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1

Bill Nye.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Fans both young and old of Bill Nye the Science Guy, former stand-up comedian and host of the critically acclaimed television series, can get their fill at this fun and informative site. The highlight of the site is a collection of over 40 experiments that young people can try at home, from bending light to marble madness to a tornado in a bottle. Users can also visit the Goodies sections for video clips, photos, and audio recordings of songs featured in the series. Additional features include a Teacher's Lounge, TV listings, and Question of the Week.

2

78 FR 52498 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY...SUMMARY: The White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee (RAC...cancellation. For status of the White Pine-Nye RAC meetings prior to attending...

2013-08-23

3

Socioeconomic Profile of Nye County, Nevada: Community Services Inventory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is preparing socioeconomic profiles of Nye County, Nevada, and communities in Nye County that could be affected by siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a high-level nuclear waste r...

1986-01-01

4

FraC/FraD-dependent intercellular molecular exchange in the filaments of a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp.  

PubMed

The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms in which two different cell types, the CO?-fixing vegetative cells and the N?-fixing heterocysts, exchange nutrients and regulators. In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, inactivation of sepJ or genes in the fraC operon (fraC, fraD and fraE) produce filament fragmentation. SepJ, FraC and FraD are cytoplasmic membrane proteins located in the filament's intercellular septa that are needed for intercellular exchange of the fluorescent tracer calcein (622 Da). Transmission electron microscopy showed an alteration in the heterocyst cytoplasmic membrane at the vegetative cell-heterocyst septa in ?fraC and ?fraD mutants. Immunogold labelling of FraD confirmed its localization in the intercellular septa and clearly showed the presence of part of the protein between the cytoplasmic membranes of the adjacent cells. This localization seemed to be affected in the ?fraC mutant but was not impaired in a ?sepJ mutant. Intercellular transfer of a smaller fluorescent tracer, 5-carboxyfluorescein (374 Da), was largely impaired in ?fraC, ?fraD and double ?fraC-?fraD mutants, but much less in the ?sepJ mutant. These results show the existence in the Anabaena filaments of a FraC/FraD-dependent intercellular molecular exchange that does not require SepJ. PMID:21819458

Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Schwarz, Heinz; Maldener, Iris; Mariscal, Vicente; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

2011-10-01

5

Apollo 14 mission to Fra Mauro  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1971 Apollo 14 Mission to Fra Mauro, a lunar highland area, is highlighted in this video. The mission's primary goal was the collection of lunar rocks and soil samples and lunar exploration. The soil and rock sampling was for the geochronological determination of the Moon's evolution and its comparison with that of Earth. A remote data collection station was

Brian D. Beasley

1991-01-01

6

Naomi Shihab Nye: People! People! My Heart Cried Out.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noted poet and anthologist Naomi Shihab Nye discusses her books of poetry for young people and her work with students to help them find their own poetic voices. Nye's poetry anthologies are appropriate for elementary, middle-school, and high-school students. Fundamental themes are crossing boundaries and making connections to help young readers…

Schliesman, Megan

1998-01-01

7

76 FR 85 - Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) AGENCY: Forest Service...SUMMARY: The Nye/White Pine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a...

2011-01-03

8

Structure of Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In 1976, the second oil field in Nevada - Trap Springs - was discovered in Railroad Valley. Since then, more than 100 oil wells have been drilled in Nye County, and most of these have been in Railroad Valley. This well-control helped to unravel the complex structure of Railroad Valley and enabled the construction of more accurate maps of this valley than any other. This information can be used to construct models for exploring other valleys in the Basin and Range Province of eastern Nevada. The basic stratigraphy of the valley consists of Paleozoic carbonates and shales overlain by Tertiary volcanics, overlain, in turn, by valley fill. The areal extent of Tertiary volcanics, which can be a good reservoir rock, is controlled by tensional normal faulting and paleotopography. In some areas, these volcanics can be in excess of 5000 ft thick, but absent within a few miles, owing to paleotopography and/or faulting. The Paleozoic rocks are deformed by a pre-basin and range compressional history that folded and faulted them. As a result, the structure within the Paleozoics is more complex. Thrust faulting played an important role in the deformation of these rocks. Crystalline basement rocks can be found juxtaposed between Paleozoic outcrops in the flanks of the valley, and Paleozoic rocks found in well control farther out in the valley. The geothermal history of Railroad Valley plays an important role in constructing a structural map of the valley, taking into account the Mesozoic thrust faulting and Tertiary normal faulting. Air photos, combined with good well control and published reports, assist in mapping the geologic structure in Railroad Valley.

Ehni, W.J.

1987-08-01

9

Popular Culture and the Academic Library: The Nye Collection.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Russel B. Nye popular culture collection, explores the role of academic libraries in this area, and examines the collection building process for popular culture materials. The reactions of library staff and patrons are included. Seven references are listed. (RAA)

Fiore, Jannette

1980-01-01

10

Socioeconomic profile of Nye County, Nevada: Community services inventory  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is preparing socioeconomic profiles of Nye County, Nevada, and communities in Nye County that could be affected by siting, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, located in Nye County. These profiles serve as a data base for evaluating local community service impacts; store existing socioeconomic data in a uniform, readily accessible format; identify the need for additional data; and assist in developing a plan for monitoring and mitigating any significant adverse impacts that may be associated with site characterization and potential repository development. This element of the socioeconomic profiles contains an inventory of community services provided by local, county, and state agencies and volunteer organizations to residents of Amargosa Valley, Beatty, and Pahrump. Services inventoried for each community include housing, growth management, general government, education, police protection, transportation networks, public clinics, private health personnel, parks and recreation, social services, libraries, ambulances, electric power, heating fuel, water, sewers and wastewater treatment, solid waste, and fire protection. The report includes a summary overview of service providers in Nye County, discussions of services provided to residents of the three communities, and summary tables. Data presented in this profile were collected through early 1985. Data collection efforts are ongoing and this profile will be updated periodically.

NONE

1986-09-01

11

Bedded barite in East Northumberland Canyon, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Bedded barite has been identified in the course of stratigraphic studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in and near East Northumberland Canyon, Toquima Range, Nye County, Nev. The barite beds are interlayered in black chert of probable Ordovician age. The barite rock is mostly dark gray and massive, has a specific gravity averaging about 4.0, and contains, by chemical analysis, 70.7 to 93.9 percent BaSO4.

Shawe, Daniel R.; Poole, F. G.; Brobst, Donald Albert

1967-01-01

12

Interpretation of Transformer FRA Responses— Part I: Influence of Winding Structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frequency-response analysis (FRA) has been accepted as one of the most sensitive tools to detect mechanical faults of power transformers. Correct interpretation of FRA responses is crucial when assessing the integrity of a transformer. Transformer FRA responses have distinctive frequency regions which are predominated by core, windings, and measuring setup. This paper addresses one of the major factors that affect

Zhongdong Wang; Jie Li; Dahlina M. Sofian

2009-01-01

13

Captain Pearl R. Nye: Life on the Ohio and Erie Canal  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Captain Pearl R. Nye was a man cut from a bit of different cloth, and his life and the music he loved so dearly are celebrated as part of this wonderful online collection created by the staff members of the Library of Congress's American Memory Project. Nye was born in 1872 and raised on a canal boat on the Ohio and Erie Canal. He was committed to preserving the songs and stories that were part of the Canal's very essence, and this website features recordings of 75 songs sung by Nye. First-time visitors should look over the timeline of related events that span both Nye's personal history and that of the Canal. Then they can also read through the two informative essays offered here, including "An Informant in Search of a Collector: Captain Pearl R. Nye of Ohio", authored by Rebecca B. Schroeder. Visitors should then listen to the songs, which include such ditties as "Lord Vaniford's Life" and "Mr. Frog".

14

76 FR 41859 - Waiver Petition Docket Numbers FRA-2011-0002, CSX Transportation Railroad, and FRA-2004-17565...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...contact FRA's Docket Clerk, Jerome Melis-Tull by telephone, e-mail, or in...days before the date of the hearing. Mr. Melis-Tull's contact information is as follows...telephone 202-493-6030; e-mail Jerome.Melis-Tull@dot.gov. The informal...

2011-07-15

15

DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: WATER-LEVEL DATA FROM THE NYE COUNTY EARLY WARNING DRILLING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate unqualified, water-level data gathered under the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and to determine whether the status of the data should be changed to ''qualified'' data in accordance with AP-SIII.2Q (Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data). The corroboration method (as defined in Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q) was implemented to qualify water-level data from Nye County measurements obtained directly from the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Program Office (NWRPO). Comparison of United States Geological Survey (USGS) measurements contained in DTN GS990608312312.003 with the Nye County water-level data has shown that the differences in water-level altitudes for the same wells are significantly less than 1 meter. This is an acceptable finding. Evaluation and recommendation criteria have been strictly applied to qualify Nye County measurements of water levels in selected wells measured by the USGS. However, the process of qualifying measured results by corroboration also builds confidence that the Nye County method for measurement of water levels is adequate for the intended use of the data (which is regional modeling). Therefore, it is reasonable to extend the term of ''qualified'' to water-level measurements in the remaining Nye County Phase I wells on the basis that the method has been shown to produce adequate results for the intended purpose of supporting large-scale modeling activities for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The Data Qualification Team recommends the Nye County, water-level data contained in Appendix D of this report be designated as ''qualified''. These data document manual measurements of water-levels in eight (8) EWDP Phase I drillholes that were obtained prior to the field installation of continuous monitoring equipment.

F. H. Dove, P. Sanchez, and L. Saraka

2000-04-21

16

Deformation of silicates in some Fra Mauro breccias.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of the studies conducted show that there is no unequivocal evidence for appreciable static deformation (other than annealing) in the Fra Mauro formation. These rocks probably have been derived from depths to about 10 km. It is suggested that there has been no substantial tectonic activity in the range from the surface to 10 km since these rocks and those of the other Apollo sites crystallized some 3 to 4 billion years ago. This negative conclusion implies that at least the outer layer of the moon has been static for this length of time.

Lallemant, H. G. A.; Carter, N. L.

1972-01-01

17

Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998  

SciTech Connect

This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

NONE

1998-07-01

18

Fra2 is a co-regulator of fep1 inhibition in response to iron starvation.  

PubMed

Iron is required for several metabolic functions involved in cellular growth. Although several players involved in iron transport have been identified, the mechanisms by which iron-responsive transcription factors are controlled are still poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Fep1 transcription factor represses genes involved in iron acquisition in response to high levels of iron. In contrast, when iron levels are low, Fep1 becomes inactive and loses its ability to associate with chromatin. Although the molecular basis by which Fep1 is inactivated under iron starvation remains unknown, this process requires the monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4. Here, we demonstrate that Fra2 plays a role in the negative regulation of Fep1 activity. Disruption of fra2+ (fra2?) led to a constitutive repression of the fio1+ gene transcription. Fep1 was consistently active and constitutively bound to its target gene promoters in cells lacking fra2+. A constitutive activation of Fep1 was also observed in a php4? fra2? double mutant strain in which the behavior of Fep1 is freed of its transcriptional regulation by Php4. Microscopic analyses of cells expressing a functional Fra2-Myc13 protein revealed that Fra2 localized throughout the cells with a significant proportion of Fra2 being observed within the nuclei. Further analysis by coimmunoprecipitation showed that Fra2, Fep1 and Grx4 are associated in a heteroprotein complex. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments brought further evidence that an interaction between Fep1 and Fra2 occurs in the nucleus. Taken together, results reported here revealed that Fra2 plays a role in the Grx4-mediated pathway that inactivates Fep1 in response to iron deficiency. PMID:24897379

Jacques, Jean-François; Mercier, Alexandre; Brault, Ariane; Mourer, Thierry; Labbé, Simon

2014-01-01

19

Fra2 Is a Co-Regulator of Fep1 Inhibition in Response to Iron Starvation  

PubMed Central

Iron is required for several metabolic functions involved in cellular growth. Although several players involved in iron transport have been identified, the mechanisms by which iron-responsive transcription factors are controlled are still poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Fep1 transcription factor represses genes involved in iron acquisition in response to high levels of iron. In contrast, when iron levels are low, Fep1 becomes inactive and loses its ability to associate with chromatin. Although the molecular basis by which Fep1 is inactivated under iron starvation remains unknown, this process requires the monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4. Here, we demonstrate that Fra2 plays a role in the negative regulation of Fep1 activity. Disruption of fra2+ (fra2?) led to a constitutive repression of the fio1+ gene transcription. Fep1 was consistently active and constitutively bound to its target gene promoters in cells lacking fra2+. A constitutive activation of Fep1 was also observed in a php4? fra2? double mutant strain in which the behavior of Fep1 is freed of its transcriptional regulation by Php4. Microscopic analyses of cells expressing a functional Fra2-Myc13 protein revealed that Fra2 localized throughout the cells with a significant proportion of Fra2 being observed within the nuclei. Further analysis by coimmunoprecipitation showed that Fra2, Fep1 and Grx4 are associated in a heteroprotein complex. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments brought further evidence that an interaction between Fep1 and Fra2 occurs in the nucleus. Taken together, results reported here revealed that Fra2 plays a role in the Grx4-mediated pathway that inactivates Fep1 in response to iron deficiency.

Jacques, Jean-Francois; Mercier, Alexandre; Brault, Ariane; Mourer, Thierry; Labbe, Simon

2014-01-01

20

The global Landsat imagery database for the FAO FRA remote sensing survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

To collect and provide periodically updated information on global forest resources, their management and use, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has been coordinating global forest resources assessments (FRA) every 5–10 years since 1946. To complement the FRA national-based statistics and to provide an independent assessment of forest cover and change, a global remote sensing survey (RSS) has

P. Potapov; M. C. Hansen; A. M. Gerrand; E. J. Lindquist; K. Pittman; S. Turubanova; M. Løyche Wilkie

2011-01-01

21

Apollo 14 - Nature and origin of rock types in soil from the Fra Mauro formation.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Compositions of glasses in the Apollo 14 soil correspond to four types of Fra Mauro basalts, to mare basalts and soils, and, in minor amounts, to gabbroic anorthosite and potash granite. The Fra Mauro basalts can be related by simple low pressure crystal-liquid fractionation that implies a parent composition like that of Apollo 14 sample 14310.

