Sample records for partikeludslip fra nye

  1. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 241 - Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters C...Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters The...boundaries of FRA's eight regions and the addresses for the regional headquarters of...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 241 - Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters C...Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters The...boundaries of FRA's eight regions and the addresses for the regional headquarters of...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 241 - Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters C...Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters The...boundaries of FRA's eight regions and the addresses for the regional headquarters of...

  4. Fri prosjektsttte: Nye prosjekter innenfor matematikk, naturvitenskap og teknologi (FRINATEK) fra 2014 Prosjekt Tittel Prosjektansvarlig

    E-print Network

    Brandenburg, Axel

    Corroles as a Platform for Fundamental Transition Metal Chemistry, with Emphasis on Heavy Elements (EME) Farmasøytisk institutt, Universitetet i Oslo 231741 Modeling of obstructive sleep apnea by fluid

  5. Afprvning af leverance af reguleringsydelser fra et

    E-print Network

    Afprøvning af leverance af reguleringsydelser fra et mini KV-anlæg med UPS og TriGen funktionalitet ANTAGELSER 17 DEFINITIONER 19 ANALYSE AF YDELSER FRA ET TRIGEN ANLÆG 22 RESULTATER 24 #12;TEST PLAN 24 TEST at udviklet og afprøve et mini KV-anlæg med UPS og TriGen, arbejdspakke 8 (WP8). Der har i perioden været

  6. 76 FR 85 - Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service...SUMMARY: The Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a...

  7. Apollo 14 mission to Fra Mauro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Brian D.

    1991-04-01

    The 1971 Apollo 14 Mission to Fra Mauro, a lunar highland area, is highlighted in this video. The mission's primary goal was the collection of lunar rocks and soil samples and lunar exploration. The soil and rock sampling was for the geochronological determination of the Moon's evolution and its comparison with that of Earth. A remote data collection station was assembled on the Moon and left for continuous data collection and surface monitoring experiments. The Apollo 14 astronauts were Alan B. Shepard, Edgar D. Mitchell, and Stuart A. Rossa. Astronauts Shepard and Mitchell landed on the Moon (February 5, 1971) and performed the sampling, the EVA, and deployment of the lunar experiments. There is film-footage of the lunar surface, of the command module's approach to both the Moon and the Earth, Moon and Earth spacecraft launching and landing, in-orbit command- and lunar-module docking, and of Mission Control.

  8. The strawberry fruit Fra a allergen functions in flavonoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Cristina; Hoffmann, Thomas; Escobar, Nieves Medina; Ludemann, Felix; Botella, Miguel A; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Schwab, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    The strawberry Fra a 1 allergen is a homolog of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. It is synthesized by red ripe fruits of Fragaria x ananassa while white fruits of a mutant genotype, which is known to be tolerated by individuals affected by allergy, are devoid of it. Proteomic analyses have shown that Fra a 1 is down-regulated in the tolerated white-fruited genotype along with enzymes of the anthocyanin pigment pathway. In this study, we report the spatial and temporal expression of three Fra a genes that encode different isoforms, and the transient RNAi-mediated silencing of the Fra a genes in strawberry fruits of the red-fruited cultivar Elsanta with an ihpRNA construct. As a consequence of reduced levels of Fra a mRNAs, fruits were obtained that produced significantly decreased levels of anthocyanins and upstream metabolites. This effect is consistent with the parallel down-regulation of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase (FaPAL) and to a lesser extent of the chalcone synthase (FaCHS) transcript levels also found in these fruits. In naturally occurring white-fruited genotypes of F. chiloensis and F. vesca, Fra a transcript levels are higher than those of the red-fruited varieties, likely to compensate for the low expression levels of FaPAL and FaCHS in these mutant genotypes. The results demonstrate that Fra a expression is directly linked to flavonoid biosynthesis and show that the Fra a allergen has an essential biological function in pigment formation in strawberry fruit. PMID:19969523

  9. Mineralogy and origin of Fra Mauro fines and breccias.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaide, W.; Wrigley, R.

    1972-01-01

    Textural features, glassy spherule and glassy aggregate contents, and size-frequency distributions of lithic components of the regolith fines indicate that the Fra Mauro regolith of the smooth terrain is a highly reworked accumulation of debris derived primarily by impact comminution of annealed breccias. Analyses of the glassy spherules suggest that mare-derived debris must amount to less than 5% of the regolith, but exotic materials having the composition of the Fra Mauro breccias (highland-like) cannot be recognized. Breccia samples from the Fra Mauro site include (1) regolith breccias derived by lithification of local regolith material, (2) texturally and compositionally unique white rock breccias that may have been derived from ancient ejecta buried beneath the Fra Mauro formation, and (3) annealed breccias that are excavated samples of the Fra Mauro formation. The latter were deposited as heated impact ejecta, probably by avalanches produced by the Imbrian event and were annealed in situ in a thermal regime perhaps equivalent to that responsible for the pyroxene-hornfels facies of metamorphism in terrestrial rocks.

  10. [Screening of the candidate proteins interacting with TaFRA].

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Jie; Hao, Chen-Yang; Pu, Wen; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Xue-Yong

    2011-01-01

    F-box protein is an important subunit of SCF complex, an E3 ligase in ubiquitin system, and its function is determined through mediating the specific recognition and combining with substrate protein. TaFRA (F-box protein related to abiotic stress) was identified by RACE based on the fragments diferently expressing in wheat seedling exposed to salt stress and encodes an F-box protein. In this study, pBD-TaFRA bait expression vector was constructed, and cDNA+pGAD+pBD was directly co-transformed into yeast hybrid system to screen condidate proteins interacting with TaFRA. Fourty-four candidate proteins were obtained, in which 32 were known proteins and transcript factors related to stress tolerance such as thioredoxin, metallothinein, ATP synthase, and serine/threonine protein kinase etc. This indicates that TaFRA participates in stress response through regulating above condidate genes, which will provide basis for revealing the mechanism of TaFRA reaction to abiotic stress. PMID:21377964

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the strawberry allergens Fra a 1E and Fra a 3 in the presence of catechin

    PubMed Central

    Casañal, Ana; Zander, Ulrich; Dupeux, Florine; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Marquez, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    The strawberry Fra a proteins belong to the pathogenesis-related PR-10 protein family and share a common fold with the Bet v 1 major pollen allergen and the START/PYR/PYL proteins, which are characterized by the presence of a central cavity and are often involved in the binding of a variety of natural compounds. The Fra a proteins play a key role in the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in strawberries and are essential for pigment formation in fruits. In order to understand Fra a protein function, full-length Fra a 1E and Fra a 3 cDNAs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the proteins were purified to homogeneity using metal-affinity chromatography. Diffraction-quality crystals of Fra a 1E and of Fra a 3 in the presence of (+)-catechin were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data from single crystals of Fra a 1E and Fra a 3 were processed to 2.2 and 3.0?Å resolution in space groups P212121 and P2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.02, b = 74.42, c = 84.04?Å and a = 137.91, b = 206.61, c = 174.7?Å for Fra a 1E and Fra a 3, respectively. PMID:23695565

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the strawberry allergens Fra a 1E and Fra a 3 in the presence of catechin.

    PubMed

    Casañal, Ana; Zander, Ulrich; Dupeux, Florine; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Marquez, Jose A

    2013-05-01

    The strawberry Fra a proteins belong to the pathogenesis-related PR-10 protein family and share a common fold with the Bet v 1 major pollen allergen and the START/PYR/PYL proteins, which are characterized by the presence of a central cavity and are often involved in the binding of a variety of natural compounds. The Fra a proteins play a key role in the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in strawberries and are essential for pigment formation in fruits. In order to understand Fra a protein function, full-length Fra a 1E and Fra a 3 cDNAs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the proteins were purified to homogeneity using metal-affinity chromatography. Diffraction-quality crystals of Fra a 1E and of Fra a 3 in the presence of (+)-catechin were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data from single crystals of Fra a 1E and Fra a 3 were processed to 2.2 and 3.0?Å resolution in space groups P212121 and P2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.02, b = 74.42, c = 84.04?Å and a = 137.91, b = 206.61, c = 174.7?Å for Fra a 1E and Fra a 3, respectively. PMID:23695565

  13. Fragile site orthologs FHIT/FRA3B and Fhit/Fra14A2: Evolutionarily conserved but highly recombinogenic

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Ayumi; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Trapasso, Francesco; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Alder, Hansjuerg; Mori, Masaki; Huebner, Kay; Croce, Carlo M.

    2003-01-01

    Common fragile sites are regions that show elevated susceptibility to DNA damage, leading to alterations that can contribute to cancer development. FRA3B, located at chromosome region 3p14.2, is the most frequently expressed human common fragile site, and allelic losses at FRA3B have been observed in many types of cancer. The FHIT gene, encompassing the FRA3B region, is a tumor-suppressor gene. To identify the features of FHIT/FRA3B that might contribute to fragility, sequences of the human FHIT and the flanking PTPRG gene were compared with those of murine Fhit and Ptprg. Human and mouse orthologous genes, FHIT and Fhit, are more highly conserved through evolution than PTPRG/Ptprg and yet contain more sequence elements that are exquisitely sensitive to genomic rearrangements, such as high-flexibility regions and long interspersed nuclear element 1s, suggesting that common fragile sites serve a function. The conserved AT-rich high-flexibility regions are the most characteristic of common fragile sites. PMID:14630947

  14. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  15. Compositional data for twenty-one Fra Mauro lunar materials.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, H. J., Jr.; Cuttitta, F.; Annell, C. S.; Carron, M. K.; Christian, R. P.; Dwornik, E. J.; Greenland, L. P.; Ligon, D. T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Major, minor, and trace element analyses are presented for two igneous rocks, six breccias, four microbreccias, two breccia clasts, and six soils, as well as a sample of sawdust from rock 14066. Evaluation of the data suggests that the samples from the Fra Mauro highlands have the same nonterrestrial characteristics shown previously by the samples returned from the mare regions by Apollo 11 and 12 - namely, a high refractory element content, a lower volatile element content, and an excess reducing capacity above that due to FeO. The Fra Mauro soils have higher concentrations of Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O and lower amounts of FeO and TiO2 than do the mare soils. They also show a bimodal distribution of Ni, B, and Nb. The highland breccias are richer in SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, Na2O, and K2O than those returned from the mare lowlands. FeO, TiO2, and MnO are lower in concentration at Fra Mauro, and the highland breccias are more complex mineralogically than those collected previously.

  16. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    E-print Network

    Sethna, James P.

    Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide

  17. Geological map of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Monsen, S.A.; Carr, M.D.; Reheis, M.C.; Orkild, P.P.

    1992-12-31

    Bare Mountain comprises the isolated complex of mountain peaks southeast of the town of Beatty in southern Nye County, Nevada. This small mountain range lies between the alluvial basins of Crater Flat to the east and the northern Amargosa Desert to the southwest. The northern boundary of the range is less well defined, but for this report, the terrane of faulted Miocene volcanic rocks underlying Beatty Mountain and the unnamed hills to the east are considered to be the northernmost part of Bare Mountain. The southern tip of the mountain range is at Black Marble, the isolated hill at the southeast corner of the map. The main body of the range, between Fluorspar Canyon and Black Marble, is a folded and complexly faulted, but generally northward-dipping (or southward-dipping and northward-overturned), sequence of weakly to moderately metamorphosed upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic marine strata, mostly miogeoclinal (continental shelf) rocks. The geology of Bare Mountain is mapped at a scale of 1:24,000.

  18. Fra-1 governs cell migration via modulation of CD44 expression in human mesotheliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Blumen, Steven R; Pass, Harvey; Mossman, Brooke T

    2007-01-01

    Silencing of Fra-1, a component of the dimeric transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), inhibits mRNA expression of c-met and cd44 in rat mesothelioma cells and is causally linked to maintenance of the transformed phenotype. However, the mechanisms of Fra-1 regulation and Fra-1 regulated gene expression in human malignant mesothelioma (MM) are unclear. We first show in a panel of human MM cells that Fra-1 mRNA expression in MM is complex and regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1, ERK2), Src, and phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in a tumor-specific fashion. Cell lines with PI3K-dependent Fra-1 expression were SV40 positive and expressed the lowest basal Fra-1 levels. Levels of Fra-1 expression correlated with amounts of CD44 expression that were greater in simian virus 40 negative (SV40-) MM cells. Using dominant negative (dn), short hairpin (sh) and small interference (si) RNA constructs, we next demonstrate that expression of CD44, the principal hyaluronic receptor in MMs, correlates with Fra-expression in both simian virus 40 positive (SV40+) and SV40- MMs. Moreover, both Fra-1 and CD44 expression are linked to cell migration in SV40- MM cells. Lastly, in contrast to normal lung tissue, tissue microarrays revealed that Fra-1 was expressed in 33 of 34 human MMs, and that all CD44+ tumors were SV40-. These results suggest that Fra-1 is associated with cell migration in human MMs and that Fra-1 modulation of CD44 may govern migration of selected MMs. PMID:18096084

  19. Fra-1 governs cell migration via modulation of CD44 expression in human mesotheliomas.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Blumen, Steven R; Pass, Harvey; Mossman, Brooke T

    2007-01-01

    Silencing of Fra-1, a component of the dimeric transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), inhibits mRNA expression of c-met and cd44 in rat mesothelioma cells and is causally linked to maintenance of the transformed phenotype. However, the mechanisms of Fra-1 regulation and Fra-1 regulated gene expression in human malignant mesothelioma (MM) are unclear. We first show in a panel of human MM cells that Fra-1 mRNA expression in MM is complex and regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1, ERK2), Src, and phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways in a tumor-specific fashion. Cell lines with PI3K-dependent Fra-1 expression were SV40 positive and expressed the lowest basal Fra-1 levels. Levels of Fra-1 expression correlated with amounts of CD44 expression that were greater in simian virus 40 negative (SV40-) MM cells. Using dominant negative (dn), short hairpin (sh) and small interference (si) RNA constructs, we next demonstrate that expression of CD44, the principal hyaluronic receptor in MMs, correlates with Fra-expression in both simian virus 40 positive (SV40+) and SV40- MMs. Moreover, both Fra-1 and CD44 expression are linked to cell migration in SV40- MM cells. Lastly, in contrast to normal lung tissue, tissue microarrays revealed that Fra-1 was expressed in 33 of 34 human MMs, and that all CD44+ tumors were SV40-. These results suggest that Fra-1 is associated with cell migration in human MMs and that Fra-1 modulation of CD44 may govern migration of selected MMs. PMID:18096084

  20. Presence of hydroxyl in the Fra Mauro region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoy, Alexey; Wöhler, Christian; Sinitsyn, Mikhail; Grumpe, Arne; Feoktistova, Ekaterina; Shevchenko, Vladislav

    Lunar pyroclastic deposits (LPDs) are known to consist of volcanic material (basalt and glass) ejected by eruptions [1]. In the southern part of the crater Fra Mauro, a localised LPD is associated with Rima Parry V [2]. In [3], a suppressed neutron flux is described for the Fra Mauro region based on measurements of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) [4], interpreted as an indicator of hydroxyl (OH). In this study we compare these measurements with NIR hyperspectral data acquired by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M(3) ) [5] instrument. The suppression factor of the neutron flux is defined according to delta = (N_ref-N_ex)/N_ref [6,7] with N_ex as the average count rate of the omnidirectional sensor (SETN) [8] of LEND for the region under study (here: the Fra Mauro region) and N_ref as the average count rate for a reference area (here: immediately west of Fra Mauro). For Fra Mauro crater, a suppression factor of 2.4% with a standard error of 0.41% was found. The epithermal neutron flux can be assumed to be inversely proportional to the hydrogen content. Hence, the measured positive suppression factor indicates a positive anomaly of the hydrogen content at up to 1 m depth. Under the approximative assumption of a proportional relation between the suppression factor delta and the hydrogen content, the observation in [7] of a suppression factor of 18% in the crater Cabeus associated with a homogeneous hydrogen content of about 500 ppm implies an enrichment in hydrogen by about 70 ppm for the Fra Mauro region. However, these values do not specifically refer to the small Fra Mauro LPD but to a larger area of about 150 km diameter. To identify the LPD-specific suppression factor, it would be necessary to acquire collimated neutron flux measurements. We have complemented the LEND-based measurements by the analysis of spectral reflectance data acquired by the M(3) instrument. The presence of OH in the surface material leads to an absorption band beyond 2700 nm wavelength [9]. Based on the M(3) version V03 radiance data [10] and GLD100 topographic data [11], a topographically and photometrically corrected spectral reflectance data set normalised to 30(°) incidence angle, 0(°) emission angle and 30(°) phase angle [12] has been generated along with a refined DEM of high lateral resolution (cf. [13] for a detailed description of the applied processing steps). The depth of the OH absorption band is indicated by the reflectance ratio between the 2657 nm and 2817 nm bands (M(3) channels 77 and 81). In our map of the 2657/2817 reflectance ratio, the Fra Mauro LPD as well as a similar deposit in the northern part of the crater Bonpland stand out as positive anomalies exhibiting an increase of 2-2.5% with respect to the surrounding crater floor material. This observation indicates the presence of OH in the LPD surface material. Similar absorption depths can be observed for the inner walls and ejecta of a crater of 3 km diameter located north-northwest of the Fra Mauro LPD and of several craters with diameters less than 2 km in the northern floor of Bonpland. This behaviour may indicate the presence of OH also at larger depth below the surface. [1] Gaddis et al. (2003) Icarus 161(2), 262-280 [2] Head, J. W., Wilson, L. (1993) PSS 41(10), 719-727 [3] Sinitsyn et al. (2013) 4th Moscow Solar System Symp., 4MS3-PS14 [4] Mitrofanov et al. (2010a) Space Sci. Rev. 150(1-4), 183-207 [5] Pieters et al. (2009) Current Science 96(4), 500-505 [6] Boynton et al. (2012) JGR 117, E00H33 [7] Mitrofanov et al. (2010b) Science 330, 483-485 [8] Litvak et al. (2012) JGR 117, E00H22 [9] Clark et al. (2010) LPSC XXXXI, abstract #1533 [10] http://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/volumes/m3.html [11] Scholten et al. (2012) JGR 117, E00H17 [12] Pieters (1999) Workshop on New Views of the Moon II, abstract #8025 [13] Grumpe et al. (2013) Adv. Space Res., in press.

  1. Deformation of silicates in some Fra Mauro breccias.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallemant, H. G. A.; Carter, N. L.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the studies conducted show that there is no unequivocal evidence for appreciable static deformation (other than annealing) in the Fra Mauro formation. These rocks probably have been derived from depths to about 10 km. It is suggested that there has been no substantial tectonic activity in the range from the surface to 10 km since these rocks and those of the other Apollo sites crystallized some 3 to 4 billion years ago. This negative conclusion implies that at least the outer layer of the moon has been static for this length of time.

  2. Winding movement in power transformers: a comparison of FRA measurement connection methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. S. B. Jayasinghe; Z. D. Wang; P. N. Jarman; A. W. Darwin

    2006-01-01

    Frequency response analysis (FRA) is an effective diagnostic tool for detecting transformer winding movements. Various FRA traces can be measured from a set of transformer winding terminals each of which relate to a different test connection scheme. Practical considerations of test and analysis time dictate that only some of the connections are used, and currently there is no standard test

  3. Apollo 14 - Nature and origin of rock types in soil from the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitken, F. K.; Anderson, D. H.; Bass, M. N.; Brown, R. W.; Butler, P., Jr.; Heiken, G.; Jakes, P.; Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Takeda, H.

    1971-01-01

    Compositions of glasses in the Apollo 14 soil correspond to four types of Fra Mauro basalts, to mare basalts and soils, and, in minor amounts, to gabbroic anorthosite and potash granite. The Fra Mauro basalts can be related by simple low pressure crystal-liquid fractionation that implies a parent composition like that of Apollo 14 sample 14310.

  4. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F; Schett, Georg; Mielenz, Dirk; David, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-20

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell-specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression. PMID:25288397

  5. Rock-mass classification of candidate repository units at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. S. Langkopf; P. R. Gnirk

    1986-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project managed by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, a tuff site on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Between 1981 and 1983, four tuff units were considered as potential units

  6. Chromosomes and Chromatin Anne C Nye, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA

    E-print Network

    Carpenter, Anne E.

    Chromosomes and Chromatin Anne C Nye, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA Ramji R Rajendran, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA Andrew S Belmont, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA DNA, the hereditary material of the cell, is folded into protein-containing fibers

  7. BOOK REVIEW: SOLUTE MOVEMENT IN THE RHIZOSPHERE BY TINKEY AND NYE

    EPA Science Inventory

    After 23 years, Tinker and Nye have published an updated version of their earlier book titled "Solute Movement in the Soil-Root System" (University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1977). The book contains many of the same elements that made the 1977 publication so use...

  8. Sequence conservation at human and mouse orthologous common fragile regions, FRA3B/FHIT and Fra14A2/Fhit.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, T; Druck, T; Mimori, K; Flomenberg, J; Berk, L; Alder, H; Miller, W; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    2001-05-01

    It has been suggested that delayed DNA replication underlies fragility at common human fragile sites, but specific sequences responsible for expression of these inducible fragile sites have not been identified. One approach to identify such cis-acting sequences within the large nonexonic regions of fragile sites would be to identify conserved functional elements within orthologous fragile sites by interspecies sequence comparison. This study describes a comparison of orthologous fragile regions, the human FRA3B/FHIT and the murine Fra14A2/Fhit locus. We sequenced over 600 kbp of the mouse Fra14A2, covering the region orthologous to the fragile epicenter of FRA3B, and determined the Fhit deletion break points in a mouse kidney cancer cell line (RENCA). The murine Fra14A2 locus, like the human FRA3B, was characterized by a high AT content. Alignment of the two sequences showed that this fragile region was stable in evolution despite its susceptibility to mitotic recombination on inhibition of DNA replication. There were also several unusual highly conserved regions (HCRs). The positions of predicted matrix attachment regions (MARs), possibly related to replication origins, were not conserved. Of known fragile region landmarks, five cancer cell break points, one viral integration site, and one aphidicolin break cluster were located within or near HCRs. Thus, comparison of orthologous fragile regions has identified highly conserved sequences with possible functional roles in maintenance of fragility. PMID:11320209

  9. Nye County Nevada Perspectives on the State of the Yucca Mountain Project - 12388

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Darrell; Voegele, Michael; Jaszczak, Casmier [Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Responding to the Department of Energy decision to try to withdraw the Yucca Mountain license application and the Administration actions to close down the Yucca Mountain project, Nye County undertook a number of activities to articulate its support for continuing the Yucca Mountain project. The activities included responding to inquiries from federal agencies, including investigations undertaken by the Government Accountability Office addressing other potential uses for the Yucca Mountain site, responding to a Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the possible use of Yucca Mountain for disposal of Greater than Class C wastes, testifying in hearings, and interacting with the President's Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. The paper summarizes Nye County's position on the Yucca Mountain repository, Nye County's perspectives on the various activities that were developed and considered by the Government Accountability Office, Nye County's concerns with the use of the Nevada National Security Site for Disposal of Greater than Class C Low-Level Radioactive Wastes, testimony of Nye County officials expressing local community support for the Yucca Mountain project, and Nye County's perspectives on recommendations provided by the Blue Ribbon Commission to move the nation's high-level radioactive waste disposal programs forward without consideration of the role Yucca Mountain could have served in those recommendations. Nye County believes that every effort should be made to, at a minimum, fund the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to complete the license application review. Then, if Congress does decide to change the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, there will be valuable information available to support new policy development. This administration contends that Congressional language associated with the FY2010 and FY2011 appropriations and authorization process is sufficient evidence of its intent to terminate the Yucca Mountain repository program. The appropriation process needs to be explicit that, absent explicit language to the contrary, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act stands. It also should include language that requires the Department of Energy to preserve all necessary records until the Nuclear Waste Policy Act is amended or rescinded by specific Congressional action. (authors)

  10. Expression of FRA16D/WWOX and FRA3B/FHIT genes in hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hideshi; Vecchione, Andrea; Furukawa, Yutaka; Sutheesophon, Krittaya; Han, Shuang-Yin; Druck, Teresa; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Trapasso, Francesco; Nishimura, Miki; Saito, Yasushi; Ozawa, Keiya; Croce, Carlo M; Huebner, Kay; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2003-11-01

    The WW domain containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene was recently identified as a candidate tumor suppressor gene at a common fragile site, FRA16D. Because the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene, a tumor suppressor gene encompassing the most active, common fragile site FRA3B, is frequently deleted in various cancers, we evaluated the expression of WWOX and FHIT in 74 cases of primary hematopoietic neoplasias and 20 leukemia cell lines. Aberration or absence of WWOX transcripts was detected in 51% of the primary cases and 55% of cell lines, and three WWOX nucleotide variants were detected among the leukemia cell lines. FHIT expression was absent or altered in 36% of the primary cases and 15% of cell lines. The occurrence of aberrant FHIT reverse transcription-PCR products correlated significantly with the occurrence of WWOX alterations. Wild-type transcripts of both genes were expressed in normal hematopoiesis along with a small fraction of short transcripts. A DNA blot study showed that WWOX and FHIT genes were deleted in 2 of 18 cases with primary acute leukemias; both genes were not expressed in the 2 cases. Furthermore, treatment of cells with a demethylating or histone acetylating agent in culture resulted in increased expression of WWOX and FHIT mRNA in leukemia cells. Conclusions are that WWOX expression is frequently altered or absent in hematopoietic disorders, often in association with FHIT alterations, and that alterations of these fragile genes may result not only from genomic deletions but also from epigenetic modifications associated with expression of fragility. PMID:14638866

  11. Sequence of the FRA3B common fragile region: implications for the mechanism of FHIT deletion.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Ishii, H; Alder, H; Snyder, E; Druck, T; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1997-12-23

    The hypothesis that chromosomal fragile sites may be "weak links" that result in hot spots for cancer-specific chromosome rearrangements was supported by the discovery that numerous cancer cell homozygous deletions and a familial translocation map within the FHIT gene, which encompasses the common fragile site, FRA3B. Sequence analysis of 276 kb of the FRA3B/FHIT locus and 22 associated cancer cell deletion endpoints shows that this locus is a frequent target of homologous recombination between long interspersed nuclear element sequences resulting in FHIT gene internal deletions, probably as a result of carcinogen-induced damage at FRA3B fragile sites. PMID:9405656

  12. 49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608 FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. (a) Except as provided...

  13. 49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. 219.602 Section 219...DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.602 FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. (a) Except as...

  14. 49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. 219.602 Section 219...DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.602 FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. (a) Except as...

  15. 49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. 219.602 Section 219...DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.602 FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. (a) Except as...

  16. 49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608 FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. (a) Except as provided...

  17. 49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608 FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. (a) Except as provided...

  18. 49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608...

  19. 49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...situations that arise in the course of railroad operations...training sessions in the normal course of their inspection duties. FRA believes that this sort of preventive, rather...civil penalty cases. Long-term solutions to compliance...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...situations that arise in the course of railroad operations...training sessions in the normal course of their inspection duties. FRA believes that this sort of preventive, rather...civil penalty cases. Long-term solutions to compliance...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...situations that arise in the course of railroad operations...training sessions in the normal course of their inspection duties. FRA believes that this sort of preventive, rather...civil penalty cases. Long-term solutions to compliance...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...situations that arise in the course of railroad operations...training sessions in the normal course of their inspection duties. FRA believes that this sort of preventive, rather...civil penalty cases. Long-term solutions to compliance...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...situations that arise in the course of railroad operations...training sessions in the normal course of their inspection duties. FRA believes that this sort of preventive, rather...civil penalty cases. Long-term solutions to compliance...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...code is to establish a uniform language among FRA, States, and...119Defective Freight Car Truck. Car Bodies 215.121Defective Car Body. Draft System 215.123Defective...beam. 215.121Defective car body. (A) Improper...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...code is to establish a uniform language among FRA, States, and...119Defective Freight Car Truck. Car Bodies 215.121Defective Car Body. Draft System 215.123Defective...beam. 215.121Defective car body. (A) Improper...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...code is to establish a uniform language among FRA, States, and...119Defective Freight Car Truck. Car Bodies 215.121Defective Car Body. Draft System 215.123Defective...beam. 215.121Defective car body. (A) Improper...

  8. From Filippo Lippi to Piero della Francesca: Fra Carnevale and the Making of a Renaissance Master

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This special Web feature from the Metropolitan Museum centers around two fifteenth century paintings acquired by two US museums (the Metropolitan and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston) from the Barberini Collection in Rome in the 1930s, that have puzzled scholars for more than a century, and have only recently been identified as the work of Giovanni di Bartolomeo Corradini of Urbino, also known as Fra Carnevale. In addition to investigating the mystery of Fra Carnevale, the Web feature also examines the concepts of artistic identity, in contrast with the Renaissance practice of artworks that issue from the studio of a named artist, that are actually the work of many unnamed artists. To do this, the feature is divided into three sections: "Filippo Lippi", 29 works by Lippi and others trained in his workshop; "An Alternative Vision", seven paintings by artists working within the studio system, but, similar to Fra Carnevale's works, containing unusual elements; and "The Mystery of Fra Carnevale", including the two panels, most likely parts of Fra Carnevale's altarpiece for Santa Maria della Bella in Urbino, The Birth of the Virgin and The Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple, done in what has come to be recognized as Fra Carnevale's style-paintings so full of architectural details that the figures seem incidental to the architecture.

  9. Fra-1 regulation of Matrix Metallopeptidase-1 (MMP-1) in metastatic variants of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Henckels, Eric; Prywes, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Metallopeptidase 1 (MMP-1) expression has repeatedly been correlated to tumorigenesis and metastasis.  Yet, MMP-1 regulation in a metastatic context remains largely unknown.  Here we confirm differential MMP-1 expression in mammary carcinoma cells with varied metastatic potentials. We show that MMP-1 expression is regulated by an AP-1 element in its promoter in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 mammary carcinoma cell derivatives.  Fra-1, an AP-1 family transcription factor, differentially binds this element in highly metastatic cells compared to low metastatic cells and is required for MMP-1 expression.  Overexpression of Fra-1 also caused increased MMP-1 expression. Fra-1 mRNA levels are unchanged in the cell variants, however its protein levels are higher in the metastatic cells. While there was no change in Fra-1 protein degradation rates, protein synthesis of Fra-1 was increased in the metastatic cell variant. These results demonstrate that Fra-1 and MMP-1 levels are differentially regulated in metastatic cell variants at the level of Fra-1 protein translation. Consistent with the importance of Fra-1 for tumor growth, we found that Fra-1 overexpression was sufficient to increase cell motility and anchorage independent growth.  These results suggest that increased Fra-1 translation is critical for regulation of MMP-1 and tumor cell metastasis. PMID:25339983

  10. HGF Mediates Cell Proliferation of Human Mesothelioma Cells through a PI3K/MEK5/Fra-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Nino, Maria E.; Blumen, Steven R.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Pass, Harvey; Carbone, Michele; Testa, Joseph R.; Altomare, Deborah A.; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2008-01-01

    The ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Met, are highly expressed in most human malignant mesotheliomas (MMs) and may contribute to their increased growth and viability. Based upon our observation that RNA silencing of fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1) inhibited c-met expression in rat mesotheliomas (1), we hypothesized that Fra-1 was a key player in HGF-induced proliferation in human MMs. In three of seven human MM lines evaluated, HGF increased Fra-1 levels and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal–regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) and AKT that were inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY290042. HGF-dependent phosphorylation and Fra-1 expression were decreased after knockdown of Fra-1, whereas overexpression of Fra-1 blocked the expression of mitogen/extracellular signal–regulated kinase kinases (MEK)5 at the mRNA and protein levels. Stable MM cell lines using a dnMEK5 showed that basal Fra-1 levels were increased in comparison to empty vector control lines. HGF also caused increased MM cell viability and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression that were abolished by knockdown of MEK5 or Fra-1. Data suggest that HGF-induced effects in some MM cells are mediated via activation of a novel PI3K/ERK5/Fra-1 feedback pathway that might explain tumor-specific effects of c-Met inhibitors on MM and other tumors. PMID:17872495

  11. HGF mediates cell proliferation of human mesothelioma cells through a PI3K/MEK5/Fra-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Blumen, Steven R; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Pass, Harvey; Carbone, Michele; Testa, Joseph R; Altomare, Deborah A; Mossman, Brooke T

    2008-02-01

    The ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Met, are highly expressed in most human malignant mesotheliomas (MMs) and may contribute to their increased growth and viability. Based upon our observation that RNA silencing of fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1) inhibited c-met expression in rat mesotheliomas (1), we hypothesized that Fra-1 was a key player in HGF-induced proliferation in human MMs. In three of seven human MM lines evaluated, HGF increased Fra-1 levels and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) and AKT that were inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY290042. HGF-dependent phosphorylation and Fra-1 expression were decreased after knockdown of Fra-1, whereas overexpression of Fra-1 blocked the expression of mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinases (MEK)5 at the mRNA and protein levels. Stable MM cell lines using a dnMEK5 showed that basal Fra-1 levels were increased in comparison to empty vector control lines. HGF also caused increased MM cell viability and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression that were abolished by knockdown of MEK5 or Fra-1. Data suggest that HGF-induced effects in some MM cells are mediated via activation of a novel PI3K/ERK5/Fra-1 feedback pathway that might explain tumor-specific effects of c-Met inhibitors on MM and other tumors. PMID:17872495

  12. FRaC: a feature-modeling approach for semi-supervised and unsupervised anomaly detection.

    PubMed

    Noto, Keith; Brodley, Carla; Slonim, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Anomaly detection involves identifying rare data instances (anomalies) that come from a different class or distribution than the majority (which are simply called "normal" instances). Given a training set of only normal data, the semi-supervised anomaly detection task is to identify anomalies in the future. Good solutions to this task have applications in fraud and intrusion detection. The unsupervised anomaly detection task is different: Given unlabeled, mostly-normal data, identify the anomalies among them. Many real-world machine learning tasks, including many fraud and intrusion detection tasks, are unsupervised because it is impractical (or impossible) to verify all of the training data. We recently presented FRaC, a new approach for semi-supervised anomaly detection. FRaC is based on using normal instances to build an ensemble of feature models, and then identifying instances that disagree with those models as anomalous. In this paper, we investigate the behavior of FRaC experimentally and explain why FRaC is so successful. We also show that FRaC is a superior approach for the unsupervised as well as the semi-supervised anomaly detection task, compared to well-known state-of-the-art anomaly detection methods, LOF and one-class support vector machines, and to an existing feature-modeling approach. PMID:22639542

  13. Analysis of single-hole and cross-hole tracer tests conducted at the Nye County early warning drilling program well complex, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Umari, A.; Earle, J.D.; Fahy, M.F.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand the flow and transport characteristics downgradient from the proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, single- and cross-hole tracer tests were conducted from December 2004 through October 2005 in boreholes at the Nye County 22 well complex. The results were analyzed for transport properties using both numerical and analytical solutions of the governing advection dispersion equation. Preliminary results indicate effective flow porosity values ranging from 1.0 ?? 10-2 for an individual flow path to 2.0 ?? 10 -1 for composite flow paths, longitudinal dispersivity ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, and a transverse horizontal dispersivity of 0.03 m. Individual flow paths identified from the cross-hole testing indicate some solute diffusion into the stagnant portion of the alluvial aquifer.

  14. [Incidence of oligophrenia with fragile X chromosome (FraXq27)].

    PubMed

    Bliumina, M G

    1987-01-01

    The study of 50 retarded males imbezilitat and idiots, and 100 males with oligophrenia-debilitat in 16-18 years. Severe macroorchism (1.8-4.5 times more, then anthropometric norma for this years) was found at 5 males in first group (10%), and in 8 males in second group (8%). The karyotype was study in 4 males with macroorchism. In 9-15% cells FraX (q27) was found. These data were extrapolated to 600 retarded children preschool and school age. The frequency of oligophrenia with FraX (q27) among all retarded males-8.5 +/- 1.5; retarded heterozygous females among all retarded girls-5.0 +/- 1.3; incidence of oligophrenia with FraX (q27) among all males in population-1:1000; all heterozigous for this gene among all females in population-7:750; retarded heterozygous females in all girls-1:2250 were established. PMID:3817470

  15. Frequency of Fra X syndrome among institutionalized mentally retarded males in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurczak, T.; Bocian, E.; Milewski, M. [National Research Inst. of Mother and Child, Warsaw (Poland)] [and others] [National Research Inst. of Mother and Child, Warsaw (Poland); and others

    1996-07-12

    Results of cytogenetic studies, performed in a group of 201 institutionalized mentally retarded males, are presented. At least two cytogenetic methods for eliciting the Xq27.3 fragile site, recommended by the Fourth International Workshop on the Fra X Syndrome were used. A subgroup of 67 out of 201 studied males was also examined using molecular methods. In 6 (2.9%) males fra X syndrome was diagnosed. All cytogenetic positive results were confirmed by molecular analysis. Five patients had full expansion CGG repeats and one had both premutation and full mutation. Postulated frequency of fra X syndrome in Polish population being 0.2-0.4 / 1,000 males seems to be lower than it could be expected on the basis of previous literature data. 19 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Implications of FRA 16A structure for the mechanism of chromosomal fragile site genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nancarrow, J.K.; Kremer, E.; Holman, K.; Eyre, H.; Callen, D.F.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I. (Centre for Medical Genetics, North Adelaide (Australia)); Doggett, N.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Paslier, D.Le (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain, Paris (France))

    1994-06-24

    Fragile sites are chemically induced nonstaining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. DNA sequences encompassing and including the rare, autosomal, folate-sensitive fragile site, FRA16A, were isolated by positional cloning. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)[sub n] repeat. This repeat was adjacent to a CpG island that was methylated in fragile site-expressing individuals. The FRA16A locus in individuals who do not express the fragile site is not a site of DNA methylation (imprinting), which suggests that the methylation associated with fragile sites may be a consequence and not a cause of their genesis.

  17. Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

    1990-11-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Estimation of dislocation density from precession electron diffraction data using the Nye tensor.

    PubMed

    Leff, A C; Weinberger, C R; Taheri, M L

    2015-06-01

    The Nye tensor offers a means to estimate the geometrically necessary dislocation density of a crystalline sample based on measurements of the orientation changes within individual crystal grains. In this paper, the Nye tensor theory is applied to precession electron diffraction automated crystallographic orientation mapping (PED-ACOM) data acquired using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The resulting dislocation density values are mapped in order to visualize the dislocation structures present in a quantitative manner. These density maps are compared with other related methods of approximating local strain dependencies in dislocation-based microstructural transitions from orientation data. The effect of acquisition parameters on density measurements is examined. By decreasing the step size and spot size during data acquisition, an increasing fraction of the dislocation content becomes accessible. Finally, the method described herein is applied to the measurement of dislocation emission during in situ annealing of Cu in TEM in order to demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterizing microstructural dynamics. PMID:25697461

  19. A revised Litostragraphic Framework for the Southern Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    R.W. Spengler; F.M. Byers; R.P. Dickerson

    2006-03-24

    An informal, revised lithostratigraphic framework for the southern Yucca Mountain area, Nevada has been developed to accommodate new information derived from subsurface investigations of the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Lithologies penetrated by recently drilled boreholes at locations between Stagecoach Road and Highway 95 in southern Nye County include Quaternary and Pliocene alluvium and alluvial breccia, Miocene pyroclastic flow deposits and intercalated lacustrine siltstone and claystone sequences, early Miocene to Oligocene pre-volcanic sedimentary rocks, and Paleozoic strata. Of the 37 boreholes currently drilled, 21 boreholes have sufficient depth, spatial distribution, or traceable pyroclastic flow, pyroclastic fall, and reworked tuff deposits to aid in the lateral correlation of lithostrata. Medial and distal parts of regional pyroclastic flow deposits of Miocene age can be correlated with the Timber Mountain, Paintbrush, Crater Flat, and Tram Ridge Groups. Rocks intercalated between these regional pyroclastic flow deposits are substantially thicker than in the central part of Yucca Mountain, particularly near the downthrown side of major faults and along the southern extent of exposures at Yucca Mountain.

