the Schwarzschild metric. It also displays a plot of the effective potential well in which the orbiting particle resides. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the gr_schwarzschild_particle.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. GR Schwarzschild Particle is part of a suite of Open Source Physics programs that model aspects of General Relativity. Other programs provide additional visualizations. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or General Relativity.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario; Cox, Anne

2008-05-02

368

Bioactivation of particles  

DOEpatents

Particles are bioactivated by attaching bioactivation peptides to the particle surface. The bioactivation peptides are peptide-based compounds that impart one or more biologically important functions to the particles. Each bioactivation peptide includes a molecular or surface recognition part that binds with the surface of the particle and one or more functional parts. The surface recognition part includes an amino-end and a carboxy-end and is composed of one or more hydrophobic spacers and one or more binding clusters. The functional part(s) is attached to the surface recognition part at the amino-end and/or said carboxy-end.

Pinaud, Fabien (Berkeley, CA); King, David (San Francisco, CA); Weiss, Shimon (Los Angeles, CA)

2011-08-16

369

Absolute measurement of the energies of alpha-particles emitted by sources of 252Cf and 227Ac  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Absolute energy measurements of ?-particles from sources of 252Cf and 227Ac by magnetic spectrometry are described. The sources were prepared at AERE, Harwell and measurements carried out using the 180° uniform-field spectrometer at BIPM followed the well-established technique applying cellulose-nitrate films (Kodak LR115) for track detection. The following values and uncertainties were obtained: 252Cf: E ? 0 = (6118.24±0.04) keV, E ? 43 = (6075.77±0.11) keV; 250Cf: E ? 0 = (6030.35±0.20) keV; 227Ac: E ? 0 = (4953.37±0.14) kev, E ? 13 = (4940.8±0.8) keV.

Rytz, A.; Wiltshire, R. A. P.; King, M.

1986-12-01

370

Nanolipidic particles improve the bioavailability and alpha-secretase inducing ability of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Prevention of amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein with the use of natural phytochemicals capable of enhancing alpha-secretase activity may be a therapeutic approach for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and HIV-associated dementia (HAD). We have recently shown promising preclinical results with the use of green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in mouse models of both diseases, however the translation into clinical use has been problematic primarily as a result of poor bioavailability and inefficient delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). While the antioxidant properties of EGCG are well known, we have shown that it is able to promote non-amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by upregulating alpha-secretase, thus preventing brain beta amyloid plaque formation, a hallmark of AD pathology and common finding in HIV infection. In this preliminary study, we investigated the ability of one preformulation method to improve the oral bioavailability of EGCG. We found that forming nanolipidic EGCG particles improves the neuronal (SweAPP N2a cells) alpha-secretase enhancing ability in vitro by up to 91% (P<001) and it's oral bioavailability in vivo by more than two-fold over free EGCG. PMID:20083179

Smith, Adam; Giunta, Brian; Bickford, Paula C; Fountain, Michael; Tan, Jun; Shytle, R Douglas

2010-04-15

371

The ITER Power And Particle Control System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ITER power and particle control system is designed to exhaust the 300 to 400 MW of alpha and auxiliary heating power and the He ash created by the fusion reactions, to control the density, and to fuel the plasma. The power and particle control system consists of a single null poloidal divertor, a set of active pumps with a

D. Post; T. Ando; A. Antipenkov; S. Chiocchio; J. Dietz; G. Federici; M. Gouge; Y. Igitkhanov; G. Janeschitz; C. Karney; A. Kukushkin; P. Ladd; J. Mandrekas; E. Martin; D. Mitin; H. Nakamura; H. Pacher; R. Parker; W. Stacey; M. Sugihara; R. Tivey

1996-01-01

372

Role of low-level impurities and intercalated molecular gases in the {alpha} particle radiolysis of polytetrafluoroethylene examined by static time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometery  

SciTech Connect

The structural degradation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) upon irradiation with MeV alpha ({alpha}) particles is accompanied by the proliferation of hydrogenated and oxygen-functionalized fluorocarbon species. In this article, we explore the origin of monoxide- and dioxide-functionalized fluorocarbon species that emerge upon {alpha} particle irradiation of PTFE. Samples of neat PTFE were irradiated to {alpha} doses in the range of 10{sup 7}-5x10{sup 10} rad using 5.5 MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+} ions produced in a tandem accelerator. Static time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), using a 20 keV C{sub 60}{sup +} source, was employed to probe chemical changes as a function of {alpha} particle irradiation. Chemical images and high-resolution mass spectra were collected in both the positive and negative polarities. Residual gas analysis, utilized to monitor the liberation of molecular gases during {alpha} particle irradiation of the PTFE in vacuum, is discussed in relationship to the TOF-SIMS data.