Aitken, F. K.; Anderson, D. H.; Bass, M. N.; Brown, R. W.; Butler, P., Jr.; Heiken, G.; Jakes, P.; Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Takeda, H.

1971-01-01

22

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code C Appendix C to...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 215, App. C Appendix C to Part 215âFRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code The...

2013-10-01

23

Signal-dependent fra-2 regulation in skeletal muscle reserve and satellite cells  

PubMed Central

Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that paradoxically also has some tissue-specific functions. In skeletal muscle cells, we document that the AP-1 subunit, Fra-2, is expressed in the resident stem cells (Pax7-positive satellite cells) and also in the analogous undifferentiated ‘reserve' cell population in myogenic cultures, but not in differentiated myofiber nuclei. Silencing of Fra-2 expression enhances the expression of differentiation markers such as muscle creatine kinase and myosin heavy chain, indicating a possible role of Fra-2 in undifferentiated myogenic progenitor cells. We observed that Fra-2 is a target of cytokine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 signaling in cultured muscle cells, and extensive mass spectrometry and mutational analysis identified S320 and T322 as regulators of Fra-2 protein stability. Interestingly, Fra-2 S320 phosphorylation occurs transiently in activated satellite cells and is extinguished in myogenin-positive differentiating cells. Thus, cytokine-mediated Fra-2 expression and stabilization is linked to regulation of myogenic progenitor cells having implications for the molecular regulation of adult muscle stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

Alli, N S; Yang, E C; Miyake, T; Aziz, A; Collins-Hooper, H; Patel, K; McDermott, J C

2013-01-01

24

Fra-2/AP-1 controls bone formation by regulating osteoblast differentiation and collagen production  

PubMed Central

The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex, in particular the Fos proteins, is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. Fra-2 (Fosl2), a Fos-related protein of the AP-1 family, is expressed in bone cells, and newborn mice lacking Fra-2 exhibit defects in chondrocytes and osteoclasts. Here we show that Fra-2–deficient osteoblasts display a differentiation defect both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, Fra-2–overexpressing mice are osteosclerotic because of increased differentiation of osteoblasts, which appears to be cell autonomous. Importantly, the osteoblast-specific osteocalcin (Oc) gene and collagen1?2 (col1?2) are transcriptional targets of Fra-2 in both murine and human bone cells. In addition, Fra-2, Oc, and col1 are expressed in stromal cells of human chondroblastic and osteoblastic osteosarcomas (Os’s) as well as during osteoblast differentiation of human Os cell lines. These findings reveal a novel function of Fra-2/AP-1 as a positive regulator of bone and matrix formation in mice and humans.

Bozec, Aline; Bakiri, Latifa; Jimenez, Maria; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael

2010-01-01

25

Fra-2/AP-1 controls bone formation by regulating osteoblast differentiation and collagen production.  

PubMed

The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex, in particular the Fos proteins, is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. Fra-2 (Fosl2), a Fos-related protein of the AP-1 family, is expressed in bone cells, and newborn mice lacking Fra-2 exhibit defects in chondrocytes and osteoclasts. Here we show that Fra-2-deficient osteoblasts display a differentiation defect both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, Fra-2-overexpressing mice are osteosclerotic because of increased differentiation of osteoblasts, which appears to be cell autonomous. Importantly, the osteoblast-specific osteocalcin (Oc) gene and collagen1?2 (col1?2) are transcriptional targets of Fra-2 in both murine and human bone cells. In addition, Fra-2, Oc, and col1 are expressed in stromal cells of human chondroblastic and osteoblastic osteosarcomas (Os's) as well as during osteoblast differentiation of human Os cell lines. These findings reveal a novel function of Fra-2/AP-1 as a positive regulator of bone and matrix formation in mice and humans. PMID:20837772

Bozec, Aline; Bakiri, Latifa; Jimenez, Maria; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F

2010-09-20

26

Fra-1 controls motility of bladder cancer cells via transcriptional upregulation of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL.  

PubMed

Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1) is a Fos family member overexpressed in several types of human cancers. Here, we report that Fra-1 is highly expressed in the muscle-invasive form of the carcinoma of the bladder (80%) and to a lesser extent in superficial bladder cancer (42%). We demonstrate that in this type of cancer Fra-1 is regulated via a C-terminal instability signal and C-terminal phosphorylation. We show that manipulation of Fra-1 expression levels in bladder cancer cell lines affects cell morphology, motility and proliferation. The gene coding for AXL tyrosine kinase is directly upregulated by Fra-1 in bladder cancer and in other cell lines. Importantly, our data demonstrate that AXL mediates the effect of Fra-1 on tumour cell motility but not on cell proliferation. We suggest that AXL may represent an attractive therapeutic target in cancers expressing high Fra-1 levels. PMID:21822309

Sayan, A E; Stanford, R; Vickery, R; Grigorenko, E; Diesch, J; Kulbicki, K; Edwards, R; Pal, R; Greaves, P; Jariel-Encontre, I; Piechaczyk, M; Kriajevska, M; Mellon, J K; Dhillon, A S; Tulchinsky, E

2012-03-22

27

75 FR 59322 - Notice of Availability of Answers to Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Buy America & FRA's...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Regarding Buy America & FRA's High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Program AGENCY: Federal...related programs into the High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail (HSIPR) program, as...articulated a new ``Vision for High-Speed Rail in America''...

2010-09-27

28

NrrA directly regulates expression of the fraF gene and antisense RNAs for fraE in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.  

PubMed

The heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 grows as linear multicellular filaments that can contain hundreds of cells. Heterocysts, which are specialized cells for nitrogen fixation, are regularly intercalated among photosynthetic vegetative cells, and these cells are metabolically dependent on each other. Thus, multicellularity is essential for diazotrophic growth of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the fraF gene, which is required to limit filament length, is induced by nitrogen deprivation. The fraF transcripts extend to the fraE gene, which lies on the opposite DNA strand and could possess dual functionality, mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE. In the present study, we found that NrrA, a nitrogen-regulated response regulator, directly regulated expression of fraF. Induction of fraF by nitrogen deprivation was abolished by the nrrA disruption. NrrA specifically bound to the promoter region of fraF, and recognized an inverted repeat sequence. Thus, it is concluded that NrrA controls expression of mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE in response to nitrogen deprivation. PMID:24554757

Ehira, Shigeki; Ohmori, Masayuki

2014-05-01

29

Chromosomal Fragile Site FRA16D and DNA Instability in Cancer1  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been proposed that common aphidicolin-inducible fragile sites, in general, predispose to specific chromosomal breakage associated with deletion, amplification, and\\/or translocation in certain forms of cancer. Although this appears to be the case for the fragile site FRA3B and may be the case for FRA7G, it is not yet clear whether this association is a general property of this

Marie Mangelsdorf; Karin Ried; Erica Woollatt; Sonia Dayan; Helen Eyre; Merran Finnis; Lynne Hobson; Julie Nancarrow; Deon Venter; Elizabeth Baker; Robert I. Richards

30

Frequent breakpoints in the region surrounding FRA3B in sporadic renal cell carcinomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The constitutive fragile site at chromosomal band 3p14.2, FRA3B, is the most active common fragile site in the human genome. We have localized aphidicolin-induced breakpoints to two distinct clusters, separated by 200 Kb, in FRA3B (Paradee et al., 1996). Sequence analysis of these regions identified two polymorphic microsatellite markers immediately adjacent to each of these breakpoint clusters. In this report

Viji Shridhar; Liang Wang; Rita Rosati; William Paradee; Ravi Shridhar; Chadwick Mullins; Wael Sakr; David Grignon; Orlando J Miller; Qi C Sun; John Petros; David I Smith; DI Smith

1997-01-01

31

Aphidicolin-Induced FRA3B Breakpoints Cluster in Two Distinct Regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The common fragile site at chromosomal band 3p14.2 (FRA3B) is the most sensitive single site in the human genome to induced chromosomal lesions. This fragile site may predispose chromosome 3p to breakage that is commonly observed in lung, renal, and many other cancers. We previously used aphidicolin induction of FRA3B expression in a chromosome 3-only somatic cell hybrid to generate

Liang Wang; William Paradee; Chadwick Mullins; Ravi Shridhar; Rita Rosati; Charles M. Wilke; Thomas W. Glover; David I. Smith

1997-01-01

32

Implications of FRA16A Structure for the Mechanism of Chromosomal Fragile Site Genesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fragile sites are chemically induced nonstaining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. DNA sequences encompassing and including the rare, autosomal, folate-sensitive fragile site, FRA16A, were isolated by positional cloning. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)_n repeat. This repeat

J. K. Nancarrow; E. Kremer; K. Holman; H. Eyre; N. A. Doggett; D. Le Paslier; D. F. Callen; G. R. Sutherland; R. I. Richards

1994-01-01

33

From Filippo Lippi to Piero della Francesca: Fra Carnevale and the Making of a Renaissance Master  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This special Web feature from the Metropolitan Museum centers around two fifteenth century paintings acquired by two US museums (the Metropolitan and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston) from the Barberini Collection in Rome in the 1930s, that have puzzled scholars for more than a century, and have only recently been identified as the work of Giovanni di Bartolomeo Corradini of Urbino, also known as Fra Carnevale. In addition to investigating the mystery of Fra Carnevale, the Web feature also examines the concepts of artistic identity, in contrast with the Renaissance practice of artworks that issue from the studio of a named artist, that are actually the work of many unnamed artists. To do this, the feature is divided into three sections: "Filippo Lippi", 29 works by Lippi and others trained in his workshop; "An Alternative Vision", seven paintings by artists working within the studio system, but, similar to Fra Carnevale's works, containing unusual elements; and "The Mystery of Fra Carnevale", including the two panels, most likely parts of Fra Carnevale's altarpiece for Santa Maria della Bella in Urbino, The Birth of the Virgin and The Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple, done in what has come to be recognized as Fra Carnevale's style-paintings so full of architectural details that the figures seem incidental to the architecture.

34

Demographic survey centered around the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demographic data were gathered for several small population centers on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Population projections were made for the three townships that include most of the major population centers in the study area, based on the share approach. These townships were Alamo Township (Lincoln County), Beatty and Pahrump townships (Nye County). It was estimated that the

Richard-Haggard

1983-01-01

35

BOOK REVIEW: SOLUTE MOVEMENT IN THE RHIZOSPHERE BY TINKEY AND NYE  

EPA Science Inventory

After 23 years, Tinker and Nye have published an updated version of their earlier book titled "Solute Movement in the Soil-Root System" (University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1977). The book contains many of the same elements that made the 1977 publication so use...

36

NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA No. 2003-0368-2961, Nye County Justice Court Building, Pahrump, Nevada, March 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On September 12, 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a confidential request from employees to evaluate health concerns thought to be related to the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of the Nye County Justice C...

2005-01-01

37

The PKC? pathway participates in the aberrant accumulation of Fra-1 protein in invasive ER-negative breast cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Fra-1 is aberrantly expressed in a large number of cancer cells and tissues, and emerging evidence suggests an important role for this Fos family protein in both oncogenesis and the progression or maintenance of many tumour types. Here, we show that the concentration of Fra-1 is high in invasive oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative (ER?) breast cancer cell lines, regardless of their Ras pathway status. All of the ER? cells express high levels of activated PKC?, and the inhibition of PKC? activity using RNA interference or the expression of a dominant-negative mutant results in a dramatic reduction in Fra-1 abundance. Conversely, the ectopic expression of constitutively active PKC? leads to Fra-1 phosphorylation and accumulation in poorly invasive ER+ cells. This accumulation is due to the stabilisation of the Fra-1 protein through PKC? signalling, whereas other members of the PKC family are ineffective. Both SPAK and ERK1/2, whose activities are up-regulated by PKC?, participate in PKC?-driven Fra-1 stabilisation. Interestingly, their relative contributions appear to be different depending on the cell line studied. ERK1/2 signalling has a major role in ER- MDA-MB-231 cells whereas Fra-1 accumulation occurs mainly through SPAK signalling in ER? BT549 cells. Fra-1 mutational analysis shows that the phosphorylation of S265, T223 and T230 is critical for PKC?-driven Fra-1 stabilisation. Phosphorylation of the protein was confirmed using specific antisera against Fra-1 phosphorylated on T223 or S265. In addition, Fra-1 participates in PKC?-induced cell invasion and is necessary for PKC?-induced cell migration. In summary, we identified PKC? signalling as an important regulator of Fra-1 accumulation in ER- breast cancer cells. Moreover, our results suggest that PKC? could participate in progression of some breast cancers and could be a new therapeutic target.

Belguise, Karine; Milord, Sandrine; Galtier, Florence; Moquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Piechaczyk, Marc; Chalbos, Dany

2012-01-01

38

FRaC: a feature-modeling approach for semi-supervised and unsupervised anomaly detection.  

PubMed

Anomaly detection involves identifying rare data instances (anomalies) that come from a different class or distribution than the majority (which are simply called "normal" instances). Given a training set of only normal data, the semi-supervised anomaly detection task is to identify anomalies in the future. Good solutions to this task have applications in fraud and intrusion detection. The unsupervised anomaly detection task is different: Given unlabeled, mostly-normal data, identify the anomalies among them. Many real-world machine learning tasks, including many fraud and intrusion detection tasks, are unsupervised because it is impractical (or impossible) to verify all of the training data. We recently presented FRaC, a new approach for semi-supervised anomaly detection. FRaC is based on using normal instances to build an ensemble of feature models, and then identifying instances that disagree with those models as anomalous. In this paper, we investigate the behavior of FRaC experimentally and explain why FRaC is so successful. We also show that FRaC is a superior approach for the unsupervised as well as the semi-supervised anomaly detection task, compared to well-known state-of-the-art anomaly detection methods, LOF and one-class support vector machines, and to an existing feature-modeling approach. PMID:22639542

Noto, Keith; Brodley, Carla; Slonim, Donna

2012-01-01

39

Frequency of Fra X syndrome among institutionalized mentally retarded males in Poland  

SciTech Connect

Results of cytogenetic studies, performed in a group of 201 institutionalized mentally retarded males, are presented. At least two cytogenetic methods for eliciting the Xq27.3 fragile site, recommended by the Fourth International Workshop on the Fra X Syndrome were used. A subgroup of 67 out of 201 studied males was also examined using molecular methods. In 6 (2.9%) males fra X syndrome was diagnosed. All cytogenetic positive results were confirmed by molecular analysis. Five patients had full expansion CGG repeats and one had both premutation and full mutation. Postulated frequency of fra X syndrome in Polish population being 0.2-0.4 / 1,000 males seems to be lower than it could be expected on the basis of previous literature data. 19 refs., 4 tabs.