  20. Stratigraphic and structural characteristics of volcanic rocks in core hole USW G-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Spengler; M. P. Chornack; D. C. Muller; J. E. Kibler

    1984-01-01

    Detailed stratigraphic and structural studies, performed in connection with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations program, have been in progress since 1978. The purpose of these studies is to characterize volcanic rocks underlying Yucca Mountain - a volcanic highland situated along the western boundary of the Nevada Test Site in southern Nye county, Nevada. Core hole USW G-4 was cored

  1. Geology of the Syncline Ridge area related to nuclear waste disposal, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Hoover; J. N. Morrison

    1980-01-01

    The Syncline Ridge area is in the western part of Yucca Flat, Nye Co., Nev. Drill holes, geophysical surveys, mapping, and laboratory studies during 1976 through 1978 were used to investigate argillite in unit J (Mississippian) of the Eleana Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) as a possible nuclear waste repository site. Argillite in unit J has a minimum stratigraphic thickness of

  2. Investigations on the transformer high frequency transfer function to interpretation of FRA measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Firoozi; M. Kharezi; A. Farshidnia; A. A. Azirani

    2009-01-01

    Frequency Response Analysis (FRA) is a powerful technique for condition monitoring and fault diagnosing of power transformers. The challenge in this regard is the analysis of the transformer transfer functions due to different existing faults. In another word, the correlation between different faults and transfer functions is not fully yet known. The main idea in this study is that the

  3. The ages of lunar material from Fra Mauro, Hadley Rille, and Spur Crater.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husain, L.; Schaeffer, O. A.; Funkhouser, J.; Sutter, J.

    1972-01-01

    Ar-40/Ar-39 dating techniques were applied to estimate the age of twelve crystalline and fragmented Fra Mauro rock samples and six Hadley Rille and Spur Crater rock samples provided by the Apollo 14 and 15 missions. Genesis histories of some associated lunar surface features are traced back on the basis of obtained rock age values.

  4. Lo sviluppo dell'impresa resource - based fra appropriazione e creazione di valore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arabella Mocciaro Li Destri; Giovanni Battista Dagnino

    2003-01-01

    Lo sviluppo dell'impresa resource - based fra appropriazione e creazione di valore (di Arabella Mocciaro Li Destri e Giovanni Battista Dagnino) - ABSTRACT: Various authors have brought forth the idea that the increase in context turbulence and the relentless change in today’s economic and competitive environments have rendered it essential for an effective strategy to combine both value appropriation and

  5. A floristic survey of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, W.E.; Leary, P.J.; Holland, J.S.; Landau, F.H.

    1995-12-01

    A survey of the vascular flora of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, was conducted from March to June 1994, and from March to October 1995. An annotated checklist of recorded taxa was compiled. Voucher plant specimens were collected and accessioned into the Herbarium at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Collection data accompanying these specimens were entered into that herbarium`s electronic data base. Combined results from this survey and the works of other investigators reveal the presence of a total of 375 specific and intraspecific taxa within the area these allocated to 179 genera and 54 families. No taxon currently listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act was encountered during this study. Several candidate species for listing under this Act were present, and distributional data for these were recorded. No change in the status of these candidate species is recommended as the result of this study.

  6. Perennial vegetation data from permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Murov, Marilyn B.; Esque, Todd C.; Boyer, Diane E.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Haines, Dustin F.; Oldershaw, Dominic; Scoles, Sara J.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Blainey, Joan B.; Medica, Philip A.

    2003-01-01

    Perennial vegetation data from 68 permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, are given for the period of 1963 through 2002. Dr. Janice C. Beatley established the plots in 1962 and then remeasured them periodically from 1963 through 1975. We remeasured 67 of these plots between 2000 and 2003; the remaining plot was destroyed at some time between 1975 and 1993. The plots ranged from 935 to 2,274 m in elevation and are representative of common plant associations of the Mojave Desert, the transition to Great Basin Desert, and pinyon-juniper woodlands. The purpose of this report is to describe the complete set of ecological data that Beatley collected from the Nevada Test Site from 1963 through 1975 and to present the data for perennial vegetation collected from 2000 through 2003.

  7. Mineral-Resource Assessment of Northern Nye County, Nevada - A Progress Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, Steve; John, David A.; Muntean, John L.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Castor, Stephen B.; Henry, Christopher D.; Wintzer, Niki; Cline, Jean S.; Simon, Adam C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), and Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG), which is a part of the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), have completed the first year of data collection and analysis in preparation for a new mineral- and energy-resource assessment of northern Nye County, Nevada. This report provides information about work completed before October 1, 2009. Existing data are being compiled, including geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral-deposit information. Field studies are underway, which are primarily designed to address issues raised during the review of existing information. In addition, new geochemical studies are in progress, including reanalyzing existing stream-sediment samples with modern methods, and analyzing metalliferous black shales.

  8. Flood Assessment Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-07-01

    A flood assessment was conducted at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figure 1-1). The study area encompasses the watershed of Yucca Flat, a closed basin approximately 780 square kilometers (km2) (300 square miles) in size. The focus of this effort was on a drainage area of approximately 94 km2 (36 mi2), determined from review of topographic maps and aerial photographs to be the only part of the Yucca Flat watershed that could directly impact the Area 3 RWMS. This smaller area encompasses portions of the Halfpint Range, including Paiute Ridge, Jangle Ridge, Carbonate Ridge, Slanted Buttes, Cockeyed Ridge, and Banded Mountain. The Area 3 RWMS is located on coalescing alluvial fans emanating from this drainage area.

  9. Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

    1995-02-01

    The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

  10. Surveys for Astragalus beatleyae on Nellis Bombing Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Collins, E.

    1984-04-01

    Aerial and ground surveys of western portions of the US Air Force's Nellis Bombing Range, Nye County, Nevada, were conducted to determine if the rare plant, Astragalus beatleyae (Barneby), was widely distributed there. Additional information on its distribution will assist the US Department of Energy and the Fish and Wildlife Service in assessing the need to provide federal protection for this plant under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Eleven areas were surveyed on foot between 18 and 20 July 1983 in potential habitat identified during a helicopter reconnaissance. Astragalus beatleyae was found in seven discrete groups at three major locations on contiguous portions of Pahute Mesa. Plants were distributed between 4.75 and 8.5 miles west of the species' type locality on the Nevada Test Site. One population was growing on an atypical habitat having deep, clay soils. 11 references, 4 figures.

  11. Pre-Imbrian history of the Fra Mauro region and Apollo 14 sample provenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Head, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Pre-Imbrian impact structures in a large area surrounding the Apollo 14 site were identified in a study of the pre-Imbrian history of the Fra Mauro region. Calculations suggest that a total ejecta thickness of over 1700 m could have accumulated during Phase I (time prior to the Imbrium event) in the area of the ridge on which the Cone crater later formed. The majority (53%) of the ejecta at the site just prior to the Imbrium event was contributed by the numerous large Phase IB and IC craters in the vicinity and not by the lunar basins. Evidence exists for extensive pre-Imbrian volcanic activity in the Fra Mauro region. Early KREEP volcanic deposits may have existed in the target sites of many Phase IB and IC craters and would have been incorporated into their ejecta.

  12. The role of deletions at the FRA3B/FHIT locus in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huebner, K; Druck, T; Siprashvili, Z; Croce, C M; Kovatich, A; McCue, P A

    1998-01-01

    The FHIT gene, which encodes a 1-kb message and a 16.8-kDa protein that hydrolyses diadenosine triphosphate (ApppA) to ADP and AMP in vitro, covers a megabase genomic region at chromosome band 3p14.2. The gene encompasses the most active of the common human chromosomal fragile regions, FRA3B. Over the years, it has been suggested that fragile sites might be especially susceptible to carcinogen damage and that chromosomal regions of nonrandom alterations in cancer cells may coincide with defined fragile sites. Within the FRA3B region, the characteristic induced chromosome gaps can occur across the entire region, but 60% of the gaps are centered on a 300-kb region flanking FHIT exon 5, the first protein-coding exon. Numerous hemizygous and homozygous deletions, translocations and DNA insertions occur within FHIT in cancer cell lines, uncultured tumors, and even in preneoplastic lesions, especially in tissues such as lung that are targets of carcinogens. This supports the proposed cancer-fragile site connection and suggests that the FHIT gene, expression of which is frequently altered in cells showing FHIT locus damage, is a tumor suppressor gene whose inactivation may drive clonal expansion of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells. Replacement of Fhit expression in Fhit-negative cancer cells abrogates their tumorigenicity in nude mice. Analysis of the approximately 300-kb DNA sequence encompassing FHIT exon 5 in the FRA3B epicenter has provided clues to the mechanism of repair of the fragile site double strand breaks. The mechanism involves recombination between LINE 1 elements with deletion of the intervening sequence, often including FHIT exons. These studies have also shown that FHIT alterations generally entail independent deletion of both FHIT alleles. Future studies will focus on two objectives: study of (1) the in vivo function of the Fhit protein and (2) mechanisms of break and repair in the FRA3B fragile region. PMID:10027001

  13. Chromosomal fragile site, FRA16A: Implications for fragile site genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.I.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Mangelsdorf, M. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Fragile sites are chemically induced non-staining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. The fragile sites sequenced to date (FRAXA and FRAXE) are rare, folate sensitive sites located on the X chromosomes. They have similar DNA sequence composition of a p(CCG)n repeat adjacent to a methylatable CpG island. Individuals expressing the fragile site have an unstable expanded repeat and methylation of the adjacent CpG island. FRAXA is associated with the most common form of familial mental retardation, Fragile X Syndrome. In order to further understand the relationship between the DNA sequence composition, position in the genome, and the chemistry of induction of fragile sites, we have characterized the rare, folate sensitive fragile site on human chromosome 16 referred to as FRA16A. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)n repeat. This repeat was adjacent to a CpG island that was methylated in fragile-site-expressing individuals. The FRA16A locus in individuals who do not express the fragile site is not a site of DNA methylation (imprinting) which suggests that the methylation associated with fragile sites may be a consequence and not a cause of their genesis. We have analyzed the normal repeat copy numbers for the fragile site p(CCG)n repeats in European, Japanese and Indian populations. While the FRAXA and FRAXE repeats show similar distributions of copy numbers, the FRA16A p(CCG)n repeat in Europeans has a greater range and number of alleles (23.7% have n>25) than its Japanese and Indian counterparts. In conjunction with our previous data demonstrating linkage disequilibrium (founder chromosomes) at the FRAXA locus, these data suggest that certain p(CCG)n repeats are inherently unstable.

  14. Off\\/on-line FRA condition monitoring technique for power transformer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Birlasekaran; Fred Fetherston

    1999-01-01

    This letter presents a novel and sensitive frequency response analysis (FRA) technique for off\\/on-line condition monitoring of expensive power apparatus. The main objective is to investigate the applicability of this predictive maintenance technique to diagnosing power transformer failures, to characterize the transformer in a frequency plane for safe operation, and to develop on-line monitoring technique. The effectiveness of this technique

  15. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-01-01

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat

  16. The Strawberry Pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) Fra a Proteins Control Flavonoid Biosynthesis by Binding to Metabolic Intermediates*

    PubMed Central

    Casañal, Ana; Zander, Ulrich; Muñoz, Cristina; Dupeux, Florine; Luque, Irene; Botella, Miguel Angel; Schwab, Wilfried; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Marquez, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) proteins are involved in many aspects of plant biology but their molecular function is still unclear. They are related by sequence and structural homology to mammalian lipid transport and plant abscisic acid receptor proteins and are predicted to have cavities for ligand binding. Recently, three new members of the PR-10 family, the Fra a proteins, have been identified in strawberry, where they are required for the activity of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, which is essential for the development of color and flavor in fruits. Here, we show that Fra a proteins bind natural flavonoids with different selectivity and affinities in the low ?m range. The structural analysis of Fra a 1 E and a Fra a 3-catechin complex indicates that loops L3, L5, and L7 surrounding the ligand-binding cavity show significant flexibility in the apo forms but close over the ligand in the Fra a 3-catechin complex. Our findings provide mechanistic insight on the function of Fra a proteins and suggest that PR-10 proteins, which are widespread in plants, may play a role in the control of secondary metabolic pathways by binding to metabolic intermediates. PMID:24133217

  17. Inter and intrasite analyses of cultural materials from U20aw, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, P.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.

    1991-12-01

    This archaeological presents the results of the analyses of the data derived from all sites investigated during the data recovery operations on Drill Hole U20aw on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada. These sites were determined to be potentially eligible for inclusion in the national Register of Historic Places. Detailed analyses were focused on the spatial distribution of artifacts and features within and between sites in the southern portion of the study area. These analyses indicate that one area served principally as a temporary camp, while the area around the canyonhead to the east seems to have been used as a site for both temporary camps and special activity loci. Projectile point styles suggest that the area was occupied from the Early Archaic into the early Historic period. Analyses of the artifacts that were recovered indicate that obsidian was the preferred material for all classes of flaked stone tools. All stages of lithic reduction are represented on the sites, but core reduction and thinning of bifaces appear to have been the primary activities. Processing of floral foods is indicated by the presence of several ground stone artifacts. Pinyon nuts and other items appear to have been stored in several areas as evidenced by the presence of several rock features that may have served as caches.

  18. Geologic Map of the Pahranagat Range 30' x 60' Quadrangle, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Pahranagat Range 30' x 60' quadrangle lies within an arid, sparsely populated part of Lincoln and Nye Counties, southeastern Nevada. Much of the area is public land that includes the Desert National Wildlife Range, the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and the Nellis Air Force Base. The topography, typical of much of the Basin and Range Province, consists of north-south-trending ranges and intervening broad alluvial valleys. Elevations range from about 1,000 to 2,900 m. At the regional scale, the Pahranagat Range quadrangle lies within the Mesozoic and early Tertiary Sevier Fold-and-Thrust Belt and the Cenozoic Basin and Range Province. The quadrangle is underlain by a Proterozoic to Permian miogeoclinal section, a nonmarine clastic and volcanic section of middle Oligocene or older to late Miocene age, and alluvial deposits of late Cenozoic age. The structural features that are exposed reflect relatively shallow crustal deformation. Mesozoic deformation is dominated by thrust faults and asymmetric or open folds. Cenozoic deformation is dominated by faults that dip more than 45i and dominostyle tilted blocks. At least three major tectonic events have affected the area: Mesozoic (Sevier) folding and thrust faulting, pre-middle Oligocene extensional deformation, and late Cenozoic (mainly late Miocene to Holocene) extensional deformation. Continued tectonic activity is expressed in the Pahranagat Range area by seismicity and faults having scarps that cut alluvial deposits.

  19. Magnetic properties of drill core and surface samples from the Calico Hills area, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, M.J.; Jahren, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    The interpretation of the aeromagnetic survey of the Calico Hills area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, required the determination of magnetic properties of rocks exposed in the region. Eighty-two samples representing a variety of units found at the surface show that most rocks in the Calico Hills, other than parts of the Eleana Formation, are relatively nonmagnetic. The magnetic vector of the Eleana Formation at the surface was found to point northward and downward. Remanence directions were scattered, but a remanence azimuth of 16? east of north was assigned on the basis of present-day declination. Measurements of 123 samples of the Eleana Formation from the exploratory drill hole UE25a-3 indicate that some facies are strongly magnetic. The average total magnetization of the argillite samples is 3.89 A/m (0.00389 emu). These samples have an average natural remanent inclination of 76?. Results of demagnetization demonstrated that this relatively high inclination is due, at least in part, to a soft vertical component of remanent magnetization. The magnitude of the component could not be determined. Further tests showed that the tendency to pick up a soft component of magnetism may be a function of rock type. Inhomogeneity of the Eleana argillite was probably the cause of some differences in remanence values between large and small samples from the same depth.

  20. 1984 Biotic Studies of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.; O`Farrell, T.P.

    1985-02-01

    A portion of Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, is being considered as a possible location for a national high-level radioactive waste repository. The geologic and environmental characteristics of the site are being investigated to determine its suitability for further characterization. Goals of biotic studies were to identify species of concern, describe major floral and faunal associations, determine exposure levels of external background radiation, and assess possible impacts of characterization and operational activities. The species composition of dominant small mammals inhabiting major vegetation associations in 1984 varied little compared with results of similar surveys conducted in 1982 and 1983. Total captures were lower and reproduction was apparently curtailed. Merriam`s kangaroo rat and the long tailed pocket mouse continued to be the most abundant species. Diversity of resident species did not differ significantly between the trapping lines. The composition and relative abundance of associated species was more variable. Western harvest mice were trapped for the first time, but pinyon mice, which were present in prior years, were not trapped. Five desert tortoises were observed during surveys of possible sites for repository surface facilities. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Bedrock geologic map of the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.C.; Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Fridrich, C.J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (US); Dickerson, R.P.; San Juan, C.A.; Drake, R.M. II [Pacific Western Technologies, Inc., Denver, CO (US)

    1998-11-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a potential site for underground storage of high-level radioactive nuclear waste. Detailed bedrock geologic maps form an integral part of the site characterization program by providing the fundamental framework for research into the geologic hazards and hydrologic behavior of the mountain. This bedrock geologic map provides the geologic framework and structural setting for the area in and adjacent to the site of the potential repository. The study area comprises the northern and central parts of Yucca Mountain, located on the southern flank of the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex, which was the source for many of the volcanic units in the area. The Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex is part of the Miocene southwestern Nevada volcanic field, which is within the Walker Lane belt. This tectonic belt is a northwest-striking megastructure lying between the more active Inyo-Mono and Basin-and-Range subsections o f the southwestern Great Basin.

  2. Bedrock geologic map of the central block area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.C.; Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dickerson, R.P.; San Juan, C.A. [Pacific Western Technologies Ltd., Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Bedrock geologic maps form the foundation for investigations that characterize and assess the viability of the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study was funded by the US Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project to provide a detailed (1:6,000-scale) bedrock geologic map for the area within and adjacent to the potential repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to this study, the 1:12,000-scale map of Scott and Bon, (1984) was the primary source of bedrock geologic data for the Yucca Mountain Project. However, targeted detailed mapping within the central block at Yucca Mountain revealed structural complexities along some of the intrablock faults that were not evident at 1:12,000 (Scott and Bonk, 1984). As a result, this study was undertaken to define the character and extent of the dominant structural features in the vicinity of the potential repository. In addition to structural considerations, ongoing subsurface excavation and geologic mapping within the exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), development of a three-dimensional-framework geologic model, and borehole investigations required use of a constituent stratigraphic system to facilitate surface to underground comparisons. The map units depicted in this report correspond as closely as possible to the proposed stratigraphic nomenclature by Buesch and others (1996), as described here.

  3. Neotectonics of the southern Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada and Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, D.E. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    A complex pattern of active faults occurs in the southern Amargosa Desert, southern Nye, County, Nevada. These faults can be grouped into three main fault systems: (1) a NE-striking zone of faults that forms the southwest extension of the left-lateral Rock Valley fault zone, in the much larger Spotted Range-Mine Mountain structural zone, (2) a N-striking fault zone coinciding with a NNW-trending alignment of springs that is either a northward continuation of a fault along the west side of the Resting Spring Range or a N-striking branch fault of the Pahrump fault system, and (3) a NW-striking fault zone which is parallel to the Pahrump fault system, but is offset approximately 5 km with a left step in southern Ash Meadows. These three fault zones suggest extension is occurring in an E-W direction, which is compatible with the {approximately}N10W structural grain prevalent in the Death Valley extensional region to the west.

  4. Environmental assessment for double tracks test site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), with appropriate approvals from the U.S. Air Force (USAF), proposes to conduct environmental restoration operations at the Double Tracks test site located on the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in Nye County, Nevada. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental consequences of four alternative actions for conducting the restoration operation and of the no action alternative. The EA also identifies mitigation measures, where appropriate, designed to protect natural and cultural resources and reduce impacts to human health and safety. The environmental restoration operation at the Double Tracks test site would serve two primary objectives. First, the proposed work would evaluate the effectiveness of future restoration operations involving contamination over larger areas. The project would implement remediation technology options and evaluate how these technologies could be applied to the larger areas of contaminated soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), and the NAFR. Second, the remediation would provide for the removal of plutonium contamination down to or below a predetermined level which would require cleanup of 1 hectare (ha) (2.5 acres), for the most likely case, or up to 3.0 ha (7.4 acres) of contaminated soil, for the upper bounding case.

  5. Apollo 14 mineral ages and the thermal history of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compston, W.; Vernon, M. J.; Berry, H.; Rudowski, R.; Gray, C. M.; Ware, N.; Chappell, B. W.; Kaye, M.

    1972-01-01

    The thermal inertia of the Fra Mauro formation limits its rate of cooling. The calculations of Jaeger (1961) for the cooling of an extrusive sheet are used to estimate the time required for a central temperature drop of 10%. This time is found to be about 45 years. For a 90% temperature drop, the time is about 200 years. Analytical methods used in the investigations are discussed together with the diffusion of Rb and Sr within lunar basalt. Isochron diagrams for various minerals are presented.

  6. Near vertical view of the Apollo 14 landing site in Fra Mauro highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A photographic illustration showing a near vertical view of the Apollo 14 landing site located in the Fra Mauro highlands on the lunar nearside. The predicted landing point is 17 degrees 29 minutes 46 seconds west longitude and 3 degrees 40 minutes 19 seconds south latitude. Cone Crater is at lower right. North is toward the right side of the picture (Cone Crater being located near the northeast corner of photo). The landing point is between Triplet Crater and Doublet Crater in the center of the picture.

  7. Soil Characterization Database for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Y. J. Lee; R. D. Van Remortel; K. E. Snyder

    2005-01-01

    Soils were characterized in an investigation at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada. Data from the investigation are presented in four parameter groups: sample and site characteristics, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) particle size fractions, chemical parameters, and American Society for Testing Materials-Unified Soil Classification System (ASTM-USCS) particle size fractions. Spread-sheet workbooks based on these parameter groups are presented to evaluate data quality, conduct database updates,and set data structures and formats for later extraction and analysis. This document does not include analysis or interpretation of presented data.

  8. Geohydrologic and drill-hole data for test well USW H-1, adjacent to Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rush, F. Eugene; Thordarson, William; Bruckheimer, Laura

    1983-01-01

    This report presents data collected to determine the hydraulic characteristics of rocks penetrated in test well USW H-1. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in a program conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Data on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, hydrologic monitoring, core analysis, ground-water chemistry and pumping and injection tests for well USW H-1 are contained in this report.

  9. Inter and intrasite analyses of cultural materials from U20aw, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, P.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Lockett, C.L.

    1991-12-01

    In the Spring of 1986 Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted a Class III archaeological survey of Drill Hole U20aw on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Seven archaeological sites were located during the course of this survey including two temporary camps, four lithic scatters, and a possible pinyon cache. This report presents the results of the analyses of the data derived from all sites investigated during the data recovery operations on Drill Hole U20aw. Detailed analyses were focused on the spatial distribution of artifacts and features within and between sites in the southern portion of the study area (26Ny4867, 26Ny4869, and 26Ny4871). These analyses indicate that 26Ny4871 served principally as a temporary camp, while the area around the canyonhead to the east (which includes 26Ny4867 and 26Ny4869) seems to have been used as a site for both temporary camps and special activity loci. Projectile point styles suggest that the area was occupied from the Early Archaic into the early Historic period. Analyses of the artifacts that were recovered indicate that obsidian was the preferred material for all classes of flaked stone tools. All stages of lithic reduction are represented on the sites, but core reduction and thinning of bifaces appear to have been the primary activities. Processing of floral foods is indicated by the presence of several ground stone artifacts. Pinyon nuts and other items appear to have been stored in the area of 26Ny4869 and to the north of the drill hole as evidenced by the presence of several rock features that may have served as caches.

  10. Digital geologic map of the Thirsty Canyon NW quadrangle, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, S.A.; Orkild, P.P.; Sargent, K.A.; Warren, R.G.; Sawyer, D.A.; Workman, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    This digital geologic map compilation presents new polygon (i.e., geologic map unit contacts), line (i.e., fault, fold axis, dike, and caldera wall), and point (i.e., structural attitude) vector data for the Thirsty Canyon NW 7 1/2' quadrangle in southern Nevada. The map database, which is at 1:24,000-scale resolution, provides geologic coverage of an area of current hydrogeologic and tectonic interest. The Thirsty Canyon NW quadrangle is located in southern Nye County about 20 km west of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and 30 km north of the town of Beatty. The map area is underlain by extensive layers of Neogene (about 14 to 4.5 million years old [Ma]) mafic and silicic volcanic rocks that are temporally and spatially associated with transtensional tectonic deformation. Mapped volcanic features include part of a late Miocene (about 9.2 Ma) collapse caldera, a Pliocene (about 4.5 Ma) shield volcano, and two Pleistocene (about 0.3 Ma) cinder cones. Also documented are numerous normal, oblique-slip, and strike-slip faults that reflect regional transtensional deformation along the southern part of the Walker Lane belt. The Thirsty Canyon NW map provides new geologic information for modeling groundwater flow paths that may enter the map area from underground nuclear testing areas located in the NTS about 25 km to the east. The geologic map database comprises six component ArcINFO map coverages that can be accessed after decompressing and unbundling the data archive file (tcnw.tar.gz). These six coverages (tcnwpoly, tcnwflt, tcnwfold, tcnwdike, tcnwcald, and tcnwatt) are formatted here in ArcINFO EXPORT format. Bundled with this database are two PDF files for readily viewing and printing the map, accessory graphics, and a description of map units and compilation methods.

  11. Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model, Tiva Canyon tuff, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Anna, L.O.

    1998-09-01

    A three-dimensional discrete fracture model was completed to investigate the potential effects of fractures on the flow of water at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. A fracture network of the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area was simulated and calibrated with field data. Two modeled volumes were used to simulate three-dimensional fracture networks of the Tiva Canyon tuff. One volume had a width and length of 150 meters, and the other had a width and length of 200 meters; both volumes were 60 meters thick. The analysis shows that the fracture system in the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area has numerous connected fractures that have relatively large permeabilities. However, pathway analysis between three radial boreholes indicated there were few pathways and little connection, which is consistent with results of cross-boreholes pressure testing. Pathway analysis also showed that at the scales used there was only one pathway connecting one end of the flow box to the opposite end. The usual vertical pathway was along one large fracture, whereas in four horizontal directions the pathway was from multiple fracture connections. As a result, the fracture network can be considered sparse. The fracture network was refined by eliminating nonconductive fractures determined from field-derived permeabilities. Small fractures were truncated from the simulated network without any effect on the overall connectivity. Fractures as long as 1.25 meters were eliminated (a large percentage of the total number of fractures) from the network without altering the number of pathways. Five directional permeabilities were computed for the 150- and 200-meter-scale flow box areas. Permeabilities for the 150-meter scale vary by almost two orders of magnitude, with the principal permeability direction being easterly. At the 200-meter scale, however, the flow box permeabilities only vary by a factor of four, with the principal permeability direction being vertical.

  12. Geologic map of the Oasis Valley basin and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; Ryder, P.L.; Slate, J.L.

    2000-01-13

    This map and accompanying cross sections present an updated synthesis of the geologic framework of the Oasis Valley area, a major groundwater discharge site located about 15 km west of the Nevada Test Site. Most of the data presented in this compilation is new geologic map data, as discussed below. In addition, the cross sections incorporate new geophysical data that have become available in the last three years (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999). Geophysical data are used to estimate the thickness of the Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks on the cross sections, and to identify major concealed structures. Large contiguous parts of the map area are covered either by alluvium or by volcanic units deposited after development of the major structures present at the depth of the water table and below. Hence, geophysical data provide critical constraints on our geologic interpretations. A companion paper by Fridrich and others (1999) and the above-cited reports by Hildenbrand and others (1999) and Mankinen and others (1999) provide explanations of the interpretations that are presented graphically on this map. This map covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles in Nye County, Nevada, centered on the Thirsty Canyon SW quadrangle, and is a compilation of one published quadrangle map (O'Connor and others, 1966) and eight new quadrangle maps, two of which have been previously released (Minor and others, 1997; 1998). The cross sections that accompany this map were drawn to a depth of about 5 km below land surface at the request of hydrologists who are modeling the Death Valley groundwater system.

  13. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Mapolelo, D; Dingra, N; Naik, S; Lees, N; Hoffman, B; Riggs-Gelasco, P; Huynh, B; Johnson, M; Outten, C

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However, the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in Escherichia coli. We have shown that coexpression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+} cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV?visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, M{umlt o}ssbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast.

  14. Structure of pre-Cenozoic rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada: a potential nuclear-waste disposal site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1985-01-01

    A potential nuclear-waste disposal site is being evaluated at Yucca Mountain, southern Nye County, Nevada. The site is within Tertiary volcanic rocks, and much of the surrounding region is underlain by such rocks. The volcanic rocks are as much as 3000 m thick north and west of the site but thin to as little as 1200 m under the site

  15. La valutazione dei corsi da parte degli studenti: confronto fra carta e web Lorenzo Bernardi e Gianpiero Dalla Zuanna

    E-print Network

    Cesare, Bernardo

    La valutazione dei corsi da parte degli studenti: confronto fra carta e web Lorenzo Bernardi e procedura informatica di valutazione dei corsi da parte degli studenti. Di concerto con l'Ateneo, la Facoltà sovrapposizione effettiva è di soli 75 insegnamenti, tredici dei quali non considerati in quanto in almeno una

  16. Transcriptional complexity and roles of Fra-1/AP-1 at the uPA/Plau locus in aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Tolza, Claire; Piechaczyk, Marc; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Plau codes for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), critical in cancer metastasis. While the mechanisms driving its overexpression in tumorigenic processes are unknown, it is regulated by the AP-1 transcriptional complex in diverse situations. The AP-1 component Fra-1 being overexpressed in aggressive breast cancers, we have addressed its role in the overexpression of Plau in the highly metastatic breast cancer model cell line MDA-MB231 using ChIP, pharmacological and RNAi approaches. Plau transcription appears controlled by 2 AP-1 enhancers located -1.9 (ABR-1.9) and -4.1 kb (ABR-4.1) upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) of the uPA-coding mRNA, Plau-001, that bind Fra-1. Surprisingly, RNA Pol II is not recruited only at the Plau-001 TSS but also upstream in the ABR-1.9 and ABR-4.1 region. Most Pol II molecules transcribe short and unstable RNAs while tracking down toward the TSS, where there are converted into Plau-001 mRNA-productive species. Moreover, a minority of Pol II molecules transcribes a low abundance mRNA of unknown function called Plau-004 from the ABR-1.9 domain, whose expression is tempered by Fra-1. Thus, we unveil a heretofore-unsuspected transcriptional complexity at Plau in a reference metastatic breast cancer cell line with pleiotropic effects for Fra-1, providing novel information on AP-1 transcriptional action. PMID:25200076

  17. Sedimentology of clastic rocks from the Fra Mauro region of the moon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A thin-section examination of sixteen clastic rock samples returned by the Apollo 14 mission from the Fra Mauro region of the moon suggests the presence of at least two distinctly different lithologies. Five of the samples (group I) are characterized by an abundant glassy matrix and glass particles and lesser amounts of plagioclase and pyroxene grains, and lithic clasts. The other eleven samples (group II) are relatively fine grained, very poorly sorted, and consist largely of pyroxene, plagioclase, and lithic clasts set in an abundant mineralic matrix. Group I and II lithologies were probably both deposited from impact generated base surges. The differences between them stem not as much from the basic sedimentary processes as from the differences in the magnitude of the events generating the base surges and the resultant difference in available detrital materials.

  18. Bulk magnetization properties of the Fra Mauro and Reiner Gamma Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    In the reported investigation, bulk magnetization properties within two lunar surface geologic units have been inferred using low-altitude, high-resolution Apollo 16 subsatellite magnetometer data. On the basis of correlations of mapped anomalies with relatively surficial units on the central near side, a surface plate model with thickness much less than the subsatellite altitude was adopted and was used to represent the sources of largest anomalies. The results strongly suggest that directional coherence of the surface density of magnetization can occur over horizontal scales up to 100 km. Tentative evidence for a lack of directional coherence on scales greater than 100 km was found in the case of the Fra Mauro Formation.

  19. Bedrock geologic Map of the Central Block Area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    W.C. Day; C. Potter; D. Sweetkind; R.P. Dickerson; C.A. San Juan

    1998-09-29

    Bedrock geologic maps form the foundation for investigations that characterize and assess the viability of the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As such, this map focuses on the central block at Yucca Mountain, which contains the potential repository site. The central block is a structural block of Tertiary volcanic rocks bound on the west by the Solitario Canyon Fault, on the east by the Bow Ridge Fault, to the north by the northwest-striking Drill Hole Wash Fault, and on the south by Abandoned Wash. Earlier reconnaissance mapping by Lipman and McKay (1965) provided an overview of the structural setting of Yucca Mountain and formed the foundation for selecting Yucca Mountain as a site for further investigation. They delineated the main block-bounding faults and some of the intrablock faults and outlined the zoned compositional nature of the tuff units that underlie Yucca Mountain. Scott and Bonk (1984) provided a detailed reconnaissance geologic map of favorable area at Yucca Mountain in which to conduct further site-characterization studies. Of their many contributions, they presented a detailed stratigraphy for the volcanic units, defined several other block-bounding faults, and outlined numerous intrablock faults. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project to provide a detailed (1:6,000-scale) bedrock geologic map for the area within and adjacent to the potential repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to this study, the 1:12,000-scale map of Scott and Bonk (1984) was the primary source of bedrock geologic data for the Yucca Mountain Project. However, targeted detailed mapping within the central block at Yucca Mountain revealed structural complexities along some of the intrablock faults that were not evident at 1:12,000 (Scott and Bonk, 1984). As a result, this study was undertaken to define the character and extent of the dominant structural features in the vicinity of the potential repository. In addition to structural considerations, ongoing subsurface excavation and geologic mapping within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), development of a three-dimensional-framework geologic model, and borehole investigations required use of a consistent stratigraphic system to facilitate surface to underground comparisons. The map units depicted in this report correspond as closely as possible to the proposed stratigraphic nomenclature by Buesch and others (1996), as described.

  20. "Granite" exploration hole, Area 15, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada : interim report, Part C, physical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, Glen Arthur

    1960-01-01

    Physical properties measurements including porosity, density, permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and thermal conductivity were made on granite samples from the U-15A 'Granite' exploration borehole, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Porosity values range from 0.4 to 4.8 percent, and density values range from 2.56 to 2.69 g/cc (bulk density) and from 2.66 to 2.72 g/cc (grain density). Permeability of fresh rock from the borehole is probably less than 10 -13 millidarcies. Magnetic susceptibility measurements range from 0.36 to 3.48 x 10 -3 cgs units, and thermal conductivity values range from 5.6 to 8.1 cgs units.

  1. Water levels in periodically measured wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1981-87

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, J.H.; Stephens, D.M.; Luckey, R.R.; Baldwin, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains data on groundwater levels beneath Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas, Nye County, Nevada. In addition to new data collected since 1983, the report contains data that has been updated from previous reports, including added explanations of the data. The data was collected in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy to help that agency evaluate the suitability of the area of storing high-level nuclear waste. The water table in the Yucca Mountain area occurs in ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age. West of the crest of Yucca Mountain, water level altitudes are about 775 m above sea level. Along the eastern edge and southern end of Yucca Mountain, the potentiometric surface generally is nearly flat, ranging from about 730 to 728 m above sea level. (USGS)

  2. Rb-Sr ages of igneous rocks from the Apollo 14 mission and the age of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Internal Rb-Sr isochrons were determined on four basaltic rocks and on a basaltic clast from a breccia from the Fra Mauro landing site. An internal isochron was determined for rock 12004 and yielded a value in agreement with previous results for basaltic rocks from the Apollo 12 site. The crystallization ages for Apollo 14 basalts are only 0.2 to 0.3 AE older than were found for mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility. Assuming these leucocratic igneous rocks to be representative of the Fra Mauro site, it follows that there were major igneous processes active in these regions, and presumably throughout the highlands, at times only slightly preceding the periods at which the maria were last flooded.

  3. JunD mutants with spontaneously acquired transforming potential have enhanced transactivating activity in combination with Fra-2.

    PubMed Central

    Kameda, T; Akahori, A; Sonobe, M H; Suzuki, T; Endo, T; Iba, H

    1993-01-01

    Although a replication-competent retrovirus that carries junD has no transforming activity in chicken embryo fibroblasts, we have isolated mutant viruses that have spontaneously acquired transforming activity. The molecularly cloned junD genes of three such mutant viruses (T1, T2, and T3) were shown to be responsible for the cellular transformation. DNA sequence analysis indicated that a specific polynucleotide in the junD sequence was tandemly multiplied three times of five times in T1 and T2, respectively. The repeated polynucleotide encodes 16 amino acid residues that are located in a highly conserved region among Jun family proteins. The junD mutation in T3 involved an inversion, a translocation, and nucleotide substitutions that caused drastic amino acid exchanges in another well-conserved region among Jun family proteins. The transcriptional activity of these mutants was analyzed by means of transient expression experiments in F9 cells using a reporter gene containing a single AP-1 binding site. Compared with the wild-type JunD, none of them showed enhanced transactivating activity in the forms of homodimers or of heterodimers with c-Fos or Fra-1. However, they did exhibit much higher transactivating activity than the wild type when they formed heterodimers with Fra-2, indicating that the mutated regions function as transactivation domains in a partner-specific manner. Since we have previously reported that there is a basal level of Fra-2 expression in chicken embryo fibroblasts, the results may indicate that protein complexes between JunD mutants and Fra-2 play a crucial role in the cellular transforming activity. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8415709

  4. Positions of chromosome 3p14.2 fragile sites (FRA3B) within the FHIT gene.

    PubMed

    Zimonjic, D B; Druck, T; Ohta, M; Kastury, K; Croce, C M; Popescu, N C; Huebner, K

    1997-03-15

    The FHIT gene spans approximately 1 Mb of DNA at chromosome band 3p14.2, which includes the familial renal cell carcinoma chromosome translocation breakpoint (between FHIT exons 3 and 4), the most frequently expressed human constitutive chromosomal fragile site (FRA3B, telomeric to the t(3;8) translocation), and numerous homozygous deletions in various human cancers, frequently involving FHIT exon 5. The FRA3B has previously been shown to represent more than one specific site, and some specific representatives of FRA3B breaks have been shown to fall in two regions, which we know to be in FHIT introns 4 and intron 5. Because breakage and integration of exogenous DNA in this chromosome region is frequent in aphidicolin-treated somatic cell hybrids, cancer cells, and, presumably, aphidicolin-treated normal lymphocytes that exhibit gaps or breaks, we determined by one- and two color fluorescence in situ hybridization, using cosmids covering specific regions of the FHIT gene, that most of the aphidicolin-induced gaps at FRA3B fall within the FHIT gene, with the highest frequency of gaps falling in intron 5 of the FHIT gene, less than 30 kb telomeric to FHIT exon 5. Gaps also occur in intron 4, where a human papillomavirus 16 integration site has been localized, and in intron 3, where the t(3;8) break point is located. These results suggest that the cancer-specific deletions, which frequently involve introns 4 and 5, originated through breaks in fragile sites. PMID:9067288

  5. Cancer-specific chromosome alterations in the constitutive fragile region FRA3B.

    PubMed

    Mimori, K; Druck, T; Inoue, H; Alder, H; Berk, L; Mori, M; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1999-06-22

    We have sequenced 870 kilobases of the FHIT/FRA3B locus, from FHIT intron 3 to intron 7. The locus is AT rich (61.5%) and Alu poor (6. 2%), and it apparently does not harbor other genes. In a detailed analysis of the 308-kilobase region between FHIT exon 5 and the telomeric end of intron 3, a region known to encompass a human papillomavirus-16 integration site and two clusters of aphidicolin-induced chromosome 3p14.2 breakpoints, we have precisely mapped 10 deletion and translocation endpoints in cancer-derived cell lines relative to positions of specific repetitive elements, regions of high genome flexibility and aphidicolin-induced breakpoints. Conclusions are (i) that aphidicolin-induced breakpoint clusters fall close to high-flexibility sequences, suggesting that these sequences contribute directly to aphidicolin-induced fragility; (ii) that 9 of the 10 FHIT allelic deletions in cancer cell lines resulted in loss of exons, with 7 deletion endpoints near long interspersed nuclear elements or long terminal repeat elements; and (iii) that cancer-specific deletions encompass multiple high-flexibility genomic regions, suggesting that fragile breaks may occur at these regions, whereas repair of the breaks involves homologous pairing of flanking sequences with concomitant deletion of the damaged fragile sequence. PMID:10377436

  6. Case Study on Fault Diagnosis of the Actual Operating Transformer by FRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Takahiro; Ogawa, Yoshiharu; Shimonosono, Takaaki; Wada, Tadayuki

    A high voltage, large capacity power transformer is one of the most important equipment in electric power system. If a failure occurs in such a transformer, stable power supply may become impossible. In addition, efficient power system operation may become difficult because it takes long time to replace the transformer. To prevent failures that may occur, effective external diagnosis must be performed and the defective portions must be correctly identified. However, such anomalous phenomena are complicated in many cases, and their causes cannot be identified in some cases by using conventional techniques. This paper reports a case study on the fault diagnosis of an oil-immersed power transformer that had a tendency to increase in the total combustible gas (TCG) during a regular operation. Specifying the faulty parts became possible by applying various case of Frequency Response Analysis (FRA) diagnosis though it was impossible by the electrical tests, DGA (Dissolved Gas Analysis), and so on. This transformer was disassembled to investigate the condition and was replaced without causing failure.