Fisher, Gregory L.; Szakal, Christopher; Wetteland, Christopher J.; Winograd, Nicholas [Nuclear Materials Technology (NMT-16), Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Chemistry Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Materials Science and Technology (MST-8), Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Chemistry Building, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2006-07-15

373

Applied Radiation and Isotopes 59 (2003) 363366 Comparison among alpha-particle energy losses in air obtained  

E-print Network

detectors are passivated implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detectors with areas of 300 mm2 . Energy of the alpha spectroscopy system and was facing up towards the detector. A collimator made of acrylic resin by the detector. A ruler attached to the holder was provided with the alpha spectroscopy system to give

Yu, K.N.

374

Particle swarm optimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A concept for the optimization of nonlinear functions using particle swarm methodology is introduced. The evolution of several paradigms is outlined, and an implementation of one of the paradigms is discussed. Benchmark testing of the paradigm is described, and applications, including nonlinear function optimization and neural network training, are proposed. The relationships between particle swarm optimization and both artificial life

James N. Kennedy; Russell C. Eberhart

1995-01-01

375

Condensation Particle Counter  

E-print Network

Model 3007 Condensation Particle Counter Operation and Service Manual 1930035, Revision C August 2002 P a r t i c l e I n s t r u m e n t s #12;#12;Model 3007 Condensation Particle Counter Operation............................................................................V 1. UNPACKING AND PARTS IDENTIFICATION..................................1 Unpacking the Condensation

Weber, Rodney

376

Smoothed particle hydrodynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this review the theory and application of Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) since its inception in 1977 are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the strengths and weaknesses, the analogy with particle dynamics and the numerous areas where SPH has been successfully applied.

J. J. Monaghan

2005-01-01

377

Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

2004-01-01

378

OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES & NUCLEI  

E-print Network

calculations within the framework of the model are shown. Since more than 30 years the General Bohr HamiltonianPHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND ATOMIC NUCLEI PARTICLES & NUCLEI SCIENTIFIC REVIEW JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL NUCLEI IN THE FRAMEWORK OF ®QUADRUPOLE PLUS PAIRING� COLLECTIVE MODEL S.G.Rohozi# nski, J

Pomorski, Krzysztof

379

Particle Physics and Cosmology  

Microsoft Academic Search

An interplay between elementary particle physics and cosmology is discussed with a special emphasis on the theory of scalar meson fields and the inflationary universe scenario. It is shown that the chaotic inflation scenario, unlike the new inflationary universe scenario, can be realized in a wide class of realistic theories of elementary particles under some natural assumptions concerning initial conditions

Andrei Linde

1985-01-01

380

Are phonons particles?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If phonons are particles, they must be attached to absolute space through their proper masses, which depend on the absolute velocities. In such a case one should be able to register with phonons the Sagnac and Marinov effects which have been observed with massless and massive particles (photons and neutrons). The experimental possibilities for such experiments are analyzed.

Marinov, Stefan

1982-05-01

381

Particle Analysis Pitfalls  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of particle analysis to assist in preparing for the 4th Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing mission. During this mission the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) will be repaired. The particle analysis consisted of Finite element mesh creation, Black-body viewfactors generated using I-DEAS TMG Thermal Analysis, Grey-body viewfactors calculated using Markov method, Particle distribution modeled using an iterative Monte Carlo process, (time-consuming); in house software called MASTRAM, Differential analysis performed in Excel, and Visualization provided by Tecplot and I-DEAS. Several tests were performed and are reviewed: Conformal Coat Particle Study, Card Extraction Study, Cover Fastener Removal Particle Generation Study, and E-Graf Vibration Particulate Study. The lessons learned during this analysis are also reviewed.

Hughes, David; Dazzo, Tony

2007-01-01

382

Two Years of Chemical Sampling on Meridiani Planum by the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer Onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For over two terrestrial years, the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring the martian surface at Meridiani Planum using the Athena instrument payload [1], including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS). The APXS has a small sensor head that is mounted on the robotic arm of the rover. The chemistry, mineralogy and morphology of selected samples were investigated by the APXS along with the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) and the Microscopic Imager (MI). The Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) provided the possibility to dust and/or abrade rock surfaces down to several millimeters to expose fresh material for analysis. We report here on APXS data gathered along the nearly 6-kilometers long traverse in craters and plains of Meridiani.

Bruckner, J.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B.C.; Dreibus, G.; Rieder, R.; Wanke, H.; d'Uston, C.; Economou, T.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lugmair, G.; Ming, D.W.; Squyres, S.W.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

2006-01-01

383

A primary standard for the measurement of alpha and beta particle surface emission rate at the National Metrology Institute of South Africa.  