Mazurczak, T.; Bocian, E.; Milewski, M. [National Research Inst. of Mother and Child, Warsaw (Poland)] [and others] [National Research Inst. of Mother and Child, Warsaw (Poland); and others

1996-07-12

40

Fra proteins influencing filament integrity, diazotrophy and localization of septal protein SepJ in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.  

PubMed

Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can fix N(2) in differentiated cells called heterocysts, which exchange nutritional and regulatory compounds with the neighbouring photosynthetic vegetative cells. The cells in the filament appear to be joined by some protein structures, of which SepJ (FraG) that is located at the cell poles in the intercellular septa and is needed for filament integrity seems to be a component. Other known proteins required for filament integrity include FraC and FraH. Whereas fraC (alr2392) was constitutively expressed as an operon together with two downstream genes, alr2393 (fraD) and alr2394 (fraE), fraH (alr1603) was induced under nitrogen deprivation. Single mutants of these genes showed filament fragmentation under nitrogen deprivation and did not grow diazotrophically, although they formed heterocysts. The fraC and fraD mutants showed an impaired localization of SepJ at the intercellular septa and were hampered in the intercellular transfer of the fluorescent probe calcein. As shown with GFP fusions, FraC and FraD are also located at the intercellular septa. Therefore, at least three different proteins, SepJ, FraC and FraD, influence the architecture and function of the intercellular septa in the Anabaena filaments. PMID:20487302

Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Mariscal, Vicente; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

2010-03-01

41

The F8H Glycosyltransferase is a Functional Paralog of FRA8 Involved in Glucuronoxylan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis  

EPA Science Inventory

The FRAGILE FIBER8 gene was previously shown to be required for the biosynthesis of the reducing end tetrasaccharide sequence of glucuronoxylan (GX) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we demonstrate that F8H, a close homolog of FRA8, is a functional ortholog of FRA8 involved in GX bi...

42

DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: WATER-LEVEL DATA FROM THE NYE COUNTY EARLY WARNING DRILLING PROGRAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this work is to evaluate unqualified, water-level data gathered under the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and to determine whether the status of the data should be changed to ''qualified'' data in accordance with AP-SIII.2Q (Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data). The corroboration method (as defined in Attachment 2

F. H. Dove; P. Sanchez; L. Saraka

2000-01-01

43

Neotectonics of the southern Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada and Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complex pattern of active faults occurs in the southern Amargosa Desert, southern Nye, County, Nevada. These faults can be grouped into three main fault systems: (1) a NE-striking zone of faults that forms the southwest extension of the left-lateral Rock Valley fault zone, in the much larger Spotted Range-Mine Mountain structural zone, (2) a N-striking fault zone coinciding with

1991-01-01

44

The inheritance of fragile sites: apparent absence of fra(2)(q13) in the parents of three unrelated probands.  

PubMed Central

We describe the inherited folate sensitive fragile site, fra(2)(q13), in three unrelated mentally retarded children, two of them with different forms of epilepsy. Fra(2)(q13) was detected in one healthy sib of one of the probands. Except for one cell in one of the fathers, fra(2)(q13) could not be detected in any of the six parents, who were repeatedly studied using methods known to induce fragile sites of this type. These findings suggest that fra(2)(q13) is not associated with the clinical features of our patients and can be transmitted by persons not expressing it. The expression of fra(2)(q13) may be age dependent. Images

Keskiaho, L; Knuutila, S; Pihko, H; Nuutila, A; Kaski, U; Koivikko, M; de la Chapelle, A

1987-01-01

45

The next generation high-speed rail technology program at FRA  

Microsoft Academic Search

As authorized in the Swift Rail Development Act of 1994, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) may undertake activities for the improvement, adaptation, and integration of proven technologies for commercial application in high-speed passenger rail service in the US. Since the sole operator of intercity passenger rail service in the country, Amtrak, has initiated a program to complete the electrification of

R. McCown; T. Tsai

1995-01-01

46

Investigations on sensitivity of FRA method in diagnosis of interturn faults in transformer winding  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents sensitivity of Frequency Response Analysis (FRA) method applied to detection of interturn faults. Frequency response has been carried out on a special Reduced Scale Traction Transformer (RSTT). The RSTT has the wound iron core and eight coils arranged in the \\

Andrzej Wilk; Dominik Adamczyk

2011-01-01

47

Uniparental disomy (UPD) for fra(X) in a 47,XXY male  

SciTech Connect

We report a 4-year-old hyperactive, mentally retarded male with 47,XXY and UPD for fra(X). Speech and motor delay were first noted at age 15 months. He has no dysmorphic features, normal ears, hyperextensible joints, small testes, and no history of seizures. His mother has prominent lowest ears, a long midface, anteverted nostrils, hyperextensible joints, malocclusion, and had learning problems in school. Routine chromosome analysis revealed the proband to be 47,XXY. Parental chromosomes were normal in number. The proband was fra(X) positive [30/160 cells, 18%]. No cells had two expressed fra(X)s; however, this may be a function of the low level of expression and the number of cells scored. Maternal cells were also fra(X) positive [19/205, 9.2%]. Southern analysis demonstrated the mother to be heterozygous for a methylated, full mutation (>220 repeats); her normal FMR-1 gene was disproportionately unmethylated. The proband had two fully expanded and methylated FMR-1 genes, one the same size as the maternal gene and the other >620 repeats. RFLP analysis revealed a maternal meiotic II error, the result of which was UPD of the X chromosome.

Torfs, C.P.; Christianson, R.E.; Amos, J.A.; Huang, X.L.; Kang, X.Z. [Center for Human Genetics Boston Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

48

Clinico-neurological investigations in the fra(X) form of mental retardation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinical, neurological and electroencephalographic investigation was undertaken in 29 previously cytogenetically verified hemizygous males with the fra(X) form of mental retardation (age range 3.5 to 59 years); in addition, 6 heterozygous females were examined. All male patients displayed the known physical aspects of this syndrome together with associated abnormalities of the palate, skeleton, connective tissue and endocrine system. The

P. Vieregge; U. Froster-Iskenius

1989-01-01

49

FRA2A is a CGG repeat expansion associated with silencing of AFF3.  

PubMed

Folate-sensitive fragile sites (FSFS) are a rare cytogenetically visible subset of dynamic mutations. Of the eight molecularly characterized FSFS, four are associated with intellectual disability (ID). Cytogenetic expression results from CGG tri-nucleotide-repeat expansion mutation associated with local CpG hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. The best studied is the FRAXA site in the FMR1 gene, where large expansions cause fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited ID syndrome. Here we studied three families with FRA2A expression at 2q11 associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes. We identified a polymorphic CGG repeat in a conserved, brain-active alternative promoter of the AFF3 gene, an autosomal homolog of the X-linked AFF2/FMR2 gene: Expansion of the AFF2 CGG repeat causes FRAXE ID. We found that FRA2A-expressing individuals have mosaic expansions of the AFF3 CGG repeat in the range of several hundred repeat units. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing both suggest AFF3 promoter hypermethylation. cSNP-analysis demonstrates monoallelic expression of the AFF3 gene in FRA2A carriers thus predicting that FRA2A expression results in functional haploinsufficiency for AFF3 at least in a subset of tissues. By whole-mount in situ hybridization the mouse AFF3 ortholog shows strong regional expression in the developing brain, somites and limb buds in 9.5-12.5dpc mouse embryos. Our data suggest that there may be an association between FRA2A and a delay in the acquisition of motor and language skills in the families studied here. However, additional cases are required to firmly establish a causal relationship. PMID:24763282

Metsu, Sofie; Rooms, Liesbeth; Rainger, Jacqueline; Taylor, Martin S; Bengani, Hemant; Wilson, David I; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Morrison, Harris; Vandeweyer, Geert; Reyniers, Edwin; Douglas, Evelyn; Thompson, Geoffrey; Haan, Eric; Gecz, Jozef; Fitzpatrick, David R; Kooy, R Frank

2014-04-01

50

FRA2A Is a CGG Repeat Expansion Associated with Silencing of AFF3  

PubMed Central

Folate-sensitive fragile sites (FSFS) are a rare cytogenetically visible subset of dynamic mutations. Of the eight molecularly characterized FSFS, four are associated with intellectual disability (ID). Cytogenetic expression results from CGG tri-nucleotide-repeat expansion mutation associated with local CpG hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. The best studied is the FRAXA site in the FMR1 gene, where large expansions cause fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited ID syndrome. Here we studied three families with FRA2A expression at 2q11 associated with a wide spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes. We identified a polymorphic CGG repeat in a conserved, brain-active alternative promoter of the AFF3 gene, an autosomal homolog of the X-linked AFF2/FMR2 gene: Expansion of the AFF2 CGG repeat causes FRAXE ID. We found that FRA2A-expressing individuals have mosaic expansions of the AFF3 CGG repeat in the range of several hundred repeat units. Moreover, bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing both suggest AFF3 promoter hypermethylation. cSNP-analysis demonstrates monoallelic expression of the AFF3 gene in FRA2A carriers thus predicting that FRA2A expression results in functional haploinsufficiency for AFF3 at least in a subset of tissues. By whole-mount in situ hybridization the mouse AFF3 ortholog shows strong regional expression in the developing brain, somites and limb buds in 9.5–12.5dpc mouse embryos. Our data suggest that there may be an association between FRA2A and a delay in the acquisition of motor and language skills in the families studied here. However, additional cases are required to firmly establish a causal relationship.

Metsu, Sofie; Rooms, Liesbeth; Rainger, Jacqueline; Taylor, Martin S.; Bengani, Hemant; Wilson, David I.; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Morrison, Harris; Vandeweyer, Geert; Reyniers, Edwin; Douglas, Evelyn; Thompson, Geoffrey; Haan, Eric; Gecz, Jozef; FitzPatrick, David R.; Kooy, R. Frank

2014-01-01

51

Activator Protein 1 transcription factor Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1) is dispensable for murine liver fibrosis, but modulates xenobiotic metabolism.  

PubMed

The Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor subunit Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1) has been implicated in liver fibrosis. Here we used loss-of-function as well as switchable, cell type-specific, gain-of-function alleles for Fra-1 to investigate the relevance of Fra-1 expression in cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis. Our results indicate that Fra-1 is dispensable in three well-established, complementary models of liver fibrosis. However, broad Fra-1 expression in adult mice results in liver fibrosis, which is reversible, when ectopic Fra-1 is switched off. Interestingly, hepatocyte-specific Fra-1 expression is not sufficient to trigger the disease, although Fra-1 expression leads to dysregulation of fibrosis-associated genes. Both opn and cxcl9 are controlled by Fra-1 in gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments. Importantly, Fra-1 attenuates liver damage in the 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine-feeding cholestatic liver injury model. Strikingly, manipulating Fra-1 expression affects genes involved in hepatic transport and detoxification, in particular glutathione S-transferases. Molecular analyses indicate that Fra-1 binds to the promoters of cxcl9 and gstp1 in vivo. Furthermore, loss of Fra-1 sensitizes, while hepatic Fra-1 expression protects from acetaminophen-induced liver damage, a paradigm for glutathione-mediated acute liver failure. Conclusion: These data define a novel function of Fra-1/AP-1 in modulating the expression of detoxification genes and the adaptive response of the liver to bile acids/xenobiotic overload. PMID:23703832

Hasenfuss, Sebastian C; Bakiri, Latifa; Thomsen, Martin K; Hamacher, Rainer; Wagner, Erwin F

2014-01-01

52

Identification of a Novel Chloroplast Protein AtNYE1 Regulating Chlorophyll Degradation during Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA  

PubMed Central

A dramatic increase of chlorophyll (Chl) degradation occurs during senescence of vegetative plant organs and fruit ripening. Although the biochemical pathway of Chl degradation has long been proposed, little is known about its regulatory mechanism. Identification of Chl degradation-disturbed mutants and subsequently isolation of responsible genes would greatly facilitate the elucidation of the regulation of Chl degradation. Here, we describe a nonyellowing mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nye1-1, in which 50% Chl was retained, compared to less than 10% in the wild type (Columbia-0), at the end of a 6-d dark incubation. Nevertheless, neither photosynthesis- nor senescence-associated process was significantly affected in nye1-1. Characteristically, a significant reduction in pheophorbide a oxygenase activity was detected in nye1-1. However, no detectable accumulation of either chlorophyllide a or pheophorbide a was observed. Reciprocal crossings revealed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a monogenic semidominant nuclear mutation. We have identified AtNYE1 by positional cloning. Dozens of its putative orthologs, predominantly appearing in higher plant species, were identified, some of which have been associated with Chl degradation in a few crop species. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that AtNYE1 was drastically induced by senescence signals. Constitutive overexpression of AtNYE1 could result in either pale-yellow true leaves or even albino seedlings. These results collectively indicate that NYE1 plays an important regulatory role in Chl degradation during senescence by modulating pheophorbide a oxygenase activity.

Ren, Guodong; An, Kun; Liao, Yang; Zhou, Xiao; Cao, Yajun; Zhao, Huifang; Ge, Xiaochun; Kuai, Benke

2007-01-01

53

49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive crashworthiness design standards. 229.207 Section...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.207 New...