  7. Index to published geologic maps in the region around the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site, southern Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fouty

    1984-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located in southern Nye County, Nevada is currently being investigated as a potential site for an underground high-level radioactive waste repository. The series of index maps presented in this report provide an up-to-date reference of published geologic maps covering the Candidate Area. The published maps range in scale from 1:1200 through 1:700,000 and includes maps published by the

  8. Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-10-25

    The purpose of this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to provide information on potential environmental impacts that could result from a Proposed Action to construct, operate and monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site in Nye County, Nevada. The EIS also provides information on potential environmental impacts from an alternative referred to as the No-Action Alternative, under which there would be no development of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain.

  9. Keywords. d(GGC/GCC)5; d(CAG/CTG)5; hairpin structure; model building; molecular mechanics; quadruplex structure Abbreviations used: DM, dystrophia myotonica; FraX, fragile X syndrome; HD, Huntington disease; rms, root mean square.

    E-print Network

    Bansal, Manju

    ; quadruplex structure ________________ Abbreviations used: DM, dystrophia myotonica; FraX, fragile X syndrome myotonica, DM), fragile X syndrome (FraX), Huntington disease (HD), several spinocerebellar ataxias have (CAG)n­ (CTG)n repeats and four fragile-X chromosomal sites contain (GGC)n­(GCC)n repeats

  10. Inter and intrasite analyses of cultural materials from U20aw, Nye County, Nevada. Technical report No. 66

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, P.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Lockett, C.L.

    1991-12-01

    In the Spring of 1986 Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted a Class III archaeological survey of Drill Hole U20aw on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Seven archaeological sites were located during the course of this survey including two temporary camps, four lithic scatters, and a possible pinyon cache. This report presents the results of the analyses of the data derived from all sites investigated during the data recovery operations on Drill Hole U20aw. Detailed analyses were focused on the spatial distribution of artifacts and features within and between sites in the southern portion of the study area (26Ny4867, 26Ny4869, and 26Ny4871). These analyses indicate that 26Ny4871 served principally as a temporary camp, while the area around the canyonhead to the east (which includes 26Ny4867 and 26Ny4869) seems to have been used as a site for both temporary camps and special activity loci. Projectile point styles suggest that the area was occupied from the Early Archaic into the early Historic period. Analyses of the artifacts that were recovered indicate that obsidian was the preferred material for all classes of flaked stone tools. All stages of lithic reduction are represented on the sites, but core reduction and thinning of bifaces appear to have been the primary activities. Processing of floral foods is indicated by the presence of several ground stone artifacts. Pinyon nuts and other items appear to have been stored in the area of 26Ny4869 and to the north of the drill hole as evidenced by the presence of several rock features that may have served as caches.

  11. "Pseudo-distanze fra variet`a dotate di funzioni a valori reali" PROGRAMMA DEL CORSO (A.A. 2007/2008)

    E-print Network

    Frosini, Patrizio

    "Pseudo-distanze fra variet`a dotate di funzioni a valori reali" PROGRAMMA DEL CORSO (A.A. 2007/2008) I LEZIONE Definizione di coppia di taglia e di pseudo-distanza naturale. Omeomorfismi e diffeomorfismi ottimali. II LEZIONE Teorema fondamentale sulle pseudo-distanze naturali. Teorema degli

  12. Fasit til eksamen i MEK1100 hst 2006 Det er tilsammen 10 delsprsmal. Hvert delsprsmal honoreres med poengsum fra 0 til

    E-print Network

    Gjevik, Bjørn

    °al honoreres med poengsum fra 0 til 10 (10 for fullstendig svar, 0 for blank). Maksimal oppn°aelig poengsum er 100. Kontroller at du ikke overser noen av spørsm°ala. Oppgave 1 Vi har gitt et vektorfelt v = (x

  13. In quest of lunar regolith breccias of exotic provenance - A uniquely anorthositic sample from the Fra Mauro (Apollo 14) highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerde, Eric A.; Warren, Paul H.; Morris, Richard V.

    1990-01-01

    Bulk compositions of 21 Apollo regolith breccias were determined using an INAA procedure modified from that of Kallemeyn et al. (1989). With one major exception, namely, the 14076,1 sample, the regolith breccias analyzed were found to be not significantly different from the surfaces from which they were collected. In contrast, the 14076,1 sample from the Fra Mauro (Apollo 14) region is a highly anorthositic regolith breccia from a site where anorthosites are extremely scarce. The sample's composition resembles soils from the Descartes (Apollo 16) highlands. However, the low statistical probability for long-distance horizontal transport by impact cratering, together with the relatively high contents of imcompatible elements in 14076,1 suggest that this regolith breccia originated within a few hundred kilometers of the Apollo 14 site. Its compositional resemblance to ferroan anorthosite strengthens the hypothesis that ferroan anorthosite originated as the flotation crust of a global magmasphere.

  14. [Biological and physico-chemical properties of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis bacterial culture having the fra-operon Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Byvalov, A A; Gavrilov, K E; Krupin, V V; Chebotarev, E V; Zheludkova, E V; Drubkov, V I; Smirnov, A E; Mal'kov, V N; Dupiasheva, T Iu; Pechenkin, D V; Bondarev, V P

    2008-01-01

    The biological and physico-chemical properties of cultures of two isogenous recombinant variants of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis were studied. The cell genomes of the cultures are distinguished from one another only by the presence or by the absence of the fra-operon, which is a determined attribute of the plague microbe capsule-forming process. The expression of the attribute is amplified by rising the microbial biomass cultivation temperature and stimulates the decrease in the viability of the bacteria and adaptation potential in vitro. In the warm-blooded owner organism the microbes of the capsule-forming recombinant variant are characterized by the greater residual pathogenicity and immunogenic ability to the experimental plague of the laboratory animals as compared to the reference-variant cells. These specific features could be explained by more expressed colonizing ability of the capsule-forming microbes provided by owner cells' stability to the phagocyte process. PMID:18368776

  15. A comparison of forest cover maps in Mainland Southeast Asia from multiple sources: PALSAR, MERIS, MODIS and FRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J.; Xiao, X.; Sheldon, S. L.; Biradar, C. M.; Duong, N. D.; Hazarika, M.

    2012-12-01

    The uncertainty in tracking tropical forest extent and changes substantially affects our assessment of the consequences of forest change on the global carbon cycle, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Recently cloud-free imagery useful for tropical forest mapping from the Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has become available. We used PALSAR 50-m Orthorectified mosaic imagery in 2009 and a decision tree method to conduct land cover classification and generate a 2009 forest map, which was evaluated using 2106 field photos from the Global Geo-referenced Field Photo Library (http://www.eomf.ou.edu/photos). The resulting land cover classification had a high overall accuracy of 93.3 % and a Kappa Coefficient of 0.9. The PALSAR-based forest map was then compared with three existing forest cover products at three scales (regional, national, and continental): the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Forest Resources Assessments (FRA) 2010, Global Land Cover Map with MERIS (GlobCover) 2009, and the MODIS Terra + Aqua Land Cover Type product (MCD12Q1) 2009. The intercomparison results show that these four forest datasets differ. The PALSAR-based forest area estimate is within the range (6.1 ~ 9.0 ×105 km2) of the other three products and closest to the FAO FRA 2010 estimate. The spatial disagreements of the PALSAR-based forest, MCD12Q1 forest and GlobCover forest are evident; however, the PALSAR-based forest map provides more detail (50-m spatial resolution) and high accuracy (the Producer's and the User's Accuracies were 88 % and 95 %, respectively) and PALSAR can be used to evaluate MCD12Q1 2009 and GlobCover 2009 forest maps. Given the higher spatial resolution, PALSAR-based forest products could further improve the modeling accuracy of carbon cycle in tropical forests.

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 2A Promotes Invasion of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells through ERK/Fra-1-Mediated Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yu-Yan; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Chang, Kung-Chao; Chang, Jeffrey Shu-Ming; Chen, Chaio-Wei; Lai, Hsiao-Ching; Wu, Shih-Yi; Yeh, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Fang-Hsin; Lin, Wei-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly metastatic, and this malignant feature may be promoted by an EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A). Acting as a signal regulator, LMP2A can enhance invasiveness and motility of epithelial cells. Downstream from the LMP2A-triggered signaling events, it is largely unknown what key effector proteins are induced and essentially promote cell invasion. In the present study, we found that in NPC cells, LMP2A upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a metastasis-associated protease. LMP2A increased MMP9 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. It also activated the MMP9 promoter, in which two AP-1 elements were required for the promoter activation. Among AP-1 transcription factors, Fra-1 was induced by LMP2A and is essential for LMP2A-triggered MMP9 expression. Induction of Fra-1 was dependent on the LMP2A-activated ERK1/2 pathway, and induction of the ERK1/2–Fra-1–MMP9 axis required PY motifs in the amino-terminal domain of LMP2A. Notably, LMP2A-promoted invasion of NPC cells was blocked when MMP9 expression, Fra-1 induction, or ERK1/2 activation was inhibited. In addition, we found an association of LMP2A with MMP9 expression in NPC tumor biopsy specimens, where Fra-1 was a major mediation factor. This study reveals an underlying mechanism of LMP2A-induced cell invasion, from signal transduction to upregulation of a critical protease. Considering that MMP9 can also be upregulated by another EBV oncoprotein, LMP1, this protease may be a pivotal effector at which the EBV-induced, invasion-promoting mechanisms converge, serving as an attractive therapeutic target for NPC treatment. PMID:22514348

  17. Quality assurance and analysis of water levels in wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    Periodic and continual water-level data from 1963 to 1998 were compiled and quality assured for 65 observation wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada. As part of the quality assurance of all water levels, ancillary data pertinent to computing hydraulic heads in wells were compiled and analyzed. Quality-assured water levels that were not necessarily in error but which did not represent static heads in the regional aquifer system, or required some other qualification, were flagged. Water levels flagged include those recovering from recent pumping or well construction, water levels affected by nuclear tests, and measurements affected by borehole deviations. A cursory examination of about 30 wells with available water-level and down-hole temperature data indicate that water levels in most wells on Pahute Mesa would not be significantly affected by temperature if corrected to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Wells with large corrections (greater than 10 feet) are those with long water columns (greater than 1,500 feet of water above the assumed point of inflow) in combination with mean water-column temperatures exceeding 105 degrees Fahrenheit. Water-level fluctuations in wells on Pahute Mesa are caused by several factors including infiltration of precipitation, barometric pressure, Earth tides, ground-water pumpage, and seismic events caused by tectonic activity and underground nuclear testing. No observed water-level fluctuations were attributed to a naturally occurring earthquake. The magnitude and duration of changes in water levels caused by nuclear tests are affected by the test size and the distance from a well to the test. Identifying water levels that might be affected by past nuclear tests is difficult because pre-testing water-level data are sparse. Hydrologically significant trends were found in 13 of 25 wells with multiple years of water-level record. The largest change in water levels (1,029 feet in 25 years) occurred in well U-19v PS 1D as a result of the Almendro nuclear test. Likely explanations for trends in most of the wells are either changes in precipitation patterns that affect recharge rates to the ground-water system, pumping effects from water-supply well U-20 WW, or a combination of these two factors.

  18. Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--90

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, M.S.

    1994-12-01

    Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suitability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988-1990. Precision and accuracy ranges were determined for all phases of the water-level measuring process, and overall accuracy ranges are presented.

  19. Mental retardation, acromegalic face, and megalotestes in two half-brothers: a specific form of X-linked mental retardation without fra(X) (q)?

    PubMed

    Tariverdian, G; Froster-Iskenius, U; Deuschl, G; Wolff, G

    1991-01-01

    We describe a family with two half-brothers affected with severe mental retardation. The phenotype in the affected individuals is characterized by apparent acromegaly, profound mental retardation, and hyperactivity. The mother has analogous but less severe facial anomalies and mild mental impairment. Screening for fra(X) (q) was negative in peripheral lymphocytes using methotrexate for fra(X) enhancement. The clinical findings in our patients are similar to those described by Fryns et al. [1986] in two patients with acquired lesions of the central nervous system. CT investigations in one of our patients showed areas of hyperdensity in the pontine region and a small subarachnoid cyst. The pedigree suggests X-linked inheritance. The association of apparent acromegaly, CNS anomalies, megalotestes, and mental retardation in this family supports the hypothesis that a distinct syndrome may exist with phenotype anomalies more severe than those characteristic for the Martin-Bell syndrome but without fragile X. PMID:2018059

  20. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3\\/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haoran Li; Daphne T. Mapolelo; Nin N. Dingra; Sunil G. Naik; Nicolas S. Lees; Brian M. Hoffman; Pamela J. Riggs-Gelasco; Boi Hanh Huynh; Michael K. Johnson; Caryn E. Outten

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However, the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which

  1. Common Chromosome Fragile Sites in Human and Murine Epithelial Cells and FHIT/FRA3B Loss-Induced Global Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Horton, Susan; Saldivar, Joshua C.; Miuma, Satoshi; Stampfer, Martha R.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Huebner, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal positions of common fragile sites differ in lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, with positions dependent on the epigenetically determined density of replication origins at these loci. Because rearrangement of fragile loci and associated loss of fragile gene products are hallmarks of cancers, we aimed to map common fragile sites in epithelial cells, from which most cancers derive. Among the five most frequently activated sites in human epithelial cells were chromosome bands 2q33 and Xq22.1, which are not among top fragile sites identified in lymphoblasts or fibroblasts. FRA16D at 16q23 was among the top three fragile sites in the human epithelial cells examined, as it is in lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, while FRA3B at 3p14.2, the top fragile locus in lymphoblasts, was not fragile in most epithelial cell lines tested. Epithelial cells exhibited varying hierarchies of fragile sites; some frequent epithelial cell fragile sites are apparently not frequently altered in epithelial cancers and sites that are frequently deleted in epithelial cancers are not necessarily among the most fragile. Since we have reported that loss of expression of the FRA3B-encoded FHIT protein causes increased replication stress-induced DNA damage, we also examined the effect of FHIT-deficiency on markers of genome instability in epithelial cells. FHIT-deficient cells exhibited increases in fragile breaks and in ?H2AX and 53BP1 foci in G1 phase cells, confirming in epithelial cells that the FHIT gene and encompassing FRA3B, is a “caretaker gene” necessary for maintenance of genome stability. PMID:23929738

  2. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-06-01

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

  3. Sources of clasts in terrestrial impact melts - Clues to the origin of LKFM. [Low-K Fra Mauro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, K. A.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; Spudis, P. D.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1989-01-01

    Low-K Fra Mauro (LKFM) 'basalt', which is found exclusively as an impact melt rock, cannot be modeled geochemically from its clast population or from any combination of known pristine lunar rock types. To clarify clast/melt relationships, a study was made of impact melt rocks from Mistastin Lake crater, Labrador, where there are only three target rocks: anorthosite, quartz monzonite, and granodiorite. Feldspar compositions in these rocks define distinct fields on the An-Ab-Or ternary diagram, making it possible to identify the source of each feldspar clast. Clasts in the Mistastin impact melts do not reflect the abundance of target rocks melted during the impact. The abundance of anorthosite in the clast population varies from 34 to 100 percent compared to a relatively constant value of 65 percent calculated to be in the melt matrix. Therefore the clasts appear to be derived predominantly from material relatively far removed from the zone of impact melting. Melt-matrix composition is dictated strictly by the composition of the target materials within a small radius around and below the point of impact. This suggests that the LKFM composition was derived from a lower crustal source.

  4. Sources of mineral fragments in impact melts 15445 and 15455 - Toward the origin of low-K Fra Mauro basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Ryder, G.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; Mccormick, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The compositions of major and minor elements in mineral clasts in low-K Fra Mauro (LKFM) are studied in order to gain a deeper understanding of the genesis of LKFM and its primogenitors. The fragments are picked up as the impact melt moves outward from the center of the target. It is suggested that most of the mineral debris found in the melts is derived from troctolites of the Mg-suite. The chemical end member that dominates the LKFM melt matrics is not present as either mineral or lithic clastic debris in these melt rocks. It is proposed that the missing chemical component of LKFM could have been a magma, existing within the crust 3.9 Ga ago, and was either ejected intact to form LKFM melt rocks or was mixed with other shock-melted crusted and mantle rocks to produce the LKFM compositions. Assimilation of lithic and mineral clasts into the melt after breccian assembly is not a significant process and cannot be adduced to explain the LKFM melt/clast dichotomy.

  5. Sources of mineral fragments in impact melts 15445 and 15455 - Toward the origin of low-K Fra Mauro basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Ryder, G.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.; McCormick, K. A.

    The compositions of major and minor elements in mineral clasts in low-K Fra Mauro (LKFM) are studied in order to gain a deeper understanding of the genesis of LKFM and its primogenitors. The fragments are picked up as the impact melt moves outward from the center of the target. It is suggested that most of the mineral debris found in the melts is derived from troctolites of the Mg-suite. The chemical end member that dominates the LKFM melt matrics is not present as either mineral or lithic clastic debris in these melt rocks. It is proposed that the missing chemical component of LKFM could have been a magma, existing within the crust 3.9 Ga ago, and was either ejected intact to form LKFM melt rocks or was mixed with other shock-melted crusted and mantle rocks to produce the LKFM compositions. Assimilation of lithic and mineral clasts into the melt after breccian assembly is not a significant process and cannot be adduced to explain the LKFM melt/clast dichotomy.

  6. Scribble Modulates the MAPK/Fra1 Pathway to Disrupt Luminal and Ductal Integrity and Suppress Tumour Formation in the Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Godde, Nathan J.; Sheridan, Julie M.; Smith, Lorey K.; Pearson, Helen B.; Britt, Kara L.; Galea, Ryan C.; Yates, Laura L.; Visvader, Jane E.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2014-01-01

    Polarity coordinates cell movement, differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis to build and maintain complex epithelial tissues such as the mammary gland. Loss of polarity and the deregulation of these processes are critical events in malignant progression but precisely how and at which stage polarity loss impacts on mammary development and tumourigenesis is unclear. Scrib is a core polarity regulator and tumour suppressor gene however to date our understanding of Scrib function in the mammary gland has been limited to cell culture and transplantation studies of cell lines. Utilizing a conditional mouse model of Scrib loss we report for the first time that Scrib is essential for mammary duct morphogenesis, mammary progenitor cell fate and maintenance, and we demonstrate a critical and specific role for Scribble in the control of the early steps of breast cancer progression. In particular, Scrib-deficiency significantly induced Fra1 expression and basal progenitor clonogenicity, which resulted in fully penetrant ductal hyperplasia characterized by high cell turnover, MAPK hyperactivity, frank polarity loss with mixing of apical and basolateral membrane constituents and expansion of atypical luminal cells. We also show for the first time a role for Scribble in mammalian spindle orientation with the onset of mammary hyperplasia being associated with aberrant luminal cell spindle orientation and a failure to apoptose during the final stage of duct tubulogenesis. Restoring MAPK/Fra1 to baseline levels prevented Scrib-hyperplasia, whereas persistent Scrib deficiency induced alveolar hyperplasia and increased the incidence, onset and grade of mammary tumours. These findings, based on a definitive genetic mouse model provide fundamental insights into mammary duct maturation and homeostasis and reveal that Scrib loss activates a MAPK/Fra1 pathway that alters mammary progenitor activity to drive premalignancy and accelerate tumour progression. PMID:24852022

  7. A scientific approach to the characterization of the painting materials of Fra Mattia della Robbia polychrome terracotta altarpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadori, M. L.; Barcelli, S.; Casoli, A.; Mazzeo, R.; Prati, S.

    2013-12-01

    During the last restoration (2008-2011) of the polychrome terracotta altarpiece called Coronation of Virgin between Saints Rocco, Sebastian, Peter martyr and Antonio abbot, located in the collegiate church of S. Maria Assunta in Montecassiano (Macerata, Italy), scientific investigations were carried out to acquire detailed information about the painting technique. The identification of materials allowed a correct restoration. The altarpiece is almost entirely realized by Marco della Robbia (Fra Mattia), dates back to the first half of the XVI century and represents an interesting example of painted terracotta produced by using two different techniques: glazed polychrome terracotta and the "cold painting" technique. The characterization of the samples' material constituents was obtained by analysing the cross-sections and the fragments by different techniques (optical, SEM-EDS and ATR-FTIR microscopy as well as GC-MS), as the real nature of a component is often difficult to assess with one single technique. The optical microscope examination of paint cross-sections shows the presence of many layers, indicating the complexity of the paint stratigraphic morphologies. The original polychromy of della Robbia's masterpiece is constituted of cinnabar, red lake, red lead, orpiment, red ochre, lead white, lead tin yellow, green earth and raw umber. Two different types of gilding technique have been distinguished. The first one presents a glue mordant, and the second one shows an oil mordant composed by a mixture of red lead, red ochre, cinnabar and orpiment. The GC-MS analysis allowed the characterisation of linseed oil and a mixture of animal glue and egg as binding media stratigraphically located by the use of ATR-FTIR mapping microscopy. The analytical results of the painted terracotta integrated investigations show that original technique adopted is characterised by the application of pigments in an oil-binding medium directly applied on the substrates, probably treated with oil and animal glue. A large number of overpaintings above the original scheme of polychromy was found, which could be ascribed to almost three different interventions; the absence of modern pigments suggests that they could be realized long ago.

  8. Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Wood

    2009-10-08

    Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

  9. Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Wood

    2007-10-24

    Between 1951 and 1992, 828 underground tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

  10. Addendum for the Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--076, Revision 0 (June 2006) was prepared to address review comments of this final document by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated July 19, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • On Plate 1 (inserted in the back of the document), the ET Unit legend has been revised. The revised Plate 1 is included and replaces the original Plate 1. • Some of the Appendix D perturbation sensitivity analysis plots included on the CD for Sections D.3.1 and D.3.2 were not properly aligned. A revised CD is provided with all plots properly aligned.

  11. FRA MAURO FORMATION, APOLLO 14: IV. SYNOPSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF CONSORTIUM STUDIES. D. ~ t 6 fflerl, K.D. ~obel,E.K. ~essber~er', S. ~ i n ~ n e rl, H. palme 3, B. sPettel3, .~tnde-nn2 , and H. ~ S n k e, Institut

    E-print Network

    FRA MAURO FORMATION, APOLLO 14: IV. SYNOPSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF CONSORTIUM STUDIES. D. ~ t 6 fflerl. The aim of this paper is to discuss the results of a consortium study of Apollo 14 rocks (1, 2, 3 assumption that the Fra Muuro formation sampled by the Apollo 14 mission is part of the continuous ejecta

  12. Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--1990; Water-resources investigations report 93-4025

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suit-ability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988--90.

  13. Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model of the Topopah Spring tuff in the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Anna, L.O.

    1998-09-01

    Discrete-fracture modeling is part of site characterization for evaluating Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, as a potential high-level radioactive-waste repository site. Because most of the water and gas flow may be in fractures in low-porosity units, conventional equivalent-continuum models do not adequately represent the flow system. Discrete-fracture modeling offers an alternative to the equivalent-continuum method. This report describes how discrete-fracture networks can be constructed and used to answer concerns about the flow system at Yucca Mountain, including quantifying fracture connectivity, deriving directional-permeability distributions for one-and two-phase flow, determining parameters of anisotropy at different scales, and determining at what scale the rock functions as an equivalent continuum. A three-dimensional discrete-fracture model was developed to investigate the effects of fractures on flow of water and gas in the Topopah Spring tuff of Miocene age in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Fracture data, used as model input, were taken exclusively from detailed line surveys in the Exploratory Studies Facility and converted into input parameters for simulation. A simulated fracture network was calibrated to field data. The simulated discrete fracture network was modified by eliminating nonconductive fractures determined from field-derived permeabilities. Small fractures also were removed from the simulated network without affecting the overall connectivity. Fractures, as much as 1.50 meters in length, were eliminated (a large percentage of the total number of fractures) from the network without altering the number of connected pathways. The analysis indicates that the fracture system in the Exploratory Studies Facility has numerous connected fractures that have relatively large permeabilities, but there are relatively few connected pathways across the simulated region. The fracture network was, therefore, sparse.

  14. Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

  15. Geohydrologic data collected from shallow neutron-access boreholes and resultant-preliminary geohydrologic evaluations, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Blout, D.O. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hammermeister, D.P.; Loskot, C.L.; Chornack, M.P.

    1994-12-31

    In cooperation with the US Department of Energy, 74 neutron-access boreholes were drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drilling, coring, sample collection and handling, and lithologic and preliminary geohydrologic data are presented in this report. The boreholes were drilled in a combination of alluvium/colluvium, ash-flow tuff, ash-fall tuff, or bedded tuff to depths of 4.6 to 36.6 meters. Air was used as a drilling medium to minimize disturbance of the water content and water potential of drill cuttings, core, and formation rock. Drill cuttings were collected at approximately 0.6-meter intervals. Core was taken at selected intervals from the alluvium/colluvium using drive-coring methods and from tuff using rotary-coring methods. Nonwelded and bedded tuffs were continuously cored using rotary-coring methods. Gravimetric water-content and water-potential values of core generally were greater than those of corresponding drill cuttings. Gravimetric water-content, porosity, and water-potential values of samples generally decreased, and bulk density values increased, as the degree of welding increased. Grain-density values remained fairly constant with changes in the degree of welding. A high degree of spatial variability in water-content and water-potential profiles was noted in closely spaced boreholes that penetrate similar lithologic subunits and was also noted in adjacent boreholes located in different topographic positions. Variability within a thick lithologic unit usually was small. 18 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  16. 5th Conference on Pesticides and Related Organic Micropollutants in the Environment, Marseille, FRA, 22-25 Octobre 2008 1 How to mitigate pesticides point sources pollution at the EU level

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    5th Conference on Pesticides and Related Organic Micropollutants in the Environment, Marseille, FRA, 22-25 Octobre 2008 1 How to mitigate pesticides point sources pollution at the EU level Bernard. Keywords Pesticides Point Source Pollution Reduction, Stakeholder Decision, Surveys, Uspcaling Process

  17. Candidate tumor suppressor genes at FRA7G are coamplified with MET and do not suppress malignancy in a gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuang-Yin; Druck, Teresa; Huebner, Kay

    2003-02-01

    Common fragile sites predispose to specific chromosomal breakage associated with deletion, amplification, and/or translocation in certain forms of cancer. Chromosomal fragile sites not only are susceptible to DNA instability in cancer cells, but may also be associated with genes that contribute to the neoplastic process. FRA7G is a common fragile site containing the candidate tumor suppressor genes CAV1, CAV2, and TESTIN (TES). The human gastric cancer cell line GTL-16 has an amplification of this genomic region and was used to seek evidence for the suppressor candidacy of one of these genes. Our results demonstrate that CAV1, CAV2, and TESTIN are coamplified with the MET oncogene and overexpressed in GTL-16. Somatic mutation was not detected in the coding regions of these genes, although they were each overexpressed. The results show that CAV1, CAV2, and TESTIN are not tumor suppressor genes in this gastric cancer. PMID:12620387

  18. The comparative behavior of apatite-zircon U-Pb systems in Apollo 14 breccias: Implications for the thermal history of the Fra Mauro Formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Healy, D.; Grange, M. L.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Vaughan, J.

    2009-12-01

    We report secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) U-Pb analyses of zircon and apatite from four breccia samples from the Apollo 14 landing site. The zircon and apatite grains occur as cogenetic minerals in lithic clasts in two of the breccias and as unrelated mineral clasts in the matrices of the other two. SIMS U-Pb analyses show that the ages of zircon grains range from 4023 ± 24 Ma to 4342 ± 5 Ma, whereas all apatite grains define an isochron corresponding to an age of 3926 ± 3 Ma. The disparity in the ages of cogenetic apatite and zircon demonstrates that the apatite U-Pb systems have been completely reset at 3926 ± 3 Ma, whereas the U-Pb system of zircon has not been noticeably disturbed at this time. The apatite U-Pb age is slightly older than the ages determined by other methods on Apollo 14 materials highlighting need to reconcile decay constants used for the U-Pb, Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr systems. We interpret the apatite age as a time of formation of the Fra Mauro Formation. If the interpretation of this Formation as an Imbrium ejecta is correct, apatite also determines the timing of Imbrium impact. The contrast in the Pb loss behavior of apatite and zircon places constraints on the temperature history of the Apollo 14 breccias and we estimate, from the experimentally determined Pb diffusion constants and an approximation of the original depth of the excavated samples in the Fra Mauro Formation, that the breccias experienced an initial temperature of about 1300-1100 °C, but cooled within the first five to ten years.

  19. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Futo, Kiyoto; Oliver, Thomas A.; Marshall, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

  20. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.

    SciTech Connect

    James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

    2007-08-07

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

  1. Fra Mauro Formation,Apollo 14: 11. ^ ~ r -^ ~ rAges of Apollo 14 Rocks F. J. stadennannl, E. Heusser and E. K. Jessbergcr; Max Planck Institut fur Kemphysik, D-6900

    E-print Network

    Fra Mauro Formation,Apollo 14: 11. ^ ~ r - ^ ~ rAges of Apollo 14 Rocks F. J. stadennannl, E As a contribution to the Cone-Crater-Consortium^Ar-^Ar ages of 21 Apollo-14 samples were determined. Among to 4.11 Ga. The ^Ar-^Ar age of 4.09 Ga is the highest so far found in the Apollo-14 rock

  2. Potential gastrointestinal tumor suppressor locus at the 3p14.2 FRA3B site identified by homozygous deletions in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kastury, K; Baffa, R; Druck, T; Ohta, M; Cotticelli, M G; Inoue, H; Negrini, M; Rugge, M; Huang, D; Croce, C M; Palazzo, J; Huebner, K

    1996-03-01

    A number of DNA fragments, identified by representational difference analysis, which were homozygously deleted in various cancer cell lines were previously mapped to human chromosomal arms. One of these, BE758-6, which was homozygously deleted in a number of colon carcinoma cell lines, had been mapped to chromosome region 3p. We have further localized the probe to 3p14.2, approximately 350kbp telomeric to the 3p14.2 break of the t(3;8) hereditary renal cell carcinoma chromosome translocation, within or near the 3p14.2 FRA3B, the most common human fragile site. We determined the sizes of the homozygous deletions in a number of cancer cell lines after isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig and development of STS markers which fall between D3S1234 and D2S1481, which flank the deletions. Homozygous deletions were observed and sized not only in the cell lines originally reported but also in a number of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines and a gastric carcinoma cell line. About 50% of uncultured stomach and colon carcinomas were then shown to lose heterozygosity for alleles in the same region, with a common region of loss between the D3S1234 and D3S1481 markers. Thus, it is likely that the homozygous deletion observed in these cancer cell lines harbors an important tumor suppressor gene for several tumor types. PMID:8640789

  3. A Comparison of Forest Cover Maps in China in 2010 from Multi-source: Landsat, PALSAR, MCD12Q1, FAO FRA, and National Forestry Inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Xiao, X.; Dong, J.; Zhang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Forests and their changes are quite important to global carbon cycle, biodiversity and ecological services. Some uncertainties about forest cover maps still exist in China, so an accurate and updated forest cover distribution map is necessary as a baseline for carbon cycle estimation, especially at a fine spatial resolution. In this study, we developed a decision tree classification algorithm to identify forest and non-forest land cover, based on the signature analysis of 50 m ALOS PLASAR backscatter data in 2010 for a few land cover types. We used MODIS-based NDVI dataset in 2010 (MOD13Q1) to generate a map of annual maximum NDVI and used it to mask out built-up lands, barren lands, and sparsely vegetated lands. We applied the PALSAR-based algorithm and produced a forest cover map in China in 2010. Several comparisons in forest area and spatial distribution between the resultant forest map with other forest maps were carried out. The results show that the total forest area in China from the PALSAR-based forest map in 2010 is close to those of JAXA, FAO FRA, and National Forestry Inventory, and there are good linear relationships between the PALSAR-based forest map with the JAXA, MCD12Q1, and NLCD-China forest areas at province and county scales. All the forest maps have similar forest/non-forest distribution, but our PALSAR-based forest map recognizes well the agro-forests. The results of this study provide a baseline map of forest cover in China in 2010, which can be used for the studies of forest disturbance, carbon cycle, and ecological restoration projects in China.

  4. Addendum for the Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--077, Revision 0 (June 2006), was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 4, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made for the two plates inserted in the back of the document: • Plate 4: Disregard the repeat of legend text ‘Drill Hole Name’ and ‘Drill Hole Location’ in the lower left corner of the map. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-16-1 location (white dot on the lower left side of the map) is not color-coded because no water level has been determined. The well location is included for reference. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-12-1 location (upper left corner of the map), a yellow dot, represents the lower water level elevation. The higher water level elevation, represented by a red dot, was overprinted.

  5. Astrocytoma-associated antigens - IL13R?2, Fra-1, and EphA2 as potential markers to monitor the status of tumour-derived cell cultures in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular heterogeneity of high-grade astrocytomas underlies the difficulties in the development of representative and valuable in vitro experimental models for their studies. The purpose of our study was to estimate the value of astrocytoma-associated antigens (AAAs) - IL13R?2, Fra-1, EphA2 - and the most common molecular aberrations typical for astrocytomas as potential markers to screen the status of tumour-derived cell cultures in vitro. Methods The tumour-derived cell cultures were established from high-grade astrocytomas. The expression analyses of the tested genes were performed via semi-quantitative real-time PCR and subsequently verified by immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical technique. The analyses of molecular aberrations at DNA level included gene dosage status evaluation based on real-time PCR, sequencing analysis, and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay. Results The expression analyses based on semi-quantitative real-time PCR showed that in the final stage of culture the expression level of all tested AAAs was significantly higher or at least comparable to that of primary tumours; however, two expression patterns were observed during cell culture establishment. Analysis at the single cell level via immunocytochemistry also demonstrated an increase of the level of tested proteins and/or selection of tumour cell populations strongly positive for AAAs vs. other cell types including admixed non-tumoural cells. Confrontation of AAA expression data with the results of molecular analyses at DNA level seems to support the latter, revealing that the expression pattern of astrocytoma-associated antigens in tumour-derived cells in subsequent stages of culture is convergent with changes in the molecular profile of examined cell populations. Conclusions The consistency of the obtained results seems to support the use of the selected AAAs, in particular IL13R?2 and Fra-1, as tools facilitating the establishment of tumour-derived cultures. However, the intratumoural heterogeneity of high-grade astrocytomas may require further detailed characterisation of the molecular profile of a tumour in order to evaluate the value of the experimental model in relation to the individual context of particular studies. PMID:25788865

  6. Apollo 14: Science at Fra Mauro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The many scientific activities and experiments performed during the Apollo 14 Mission are presented in a descriptive, non-technical format. Content relates to experiments on the lunar surface and to those performed while traveling in space, and provides a great deal of information about the flight. Many photographs from the journey, a map of the…

  7. The particle track record of Fra Mauro.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, H. R., Jr.; Comstock, G. M.; Fleischer, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Apollo 14 breccias show a mixture of high and low track densities at most interior positions, indicating that the majority of the tracks have been inherited from the parent ingredients of the breccias. Using the lowest of these track densities as indicative of maximum postbrecciation surface residence times, we find a median 1.35 m.y., much younger than the less friable Apollo 11 and 12 igneous rocks. The igneous rock 14310 is studied as a part of a consortium, the results indicating a complex irradiation history. Soils are extremely variable, median track densities ranging over at least a factor of 200. Individual high density soil grains yield track density gradients having variable slopes, most of which are lower than expected from the Surveyor III filter glass results.

  8. La rivalità fra Lo Surdo e Fermi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Foresta Martin; Geppi Calcara

    \\u000a Nella vulgata della scuola di fisica romana degli anni Trenta Antonino Lo Surdo viene presentato come un professore antiquato,\\u000a ostile a Fermi e ad alcuni suoi giovani collaboratori, di carattere freddo e invidioso. Questi giudizi negativi si basano\\u000a sulle testimonianze scritte di Emilio Segrè, uno dei più brillanti allievi e collaboratori di Enrico Fermi, premio Nobel per\\u000a la Fisica nel

  9. PARSTAT 2273 Advanced Potentiostat/Galvanostat/FRA

    E-print Network

    Ulm, Universität

    systems will be measured. Applications · Research Electrochemistry · Corrosion · Sensors · Batteries Bus (USB), so there is no need for an additional card for your system. Electrochemistry Power for long term, heavy load operations #12;4 Applications Research Electrochemistry The physical nature

  10. RisNyt NO1 2004 3 Nye sporstoffer -nye vinduer for

    E-print Network

    præcise anatomi omkring svulsterne. Den tidlige og præcise diagnose af kræft er ofte af stor betydning røntgenbilleder viser den præcise anatomi omkring svulsterne. 3 #12;RisøNyt NO1 2004 sporstoffer til behandling af

  11. Mini-rsberetning, Datalogisk Institut, 2009 Det er med stor glde, at jeg endnu en gang kan konstatere, at det forlbne r har vret yderst succesfuldt

    E-print Network

    konstatere, at det forløbne år har været yderst succesfuldt og budt på vækst og fremgang på mange forskellige to bacheloruddannelser steget fra 82 til 183, og instituttet har nu næsten en fjerdedel af alle fakultetets nye-Camps for piger, som instituttet hvert år afholder i efterårsferien. Instituttet har nu to fuldtids

  12. JAPANESEVISUALCULTURE NoahBianchi,JoshuaNye,YinYefko,ProgramDirectors

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    that is represented in Japanese pop culture. Using digital and published sources as well as inviting lecturers, we wish to create a learning environment for those interested with the visual arts Japan has to offer free time including games, video games, and manga. Japanese Visual Culture House will work hand

  13. Phenology of desert shrubs in southern Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, T.L.; Romney, E.M.; Wallace, A.; Kinnear, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    This study was done to document the variability in time of phenological events at different locations on the Nevada Test Site. Phenological events for desert shrubs were recorded, and rainfall and temperature data were gathered for four to six years at eight sites that are located within the northern Mojave Desert, the southern Great Basin Desert, and the transitional zone between them. Results have been graphically displayed to show the variability in phenological activity encountered during the study period and also to show the general correlation between these events and the environmental regime that triggered a particular phenological stage among different species. For a given location a four-to-six week range in beginning events from year to year was common. In addition to the usual spring activity that normally followed winter rain and snow, most shrub species resumed new growth, and six species were observed to flower and fruit following rare summer or early fall rains. In comparison to surrounding locations, the closed drainage basins within the study area have lower temperatures at night that result in a delay of phenological events in most shrubs.