PubMed

An absolute alpha and beta particle measurement system for the calibration of extended area sources has been established at the National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA). Various characteristics of the measurement system were studied. Dead time and optimal values for high-voltage and low-energy discrimination were determined. The surface emission rates from four extended area sources (Am-241, Sr-90/Y-90, Cl-36 and C-14) that were previously certified by National Physical Laboratory (NPL) were measured. The results obtained with the NMISA measurement system and those from the NPL were in excellent agreement with E(n) values of below 0.25 being observed for all four sources. PMID:18358733

Mostert, J C

2008-01-01

384

Evaluation of internal alpha-particle radiation exposure and subsequent fertility among a cohort of women formerly employed in the radium dial industry  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the effect of internal exposure to {alpha}-particle radiation on subsequent fertility among women employed in radium dial industry prior to 1930, when appreciable amounts of radium were often ingested through the practice of pointing the paint brush with the lips. The analysis was limited to women for whom a radium body burden measurement had been obtained and who were married prior to age 45 (n = 603). Internal radiation dose to the ovary was calculated based on initial intakes of radium-226 and radium-228, average ovarian mass, number and energy of {alpha} particles emitted, fraction of energy absorbed within the ovary, effective retention integrals and estimated photon irradiation. Time between marriage and pregnancy, number of pregnancies and number of live births served as surrogates for fertility. Radiation appeared to have no effect on fertility at estimated cumulative ovarian dose equivalents below 5 Sv; above this dose, however, statistically significant declines in both number of pregnancies and live births were observed. These trends persisted after multivariable adjustment for potential confounding variables and after exclusion of subjects contributing a potential classification or selection bias to the study. Additionally, the high-dose group experienced fewer live births than would have been expected based on population rates. There were no differences in time to first pregnancy between high- and low-dose groups. These results are consistent with earlier studies of {gamma}-ray exposures and suggest that exposure to high doses of radiation from internally deposited radium reduces fertility rather than inducing sterility. 42 refs., 5 tabs.

Schieve, L.A.; Davis, F.; Freels, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01

385

Intratumour injection of immunoglobulins labelled with the alpha-particle emitter 211At: analyses of tumour retention, microdistribution and growth delay.  

PubMed Central

To determine the effects of 211At-labelled antibodies in solid tumour tissue, nude mice carrying OHS human osteosarcoma xenografts received intratumour injections at dosages of 1, 2 or 4 MBq (-1) tumour. The radioisotope was conjugated to either the osteosarcoma-specific monoclonal antibody TP-3 or the non-specific polyclonal antibody hlgGkappa. Tumour retention of injected radioimmunoconjugate (RIC), measured as the percentage of injected activity dosage per gram, was significantly higher for the [211At]TP-3 (203 +/- 93 at 24.1 h post injection) compared with the [211At]hlgGkappa (57 +/- 22 at 23.2 h post injection). The radioactive count rates in body (measured at neck and abdomen) were significantly lower with the TP-3 than with the hlgGkappa. Microautoradiography of the tumour radionuclide distribution was different for the two RICs, i.e. the [211At]TP-3 was to a larger extent concentrated near the injection site, whereas the [211At]hlgGkappa was more evenly distributed all over the tumour. The tumour growth was significantly delayed as a function of the injected activity dosage but without significant difference between the specific and the non-specific RIC. According to this study, it is possible to deliver highly selective radiation doses to solid tumours using intratumour injection of alpha-particle-emitting RICs. Improved tumour retention caused by antigen binding indicates that reduced normal tissue exposure can be obtained with antigen-specific antibodies. The heterogeneous tumour dose distribution observed is, however, a major impediment to the use of alpha-particle emitters against solid tumours. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9569048

Larsen, R. H.; Bruland, O. S.

1998-01-01

386

Particle exposures and infections.  

PubMed

Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, agricultural work, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), wood stoves, traffic-related emissions, gas stoves, and ambient air pollution are all particle-related exposures associated with an increased risk for respiratory infections. In addition, cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, and ETS can result in an elevated risk for tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis. One of the mechanisms for particle-related infections includes an accumulation of iron by surface functional groups of particulate matter (PM). Since elevations in metal availability are common to every particle exposure, all PM potentially contributes to these infections. Therefore, exposures to wood stove emissions, diesel exhaust, and air pollution particles are predicted to increase the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis, albeit these elevations are likely to be small and detectable only in large population studies. Since iron accumulation correlates with the presence of surface functional groups and dependent metal coordination by the PM, the risk for infection continues as long as the particle is retained. Subsequently, it is expected that the cessation of exposure will diminish, but not totally reverse, the elevated risk for infection. PMID:24488331