2013-10-01

54

49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive crashworthiness design standards. 229.207 Section...STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.207 New...

2009-10-01

55

Cancer-Specific Chromosome Alterations in the Constitutive Fragile Region FRA3B  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have sequenced 870 kilobases of the FHIT\\/FRA3B locus, from FHIT intron 3 to intron 7. The locus is AT rich (61.5%) and Alu poor (6.2%), and it apparently does not harbor other genes. In a detailed analysis of the 308-kilobase region between FHIT exon 5 and the telomeric end of intron 3, a region known to encompass a human

Koshi Mimori; Teresa Druck; Hiroshi Inoue; Hansjuerg Alder; Lori Berk; Masaki Mori; Kay Huebner; Carlo M. Croce

1999-01-01

56

Replication stress induces tumor-like microdeletions in FHIT\\/FRA3B  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common fragile sites (CFSs) are loci that preferentially exhibit metaphase chromosome gaps and breaks after partial inhibition of DNA synthesis. The fragile site FRA3B, which lies within the FHIT tumor-suppressor gene, is a site of frequent heterozygous and homozygous deletions in many cancer cells and precancerous lesions. The great majority of FHIT and other CFS-associated gene rearrangements in tumors are

Sandra G. Durkin; Ryan L. Ragland; Martin F. Arlt; Jennifer G. Mulle; Stephen T. Warren; Thomas W. Glover

2008-01-01

57

Chromosomal fragile site, FRA16A: Implications for fragile site genesis  

SciTech Connect

Fragile sites are chemically induced non-staining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. The fragile sites sequenced to date (FRAXA and FRAXE) are rare, folate sensitive sites located on the X chromosomes. They have similar DNA sequence composition of a p(CCG)n repeat adjacent to a methylatable CpG island. Individuals expressing the fragile site have an unstable expanded repeat and methylation of the adjacent CpG island. FRAXA is associated with the most common form of familial mental retardation, Fragile X Syndrome. In order to further understand the relationship between the DNA sequence composition, position in the genome, and the chemistry of induction of fragile sites, we have characterized the rare, folate sensitive fragile site on human chromosome 16 referred to as FRA16A. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)n repeat. This repeat was adjacent to a CpG island that was methylated in fragile-site-expressing individuals. The FRA16A locus in individuals who do not express the fragile site is not a site of DNA methylation (imprinting) which suggests that the methylation associated with fragile sites may be a consequence and not a cause of their genesis. We have analyzed the normal repeat copy numbers for the fragile site p(CCG)n repeats in European, Japanese and Indian populations. While the FRAXA and FRAXE repeats show similar distributions of copy numbers, the FRA16A p(CCG)n repeat in Europeans has a greater range and number of alleles (23.7% have n>25) than its Japanese and Indian counterparts. In conjunction with our previous data demonstrating linkage disequilibrium (founder chromosomes) at the FRAXA locus, these data suggest that certain p(CCG)n repeats are inherently unstable.

Richards, R.I.; Nancarrow, J.K.; Mangelsdorf, M. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

1994-09-01

58

All-fra\\/is-retinoic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Human RhabdomyosarcomaCell Lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have been evaluating the role of all-fra\\/w-retinoic acid (RA) in the differentiation and growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Treatment of both embryonal (RD) and alveolar (RH30) human RMS cell lines with all-f ranv-KA resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth with a maximal inhibition of 92 and 66%, respectively, at 5 x 10~* M. When 13-cw-RA

Gary D. Crouch; Lee J. Helman

1991-01-01

59

Positions of Chromosome 3pl'L2 Fragile Sites (FRA3B) within the FHIT Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FHIT gene spans approximately 1 Mb of DNA at chromosome band 3p14.2, which includes the famffial renal ceHcarcinoma chromosome translocation breakpoint (between FHIT exons 3 and 4), the most Ire quently expressed human constitutive chromosomal fragile site (FRA3B, telomeric to the t(3;8) translocation), and numerous homozygousdeletions in various human cancers, frequently involving FHIT exon 5. The FRA3B has previously

Drazen B. Zimonjic; Teresa Druck; Masataka Ohta; Kumar Kastury; Carlo M. Croce; Nicholas C. Popescu; Kay Huebner

60

Aphidicolin-induced FRA3B breakpoints cluster in two distinct regions  

SciTech Connect

The common fragile site at chromosomal band 3p14.2 (FRA313) is the most sensitive single site in the human genome to induced chromosomal lesions. This fragile site may predispose chromosome 3p to breakage that is commonly observed in lung, renal, and many other cancers. We previously used aphidicolin induction of FRA3B expression in a chromosome 3-only somatic cell hybrid to generate a series of hybrids with breakpoints in the 3p14.2 region. These breakpoints were localized to two distinct clusters, separated by 200 kb, that lie on either side of a region of frequent breakage within FRA3B as observed by FISH analysis. Seven proximal aphidicolin-induced breakpoints were localized at or near the end of a THE element. The THE-1 element is flanked by LINE and Alu repetitive elements. The eight distal aphidicolin-induced breakpoints clustered in a region capable of forming multiple hairpin-like structures. Thus repetitive elements and hairpin-like structures may be responsible for chromosome fragility in this region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

Wang, Liang; Smith, D.I. [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); Paradee, W. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others] [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); and others

1997-05-01

61

The strawberry pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) Fra a proteins control flavonoid biosynthesis by binding to metabolic intermediates.  

PubMed

Pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) proteins are involved in many aspects of plant biology but their molecular function is still unclear. They are related by sequence and structural homology to mammalian lipid transport and plant abscisic acid receptor proteins and are predicted to have cavities for ligand binding. Recently, three new members of the PR-10 family, the Fra a proteins, have been identified in strawberry, where they are required for the activity of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, which is essential for the development of color and flavor in fruits. Here, we show that Fra a proteins bind natural flavonoids with different selectivity and affinities in the low ?m range. The structural analysis of Fra a 1 E and a Fra a 3-catechin complex indicates that loops L3, L5, and L7 surrounding the ligand-binding cavity show significant flexibility in the apo forms but close over the ligand in the Fra a 3-catechin complex. Our findings provide mechanistic insight on the function of Fra a proteins and suggest that PR-10 proteins, which are widespread in plants, may play a role in the control of secondary metabolic pathways by binding to metabolic intermediates. PMID:24133217

Casañal, Ana; Zander, Ulrich; Muñoz, Cristina; Dupeux, Florine; Luque, Irene; Botella, Miguel Angel; Schwab, Wilfried; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Marquez, José A

2013-12-01

62

Osteoblast-specific expression of Fra-2/AP-1 controls adiponectin and osteocalcin expression and affects metabolism.  

PubMed

Recent studies have established that the skeleton functions as an endocrine organ affecting metabolism through the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin (Ocn). However, it is not fully understood how many transcription factors expressed in osteoblasts regulate the endocrine function. Here, we show that mice with osteoblast-specific deletion of Fra-2 (Fosl2) have low bone mass but increased body weight. In contrast, transgenic expression of Fra-2 in osteoblasts leads to increased bone mass and decreased body weight accompanied by reduced serum glucose and insulin levels, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, mice lacking Fra-2 have reduced levels of circulating Ocn, but high adiponectin (Adipoq), whereas Fra-2 transgenic mice exhibit high Ocn and low Adipoq levels. Moreover, we found that Adipoq was expressed in osteoblasts and that this expression was transcriptionally repressed by Fra-2. These results demonstrate that Fra-2 expression in osteoblasts represents a novel paradigm for a transcription factor controlling the endocrine function of the skeleton. PMID:24046454

Bozec, Aline; Bakiri, Latifa; Jimenez, Maria; Rosen, Evan D; Catalá-Lehnen, Philip; Schinke, Thorsten; Schett, Georg; Amling, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F

2013-12-01

63

Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of

Donald S. Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

2007-01-01

64

Annotated bibliography for biologic overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This annotated bibliography was compiled to accompany the Biologic Overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, EG and G, Santa Barbara Operations Report No. EGG 1183-2443, which documents and synthesizes important biotic information related to Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI). As such, it is an important part of the NNWSI screening process

E. Collins; W. A. Rhoads

1981-01-01

65

A revised lithostratigraphic framework for the southern Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An informal, revised lithostratigraphic framework for the southern Yucca Mountain area, Nevada has been developed to accommodate new information derived from subsurface investigations of the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Lithologies penetrated by recently drilled boreholes at locations between Stagecoach Road and Highway 95 in southern Nye County include Quaternary and Pliocene alluvium and alluvial breccia, Miocene pyroclastic flow deposits, Miocene intercalated lacustrine siltstone and claystone sequences, early Miocene to Oligocene pre-volcanic sedimentary rocks, and Paleozoic strata. Of the 37 boreholes currently drilled, 21 boreholes have sufficient depth, spatial distribution, or traceable pyroclastic flow, pyroclastic fall, and reworked tuff deposits to aid in the lateral correlation of lithostrata. Medial and distal parts of regional pyroclastic flow deposits of Miocene age can be correlated with the Timber Mountain, Paintbrush, Crater Flat, and Tram Ridge Groups. Rocks intercalated between these regional pyroclastic flow deposits are substantially thicker than in the central part of Yucca Mountain, particularly near the downthrown side of major faults and along the southern extent of exposures at Yucca Mountain.

Spengler, R. W.; Byers, F. M.; Dickerson, R. P.

2006-01-01

66

Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify a potential repository for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Project, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range. 31 refs., 33 figs., 8 tabs.

Brocher, T.M.; Hart, P.E.; Carle, S.F.

1990-11-01

67

Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify potential repositories for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Projects, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range.

Brocher, Thomas M.; Hart, Patrick E.; Carle, Steven F.

68

Replication of a common fragile site, FRA3B, occurs late in S phase and is delayed further upon induction: implications for the mechanism of fragile site induction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FRA3B at 3p14.2 is the most highly expressed of the common fragile sites observed when DNA repli- cation is perturbed by aphidicolin or folate stress. The molecular basis for chromosome fragility at FRA3B is unknown. In contrast to the rare fragile sites, including FRAXA, no repeat motifs, such as trinucleotide re- peats, have been identified within FRA3B. Several lines

Michelle M. Le Beau; Feyruz V. Rassool; Mary E. Neilly; Rafael Espinosa; Thomas W. Glover; David I. Smith; Timothy W. McKeithan

1998-01-01

69

Perennial vegetation data from permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Perennial vegetation data from 68 permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, are given for the period of 1963 through 2002. Dr. Janice C. Beatley established the plots in 1962 and then remeasured them periodically from 1963 through 1975. We remeasured 67 of these plots between 2000 and 2003; the remaining plot was destroyed at some time between 1975 and 1993. The plots ranged from 935 to 2,274 m in elevation and are representative of common plant associations of the Mojave Desert, the transition to Great Basin Desert, and pinyon-juniper woodlands. The purpose of this report is to describe the complete set of ecological data that Beatley collected from the Nevada Test Site from 1963 through 1975 and to present the data for perennial vegetation collected from 2000 through 2003.

Webb, Robert H.; Murov, Marilyn B.; Esque, Todd C.; Boyer, Diane E.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Haines, Dustin F.; Oldershaw, Dominic; Scoles, Sara J.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Blainey, Joan B.; Medica, Philip A.

2003-01-01

70

Field examination of shale and argillite in northern Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-two locales underlain by clay-rich strata ranging from Cambrian Pioche Shale to Mississippian Chainman Shale and equivalents were examined in northern Nye County, Nevada. The text of the report summarizes data for each stratigraphic unit examined. Checklists for tabulating field data at each locale are included in an appendix. Working guidelines used to evaluate the locales include a minimum thickness of 150 m (500 ft) of relatively pure clay-rich bedrock, subsurface depth between 150 m (500 ft) and 900 m (3000 ft), low topographic relief, low seismic and tectonic activity, and avoidance of areas with mineral resource production or potential. Field studies indicate that only the Chainman Shale, specifically in the central and northern parts of the Pancake Range, appears to contain sites that meet these guidelines.

Connolly, J. R.; Woodward, L. A.; Emanuel, K. M.; Keil, K.

1981-12-01

71

Ground-water altitudes and well data, Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report contains ground-water altitudes and well data for wells located in Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California, south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Data are from wells whose coordinates are within the Beatty and Death Valley Junction, California-Nevada maps from the US Geological Survey, scale 1:100,000 (30-minute {times} 60-minute quadrangle). Compilation of these data was made to provide a reference for numerical models of ground-water flow at Yucca Mountain and its vicinity. Water-level measurements were obtained from the US Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, and span the period of October 1951 to May 1991; most measurements were made from 1980 to 1990.

Ciesnik, M.S.

1995-05-01

72

Demographic survey centered around the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Demographic data were gathered for several small population centers on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Population projections were made for the three townships that include most of the major population centers in the study area, based on the share approach. These townships were Alamo Township (Lincoln County), Beatty and Pahrump townships (Nye County). It was estimated that the total population of these three townships, plus Clark County, would reach a maximum of 934,000 people by the year 2000. It was assumed that the on-site population of the NTS would continue to be a function of activity at the site, and that this would, if anything, aid in the attainment of site objectives.

Richard-Haggard, K.

1983-03-01

73

Flood Assessment Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A flood assessment was conducted at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figure 1-1). The study area encompasses the watershed of Yucca Flat, a closed basin approximately 780 square kilometers (km2) (300 square miles) in size. The focus of this effort was on a drainage area of approximately 94 km2 (36 mi2), determined from review of topographic maps and aerial photographs to be the only part of the Yucca Flat watershed that could directly impact the Area 3 RWMS. This smaller area encompasses portions of the Halfpint Range, including Paiute Ridge, Jangle Ridge, Carbonate Ridge, Slanted Buttes, Cockeyed Ridge, and Banded Mountain. The Area 3 RWMS is located on coalescing alluvial fans emanating from this drainage area.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-07-01

74

Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

1995-02-01

75

Pores of the toxin FraC assemble into 2D hexagonal clusters in both crystal structures and model membranes.  