  14. Sans Spring Field Exploration Model, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.H. [CENEX Exploration and Production, Billings, MT (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The existing model for Oligocene volcanic reservoir production in Railroad Valley was expanded with the discovery of oil at Sans Spring field by CENEX, et. al in March, 1993. Prior to drilling the CENEX No. 5-14 Federal (SWNW, section 14, T7N-R56E), economic production had only been established along the east and west borders of the valley, in structures associated with large offset normal faults. The location of Sans Spring field is on an east-west structural high that separates the productive central Railroad Valley sub-basin from the as yet unproductive southern sub-basin. Gravity, regional and detailed conventional 2-D seismic data coverage was employed to define the structure. This geophysical data further suggested that the structure had remained relatively undeformed, providing seal and trap integrity, during the post Oligocene extensional structural development of Railroad Valley. The location also met a critical criterion of being along a potential hydrocarbon migration pathway for oil generated by the Mississippian Chainman shale source rocks. The discovery well found reservoir development in a moderately welded and altered rhyolitic ignimbrite, with an IPF 1253 BOPD. The trap is an angular unconformity, with truncation to the west that has been modified and complicated by cut and fill channeling and faulting. Definition of the structural configuration, fault geometries and offsets has been greatly enhanced with the acquisition of a 3-D seismic survey. However, the data volume does not as yet provide an unambiguous solution to stratigraphic variations.

  15. 76 FR 41451 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following business will be conducted: Review and...previous meeting's minutes and business expenses, Recommend funding...

  16. 78 FR 30847 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ...of the Committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following business will be conducted: Review and...previous meeting's minutes and business expenses. Review previously...

  17. 77 FR 58095 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ...of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following business will be conducted: Review and...previous meeting's minutes and business expenses, Review projects...

  18. 78 FR 52498 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ...Pub. L. 92-463). The purpose of the RAC is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice and recommendations to...is: (1) Review and approve previous meeting minutes and business expenses; (2) Review and recommend funding...

  19. 77 FR 45331 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ...of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following business will be conducted: Review and...previous meeting's minutes and business expenses, Recommend funding...

  20. Geohydrology of Pahute Mesa-3 test well, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Kilroy, K.C.; Savard, C.S.

    1997-02-01

    The Pahute Mesa-3 test well is on Pahute Mesa about 3 miles west of the Nevada Test Site and 20 miles northeast of Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nevada. The well was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Migration Program to monitor conditions near the western edge of the Nevada Test Site. The well was drilled with conventional rotary methods and an air-foam drilling fluid to a depth of 3,019 feet. A 10.75-inch diameter steel casing was installed to a depth of 1,473 feet. The test well penetrates thick units of non-welded to partly welded ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age with several thin layers of densely welded tuff, rhyolite and basalt flows, and breccia. Geophysical logs indicate that fractures are significant in the Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group and this was confirmed by high flow in this unit during a borehole-flow survey. The geophysical logs also show that the effective porosity in tuffaceous units ranges from 19 to 38 percent and averages 30 percent, and the total porosity ranges from 33 to 55 percent and averages 42 percent. The measured temperature gradient of 1.00 degree Celsius per 100 feet is steep, but is similar to that of other nearby wells, one of which penetrates a buried granite intrusion. Injection tests for six intervals of the well yielded transmissivities that ranged from 3.1 x 10{sup -3} to 25 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivities that ranged from 6 x 10{sup -5} to 0.12 foot per day. The sum of the transmissivities is 28 feet squared per day and the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity is 1.7 x 10{sup -3} foot per day. Estimates of storage coefficient range from 2.1 x 10{sup -5} to 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, indicating that the aquifer responded to the injection tests in a confined manner. An aquifer test produced a drawdown of 78 feet during 31 hours of testing at 169 gallons per minute.

  1. Huebnerite veins near Round Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Foord, E.E.; Conklin, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small huebnerite-bearing quartz veins occur in and near Cretaceous (about 95 m.y. old) granite east and south of Round Mountain. The veins are short, lenticular, and strike mostly northeast and northwest in several narrow east-trending belts. The quartz veins were formed about 80 m.y. ago near the end of an episode of doming and metamorphism of the granite and emplacement of aplite and pegmatite dikes in and near the granite. An initial hydrothermal stage involved deposition of muscovite, quartz, huebnerite, fluorite, and barite in the veins. Veins were then sheared, broken, and recrystallized. A second hydrothermal stage, possibly associated with emplacement of a rhyolite dike swarm and granodiorite stock about 35 m.y. ago, saw deposition of more muscovite, quartz, fluorite, and barite, and addition of scheelite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, several sulfide minerals, and chalcedony. Finally, as a result of near-surface weathering, secondary sulfide and numerous oxide, tungstate, carbonate, sulfate, phosphate, and silicate minerals formed in the veins. Depth of burial at the time of formation of the veins, based on geologic reconstruction, was about 3-3.5 km. The initial hydrothermal stage ended with deposition of quartz at a temperature of about 210/sup 0/C and pressures of about 240 to 280 bars from fluids with salinity of about 5 wt % sodium chloride. Fluorite then was deposited at about 250/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/C from solutions of similar salinity and containing a small amount of carbon dioxide. During shearing that followed initial mineralization, quartz was recrystallized at a temperature of 270/sup 0/ to 290/sup 0/C and in association with fluids of about 5 wt % sodium chloride equivalent and containing carbon dioxide. Late-stage fluorite was deposited from fluids with similar salinity but devoid of carbon dioxide at a temperature of about 210/sup 0/C. 76 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Balic, Brun, Dahle, Kalisch, Karlsen, Tucker REFERAT FRA

    E-print Network

    Kalisch, Henrik

    datamaskiner i Alleegaten ? Sak 4. Mote med IT avdeling. Hva onsker vi a legge frem pa dette motet ? Ansatte. Hvordan handterer IT-avdeling problem med ulike versjoner av programvare. Hva om det er en del av

  3. Ancient crustal components in the Fra Mauro breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Texturally pristine clasts preserve primary petrographic relationships and mineral compositions, yielding insights into igneous processes of the early lunar crust that cannot be gained from highly shocked and brecciated 'chemically pristine' samples. The use of texture as a prime criterion allows for expansion of the data base derived solely from chemical criteria, and provides complementary data. Texturally pristine clasts from the Apollo 14 site studied here include anorthosite, troctolites, gabbronorites, and basalts. Alkali anorthosites are plagioclase orthocumulates and may form by flotation in Mg-suite plutons. Ferroan anorthosite was cataclastically deformed and metamorphosed to granulite facies. Troctolites include both 01 + Plg and 01 + En + Plg cumulates. Major and trace element analyses of two troctolites reveal 'eastern' geochemical affinities that contrast other 'western' troctolites. Gabbronorites are Pig + Plg + or - Sp cumulates whose parent magmas may range from high-Al to intermediate-Ti mare basalt. At least three varieties of mare basalt are found at Apollo 14: high-Al, low-Ti; low-Al, intermediate-Ti; and low-Al, Ti VHK basalt. VHK (Very High Potassium) basalt is a new variety indigenous to Apollo 14.

  4. Experimental petrology and origin of Fra Mauro rocks and soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Results of melting experiments over the pressure range from 0 to 20 kb on Apollo 14 igneous rocks 14310 and 14072, and on comprehensive fines 14259. It is found that low-pressure crystallization of rocks 14310 and 14072 proceeds as predicted from the textural relationships displayed by thin sections of these rocks. The mineralogy and textures of these rocks are the result of near-surface crystallization. The chemical compositions of these lunar samples all show special relationships to multiply saturated liquids in the system anorthite-forsterite-fayalite-silica at low pressure. Partial melting of a lunar crust consisting largely of plagioclase, low-calcium pyroxene, and olivine, followed by crystal fractionation at the lunar surface, is a satisfactory mechanism for the production of the igneous rocks and soil glasses sampled by Apollo 14. The KREEP component of other lunar soils, may have a similar origin.

  5. Geophysical studies of the Syncline Ridge area, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, D.B.; Hanna, W.F.; Anderson, L.A.; Flanigan, V.J.; Pankratz, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    A wide variety of geophysical methods were employed to study a proposed nuclear waste site at Syncline Ridge on the Nevada Test Site, Nev. The proposed site was believed to be a relatively undisturbed synclinal structure containing a thick argillite unit of Misslsslppian age, the Eleana Formation unit J, which would be the emplacement medium. Data acquisition for the geophysical studies was constrained because of rugged topography in a block of Tipplpah Limestone overlying the central part of the proposed site. This study employed gravity, magnetic, seismic refraction and reflection, and four distinct electrical methods to try and define the structural integrity and shape of the proposed repository medium. Detailed and regional gravity work revealed complex structure at the site. Magnetics helped only in identifying small areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks because of low magnetization of the rocks. Seismic refraction assisted in identifying near surface faulting and bedrock structure. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining good quality reflection data. This implied significant structural complexity but also revealed the principal features that were supported by other data. Electrical methods were used for fault identification and for mapping of a thick argillaceous unit of the Eleana Formation in which nuclear waste was to be emplaced. The geophysical studies indicate that major faults along the axis of Syncline Ridge and on both margins have large vertical offsets displacing units so as not only to make mining difficult, but also providing potential paths for waste migration to underlying carbonate aquifers. The Eleana Formation appeared heterogeneous, which was inferred to be due to structural complexity. Only a small region in the northwest part of the study area was found to contain a thick and relatively undisturbed volume of host rock.

  6. Geophysical studies of the Syncline Ridge area, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, D.B.; Hanna, W.F.; Anderson, L.A.; Flanigan, V.J.; Pankratz, L.W.

    1982-12-31

    A wide variety of geophysical methods were employed to study a proposed nuclear waste site at Syncline Ridge on the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Detailed and regional gravity work revealed complex structure at the site. Magnetics helped only in identifying small areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks because of low magnetization. Seismic refraction assisted in identifying near surface faulting and bedrock structure. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining good quality reflection data, implying significant structural complexity. Electrical methods were used for fault identification and for mapping of a thick argillaceous unit of the Eleana Formation in which nuclear waste was to be emplaced. The geophysical studies indicate that major faults along the axis of Syncline Ridge and on both margins have large vertical offsets displacing units so as not only to make mining difficult, but also providing potential paths for waste migration to underlying carbonate aquifers. The Eleana Formation appeared heterogeneous, which was inferred to be due to structural complexity. Only a small region in the northwest part of the study area was found to contain a thick and relatively undisturbed volume of host rock. Deep electrical soundings identified a very conductive region in the crust below Syncline Ridge at depths shallower than 10 km. Similar conductive regions have been observed associated with geothermal systems in the western United States and imply the potential for a blind geothermal system below Syncline Ridge. The geophysical studies provided negative evidence for the suitability of the site for a nuclear waste repository.

  7. Surrogate Indicators of Radionuclide Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Baker, R. J.; Luo, W.; Michel, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Contaminant-transport processes are being investigated at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), adjacent to the Nation's first commercial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. Gases containing tritium and radiocarbon are migrating through a 110-m thick unsaturated zone from unlined trenches that received waste from 1962 to 1992. Information on plume dynamics comes from an array of shallow (<2 m) and two vertical arrays of deep (5-109 m) gas-sampling ports, plus ground-water monitoring wells. Migration is dominated by lateral transport in the upper 50 m of sediments. Radiological analyses require ex-situ wet-chemical techniques, because in-situ sensors for the radionuclides of interest do not exist. As at other LLRW-disposal facilities, radionuclides at the ADRS are mixed with varying amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other substances. Halogenated-methanes, -ethanes, and -ethenes dominate the complex mixture of VOCs migrating from the disposal area. These compounds and their degradates provide a distinctive "fingerprint" of contamination originating from low-level radioactive waste. Carbon-dioxide and VOC anomalies provide indicator proxies for radionuclide contamination. Spatial and temporal patterns of co-disposed and byproduct constituents provide field-scale information about physical and biochemical processes involved in transport. Processes include reduction and biorespiration within trenches, and largely non-reactive, barometrically dispersed diffusion away from trenches.

  8. Mineral Resources of the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Nash, J. Thomas; Plouff, Donald; McDonnell, John R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Morey (NV-060-191) and Fandango (NV-060-190) Wilderness Study Areas are located in the northern Hot Creek Range about 25 mi north of Warm Springs, Nev. At the request of the Bureau of Land Management, 46,300 acres of the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas were studied. In this report, the area studied is referred to as 'the wilderness study area', or simply 'the study area'. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys were conducted by the USGS and the USBM in 1984 to appraise the identified mineral resources and to assess the mineral resource potential of the study areas. These studies indicate that there are small identified resources of zinc, lead, and silver at the Lead Pipe property in the Fandango Wilderness Study Area, several areas of high potential for the occurrence of gold resources in the Fandango study area, small areas of low and moderate potential for the occurrence of silver, lead, and zinc resources in the Fandango study area, areas of moderate and high potential for the occurrence of silver, lead, and zinc resources in the Morey study area, and an area of low potential for copper, molybdenum, and tin in the Morey study area. Both study areas have low resource potential for petroleum, natural gas, uranium, and geothermal energy.

  9. Database of groundwater levels and hydrograph descriptions for the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Peggy E.; Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    A database containing water levels measured from wells in and near areas of underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site was developed. The water-level measurements have been collected from the wells since 1941. The database provides information for each well including well construction, borehole lithology, units contributing water to the well, and general site remarks. Water-level information provided in the database includes measurement source, status, method, accuracy, and specific water-level remarks. Additionally, the database provides hydrograph narratives that document the water-level history and describe and interpret the water-level hydrograph for each well. Water levels in the database were quality assured and analyzed. Multiple conditions were assigned to each water?level measurement to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed to each water-level measurement.

  10. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2006-01-01

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

  11. Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

    2005-10-31

    The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

  12. Field trip report: Observations made at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Special report No. 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hill

    1993-01-01

    A field trip was made to the Yucca Mountain area on December 5-9, 1992 by Jerry Frazier, Don Livingston, Christine Schluter, Russell Harmon, and Carol Hill. Forty-three separate stops were made and 275 lbs. of rocks were collected during the five days of the field trip. Key localities visited were the Bare Mountains, Yucca Mountain, Calico Hills, Busted Butte, Harper

  13. Hydrogeology of rocks penetrated by test well JF-3, Jackass Flats, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Plume, R.W.; La Camera, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Geological Survey are monitoring water levels in southern Nevada and adjacent parts of California in response to concern about the potential effects of pumping ground water to support the Yucca Mountain Site-Characterization Program. Well JF-3 was drilled in the western part of Jackass Flats for monitoring water levels, for determining the likelihood of a hydraulic connection between well JF-3 and production wells J-12 and J-13, and for measuring the hydraulic properties of the Topopah Spring Tuff. The borehole for JF-3 penetrated about 480 feet of alluvium and 818 feet of underlying volcanic rock. The well was finished at a depth of 1,138 feet below land surface near the base of the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the principal volcanic-rock aquifer in the area. The Topopah Spring Tuff at well JF-3 extends from depths of 580 feet to 1,140 feet and consists of about 10 feet of partly to moderately welded ash-flow tuff; 10 feet of vitrophyre; 440 feet of devitrified, moderately to densely welded ash-flow tuff; 80 feet of densely welded ash-flow tuff; 10 feet of vitric, nonwelded to partly welded ash-flow tuff; and 10 feet of ashfall tuff. Fractures and lithophysae are most common in the devitrified tuff, especially between depths of 600 feet and 1,040 feet. Much of the water produced in well JF-3 probably comes from the sequence of these devitrified tuffs that is below the water table. The transmissivity of the aquifer is an estimated 140,000-160,000 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivity is 330-370 feet per day. These values exceed estimates made at well J-13 by two orders of magnitude. Such large differences may be accounted for by differences in the development of fractures and lithophysae in the Topopah Spring Tuff at the two wells.

  14. FY-92 report on the isotope hydrology characterization of the Faultless test site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M.L.; Nimz, G.J.; Hudson, G.B.; Smith, D.K.; Rego, J.H.; Kenneally, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    In January of 1968 the Faultless test shot at 975m below the surface had an estimated magnitude range between 200kt to 1Mt. The detonation resulted in a surface crater estimated at 1km in diameter accompanied by a > 3m collapse escarpment at the surface. Careful monitoring of outlying observation wells before, during and after the shot has provided valuable data on the hydrodynamic response of the groundwater. This report of FY92 investigations at Faultless by the Nuclear Chemistry Division at LLNL serves to outline new and previous isotopic data of natural and shot-related nuclides measured in the drillback hole and the two closest satellite wells. The goals of this study are: (1) to investigate and characterize the geochemical and isotopic variabilities of groundwater, as a function of groundwater source and age, (2) to determine concentrations of event-related nuclide activity and investigate any possible migration of the hydrologic source term. A more comprehensive source and age characterization from isotopic and geochemical variations of natural groundwater in the Hot Creek Valley would require a regional scale investigation.

  15. Estimated ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration, Ash Meadows Area, Nye County, Nevada, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.D.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Rapp, T.R.

    1997-05-01

    Ground water discharges from the regional ground-water flow system that underlies the eastern part of the Nevada Test Site through numerous springs and seeps in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada. The total spring discharge was estimated to be about 17,000 acre-feet per year by earlier studies. Previous studies estimated that about 10,500 acre-feet of this discharge was lost to evapotranspiration. The present study was undertaken to develop a more rigorous approach to estimating ground-water discharge in the Ash Meadows area. Part of the study involves detailed field investigation of evapotranspiration. Data collection began in early 1994. The results of the first year of study provide a basis for making preliminary estimates of ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration. An estimated 13,100 acre-feet of ground water was evapotranspired from about 6,800 acres of marsh and salt-grass. Additional 3,500 acre-feet may have been transpired from the open water and from about 1,460 acres of other areas of Ash Meadows in which field studies have not yet been made.

  16. Effect of irrigation pumping on desert pupfish habitats in the Ash Meadows, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudley, William W., Jr.; Larson, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Ash Meadows area, at the southern tip of the Amargosa Desert in southern Nevada, discharges ground water collected over several thousand square miles of a regional flow system developed in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water moves westward across fault contacts from the bedrock into poorly interconnected gravel, sand, and terrestrial-limestone aquifers in the upper few hundred feet of the basin sediments at Ash Meadows. A small pool in Devils Hole, which is a collapse depression in Cambrian limestone, and numerous springs in the adjacent desert valley contain rare fish species of the genus Cyprinodon, faunal remnants of Pleistocene lakes. The Devils Hole pupfish, C. diabolis, is the most endangered of the several surviving species that have evolved since the post-pluvial isolation of their ancestors. This population feeds and reproduces on a slightly submerged rock ledge. Recent irrigation pumping has nearly exposed this ledge. Correlation of pumping histories with the stage in Devils Hole allows identification of several wells that affect the pool level most severly. Some springs that are habitats for other species of Cyprinodon have reduced discharge because of pumping. Hydraulic testing, long-term water-level monitoring, water quality, and geologic evidence aid in defining the principal flow paths and hydraulic interconnections in the Ash Meadows area. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Water-table fluctuations in the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Paces, James B.; Whelan, Joseph

    2001-04-29

    Pleistocene ground-water discharge deposits approximately 20 km southwest of Yucca Mountain were previously thought to represent pluvial water-table rises of 80 to 120 m. Data from new boreholes at two of the three discharge sites indicate that the modern water-table is at depths of only 17 to 30 m and that this shallow water is part of the regional ground-water flow system rather than being perched. Calcite in equilibrium with this modern ground water would have isotopic compositions similar to those in Pleistocene calcite associated with the discharge deposits. Carbon and uranium isotopes in both ground water and discharge deposits imply that past discharge consisted of a mixture of both shallow and deep ground water. These data limit Pleistocene water-table fluctuations at the specified Amargosa Desert discharge sites to between 17 and 30 m and eliminate the need to invoke large water-table rises.

  18. Sequential Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic events in Grant range and Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, D.M.H.

    1989-03-01

    A series of palinspastic geologic cross sections were constructed for the Grant Range-Railroad Valley (GR-RRV) area. This palinspastic reconstruction differs from previously published interpretations in two major ways. First, new granite age dates and a chronological framework deduced by Fryxell in 1984 in the central and southern Grant Range were applied, where possible, to the northern Grant Range. Second, recent drilling was correlated to outcrop interpretations. Results of this reconstruction suggest that significant tectonism affected the GR-RRV area earlier than previously believed. Mesozoic compression produced east-vergent folding in the GR-RRV area, followed by Late Cretaceous intrusion. Local, possibly blind thrusting may have been associated with the intrusion. Above the granite dome, shallow, brittle, listric faulting and deeper low-angle attenuation faulting accommodated intrusion. After intrusion, relative quiescence prevailed during the deposition of the Sheep Pass Formation and the lower Garrett Ranch Group ignimbrite. Uplift in the middle and late Oligocene produced pervasive listric, normal, east-dipping faulting that may in part be represented by apparent growth faults within volcanics. Subsequent west-dipping listric faulting was in part gravity driven. High-angle Miocene normal faulting initiated the present structure. All commercial oil fields in Railroad Valley are producing from Miocene and younger structures. However, an understanding of older structures will allow more accurate prediction of reservoirs within a particular, prospective, younger structure.

  19. Magnetotelluric study of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley regions, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenkel, Clifford J.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Dixon, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetotelluric data delineate distinct layers and lateral variations above the pre-Tertiary basement. On Pahute Mesa, three resistivity layers associated with the volcanic rocks are defined: a moderately resistive surface layer, an underlying conductive layer, and a deep resistive layer. Considerable geologic information can be derived from the conductive layer which extents from near the water table down to a depth of approximately 2 km. The increase in conductivity is probably related to zeolite zonation observed in the volcanic rock on Pahute Mesa, which is relatively impermeable to groundwater flow unless fractured. Inferred faults within this conductive layer are modeled on several profiles crossing the Thirsty Canyon fault zone. This fault zone extends from Pahute Mesa into Oasis Valley basin. Near Colson Pond where the basement is shallow, the Thirsty Canyon fault zone is several (~2.5) kilometers wide. Due to the indicated vertical offsets associated with the Thirsty Canyon fault zone, the fault zone may act as a barrier to transverse (E-W) groundwater flow by juxtaposing rocks of different permeabilities. We propose that the Thirsty Canyon fault zone diverts water southward from Pahute Mesa to Oasis Valley. The electrically conductive nature of this fault zone indicates the presence of abundant alteration minerals or a dense network of open and interconnected fractures filled with electrically conductive groundwater. The formation of alteration minerals require the presence of water suggesting that an extensive interconnected fracture system exists or existed at one time. Thus, the fractures within the fault zone may be either a barrier or a conduit for groundwater flow, depending on the degree of alteration and the volume of open pore space. In Oasis Valley basin, a conductive surface layer, composed of alluvium and possibly altered volcanic rocks, extends to a depth of 300 to 500 m. The underlying volcanic layer, composed mostly of tuffs, fills the basin with about 3-3.5 km of relief on basement. A fault zone, related to the southern margin of the basin, appears to extend up to a depth of about 500 m. The path of groundwater encountering this fault zone is uncertain but may be either to the southwest towards Beatty or to the south towards Crater Flat.

  20. Gravity and magnetic study of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley region, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Dixon, Gary L.; McKee, Edwin H.; Fridrich, Christopher J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    1999-01-01

    Regional gravity and aeromagnetic maps reveal the existence of deep basins underlying much of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, approximately 150 km northwest of Las Vegas. These maps also indicate the presence of prominent features (geophysical lineaments) within and beneath the basin fill. Detailed gravity surveys were conducted in order to characterize the nature of the basin boundaries, delineate additional subsurface features, and evaluate their possible influence on the movement of ground-water. Geophysical modeling of gravity and aeromagnetic data indicates that many of the features may be related to processes of caldera formation. Collapse of the various calderas within the volcanic field resulted in dense basement rocks occurring at greater depths within caldera boundaries. Modeling indicates that collapse occurred along faults that are arcuate and steeply dipping. There are indications that the basement in the western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region consists predominantly of granitic and/or fine-grained siliceous sedimentary rocks that may be less permeable to groundwater flow than the predominantly fractured carbonate rock basement to the east and southeast of the study area. The northeast-trending Thirsty Canyon lineament, expressed on gravity and basin thickness maps, separates dense volcanic rocks on the northwest from less dense intracaldera accumulations in the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes. The source of the lineament is an approximately 2-km wide ring fracture system with step-like differential displacements, perhaps localized on a pre-existing northeast-trending Basin and Range fault. Due to vertical offsets, the Thirsty Canyon fault zone probably juxtaposes rock types of different permeability and, thus, it may act as a barrier to ground-water flow and deflect flow from Pahute Mesa along its flanks toward Oasis Valley. Within the Thirsty Canyon fault zone, highly fractured rocks may serve also as a conduit, depending upon the degree of alteration and its effect on porosity and permeability. In the Oasis Valley region, other structures that may influence ground-water flow include the western and southern boundaries of the Oasis Valley basin, where the basement abruptly shallows.

  1. Hydraulic characterization of overpressured tuffs in central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Galloway, Devin L.

    2005-01-01

    A sequence of buried, bedded, air-fall tuffs has been used extensively as a host medium for underground nuclear tests detonated in the central part of Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Water levels within these bedded tuffs have been elevated hundreds of meters in areas where underground nuclear tests were detonated below the water table. Changes in the ground-water levels within these tuffs and changes in the rate and distribution of land-surface subsidence above these tuffs indicate that pore-fluid pressures have been slowly depressurizing since the cessation of nuclear testing in 1992. Declines in ground-water levels concurrent with regional land subsidence are explained by poroelastic deformation accompanying ground-water flow as fluids pressurized by underground nuclear detonations drain from the host tuffs into the overlying water table and underlying regional carbonate aquifer. A hydraulic conductivity of about 3 x 10-6 m/d and a specific storage of 9 x 10-6 m-1 are estimated using ground-water flow models. Cross-sectional and three-dimensional ground-water flow models were calibrated to measured water levels and to land-subsidence rates measured using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Model results are consistent and indicate that about 2 million m3 of ground water flowed from the tuffs to the carbonate rock as a result of pressurization caused by underground nuclear testing. The annual rate of inflow into the carbonate rock averaged about 0.008 m/yr between 1962 and 2005, and declined from 0.005 m/yr in 2005 to 0.0005 m/yr by 2300.

  2. Site environmental report for calendar year 1994, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization office has established an environmental program to ensure that facilities are operated in order to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US DOE orders. The status of the environmental program has been summarized in this annual report to characterize performance, confirm compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during CY 1994. Monitoring, archaeology, groundwater, ecosystems, tortoise conservation, waste minimization, etc., are covered.

  3. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Perry; J. A. Grow

    1993-01-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts

  4. Geological techniques utilized in trap Spring Field discovery, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dolly, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    The trap at Eagle Springs Field is a combination stratigraphic truncation-subcrop-fault trap. Production occurs from matrix and fracture porosity in reservoirs in the Sheep Pass Formation (Cretaceous and Eocene) and the Garrett Ranch volcanic group (Oligocene). Probably the most unique feature about the field is that the production occurs from the highest position on the lowermost fault block at the basin margin. On the adjacent higher fault blocks the reservoir beds were removed by erosion during the basin and range orogenic event. The position of the truncated edge of the lower Tertiary reservoir units is controlled by the fault pattern at the margin of the valley-basin Graben. Detailed geomorphic studies indicated that this fault pattern may be identified at the surface. Regional geomorphic mapping of fault patterns was conducted to localize areas with possible subcrop truncation patterns similar to Eagle Springs Field. 20 references.

  5. Geological techniques utilized in trap Spring Field discovery, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dolly

    1980-01-01

    The trap at Eagle Springs Field is a combination stratigraphic truncation-subcrop-fault trap. Production occurs from matrix and fracture porosity in reservoirs in the Sheep Pass Formation (Cretaceous and Eocene) and the Garrett Ranch volcanic group (Oligocene). Probably the most unique feature about the field is that the production occurs from the highest position on the lowermost fault block at the

  6. 76 FR 25298 - White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ...of the committee is to improve collaborative relationships and to provide advice...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following business will be conducted: Review and...previous meeting's minutes and business expenses, Recommend funding...

  7. Final Environmental Assessment for solid waste disposal, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    New solid waste regulations require that the existing Nevada Test Site (NTS) municipal landfills, which receive less than 20 tons of waste per day, be permitted or closed by October 9, 1995. In order to be permitted, the existing landfills must meet specific location, groundwater monitoring, design, operation, and closure requirements. The issuance of these regulations has resulted in the need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a practical, cost-effective, environmentally sound means of solid waste disposal at the NTS that is in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. The current landfills in Areas 9 and 23 on the Nevada Test Site do not meet design requirements specified in new state and federal regulations. The DOE Nevada Operations Office prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential impacts of the proposal to modify the Area 23 landfill to comply with the new regulations and to close the Area 9 landfill and reopen it as Construction and Demolition debris landfill. Based on information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  8. Ash-flow eruptive megabreccias of the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Snyder, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed field study of ash-flow megabreccias associated with the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas shows that megaclasts were brecciated in sub-caldera level before incorporation in ash flows. This evidence in addition to the presence of some clast lithologies that are nowhere recognized in caldera walls and the occurrence of some megabreccia units as outflow suggest an origin by eruption rather than by collapse of caldera walls. Geophysical investigations and a mathematical analysis are presented in the paper.

  9. Gravity and magnetic study of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley region, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.L.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Laczniak, R.J.; Mankinen, E.A.; McKee, E.H.

    1999-08-31

    Regional gravity and aeromagnetic maps reveal the existence of deep basins underlying much of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, approximately 150 km northwest of Las Vegas. These maps also indicate the presence of prominent features (geophysical lineaments) within and beneath the basin fill. Detailed gravity surveys were conducted in order to characterize the nature of the basin boundaries, delineate additional subsurface features, and evaluate their possible influence on the movement of ground water. Geophysical modeling of gravity and aeromagnetic data indicates that many of the features may be related to processes of caldera formation. Collapse of the various calderas within the volcanic field resulted in dense basement rocks occurring at greater depths within caldera boundaries. Modeling indicates that collapse occurred along faults that are arcuate and steeply dipping. There are indications that the basement in the western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region consists predominantly of granitic and/or fine-grained siliceous sedimentary rocks that may be less permeable to ground-water flow than the predominantly fractured carbonate rock basement to the east and southeast of the study area. The northeast-trending Thirsty Canyon lineament, expressed on gravity and basin thickness maps, separates dense volcanic rocks on the northwest from less dense intracaldera accumulations in the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes. The sources of the lineament is an approximately 2-km wide ring fracture system with step-like differential displacements, perhaps localized on a pre-existing northeast-trending Basin and Range fault. Due to vertical offsets, the Thirsty Canyon faults zone probably juxtaposes rock types of different permeability and, thus, it may act as a barrier to ground-water flow and deflect flow from Pahute Mesa along its flanks toward Oasis Valley. Within the Thirsty Canyon fault zone, highly fractured rocks may serve also as a conduit, depending upon the degree of alteration and its effect on porosity and permeability. In the Oasis Valley region, other structures that may influence ground-water flow include the western and southern boundaries of the Oasis Valley basin, where the basement abruptly shallows.

  10. The Hall (Nevada moly) molybdenum deposit, Nye County, Nevada: Geology, alteration, mineralization and geochemical dispersion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. Shaver

    1984-01-01

    At Hall, each of two molybdenum bearing, quartz monzonite porphyry stocks underwent continuous inward crystallization which was interrupted by the successively deeper release of hydrothermal fluids to form a concentrically zoned stock, three stacked orebodies, and overlapping zones of alteration mineralization. Each pulse progressed in time from albitic to potassic to greisen alteration, with later veins closing the pulse. Based

  11. The Hall (Nevada moly) molybdenum deposit, Nye County, Nevada: Geology, alteration, mineralization and geochemical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, S. A.

    At Hall, each of two molybdenum bearing, quartz monzonite porphyry stocks underwent continuous inward crystallization which was interrupted by the successively deeper release of hydrothermal fluids to form a concentrically zoned stock, three stacked orebodies, and overlapping zones of alteration mineralization. Each pulse progressed in time from albitic to potassic to greisen alteration, with later veins closing the pulse. Based on fluid inclusions, early (potassic) veins formed from high temperature, moderate salinity, nonboiling fluids under lithostatic pressure; later (base metal) veins formed from lower temperature, high salinity, probably boiling fluids under hydrostatic pressure. Differences between quartz monzonite type and climax type porphyry molybdenum deposits in geology, alteration, mineralization, and geochemical dispersion are consistent with greater depths of emplacement of the quartz monzonite type deposits.

  12. Contributions to Astrogeology: Geology of the lunar crater volcanic field, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.; Trask, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Crater volcanic field in east-central Nevada includes cinder cones, maars, and basalt flows of probably Quaternary age that individually and as a group resemble some features on the moon. Three episodes of volcanism are separated by intervals of relative dormancy and erosion. Changes in morphology of cinder cones, degree of weathering, and superposition of associated basalt flows provide a basis for determining the relative ages of the cones. A method has been devised whereby cone heights, base radii, and angles of slope are used to determine semiquantitatively the age relationships of some cinder cones. Structural studies show that cone and crater chains and their associated lava flows developed along fissures and normal faults produced by tensional stress. The petrography of the basalts and pyroclastics suggests magmatic differentiation at depth which produced interbedded subalkaline basalts, alkali-olivine basalts, and basanitoids. The youngest flows in the field are basanitoids.

  13. Archaeological studies at Drill Hole U20az Pahute Mesa, Nye county, Nevada. [Contains bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Henton, G.H.; Lockett, C.L.; Nials, F.L.; Pippin, L.C.; Walsh, L.

    1991-07-01

    During the summer of 1987, the Quaternary Sciences Center (formerly Social Science Center) of the Desert Research Institute (DRI), University of Nevada System, conducted data recovery investigations at five archaeological sites located near Drill Hole U20az on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. These sites were among 12 recorded earlier during an archaeological survey of the drill hole conducted as part of the environmental compliance activities of the Department of Energy (DOE). The five sites discussed in this report were considered eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and were in danger of being adversely impacted by construction activities or by effects of the proposed underground nuclear test. Avoidance of these sites was not a feasible alternative; thus DRI undertook a data recovery program to mitigate expected adverse impacts. DRI's research plan included controlled surface collections and excavation of the five sites in question, and had the concurrence of the Nevada Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology and the Advisory Council of Historic Preservation. Of the five sites investigated, the largest and most complex, 26Ny5207, consists of at least three discrete artifact concentrations. Sites 26Ny5211 and 26Ny5215, both yielded considerable assemblages. Site 26Ny5206 is very small and probably is linked to 26Ny5207. Site 26Ny5205 contained a limited artifact assemblage. All of the sites were open-air occurrences, and, with one exception contained no or limited subsurface cultural deposits. Only two radiocarbon dates were obtained, both from 26Ny5207 and both relatively recent. While the investigations reported in the volume mitigate most of the adverse impacts from DOE activities at Drill Hole U20az, significant archaeological sites may still exist in the general vicinity. Should the DOE conduct further activities in the region, additional cultural resource investigations may be required. 132 refs., 71 figs., 44 tabs.

  14. Archaeological data recovery at drill pad U19au, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    Construction activities accompanying underground nuclear tests result in the disturbance of the surface terrain at the Nevada Test Site. In compliance with Federal legislation (National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (PL 89-665) and National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190)), the US Department of Energy (DOE), Field Office, Nevada, has long required that cultural resources studies must precede all land-disturbing activities on the Nevada Test Site. In accordance with 36 CFR Part 800, these studies consist of archaeological surveys conducted prior to the land-disturbing activities. The intent of these surveys is to identify and evaluate all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the proposed construction activity. This report presents the final analysis of the data recovered from archaeological investigations conducted at the U19au drill site and access road. This report includes descriptions of the archaeological sites as recorded during the original survey, the research design used to guide the investigations, the method and techniques used to collect and analyze the data, and the results and interpretations of the analysis. 200 refs., 112 figs., 53 tabs.

  15. Preliminary study of quaternary faulting on the east side of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Reheis, M.C.

    1986-12-31

    Active faults bound the east side of Bare Mountain. Geomorphic features, stratigraphy, and soil development indicate that two 3-km-long segments of the range-front fault probably last moved in Holocene or late Pleistocene time. Other segments of the fault have been quiescent since the late Pleistocene. Both late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits bury many faults east of the northern end of Bare Mountain. Two prospect pits on the range-front fault reveal evidence of recurrent late Quaternary movements. Both older and younger deposits in one pit are faulted, but fractures in the older unit do not extend up into the younger unit. Based on soil development, the older and younger fault episodes respectively are probably late Pleistocene and Holocene in age. Another pit shows carbonate-cemented fractures with slickensides in a late Pleistocene deposit, suggesting at least two late Pleistocene or Holocene fault movements. Middle to early Pleistocene and Tertiary deposits show evidence of recurrent faulting in many locations. Faults in these deposits are pervaded by secondary CaCO{sub 3} and silica that commonly exhibit slickensides.

  16. Preliminary study of quaternary faulting on the east side of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reheis

    1986-01-01

    Active faults bound the east side of Bare Mountain. Geomorphic features, stratigraphy, and soil development indicate that two 3-km-long segments of the range-front fault probably last moved in Holocene or late Pleistocene time. Other segments of the fault have been quiescent since the late Pleistocene. Both late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits bury many faults east of the northern end of

  17. Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM-2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.M.; Locke, G.L.

    1997-02-01

    Analysis of water from well Pahute Mesa No. 2 (PM-2), on Pahute Mesa in the extreme northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations above background levels in August 1993. A coordinated investigation of the tritium occurrence in well PM-2 was undertaken by the Hydrologic Resources Management Program of the US Department of Energy. Geologic and hydrologic properties of the hydrogeologic units were characterized using existing information. Soil around the well and water quality in the well were characterized during the investigation. The purpose of this report is to present existing information and results from a coordinated investigation of tritium occurrence. The objectives of the overall investigation include: (1) determination of the type and concentration of contamination; (2) identification of the source and mechanism of contamination; (3) estimation of the extent of radiological contamination; (4) initiation of appropriate monitoring of the contamination; and (5) reporting of investigation results. Compiled and tabulated data of the area are presented. The report also includes characterization of geology, soil, hydrology, and water quality data.