Ghio, A J

2014-06-01

387

Particle Worldline Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Particle Worldline model computes and displays the trajectory of a test particle in the vicinity of a black hole using Schwarzschild coordinates. It was created for the study of Einstein's theory of general relativity and the Schwarzschild metric. The model has input fields displaying the Schwarzschild coordinates and their rates of change as well as the energy E and and angular momentum L of the particle. Conservation laws and the speed of light impose restrictions on the dynamical variables and these restrictions are enforced when entering values or dragging the particle. For example, if a user changes the default value of dr/dt to 10, the model automatically reduces the value to 0.685 because the particle speed cannot exceed the speed of light c=1. The Particle Worldline model a supplemental simulation for the article "When action is not least for orbits in general relativity" by C. G. Gray and Eric Poisson in the American Journal of Physics 79(1), 43-55 (2011) and has been approved by the authors and the American Journal of Physics (AJP) editor. The simulation was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool and is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_gr_ParticleWorldline.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2010-10-30

388

Particle acceleration efficiencies in astrophysical shear flows  

E-print Network

The acceleration of energetic particles in astrophysical shear flows is analyzed. We show that in the presence of a non-relativistic gradual velocity shear, power law particle momentum distributions $f(p) \\propto p^{-(3+\\alpha)}$ may be generated, assuming a momentum-dependent scattering time $\\tau \\propto p^{\\alpha}$, with $\\alpha > 0$. We consider possible acceleration sites in astrophysical jets and study the conditions for efficient acceleration. It is shown, for example, that in the presence of a gradual shear flow and a gyro-dependent particle mean free path, synchrotron radiation losses no longer stop the acceleration once it has started to work efficiently. This suggests that shear acceleration may naturally account for a second, non-thermal population of energetic particles in addition to a shock-accelerated one. The possible relevance of shear acceleration is briefly discussed with reference to the relativistic jet in the quasar 3C 273.

F. M. Rieger; P. Duffy

2005-02-04

389

Entanglement of Accelerating Particles  

E-print Network

We study how the entanglement of a maximally entangled pair of particles is affected when one or both of the pair are uniformly accelerated, while the detector remains in an inertial frame. We find that the entanglement is unchanged if all degrees of freedom are considered. However, particle pairs are produced, and the entanglements of different bipartite systems may change with the acceleration. In particular, the entanglement between accelerating fermions is transferred preferentially to the produced antiparticles when the acceleration is large, and the entanglement transfer is complete when the acceleration approaches infinity. However, for scalar particles, no entanglement transfer to the antiparticles is observed.

W. L. Ku; M. -C. Chu

2007-09-03

390

Charged particle accelerator grating  

DOEpatents

A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

Palmer, Robert B. (Shoreham, NY)

1986-01-01

391

Fermilab: Particle Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Fermilab website offers physicists the chance to educate individuals about the "fundamental particles and forces of our universe." The website offers a database containing over 250 hands-on activities, special events, research participation, and other educational and outreach programs. The information can be searched by state, audience, and institution. The database offers a brief description of each program and a link to its website. Students can learn about the basics of particle physics through a concise article. Educators can discover why particle physics education is important.

392

Soil Particle Density Protocol  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of this resource is to measure the soil particle density of each horizon in a soil profile. Students weigh a sample of dry, sieved soil from a horizon, mix it with distilled water and then boil the mixture to remove any air. The mixture cools for a day and then students add water until the volume of the mixture is 100 mL. Students measure the temperature and mass of the final mixture and use the Soil Particle Density Data Sheet to calculate the soil particle density. Three samples should be measured for each horizon.

The GLOBE Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

2003-08-01

393

Theory of elementary particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Progress is reported in these areas: soft X-ray Li laser pumped by synchrotron radiation; microbunching electron beams; laser acceleration of particles; generation of short risetime radiation pulses from electron storage rings; optimally effective X-ray gratings and zone plates; CP noninvariance, grand unification, and supersymmetry; hadron-nucleus collisions; quark-gluon plasma; polarization phenomena; the Drell-Yan process; supersymmetry phenomenology; Higgs particles; structure of cross-sections for sequential production and decay of spinning particles; flavor changing neutral currents.

394

Sequential Cytarabine and Alpha-Particle Immunotherapy with Bismuth-213-Lintuzumab (HuM195) for Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Lintuzumab (HuM195), a humanized anti-CD33 antibody, targets myeloid leukemia cells and has modest single-agent activity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To increase the antibody’s potency without the nonspecific cytotoxicity associated with ?-emitters, the ? particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-213 (213Bi) was conjugated to lintuzumab. This phase I/II trial was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and antileukemic effects of 213Bi-lintuzumab, the first targeted ?-emitter, after partially cytoreductive chemotherapy. Experimental Design Thirty-one patients with newly diagnosed (n = 13) or relapsed/refractory (n = 18) AML (median age, 67 years; range, 37–80) were treated with cytarabine 200 mg/m2/day for 5 days followed by 213Bi-lintuzumab 18.5–46.25 MBq/kg. Results The MTD of 213Bi-lintuzumab was 37 MB/kg; myelosuppression lasting > 35 days was dose-limiting. Extramedullary toxicities were primarily limited to ? grade 2 events, including infusion-related reactions. Transient grade 3/4 liver function abnormalities were seen in 5 patients (16%). Treatment-related deaths occurred in 2 of 21 patients (10%) who received the MTD. Significant reductions in marrow blasts were seen at all dose levels. The median response duration was 6 months (range, 2–12). Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies suggested that saturation of available CD33 sites by 213Bi-lintuzumab was achieved after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine. Conclusions Sequential administration of cytarabine and 213Bi-lintuzumab is tolerable and can produce remissions in patients with AML. PMID:20858843