PubMed

The recent high-resolution structure of the toxin FraC derived from the sea anemone Actinia fragacea has provided new insight into the mechanism of pore formation by actinoporins. In this work, we report two new crystal forms of FraC in its oligomeric prepore conformation. Together with the previously reported structure, these two new structures reveal that ring-like nonamers of the toxin assemble into compact two-dimensional hexagonal arrays. This supramolecular organization is maintained in different relative orientations adopted by the oligomers within the crystal layers. Analyses of the aggregation of FraC pores in both planar and curved (vesicles) model membranes show similar 2D hexagonal arrangements. Our observations support a model in which hexagonal pore-packing is a clustering mechanism that maximizes toxin-driven membrane damage in the target cell. PMID:22728830

Mechaly, Ariel E; Bellomio, Augusto; Morante, Koldo; Agirre, Jon; Gil-Cartón, David; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Guérin, Diego M A

2012-11-01

76

c-Jun, Fra2, and ATF-2 Immunoreactivity in the Jejunal Tissues of the Healthy Rat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to compare the localization of some activator protein-1 (AP-1) proteins in healthy rat jejunum.\\u000a For this purpose, the AP-1 members c-Jun, Fra-2, and ATF-2 immunoreactivity (c-Jun-IR, Fra-2-IR, ATF-2-IR) in villus epithelial\\u000a cells (ECs), intravillous lamina propria cells (LPCs), crypt cells (CCs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were analyzed by\\u000a immunohistochemical methods. Among all the

Nurullah Keklikoglu

2008-01-01

77

Quality assurance and analysis of water levels in wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Periodic and continual water-level data from 1963-1998 were compiled and quality assured for 65 observation wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada. As part of the quality assurance of all water levels, ancillary data pertinent to computing hydraulic heads in wells were compiled and analyzed. Quality-assured water levels that were not necessarily in error but which did not

Fenelon

2000-01-01

78

Mercury Concentrations in Largemouth Bass ( Micropterus salmoides ) Collected from Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a known neurotoxin and contaminant of concern worldwide. Mercury may occur at elevated concentrations adjacent\\u000a to industrial sources, such as coal-fired power plants, or in remote environments and newly filled water bodies. Mercury tissue\\u000a concentrations were determined for a sample of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from Crystal Reservoir, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada. This investigation

Shawn GoodchildShawn Gerstenberger

2011-01-01

79

The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation†  

PubMed Central

The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in S. cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in E. coli. We have shown that co-expression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV-visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, Mössbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast.

Li, Haoran; Mapolelo, Daphne T.; Dingra, Nin N.; Naik, Sunil G.; Lees, Nicolas S.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela J.; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Johnson, Michael K.; Outten, Caryn E.

2009-01-01

80

Evidence against close linkage of the loci for fraXq of Martin-Bell syndrome and for factor IX  

Microsoft Academic Search

Linkage between the loci for fraXq of Martin-Bell syndrome and factor IX was studied in nine families exhibiting this syndrome by means of a restriction fragment length polymorphism at the factor IX locus. Computer analysis of the data indicates there to be no evidence for close linkage between the syndrome and the factor IX locus.

B. Zoll; J. Arnemann; M. Krawczak; D. N. Cooper; G. Pescia; W. Wahli; P. Steinbach; J. Schmidtke

1985-01-01

81

Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

2013-10-01

82

FRA2 Is a STAT5 Target Gene Regulated by IL-2 in Human CD4 T Cells  

PubMed Central

Signal transducers and activators of transcription 5(STAT5) are cytokine induced signaling proteins, which regulate key immunological processes, such as tolerance induction, maintenance of homeostasis, and CD4 T-effector cell differentiation. In this study, transcriptional targets of STAT5 in CD4 T cells were studied by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Genomic mapping of the sites cloned and identified in this study revealed the striking observation that the majority of STAT5-binding sites mapped to intergenic (>50 kb upstream) or intronic, rather than promoter proximal regions. Of the 105 STAT5 responsive binding sites identified, 94% contained the canonical (IFN-? activation site) GAS motifs. A number of putative target genes identified here are associated with tumor biology. Here, we identified Fos-related antigen 2 (FRA2) as a transcriptional target of IL-2 regulated STAT5. FRA2 is a basic -leucine zipper (bZIP) motif ‘Fos’ family transcription factor that is part of the AP-1 transcription factor complex and is also known to play a critical role in the progression of human tumours and more recently as a determinant of T cell plasticity. The binding site mapped to an internal intron within the FRA2 gene. The epigenetic architecture of FRA2, characterizes a transcriptionally active promoter as indicated by enrichment for histone methylation marks H3K4me1, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and transcription/elongation associated marks H2BK5me1 and H4K20me1. FRA2 is regulated by IL-2 in activated CD4 T cells. Consistently, STAT5 bound to GAS sequence in the internal intron of FRA2 and reporter gene assays confirmed IL-2 induced STAT5 binding and transcriptional activation. Furthermore, addition of JAK3 inhibitor (R333) or Daclizumab inhibited the induction in TCR stimulated cells. Taken together, our data suggest that FRA2 is a novel STAT5 target gene, regulated by IL-2 in activated CD4 T cells.

Rani, Aradhana; Greenlaw, Roseanna; Runglall, Manohursingh; Jurcevic, Stipo; John, Susan

2014-01-01

83

Sedimentology of clastic rocks from the Fra Mauro region of the moon.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thin-section examination of sixteen clastic rock samples returned by the Apollo 14 mission from the Fra Mauro region of the moon suggests the presence of at least two distinctly different lithologies. Five of the samples (group I) are characterized by an abundant glassy matrix and glass particles and lesser amounts of plagioclase and pyroxene grains, and lithic clasts. The other eleven samples (group II) are relatively fine grained, very poorly sorted, and consist largely of pyroxene, plagioclase, and lithic clasts set in an abundant mineralic matrix. Group I and II lithologies were probably both deposited from impact generated base surges. The differences between them stem not as much from the basic sedimentary processes as from the differences in the magnitude of the events generating the base surges and the resultant difference in available detrital materials.

Lindsay, J. F.

1972-01-01

84

Preliminary survey of tuff distribution in Esmeralda, Nye, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report inventories the surface distribution of silicic tuffs in Nye, Esmeralda, and Lincoln Counties, NV, based on a review of available literature. The inventory was taken to provide a data base in evaluating tuff sites for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Silicic ash-flow tuffs that are about 11 to 34 million years (my) old are widespread in these counties. These rocks are locally deformed by right-lateral movement along Walker Lane and the Las Vegas Shear Zone, and left-lateral movement along a zone from near the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the Utah border, and are commonly offset by steeply dipping normal faults. The normal faults that bound horsts, grabens, and tilted-fault blocks of the Basin-and-Range Province began to form 30 my ago; some are still active. Tuff distribution is discussed on a regional basis. Tuff thicknesses and alterations, structural complexity, and proximity to recent faulting, recent volcanism, and mineral resources are discussed for each area. Although the literature on which it is based is often incomplete and sketchy, this report is intended to serve as a basis for future, more detailed work that includes initial field inspection, detailed field and laboratory studies, and extrapolations to the subsurface.

Smith, G.V.; Pink, T.S.; Lawrence, J.R.; Woodward, L.A.; Keil, K.; Lappin, A.R.

1981-02-01

85

Bedrock geologic map of the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, has been identified as a potential site for underground storage of high-level radioactive nuclear waste. Detailed bedrock geologic maps form an integral part of the site characterization program by providing the fundamental framework for research into the geologic hazards and hydrologic behavior of the mountain. This bedrock geologic map provides the geologic framework and structural setting for the area in and adjacent to the site of the potential repository. The study area comprises the northern and central parts of Yucca Mountain, located on the southern flank of the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex, which was the source for many of the volcanic units in the area. The Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex is part of the Miocene southwestern Nevada volcanic field, which is within the Walker Lane belt. This tectonic belt is a northwest-striking megastructure lying between the more active Inyo-Mono and Basin-and-Range subsections o f the southwestern Great Basin.

Day, W.C.; Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Fridrich, C.J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (US); Dickerson, R.P.; San Juan, C.A.; Drake, R.M. II [Pacific Western Technologies, Inc., Denver, CO (US)

1998-11-01

86

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01

87

Breakages at common fragile sites set boundaries of amplified regions in two leukemia cell lines K562 - Molecular characterization of FRA2H and localization of a new CFS FRA2S.  

PubMed

Genome amplification is often observed in human tumors. The breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle is the mechanism that often underlies duplicated regions. Some research has indicated common fragile sites (CFS) as possible sites of chromosome breakages at the origin of BFB cycles. Here we searched two human genome regions known as amplification hot spots for any DNA copy number amplifications by analyzing 21 cancer cell lines to investigate the relationship between genomic fragility and amplification. We identified a duplicated region on a chromosomes der(2) present in the karyotype of two analysed leukemia cell lines K562. The two duplicated regions are organized into large palindromes, which suggests that one BFB cycle has occurred. Our findings show that the three breakpoints are localized in the sequence of three CFSs: FRA2H (2q32.1-q32.2), which here has been characterized molecularly; FRA2S (2q22.3-q23.3), a newly localized aphidicolin inducible CFS; and FRA2G (2q24.3-q31). PMID:20851513

Pelliccia, Franca; Bosco, Nazario; Rocchi, Angela

2010-12-18

88

In cardiac myoblasts, cellular redox regulates FosB and Fra-1 through multiple cis-regulatory modules.  

PubMed

Depending on the dose, norepineprine (NE) can induce hypertrophy or apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in mediating both responses, but the mechanisms are not understood as yet. Earlier we demonstrated that the two pathways are marked by the differential induction of FosB and Fra-1, two members of the AP-1 family of transcription factors. We now demonstrate that NE induces both fosB and fra-1 at the transcriptional level. Catalase and MnTMPyP (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) suppress their activation by NE. In contrast, in cells without NE treatment, MnTMPyP upregulates their expression, whereas catalase inhibits it. Thus, regulation of fosB and fra-1 by ROS is context specific. To delineate the mechanisms, the 1493- and 2689-bp upstream regions of the fosB and fra-1 genes were cloned into the luciferase vector and assayed for transient expression. Catalase and MnTMPyP regulated both promoters the same as their endogenous counterparts in NE-treated and untreated cells. Deletion, mutation, and ChIP analyses suggested that multiple cis-elements including SP-1, CEBP, and AP-1 in the fosB promoter make discrete contributions to mediating the redox response. A gel mobility-shift-based oxidation-reduction assay suggested that, whereas SP-1 is a direct sensor of cellular redox state, CEBP is not. This study suggests that multiple redox signals generate gene-specific modules affecting their expression. PMID:21820506

Jindal, Ekta; Goswami, Shyamal K

2011-10-15

89

Gene expression profiling in prostate cancer cells with Akt activation reveals Fra-1 as an Akt-inducible gene.  

PubMed

To determine which genes may be regulated by Akt and participate in the transformation of cells, we have examined by microarray analyses genes turned on in the prostate cancer cell line, PC3, when Akt activity was induced. PC3 cells, which lack the lipid phosphatase PTEN, were treated overnight with a reversible inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, LY294002 (a treatment which was found to reversibly decrease Akt enzymatic activity). The inhibitor was then washed out and mRNA collected 2, 6, and 10 h later and compared by microarray analyses with mRNAs present immediately after removal of the inhibitor. One of the identified induced mRNAs, Fra-1, was further studied by transient transfections of a reporter construct containing its 5' regulatory region. This construct was found to be directly induced 4- to 5-fold by co-transfection with constitutively active Akt3 but not kinase dead Akt. The regulation by Akt3 was found to be due to two specific regions in the Fra-1 regulatory sequence which match Sp1 consensus sites. Finally, gel shift studies showed that the binding of Sp1 to one of these sites was dependent on the PI 3-kinase pathway. These results indicate that LY294002 treatment and washout is a useful method to study the activation of Akt in the context of a tumor cell. Moreover, the identification of Fra-1 as an Akt-regulated gene may have implications for the ability of Akt to transform cells since Fra-1 has been implicated in cell growth and the aggressiveness of tumors. PMID:12692267

Tiwari, Gunjan; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Pollack, Jonathan R; Roth, Richard A

2003-04-01

90

ATF3 and Fra1 have opposite functions in JNK and ERK-dependent DNA damage responses  

Microsoft Academic Search

JNK and ERK MAP kinases regulate cellular responses to genotoxic stress in a cell type and cell context-dependent manner. However, the factors that determine and execute JNK- and ERK-controlled stress responses are only partly known. In this study, we investigate the roles of the AP-1 components ATF3 and Fra1 in JNK- and ERK-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We show

Mohamed Hamdi; Herman E. Popeijus; Françoise Carlotti; Josephine M. Janssen; Corina van der Burgt; Paulien Cornelissen-Steijger; Bob van de Water; Rob C. Hoeben; Koichi Matsuo; Hans van Dam

2008-01-01

91

Matrix attachment region (MAR) properties and abnormal expansion of AT island minisatellites in FRA16B fragile sites in leukemic CEM cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

AT-rich minisatellites (AT islands) are sites of genomic instability in cancer cells and targets for extremely lethal AT-specific drugs, such as biz- elesin. Here we investigated the AT islands in the FRA16B fragile site region for their possible roles in the organization of DNA on the nuclear matrix. The FRA16B AT island nominally spans ~3 kb of mostly >90% A\\/T

Jennifer A. Jackson; Alex V. Trevino; Maryanne C. Herzig; Terence S. Herman; Jan M. Woynarowski

2003-01-01

92

Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model, Tiva Canyon tuff, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional discrete fracture model was completed to investigate the potential effects of fractures on the flow of water at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. A fracture network of the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area was simulated and calibrated with field data. Two modeled volumes were used to simulate three-dimensional fracture networks of the Tiva Canyon tuff. One volume had a width and length of 150 meters, and the other had a width and length of 200 meters; both volumes were 60 meters thick. The analysis shows that the fracture system in the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area has numerous connected fractures that have relatively large permeabilities. However, pathway analysis between three radial boreholes indicated there were few pathways and little connection, which is consistent with results of cross-boreholes pressure testing. Pathway analysis also showed that at the scales used there was only one pathway connecting one end of the flow box to the opposite end. The usual vertical pathway was along one large fracture, whereas in four horizontal directions the pathway was from multiple fracture connections. As a result, the fracture network can be considered sparse. The fracture network was refined by eliminating nonconductive fractures determined from field-derived permeabilities. Small fractures were truncated from the simulated network without any effect on the overall connectivity. Fractures as long as 1.25 meters were eliminated (a large percentage of the total number of fractures) from the network without altering the number of pathways. Five directional permeabilities were computed for the 150- and 200-meter-scale flow box areas. Permeabilities for the 150-meter scale vary by almost two orders of magnitude, with the principal permeability direction being easterly. At the 200-meter scale, however, the flow box permeabilities only vary by a factor of four, with the principal permeability direction being vertical.