  18. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-04-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

  19. A Cold War Battlefield: Frenchman Flat Historic District, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William Gray [DRI; Holz, Barbara A [DRI; Jones, Robert [DRI

    2000-08-01

    This report provides the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office with the documentation necessary to establish the Frenchman Flat Historic District on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It includes a list of historic properties that contribute to the eligibility of the district for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and provides contextual information establishing its significance. The list focuses on buildings, structures and features associated with the period of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons on the NTS between 1951 and 1962. A total of 157 locations of buildings and structures were recorded of which 115 are considered to be eligible for the NRHP. Of these, 28 have one or more associated features which include instrumentation supports, foundations, etc. The large majority of contributing structures are buildings built to study the blast effects of nuclear weaponry. This has resulted in a peculiar accumulation of deteriorated structures that, unlike most historic districts, is best represented by those that are the most damaged. Limitations by radiological control areas, surface exposure and a focus on the concentration of accessible properties on the dry lake bed indicate additional properties exist which could be added to the district on a case-by-case basis.

  20. Geohydrology of rocks penetrated by test well USW H-6, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Reed, R.L. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Test well USW H-6 is one of several wells drilled in the Yucca Mountain area near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for investigations related to isolation of high-level nuclear waste. This well was drilled to a depth of 1,220 meters. Rocks penetrated are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age, with the principal exception of dacitic(?) lave penetrated at a depth from 877 to 1,126 meters. The composite static water level was about 526 meters below the land surface; the hydraulic head increased slightly with depth. Most permeability in the saturated zone is in two fractured intervals in Crater Flat Tuff. Based on well-test data using the transitional part of a dual-porosity solution, an interval of about 15 meters in the middle part of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has a calculated transmissivity of about 140 meters squared per day, and an interval of about 11 meters in the middle part of the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has a calculated transmissivity of about 75 meters squared per day. The upper part of the Bullfrog Member has a transmissivity of about 20 meters squared per day. The maximum likely transmissivity of any rocks penetrated by the test well is about 480 meters squared per day, based on a recharge-boundary model. The remainder of the open hole had no detectable production. Matrix hydraulic conductivity ranges from less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} meter per day. Ground water is a sodium bicarbonate type that is typical of water from tuffaceous rock of southern Nevada. The apparent age of the water is about 14,6000 years. 29 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Preliminary gravity investigations of the Wahmonie Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, D.A.

    1981-12-31

    A gravity survey of the southwest corner of the Nevada Test Site was completed during 1979 to 1980 as part of an effort to characterize a possible radioactive waste storage site in granitic rocks. The survey outlined a large, broad, and flat gravity high centered near Wahmonie Site. Combined geophysical data indicate that the anomalous area is underlain by a dense, magnetic, and possibly intrusive body. Gravity data show a +15 milligal Bouguer anomaly coincident with a large positive aeromagnetic anomaly. The data reveal a prominent fault at the west edge of the inferred intrusive. Both gravity and magnetic anomalous highs extend NNE over a horst composed predominantly of rhyodacite of the Tertiary Salyer Formation. Local aeromagnetic highs are closely associated with two granodiorite exposures on the eastern edge of the horst. A local gravity high of about +2 milligal is centered directly over the southern granodiorite exposure and another high is centered over the northern exposure. A steep gravity gradient outlining the gravity high coincides with the outer edge of a zone of hydrothermal alteration which surrounds the horst. The gravity gradient probably marks the approximate limit of an intrusive body.

  2. Geologic map of the Mound Spring quadrangle, Nye and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundstrom, Scott C.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Paces, James B.; Young, Owen D.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Dixon, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    The Mound Spring quadrangle, the southwestern-most 7.5' quadrangle of the area of the Las Vegas 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, is entirely within the Pahrump Valley, spanning the Nevada/California State line. New geologic mapping of the predominantly Quaternary materials is combined with new studies of gravity and geochronology in this quadrangle. Eleven predominantly fine-grained units are delineated, including playa sediment, dune sand, and deposits associated with several cycles of past groundwater discharge and distal fan sedimentation. These units are intercalated with 5 predominantly coarse-grained alluvial-fan and wash gravel units mainly derived from the Spring Mountains. The gravel units are distinguished on the basis of soil development and associated surficial characteristics. Thermoluminescence and U-series geochronology constrain most of the units to the Holocene and late and middle Pleistocene. Deposits of late Pleistocene groundwater discharge in the northeast part of the quadrangle are associated with a down-to-the-southwest fault zone that is expressed by surface fault scarps and a steep gravity gradient. The gravity field also defines a northwest-trending uplift along the State line, in which the oldest sediments are poorly exposed. About 2 km to the northeast a prominent southwest-facing erosional escarpment is formed by resistant beds in middle Pleistocene fine-grained sediments that dip northeast away from the uplift. These sediments include cycles of groundwater discharge that were probably caused by upwelling of southwesterly groundwater flow that encountered the horst.

  3. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

    1995-12-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  4. Paraje (de Fra Cristobal): investigations of a Territorial period Hispanic village site in southern New Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Boyd, Douglas Kevin

    1986-01-01

    Figure 6. 27. Profile of Room D. 147 148 149 150 Figure 6. ZB. Profile of unit outside Structure 10. . . Figure 6. Zg. Feature 10-1 151 153 Figure 7. 1. Type 1 coarse earthenware rim forms. . . 161 Figure 7. 2. Type 3 coarse earthenware rim form.... . . Figure 7. 3. Type 4 coarse earthenware rim form. . . 164 165 Figure 8. 1. Assigned provenience locations of excavation units at Structure 1. . . 242 LIST OF TABLES Table 5. 1. Reorganization of Mounted Regiments, August 3, 1861 Page 67 Table 7...

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Fra2, an Additional Member of the Fos Gene Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Nishina; Hironori Sato; Takeshi Suzuki; Moriyuki Sato; Hideo Iba

    1990-01-01

    Antiserum raised against a Fos peptide (amino acids Lys-127 to Arg-140 of chicken c-Fos) recognizes a 46-kDa Fos-related protein in cell lysates of growth-stimulated chicken embryo fibroblasts. Induction of the 46-kDa protein is transient but is slightly prolonged relative to c-Fos following growth stimulation. Using a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding the peptide antigen, we have cloned the chicken genomic locus

  6. 75 FR 27112 - Solicitation of Applications and Notice of Funding Availability for the FRA Railroad System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ...grants: (1) To conduct a Locomotive Biofuel Study, and (2) to conduct a Study of...Protection Agency, to conduct a ``Locomotive Biofuel Study.'' This study will focus on determining...other passenger rail operators could use biofuel blends to power locomotives and...

  7. 75 FR 34213 - Solicitation of Applications and Notice of Funding Availability for the FRA Railroad System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...responsible parties for two grants: to conduct a Locomotive Biofuel Study, and to conduct a Study of the Use of Bio-based Technologies...for the two grant programs: (1) To conduct a Locomotive Biofuel Study, and (2) to conduct a Study of the Use of...

  8. Maske fra Sri Lanka, brukt i Singalesisk folketeater, innkjpt av Etnografisk museum

    E-print Network

    Løw, Erik

    Hagenbeck i Hamburg i 1887 #12;2 3 JA, VI ELSKER FRIHET Du vet godt når du er fri. Frihet er noe du vet hva til å være den vi ønsker å være. Hva skal til for at akkurat du skal føle deg fri? Har du tenkt på hva alvor. Hva kan vi si offentlig og hva kan vi utsette andre for? Hva kan vi leke med før det blir ufint

  9. The magma ocean from the Fra Mauro shoreline - An overview of the Apollo 14 crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, R. H.; Taylor, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical studies of coarse grained, polymineralic, texturally monominct igneous clasts from the Apollo 14 breccias show troctolite and troctolitic anorthosite to be the most abundant rock types. The second most abundant group consists of plagioclase cumulates with more evolved mineral compositions than the Mg-rich trend anorthosite cumulates. Coarse grained ilmenite gabbros and mineralogically evolved monzonoritic and granitic clasts are widespread in occurrence, but not abundant. The present data provide further support for widespread regional heterogeneities within the early lunar crust.

  10. Lunar surface closeup stereoscopic photography at Fra Mauro (Apollo 14 site)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, W. D., III; Heiken, G.

    1972-01-01

    A total of 17-1/2 stereopairs of lunar surface rocks and soil was taken on the Apollo 14 mission. The closeup stereopair photographs are presented with a preliminary interpretation for those interested in lunar soil formation, impact phenomena, and soil mechanics.

  11. Geomorphology of crater and basin deposits - Emplacement of the Fra Mauro formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. H.; Oberbeck, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    Characteristics of continuous deposits near lunar craters larger than about 1 km wide are considered, and it is concluded that (1) concentric dunes, radial ridges, and braided lineations result from deposition of the collision products of ejecta from adjacent pairs of similarly oriented secondary-crater chains and are, therefore, concentrations of secondary-crater ejecta; (2) intracrater ridges are produced within preexisting craters surrounding a fresh primary crater by ricocheting and focusing of secondary-crater ejecta from the preexisting craters' walls; and (3) secondary cratering has produced many of the structures of the continuous deposits of relatively small lunar craters and is the dominant process for emplacement of most of the radial facies of the continuous deposits of large lunar craters and basins. The percentages of Imbrium ejecta in deposits and the nature of Imbrium sculpturing are investigated.

  12. On Pu-244 in lunar rocks from Fra Mauro and implications regarding their origin.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marti, K.; Lightner, B. D.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The evidence for in situ produced fission xenon from Pu-244 in rock 14321 is presented. The inferred abundance ratio Pu-244/U-238 is found to be consistent with values observed in a meteorite. Data from a stepwise release of the xenon permits a characterization of the trapped component, which can be shown to be distinct from solar xenon. We discuss the evidence for the presence of fission gases and of uncorrelated radiogenic argon in this and in other Apollo 14 rocks and some implications regarding their origin.

  13. Exposure ages and neutron capture record in lunar samples from Fra Mauro.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic-ray exposure ages of Apollo 14 rocks and rock fragments obtained by the Kr81-Kr83 method range from 27 to 700 m.y. Rock 14321, collected near the Cone crater rim, is one of the many approximately 27 m.y. old ejecta which were reported at the Third Lunar Science Conference. All the other rocks have considerably higher exposure ages. Isotopic anomalies from neutron capture in gadolinium, bromine, and barium are used to obtain information on the lunar neutron spectrum at various depths below the lunar surface. The flux ratio of resonance and slow (less than 0.3 eV) neutrons is found to be nearly constant in the topmost approximately 100 g/sq cm.

  14. Sintering and hot pressing of Fra Mauro composition glass and the lithification of lunar breccias.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    It is proposed that Apollo 14 type breccias lithify by sintering of particles of matrix glass under stress-free conditions. Meteorite impacts generate the heat necessary for sintering. Compacted angular particles of glass with the composition of an Apollo 14 rock were sintered experimentally. Loose clods of sub 37 micron grains form in several days at 700 C. Synthetic rocks, which texturally resemble the breccias, were produced at 795 C and above in 7.5 hours. Glass devitrified with increasing temperature. At 850 C, devitrification prevents much further densification of the synthetic breccias after 2 hours. Experiments compressing glass at 500 bars at 600 C produced dense vitreous masses which did not resemble lunar breccias. Confining pressure does not play a major role in lithifying the breccias. It is concluded that Apollo 14 type lunar breccias form at shallow depths at 800 C+ in a period of minutes to days.

  15. Servizi per l'infanzia, mutamenti, legami con il territorio fra cultura e controcultura

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maurizio Fabbri

    2010-01-01

    Il report analizza le rappresentazioni di insegnanti di scuola dell'infanzia e educa- trici di nido, in relazione ai principali trend di mutamento sociale e istituzionale e ai cambiamenti legati agli stili educativi. Particolarmente significativo risulta su questo versante l'intreccio dinamico tra servizi e territorio: in direzione di sinergia e di collaborazione reciproca in alcune parti del paese; di maggiore attrito

  16. 49 CFR 240.103 - Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    (1) To accept responsibility for the training of student engineers and thereby obtain authority for that railroad to initially certify a person as an engineer in an appropriate class of service, or (2) To recertify only engineers previously certified by other...

  17. 49 CFR 240.103 - Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    (1) To accept responsibility for the training of student engineers and thereby obtain authority for that railroad to initially certify a person as an engineer in an appropriate class of service, or (2) To recertify only engineers previously certified by other...

  18. 49 CFR 240.103 - Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    (1) To accept responsibility for the training of student engineers and thereby obtain authority for that railroad to initially certify a person as an engineer in an appropriate class of service, or (2) To recertify only engineers previously certified by other...

  19. I prodotti editoriali nella rete-mercato fra editori e consumatori

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richeri Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The article analyze the main sectors of the publishing industry highlighting major features and factors that encourage or curb the shift from physical to intangible. To-day publishers are able to find a very wild on-line market for their products that offer the possibility to change in deep the organizational and costing structure, the time to market of the editorial contents

  20. FraNtiC: A Fractal Geometric Framework for Mesh-Based Wireless Access Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samik Ghosh; Kalyan Basu; Sajal K. Das

    2005-01-01

    The design of the access networks of next generation broadband wireless systems requires special attention in the light of changing network characteristics. In this paper, we present a mesh-based distributed radio access network (RAN) framework for future wireless systems. Using short, high bandwidth optical wireless links to interconnect the various network elements, we identify a generic fractal or self-similar structure

  1. Valutazione clinica comparativa fra due collutori agli oli essenziali con e senza alcol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Basso; J. Nowakowska; G. Bordini; S. Corbella

    2011-01-01

    ObjectivesEssential oils have been used for years as components of mouthwashes. Although their antiseptic potency is inferior to that of chlorhexidine, they can be used daily as an adjunct to daily oral hygiene and as a treatment for halitosis. The aim of this prospective, double-blind, comparative study was to evaluate the efficacy of two mouthwashes containing essential oils, one without

  2. Human Chromosomal Fragile Site FRA16B Is an Amplified AT-Rich Minisatellite Repeat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sui Yu; Marie Mangelsdorf; Duncan Hewett; Lynne Hobson; Elizabeth Baker; Helen J Eyre; Naras Lapsys; Denis Le Paslier; Norman A Doggett; Grant R Sutherland; Robert I Richards

    1997-01-01

    Fragile sites are nonstaining gaps in chromosomes induced by specific tissue culture conditions. They vary both in population frequency and in the culture conditions required for induction. Folate-sensitive fragile sites are due to expansion of p(CCG)n trinucleotide repeats; however, the relationship between sequence composition and the chemistry of induction of fragile sites is unclear. To clarify this relationship, the distamycin

  3. Oncogene . Author manuscript The PKC pathway participates in the aberrant accumulation of Fra-1

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Oncogene . Author manuscript Page /1 13 The PKC pathway participates in the aberrant accumulation-Serine-Threonine Kinases ; metabolism ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos ; metabolism ; Receptors, Estrogen ; metabolism

  4. Fra molekyl til prosess Beregning av likevekt og transport med de sm systemers metode

    E-print Network

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Kjelstrup Institutt for kjemi NKS Landsmøte, Lillestrøm, 29.30 oktober, 2014 #12;2 Tilegnet alle mine dr standard tilstand! Fult dekket overflate 300 K: 12.5 molekyl/(nm)² #12;Reservoar: 168 Å x 216 Å x 336 Å L Standard kjemisk potensial, entropi og entalpi for lagene 298 K Lag 1+2 Lag 1 Lag 2 CO2 gass µ0 kJ/mol 47

  5. FL/FRA Liste de priodiques 06.03.2008 1

    E-print Network

    Genève, Université de

    (1979)-63(1990) L'Ane : le magazine freudien. - Paris : Analyse Nouvelle Expérience, 1981->. - No 1(1981)->. 0531508 Romanicum : nuova rivista di filologia romanza. - Genève : L.S. Olschki ; [poi] Firenze : Bibliopolis. - Vol

  6. FRA3B and other common fragile sites: the weakest links

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kay Huebner; Carlo M. Croce

    2001-01-01

    In 1979, the first chromosome alteration associated with familial cancer was reported. Five years later, a fragile site was observed in the same chromosome region. The product of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene, which encompasses this fragile site, is partially or entirely lost in most human cancers, indicating that it has a tumour-suppressor function. Inactivation of only one FHIT

  7. Decreto n. 427 IL DRETTORE AMMINISTRATIVO

    E-print Network

    Malerba, Donato

    CULTURACIVILTÀ E CULTURACIVILTÀ E CULTURA SCRITTA FRA TARDA ANSCRITTA FRA TARDA ANSCRITTA FRA TARDA ANSCRITTA FRA CONFERIMENTO DEL TITOLO DI DOTTORE DI RICERCA IN civiltà e cultura scritta fra tardaciviltà e cultura scritta fra tardaciviltà e cultura scritta fra tardaciviltà e cultura scritta fra tarda #12;antichità e

  8. Survey of Yucca Mountain, Forty-Mile Canyon, and Jackass Flats in Nye County, Nevada for desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii

    SciTech Connect

    Medica, P.A.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Collins, E.

    1981-10-01

    The objective of this brief survey was to determine if G. agassizii is present west of Forty-Mile Canyon in the Yucca Mountain.. area, or along the major access roads which lead through Jackass Flats to Forty-Mile Canyon and Yucca Mountain

  9. Reconnaissance Seismic Refraction Studies at Calico Hills, Wahmonie, and Yucca Mountain, Southwest Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankratz, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    Reconnaissance refraction surveys consisting off a total of 5 spreads were conducted in the Calico Hills, Wahmonie and Yucca Mountain areas, southwestern Nevada Test Site (NTS). Data from Calico Hills and Wahmonie are generally high in quality; data from Yucca Mountain are for the most part low in quality. At Calico Hills and Wahmonie, special attention was focused on the possible occurrence of a major intrusive body at depth. At Calico Hills this occurrence is supported by an inferred dome-shaped velocity interface. possibly associated with the roof of an altered phase of argillite. However, if an intrusive body is present, its top must be buried deeper than 3 km or it must be so pervasively altered that its velocity is similar to that of the calcareous argillite encountered at the bottom of drill hole DE 25a-3. At Wahmonie, the seismic data suggest the occurrence of a massive lenticular unit within 60 m of the ground surface, probably consisting of argillite but possibly consisting of intensively altered intrusive rock. At Yucca Mountain, preliminary interpretations of the most reliable data suggest the occurrence of a major, steeply inclined velocity interface 500 m from the southwest end of the Yucca C spread. This interface may represent a major fault or erosional feature separating the Topopah Spring and Tiva Canyon Members with Paintbrush Tuff at depth. This interface is 800 m east of a previously mapped fault. On the basis of poor-quality data obtained at Yucca Mountain, the subsurface velocity distribution appears to be complex. For example, one spread near drill hole UE25 a-I suggests not only a much thicker section of Tiva but also that this material is down thrown in the valley. This may suggest faulting with throws exceeding 100 meters or an equivalent erosional feature.

  10. Reconnaissance seismic refraction studies at Calico Hills, Wahmonie, and Yucca Mountain: southwest Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratz, L.W.

    1982-12-31

    Reconnaissance refraction surveys consisting of a total 5 spreads were conducted in the Calico Hills, Wahmonie, and Yucca Mountain areas, southwestern Nevada Test Site (NTS). Data from Calico Hills and Wahmonie are generally high in quality; data from Yucca Mountain are for the most part low in quality. At Calico Hills and Wahmonie, special attention was focused on the possible occurrence of a major intrusive body at depth. At Calico Hills this occurrence is supported by an inferred dome-shaped velocity interface, possibly associated with the roof of an altered phase of argillite. however, if an intrusive body is present, its top must be buried deeper than 3 km or it must be so pervasively altered that its velocity is similar to that of the calcareous argillite encountered at the bottom of drill hole UE 25a-3. At Wahmonie, the seismic data suggest the occurrence of a massive lenticular unit within 60 m of the ground surface, probably consisting of argillite but possibly consisting of intensively altered intrusive rock. At Yucca Mountain, preliminary interpretations of the most reliable data suggest the occurrence of a major, steeply inclined velocity interface 500 m from the southwest end of the Yucca C spread. This interface may represent a major fault or erosional feature separating the Topopah Spring and Tiva Canyon Members with Paintbrush Tuff at depth. This interface is 800 m east of a previously mapped fault. On the basis of poor-quality data obtained at Yucca Mountain, the subsurface velocity distribution appears to be complex. For example, one spread near drill hole UE25 a-1 suggests not only a much thicker section of Tiva but also that this material is down thrown in the valley. This may suggest faulting with throws exceeding 100 meters or an equivalent erosional feature.

  11. Well ER-6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Ruskauff

    2006-09-01

    The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of limestone and dolomite, and is pervasively fractured. Groundwater flow in this aquifer is primarily in the fractures, and the hydraulic properties are primarily related to fracture frequency and fracture characteristics (e.g., mineral coatings, aperture, connectivity). The objective of the multiple-well aquifer test (MWAT) was to determine flow and hydraulic characteristics for the LCA in Yucca Flat. The data were used to derive representative flow model and parameter values for the LCA. The items of specific interest are: Hydraulic conductivity; Storage parameters; Dual-porosity behavior; and Fracture flow characteristics. The objective of the tracer transport experiment was to evaluate the transport properties and processes of the LCA and to derive representative transport parameter values for the LCA. The properties of specific interest are: Effective porosity; Matrix diffusion; Longitudinal dispersivity; Adsorption characteristics; and Colloid transport characteristics. These properties substantially control the rate of transport of contaminants in the groundwater system and concentration distributions. To best support modeling at the scale of the corrective action unit (CAU), these properties must be investigated at the field scale. The processes represented by these parameters are affected by in-situ factors that are either difficult to investigate at the laboratory scale or operate at a much larger scale than can be reproduced in the laboratory. Measurements at the field scale provide a better understanding of the effective average parameter values. The scale of this tracer test is still small compared to the scale of a CAU, but is of sufficient scale to be generally representative of the processes that affect in-situ transport. The scale of the tracer test undertaken is limited by the rate of transport in the formation and the resultant time frame required for completing such a test. The measurements at the field scale will provide information for relating laboratory measurements for transport processes to the larger scale. This report describes the analysis of the tracer test data and development of a conceptual model of transport in the LCA in Yucca Flat.

  12. Micrometeorological data for energy-budget studies near Rogers Spring, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.D.; Rapp, T.R.

    1996-05-01

    The data were collected at two sites near Rogers Spring for use in energy-budget studies beginning in 1994. The data collected at each site included net radiation, air temperature at two heights, dew- point temperature at two heights, windspeed at two heights, soil heat flux, and soil temperature in the interval between the land surface and the buried heat-flux plates.

  13. Groundwater withdrawals and associated well descriptions for the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Peggy E.; Moreo, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    From 1951 to 2008, groundwater withdrawals totaled more than 25,000 million gallons from wells on and directly adjacent to the Nevada National Security Site. Total annual groundwater withdrawals ranged from about 30 million gallons in 1951 to as much as 1,100 million gallons in 1989. Annual withdrawals from individual wells ranged from 0 million gallons to more than 325 million gallons. Monthly withdrawal data for the wells were compiled in a Microsoft(copyright) Excel 2003 spreadsheet. Groundwater withdrawal data are a compilation of measured and estimated withdrawals obtained from published and unpublished reports, U.S. Geological Survey files, and/or data reported by other agencies. The withdrawal data were collected from 42 wells completed in 33 boreholes. A history of each well is presented in terms of its well construction, borehole lithology, withdrawals, and water levels.

  14. 77 FR 13142 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified-Competitive Sale of Public Land in Pahrump, Nye County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ...is given by the United States as to the title...the Interior--Bureau of Land Management...bidders must be (1) United States citizens 18 years...rights against the United States may accrue until...the Interior--Bureau of Land...

  15. Reconnaissance seismic refraction studies at Calico Hills, Wahmonie, and Yucca Mountain: southwest Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pankratz

    1982-01-01

    Reconnaissance refraction surveys consisting of a total 5 spreads were conducted in the Calico Hills, Wahmonie, and Yucca Mountain areas, southwestern Nevada Test Site (NTS). Data from Calico Hills and Wahmonie are generally high in quality; data from Yucca Mountain are for the most part low in quality. At Calico Hills and Wahmonie, special attention was focused on the possible

  16. Digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Rowley, P.D.; Fridrich, C.J.; Morgan, K.S.; Workman, J.B.; Young, O.D.; Dixon, G.L.; Williams, V.S.; McKee, E.H.; Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Swadley, W.C.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Ekren, E.B.; Warren, R.G.; Cole, J.C.; Fleck, R.J.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sawyer, D.A.; Minor, S.A.; Grunwald, D.J.; Laczniak, R.J.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.; Jayko, A.S.

    2000-03-08

    This digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity, as well as its accompanying digital geophysical maps, are compiled at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers two 30 {times} 60-minute quadrangles-the Pahute Mesa quadrangle to the north and the Beatty quadrangle to the south-plus a strip of 7 1/2-minute quadrangles on the east side. In addition to the NTS, the map area includes the rest of the southwest Nevada volcanic field, part of the Walker Lane, most of the Amargosa Desert, part of the Funeral and Grapevine Mountains, some of Death Valley, and the northern Spring Mountains. This geologic map improves on previous geologic mapping of the same area by providing new and updated Quaternary and bedrock geology, new geophysical interpretations of faults beneath the basins, and improved GIS coverages. This publication also includes a new isostatic gravity map and a new aeromagnetic map. The primary purpose of the three maps is to provide an updated geologic framework to aid interpretation of ground-water flow through and off the NTS. The NTS is centrally located within the area of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southwestern Nevada and adjacent California. During the last 40 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have conducted about 900 nuclear tests on the NTS, of which 100 were atmospheric tests and the rest were underground tests. More than 200 of the tests were detonated at or beneath the water table, which commonly is about 500 to 600 m below the surface. Because contaminants introduced by these test may move into water supplies off the NTS, rates and directions of ground-water flow must be determined. Knowledge about the ground water also is needed to properly appraise potential future effects of the possible nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, adjacent to the NTS.

  17. Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.K.

    1995-06-01

    The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site.

  18. Oxygen isotopes and trace elements in the Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.D.; Kyser, T.K.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1996-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. Because Yucca Mountain is located in a resource-rich geologic setting, one aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation of the resource potential at Yucca Mountain. The Tiva Canyon Tuff (TCT) is a widespread felsic ash-flow sheet that is well exposed in the Yucca Mountain area. Samples of the upper part of the TCT were selected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposits within the Miocene volcanic section. These samples of the upper cliff and caprock subunits have been analyzed for oxygen isotopes and a large suite of elements. Oxygen isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 18}O) of the TCT are typical of felsic igneous rocks but range from 6.9 to 11.8 permil, indicating some post-depositional alteration. There is no evidence of the low {delta}{sup 18}O values (less than 6 permil) that are typical of epithermal precious-metal deposits in the region. The variation in oxygen isotope ratios is probably the result of deuteric alteration during late-stage crystallization of silica and low-temperature hydration of glassy horizons; these processes are also recorded by the chemical compositions of the rocks. However, most elemental contents in the TCT reflect igneous processes, and the effects of alteration are observed only in some of the more mobile elements. These studies indicate that the TCT at Yucca Mountain has not been affected by large-scale meteoric-water hydrothermal circulation. The chemical compositions of the TCT, especially the low concentrations of most trace elements including typical pathfinder elements, show no evidence for epithermal metal deposits. Together, these data indicate that the potential for economic mineralization in this part of the volcanic section at Yucca Mountain is small.

  19. Attenuation in Railroad Valley, Nye County, eastern Nevada, and its significance for petroleum exploration in the eastern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Francis, R.D. [California State Univ. of Long Beach, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Data from over 100 wells suggest that the boundary between the Grant Range and Railroad Valley is a low angle detachment fault at or close to a metamorphic core complex. The White Pine Detachment, mapped previously in the White Pine and Grant Ranges, is penetrated by many wells because it occurs at a high structural level. A structure contour map based on both surface and subsurface data indicates that the detachment dips uniformly into the subsurface and is not displaced significantly by a high angle fault. In the Grant Range subparallel detachments are developed in the more ductile units. Because the White Pine Detachment is not displaced by high angle faults Railroad Valley cannot have formed by steep normal faulting but instead by attenuation along a series of subparallel detachments. Generation and accumulation of hydrocarbons in Railroad Valley and similar basins may be related to the attenuation that created the basins. For example, the extent to which attenuation juxtaposed potential source rocks and hot infrastructure rocks may influence maturity. Consequently, areas normally considered too shallow for petroleum generation should not necessarily be discounted. Furthermore, failure to find petroleum in a favorable structure may not mean that the basin lacks potential because, as in Railroad Valley, source rocks may be locally absent as a result of attenuation. Reservoir structures formed by attenuation, such as lenticular stretch structures and localized fracture zones in otherwise impermeable formations, may exist.

  20. Attenuation in Railroad Valley, Nye County, eastern Nevada, and its significance for petroleum exploration in the eastern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.T.; Francis, R.D. (California State Univ. of Long Beach, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Data from over 100 wells suggest that the boundary between the Grant Range and Railroad Valley is a low angle detachment fault at or close to a metamorphic core complex. The White Pine Detachment, mapped previously in the White Pine and Grant Ranges, is penetrated by many wells because it occurs at a high structural level. A structure contour map based on both surface and subsurface data indicates that the detachment dips uniformly into the subsurface and is not displaced significantly by a high angle fault. In the Grant Range subparallel detachments are developed in the more ductile units. Because the White Pine Detachment is not displaced by high angle faults Railroad Valley cannot have formed by steep normal faulting but instead by attenuation along a series of subparallel detachments. Generation and accumulation of hydrocarbons in Railroad Valley and similar basins may be related to the attenuation that created the basins. For example, the extent to which attenuation juxtaposed potential source rocks and hot infrastructure rocks may influence maturity. Consequently, areas normally considered too shallow for petroleum generation should not necessarily be discounted. Furthermore, failure to find petroleum in a favorable structure may not mean that the basin lacks potential because, as in Railroad Valley, source rocks may be locally absent as a result of attenuation. Reservoir structures formed by attenuation, such as lenticular stretch structures and localized fracture zones in otherwise impermeable formations, may exist.

  1. Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River Channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Akstin, Katherine C.; Boyd, Robert A.; Henkelman, Katherine K.

    2003-01-01

    The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and transport. An understanding of regional flow patterns is important because ground water originating on the Nevada Test Site may pass through the area before discharging from springs at lower elevations in the Amargosa Desert and in Death Valley. Nine boreholes 10 to 16 meters deep were cored nearly continuously using a hollow-stem auger designed for gravelly sediments. Two boreholes were drilled in each of three irrigated fields in the Amargosa-Farms area, two in the Amargosa-River channel, and one in an undisturbed area of native vegetation. Data from previously cored boreholes beneath undisturbed, native vegetation were compared with the new data to further assess deep percolation under current climatic conditions and provide information on spatial variability. The profiles beneath native vegetation were characterized by large amounts of accumulated chloride just below the root zone with almost no further accumulation at greater depths. This pattern is typical of profiles beneath interfluvial areas in arid alluvial basins of the southwestern United States, where salts have been accumulating since the end of the Pleistocene. The profiles beneath irrigated fields and the Amargosa-River channel contained more than twice the volume of water compared to profiles beneath native vegetation, consistent with active deep percolation beneath these sites. Chloride profiles beneath two older fields (cultivated since the 1960?s) as well as the upstream Amargosa-River site were indicative of long-term, quasi-steady deep percolation. Chloride profiles beneath the newest field (cultivated since 1993), the downstream Amargosa-River site, and the edge of an older field were indicative of recently active deep percolation moving previously accumulated salts from the upper profile to greater depths. Results clearly indicate that deep percolation and ground-water recharge occur not only beneath areas of irrigation but also beneath ephemeral stream channels, despite the arid climate and infrequency of runoff. Rates of deep percolation beneath irrigated fields ranged from 0.1 to 0.5 m/yr. Estimated rates of deep percolation beneath the Amargosa-River channel ranged from 0.02 to 0.15 m/yr. Only a few decades are needed for excess irrigation water to move through the unsaturated zone and recharge ground water. Assuming vertical, one-dimensional flow, the estimated time for irrigation-return flow to reach the water table beneath the irrigated fields ranged from about 10 to 70 years. In contrast, infiltration from present-day runoff takes centuries to move through the unsaturated zone and reach the water table. The estimated time for water to reach the water table beneath the channel ranged from 140 to 1000 years. These values represent minimum times, as they do not take lateral flow into account. The estimated fraction of irrigation water becoming deep percolation averaged 8 to 16 percent. Similar fractions of infiltration from ephemeral flow events were estimated to become deep percolation beneath the normally dry Amargosa-River channel. In areas where flood-induced channel migration occurs at sub-centennial frequencies, residence times in the unsaturated zone beneath the Amargosa channel could be longer. Estimates of deep percolation presented herein provide a basis for evaluating the importance of recharge from irrigation and channel infiltration in models of ground-water flow from the Nevada Test Site.

  2. Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the U.S. Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts supported through the U.S. Department of Energy program will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Test-generated contaminants have been introduced over large areas and at variable depths above and below the water table throughout NTS. Evaluating the risks associated with these byproducts of underground testing presupposes a knowledge of the source, transport, and potential receptors of these contaminants. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. Any assessment of the risk must rely in part on the current understanding of ground-water flow, and the assessment will be only as good as the understanding itself. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. An apparent deficiency in the current understanding is a lack of knowledge about flow directions and rates away from major areas of testing. Efforts are necessary to delineate areas of downgradient flow and to identify factors that constrain and control flow within these areas. These efforts also should identify the areas most critical to gaining detailed understanding and to establishing long-term monitoring sites necessary for effective remediation.

  3. Characterization of the Highway 95 Fault in lower Fortymile Wash using electrical and electromagnetic methods, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macy, Jamie P.; Kryder, Levi; Walker, Jamieson

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated application of electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods provided better characterization of the Highway 95 Fault. The comparison of dipole-dipole resistivity, TEM, and CSAMT data confirm faulting of an uplifted block of resistive Paleozoic Carbonate that lies beneath a more conductive sandstone unit. A more resistive alluvial basin-fill unit is found above the sandstone unit, and it constitutes only about 150 m of the uppermost subsurface.

  4. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  5. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  6. Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

    2012-09-30

    This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

  7. Minerals in fractures of the saturated zone from drill core USW G-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    The minerals in fractures in drill core USW G-4, from the static water level (SWL) at 1770 ft to the base of the hole at 3000 ft, were studied to determine their identity and depositional sequence and to compare them with those found above the SWL in the same drill hole. There is no change in mineralogy or mineral morphology across the SWL. The significant change in mineralogy and relationship to the host rock occurs at 1381 ft, well above the present water table. Below 1381 ft clinoptilolite appears in the fractures and rock matrix instead of heulandite, and the fracture mineralogy correlates with the host rock mineralogy. Throughout most of the saturated zone (below the SWL) in USW G-4, zeolites occur in fractures only in zeolitic tuff; however, zeolites persist in fracture below the base of the deepest zeolitic tuff interval. Nonzeolitic intervals of tuff have fewer fractures, and many of these have no coatings; a few have quartz and feldspar coatings. One interval in zeolitic tuff (2125-2140 ft) contains abundant crisobalite coatings in the fractures. Calcite occurs in fractures from 2575 to 2660 ft, usually with the manganese mineral hollandite, and from 2750 to 2765 ft, usually alone. Manganese minerals occur in several intervals. The spatial correlation of zeolites in fractures with zeolitic host rock suggests that both may have been zeolitized at the same time, possibly by water moving laterally through more permeable zones in the tuff. The continuation of zeolites in fractures below the lowest zeolitic interval in this hole suggests that vertical fracture flow may have been important in the deposition of these coatings. Core from deeper intervals in another hole will be examined to determine if that relationship continues. 17 refs., 19 figs.

  8. A Summary interpretation of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical data for Yucca Valley, Nevada test site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilmarth, Verl Richard; Healey, D.L.; Clebsch, Alfred, Jr.; Winograd, I.J.; Zietz, Isadore; Oliver, H.W.

    1959-01-01

    This report summarizes an interpretation of the geology of Yucca Valley to depths of about 2,300 feet below the surface, the characteristics features of ground water in Yucca and Frenchman Valleys, and the seismic, gravity, and magnetic data for these valleys. Compilation of data, preparation of illustrations, and writing of the report were completed during the period December 26, 1958 to January 10, 1959. Some of the general conclusions must be considered as tentative until more data are available. This work was done by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of Albuquerque Operations Office, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  9. Digital Aeromagnetic Map of the Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponce, David A.

    2000-01-01

    An aeromagnetic map of the Nevada Test Site area was prepared from publicly available aeromagnetic data described by McCafferty and Grauch (1997). Magnetic surveys were processed using standard techniques. Southwest Nevada is characterized by magnetic anomalies that reflect the distribution of thick sequences of volcanic rocks, magnetic sedimentary rocks, and the occurrence of granitic rocks. In addition, aeromagnetic data reveal the presence of linear features that reflect faulting at both regional and local scales.

  10. Economic potential of alternative land and natural resource uses at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Richard-Haggard, K.

    1983-03-01

    The economic potentials of several alternative land uses at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are estimated. Alternatives considered include mining, agriculture, grazing, and hunting. There are two known tungsten ore bodies located in the Oak Spring mining district. The economic potential of the reserves is estimated to be $42,840. It is also possible that there are other economic mineral resources on the NTS whose values are yet unknown. There are an estimated 5000 ha of agricultural land on the Test Site; the cash value of alfalfa grown on this acreage is approximately $564,030. The economic potential of grazing at the Test Site lies somewhere in the range of $10,340 to $41,220. The assumed annual worth of mule deer to hunters is $90,440. The gross potential of hunting at the NTS is probably somewhat higher if trophy species, game birds and fur-bearing animals are also considered. It should be noted that the above values indicate gross worth; no costs are included in the estimates.

  11. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  12. Neogene structural evolution of Gold Mountain, Slate Ridge and adjacent areas, Esmeralda and Nye counties, SW Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, D.C.; Weiss, S.I.; Worthington, J.E. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines); McKee, E.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The onset of crustal instability in the Gold Mountain-Slate Ridge (GMSR) area took place prior to middle Miocene time, as shown by the irregular topography upon which the 16.8 Ma tuff of Mount Dunfee was deposited. Local wedges of fanglomerate and conglomerate between four overlying ash-flow sheets and complex patterns of thinning and thickening, nondeposition, and erosion show that normal faulting took place more-or-less continuously between 16.8 and 11.5 Ma. More intense listric( ) faulting, tilting, uplift, erosion and deposition of wedges of fanglomerate and conglomerate occurred between emplacement of the 11.5 Ma Timber Mountain Tuff (TMT) and the 7.5 Ma Stonewall Flat Tuff (SFT). The present topography west of long. 117[degree]W developed mostly after 7.5 Ma following deposition of the widespread SFT, which thickens westward with increasing elevation on the east end of Slate Ridge. major uplifted blocks include the GMSR area, Magruder Mountain, and Palmetto Mountain, where erosional remnants of the SFT are found at elevations as high as 8,200 ft. Uplift was accommodated by high-angle faulting with little tilting and by warping. In the GMSR area pre-7.5 Ma tilting was mainly to the south-southeast reflecting movement along N-dipping listric( ) faults, indicating northwest-directed extension. In contrast, southeast of Gold Mountain and in the northeastern part of the Grapevine Mountains post-11.5 Ma tilting resulted from movement on normal faults that dip to the SSE beneath Sarcobatus Flat and toward the WNW-vergent Boundary Canyon-Original Bullfrog detachment fault system further south; this implies SE-directed extensional strain within a general region of NW-directed extension. Slate Ridge also acted as a barrier to the 11.5 Ma TMT. These relations suggest that certain areas within this section of the Walker Lane belt tended to remain high from middle Miocene time until the present, with a major exception being the time of deposition of the SFT.