Rosenblat, Todd L.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Mulford, Deborah A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Heaney, Mark L.; Chanel, Suzanne; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sgouros, George; Larson, Steven M.; Scheinberg, David A.; Jurcic, Joseph G.

2010-01-01

395

Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle  

ScienceCinema

Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

None

2011-04-25

396

Studying effects of Magnolol on alpha-particle induced bystander effects using PADC-film based dishes  

E-print Network

the bark of Magnolia officinalis which is used as a traditional Chinese medicine, were studied on alpha the associated elevated risks. Various traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) had been found effective to cure been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for many years. Our current research aims at understanding

Yu, K.N.

397

Volumetric particle modeling  

E-print Network

This dissertation presents a robust method of modeling objects and forces for computer animation. Within this method objects and forces are represented as particles. As in most modeling systems, the movement of objects is driven by physically based...

Dingle, Brent Michael

2007-09-17

398

Particle Physics Masterclass  

ScienceCinema

Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

Helio Takai

2010-01-08

399

Particle Physics Masterclass  

SciTech Connect

Students from six local high schools -- Farmingdale, Sachem East, Shoreham, Smithtown East, Ward Melville, and William Floyd -- came to Brookhaven National Laboratory to experience research with particle physicist Helio Takai. They were among more than 6,

Helio Takai

2009-04-10

400

Magnetic Particle Process Improvement  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic particle testing process is performed to find linear, surface and near surface discontinuities in ferromagnetic test materials. A wet fluorescent method is used at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T). This method employs a liquid carrier mixed with iron oxide particles in suspension, and the particles used in the method are coated with a fluorescent dye to make them visible under a black light. The process in its current state employs the use of a tank of liquid solution of a mineral oil carrier with iron oxide particles in suspension. The change to the use of an aerosol delivery system with the same material reduces the amount of waste involved in the process while preserving the sensitivity of the testing, shortens the flowtime for the test, and saves labor and material costs.

Hubert, R.R.

2002-08-13

401

Particle chemistry impactor experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles are collected on impactors and studied with regard to physical and chemical properties to help explain the importance of heterogeneous chemical reactions for stratospheric ozone depletion. The nitric, hydrochloric, and sulfuric acid content of stratospheric aerosol particles collected at 18 km altitude was determined. It is suggested that nitric acid is a component of polar stratospheric clouds. This is important for two reasons: (1) it proves that chlorine activation takes place at the surface of PSC particles by converting chemically inert chlorine nitrate to chlorine radicals that can react with ozone; and (2) if the PSC particles are large enough to settle out from the stratosphere, the possibility of nitric acid removal can result in the denitrification of the stratosphere.

Pueschel, R. F.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Goodman, J. K.; Verma, S.

1990-01-01

402

Electromagnetic particle simulation codes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electromagnetic particle simulations solve the full set of Maxwell's equations. They thus include the effects of self-consistent electric and magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and electromagnetic radiation. The algorithms for an electromagnetic code which works directly with the electric and magnetic fields are described. The fields and current are separated into transverse and longitudinal components. The transverse E and B fields are integrated in time using a leapfrog scheme applied to the Fourier components. The particle pushing is performed via the relativistic Lorentz force equation for the particle momentum. As an example, simulation results are presented for the electron cyclotron maser instability which illustrate the importance of relativistic effects on the wave-particle resonance condition and on wave dispersion.

Pritchett, P. L.