Anna, L.O.

1998-09-01

93

Digital geologic map of the Thirsty Canyon NW quadrangle, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital geologic map compilation presents new polygon (i.e., geologic map unit contacts), line (i.e., fault, fold axis, dike, and caldera wall), and point (i.e., structural attitude) vector data for the Thirsty Canyon NW 7 1/2' quadrangle in southern Nevada. The map database, which is at 1:24,000-scale resolution, provides geologic coverage of an area of current hydrogeologic and tectonic interest. The Thirsty Canyon NW quadrangle is located in southern Nye County about 20 km west of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and 30 km north of the town of Beatty. The map area is underlain by extensive layers of Neogene (about 14 to 4.5 million years old [Ma]) mafic and silicic volcanic rocks that are temporally and spatially associated with transtensional tectonic deformation. Mapped volcanic features include part of a late Miocene (about 9.2 Ma) collapse caldera, a Pliocene (about 4.5 Ma) shield volcano, and two Pleistocene (about 0.3 Ma) cinder cones. Also documented are numerous normal, oblique-slip, and strike-slip faults that reflect regional transtensional deformation along the southern part of the Walker Lane belt. The Thirsty Canyon NW map provides new geologic information for modeling groundwater flow paths that may enter the map area from underground nuclear testing areas located in the NTS about 25 km to the east. The geologic map database comprises six component ArcINFO map coverages that can be accessed after decompressing and unbundling the data archive file (tcnw.tar.gz). These six coverages (tcnwpoly, tcnwflt, tcnwfold, tcnwdike, tcnwcald, and tcnwatt) are formatted here in ArcINFO EXPORT format. Bundled with this database are two PDF files for readily viewing and printing the map, accessory graphics, and a description of map units and compilation methods.

Minor, S. A.; Orkild, P. P.; Sargent, K. A.; Warren, R. G.; Sawyer, D. A.; Workman, J. B.

1998-01-01

94

Biologic overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project study area includes five major vegetation associations characteristic of the transition between the northern extent of the Mojave Desert and the southern extent of the Great Basin Desert. A total of 32 species of reptiles, 66 species of birds, and 46 species of mammals are known to occur within these associations elsewhere on the Nevada Test Site. Ten species of plants, and the mule deer, wild horse, feral burro, and desert tortoise were defined as possible sensitive species because they are protected by federal and state regulations, or are being considered for such protection. The major agricultural resources of southern Nye County included 737,000 acres of public grazing land managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and 9500 acres of irrigated crop land located in the Beatty/Oasis valleys, the Amargosa Valley, and Ash Meadows. Range lands are of poor quality. Alfalfa and cotton are the major crops along with small amounts of grains, Sudan grass, turf, fruits, and melons. The largest impacts to known ecosystems are expected to result from: extensive disturbances associated with construction of roads, seismic lines, drilling pads, and surface facilities; storage and leaching of mined spoils; disposal of water; off-road vehicle travel; and, over several hundred years, elevated soil temperatures. Significant impacts to off-site areas such as Ash Meadows are anticipated if new residential developments are built there to accommodate an increased work force. Several species of concern and their essential habitats are located at Ash Meadows. Available literature contained sufficient baseline information to assess potential impacts of the proposed project on an area-wide basis. It was inadequate to support analysis of potential impacts on specific locations selected for site characterization studies, mining an exploratory shaft, or the siting and operation of a repository.

Collins, E.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Rhoads, W.A.

1982-01-01

95

UCSD/FRA non-contact ultrasonic guided-wave system for rail inspection: an update  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, is developing a system for high-speed and non-contact rail defect detection. A prototype has been designed and field tested with the support of Volpe National Transportation Systems Center and ENSCO, Inc. The goal of this project is to develop a rail defect detection system that provides (a) better defect detection reliability (including internal transverse head defects under shelling and vertical split head defects), and (b) higher inspection speed than achievable by current rail inspection systems. This effort is also in direct response to Safety Recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) following the disastrous train derailments at Superior, WI in 1992 and Oneida, NY in 2007 among others. The UCSD prototype uses non-contact ultrasonic probing of the rail head (laser and air-coupled), ultrasonic guided waves, and a proprietary real-time statistical analysis algorithm that maximizes the sensitivity to defects while minimizing false positives. The current design allows potential inspection speeds up to 40 mph, although all field tests have been conducted up to 15 mph so far. This paper summarizes (a) the latest technology development test conducted at the rail defect farm of Herzog, Inc. in St Joseph, MO in June 2010, and (b) the completion of the new Rail Defect Farm facility at the UCSD Camp Elliott Field Station with partial in-kind donations from the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway.

Coccia, Stefano; Phillips, Robert; Nucera, Claudio; Bartoli, Ivan; Salamone, Salvatore; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood; Carr, Gary

2011-03-01

96

A novel combination: ranpirnase and rosiglitazone induce a synergistic apoptotic effect by down-regulating Fra-1 and Survivin in cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Accumulating evidence supports the idea that two known phosphatidylinositol 3?-Kinase (PI3K) downstream proteins, Fra-1 and Survivin, are potential targets for cancer therapy. Increased expression of Fra-1, a Fos family member of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), has been implicated in both the maintenance and progression of the transformed state of several cancer cells. In addition, high Survivin expression in tumors correlates with more aggressive behavior, lower response to chemotherapeutic drugs, and shortened survival time. Previously, we reported that in malignant mesothelioma cells with increased PI3K activity, small molecule inhibitors of the (PI3K)/AKT pathway acted cooperatively with the amphibian ribonuclease chemotherapeutic drug ranpirnase to inhibit cell growth. Because the thiazolidinedione (TZD) anti-diabetic drug, rosiglitazone, targets the PI3K/AKT pathway, we investigated the effect of the combination of these two drugs in cell survival in several cancer cell lines. We show here that the combination of ranpirnase and rosiglitazone synergistically decreases cell viability and increases cell apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Cell killing is associated with decreased Fra-1 and Survivin expression and knock-down of Fra-1 increases cell killing by ranpirnase in a dose-dependent manner, but not by rosiglitazone. The drug combination does not have a synergistic effect on killing in Fra-1 knock-down cells, demonstrating that Fra-1 modulation accounts in part for the synergism. The novel drug combination of ranpirnase and rosiglitazone is a promising combination to treat cancers with increased PI3K-dependent Fra-1 expression or Survivin.

Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Littenberg, Benjamin

2008-01-01

97

A novel combination: ranpirnase and rosiglitazone induce a synergistic apoptotic effect by down-regulating Fra-1 and Survivin in cancer cells.  

PubMed

Accumulating evidence supports the idea that two known phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K) downstream proteins, Fra-1 and Survivin, are potential targets for cancer therapy. Increased expression of Fra-1, a Fos family member of the transcription factor activator protein-1, has been implicated in both the maintenance and the progression of the transformed state of several cancer cells. In addition, high Survivin expression in tumors correlates with more aggressive behavior, lower response to chemotherapeutic drugs, and shortened survival time. Previously, we reported that, in malignant mesothelioma cells with increased PI3K activity, small-molecule inhibitors of the PI3K/AKT pathway acted cooperatively with the amphibian RNase chemotherapeutic drug ranpirnase to inhibit cell growth. Because the thiazolidinedione antidiabetic drug rosiglitazone targets the PI3K/AKT pathway, we investigated the effect of the combination of these two drugs in cell survival in several cancer cell lines. We show here that the combination of ranpirnase and rosiglitazone synergistically decreases cell viability and increases cell apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. Cell killing is associated with decreased Fra-1 and Survivin expression and knockdown of Fra-1 increases cell killing by ranpirnase in a dose-dependent manner but not by rosiglitazone. The drug combination does not have a synergistic effect on killing in Fra-1 knockdown cells, showing that Fra-1 modulation accounts in part for the synergism. The novel drug combination of ranpirnase and rosiglitazone is a promising combination to treat cancers with increased PI3K-dependent Fra-1 expression or Survivin. PMID:18606715

Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Littenberg, Benjamin

2008-07-01

98

Geology Report: Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Surficial geologic studies near the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) were conducted as part of a site characterization program. Studies included evaluation of the potential for future volcanism and Area 3 fault activity that could impact waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS. Future volcanic activity could lead to disruption of the Area 3 RWMS. Local and regional studies of volcanic risk indicate that major changes in regional volcanic activity within the next 1,000 years are not likely. Mapped basalts of Paiute Ridge, Nye Canyon, and nearby Scarp Canyon are Miocene in age. There is a lack of evidence for post-Miocene volcanism in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and the hazard of basaltic volcanism at the Area 3 RWMS, within the 1,000-year regulatory period, is very low and not a forseeable future event. Studies included a literature review and data analysis to evaluate unclassified published and unpublished information regarding the Area 3 and East Branch Area 3 faults mapped in Area 3 and southern Area 7. Two trenches were excavated along the Area 3 fault to search for evidence of near-surface movement prior to nuclear testing. Allostratigraphic units and fractures were mapped in Trenches ST02 and ST03. The Area 3 fault is a plane of weakness that has undergone strain resulting from stress imposed by natural events and underground nuclear testing. No major vertical displacement on the Area 3 fault since the Early Holocene, and probably since the Middle Pleistocene, can be demonstrated. The lack of major displacement within this time frame and minimal vertical extent of minor fractures suggest that waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS will not be impacted substantially by the Area 3 fault, within the regulatory compliance period. A geomorphic surface map of Yucca Flat utilizes the recent geomorphology and soil characterization work done in adjacent northern Frenchman Flat. The approach taken was to adopt the map unit boundaries (line work) of Swadley and Hoover (1990) and re-label these with map unit designations like those in northern Frenchman Flat (Huckins-Gang et al, 1995a,b,c; Snyder et al, 1995a,b,c,d).

NSTec Environmental Management

2006-07-01

99

Bedrock geologic Map of the Central Block Area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Bedrock geologic maps form the foundation for investigations that characterize and assess the viability of the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As such, this map focuses on the central block at Yucca Mountain, which contains the potential repository site. The central block is a structural block of Tertiary volcanic rocks bound on the west by the Solitario Canyon Fault, on the east by the Bow Ridge Fault, to the north by the northwest-striking Drill Hole Wash Fault, and on the south by Abandoned Wash. Earlier reconnaissance mapping by Lipman and McKay (1965) provided an overview of the structural setting of Yucca Mountain and formed the foundation for selecting Yucca Mountain as a site for further investigation. They delineated the main block-bounding faults and some of the intrablock faults and outlined the zoned compositional nature of the tuff units that underlie Yucca Mountain. Scott and Bonk (1984) provided a detailed reconnaissance geologic map of favorable area at Yucca Mountain in which to conduct further site-characterization studies. Of their many contributions, they presented a detailed stratigraphy for the volcanic units, defined several other block-bounding faults, and outlined numerous intrablock faults. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project to provide a detailed (1:6,000-scale) bedrock geologic map for the area within and adjacent to the potential repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to this study, the 1:12,000-scale map of Scott and Bonk (1984) was the primary source of bedrock geologic data for the Yucca Mountain Project. However, targeted detailed mapping within the central block at Yucca Mountain revealed structural complexities along some of the intrablock faults that were not evident at 1:12,000 (Scott and Bonk, 1984). As a result, this study was undertaken to define the character and extent of the dominant structural features in the vicinity of the potential repository. In addition to structural considerations, ongoing subsurface excavation and geologic mapping within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), development of a three-dimensional-framework geologic model, and borehole investigations required use of a consistent stratigraphic system to facilitate surface to underground comparisons. The map units depicted in this report correspond as closely as possible to the proposed stratigraphic nomenclature by Buesch and others (1996), as described.

W.C. Day; C. Potter; D. Sweetkind; R.P. Dickerson; C.A. San Juan

1998-09-29

100

Fra(X)(q27.2), the common fragile site, observed in only one of 760 cases studied for the fragile X syndrome.  

PubMed

Cell cultures from 760 whole blood, amniotic fluid, chorionic villus sample, and peripheral umbilical blood sample specimens were exposed to multiple fra(X)(q27.3) induction systems (none had aphidicolin). Fifty-three exhibited the rare fragile site, fra(X)(q27.3) or FRAXA, none of which demonstrated the common fragile site or FRAXD at band Xq27.2. Only one cell in one of the negative whole blood FUdR-treated cultures from a mentally retarded male showed FRAXD. Therefore, it appears that FRAXD occurs very rarely in cultures treated to induce FRAXA since only one positive cell was observed in over 88,000 analyzed. It appears that very low frequencies of fra(X)(q27) can be accounted for only in part by the presence of the common fragile site since only one of 9 cases, each with one fra(X)(q27) positive cell, exhibited FRAXD and the others were FRAXA. After confirmation of FRAXA with direct DNA testing in a large number of low frequency cases, it should be possible to rely on the detection of very low frequencies of fra(X)(q27.3), e.g., 1% with at least 2 positive cells. PMID:1605182

Jenkins, E C; Genovese, M J; Duncan, C J; Gu, H; Stark-Houck, S L; Lele, K; Li, S Y; Krawczun, M S

101

Neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells requires the junB and fra-1 gene induction which is dependent on the HMGI-C gene product.  