  13. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  14. Streamflow and selected precipitation data for Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years 1983--85

    SciTech Connect

    Pabst, M.E.; Beck, D.A.; Glancy, P.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Streamflow and precipitation data collected at and near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, during water years 1983--85, are presented in this report. The data were collected and compiled as part of the studies the US Geological Survey is making, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, to characterize surface-water hydrology in the Yucca Mountain area. Streamflow data include daily mean discharges and peak discharges at 4 complete-record gaging stations and peak discharges at 10 crest-stage, partial-record stations and 12 miscellaneous sites. Precipitation data include cumulative totals at 12 stations maintained by the US Geological Survey and daily totals at 17 stations maintained by the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  15. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern zone of fractures is within Quaternary alluvial sediments, but no bedrock was encountered in trenches and soil pits in this part of the prospective surface facilities site; thus, the direct association of this zone with one or more bedrock faults is uncertain. No displacement of lithologic contacts and soil horizons could be detected in the fractured Quaternary deposits. The results of these investigations imply the absence of any appreciable late Quaternary faulting activity at the prospective surface-facilities site.

  16. Hydrogeologic data for existing excavations and the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Special Projects Section of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Waste Management Division. Geologic description, in situ testing, and laboratory analyses of alluvium exposed in existing excavations are important subparts to the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the RWMS for disposal of low level waste mixed waste and transuranic waste. The primary purpose of the Existing Excavation Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important hydrologic properties of the near surface alluvium, thought to play an important role in the infiltration and redistribution of water and solutes through the upper unsaturated zone at the Area 5 RWMS; and second, to provide guidance for the design of future sampling and testing programs. The justification for this work comes from the state of Nevada review of the original DOE/NV Part B Permit application submitted in 1988 for disposal of mixed wastes at the RWMS. The state of Nevada determined that the permit was deficient in characterization data concerning the hydrogeology of the unsaturated zone. DOE/NV agreed with the state and proposed the study of alluvium exposed in existing excavations as one step toward satisfying these important site characterization data requirements. Other components of the site characterization process include the Science Trench Borehole and Pilot Well Projects.

  17. Chronology of diving activities and underground surveys in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave, Nye County, Nevada, 1950-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Ray J.

    1988-01-01

    A Chronology of diving activities and underground surveys in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave, southern Nevada, is presented for the period 1950-86. The report acknowledges the efforts of past underwater explorers, scientists, and observers of the cavern system, and provides a historical perspective for comparison with present investigations at that site. (Thacker-USGS, WRD)

  18. Nye tandplejere, tandklinikassistenter og kliniske tandteknikere I slutningen af juni 2014 tog Skolen for Klinikassistenter, Tandplejere og Kliniske Tandteknikere p

    E-print Network

    , Bødker Pedersen, Mallika Jai-On Petersen, Mia Pflug, Sofie Munk Poulsen, Sarah Leana Rasmussen, Sofie Ryde Maack-Petersen, Amir Homayun Darabzadeh, Gitte Madsen, Juliety Jessica S. Sørensen, Lapan Selvanathan, Hilda Youkhana, Rasmus Boris Otto, Hannah Lindgaard. Foto: Jacob Mark. #12;Højtidelighed i Aulaen

  19. Dual-porosity analysis of conservative tracer testing in saturated volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahy, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    A radially convergent conservative tracer injection test was conducted between boreholes UE-25 #2 and UE-25 c #3 of the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain to determine effective porosity and longitudinal dispersivity. Approximately 47% of the tracer mass was recovered and a dual-porosity analytical model replicates the breakthrough curve. Fractured-rock analyses focus on the fracture-porosity and geometry as the controlling factors in transport.

  20. Electrical studies at the proposed Wahmonie and Calico Hills nuclear waste sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, D.B.; Chornack, M.P.; Nervick, K.H.; Broker, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two sites in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were investigated as potential repositories for high-level nuclear waste. These are designated the Wahmonie and Calico Hills sites. The emplacement medium at both sites was to be an inferred intrusive body at shallow depth; the inference of the presence of the body was based on aeromagnetic and regional gravity data. This report summarizes results of Schlumberger VES, induced polarization dipole-dipole traverses and magnetotelluric soundings made in the vicinity of the sites in order to characterize the geoelectric section. At the Wahmonie site VES work identified a low resistivity unit at depth surrounding the inferred intrusive body. The low resistivity unit is believed to be either the argillite (Mississippian Eleana Formation) or a thick unit of altered volcanic rock (Tertiary). Good electrical contrast is provided between the low resistivity unit and a large volume of intermediate resistivity rock correlative with the aeromagnetic and gravity data. The intermediate resistivity unit (100-200 ohm-m) is believed to be the intrusive body. The resistivity values are very low for a fresh, tight intrusive and suggest significant fracturing, alteration and possible mineralization have occurred within the upper kilometer of rock. Induced polarization data supports the VES work, identifies a major fault on the northwest side of the inferred intrusive and significant potential for disseminated mineralization within the body. The mineralization potential is particularly significant because as late as 1928, a strike of high grade silver-gold ore was made at the site. The shallow electrical data at Calico Hills revealed no large volume high resistivity body that could be associated with a tight intrusive mass in the upper kilometer of section. A drill hole UE 25A-3 sunk to 762 m (2500 ft) at the site revealed only units of the Eleana argillite thermally metamorphosed below 396 m (1300 ft) and in part highly magnetic. Subsequent work has shown that much if not all of the magnetic and gravity anomalies can be attributed to the Eleana Formation. The alteration and doming, however, still argue for an intrusive but at greater depth than originally thought. The electrical, VES, and IP data show a complex picture due to variations in structure and alteration within the Eleana and surrounding volcanic units. These data do not suggest the presence of an intrusive in the upper kilometer of section. The magnetotelluric data however gives clear evidence for a thick, resistive body in the earth's crust below the site. While the interpreted depth is very poorly constrained due to noise and structural problems, the top of the resistive body is on the order of 2.5 km deep. The IP data also identifies area of increased polarizability at Calico Hills, which may also have future economic mineralization.

  1. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  2. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  3. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  4. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  5. Addendum 1 Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vefa Yucel

    2001-11-01

    A disposal authorization statement (DAS) was issued by the U.S. Department of Energy/Headquarters (DOE/HQ) on December 5, 2000, authorizing the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office to continue the operation of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site for the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste. Prior to the issuance of the DAS, the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) had conducted reviews of the performance assessment (PA) and the composite analysis (CA) for the Area 5 RWMS, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order DOE O 435.1. A brief history of the reviews is as follows. (The reviews were conducted by independent review teams chartered by the LFRG; the review findings and recommendations were issued in review team reports to the LFRG.) The LFRG accepted the initial PA, with conditions, on August 30, 1996. Revision 2.1 to the PA was issued in January 1998, implementing the conditions of acceptance of the 1996 PA. The LFRG reviewed Revision 2.1 as part of the Area 5 RWMS CA review during 2000, and found it acceptable. The CA and the Supplemental Information provided in response to issues identified during the initial review of the CA were accepted by the LFRG. The Supplemental Information (including the responses to four key issues) is included in the Review Team Report to the LFRG, which recommends that it be incorporated into the CA and issued to all known holders of the CA. The Area 5 RWMS DAS requires that the Supplemental Information generated during the DOE/HQ review of the CA be incorporated into the CA within one year of the date of issuance of the DAS. This report, the first addendum to the Area 5 CA, is prepared to fulfill that requirement. The Supplemental Information includes the following: Issues Identified in the Review Team Report; Crosswalk Presentation; and Maintaining Doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable. A summary of this information is included in this report, with the complete text presented in the appendices.

  6. Rettevejledning, obl. opg. 2 Opgaven er anderledes fra den frste obligatoriske opgave derved at den er langt

    E-print Network

    Eilers, Søren

    /e96/46/BD&SE #12; 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 ­3 ­2 ­1 0 1 2 3 x Figur 1: Grafen for s 3 #12; 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 ­3 ­2 ­1 0 1 2 3 x Figur 2: Grafen for s 7 #12; 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 ­3 ­2 ­1 0 1 2 3 x Figur 3: Grafen for s 20 #12;

  7. The Frankfurt Patient Safety Climate Questionnaire for General Practices (FraSiK): analysis of psychometric properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Hoffmann; Olga Maria Domanska; Zeycan Albay; Vera Mueller; Corina Guethlin; Eric J Thomas; Ferdinand M Gerlach

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundSafety culture has been identified as having a major impact on how safety is managed in healthcare. However, it has not received much attention in general practices. Hence, no instrument yet exists to assess safety climate—the measurable artefact of safety culture—in this setting. This study aims to evaluate psychometric properties of a newly developed safety climate questionnaire for use in

  8. The Frankfurt Patient Safety Climate Questionnaire for General Practices (FraSiK): analysis of psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Barbara; Domanska, Olga Maria; Albay, Zeycan; Mueller, Vera; Guethlin, Corina; Thomas, Eric J; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND Safety culture has been identified as having a major impact on how safety is managed in healthcare. However, it has not received much attention in general practices. Hence, no instrument yet exists to assess safety climate-the measurable artefact of safety culture-in this setting. This study aims to evaluate psychometric properties of a newly developed safety climate questionnaire for use in German general practices. METHODS The existing Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, Ambulatory Version, was considerably modified and enhanced in order to be applicable in general practice. After pilot tests and its application in a random sample of 400 German practices, a first psychometric analysis led to modifications in several items. A further psychometric analysis was conducted with an additional sample of 60 practices and a response rate of 97.08%. Exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal varimax rotation was carried out and the internal consistency of the identified factors was calculated. RESULTS Nine factors emerged, representing a wide range of dimensions associated with safety culture: teamwork climate, error management, safety of clinical processes, perception of causes of errors, job satisfaction, safety of office structure, receptiveness to healthcare assistants and patients, staff perception of management, and quality and safety of medical care. Internal consistency of factors is moderate to good. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the development of a patient safety climate instrument. The questionnaire displays established features of safety climate and additionally contains features that might be specific to small-scale general practices. PMID:21571753

  9. The ICT SCRM CoMMunITy FRaMewoRk DevelopMenT pRojeCT

    E-print Network

    by the National Science and Technology Council: "The national interest in some emerging areas of standardization of the President's CNCI Program, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been tasked Technology (ICT). To support NIST's work, the Supply Chain Management Center of the Robert H. Smith School

  10. Fra Den evige fred til Empire—et essay om ret, fred og frihed i lyset af globaliseringen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jens Teilberg Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Immanuel Kant lancerede med sin korte tekst Til den evige fred i 1795 udtrykket kosmopolitisk ret. I dag—200 år senere—ser en række politologiske teoretikere den kantianske kosmopolitanisme som den medicin, der skal helbrede verdenen for de dårligdomme, globaliseringen har påført den. I denne artikel argumenteres for, at selvom den kantianske kosmopolitanisme kan skabe øget fred og sikkerhed, så rummer den

  11. June 18, 2008 16:28 International Journal of Control KriBroFra International Journal of Control

    E-print Network

    Broucke, Mireille E.

    of satellites currently visible; during periods of dense cloud cover, in urban areas, and under dense vegetation. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3G4, Canada; (June devices with computing, communications, and sensing capabilities. Such devices are currently commercially

  12. International Conference on Fracture Mechanics of Concrete and Concrete Structures (FraMCoS-V), April 2004, Vail, Colorado

    E-print Network

    Mobasher, Barzin

    : The role of fibers on the tensile stress strain response and the fracture toughness of cement based debonding and pullout of fibers as closing pressure distribution which is expressed as tensile stress crack on glass fiber composites. Keywords: R-Curves, fiber reinforced concrete, closing pressure, stress

  13. Diagnosing Shorted Turns on the Windings of Power Transformers Based Upon Online FRA Using Capacitive and Inductive Couplings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vahid Behjat; Abolfazl Vahedi; Alireza Setayeshmehr; Hossein Borsi; Ernst Gockenbach

    2011-01-01

    Interturn faults are a significant problem in power transformers that can eventually burgeon into catastrophic faults and likely result in an overall network failure. The main problem with SFRA as one of the well-recognized diagnostic tools for detecting winding faults is its restriction to the domain of offline testing since the method requires injection of a test signal into the

  14. IMPLEMENTATION TECHNIQUES FOR MAIN MEMORY DATABASE SYBTEMS Davvld J Dew& Randy H Kat62, Fra$i Olken3,

    E-print Network

    Scheuermann, Peter

    paper we conMder the changed necessary to pemut a relattonal database system to take advantage of krge an advantageous for large memory situation6 Key Word6 end Phrorcr &III Memory Databa666, Acce66 Methods, JamDE-AC66.76SFoOOO6,#W-74ObmC-46, 66d by the .4~ Porn O&6 d 6cidfic Ruurch under Grmt 6~0021 Penmsslon

  15. Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

  16. Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Drici, Warda

    2003-08-01

    This report documents the analysis of the available transport parameter data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

  17. 2006 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory J, Shott, Vefa Yucel

    2007-03-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2006) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted as an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 2000; 2002). The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2006 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2006 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, and closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities, were reviewed in FY 2006 for determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

  18. Breadth-Based Models of Women’s Underrepresentation in STEM Fields: An Integrative Commentary on Schmidt (2011) and Nye et al. (2012)

    PubMed Central

    Valla, Jeffrey M.; Ceci, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Relative strength of math and verbal abilities and interests drive science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) career choices more than absolute math ability alone. Having one dominant aptitude (e.g., for mathematics) increases the likelihood of a strong self-concept in that domain and decreases the likelihood of equivocation about career choices in comparison with individuals with equivalent mathematical aptitude who have comparable strength in non-math areas. Males are more likely than females to have an asymmetrical cognitive profile of higher aptitude in math relative to verbal domains. Together, these two points suggest that the academic and career pursuits of high math ability males may be attributable to their narrower options among STEM fields, whereas females’ more symmetrical cognitive profile means their math and verbal interests compete in the formation of their ability self-concept and, hence, in their broader career choices. Such equivocation about STEM careers is in fact already evident in girls with high math aptitude as early as junior high school. Thus, we argue that asymmetry in interests and aptitudes is an underappreciated factor in sex differences in career choice. To the extent this is true, focusing on strengthening young women’s STEM-related abilities and ability self-concepts to increase female STEM representation may be an unproductive approach; to increase representation, it may be more effective to focus on harvesting the potential of those girls and women whose breadth of interest and high ability spans social/verbal and spatial/numerical domains. The use of interventions that play to this greater breadth by socially contextualizing STEM is one potential solution. PMID:25076979

  19. Geochemistry of altered and mineralized rocks from the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, northern Hot Creek Range, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, J.T.; John, D.A.; Malcolm, M.J.; Briggs, P.H.; Crock, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the St. Johns River Water Management District are investigating the hydrogeology of the Floridan aquifer system. An essential element of this investigation is the design and construction of a monitor well network in the lower saline water-bearing zone which occurs at about 2,000 ft below land surface. During 1985, a well near Ponte Vedra in northeast St. Johns County was completed into the lower saline water-bearing zone at a depth of 1,980 to 2,035 ft below land surface. This well and other wells drilled under this or other programs will be used to monitor water levels and water chemistry of the lower saline zone. Chloride concentrations in water above the lower saline zone ranged from 14 to 270 mg/L and specific conductance ranged from 450 to 1,440 micromhos/cm c. In the lower zone, chloride concentrations were as much as 16,210 mg/L and specific conductance as much as 46,000 micromhos per centimeter. Aquifer head and artesian flow from the well generally increased with depth. Water temperatures also increased from 23 C in the upper part of the aquifer to more than 28 C in the lower saline zone. (USGS)

  20. Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1989-01-01

    Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

  1. Water-level data from wells and test holes through 1991 and potentiometric contours as of 1991 for Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hale, Glenn S.; Trudeau, Douglas A.; Savard, Charles S.

    1995-01-01

    The underground nuclear-testing program of the U.S. Department of Energy takes place at the Nevada Test Site, about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nev. Water levels in Yucca Flat may be affected by underground nuclear testing. The purpose of this map report is to present water-level data collected from wells and test holes through December 1991, and to present potentiometric contours representing 1991 water-table conditions in Yucca Flat. Water-level data from 91 sites are shown on the map and include information from 54 sites shown on a 1983 map. Water levels ranged from 519.5 to 2,162.9-feet below land surface. Potentiometric contours are drawn from water-level data to represent the altitude of the water table. Water-level altitudes ranged from about 2,377 ft to 2,770 ft above sea level in the central part of Yucca Flat and from about 4,060 ft to 2,503 ft above sea level in the western and northern parts of Yucca Flat. The water-level data were contoured considering the hydrologic setting, including the concept that water levels within the Cenozoic hydrologic units in the central part of the study area are elevated with respect to water levels in the adjacent and underlying Paleozoic hydrologic units. The most notable feature in the central part of the area is the presence of four ground-water mounds not shown on the 1983 map.

  2. Stratigraphy, structure, and some petrographic features of Tertiary volcanic rocks at the USW G-2 drill hole, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Maldonado; S. L. Koether

    1983-01-01

    A continuously cored drill hole penetrated 1830.6 m of Tertiary volcanic strata comprised of the following in descending order: Paintbrush Tuff, tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills, Crater Flat Tuff, lava and flow breccia (rhyodacitic), tuff of Lithic Ridge, bedded and ash-flow tuff, lava and flow breccia bedded tuff, conglomerate and ash-flow tuff, and older tuffs of USW G-2. Comparison of

  3. Geochemical and Pb, Sr, and O isotopic study of the Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, L.A.; Marshall, B.D.; Kwak, L.M.; Futa, Kiyoto; Mahan, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Yucca Mountain is currently being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. One aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation o the resource potential at Yucca Mountain. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of past alteration of the welded tuffs that underlie Yucca Mountain provide a means of assessing the probability of hydrothermal ore deposits being present within Yucca Mountain. In this preliminary report, geochemical and isotopic measurements of altered Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff collected from fault zones exposed on the east flank of Yucca Mountain and from one drill core are compared to their unaltered equivalents sampled both in outcrop and drill core. The geochemistry and isotopic compositions of unaltered Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff (high-silica rhyolite portions) are fairly uniform; these data provide a good baseline for comparisons with the altered samples. Geochemical analyses indicate that the brecciated tuffs are characterized by addition of calcium carbonate and opaline silica; this resulted in additions of calcium and strontium,increases in oxygen-18 content, and some redistribution of trace elements. After leaching the samples to remove authigenic carbonate, no differences in strontium or lead isotope compositions between altered and unaltered sections were observed. These data show that although localized alteration of the tuffs has occurred and affected their geochemistry, there is no indication of additions of exotic components. The lack of evidence for exotic strontium and lead in the most severely altered tuff samples at Yucca Mountain strongly implies a similar lack of exotic base or precious metals.

  4. Stratigraphy, regional distribution, and reconnaisance geochemistry of Oligocene and Miocene volcanic rocks in the Paradise Range and northern Pactolus Hills, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, stratigraphy, geochronology, and geochemistry of about 40 units of Oligocene and Miocene silicic ash-flow tuff, intermediate to silicic lava, and minor sedimentary rock exposed in three stratigraphic sections are described. The distribution and sources of five regionally widespread ash-flow tuff units were delineated. The late Cenozoic volcanic and tectonic history of the Paradise Range and northern Pactolus Hills was compared to other areas in the Great Basin.

  5. Breadth-Based Models of Women's Underrepresentation in STEM Fields: An Integrative Commentary on Schmidt (2011) and Nye et al. (2012).

    PubMed

    Valla, Jeffrey M; Ceci, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Relative strength of math and verbal abilities and interests drive science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) career choices more than absolute math ability alone. Having one dominant aptitude (e.g., for mathematics) increases the likelihood of a strong self-concept in that domain and decreases the likelihood of equivocation about career choices in comparison with individuals with equivalent mathematical aptitude who have comparable strength in non-math areas. Males are more likely than females to have an asymmetrical cognitive profile of higher aptitude in math relative to verbal domains. Together, these two points suggest that the academic and career pursuits of high math ability males may be attributable to their narrower options among STEM fields, whereas females' more symmetrical cognitive profile means their math and verbal interests compete in the formation of their ability self-concept and, hence, in their broader career choices. Such equivocation about STEM careers is in fact already evident in girls with high math aptitude as early as junior high school. Thus, we argue that asymmetry in interests and aptitudes is an underappreciated factor in sex differences in career choice. To the extent this is true, focusing on strengthening young women's STEM-related abilities and ability self-concepts to increase female STEM representation may be an unproductive approach; to increase representation, it may be more effective to focus on harvesting the potential of those girls and women whose breadth of interest and high ability spans social/verbal and spatial/numerical domains. The use of interventions that play to this greater breadth by socially contextualizing STEM is one potential solution. PMID:25076979

  6. Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Halford, Keith J.

    2008-01-01

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types?volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

  7. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiner, S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith, J.L.; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of the NTS, the U.S. Department of Energy currently is investigating the potential transport of these radionuclides by ground water flow. To better evaluate any potential risk associated with these test-generated contaminants, a number of studies were undertaken to accurately quantify discharge from areas downgradient in the regional ground-water flow system from the NTS. This report refines the estimate of ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley. Ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley was estimated by quantifying evapotranspiration (ET), estimating subsurface outflow, and compiling ground-water withdrawal data. ET was quantified by identifying areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineating areas of ET defined on the basis of similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and computing ET rates for each of the delineated areas. A classification technique using spectral-reflectance characteristics determined from satellite imagery acquired in 1992 identified eight unique areas of ground-water ET. These areas encompass about 3,426 acres of sparsely to densely vegetated grassland, shrubland, wetland, and open water. Annual ET rates in Oasis Valley were computed with energy-budget methods using micrometeorological data collected at five sites. ET rates range from 0.6 foot per year in a sparse, dry saltgrass environment to 3.1 feet per year in dense meadow vegetation. Mean annual ET from Oasis Valley is estimated to be about 7,800 acre-feet. Mean annual ground-water discharge by ET from Oasis Valley, determined by removing the annual local precipitation component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-ft in 1996 and 6,300 acre-ft in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by ET, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased.

  8. Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2006-05-01

    The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

  9. Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vefa Yucel

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Assessment (PA) maintenance plan requires an annual review to determine if current operations and conditions at the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) remain consistent with PA and composite analysis (CA) assumptions and models. This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 2005 annual review findings for the Area 3 RWMS PA only. The PA Maintenance Plan states that no annual review or summary reporting will be carried out in years that a PA or CA revision is undertaken (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2002). Updated PA results for the Area 5 RWMS were published in an addendum to the Area 5 RWMS PA report in September 2005. A federal review of the draft addendum report took place in early FY 2006 (October November 2005). The review team found the addendum acceptable without conditions. The review team's recommendation will be presented to the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group in early 2006. The addendum was revised in January 2006 and incorporated comments from the review team (BN, 2006). Table 1 summarizes the updated Area 5 RWMS PA results presented in the addendum.

  10. Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data at Amargosa Desert Research Site, an arid site near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, Charles J.; Andraski, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nev., 1998-2000. Data were collected in support of ongoing research studies to improve the understanding of hydrologic and contaminant-transport processes in arid environments. Micrometeorological data include precipitation, air temperature, solar radiation, net radiation, relative humidity, ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, soil temperature, and soil-heat flux. All micrometeorological data were collected using a 10-second sampling interval by data loggers that output daily mean, maximum, and minimum values, and hourly mean values. For precipitation, data output consisted of daily, hourly, and 5-minute totals. Soil-moisture data included periodic measurements of soil-water content at nine neutron-probe access tubes with measurable depths ranging from 5.25 to 29.75 meters. The computer data files included in this report contain the complete micrometeorological and soil-moisture data sets. The computer data consists of seven files with about 14 megabytes of information. The seven files are in tabular format: (1) one file lists daily mean, maximum, and minimum micrometeorological data and daily total precipitation; (2) three files list hourly mean micrometeorological data and hourly precipitation for each year (1998-2000); (3) one file lists 5-minute precipitation data; (4) one file lists mean soil-water content by date and depth at four experimental sites; and (5) one file lists soil-water content by date and depth for each neutron-probe access tube. This report highlights selected data contained in the computer data files using figures, tables, and brief discussions. Instrumentation used for data collection also is described. Water-content profiles are shown to demonstrate variability of water content with depth. Time-series data are plotted to illustrate temporal variations in micrometeorological and soil-water content data. Substantial precipitation at the end of an El Ni?o cycle in early 1998 resulted in measurable water penetration to a depth of 1.25 meters at one of the four experimental soil-monitoring sites.

  11. Selected Micrometeorological, Soil-Moisture, and Evapotranspiration Data at Amargosa Desert Research Site in Nye County near Beatty, Nevada, 2001-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, C. Justin; Garcia, C. Amanda; Andraski, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radio-active waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nevada, 2001-05. Evapotranspiration data were collected from February 2002 through the end of December 2005. Data were col-lected in support of ongoing research to improve the understanding of hydrologic and con-taminant-transport processes in arid environments. Micrometeorological data include solar radiation, net radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, saturated and ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, precipita-tion, near-surface soil temperature, soil-heat flux and soil-water content. All micrometeorological data were collected using a 10-second sampling interval by data loggers that output daily and hourly mean values. Daily maximum and minimum values are based on hourly mean values. Precipitation data output includes daily and hourly totals. Selected soil-moisture profiles at depth include periodic measure-ments of soil volumetric water-content measurements at nine neutron-probe access tubes to depths ranging from 5.25 to 29.25 meters. Evapotranspiration data include measurement of daily evapotranspiration and 15-minute fluxes of the four principal energy budget components of latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, soil-heat flux, and net radiation. Other data collected and used in equations to determine evapotranspiration include temperature and water content of soil, temperature and vapor pressure of air, and covariance values. Evapotranspiration and flux estimates during 15-minute intervals were calculated at a 0.1-second execution interval using the eddy covariance method. Data files included in this report contain the complete micrometeorological, soil-moisture, and evapotranspiration field data sets. These data files are presented in tabular Excel spreadsheet format. This report highlights selected data con-tained in the computer generated data files using figures, tables, and brief discussions. Instrumentation used for data collection also is described. Water-content profiles are shown to demonstrate variability of water content with depth. Time-series data are plotted to illustrate temporal variations in micrometeorological, soil-water content, and evapotranspiration data.

  12. Micrometeorological, evapotranspiration, and soil-moisture data at the Amargosa Desert Research site in Nye County near Beatty, Nevada, 2006-11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, C. Justin; Andraski, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes micrometeorological, evapotranspiration, and soil-moisture data collected since 2006 at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radio-active waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nevada. Micrometeorological data include precipitation, solar radiation, net radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, saturated and ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, near-surface soil temperature, soil-heat flux, and soil-water content. Evapotranspiration (ET) data include latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, net radiation, soil-heat flux, soil temperature, air temperature, vapor pressure, and other principal energy-budget data. Soil-moisture data include periodic measurements of volumetric water-content at experimental sites that represent vegetated native soil, devegetated native soil, and simulated waste disposal trenches - maximum measurement depths range from 5.25 to 29.25 meters. All data are compiled in electronic spreadsheets that are included with this report.

  13. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Southern Funeral Mountains and Adjacent Ground-Water Discharge Sites, Inyo County, California, and Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fridrich, Christopher J.; Thompson, Ren A.; Slate, Janet L.; Berry, M.E.; Machette, Michael N.

    2008-01-01

    This map covers the southern part of the Funeral Mountains, and adjacent parts of four structural basins - Furnace Creek, Amargosa Valley, Opera House, and central Death Valley. It extends over three full 7.5-minute quadrangles, and parts of eleven others - a total area of about 950 square kilometers. The boundaries of this map were drawn to include all of the known proximal hydrogeologic features that may affect the flow of ground water that discharges from the springs of the Furnace Creek wash area, in the west-central part of the map. These springs provide the major potable water supply for Death Valley National Park.

  14. Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Fenelon

    2005-10-05

    Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

  15. Approaches to Quantify Potential Contaminant Transport in the Lower Carbonate Aquifer from Underground Nuclear Testing at Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada - 12434

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Robert W.; Birdie, Tiraz [Navarro-INTERA LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilborn, Bill; Mukhopadhyay, Bimal [National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative modeling of the potential for contaminant transport from sources associated with underground nuclear testing at Yucca Flat is an important part of the strategy to develop closure plans for the residual contamination. At Yucca Flat, the most significant groundwater resource that could potentially be impacted is the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA), a regionally extensive aquifer that supplies a significant portion of the water demand at the Nevada National Security Site, formerly the Nevada Test Site. Developing and testing reasonable models of groundwater flow in this aquifer is an important precursor to performing subsequent contaminant transport modeling used to forecast contaminant boundaries at Yucca Flat that are used to identify potential use restriction and regulatory boundaries. A model of groundwater flow in the LCA at Yucca Flat has been developed. Uncertainty in this model, as well as other transport and source uncertainties, is being evaluated as part of the Underground Testing Area closure process. Several alternative flow models of the LCA in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU have been developed. These flow models are used in conjunction with contaminant transport models and source term models and models of contaminant transport from underground nuclear tests conducted in the overlying unsaturated and saturated alluvial and volcanic tuff rocks to evaluate possible contaminant migration in the LCA for the next 1,000 years. Assuming the flow and transport models are found adequate by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, the models will undergo a peer review. If the model is approved by NNSA/NSO and NDEP, it will be used to identify use restriction and regulatory boundaries at the start of the Corrective Action Decision Document Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. These initial boundaries may be revised at the time of the Closure Report phase of the Corrective Action Strategy. (authors)

  16. Analysis of ground-water levels and associated trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

  17. Site characterization in connection with the low level defense waste management site in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Case; J. Davis; S. Raker

    1984-01-01

    The Site Characterization Report for the Defense Low Level Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site deals with the FY80-FY84 DRI activities. The areas that have been studied include geology, hydrology, unsaturated flow, soil and soil water chemistry, flood hazard, and economics-demographics. During this time the site characterization effort focussed on the following items as

  18. Hydrogeologic data from selected wells and test holes in and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, through 1986

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. E. Arteaga; C. S. Savard; M. E. Johnson; C. J. Stone

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data collected from selected wells and test holes in the Nevada Test Site area show that the measured depth to water in the area ranged from 92 to 2,467 feet below land surface. The measured altitude of the ground-water surface ranged from 2,289 to 5,913 feet above sea level. Ground water in the Nevada Test Site area is present

  19. Ground-water data for 1990--91 and ground-water withdrawals for 1951--91, Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.B.; Reiner, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents selected ground-water data collected from wells and test holes at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site. Depth-to-water measurements were made at 74 sites at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site during water years 1990--91. Measured depths to water ranged from 301 to 2,215 feet below land surface and measured altitudes of the ground-water surface at the Nevada Test Site ranged from 2,091 to 6,083 feet above sea level. Depth-to-water measurements were obtained by a combination of wire-line, electric-tape, iron-horse, and steel-tape methods. Available historic withdrawal and depth-to-water data for ground-water supply wells have been included to show changes through time. Water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium concentrations at 15 sites during water years 1990--91. Tritium concentrations in bailed water samples ranged from below detection limits to 5,550,000 picocuries per liter. Tritium concentrations in samples from three wells exceeded drinking water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. All three wells are separate piezometers contained within a single test hole near an area of extensive underground nuclear testing.

  20. Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985--1986

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites in Yucca Flat, about 56 kilometers north of Mercury, Nevada. Three sites (one in each of two craters and one at an undisturbed site at the original land surface) were instrumented to collect meteorological data for calculating bare-soil evaporation. These data include (1) long-wave radiation, (2) short-wave radiation, (3) net radiation, (4) air temperature, and (5) soil surface temperature. Meteorological data also were collected at a weather station at an undisturbed site near the study craters. Data collected at this site include (1) air temperature, (2) relative humidity, (3) wind velocity, and (4) wind direction.

  1. Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Mankinen, Edward A.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

  2. 2007 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an annual review of conditions affecting the operation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). The Area 5 RWMS PA documentation consists of the original PA (Shott et al., 1998), referred to as the 1998 Area 5 RWMS PA and supporting addenda (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2001b; 2006a). The Area 5 RWMS CA was issued as a single document (BN, 2001a) and has a single addendum (BN, 2001c). The Area 3 PA and CA were issued in a single document (Shott et al., 2000). The Maintenance Plan for the PAs and CAs (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2006) and the Disposal Authorization Statements (DASs) for the Area 3 and 5 RWMSs (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2000; 2002) require preparation of an annual summary and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the PAs and CAs. The annual summary report is submitted to DOE Headquarters. Following the annual report format in the DOE PA/CA Maintenance Guide (DOE, 1999), this report presents the annual summary for the PAs in Section 2.0 and the CAs in Section 3.0. The annual summary for the PAs includes the following: Section 2.1 summarizes changes in waste disposal operations; Section 2.1.5 provides an evaluation of the new estimates of the closure inventories derived from the actual disposals through fiscal year (FY) 2007; Section 2.2 summarizes the results of the monitoring conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's (NNSA/NSO's) Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (BN, 2005), and the research and development (R&D) activities; Section 2.4 is a summary of changes in facility design, operation, or expected future conditions; monitoring and R&D activities; and the maintenance program; and Section 2.5 discusses the recommended changes in disposal facility design and operations, monitoring and R&D activities, and the maintenance program. Similarly, the annual summary for the CAs (presented in Section 3.0) includes the following: Section 3.1 presents the assessment of the adequacy of the CAs, with a summary of the relevant factors reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.2 presents an assessment of the relevant site activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that would impact the sources of residual radioactive material considered in the CAs; Section 3.3 summarizes the monitoring and R&D results that were reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.4 presents a summary of changes in relevant site programs (including monitoring, R&D, and the maintenance program) that occurred since the CAs were prepared; and Section 3.5 summarizes the recommended changes to these programs.

  3. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Reiner; R. J. Laczniak; G. A. DeMeo; J. LaRue Smith; P. E. Elliott; W. E. Nylund; C. J. Fridrich

    2002-01-01

    Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of

  4. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Shott; Vefa Yucel; Lloyd Desotell

    2008-01-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada

  5. Lithologic and geophysical logs of drill holes Felderhoff Federal 5-1 and 25-1, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, W.J.; Grow, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Keller, S.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Two wildcat oil and gas exploration holes drilled in 1991 on the northern edge of the Amargosa Desert penetrated Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary rocks, alluvium, and basalt, possible Tertiary volcanic or volcaniclastic rocks, and Tertiary (?) and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The easternmost of the two holes, Felderhoff-Federal 5-1, encountered about 200 feet of alluvium, underlain by 305 feet of basalt breccia and basalt, about 345 feet of probable Tertiary tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, and 616 feet of dense limestone and dolomite of uncertain age. Drill hole 25-1 penetrated 240 feet of alluvium and marl (?), and 250 feet of basalt breccia (?) and basalt, 270 feet of tuff (?) and/or tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, 360 feet of slide blocks (?) and large boulders of Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and 2,800 feet of Paleozoic limestone and dolomite. The two drill holes are located within a northerly trending fault zone defined largely by geophysical data; this fault zone lies along the east side of a major rift containing many small basalt eruptive centers and, farther north, several caldera complexes. Drill hole 25-1 penetrated an inverted paleozoic rock sequence; drill hole 5-1 encountered two large cavities 24-inches wide or more in dense carbonate rock of uncertain, but probable Paleozoic age. These openings may be tectonic and controlled by a regional system of northeast-striking faults.

  6. Summary of geologic studies through January 1, 1983, of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Thorpe; J. Springer

    1984-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located at the southwest corner of the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, is being investigated as a potential site for the storage of high-level radioactive waste. Sequences of ash-flow tuff like those at Yucca Mountain potentially could provide multiple geologic barriers against the release of nuclear waste, assuming that the geologic and hydrogeologic setting of the site

  7. Photogeologic study of small-scale linear features near a potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nye County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Throckmorton

    1987-01-01

    Linear features were mapped from 1:2400-scale aerial photographs of the northern half of the potential underground nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain by means of a Kern PG 2 stereoplotter. These features were thought to be the expression of fractures at the ground surface (fracture traces), and were mapped in the caprock, upper lithophysal, undifferentiated lower lithophysal and hackly units

  8. Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

    2008-05-01

    This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a performance assessment (PA), composite analysis (CA), closure plan, monitoring plan, waste acceptance criteria, and a PA/CA maintenance plan. The DOE issued a DAS for the Area 5 RWMS in 2000. The Area 5 RWMS DAS was, in part, based on review of a CA as required under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.(3). A CA is a radiological assessment required for DOE waste disposed before 26 September 1988 and includes the radiological dose from all sources of radioactive material interacting with all radioactive waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The approved Area 5 RWMS CA, which includes the inventory of TRU waste in T04C, indicates that the Area 5 RWMS waste inventory and all interacting sources of radioactive material can meet the 0.3 mSv dose constraint. The composite analysis maximum annual dose for a future resident at the Area 5 RWMS was estimated to be 0.01 mSv at 1,000 years. Therefore, the inadvertent disposal of TRU in T04C is protective of the public and the environment, and compliant with all the applicable requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated 40 CFR 191 to establish standards for the planned disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high level, and transuranic wastes in geologic repositories. Although not required, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office requested a supplemental analysis to evaluate the likelihood that the inadvertent disposal of TRU waste in T04C meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The SA evaluates the likelihood of meeting the 40 CFR 191 containment requirements (CRs), assurance requirements, individual protection requirements (IPRs), and groundwater protection standards. The results of the SA indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of meeting all the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The conclusion of the SA is that the Area 5 RWMS with the TRU waste buried in T04C is in compliance with all requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. Compliance with the DAS is demonstrated by the results of the Area 5 RWMS CA. Supplemental analyses in the SA indicate there is a

  9. ?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sam Marutzky

    2010-09-01

    Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

  10. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeltzer, J. S.; Millier, J. J.; Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  11. Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carman, Rita L.

    1994-01-01

    Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites in Yucca Flat, about 56 kilometers north of Mercury, Nevada. Three sites (one in each of two craters and one at an undisturbed site at the original land surface) were instrumented to collect meteorological data for calculating bare-soil evaporation. These data include (1) long-wave radiation, (2) short-wave radiation, (3) net radiation, (4) air temperae, and (5) soil surface temperature. Meteorological data also were collected at a weather station at an undisturbed site near the study craters. Data collected at this site include (1) air temperature, (2) relative humidity, (3) wind velocity, and (4) wind direction.