1985-01-01

403

Particle Size Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a review of research focusing on scattering, elution techniques, electrozone sensing, filtration, centrifugation, comparison of techniques, data analysis, and particle size standards. The review covers the period 1986-1988. (MVL)

Barth, Howard G.; Sun, Shao-Tang

1989-01-01

404

Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles  

DOEpatents

A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

Martin, Sue I. (Berkeley, CA); Fergenson, David P. (Alamo, CA); Srivastava, Abneesh (Santa Clara, CA); Bogan, Michael J. (Dublin, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Oakland, CA); Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA)

2010-08-24

405

Interactive Particle Visualisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Particle-based simulation methods are used to model a wide range of complex phenomena and to solve time-dependent problems\\u000a of various scales. Effective visualizations of the resulting state will communicate subtle changes in the three-dimensional\\u000a structure, spatial organization, and qualitative trends within a simulation as it evolves. This chapter discusses two approaches\\u000a to interactive particle visualization that satisfy these goals: one

Christiaan P. Gribble

406

Particle swarm optimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particle swarm optimization (PSO) has undergone many changes since its introduction in 1995. As researchers have learned about\\u000a the technique, they have derived new versions, developed new applications, and published theoretical studies of the effects\\u000a of the various parameters and aspects of the algorithm. This paper comprises a snapshot of particle swarming from the authors’\\u000a perspective, including variations in the

Riccardo Poli; James Kennedy; Tim Blackwell

2007-01-01

407

Particle Physics From Stars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low-mass particles, such as neutrinos, axions, other Nambu-Goldstone bosons, and gravitons, are produced in the hot and dense interior of stars. Therefore, astrophysical arguments constrain the properties of these particles in ways that are often complementary to cosmological arguments and to laboratory experiments. This review provides an update on the most important stellar-evolution limits and discusses them in the context

Georg G. Raffelt

1999-01-01

408

Particle Accelerators Test Cosmological Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the symbiotic relationship of cosmology and elementary-particle physics. Presents a brief overview of particle physics. Explains how cosmological considerations set limits on the number of types of elementary particles. (RT)

Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary

1988-01-01

409

I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation  

SciTech Connect

In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of {alpha}-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of {alpha}-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental {alpha}-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation theory is augmented to include multiple-chance emission and tested on experimental data to yield positive results.

Breus, Dimitry E.

2005-05-16

410

Proton: The Particle  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ?10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup ?6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ?1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ?10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup ?24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ?74%; helium, ?24%; and heavier atoms, ?2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ?87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup ?}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ?87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

Suit, Herman

2013-11-01

411

Particle-Charge Spectrometer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An instrument for rapidly measuring the electric charges and sizes (from approximately 1 to approximately 100 micrometers) of airborne particles is undergoing development. Conceived for monitoring atmospheric dust particles on Mars, instruments like this one could also be used on Earth to monitor natural and artificial aerosols in diverse indoor and outdoor settings for example, volcanic regions, clean rooms, powder-processing machinery, and spray-coating facilities. The instrument incorporates a commercially available, low-noise, ultrasensitive charge-sensing preamplifier circuit. The input terminal of this circuit--the gate of a field-effect transistor--is connected to a Faraday-cage cylindrical electrode. The charged particles of interest are suspended in air or other suitable gas that is made to flow along the axis of the cylindrical electrode without touching the electrode. The flow can be channeled and generated by any of several alternative means; in the prototype of this instrument, the gas is drawn along a glass capillary tube (see upper part of figure) coaxial with the electrode. The size of a particle affects its rate of acceleration in the flow and thus affects the timing and shape of the corresponding signal peak generated by the charge-sensing amplifier. The charge affects the magnitude (and thus also the shape) of the signal peak. Thus, the signal peak (see figure) conveys information on both the size and electric charge of a sensed particle. In experiments thus far, the instrument has been found to be capable of measuring individual aerosol particle charges of magnitude greater than 350 e (where e is the fundamental unit of electric charge) with a precision of +/- 150 e. The instrument can sample particles at a rate as high as several thousand per second.

Fuerstenau, Stephen; Wilson, Gregory R.

2008-01-01

412

Subatomic (Particle) Physics in Canada The Canadian particle physics community  

E-print Network

Subatomic (Particle) Physics in Canada · The Canadian particle physics community · Our subatomic physics facilities · Our particle physics program · Connections with the international community William Physics · Founded in forty years ago to: ­ Promote and coordinate particle physics research in Canada

413

Alpha particle and proton relative thermoluminescence efficiencies in LiF:Mg,Cu,P:is track structure theory up to the task?  

PubMed

Low-energy alpha particle and proton heavy charged particle (HCP) relative thermoluminescence (TL) efficiencies are calculated for the major dosimetric glow peak in LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) in the framework of track structure theory (TST). The calculations employ previously published TRIPOS-E Monte Carlo track segment values of the radial dose in condensed phase LiF calculated at the Instituto National de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico) and experimentally measured normalised (60)Co gamma-induced TL dose-response functions, f(D), carried out at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland). The motivation for the calculations is to test the validity of TST in a TL system in which f(D) is not supralinear (f(D) >1) and is not significantly dependent on photon energy contrary to the behaviour of the dose-response of composite peak 5 in the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100). The calculated HCP relative efficiencies in LiF:MCP-N are 23-87% lower than the experimentally measured values, indicating a weakness in the major premise of TST which exclusively relates HCP effects to the radiation action of the secondary electrons liberated by the HCP slowing down. However, an analysis of the uncertainties involved in the TST calculations and experiments (i.e. experimental measurement of f(D) at high levels of dose, sample light self-absorption and accuracy in the estimation of D(r), especially towards the end of the HCP track) indicate that these may be too large to enable a definite conclusion. More accurate estimation of sample light self-absorption, improved measurements of f(D) and full-track Monte Carlo calculations of D(r) incorporating improvements of the low-energy electron transport are indicated in order to reduce uncertainties and enable a final conclusion. PMID:22042968