PubMed

The expression of the high mobility group I (HMGI)-C chromatin component was shown previously to be essential for the establishment of the neoplastic phenotype in retrovirally transformed thyroid cell lines. To identify possible targets of the HMGI-C gene product, we have analyzed the AP-1 complex in normal, fully transformed and antisense HMGI-C-expressing rat thyroid cells. We show that neoplastic transformation is associated with a drastic increase in AP-1 activity, which reflects multiple compositional changes. The strongest effect is represented by the dramatic junB and fra-1 gene induction, which is prevented in cell lines expressing the antisense HMGI-C. These results indicate that the HMGI-C gene product is essential for the junB and fra-1 transcriptional induction associated with neoplastic transformation. The inhibition of Fra-1 protein synthesis by stable transfection with a fra-1 antisense RNA vector significantly reduces the malignant phenotype of the transformed thyroid cells, indicating a pivotal role for the fra-1 gene product in the process of cellular transformation. PMID:9311991

Vallone, D; Battista, S; Pierantoni, G M; Fedele, M; Casalino, L; Santoro, M; Viglietto, G; Fusco, A; Verde, P

1997-09-01

102

Neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells requires the junB and fra-1 gene induction which is dependent on the HMGI-C gene product.  

PubMed Central

The expression of the high mobility group I (HMGI)-C chromatin component was shown previously to be essential for the establishment of the neoplastic phenotype in retrovirally transformed thyroid cell lines. To identify possible targets of the HMGI-C gene product, we have analyzed the AP-1 complex in normal, fully transformed and antisense HMGI-C-expressing rat thyroid cells. We show that neoplastic transformation is associated with a drastic increase in AP-1 activity, which reflects multiple compositional changes. The strongest effect is represented by the dramatic junB and fra-1 gene induction, which is prevented in cell lines expressing the antisense HMGI-C. These results indicate that the HMGI-C gene product is essential for the junB and fra-1 transcriptional induction associated with neoplastic transformation. The inhibition of Fra-1 protein synthesis by stable transfection with a fra-1 antisense RNA vector significantly reduces the malignant phenotype of the transformed thyroid cells, indicating a pivotal role for the fra-1 gene product in the process of cellular transformation.

Vallone, D; Battista, S; Pierantoni, G M; Fedele, M; Casalino, L; Santoro, M; Viglietto, G; Fusco, A; Verde, P

1997-01-01

103

Water levels in periodically measured wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1981-87  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains data on groundwater levels beneath Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas, Nye County, Nevada. In addition to new data collected since 1983, the report contains data that has been updated from previous reports, including added explanations of the data. The data was collected in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy to help that agency evaluate the suitability of the area of storing high-level nuclear waste. The water table in the Yucca Mountain area occurs in ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age. West of the crest of Yucca Mountain, water level altitudes are about 775 m above sea level. Along the eastern edge and southern end of Yucca Mountain, the potentiometric surface generally is nearly flat, ranging from about 730 to 728 m above sea level. (USGS)

Robison, J. H.; Stephens, D. M.; Luckey, R. R.; Baldwin, D. A.

1988-01-01

104

"Granite" exploration hole, Area 15, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada : interim report, Part C, physical properties  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Physical properties measurements including porosity, density, permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and thermal conductivity were made on granite samples from the U-15A 'Granite' exploration borehole, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Porosity values range from 0.4 to 4.8 percent, and density values range from 2.56 to 2.69 g/cc (bulk density) and from 2.66 to 2.72 g/cc (grain density). Permeability of fresh rock from the borehole is probably less than 10 -13 millidarcies. Magnetic susceptibility measurements range from 0.36 to 3.48 x 10 -3 cgs units, and thermal conductivity values range from 5.6 to 8.1 cgs units.

Izett, Glen Arthur

1960-01-01

105

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr\\/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr\\/86Sr

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; Brian D. Marshall

2007-01-01

106

Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--90  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suitability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment

Boucher

1994-01-01

107

Old Players with a Newly Defined Function: Fra-1 and c-Fos Support Growth of Human Malignant Breast Tumors by Activating Membrane Biogenesis at the Cytoplasm  

PubMed Central

A shared characteristic of tumor cells is their exacerbated growth. Consequently, tumor cells demand high rates of phospholipid synthesis required for membrane biogenesis to support their growth. c-Fos, in addition to its AP-1 transcription factor activity, is the only protein known up to date that is capable of activating lipid synthesis in normal and brain tumor tissue. For this latter activity, c-Fos associates to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through its N-terminal domain and activates phospholipid synthesis, an event that requires it Basic Domain (BD) (aa 139–159). Fra-1, another member of the FOS family of proteins, is over-expressed in human breast cancer cells and its BD is highly homologous to that of c-Fos with two conservative substitutions in its basic amino acids. Consequently, herein we examined if Fra-1 and/or c-Fos participate in growth of breast cancer cells by activating phospholipid synthesis as found previously for c-Fos in brain tumors. We found both Fra-1 and c-Fos over-expressed in >95% of human ductal breast carcinoma biopsies examined contrasting with the very low or undetectable levels in normal tissue. Furthermore, both proteins associate to the ER and activate phospholipid synthesis in cultured MCF7 and MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells and in human breast cancer samples. Stripping tumor membranes of Fra-1 and c-Fos prior to assaying their lipid synthesis capacity in vitro results in non-activated lipid synthesis levels that are restored to their initial activated state by addition of Fra-1 and/or c-Fos to the assays. In MDA-MB231 cells primed to proliferate, blocking Fra-1 and c-Fos with neutralizing antibodies blocks lipid-synthesis activation and cells do not proliferate. Taken together, these results disclose the cytoplasmic activity of Fra-1 and c-Fos as potential targets for controlling growth of breast carcinomas by decreasing the rate of membrane biogenesis required for growth.

Motrich, Ruben D.; Castro, Gonzalo M.; Caputto, Beatriz L.

2013-01-01

108

Chagas disease-specific antigens: characterization of epitopes in CRA/FRA by synthetic peptide mapping and evaluation by ELISA-peptide assay  

PubMed Central

Background The identification of epitopes in proteins recognized by medically relevant antibodies is useful for the development of peptide-based diagnostics and vaccines. In this study, epitopes in the cytoplasmic repetitive antigen (CRA) and flagellar repetitive antigen (FRA) proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi were identified using synthetic peptide techniques and pooled sera from Chagasic patients. The epitopes were further assayed with an ELISA assay based on synthetic peptides. Methods Twenty-two overlapping synthetic peptides representing the coding sequence of the T. cruzi CRA and FRA proteins were assessed by a Spot-synthesis array analysis using sera donated by patients with Chagas disease. Shorter peptides were selected that represented the determined epitopes and synthesized by solid phase synthesis to evaluate the patterns of cross-reactivities and discrimination through an ELISA-diagnostic assay. Results The peptide Spot-synthesis array successfully identified two IgG antigenic determinants in the CRA protein and four in FRA. Bioinformatics suggested that the CRA antigens were unique to T. cruzi while the FRA antigen showed similarity with sequences present within various proteins from Leishmania sp. Subsequently, shorter peptides representing the CRA-1, CRA-2 and FRA-1 epitopes were synthesized by solid phase synthesis and assayed by an ELISA-diagnostic assay. The CRA antigens gave a high discrimination between Chagasic, Leishmaniasis and T. cruzi-uninfected serum. A sensitivity and specificity of 100% was calculated for CRA. While the FRA antigen showed a slightly lower sensitivity (91.6%), its specificity was only 60%. Conclusions The epitopes recognized by human anti-T. cruzi antibodies have been precisely located in two biomarkers of T. cruzi, CRA and FRA. The results from screening a panel of patient sera through an ELISA assay based on peptides representing these epitopes strongly suggest that the sequences from CRA would be useful for the development of diagnostic reagents that could improve upon the sensitivity and specificity of currently available diagnostic tests. Overall, the results provide further evidence of the usefulness of identifying specific linear B-cell epitopes for improving diagnostic tools.

2013-01-01

109

In quest of lunar regolith breccias of exotic provenance - A uniquely anorthositic sample from the Fra Mauro (Apollo 14) highlands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bulk compositions of 21 Apollo regolith breccias were determined using an INAA procedure modified from that of Kallemeyn et al. (1989). With one major exception, namely, the 14076,1 sample, the regolith breccias analyzed were found to be not significantly different from the surfaces from which they were collected. In contrast, the 14076,1 sample from the Fra Mauro (Apollo 14) region is a highly anorthositic regolith breccia from a site where anorthosites are extremely scarce. The sample's composition resembles soils from the Descartes (Apollo 16) highlands. However, the low statistical probability for long-distance horizontal transport by impact cratering, together with the relatively high contents of imcompatible elements in 14076,1 suggest that this regolith breccia originated within a few hundred kilometers of the Apollo 14 site. Its compositional resemblance to ferroan anorthosite strengthens the hypothesis that ferroan anorthosite originated as the flotation crust of a global magmasphere.

Jerde, E. A.; Morris, R. V.; Warren, P. H.

1990-04-01

110

In quest of lunar regolith breccias of exotic provenance - A uniquely anorthositic sample from the Fra Mauro (Apollo 14) highlands  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bulk compositions of 21 Apollo regolith breccias were determined using an INAA procedure modified from that of Kallemeyn et al. (1989). With one major exception, namely, the 14076,1 sample, the regolith breccias analyzed were found to be not significantly different from the surfaces from which they were collected. In contrast, the 14076,1 sample from the Fra Mauro (Apollo 14) region is a highly anorthositic regolith breccia from a site where anorthosites are extremely scarce. The sample's composition resembles soils from the Descartes (Apollo 16) highlands. However, the low statistical probability for long-distance horizontal transport by impact cratering, together with the relatively high contents of imcompatible elements in 14076,1 suggest that this regolith breccia originated within a few hundred kilometers of the Apollo 14 site. Its compositional resemblance to ferroan anorthosite strengthens the hypothesis that ferroan anorthosite originated as the flotation crust of a global magmasphere.

Jerde, Eric A.; Warren, Paul H.; Morris, Richard V.

1990-01-01

111

A comparison of forest cover maps in Mainland Southeast Asia from multiple sources: PALSAR, MERIS, MODIS and FRA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The uncertainty in tracking tropical forest extent and changes substantially affects our assessment of the consequences of forest change on the global carbon cycle, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Recently cloud-free imagery useful for tropical forest mapping from the Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has become available. We used PALSAR 50-m Orthorectified mosaic imagery in 2009 and a decision tree method to conduct land cover classification and generate a 2009 forest map, which was evaluated using 2106 field photos from the Global Geo-referenced Field Photo Library (http://www.eomf.ou.edu/photos). The resulting land cover classification had a high overall accuracy of 93.3 % and a Kappa Coefficient of 0.9. The PALSAR-based forest map was then compared with three existing forest cover products at three scales (regional, national, and continental): the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Forest Resources Assessments (FRA) 2010, Global Land Cover Map with MERIS (GlobCover) 2009, and the MODIS Terra + Aqua Land Cover Type product (MCD12Q1) 2009. The intercomparison results show that these four forest datasets differ. The PALSAR-based forest area estimate is within the range (6.1 ~ 9.0 ×105 km2) of the other three products and closest to the FAO FRA 2010 estimate. The spatial disagreements of the PALSAR-based forest, MCD12Q1 forest and GlobCover forest are evident; however, the PALSAR-based forest map provides more detail (50-m spatial resolution) and high accuracy (the Producer's and the User's Accuracies were 88 % and 95 %, respectively) and PALSAR can be used to evaluate MCD12Q1 2009 and GlobCover 2009 forest maps. Given the higher spatial resolution, PALSAR-based forest products could further improve the modeling accuracy of carbon cycle in tropical forests.

Dong, J.; Xiao, X.; Sheldon, S. L.; Biradar, C. M.; Duong, N. D.; Hazarika, M.

2012-12-01

112

Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 2A Promotes Invasion of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells through ERK/Fra-1-Mediated Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9  

PubMed Central

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly metastatic, and this malignant feature may be promoted by an EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A). Acting as a signal regulator, LMP2A can enhance invasiveness and motility of epithelial cells. Downstream from the LMP2A-triggered signaling events, it is largely unknown what key effector proteins are induced and essentially promote cell invasion. In the present study, we found that in NPC cells, LMP2A upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a metastasis-associated protease. LMP2A increased MMP9 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. It also activated the MMP9 promoter, in which two AP-1 elements were required for the promoter activation. Among AP-1 transcription factors, Fra-1 was induced by LMP2A and is essential for LMP2A-triggered MMP9 expression. Induction of Fra-1 was dependent on the LMP2A-activated ERK1/2 pathway, and induction of the ERK1/2–Fra-1–MMP9 axis required PY motifs in the amino-terminal domain of LMP2A. Notably, LMP2A-promoted invasion of NPC cells was blocked when MMP9 expression, Fra-1 induction, or ERK1/2 activation was inhibited. In addition, we found an association of LMP2A with MMP9 expression in NPC tumor biopsy specimens, where Fra-1 was a major mediation factor. This study reveals an underlying mechanism of LMP2A-induced cell invasion, from signal transduction to upregulation of a critical protease. Considering that MMP9 can also be upregulated by another EBV oncoprotein, LMP1, this protease may be a pivotal effector at which the EBV-induced, invasion-promoting mechanisms converge, serving as an attractive therapeutic target for NPC treatment.