  12. Evaluation of faults and their effect on ground-water flow southwest of Frenchman Flat, Nye and Clark counties, Nevada: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Wickham, Thomas A.; Wheeler, Karen L.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-water flow through the region south and west of Frenchman Flat, in the Ash Meadows subbasin of the Death Valley ground-water flow system, is controlled mostly by faults which arrange the distribution of permeable and impermeable rocks. In addition, most permeability is along fractures caused by faulting in carbonate rocks. Large faults are more likely to reach the potentiometric surface as deep as 325 meters below the ground surface and are more likely to effect the flow path than small faults. This study concentrated on identifying large faults, especially where they cut carbonate rocks. Small faults, however, may develop as much permeability as large faults if they are penetrative and are part of an anastomosing fault_zone. The overall pattern of faults and joints at the ground surface in the Spotted and Specter Ranges is an indication of the fracture system at the depth of the water table. Most of the faults in these ranges are west-southwest-striking, high-angle faults, 100 to 3,500 meters long, with 10 to 300 meters of displacement. Many of them, such as those in the Spotted Range and Rock Valley are left-lateral strike-slip faults that are conjugate to the NW-striking right-lateral faults of the Las Vegas Valley shear zone. These faults control the ground-water flow path, which runs west-southwest beneath the Spotted Range, Mercury Valley and the Specter Range. The Specter Range thrust is a significant geologic structure with respect to ground- water flow. This regional thrust fault emplaces siliceous clastic strata into the north central and western parts of the Specter Range. These rocks act as a barrier that confines ground- water flow to the southern part of the range, directing it southwestward toward springs at Ash Meadows. These siliceous clastic aquitard rocks and overlying Cenozoic deposits probably also block westward flow of ground-water in Rock Valley, diverting it southward to the flow path beneath the southern part of the Specter Range.

  13. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment of boreholes UE-25c No. 1, UE-25c No. 2, and UE-25c No. 3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Geldon, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to characterize-the hydrogeology of saturated tuffaceous rocks penetrated by boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3. These boreholes are referred to collectively in this report as the C-holes. The C-holes were drilled to perform multiwell aquifer tests and tracer tests; they comprise the only complex of closely spaced boreholes completed in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Results of lithologic and geophysical logging, fracture analyses, water-level monitoring, temperature and tracejector surveys aquifer tests, and hydrochemical sampling completed at the C-hole complex as of 1986 are assessed with respect to the regional geologic and hydrologic setting. A conceptual hydrogeological model of the Yucca Mountain area is presented to provide a context for quantitatively evaluating hydrologic tests performed at the C-hole complex as of 1985, for planning and interpreting additional hydrologic tests at the C-hole complex, and for possibly re-evaluating hydrologic tests in boreholes other than the C-holes.

  14. Physical properties and radiometric age estimates of surficial and fracture-fill deposits along a portion of the Carpetbag fault system, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shroba, R.R.; Muhs, D.R.; Rosholt, J.N.

    1988-07-01

    Surficial deposits and fracture-fill deposits (fracture fillings that consist chiefly of calcium carbonate-cemented, pebbly sand) were studied along a 2.5-km-long portion of the Carpetbag fault system in an area characterized by prominent, explosion-produced scarps and a shallow graben that formed during and subsequent to the 1970 Carpetbag nuclear event in the northwestern part of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. The surficial deposits are fluvial and slopewash deposits and mixed eolian sediment that range in grain size from pebble gravel to silty sand. These deposits have been modified by the accumulation of varying amounts of pedogenic silt, clay, calcium carbonate, and probably opaline silica. Despite the occurrence of ancient fractures and linear features on aerial photographs, that are near and parallel to subsurface faults of the Carpetbag system, no other evidence for prehistoric surface faulting was observed in the study area. The lack of prehistoric fault scarps and the lack of offset of stratigraphic contacts exposed in trench excavations suggest that no significant vertical surface displacement has occurred on the Carpetbag system during the past 125,000 years and possible during the past 350,000 years. 39 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Geologic and geophysical maps of the Las Vegas 30' x 60' quadrangle, Clark and Nye counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, William R.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Harris, Anita G.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Paces, James B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Rowley, Peter D.; Burchfiel, B.C.; Bell, John W.; Smith, Eugene I.

    2005-01-01

    Las Vegas and Pahrump are two of the fastest growing cities in the US, and the shortage of water looms as among the greatest future problems for these cities. These new maps of the Las Vegas 30 x 60-minute quadrangle provide a geologic and geophysical framework and fundamental earth science database needed to address societal issues such as ground water supply and contamination, surface flood, landslide, and seismic hazards, and soil properties and their changing impact by and on urbanization. The mountain ranges surrounding Las Vegas and Pahrump consist of Mesozoic, Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks. A majority of these rocks are Paleozoic carbonate rocks that are part of Nevada's carbonate rock aquifer province. The Spring Mountains represent a major recharge site in the province, where maximum altitude is 3,632 m (Charleston Peak) above sea level. Rocks in the Sheep and Las Vegas Ranges and Spring Mountains contain correlative, northeast-striking, southeast-verging thrust faults that are part of the Cretaceous, Sevier orogenic belt. These thrusts were offset during the Miocene by the Las Vegas Valley shear system (LVVSZ). We conducted new mapping in the Blue Diamond area, highlighting refined work on the Bird Spring thrust, newly studied ancient landslides, and gravity-slide blocks. We conducted new mapping in the Las Vegas Range and mapped previously unrecognized structures such as the Valley thrust and fold belt; recognition of these structures has led to a refined correlation of Mesozoic thrust faults across the LVVSZ. New contributions in the quadrangle also include a greatly refined stratigraphy of Paleozoic bedrock units based on conodont biostragraphy. We collected over 200 conodont samples in the quadrangle and established stratigraphic reference sections used to correlate units across the major Mesozoic thrust faults. Quaternary deposits cover about half of the map area and underlie most of the present urbanized area. Deposits consist of large coalescing alluvial fans that grade downslope to extensive areas of fine-grained sediment indicative of groundwater-discharge during the Pleistocene. In the central areas of Las Vegas and Pahrump valleys, Quaternary fault scarps associated with past ground-water discharge deposits suggest a genetic relationship. In collaboration with NBMG and University of Nevada, a variety of ages of gravelly alluvium are newly mapped using surficial characteristics and soil development, along with reassessment of previously published mapping during compilation. Reconnaissance geochronology (thermoluminescence and U-series) of eolian and authigenic components of surficial and buried soils and spring deposits is applied to test hypotheses of geomorphic and hydrologic response to climate change over the past 100 k.y.). The major structure in the Las Vegas quadrangle is the LVVSZ. Because the LVVSZ is concealed by thick basin-fill deposits of Quaternary and Tertiary age, it was characterized primarily based on geophysics. Likewise, the newly described State line fault system in Pahrump Valley has also been characterized by geophysics, where geophysically inferred structures correlate remarkably with surface structures defined by our new geologic mapping in the Mound Spring and Hidden Hills Ranch 7.5-minute quadrangles.

  16. Database of Ground-Water Levels in the Vicinity of Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada 1957-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Fenelon

    2006-08-15

    More than 1,200 water-level measurements from 1957 to 2005 in the Rainier Mesa area of the Nevada Test Site were quality assured and analyzed. Water levels were measured from 50 discrete intervals within 18 boreholes and from 4 tunnel sites. An interpretive database was constructed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in the Rainier Mesa area. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes hydrograph narratives that describe the water-level history of each well.

  17. Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-07-01

    This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation F Appendix F to Part 236 Transportation...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation (a) This appendix provides minimum...of PTC system safety verification and validation pursuant to subpart H or I of...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation F Appendix F to Part 236 Transportation...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation (a) This appendix provides minimum...of PTC system safety verification and validation pursuant to subpart H or I of...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation F Appendix F to Part 236 Transportation...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation (a) This appendix provides minimum...of PTC system safety verification and validation pursuant to subpart H or I of...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation F Appendix F to Part 236 Transportation...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation (a) This appendix provides minimum...of PTC system safety verification and validation pursuant to subpart H or I of...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation F Appendix F to Part 236 Transportation...of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation (a) This appendix provides minimum...of PTC system safety verification and validation pursuant to subpart H or I of...

  3. Yersinia pestis pFra Shows Biovar-Specific Differences and Recent Common Ancestry with a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Plasmid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MICHAEL B. PRENTICE; KEITH D. JAMES; JULIAN PARKHILL; STEPHEN G. BAKER; KIM STEVENS; MARK N. SIMMONDS; KAREN L. MUNGALL; CAROL CHURCHER; PETRA C. F. OYSTON; RICHARD W. TITBALL; BRENDAN W. WREN; JOHN WAIN; DEREK PICKARD; TRAN TINH HIEN; JEREMY J. FARRAR; GORDON DOUGAN

    2001-01-01

    Population genetic studies suggest that Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague, is a clonal pathogen that has recently emerged from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Plasmid acquisition is likely to have been a key element in this evolutionary leap from an enteric to a flea-transmitted systemic pathogen. However, the origin of Y. pestis-specific plasmids remains obscure. We demonstrate specific plasmid rearrangements in different

  4. Petrogenesis of the western highlands of the moon - Evidence from a diverse group of whitlockite-rich rocks from the Fra Mauro formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    A group of KREEPy basalts has been discovered in Apollo 14 soils. These samples exhibit similarities to both HA and VHK basalts, albeit with much higher REE abundances, and contain up to 2 vol pct whitlockite and can be explained by assimilation of a K-, REE- and P-rich fluids by an original HA or VHK basalt. This KREEP component could have been produced late in the evolution of the lunar magma ocean and is similar in composition to QMD at Apollo 14. Two rocks have trace element compositions that are representative of actual KREEP. One of the samples appears to be petrographically pristine and could represent an actual KREEP basalt rock. Five subophitic high-Al basalts represent sampling of either a slowly cooled impact melt sheet or, more likely, the same basalt flow. Two 'quasi-pristine' highland rocks confirm the postulate of a connection between KREEP and the alkali suite. A newly discovered alkali anorthosite is a plagioclase cumulate with about 15 percent trapped KREEPy liquid.

  5. Petrogenesis of the western highlands of the moon - Evidence from a diverse group of whitlockite-rich rocks from the Fra Mauro formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1992-01-01

    A group of KREEPy basalts has been discovered in Apollo 14 soils. These samples exhibit similarities to both HA and VHK basalts, albeit with much higher REE abundances, and contain up to 2 vol pct whitlockite and can be explained by assimilation of a K-, REE- and P-rich fluids by an original HA or VHK basalt. This KREEP component could have been produced late in the evolution of the lunar magma ocean and is similar in composition to QMD at Apollo 14. Two rocks have trace element compositions that are representative of actual KREEP. One of the samples appears to be petrographically pristine and could represent an actual KREEP basalt rock. Five subophitic high-Al basalts represent sampling of either a slowly cooled impact melt sheet or, more likely, the same basalt flow. Two 'quasi-pristine' highland rocks confirm the postulate of a connection between KREEP and the alkali suite. A newly discovered alkali anorthosite is a plagioclase cumulate with about 15 percent trapped KREEPy liquid.

  6. Ideo Population: how much do numbers count?____~ _il_l_a_ss_i,_n(_)!~ivi Bacc,: Fra~Jle number th~()reJJ'--___________ :10

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Joel E.

    ~()reJJ'--___________ :10 ___How m~ny people cOl':!. the planet ho_l.':~ 4.0Joel E. Cohen~~ Carlo St.agnaro The ultimate___ 1:18 Bra./una Chellaney Asia's Great Game 14-5 #12;Joel E, Cohen How many peQRle the planet liolat people will oulnum!)cr young people. Joel E. Cohen is Abby Rockefeller Mauze Until approximately 2007

  7. Tur-retur. Rumsonden Hayabusa er netop landet efter en syvrig mission til den kartoffelformede asteroide Itokawa. Forhbentlig vil prverne fra overfladen give ny

    E-print Network

    Andersen, Anja C.

    Hayabusa. Itokawas bane omkring Solen krydser to gange Jordens bane og to gange Mars' i løbet af de 556 6. september 2005 og blev parkeret i en bane 20 kilometer over asteroidens overflade. Denne bane længe nok til, at dens bane kan bestemmes så godt, at det vil være muligt at finde præcis den samme

  8. Brandon J. Van Dyk, Marcus S. Dersch, Ryan G. Kernes, and J. Riley Edwards FRA Tie and Fastener BAA Industry Partners Meeting

    E-print Network

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    it is affected by speed · Use quantitative understanding of loading conditions to improve design of concrete crossties and fastening systems (mechanistic design) #12;Slide 4Concrete Crossties and Fastening Systems conditions ­ Concrete ties and premium ballast ­ Well-compacted subgrade (possibly hot mix asphalt

  9. Simon FraSer UniverSity, vancoUver, canada GRCNEWSthe newSletter oF the GerontoloGy reSearch centre

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    volUme 30 no.1 2011 Tips: Technolology for injury prevenTion in seniors Why global Warming should: exploring the interface Between Population aging and Global Warming ­ May 25-26, 2011. Please see ourEl pRoGRam of CollaboRativE RESEaRCh by Fabio Feldman, (co-leader, TIPS Co-Investigator, Fraser Health

  10. Vr beskrivelse av bevegelser og deformasjon av Jordens ytterste skall har i lpet av et rhundre utviklet seg fra kontinentaldrift (~1915), til havbunnspredning

    E-print Network

    Steinberger, Bernhard

    Vår beskrivelse av bevegelser og deformasjon av Jordens ytterste skall har i løpet av et århundre). Platetektonikk har hatt suksess, både teoretisk og praktisk, og den har dannet et vitenskapelig rammeverk for en millioner år siden. Senere har geologene kartlagt noen av disse glasiale avsetningene nær ekvator, og han

  11. COMPITO PER CASA per il 10 DICEMBRE 2013 Domanda 1. Qual la differenza principale fra le due proposizioni (a) e (b)?

    E-print Network

    Bellin, Gianluigi

    . Bertrand Russell traduce le descrizioni definite in una forma suscettibile di formalizzazione nel" Come tradurrebbe Bertrand Russell l'espressione m)? Domanda 10. Tuttavia l'uomo che si trova a quella linguaggio del calcolo dei predicati del I ordine. Come traduce Russell la seguente espressione, proferita

  12. R I S N Y T N O 2 2 0 0 6 S I D E 1 4

    E-print Network

    fra Poul Johansen Maskiner A/S skulle bestille en efteruddannelsesdag på Risø. Men fra virksomhedens teknologichef tog imod de mange oplysninger med åbent sind. Medarbejderne fra Poul Johansen Maskiner A/S lytter

  13. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 221 - Approved Rear End Marking Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...for or by manufacturers 1. Manufacturer: Star Headlight & Lantern Co., 168 West Main Street...14472. FRA identification Nos. FRA-PLE-STAR-845-F (flasher) and FRA-PLE-STAR-845-C (steady burn). 2....

  14. You and Gravity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Rounds

    2010-04-30

    In this assignment you will learn all about gravity, and how it affects you. Today we are going to talk about Gravity. Let's see what Bill Nye the Science Guy says about gravity. Bill Nye and Gravity Bill Nye showed us what gravity is. but now we need to define it. What is gravity? Why do we need it? What would happen if there was no gravity? Go through each ...

  15. 2013 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, Gregory [NSTec] [NSTec

    2014-03-01

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2013. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2013 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2013 include the following: • Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2013 • Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis • Development of version 4.115 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2013 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. The conclusion of the annual review is that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates that no significant changes have occurred. The FY 2013 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.115 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2013. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter the CAs results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Yucca Flat Underground Test Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97) source term, is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2015. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (CAU 98) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 Closure Report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the PA, CA, and inventory models for the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS.

  16. 2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

    2013-03-18

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

  17. Inversion of gravity data to define the pre-Tertiary surface and regional structures possibly influencing ground-water flow in the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Region, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, T.G.; Langenheim, V.E.; Mankinen, E.A.; McKee, E.H.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley region reveals a topographically complex pre-Tertiary basement surface. Beneath Pahute Mesa, the thickness of the Tertiary volcanic deposits may exceed 5 km within the Silent Canyon caldera complex. South of Pahute Mesa in Oasis Valley, basement is shallower (< 1 km) but between this valley and the Timber Mountain caldera complex is a basin that probably represents, in part, a moat related to the Timber Mountain caldera complex. Of particular interest is a NE-trending lineament, named here the Thirsty Canyon lineament (TCL), separating terranes at significantly different elevations. Southeast of the TCL, a highly undulating basement surface descends deeply into several calderas, whereas NW of the TCL basement is relatively flat and shallow. Because as many as four calderas seem to abruptly terminate at the TCL, the TCL may reflect a major buried fault zone, which influenced caldera growth. This inferred Thirsty Canyon fault zone and several EW basement ridges in the derived 3-dimensional basin thickness model may influence the flow of ground water from the Pahute Mesa region to Oasis Valley.

  18. Alternative Evaluation Study: Methods to Mitigate/Accommodate Subsidence for the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada, with Special Focus on Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.

    1997-09-01

    An Alternative Evaluation Study is a type of systematic approach to problem identification and solution. An Alternative Evaluation Study was convened August 12-15, 1997, for the purpose of making recommendations concerning closure of Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl and other disposal cells and mitigation/accommodation of waste subsidence at the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. This report includes results of the Alternative Evaluation Study and specific recommendations.

  19. Statistical test of reproducibility and operator variance in thin-section modal analysis of textures and phenocrysts in the Topopah Spring member, drill hole USW VH-2, Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.M.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Broxton, D.E.

    1989-06-01

    A thin-section operator-variance test was given to the 2 junior authors, petrographers, by the senior author, a statistician, using 16 thin sections cut from core plugs drilled by the US Geological Survey from drill hole USW VH-2 standard (HCQ) drill core. The thin sections are samples of Topopah Spring devitrified rhyolite tuff from four textural zones, in ascending order: (1) lower nonlithophysal, (2) lower lithopysal, (3) middle nonlithophysal, and (4) upper lithophysal. Drill hole USW-VH-2 is near the center of the Crater Flat, about 6 miles WSW of the Yucca Mountain in Exploration Block. The original thin-section labels were opaqued out with removable enamel and renumbered with alpha-numeric labels. The sliders were then given to the petrographer operators for quantitative thin-section modal (point-count) analysis of cryptocrystalline, spherulitic, granophyric, and void textures, as well as phenocryst minerals. Between operator variance was tested by giving the two petrographers the same slide, and within-operator variance was tested by the same operator the same slide to count in a second test set, administered at least three months after the first set. Both operators were unaware that they were receiving the same slide to recount. 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. 2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-03-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  1. 2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-03-30

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  2. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-01-31

    The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of compliance with all performance objectives. Tier II results indicate that the long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is protective of human health and the environment. The Area 5 RWMS is located in one of the least populated and most arid regions of the U.S. Site characterization data indicate that infiltration of precipitation below the plant root zone at 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) ceased 10,000 to 15,000 y ago. The site is not expected to have a groundwater pathway as long as the current arid climate persists. The national security mission of the NNSS and the location of the Area 5 RWMS within the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit require that access controls and land use restrictions be maintained indefinitely. PA modeling results for 10,000 to 60,000 y also indicate that the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is acceptable for near-surface disposal. The mean resident air pathway annual total effective dose (TED), the resident all-pathways annual TED, and the acute drilling TED are less than their performance objectives for 10,000 y after closure. The mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density exceeds the performance objective at 4,200 y, but this is due to waste already disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and is only slightly affected by disposal of the CEUSP 233U. The peak resident all-pathways annual TED from CEUSP key radionuclides occurs at 48,000 y and is less than the 0.25 millisievert performance objective. Disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in a typical SLB trench slightly increases PA results. Increasing the depth was found to eliminate any impacts of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream. Containers could not be shown to have any significant impact on performance due to the long half-life of the waste stream and a lack of data for pitting corrosion rates of stainless steel in soil. The results of the SA indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in the SLB units at the Area 5 RWMS. The long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream disposed in the near surface is protective of human health

  3. 2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-03-20

    The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

  4. Preliminary hydrogeologic assessment of boreholes UE-25c No. 1, UE-25c No. 2, and UE-25c No. 3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada; Water-resources investigations report 92-4016

    SciTech Connect

    Geldon, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to characterize the hydrogeology of saturated tuffaceous rocks penetrated by boreholes UE-25c No. 1, UE-25c No.2, and UE-25c No. 3. These boreholes are referred to collectively in this report as the C-holes. The C-holes were drilled to perform multiwell aquifer tests and tracer tests; they comprise the only complex of closely spaced boreholes completed in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain. Results of lithologic and geophysical logging, fracture analyses, water-level monitoring, temperature and tracejector surveys, aquifer tests, and hydrochemical sampling completed at the C-hole complex as of 1986 are assessed with respect to the regional geologic and hydrologic setting. A conceptual hydrogeological model of the Yucca Mountain area is presented to provide a context for quantitatively evaluating hydrologic tests performed at the C-hole complex as of 1985, for planning and interpreting additional hydrologic tests at the C-hole complex, and for possibly re-evaluating hydrologic tests in boreholes other than the C-holes.

  5. Results and interpretation of preliminary aquifer tests in boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Geldon, A.L.

    1996-07-01

    Pumping and injection tests conducted in 1983 and 1984 in boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3 (the c-holes) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were analyzed with respect to information obtained from lithologic and borehole geophysical logs, core permeameter tests, and borehole flow surveys. The three closely spaced c-holes, each of which is about 3,000 feet deep, are completed mainly in nonwelded to densely welded, ash-flow tuff of the tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills and the Crater Flat Tuff of Miocene age. Below the water table, tectonic and cooling fractures pervade the tuffaceous rocks but are distributed mainly in 11 transmissive intervals, many of which also have matrix permeability. Information contained in this report is presented as part of ongoing investigations by the US Geological Survey (USGS) regarding the hydrologic and geologic suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in an underground mined geologic repository. This investigation was conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-78ET44802, as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  6. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat\\/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John McCord

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA\\/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of

  7. Lithology, fault displacement, and origin of secondary calcium carbonate and opaline silica at Trenches 14 and 14D on the Bow Ridge Fault at Exile Hill, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.M.; Huckins, H.E.

    1995-02-01

    Yucca Mountain, a proposed site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository, is located in southern Nevada, 20 km east of Beatty, and adjacent to the southwest comer of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (fig. 1). Yucca Mountain is located within the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The climate is semiarid, and the flora is transitional between that of the Mojave Desert to the south and the Great Basin Desert to the north. As part of the evaluation, hydrologic conditions, especially water levels, of Yucca Mountain and vicinity during the Quaternary, and especially the past 20,000 years, are being characterized. In 1982, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (under interagency agreement DE-A104-78ET44802), excavated twenty-six bulldozer and backhoe trenches in the Yucca Mountain region to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting (Swadley and others, 1984). The trenches were oriented perpendicular to traces of suspected Quaternary faults and across projections of known bedrock faults into Quaternary deposits. Trench 14 exposes the Bow Ridge Fault on the west side of Exile Hill. Although the original purpose of the excavation of trench 14 was to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting on the Bow Ridge Fault, concern arose as to whether or not the nearly vertical calcium carbonate (the term ``carbonate`` in this study refers to calcium carbonate) and opaline silica veins in the fault zone were deposited by ascending waters (ground water). These veins resemble in gross morphology veins commonly formed by hydrothermal processes.

  8. 75 FR 44044 - Environmental Impact Statements: National Summary of Rescinded Notices of Intent

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ...Intersection of Route 213 and Nye School Road in Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange...26/1995 5/7/2010 and Nye School Road in WI to the interchange of Rockton Road and I-90 in IL--Rock County, WI to Winnebago...

  9. 78 FR 25302 - Notice of Realty Action: Termination of Recreation and Public Purposes Act Classifications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ...Termination of Recreation and Public Purposes Act Classifications and Opening of Lands in Nye and Esmeralda Counties; NV AGENCY: Bureau...including the 1872 Mining Law. The classification termination and opening order will affect 30 acres of public lands within Nye...

  10. Cbf genes of the FrA2 allele are differentially regulated between long-term cold acclimated crown tissue of freeze-resistant and – susceptible, winter wheat mutant lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fedora Sutton; Ding-Geng Chen; Xijin Ge; Don Kenefick

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to identify genes that might confer and maintain freeze resistance of winter wheat, a comparative transcriptome analysis was performed between control and 4 wk cold-acclimated crown tissue of two winter wheat lines that differ in field freeze survival. The lines, generated by azide mutagenesis of the winter wheat cultivar 'Winoka' were designated FR (75% survival) and FS

  11. 78 FR 26110 - Kicking Cars and Going Between Rolling Equipment During Flat Switching Operations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...have to go between equipment. (3) Review with...employees, including management employees, SOFA Safety...entering between rolling equipment exists. FRA recommends...characteristics of the type of equipment being switched, particularly...including railroad management. FRA encourages...

  12. 75 FR 9018 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ...relief being requested, and the petitioner's arguments in favor of relief. Genesis Worldwide Logistics [Waiver Petition Docket Number FRA-2010-0008] The Genesis Worldwide Logistics (GWWL) has petitioned FRA for a waiver of compliance...

  13. 75 FR 31834 - Adoption of Environmental Impact Statement; Availability of an Environmental Reevaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ...addition, under FRA's environmental procedures, FRA is required to issue a reevaluation of the adequacy, accuracy and validity of a final EIS in certain circumstances, which the agency has also done for this project. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  14. 76 FR 27170 - Notice of Application for Approval of Discontinuance or Modification of a Railroad Signal System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ...Discontinuance or Modification of a Railroad Signal System [Docket Number FRA-2010-0163...the discontinuance or modification of a signal system. FRA assigned the petition Docket...Chief Engineer, Communications and Signals, CSX Transportation, Inc., 500...

  15. Recensioni 321 schi di povert derivanti dall'aumento

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Milano-Bicocca L'educazione, la pedagogia e l'in- tervento sociale godono di brutta fama fra i rom e fra «pedagogia zingara» che si è sviluppa- ta negli anni sessanta a partire dalle interpretazioni della «crisi

  16. Norges teknisk naturvitenskapelige universitet

    E-print Network

    Malinnikova, Eugenia

    en ny maskin koster kr. 2000,-. d) I det lange løp, hva blir gjennomsnittlig bruttoinntekt fra maskinen pr. dag? I det lange løp, hva blir gjennomsnittlig nettoinntekt fra maskinen pr. dag? Oppgave 2 En

  17. 78 FR 14876 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket Number FRA-2013-0012...December 10, 2012, the Temple and Central Texas Railway (TC) has petitioned the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) for a waiver of...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 221 - Approved Rear End Marking Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...flasher), FRA-MEC-MCD-300-C (steady burn), and FRA-MEC-MCD-300-F (flasher). 3. Manufacturer: American Electronics, Inc., 1 40 Essex Street, Hackensack, NJ 07601. 1 Note: Yankee Metal Products Corp. previously produced...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 221 - Approved Rear End Marking Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...flasher), FRA-MEC-MCD-300-C (steady burn), and FRA-MEC-MCD-300-F (flasher). 3. Manufacturer: American Electronics, Inc., 1 40 Essex Street, Hackensack, NJ 07601. 1 Note: Yankee Metal Products Corp. previously produced...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 221 - Approved Rear End Marking Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...flasher), FRA-MEC-MCD-300-C (steady burn), and FRA-MEC-MCD-300-F (flasher). 3. Manufacturer: American Electronics, Inc., 1 40 Essex Street, Hackensack, NJ 07601. 1 Note: Yankee Metal Products Corp. previously produced...

  1. 78 FR 36738 - Signal System Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ...FRA-2012-0104, Notice No. 1] RIN 2130-AC44 Signal System Reporting Requirements AGENCY...that each carrier must file with FRA a signal system status report every five years...updated information regarding railroad signal systems to be available to FRA...

  2. 76 FR 34801 - Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...FRA-2010-0174] Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures In accordance...FRA) grant a modification of the single car air brake test procedures as prescribed...FRA-2010-0174. PATH operates a fleet of 25 flat cars in consist with revenue cars utilized...

  3. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the employing railroad. (b) In...railroad must report on Form FRA F 6180.55a the casualties to all persons on its...equipment must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the railroad whose train or...

  4. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the employing railroad. (b) In...railroad must report on Form FRA F 6180.55a the casualties to all persons on its...equipment must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the railroad whose train or...

  5. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the employing railroad. (b) In...railroad must report on Form FRA F 6180.55a the casualties to all persons on its...equipment must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the railroad whose train or...

  6. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the employing railroad. (b) In...railroad must report on Form FRA F 6180.55a the casualties to all persons on its...equipment must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the railroad whose train or...

  7. 49 CFR 225.23 - Joint operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...operations must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the employing railroad. (b) In...railroad must report on Form FRA F 6180.55a the casualties to all persons on its...equipment must be reported on Form FRA F 6180.55a by the railroad whose train or...

  8. 74 FR 35950 - Positive Train Control Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2009-07-21

    ...received and understood. Taking syntactic and semantic interoperability together, FRA expects...PTCDP, or PTCSP, FRA posts on its public Web site notice of receipt and reference...PTCDP, or PTCSP, FRA posts on its public Web site notice of receipt and reference...

  9. Aberrant Neural Function during Emotion Attribution in Female Subjects with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Cindy C.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Mackey, Allyson; Mobbs, Dean; Reiss, Allan L.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological systems which underlie emotion attribution among female patients with Fragile X (FraX) syndrome are examined. Results show that the emotion circuit which regulates responses to facial stimuli is potentially disrupted among female subjects with FraX syndrome. Anterior cingulate cortex activity in female subjects with FraX…

  10. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein in Circadian Rhythmicity and Memory Consolidation

    E-print Network

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    causes fragile X syndrome (FraX), the most commonly inherited form of mental retardation and autism in establishing and maintaining neural circuit function. Keywords Fragile X syndrome . Learning . Memory is clearly evident when this regulation becomes compromised, as in fragile X syndrome (FraX). FraX is caused

  11. Free ferulic acid uptake in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Soberon, M A; Cherney, J H; Liu, R H; Ross, D A; Cherney, D J R

    2012-11-01

    Ferulic acid (FRA), a phenolic compound with antioxidant and anticancer activities, naturally occurs in plants as a lignin precursor. Many veins of research have been devoted to releasing FRA from the lignin complex to improve digestibility of ruminant feeds. Thus, the objective of this research was to investigate the transfer of a given dosage of the free form of FRA into the milk of dairy cattle. Six mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows at the Cornell Research Farm (Harford, NY) were given 14-d adaptation to diet and stall position. Ad libitum access to a total mixed ration based on haylage and maize silage (31.1% neutral detergent fiber containing 5.52 mg of FRA/g) was provided during the study. A crossover design was implemented so that each cow alternated weekly between FRA-dosed and control. On d 1, jugular cannulas and urine catheters were placed in all cows. On d 2, FRA-dosed cows received a single dosage of 150 g of pure FRA powder at 0830 h via their fistula (n=4) or a balling gun for nonfistulated cows (n=2). Plasma, urine, feces, feed, orts, milk, and rumen fluid were sampled intensively for the next 36 h and analyzed for FRA concentration. On d 8, the cows crossed over and the experiment was repeated. When compared with the control, FRA administration did not have an effect on dry matter intake, milk yield, milk fat yield, milk protein yield, somatic cell count, or neutral detergent fiber content of orts and feces. The concentration of FRA in the feces did not change as a result of FRA dosage. As expected, FRA concentration increased dramatically upon FRA dosage and decreased over time until returning to basal levels in rumen fluid (4 h after dosage), plasma (5.5 h after dosage), urine (10 h after dosage), and milk (14 h after dosage). Baseline values for FRA in urine and rumen fluid were variable among cows and had an effect on FRA concentration in FRA-dosed cows. From this study, it is observed that orally ingested FRA can be transported into the milk and that the physiological transfer of FRA occurs from rumen to milk within 6.5 h or the first milking after dosage. Ferulic acid may affect the functionality of milk due to its antioxidant, anticancer, and antibacterial activities. Future research will be required to elucidate whether FRA in milk is bioavailable and bioactive, and to evaluate the complete sensory and microbiological effects of increased FRA and FRA degradation products in milk. PMID:22921626

  12. Nyelabs.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bill Nye

    Nyelabs.com is the web site of Bill Nye, the Science Guy. The site includes many science-related resources, including "Home Demos" (hands-on activities that students can try at home or in the classroom), "Questions of the Week" (an ask-the-expert feature), and "E-cards" (science-themed electronic greeting cards). There are also news features, guides to episodes of the television program "Bill Nye the Science Guy" that was originally broadcast on PBS, and biographical information on Mr. Nye.

  13. Haskins Laborawries Status Report on Speech Research 1990, SR-103 / 104, 125-136

    E-print Network

    . Goodall, 1947). In the years since its introduction, PCM has become the standard technique for the digital, Ignatius G. Mattingly, Patrick W. Nye, Tom Carrell, David B. Pisoni, and two anonymous reviewers

  14. 78. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTO SHOWING ORIGINAL BULLFROG MINE (LEFT BACKGROUND) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTO SHOWING ORIGINAL BULLFROG MINE (LEFT BACKGROUND) AND BULLFROG WEST EXTENSION MINE (RIGHT FOREGROUND). From Rhyolite, Nevada Herald (22 March 1907) - Bullfrog Mine, Rhyolite, Nye County, NV

  15. Closeup view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close-up view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. PRESIDENTIAL RHETORIC AND LEADERSHIP FROM KENNEDY TO THE PRESENT

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    PRESIDENTIAL RHETORIC AND LEADERSHIP FROM KENNEDY TO THE PRESENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH , 9:00AM, Washington Post Joseph Nye, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, Harvard Kennedy School

  17. 75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...Wisconsin Route 213 and Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and...

  18. 31. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF A THIRD CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF A THIRD CONTROL PANEL IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  19. 37. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF FACILITIES IN ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF FACILITIES IN ROOM 112, THE RESTROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. 29. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF CONTROL PANEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF CONTROL PANEL AND VIEWING WINDOW IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. 2. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF WATER FILTERING EQUIPMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF WATER FILTERING EQUIPMENT AND BROCK HOUSES ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF THE COMPOUND. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  2. 12. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF COOLING VATS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF COOLING VATS AT THE WEST END OF ROOM 102, THE DISASSEMBLY BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. 16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF ROOM 107, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF ROOM 107, THE HOT STORAGE AND PACKAGING ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. 4. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE WATER TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE WATER TOWER AND MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF THE COMPOUND. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  5. 21. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF EQUIPMENT ABOVE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF EQUIPMENT ABOVE THE OFFICE SPACE AT THE WEST END OF ROOM 101. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  6. 26. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF ROOM 109 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF ROOM 109 AND THE RAMP TO THE LOWER LEVELS. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  7. 33. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF A VIEWING WINDOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF A VIEWING WINDOW IN ROOM 108, THE OPERATIONS AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  8. 19. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE NORTH OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE NORTH OFFICE SPACE AT THE WEST END OF ROOM 101. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  9. 20. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE SOUTH OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE SOUTH OFFICE SPACE AT THE WEST END OF ROOM 101. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  10. 30. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A SECOND CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A SECOND CONTROL PANEL IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  11. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF A BROCK HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF A BROCK HOUSE USED FOR THE WATER FILTERING SYSTEM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Water Filtering System Brock House, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  12. 25. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF ROOM 109, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF ROOM 109, THE WARM AND COLD STORAGE ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  13. 15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF ROOM 107, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF ROOM 107, THE HOT STORAGE AND PACKAGING ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  14. 32. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A HONEYWELL WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A HONEYWELL WALL PRESSURE GAUGE IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  15. 4. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE WESTERN PORTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE WESTERN PORTION OF THE SOUTH ELEVATION OF THE TEST CELL. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Building No. 3210, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  16. 3. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE NORTH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF THE TEST CELL. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Building No. 3210, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  17. 5. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE EAST ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE TEST CELL, WITH DEWARS IN THE BACKGROUND. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Building No. 3210, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  18. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Range Nevada Test Site ASH MEADOWS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE DESERT NATIONAL WILDLIFE RANGE PAHRANAGAT Sunrise ManorLas Vegas North Las Vegas Nevada Test Site Lake Mohave Lake Mead Esmeralda County Nye County

  19. 6. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE TEST CELL. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Building No. 3210, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. 76 FR 14986 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the One Nevada Transmission Line (ON Line...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...District Office's management area in White Pine, Nye, and Lincoln counties, Nevada...Vegas District Office, 4701 North Torrey Pines, Las Vegas, Nevada; --Ely District...Center Street, Reno, Nevada; --White Pine County Library, 950 Campton Street,...