Horowitz, Y S; Siboni, D; Oster, L; Livingstone, J; Guatelli, S; Rosenfeld, A; Emfietzoglou, D; Bilski, P; Obryk, B

2012-07-01

414

Particle physics and cosmology  

SciTech Connect

This series of lectures is about the role of particle physics in physical processes that occurred in the very early stages of the bug gang. Of particular interest is the role of particle physics in determining the evolution of the early Universe, and the effect of particle physics on the present structure of the Universe. The use of the big bang as a laboratory for placing limits on new particle physics theories will also be discussed. Section 1 reviews the standard cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis. Section 2 reviews the decoupling of weakly interacting particles in the early Universe, and discusses neutrino cosmology and the resulting limits that may be placed on the mass and lifetime of massive neutrinos. Section 3 discusses the evolution of the vacuum through phase transitions in the early Universe and the formation of topological defects in the transitions. Section 4 covers recent work on the generation of the baryon asymmetry by baryon-number violating reactions in Grand Unified Theories, and mentions some recent work on baryon number violation effects at the electroweak transition. Section 5 is devoted to theories of cosmic inflation. Finally, Section 6 is a discussion of the role of extra spatial dimensions in the evolution of the early Universe. 78 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs.

Kolb, E.W.

1986-10-01

415

Classical supersymmetric particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dynamics of classical spinning particles is studied from the point of view of gauge supersymmetry. The central idea is that the natural way of introducing intrinsic spin degrees of freedom into a physical system is to take the square root of the Hamiltonian generators of the system without spin, which is equivalent to rendering the system gauge supersymmetric. This is accomplished by describing the spin degrees of freedom by means of ''anticommuting c-numbers'' (odd Grassman algebra elements) and relying on Dirac's theory of constrained Hamiltonian systems. The requirement of gauge supersymmetry fixes completely the action principle and leaves neither room nor need for ad hoc subsidiary conditions on the relative direction of the spin and the velocity as in the more traditional treatments. Both massive and massless particles free and in interaction with electromagnetic and gravitational fields are discussed. It is found that there exists a supergauge in which the spin tensor of a massive particle in a gravitational field is transported in parallel but the particle does not follow a geodesic. Massless particles on the other hand have the property of possessing a supergauge where their helicity is conserved and in which at the same time the worldline is a geodesic. Special attention is paid to the meaning and properties of the supergauge transformations. The main aspects of that discussion are applicable to more complicated systems such as supergravity. In particular phenomena such as necessity of invoking the equations of motion to close the gauge are analyzed.

Galvao, Carlos A. P.; Teitelboim, Claudio

1980-07-01

416

Cosmology and Particle Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses. In the last few years we have witnessed the birth and growth to healthy adolescence of a new collaboration between astrophysicists and particle physicists. The most notable success of this cooperative effort has been to provide the framework for understanding, within the context of GUTs and the hot big-bang cosmology, the universal baryon asymmetry. The most exciting new predictions this effort has spawned are that exotic relics may exist in detectable abundances. In particular, we may live in a neutrino-dominated Universe. In the next few years, accummulating laboratory data (for example proton decay, neutrino masses and oscillations) coupled with theoritical work in particle physics and cosmology will ensure the growth to maturity of this joint effort.

Steigman, G.

1982-01-01

417

Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle  

SciTech Connect

Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

None

2009-10-07

418

Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle  

ScienceCinema

Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

None

2011-04-25

419

Carbon-particle generator  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, A.J.

1982-09-29

420

Biological particle identification apparatus  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method for making multiparameter light scattering measurements from suspensions of biological particles is described. Fourteen of the sixteen Mueller matrix elements describing the particles under investigation can be substantially individually determined as a function of scattering angle and probing radiations wavelength, eight elements simultaneously for each of two apparatus configurations using an apparatus which incluees, in its simplest form, two polarization modulators each operating at a chosen frequency, one polarizer, a source of monochromatic electromagnetic radiation, a detector sensitive to the wavelength of radiation employed, eight phase-sensitive detectors, and appropriate electronics. A database of known biological particle suspensions can be assembled, and unknown samples can be quickly identified once measurements are performed on it according to the teachings of the subject invention, and a comparison is made with the database.

Salzman, Gary C. (Los Alamos, NM); Gregg, Charles T. (Los Alamos, NM); Grace, W. Kevin (Los Alamos, NM); Hiebert, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01

421

Evidence of Undetected Particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a number of physics experiments, evidence can be obtained about particles not actually detected. This is particularly true of scattering experiments and experiments in which interference patterns are produced. The most obvious relationship is that the yield depends critically upon the intensity of the incoming particles, whereas often only a few of the interacting particles are detected. This is, of course, statistical evidence. The case of interference patterns for light will be specifically discussed, in which not only the yield, but the shape of the patterns can depend upon the number of photons per unit time in the region of the detector, only a few of which are actually detected. Examples from a recent article [1] will be presented, as well as other computer generated examples which could also be tested in principle. [1]Fadner, Orosz, Smith and Sharma, J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 3, no. 6 (Dec. 2001) 400-406

Fadner, Willard

2002-04-01

422

Precision wood particle feedstocks  

DOEpatents

Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

2013-07-30

423

Particle Physics and Cosmology  

E-print Network

In the first Lecture, the Big Bang and the Standard Model of particle physics are introduced, as well as the structure of the latter and open issues beyond it. Neutrino physics is discussed in the second Lecture, with emphasis on models for neutrino masses and oscillations. The third Lecture is devoted to supersymmetry, including the prospects for discovering it at accelerators or as cold dark matter. Inflation is reviewed from the viewpoint of particle physics in the fourth Lecture, including simple models with a single scalar inflaton field: the possibility that this might be a sneutrino is proposed. Finally, the fifth Lecture is devoted to topics further beyond the Standard Model, such as grand unification, baryo- and leptogenesis - that might be due to sneutrino inflaton decays - and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays - that might be due to the decays of metastable superheavy dark matter particles.

John Ellis

2003-05-02

424

Moving particle composition analyzer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mass spectrometry apparatus for analyzing the composition of moving microscopic particles is introduced. The apparatus includes a capacitor with a front electrode upon which the particles impinge, a back electrode, and a solid dielectric sandwiched between the front and back electrodes. In one embodiment, the electrodes and dielectric are arcuately shaped as concentric peripheral segments of different spheres having a common center and different radii. The front electrode and dielectric together have a thickness such that an impinging particle can penetrate them. In a second embodiment, the capacitor has planar, parallel electrodes, in which case the ejected positive ions are deflected downstream of a planar grid by a pair of spaced, arcuate capacitor plates having a region between them through which the ejected ions travel.

Auer, S. O. (inventor)

1976-01-01

425

On particle track detectors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aqueous sodium hydroxide is widely used to develop charged particle tracks in polycarbonate film, particularly Lexan. The chemical nature of the etching process for this system has been determined. A method employing ultra-violet absorbance was developed for monitoring the concentration of the etch products in solution. Using this method it was possible to study the formation of the etching solution saturated in etch products. It was found that the system super-saturates to a significant extent before precipitation occurs. It was also learned that the system approaches its equilibrium state rather slowly. It is felt that both these phenomena may be due to the presence of surfactant in the solution. In light of these findings, suggestions are given regarding the preparation and maintenance of the saturated etch solution. Two additional research projects, involving automated techniques for particle track analysis and particle identification using AgCl crystals, are briefly summarized.

Benton, E. V.; Gruhn, T. A.; Andrus, C. H.

1973-01-01

426

Charged particle accelerator grating  

DOEpatents

A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator is described. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams onto the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

Palmer, R.B.

1985-09-09

427

Magnetic particle inspection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this experiment is to familiarize the student with magnetic particle inspection and relate it to classification of various defects. Magnetic particle inspection is a method of detecting the presence of cracks, laps, tears, inclusions, and similar discontinuities in ferromagnetic materials such as iron and steel. This method will most clearly show defects that are perpendicular to the magnetic field. The Magnaglo method uses a liquid which is sprayed on the workpiece to be inspected, and the part is magnetized at the same time. The workpiece is then viewed under a black light, and the presence of discontinuity is shown by the formation of a bright indication formed by the magnetic particles over the discontinuity. The equipment and experimental procedures are described.

Sastri, Sankar

1990-01-01

428

Non-accelerator Particle Physics  

E-print Network

Non-accelerator Particle Physics and Neutrino Physics Research programs of: Prof. Martin that often connect particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology Some questions: - What particles of the neutrino? #12;The techniques: Laboratory experiments, in the style of particle physics · High energy

Wechsler, Risa H.

429

Introduction to experimental particle physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particle physics is the study of the properties of subatomic particles and of the interactions that occur among them. This book is concerned with the experimental aspects of the subject, including the characteristics of various detectors and considerations in the design of experiments. The book includes a description of the particles and interactions studied in particle physics. Material from relativistic

R. Fernow

1986-01-01

430