  1. April 23, 1996 Vol. XLVIII No. 9

    E-print Network

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    ehind his beaker and microscope, Bill Nye the Science Guy is no nerd. Beneath the lab coat and bow tie-- for the slot, Irene Eckstrand, acting director of OSE, said, "The choice was easy. When thinking of someone who

  2. 14. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE SMALL ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE SMALL ROOM IN THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE BASEMENT. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Building No. 3210, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. 81. PHOTOCOPY OF 1978 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. PHOTOCOPY OF 1978 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From National Park Service Environmental Review and Analysis, BullfroG Mine Plan of Operations, Death Valley Nat'l Monument (24 August 1978) - Bullfrog Mine, Rhyolite, Nye County, NV

  4. 80. PHOTOCOPY OF 1976 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. PHOTOCOPY OF 1976 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From National Park Service Environmental Review and Analysis, Bullfrog Mine Plan of Operations, Death Valley Nat'l Monument (24 March 1976) - Bullfrog Mine, Rhyolite, Nye County, NV

  5. 1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506, facing south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06, facing south - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  6. Mind the gap: the distributional effects of raising the early eligibility age and full retirement age.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Anya

    2012-01-01

    Policymakers have proposed increases to the early eligibility age (EEA) and/or full retirement age (FRA) to address increasing life expectancy and Social Security solvency issues. This analysis uses the Social Security Administration's Modeling Income in the Near Term, version 6 (MINT6) model to compare three retirement-age increases suggested by the Social Security Advisory Board: increase the gap between the EEA and FRA by raising only the FRA, increase both the EEA and FRA to maintain a 4-year gap between them, and increase both the EEA and FRA to maintain a 5-year gap between them. Although all three options would improve system solvency by similar proportions, their effect on individual beneficiaries in the future would vary. Benefit reductions are greater under the proposals with more months between the EEA and FRA, while the option that maintains a 4-year gap results in benefit increases for some beneficiaries compared with current law. PMID:23397744

  7. ERK-MAPK signaling coordinately regulates activity of Rac1 and RhoA for tumor cell motility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Vial; Erik Sahai; Christopher J. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    We describe two signaling events downstream of ERK-MAP kinase contributing to cell motility in colon carcinoma cells. The Fos family member Fra-1 is expressed in an ERK-dependent manner. Silencing of Fra-1 expression with short interfering RNAs leads to losses of cell polarization, motility, and invasiveness in vitro. These effects of ablating Fra-1 are a consequence of activation of a RhoA-ROCK

  8. Et introduksjonskurs EndNote X6 introduksjon Liv Brynhild Aspaas og Jo Forthun -NTNU UB, jan. 2013 2

    E-print Network

    Malinnikova, Eugenia

    ..................................................................................................................................... 11 Eksempel 3: ISI Web of Science.................................................................................................................................. 19 EndNote Web (http://myendnoteweb.com/) ............................................................................ 20 Eks) Fra ISI Web of Science til EndNote Web

  9. UNIVERSITA' DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA "LA SAPIENZA" D.R. n. 001048

    E-print Network

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    e preventivi, per migliorare la qualità degli interventi, in base alle evidenze scientifiche, all organizzativi ed assistenziali, basati su evidenze scientifiche, favorendo processi di integrazione fra le

  10. Identification of unstable sequences within the common fragile site at 3p14.2: implications for the mechanism of deletions within fragile histidine triad gene/common fragile site at 3p14.2 in tumors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Shantel; Neilly, Mary E; Espinosa, Rafael; Davis, Elizabeth M; McKeithan, Timothy W; Le Beau, Michelle M

    2002-06-15

    The FRA3B, at 3p14.2, lies within the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene and is the most highly expressed of the common fragile sites observed when DNA replication is perturbed by aphidicolin. Common fragile sites are highly unstable regions of the genome. Large intragenic deletions within FHIT, localized within the FRA3B sequences, have been identified in a variety of tumor cells. To characterize the FRA3B deletions in tumor cells and identify FRA3B sequences that are required for fragile site induction, we used microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to isolate hybrid cell clones that retain chromosome 3 homologues with various deletions within FRA3B. Detailed molecular mapping of the FHIT/FRA3B locus in the resultant hybrid cells revealed a complex pattern of instability within FRA3B. Each tumor cell line contained multiple chromosome 3 homologues with variable deletion patterns, often with discontinuous deletions, suggesting that the process of breakage and repair within FRA3B is an ongoing one. By comparing the approximate location of the breakpoints in the hybrid clones, we identified 11 recurring breakpoint/repair regions within the FRA3B. A comparison of the frequency of breaks/gaps within FRA3B in the hybrid clones with various deletions of FRA3B sequences revealed that the loss of FRA3B sequences does not reduce the overall rate of breakage and instability within the remaining FRA3B sequences. The majority of breaks occurred in the proximal portion of the FRA3B, in a 300-kb interval between exon 4 and the proximal 50 kb of intron 5. Our observations suggest that there is no single sequence within the FRA3B that influences breakage or recombination within this region; however, we cannot rule out the presence of multiple "hot spots" within the FHIT/FRA3B locus. Together, the results suggest that factors other than the DNA sequence per se are responsible for the formation of DNA breaks/gaps. PMID:12067991

  11. ELFOR dansk eldistribution PSO 2002 F&U

    E-print Network

    ELFOR ­ dansk eldistribution PSO 2002 ­ F&U Energieffektiv intern materialetransport i industri "Energieffektiv intern materialetransport i industrien", der gennemføres med økonomisk støtte fra ELFORs PSO

  12. HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL Johnston Gate

    E-print Network

    Chou, James

    Baldwin School Sacramento Field IRVINGSTREET TROWBRIDGESTREET BEACO N STREET KENTSTREET SACRAMEN CONCORD A Y GARDENS CENTRE GRANT STREET FRA WESTERN AVENUE BRIDGE COWPERTHWAITE STREET HARVARD WAY LARZ

  13. Assignment of human KH-box-containing genes by in situ hybridization: HNRNPK maps to 9q21.32-q21.33, PCBP1 to 2p12-p13, and PCBP2 to 12q13.12-q13.13, distal to FRA12A

    SciTech Connect

    Tommerup, N. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark); Leffers, H. [Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the localization of various human KH-box-containing genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Accordingly, HNRNPK was mapped to human chromosome 9q21.32-q21.33, PCBP1 was mapped to human chromosome 2p12-p13, and PCBP2 was mapped to human chromosome 12q13.12-q13.13. These proteins affect RNA-binding capability. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Infection with retroviral vectors leads to perturbed DNA replication increasing

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    and constrictions in metaphase chromosomes from cells grown under mild replication stress conditions1 . These sites on metaphase chromosomes (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene), but the exact repertoire of common fragile sites molecularly cloned a new CFS, FRA11H, in 11q13. The genomic region of FRA11H harbors a hotspot of chromosomal

  15. Rail-car impact tests with steel coil: car crush

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eloy Martinez; David Tyrell; John Zolock

    2003-01-01

    Two grade-crossing impact tests were conducted in June 2002 at the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA's) Transportation Technology Center in Pueblo, Colorado as part of the FRA's research into passenger equipment crashworthiness. In both of these tests a cab car moving at approximately 14 mph impacted a standing coil of steel supported by a frangible table. The coil was positioned such

  16. The fragile Fiber1 kinesin contributes to cortical microtubule-mediated trafficking of cell wall components.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chuanmei; Ganguly, Anindya; Baskin, Tobias I; McClosky, Daniel D; Anderson, Charles T; Foster, Cliff; Meunier, Kristoffer A; Okamoto, Ruth; Berg, Howard; Dixit, Ram

    2015-03-01

    The cell wall consists of cellulose microfibrils embedded within a matrix of hemicellulose and pectin. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane, whereas matrix polysaccharides are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and secreted. The trafficking of vesicles containing cell wall components is thought to depend on actin-myosin. Here, we implicate microtubules in this process through studies of the kinesin-4 family member, Fragile Fiber1 (FRA1). In an fra1-5 knockout mutant, the expansion rate of the inflorescence stem is halved compared with the wild type along with the thickness of both primary and secondary cell walls. Nevertheless, cell walls in fra1-5 have an essentially unaltered composition and ultrastructure. A functional triple green fluorescent protein-tagged FRA1 fusion protein moves processively along cortical microtubules, and its abundance and motile density correlate with growth rate. Motility of FRA1 and cellulose synthase complexes is independent, indicating that FRA1 is not directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis; however, the secretion rate of fucose-alkyne-labeled pectin is greatly decreased in fra1-5, and the mutant has Golgi bodies with fewer cisternae and enlarged vesicles. Based on our results, we propose that FRA1 contributes to cell wall production by transporting Golgi-derived vesicles along cortical microtubules for secretion. PMID:25646318

  17. 21RIS N Y T 4/01 Studier af strukturerne i planter og

    E-print Network

    af blændens lille åbning. Kun en lille del af lyset slipper igennem og foto- graferes af detektoren A4. Fluorescens signal fra plantecellen i laserstrålens fokuspunkt slipper gennem blændens lille. Fluorescens signalet fra molekyler OVER fokusplanen stoppes af blændens lille åbning. Kun en lille del af

  18. 49 CFR 209.105 - Notice of probable violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...FRA may change the civil penalty amount proposed to be assessed up to and including the maximum penalty amount of $55,000 for each...if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe...property, FRA may change the penalty amount proposed to be...

  19. Finite Rank Approximation based method for solving the RTE in stellar atmospheres and application to an inverse problem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Ossesyand; Olivier Titaudz

    The Finite Rank Approximation (FRA) based method is well known in op- erator approximation theory but it is also useful for suggesting numerical methods for solving integral equations. In this document we describe two FRA methods for the nu- merical resolution of the integral formulation of the 1D Radiative Transfert Equation (RTE) posed in a static slab; we browse some

  20. Proceedings of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics, pages 7989, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, June 23-25 2014. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics

    E-print Network

    transformation. Experiments on FraCaS and PASCAL RTE datasets show promising results. 1 Introduction Dependency considered as syntactic rewriting rules. We test our system on FraCaS (Cooper et al., 1996) and PASCAL RTE- based RTE system; and (iii) a result that outper- forms state-of-the-art RTE system on RTE5 data. Our

  1. Dokumentasjon av engelskkunnskaper Ved gjennomgangen av de enkelte lands utdanninger, er nivet i engelsk vurdert spesielt. For hvert

    E-print Network

    Fomin, Fedor V.

    Mars 2007 Språkkrav Dokumentasjon av engelskkunnskaper Ved gjennomgangen av de enkelte lands utdanninger, er nivået i engelsk vurdert spesielt. For hvert land er det anført om det er krav til engelsk, samt et tall. Tallet angir hvilke søkergrupper fra vedkommende land som kan fritas: 1) Søkere fra land

  2. Add/drop Semi-Analytic Gain Tilt Control Algorithm for the Fiber Raman Amplifier under

    E-print Network

    Park, Namkyoo

    Add/drop Semi-Analytic Gain Tilt Control Algorithm for the Fiber Raman Amplifier under Dynamic. - (FRA : Fiber Raman Amplifier) add/drop . add/drop FRA Tilt [1-2]. add@stargate.snu.ac.kr Abstract : A semi-analytic gain-clamping algorithm for the deeply saturated, multi-pump fiber Raman

  3. On the development of transfer function method for fault identification in large power transformers on load

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathan Pinhas; Syed Islam; John Hullett

    2000-01-01

    Frequency Response Analysis (FRA) is now established as a proven tool in identifying some typical mechanical faults in power transformers. However, all FRA measurements so far have been off-line. An on-line technique is very much desired by the utilities, as this will prevent continued operation of the transformer while it is carrying a fault to failure stage. In this paper,

  4. Improving freight rail safety with on-board monitoring and control systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Edwards; W. M. Zavis; A. Prabhakaran; D. C. Brabb; A. S. Jackson

    2005-01-01

    The Office of Research and Development of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is sponsoring a revenue service demonstration of Advanced Train Systems to demonstrate new technologies for improving safety and efficiency in freight train operations. The project, which commenced in 1999, is part of the Rolling Stock Program Element in FRA's Five-Year Strategic Plan for Railroad Research, Development and Demonstrations.

  5. Is the Interior of South Pole-Aitken Basin Spectrally Similar to Apollo 14?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Blewett, D. T.; Holtzmann, J.; Hawke, B. R.

    2001-03-01

    Both Fra Mauro (Apollo 14 region) and SPA are examples of high-iron highlands, therefore the Apollo 14 samples may help to understand the composition of SPA. The Clementine UVVIS spectral properties of SPA show both similarities and differences with Fra Mauro.

  6. Af projektleder, seniorforsker, adjungeret professor, ph.d. Stiig Markager, DMU

    E-print Network

    dybder, fordelt på 128 prøver fra dybe CTD-kast (maksimum dybde over 400 m), 770 prøver fra lave CTD viser, at dette ikke har været noget problem. Undervejs har problemer med den lange CTD-wire på at anvende det multikanalsfluo- rometer, som var planlagt til at være en integreret del af alle CTD-kast. Når

  7. 49 CFR 225.21 - Forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...train miles, and other train miles run during the month. (c) Form FRA 6180.55a—Railroad Injury and Illness (Continuation Sheet). Form FRA 6180.55a shall be used to report all reportable fatalities, injuries and occupational...

  8. The Fragile Fiber1 Kinesin Contributes to Cortical Microtubule-Mediated Trafficking of Cell Wall Components1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chuanmei; Ganguly, Anindya; Baskin, Tobias I.; McClosky, Daniel D.; Anderson, Charles T.; Foster, Cliff; Meunier, Kristoffer A.; Okamoto, Ruth; Berg, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall consists of cellulose microfibrils embedded within a matrix of hemicellulose and pectin. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane, whereas matrix polysaccharides are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and secreted. The trafficking of vesicles containing cell wall components is thought to depend on actin-myosin. Here, we implicate microtubules in this process through studies of the kinesin-4 family member, Fragile Fiber1 (FRA1). In an fra1-5 knockout mutant, the expansion rate of the inflorescence stem is halved compared with the wild type along with the thickness of both primary and secondary cell walls. Nevertheless, cell walls in fra1-5 have an essentially unaltered composition and ultrastructure. A functional triple green fluorescent protein-tagged FRA1 fusion protein moves processively along cortical microtubules, and its abundance and motile density correlate with growth rate. Motility of FRA1 and cellulose synthase complexes is independent, indicating that FRA1 is not directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis; however, the secretion rate of fucose-alkyne-labeled pectin is greatly decreased in fra1-5, and the mutant has Golgi bodies with fewer cisternae and enlarged vesicles. Based on our results, we propose that FRA1 contributes to cell wall production by transporting Golgi-derived vesicles along cortical microtubules for secretion. PMID:25646318

  9. 75 FR 39325 - Notice of Draft Finding of No Significant Impact for the Washington State Portion of the Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ...Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the FRA's Procedures...was split into three Service Blocks, and identified incremental...in two of the three service blocks. In June 2009, the FRA released...that are described as Service Blocks 1, 2, and 3 in the EA,...

  10. Research Paper Organization and Content Mary Westervelt

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    correlation between FRA3B expression and cigarette smoking", Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer 34:333-340, 2002 The coincidence of a chromosomal fragile site, FRA3B, at a common chromosomal breakpoint in lung cancer has at 3p14, are well documented in lung tumors. 2 Intro to the hypothesis under investigation

  11. Marcus S. Dersch, J. Riley Edwards, Ryan G. Kernes, Bassem O. Andrawes, David A. Lange, and Daniel Kuchma

    E-print Network

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Mix Design Rail Seat Surface Treatments Pad / Insulator Materials Components Fastener Yield Stress Insulator Post Compression Concrete Prestress Design System Finite Element Modeling Full-Scale Laboratory Kuchma UIUC FRA Concrete Tie and Fastener BAA October 2013 Program Update FRA Tie and Fastener BAA

  12. Proceedings of CELLmicrocosmos neXt 2014 (DOI: 10.2390/biecoll-next2014-8) 18 Towards Pathway Prediction and Subcellular Localization by

    E-print Network

    Moeller, Ralf

    addressed this problem by developing a powerful framework. FraMeTex (Framework for Medical Text mining database integration and text mining methods for the prediction of biological networks. However, we can use­4]. Here, we discuss how this approach can be extended by using the new FraMeTex text mining framework. 2

  13. Fathoming fragile X in fruit flies Yong Q. Zhang and Kendal Broadie

    E-print Network

    Broadie, Kendal S.

    37235-1634, USA Fragile X syndrome (FraX) is the most common inherited mental retardation disease architectural complexity. Fragile X syndrome (FraX), one of the most common genetic diseases, is an XFathoming fragile X in fruit flies Yong Q. Zhang and Kendal Broadie Department of Biological

  14. Carrier detection and X-inactivation studies in the fragile X syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Brøndum Nielsen; N. Tommerup; Hanne Poulsen; Petrea Jacobsen; Bente Beck; Margareta Mikkelsen

    1983-01-01

    Cytogenetic investigations by three different lymphocyte culture methods in 63 obligate and potential carriers of the fragile X [fra(X)] are reported. A difference was observed between normal and retarded carriers in the manifestation of the fra(X). An inverse relationship between percentage positive cells and age was demonstrated in normal carriers, whereas retarded carriers generally showed higher percentages at all ages.

  15. Factors Associated with Parenting Stress in Mothers of Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CINDY JOHNSTON; DAVID HESSL; CHRISTINE BLASEY; HEATHER ERBA; D. JENNIFER DYER-FRIEDMAN; BRONWYN GLASER

    2003-01-01

    Whereas previous research has demonstrated elevated levels of parenting stress in parents of children with general developmental disability, there has been little investigation of stress in parents of children specifically affected by the common neurogenetic disorder fragile X syndrome (FraX). This study elucidates stress profiles in mothers of children with FraX and delineates the contribution of child characteristics, home environment,

  16. The fragile X syndrome: no evidence for any recent mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A P Smits; J C Dreesen; J G Post; D F Smeets; C de Die-Smulders; T Spaans-van der Bijl; L C Govaerts; S T Warren; B A Oostra; B A van Oost

    1993-01-01

    Fragile X (fra(X)) syndrome, the most common form of familial mental retardation, is caused by heritable unstable DNA composed of CGG repeats. As reproductive fitness of fra(X) patients is severely compromised, a high mutation rate has been proposed to explain the high prevalence. However, we have been unable to show any new mutation for 84 probands referred to us to

  17. 75 FR 65398 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...FRA-2010-0024] The Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) hereby petitions FRA for a temporary waiver...measurement system. Over the course of 6 months, CP intends to test the new system on their...a frequency that is not possible today. CP asserts that the benefits that are...

  18. 78 FR 28284 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...April 11, 2013, Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) has petitioned the Federal Railroad Administration...Number FRA-2013-0040. Specifically, CP requests relief from 49 CFR 232.205...operating in distributive power (DP) mode. CP requests that FRA allow 90 cubic feet...

  19. Detection of minor winding deformation fault in high frequency range for power transformer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Tang; A. Shintemirov; Q. H. Wu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simplified distributed parameter model for minor winding deformation fault analysis of power transformers on the basis of frequency response analysis (FRA). The FRA data of an experimental transformer is employed as a reference trace, which are compared with the simulations of the simplified distributed parameter model concerning minor winding deformation faults. In order to perform quantitative

  20. 49 CFR 229.213 - Locomotive manufacturing information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    (b) The information required in paragraph (a) of this section must be located permanently in the locomotive cab or be provided within two business days upon request of FRA or an FRA-certified State inspector. [71 FR 36914, June 28,...

  1. On the History and Origin of LKFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotev, Randy L.

    1998-01-01

    Fra Mauro is the name of a geologic formation surrounding the Imbrium Basin of the Moon as well as the name of the region of the Apollo 14 lunar landing site. The formation was named for a 16th century Italian geographer and cartographer. In its original invocation in 1971 by the Apollo Soil Survey (ASS), Fra Mauro basalt was not a crystalline basalt, but the designation of a "compositional group" of impact glasses found in the Apollo 14 soil that were basaltic in composition. The ASS noted the similarity between the Fra Mauro basalt glass composition and sample 14310, an unbrecciated, crystalline Apollo 14 rock that would now be designated an impact melt rock. In 1972 the term Fra Mauro basalt was first applied to a rock, sample 14310, although in related papers, Fra Mauro basaltic glass was equated with KREEP. In 1973 the ASS noted that a wide range of K concentrations occurred among glasses of Fra Mauro basaltic composition in the Apollo 15 regolith. The terms high-K, moderate-K and low-K Fra Mauro first occurred in that context, but always as an adjective. Lock Fra Mauro glasses were those with 0.12 +/- 0.07% K2O, compared with 0.47 +/- 0.17% and 1.1 +/- 0.4% for moderate and high-K Fra Mauro glasses and 0.6% for Apollo 15 KREEP basalt. An important evolutionary step in the concept of low Fra Mauro basalt occurred in 1973 when the composition was first used as a component in a mass-balance (mixing) model for Apollo 16 soils [8,9] and later average highlands crust, despite that the term had not yet been applied to an actual rock sample. The first use of the acronym LKFM occurred in a 1973 paper describing glass compositions in Apollo 16 soil.

  2. Using a scalar parameter to trace dislocation evolution in atomistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinbo [ORNL; Zhang, Z F [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A scalar gamma-parameter is proposed from the Nye tensor. Its maximum value occurs along a dislocation line, either straight or curved, when the coordinate system is purposely chosen. This parameter can be easily obtained from the Nye tensor calculated at each atom in atomistic modeling. Using the gamma-parameter, a fully automated approach is developed to determine core atoms and the Burgers vectors of dislocations simultaneously. The approach is validated by revealing the smallest dislocation loop and by tracing the whole formation process of complicated dislocation networks on the fly.

  3. Connecting heterogeneous single slip to diffraction peak evolution in high-energy monochromatic X-ray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    A forward modeling diffraction framework is introduced and employed to identify slip system activity in high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM) experiments. In the framework, diffraction simulations are conducted on virtual mosaic crystals with orientation gradients consistent with Nye’s model of heterogeneous single slip. Simulated diffraction peaks are then compared against experimental measurements to identify slip system activity. Simulation results compared against diffraction data measured in situ from a silicon single-crystal specimen plastically deformed under single-slip conditions indicate that slip system activity can be identified during HEDM experiments. PMID:24904242

  4. An automatic and simple method for specifying dislocation features in atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fu-Zhi; Zhang, Wen-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    An important aspect of atomistic simulations of imperfect crystalline materials is the characterization of dislocations. In this paper, we propose the use of singular values and singular vectors of the Nye tensor to specify the features of dislocations, including the cores, nodes, Burgers vectors and line directions. Atoms locate in dislocation cores and nodes are identified by non-trivial singular values of the Nye tensor, while Burgers vector direction and line direction are specified by those singular vectors corresponding to the biggest singular value. This method provides a powerful, intuitive and automatic tool for characterizing dislocations from simulation data. Its validity for characterizing dislocations is verified with three examples.

  5. Myeloid-Specific Fos-Related Antigen-1 Regulates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Inflammation, Not Emphysema, in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Michelle; Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Potteti, Haranatha R; Reddy, Sekhar P

    2015-07-01

    Heightened lung inflammation is a cardinal feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced macrophage recruitment and activation, accompanied by abnormal secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, play a major role in the pathophysiology of COPD. The Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) transcription factor differentially regulates several cellular processes that are implicated in COPD, such as inflammation and immune responses, cell proliferation and death, and extracellular remodeling. Although CS stimulates Fra-1 expression in the lung, the precise role of this transcription factor in the regulation of CS-induced lung inflammation in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we report that myeloid-specific Fra-1 signaling is important for CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammatory response. In response to chronic CS exposure, mice with Fra-1 specifically deleted in myeloid cells showed reduced levels of CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation, accompanied by decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared with their wild-type counterparts. Consistent with this result, bone marrow-derived Fra-1-null macrophages treated with CS showed decreased levels of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases. Interestingly, deletion of Fra-1 in myeloid cells did not affect the severity of emphysema. We propose that Fra-1 plays a key role in promoting chronic CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation in vivo, and that targeting this transcription factor may be useful in dampening persistent lung inflammation in patients with COPD. PMID:25489966

  6. Characterization of the Human Folate Receptor Alpha Via Novel Antibody-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    O'Shannessy, Daniel J.; Somers, Elizabeth B.; Albone, Earl; Cheng, Xin; Park, Young Chul; Tomkowicz, Brian E.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Kohl, Thomas O.; Forsyth, Tracy M.; Smale, Robert; Fu, Yao-Shi; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.

    2011-01-01

    Folate receptor alpha (FRA) is a cell surface protein whose aberrant expression in malignant cells has resulted in its pursuit as a therapeutic target and marker for diagnosis of cancer. The development of immune-based reagents that can reproducibly detect FRA from patient tissue processed by varying methods has been difficult due to the complex post-translational structure of the protein whereby most reagents developed to date are highly structure-sensitive and have resulted in equivocal expression results across independent studies. The aim of the present study was to generate novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using modified full length FRA protein as immunogen in order to develop a panel of mAbs to various, non-overlapping epitopes that may serve as diagnostic reagents able to robustly detect FRA-positive disease. Here we report the development of a panel of FRA-specific mAbs that are able to specifically detect FRA using an array of diagnostic platforms and methods. In addition, the methods used to develop these mAbs and their diverse binding properties provide additional information on the three dimensional structure of FRA in its native cell surface configuration. PMID:22204844

  7. Multilocus analysis of the fragile X syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. T. Brown; A. Gross; C. Chan; E. C. Jenkins; J. L. Mandel; I. Oberlé; B. Arveiler; G. Novelli; S. Thibodeau; R. Hagerman; K. Summers; G. Turner; B. N. White; L. Mulligan; C. Forster-Gibson; J. J. A. Holden; B. Zoll; M. Krawczak; P. Goonewardena; K. H. Gustavson; U. Pettersson; G. Holmgren; C. Schwartz; P. N. Howard-Peebles; P. Murphy; W. R. Breg; H. Veenema; N. J. Carpenter

    1988-01-01

    A multilocus analysis of the fragile X (fra(X)) syndrome was conducted with 147 families. Two proximal loci, DXS51 and F9, and two distal loci, DXS52 and DXS15, were studied. Overall, the best multipoint distances were found to be DXS51-F9, 6.9%, F9-fra(X), 22.4%; fra(X)-DXS52, 12.7%; DXS52-DXS15, 2.2%. These distances can be used for multipoint mapping of new probes, carrier testing and

  8. Det var medarbejdere hos Vir A/S, som fik ideen til at lave en plastchip baseret p

    E-print Network

    detektion af nitrat. Fokuserer lyset Ser man nærmere på sensorchippen eller mærker efter med fingrene- teknologi til biokemiske analyser. Sammen med Risø udvikler firmaet en ny type sensor baseret på fænomenet nye sensor er blot 0,5 mikrometer dybe. Perioden varierer men er også af størrelsesordenen 0

  9. 15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF EQUIPMENT IN ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF EQUIPMENT IN ROOM 4, EQUIPMENT AND GENERATOR ROOM, BUILDING 3113/3113A. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell A Facility, Test Cell A Building & Addition, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road F, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  10. The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement in Intermediate Level Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Class size and student achievement have been debated for decades. The vast amount of research on this topic is either conflicting or inconclusive. There are large and small scale studies that support both sides of this dilemma (Achilles, Nye, Boyd-Zaharias, Fulton, & Cain, 1994; Glass & Smith, 1979; Slavin, 1989). Class size reduction is a…

  11. MatSE 406 Thermal and Mechanical Behavior of Materials Schedule: TR 11:00am12:20pm, Noyes 217; Reading: R 1:001:50 (Noyes 217).

    E-print Network

    Weaver, John H.

    ) · Introduction to dislocations, D. Hull and D.J. Bacon, 4th ed. (Oxford, 2001) Grading Policy: 10%×Quizzes + 20, 4th ed. (Wiley & Sons, NY, 1996) · Physical Properties of Crystals, J. F. Nye, 2nd ed. (Oxford, 1985 receive a failing grade for the class. · Quizzes cover assigned reading; on COMPASS Mon. and Wed. 9am­9pm

  12. 2 RIS N Y T 4/01 Bioproduktion er levende organis-

    E-print Network

    planter med fordel udnyt- tes til at producere forskellige non-food produkter som plast, energiråstoffer biofysiker Rosalin Franklin spillede en afgørende rolle i at forklare DNAs molekylære struktur. Under sit anvendelsesområder. Det skyl- des udviklingen af de mange nye meto- Traditionelt tænker vi planter som foder- og

  13. Economic impact of the Department of Energy on Southern Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1985-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has significant operations in three Southern Nevada Counties: Clark, Lincoln and Nye. Together, DOE direct and indirect employment in these counties exceeds 20,000 persons, which amounts to about eight percent of the total workforce. The projected dollar contribution to their economies by DOE in 1985 approaches $1-billion.

  14. A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross

    2001-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results

  15. Completion report for Well ER-EC-6

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-01-01

    Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the

  16. Futuristics in K-12 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shostak, Arthur B.

    2008-01-01

    Youngsters nowadays have grown up learning "protect tomorrow!" lessons from "Barney" and "Bill Nye the Science Guy." They have been tutored by unforgettable futuristic movies like "A.I." and "E.T," by science fiction serials and "Star Trek" reruns and by future-oriented series on cable TV (including material on The History Channel). Of course,…

  17. Linjen for datateknikk -NTNU Institutt for datateknikk og

    E-print Network

    Langseth, Helge

    muligheter til å få utløp for "kunstneriske" tendenser. Kverna maler jevnt og trutt... #12;3 "Ehh... Hva blir løsninger når nye problemer skal løses. #12;4 "Jaha... Men hva slags problemer skal jeg løse???" Du skal

  18. Eksperimentell partikkelfysikk Kontakt : alex.read@fys.uio.no

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    ;Eksperimentell partikkelfysikk Hva er verden laget av, og hva holder den sammen? Studier av naturens minste: 22 m Lengde: 44 m Hva skjedde her? Alle kjente partikler! Noen nye? ? #12;Masteroppgaver hvorfor partikler har masse, men er ikke direkte observert ennå Supersymmetri ­ kan forklare hva mørk

  19. 39. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF A WORK STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF A WORK STATION WITH MANIPULATOR ARMS IN THE SOUTH CORRIDOR OF THE SECOND FLOOR. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  20. The Emerging Chinese Institutional Architecture in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, William Yat Wai

    2014-01-01

    The article reviews the global landscape of higher education with the anticipation of an emerging Chinese institutional architecture in Asia-Pacific higher education. It starts with a theoretical framework for analyzing the functionalities of values and institutions in international higher education by adopting Joseph Nye's concept of soft…

  1. Eos, Vol. 89, No. 14, 1 April 2008 I clearly remember the first time I real-

    E-print Network

    vessel, for the most part my concept of science had always been somewhat antiseptic. As a child, I had steered clear of zany television scientists like Bill Nye the Science Guy, pre- ferring instead list of facts just because I assured her they had scientific merit. As I sat on a nearby bench

  2. 76 FR 62820 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Valley Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ...Proposed Valley Electric Association Hidden Hills Transmission Project, Clark and Nye...related to the Valley Electric Association Hidden Hills Transmission Project by any of the following...Pass. The proposed project will support the...development of a solar electric generating...

  3. Images of Science and Scientists on Children's Educational Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Marilee; Steinke, Jocelyn

    A qualitative study analyzed images of science and scientists in children's educational science programs on television to determine whether they conveyed the images found in other media. Four episodes of each of four 30-minute, non-animated programs ("Beakman's World" broadcast on CBS, "Bill Nye, The Science Guy" shown on independent stations,…

  4. Stability of one-dimensional dark spatial solitons of finite second transverse extent A. Dreischuh, T. Arabadjiev a Neshev

    E-print Network

    Dreischuh, Alexander

    1, D-85747 Garching, Germany ABSTRACT In this work we analyze the nonlinear evolution of mixed edge-screw field amplitude is zero. This concept introduced in the wave-theory by Nye and Bery' has allowed for the clarification of the structure and properties of edge, screw, and mixed edge-screw dislocations. As a result

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the CNTA Subsurface Sites (CAU Number 443), Revision 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1999-01-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) planned environmental investigation of the subsurface Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 443. The CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The

  6. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS: CONDENSED MATTER J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 (2009) 195407 (10pp) doi:10.1088/0953-8984/21/19/195407

    E-print Network

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    2009-01-01

    that commonly occurring environmental temperatures span the triple point of ice, a strong understanding. It is known that, near the melting temperature, an interconnected network of liquid water exists within the polycrystalline solid (Nye and Frank 1973). Under hydrostatic conditions, veins of water separate the boundaries

  7. Phytochemical analysis of wastewater (nejayote) obtained after lime-cooking of different types of maize kernels processed into masa for tortillas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet A. Gutiérrez-Uribe; Carlos Rojas-García; Silverio García-Lara; Sergio O. Serna-Saldivar

    2010-01-01

    In order to generate value-added products from the wastewater (nejayote) of lime-cooked maize for tortilla production, we analyzed the phytochemical composition of six different types of kernels that were optimally cooked. Kernels, masas and nejayote solids were analyzed in terms of free and bound phenolics, ferulic acid and antioxidant (AOX) capacity. The germplasm analyzed included white (NWH), yellow (NYE), white

  8. Dynamical systems III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnol'D, V. I.

    This book is an English translation of the Russian original "Itogi nauki i tekhniki, Sovremennye problemy matematiki, Fundamental'nye napravleniya, Tom 3: Dinamicheskie sistemy 3", published in 1985 by VINITI, Moscow.The single contribution of this volume is included in its corresponding subject category - see abstract 021.017.

  9. Theorising globalisation's social impact: proposing the concept of vulnerability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peadar Kirby

    2006-01-01

    The concept of vulnerability was introduced into IR theorising by Keohane and Nye who saw it as one of the consequences of complex interdependence and it is being increasingly employed by IGOs to capture the impact of globalisation on society. However, the concept has been little used in the academic literature on globalisation, except in a descriptive sense. This article

  10. 30. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE WEST CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE WEST CORRIDOR OF THE BASEMENT IN THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA. ELECTRIC MOTORS LINE THE WEST WALL. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  11. THE SOUND OF TWO HANDS CLAPPING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY* Bruno H. Repp

    E-print Network

    offers a surprising variety of aspects to investigators who, prompted by curiosity, might wish to explore a little-studied human behavior. Thus *Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, in press to thank Cathe Browman, Leigh Lisker, Susan Nittrouer, Patrick Nye, Lawrence Rosenblum, Robert W. Young

  12. Erosion of a Sea Stack Over 100 Years

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Park Snavely

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication shows photographs exhibiting the demise of Jump-off Joe, a sea stack at Nye Beach, Newport, Oregon. In 1890, the sea stack was composed of middle Miocene concretionary sandstone of the Astoria Formation. The photos continue through 1990 when the sea stack is entirely gone.

  13. Seismic design strategy for surface facilities at the prospective Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Wu; C. V. Subramanian

    1987-01-01

    The site of the prospective Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository is in Nye County, Nevada, approx. 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site is located on federal land that is under the control of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE), the US Air Force, and the Bureau of Land Management. The repository complex will be composed of surface and

  14. New inroads in an old subject: plasticity, from around the atomic to the macroscopic scale Amit Acharya

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    )femtosecond vibration periods in Molecular Dynamics with the dissipative evolution of a mathematical dislocation density as a traveling wave profile of the governing equation for other values of nearby constant load; however, one case-convex elastic energy, small, Nye-tensor dependent core energy, and possibly an energy contribution based

  15. X-Irradiation, Phorbol Esters, and H202 Stimulate Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Activity in NIH-3T3 Cells through the Formation of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Ann Stevenson; Stephanie Sue Pollock; C. Norman Coleman; Stuart K. Calderwood

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), also known as mitogen- activated protein (MAP) kinases, are rapidly phosphorylated and acti- vated in response to a number of external factors which promote growth and differentiation (T. G. Boulton, S. H. Nye, D. J. Robbins, N. Y. Ip, E. Radziejewska, S. D. Morgenbesser, IL Ao DePinho, N. Panayotatos, M. H. Cobb, and G. D. Yancopoulos,

  16. Sparse EEG Imaging Soe Therese Hansen

    E-print Network

    ) and was suggested by Kappen et al. in a not yet published article. The algo- rithm makes two key assumptions's performance, as described by Kappen et al., was conrmed initially. Reformulations of the VG problem reducing brug i EEG biofeedback. Den nye teknik kaldes variational Garrote (VG) og blev foreslået af Kappen et

  17. 76 FR 21329 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Nevada; Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (HTNF) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate certain National Forest System (NFS) lands for geothermal leasing availability. The project area includes NFS lands on the HTNF in Douglas, Lyon, Mineral, Lander, Nye and White Pine County,...

  18. Undergraduate Chemistry Council Exec Meeting

    E-print Network

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    Undergraduate Chemistry Council Exec Meeting February 10, 2011 In attendance: Anne, Margaret, Jason Students teaching classes for high school kids o Does UCC want to co-sponsor event with materials science Bill Nye the Science Guy Talk about chemistry of chocolate Sell Chocolate UCC Shirts? 5. Need

  19. Administration of State Universities State Board of Education

    E-print Network

    Lajeunesse, Marc J.

    Rolland Heiser Commissioner Jim Horne Gerri Moll Joan Wellhouse Newton Ava L. Parker Carolyn K. Roberts Sonja W. Garcia Omar Khan Rhea F. Law Kiran C. Patel, M.D. John B. Ramil Debbie Nye Sembler ST Zank SARASOTA/MANATEE CAMPUS BOARD Charles R. Baumann Lynnette Edwards Jan Smith Robert L. Soran

  20. 42. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF ROOM 401, A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF ROOM 401, A SMALL ISOLATED WORK SPACE ABOVE ROOM 302 ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE DISASSEMBLY BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  1. *indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT

    E-print Network

    Diversity Lisa T. Belenky, Sr. Attorney 351 California Street, Suite 600 San Francisco, CA 94104 lbelenky@biologicaldiversity.org Center for Biological Diversity Ileene Anderson Public Lands Desert Director PMB 447 8033 Sunset Pahrump, NV 89048 llacy@co.nye.nv.us National Park Service Michael L. Elliott Cultural Resources

  2. 3. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 (with sliding ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 (with sliding doors open to slaughter addition) and Sioux silo, facing north-northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. 4. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 (with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 (with sliding door open to milking area), Sioux silo and slaughter addition, facing northeast - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  4. 2. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 (with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 (with slaughter addition at far left), facing southwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  5. 76 FR 55819 - Track Safety Standards; Concrete Crossties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...2011). The design and practicality of all automated and autonomous geometry measurement systems is a supplement to visual inspection...seat deterioration conditions. FRA's automated inspection vehicle uses rail cant to indicate areas of rail seat...

  6. INSTITUT FOR DATALOGI, AARHUS UNIVERSITET Science and Technology

    E-print Network

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    orienterede graf. Det antages, at grafen er givet ved incidenslister, hvor incidenslisterne er sorteret grafen og m antallet af kanter. Givet et heltal k, ønsker vi i denne opgave at finde korteste stier fra

  7. Lunar laser ranging data deposited in the National Space Science Data Center: Filtered observations for January - June 1971 and unfiltered photon detections for July - December 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. D.; Shelus, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The filtered data are discussed which were obtained during laser ranging operations with Apollo reflectors placed on the moon at Tranquility Base, Fra Mauro, and Hadley. Unfiltered photon detections are described.

  8. 49 CFR 231.35 - Procedure for modification of an approved industry safety appliance standard for new railcar...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...modification of an existing industry safety appliance standard...modification of an approved industry standard under paragraph...the FRA Docket Clerk, West Building Third Floor, Office of Chief...modification of an existing industry safety appliance...

  9. 76 FR 34683 - Withdrawal of Notices Inviting Applications for New Awards for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...International Studies and Foreign Language (UISFL) Program; International...International Studies and Foreign Language (UISFL) Program; International...Program; Fulbright-Hays Faculty Research Abroad (FRA) Fellowship...International and Foreign Language Education (IFLE):...

  10. RIS-M-2408 Forsgsanlg RIS Juni 1984

    E-print Network

    vesteuropæiske varker fordeler sig med 4 i Vesttysk- land, 2 i Holland, et i Belgien 2 i Schweiz samt 4 i "Manchester-Milano-balte", strækkende sig fra England gennem Holland-Belgien, Vesttysk- land og Schweiz til

  11. 77 FR 22841 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ...from a portion of the railroad safety glazing standards, 49 CFR Section...installation of thicker FRA Type II glass without significant modifications...side-facing windows currently consist of safety type glass that is in good condition,...

  12. 78 FR 9107 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ...regulations contained at 49 CFR part 223 (Safety Glazing Standards-- Locomotives...existing railroad without compliant FRA safety glazing, as required by 49 CFR part...currently equipped with shatterproof safety glass. Locomotive KJR 7135, an ALCO...

  13. 78 FR 41991 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ...provisions of the Federal railroad safety regulations contained at 49 CFR section...and continues to have an excellent safety record, due in part to the operating...windshield-grade, laminated safety glass. FRA Type II polycarbonate...

  14. 75 FR 9636 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ...the requirements of the Railroad Safety Glazing Standards, 49 CFR part 223...glazed with \\1/ 4\\'' laminated safety glass that is in good condition with no...caboose to comply with FRA glazing safety standards will impose an undue...

  15. Referat af SU mde d. 9. juni 2010 Deltagere

    E-print Network

    , Astrid Hornbech Svendsen (fra HRafdelingen på NAT), Mikkel Baun Kjærgaard, Marianne Dammand Iversen. Sygefraværssamtaler (ved Astrid ) 8. Eventuelt 1. Godkendelse af referat Referatet blev enstemmigt godkendt 2 ser ud i fremtiden. 7. Sygefraværssamtaler (ved Astrid Hornbech Svendsen ) Astrid orienterer om

  16. 41 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - 3-Key Points and Principles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...minutes, appendixes, working papers, drafts, studies, agenda, or other documents which were made available...with the Federal Records Act (FRA), 44 U.S.C. Chapters 21, 29-33, and regulations issued by the National...

  17. 77 FR 43902 - Notice of Availability of a Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ...Bakersfield Section of the California High- Speed Train (HST) Project (Project). FRA is the lead Federal...contemporary safety, signaling, and automated train-control systems, with trains capable of operating up to 220 miles per...

  18. R I S N Y T N O 1 2 0 0 6 S I D E 1 2

    E-print Network

    roller, både forskere, ledere, forretningsudviklere og sekretærer fra for- skellige afdelinger, til- ristiske design er lavet af planter, og den kan ende sine dage på komposten uden at skade miljøet. Stolen

  19. 49 CFR 225.27 - Retention of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...that the railroad submits to FRA on optical media (CD-ROM) or electronically...following system requirements: (1) Design Requirements. Any electronic record...by this part shall meet the following design parameters: (i) The...

  20. 78 FR 25344 - Notice of Application for Approval of Discontinuance or Modification of a Railroad Signal System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ...Discontinuance or Modification of a Railroad Signal System In accordance with Part 235 of...the discontinuance or modification of a signal system. FRA assigned the petition Docket...discontinuance of the remaining automatic block signal, interlocking, and traffic control...