Lan, Yu-Yan; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Chang, Kung-Chao; Chang, Jeffrey Shu-Ming; Chen, Chaio-Wei; Lai, Hsiao-Ching; Wu, Shih-Yi; Yeh, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Fang-Hsin; Lin, Wei-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen

2012-01-01

113

Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill-Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill-hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin such as alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake, Ronald M., II

2007-01-01

114

Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake, Ronald M., II

2007-01-01

115

Characterization of liquid-water percolation in tuffs in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A surface-based borehole investigation currently (1989) is being done to characterize liquid-water percolation in tuffs of Miocene age in the unsaturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Active in-situ testing and passive in-situ monitoring will be used in this investigation to estimate the present-day liquid-water percolation (flux). The unsaturated zone consists of a gently dipping sequence of fine-grained, densely fractured, and mostly welded ash-flow tuffs that are interbedded with fine-grained, slightly fractured, non-welded ash-flow and ash-fall tuffs that are partly vitric and zeolitized near the water table. Primary study objectives are to define the water potential field within the unsaturated zone and to determine the in-situ bulk permeability and bulk hydrologic properties of the unsaturated tuffs. Borehole testing will be done to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of physical and hydrologic properties of the geohydrologic units, and of their water potential fields. The study area of this investigation is restricted to that part of Yucca Mountain that immediately overlies and is within the boundaries of the perimeter drift of a US Department of Energy proposed mined, geologic, high-level radioactive-waste repository. Vertically, the study area extends from near the surface of Yucca Mountain to the underlying water table, about 500 to 750 meters below the ground surface. The average distance between the proposed repository and the underlying water table is about 205 meters.

Kume, J.; Rousseau, J.P.

1989-12-31

116

A 350-kb Cosmid Contig in 3p14.2 That Crosses the t(3;8) Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma Translocation Breakpoint and 17 Aphidicolin-Induced FRA3B Breakpoints  

Microsoft Academic Search

The constitutive fragile site at human chromosomal band 3p14.2, FRA3B, has been described as the most active common fragile site in the human genome. FRA3B is cytologically indistinguishable from the chromosome 3 breakpoint observed in the hereditary renal cell carcinoma (hRCC) translocation t(3;8) (p14.2;q24.13). Previous work demonstrated that a 1330-kb YAC clone, YC850A6, spans both the t(3;8) translocation and FRA3B

William Paradee; Charles M. Wilke; Liang Wang; Ravi Shridhar; Chadwick M. Mullins; Ann Hoge; Thomas W. Glover; David I. Smith

1996-01-01

117

Contribution of REM sleep to Fos and FRA expression in the vestibular nuclei of rat leading to vestibular adaptation during the STS-90 Neurolab Mission.  

PubMed

1. Electrophysical studies performed in ground-based experiments have shown that VN neurons respond to labyrinthine signals following stimulation of macular gravity receptors. Additional evidence indicates that VN neurons may also respond to extralabyrinthine signals of pontine origin, which occur during the PGO waves typical of REM sleep (Bizzi et al., 1964a, b; cf. also Pompeiano, 1967, 1970, 1974 for ref.). 2. In a previous study (Pompeiano et al., 2002) changes in Fos and FRA expression were used to identify the short-term (Fos) and the long-term (FRA) molecular changes which affect the VN neurons at different time points of the space flight. In particular, while Fos protein persists in the brain tissue only for a few hours (6-8 hrs) after its induction, FRA proteins, which can also be induced in the same experimental conditions, persist in the brain tissue for longer periods of time (i.e. from 12/24 hrs to days). 3. In order to relate the changes in gene expression which occurred in the VN during the space flight either to gravity changes or to REM sleep, we investigated in a recent study (Centini et al, 2006) the changes in Fos and FRA expression which occurred in different phases of the sleep-waking cycle, thus being indicative of the animal state. We could then compare the results obtained during the space lab Mission with those previously observed either in ground-based experiments during the physiological state of waking and slow-wave (SWS) or during neurochemically induced episodes of PS, as obtained after microinjection of appropriate agents in dorsal pontine structures of rats. 4. Our findings indicated that a waking state possibly associated with episodes of SWS, occurred at FD2 and FD14, i.e. at launch and after exposure of the animal to microgravity. It appeared also that at the reentry (R + 1) rather than at launch (FD2), an increase in Fos and FRA expression affected the noradrenergic LC neurons, as well as several related structures. These findings probably resulted from the acceleration stress, or immobilization stress as shown by the appearance of a starle reaction (or arrest reaction) which occurred after landing. This condition of stress was followed after landing by an increase in Fos and FRA expression which affected ventromedial medullary reticular structures, whose descending projections are involved in the suppression of postural activity during PS. Moreover, their ascending projections were likely to increase the FRA expression in the neocortex as well as in several regions of the limbic system, such as the dentate gyrus and the hippocampus, which lead to EEG desynchronization and the theta activity during PS. FRA expression affected also at the reentry pontine and diencephalic structures, such as the lateral parabrachial nucleus and the central nucleus of the amygdala, which are known to contribute to the occurrence of pontine waves and the related bursts of REM. 5. Observations made on the various components of the vestibular complex indicated that no Fos and FRA expression occurred in the LVN at the four different mission time points. However, an increase in Fos and FRA expression occurred particularly in the medial (MVN) and spinal vestibular nuclei (SpVN) at FD2 and at R + 1, i.e. 1 day after launch and 12-24 hours after landing, respectively. The pattern of FRA expression observed in the VN during the space flight was generally similar to that of Fos, except at the reentry, when FRA positive cells were observed throughout the whole SpVN, but not the MVN, which showed only a few labeled cells in its rostral part. In contrast to this finding, a prominent Fos expression was found not only in the SpVN, but also throughout the entire MVN. In this case the Fos labeling affected not only the caudal but also the rostral part of this structure, including the dorsal (MVePc) rather than the ventral aspect (MVeMc). Grounded on their different time of persistence, both Fos and FRA expression which occurred in the SpVe could be attributed to the increase in gravity force experienced during take-off a

Pompeiano, O

2007-01-01

118

Quality assurance and analysis of water levels in wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Periodic and continual water-level data from 1963-1998 were compiled and quality assured for 65 observation wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada. As part of the quality assurance of all water levels, ancillary data pertinent to computing hydraulic heads in wells were compiled and analyzed. Quality-assured water levels that were not necessarily in error but which did not represent static heads in the regional aquifer system, or required some other qualification, were flagged. Water levels flagged include those recovering from recent pumping or well construction, water levels affected by nuclear tests, and measurements affected by borehole deviations. A cursory examination of about 30 wells with available water-level and down-hole temperature data indicate that water levels in most wells on Pahute Mesa would not be significantly affected by temperature if corrected to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Wells with large corrections (greater than 10 feet) are those with long water columns (greater than 1,500 feet of water above the assumed point of inflow) in combination with mean water-column temperatures exceeding 105 degrees Fahrenheit. Water-level fluctuations in wells on Pahute Mesa are caused by several factors including infiltration of precipitation, barometric pressure, Earth tides, ground-water pumpage, and seismic events caused by tectonic activity and underground nuclear testing. No observed water-level fluctuations were attributed to a naturally occurring earthquake. The magnitude and duration of changes in water levels caused by nuclear tests are affected by the test size and the distance from a well to the test. Identifying water levels that might be affected by past nuclear tests is difficult because pre-testing water-level data are sparse. Hydrologically significant trends were found in 13 of 25 wells with multiple years of water-level record. The largest change in water levels (1,029 feet in 25 years) occurred in well U-19v PS 1D as a result of the Almendro nuclear test. Likely explanations for trends in most of the wells are either changes in precipitation patterns that affect recharge rates to the ground-water system, pumping effects from water-supply well U-20 WW, or a combination of these two factors.

Fenelon, J.M.

2000-04-05

119

Scribble Modulates the MAPK/Fra1 Pathway to Disrupt Luminal and Ductal Integrity and Suppress Tumour Formation in the Mammary Gland  

PubMed Central

Polarity coordinates cell movement, differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis to build and maintain complex epithelial tissues such as the mammary gland. Loss of polarity and the deregulation of these processes are critical events in malignant progression but precisely how and at which stage polarity loss impacts on mammary development and tumourigenesis is unclear. Scrib is a core polarity regulator and tumour suppressor gene however to date our understanding of Scrib function in the mammary gland has been limited to cell culture and transplantation studies of cell lines. Utilizing a conditional mouse model of Scrib loss we report for the first time that Scrib is essential for mammary duct morphogenesis, mammary progenitor cell fate and maintenance, and we demonstrate a critical and specific role for Scribble in the control of the early steps of breast cancer progression. In particular, Scrib-deficiency significantly induced Fra1 expression and basal progenitor clonogenicity, which resulted in fully penetrant ductal hyperplasia characterized by high cell turnover, MAPK hyperactivity, frank polarity loss with mixing of apical and basolateral membrane constituents and expansion of atypical luminal cells. We also show for the first time a role for Scribble in mammalian spindle orientation with the onset of mammary hyperplasia being associated with aberrant luminal cell spindle orientation and a failure to apoptose during the final stage of duct tubulogenesis. Restoring MAPK/Fra1 to baseline levels prevented Scrib-hyperplasia, whereas persistent Scrib deficiency induced alveolar hyperplasia and increased the incidence, onset and grade of mammary tumours. These findings, based on a definitive genetic mouse model provide fundamental insights into mammary duct maturation and homeostasis and reveal that Scrib loss activates a MAPK/Fra1 pathway that alters mammary progenitor activity to drive premalignancy and accelerate tumour progression.

Godde, Nathan J.; Sheridan, Julie M.; Smith, Lorey K.; Pearson, Helen B.; Britt, Kara L.; Galea, Ryan C.; Yates, Laura L.; Visvader, Jane E.; Humbert, Patrick O.

2014-01-01

120

MicroRNA-19a-3p inhibits breast cancer progression and metastasis by inducing macrophage polarization through downregulated expression of Fra-1 proto-oncogene.  

PubMed

One of the hallmarks of malignancy is the polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) from a pro-immune (M1-like) phenotype to an immune-suppressive (M2-like) phenotype. However, the molecular basis of the process is still unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA) comprises a group of small, non-coding RNAs that are broadly expressed by a variety of organisms and are involved in cell behaviors such as suppression or promotion of tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrate that miR-19a-3p, broadly conserved among vertebrates, was downregulated in RAW264.7 macrophage cells of the M2 phenotype in conditoned medium of 4T1 mouse breast tumor cells. This downregulation correlated with an increased expression of the Fra-1 gene, which was reported to act as a pro-oncogene by supporting the invasion and progression of breast tumors. We found significant upregulation of miR-19a-3p in RAW264.7 macrophages after transfection with a miR-19a-3p mimic that resulted in a significant suppression of the expression of this gene. In addition, we could measure the activity of binding between miR-19a-3p and Fra-1 with a psiCHECK luciferase reporter system. Further, transfection of RAW264.7 macrophage cells with the miR-19a-3p mimic decreased the expression of the Fra-1 downstream genes VEGF, STAT3 and pSTAT3. Most importantly, the capacity of 4T1 breast tumor cells to migrate and invade was impaired in vivo by the intratumoral injection of miR-19a-3p. Taken together, these findings indicate that miR-19a-3p is capable of downregulating the M2 phenotype in M2 macrophages and that the low expression of this miRNA has an important role in the upregulation of Fra-1 expression and induction of M2 macrophage polarization. PMID:23831570

Yang, J; Zhang, Z; Chen, C; Liu, Y; Si, Q; Chuang, T-H; Li, N; Gomez-Cabrero, A; Reisfeld, R A; Xiang, R; Luo, Y

2014-06-01

121

Relative abundance and distribution of fishes and crayfish at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study provides baseline data of native and non-native fish populations in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Nye County, Nevada, that can serve as a gauge in native fish enhancement efforts. In support of Carson Slough restoration, comprehensive surveys of Ash Meadows NWR fishes were conducted seasonally from fall 2007 through summer 2008. A total of 853 sampling stations were created using Geographic Information Systems and National Agricultural Imagery Program. In four seasons of sampling, Amargosa pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) was captured at 388 of 659 stations. The number of captured Amargosa pupfish ranged from 5,815 (winter 2008) to 8,346 (summer 2008). The greatest success in capturing Amargosa pupfish was in warm water spring-pools with temperature greater than 25 degrees C, headwaters of warm water spring systems, and shallow (depths less than 10 centimeters) grassy marshes. In four seasons of sampling, Ash Meadows speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus nevadesis) was captured at 96 of 659 stations. The number of captured Ash Meadows speckled dace ranged from 1,009 (summer 2008) to 1,552 (winter 2008). The greatest success in capturing Ash Meadows speckled dace was in cool water spring-pools with temperature less than 20 degrees C and in the high flowing water outflows. Among 659 sampling stations within the range of Amargosa pupfish, red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) was collected at 458 stations, western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) at 374 stations, and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) at 128 stations. School Springs was restored during the course of this study. Prior to restoration of School Springs, maximum Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis pectoralis) captured from the six springs of the Warm Springs Complex was 765 (fall 2007). In four seasons of sampling, Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish were captured at 85 of 177 stations. The greatest success in capturing Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish when co-occurring with red swamp crayfish and western mosquitofish was in water with temperature greater than 26 degrees C near the springhead, and in shallow (depths less than 10 centimeters) grassy marshes. Among 177 sampling stations within the range of Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish, red swamp crayfish were collected at 96 stations and western mosquitofish were collected at 49 stations. Removal of convict cichlid (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) from Fairbanks Spring was followed by a substantial increase in Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) captures from 910 pre-removal to 3,056 post-removal. Red swamp crayfish was continually removed from Bradford 1 Spring, which seemed to cause an increase in the speckled dace population. Restoration of Kings Pool and Jackrabbit Springs promoted the success of native fishes with the greatest densities in restored reaches. Ongoing restoration of Carson Slough and its tributaries, as well as control and elimination of invasive species, is expected to increase abundance and distribution of Ash Meadows' native fish populations. Further analysis of data from this study will help determine the habitat characteristic(s) that promote native species and curtail non-native species.

Scoppettone, G. Gary; Rissler, Peter; Johnson, Danielle; Hereford, Mark

2011-01-01

122

LOXL4 Is Induced by Transforming Growth Factor ?1 through Smad and JunB/Fra2 and Contributes to Vascular Matrix Remodeling  

PubMed Central

Transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) is a pleiotropic factor involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and remodeling. In search for novel genes mediating the action of TGF-?1 on vascular ECM, we identified the member of the lysyl oxidase family of matrix-remodeling enzymes, lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4), as a direct target of TGF-?1 in aortic endothelial cells, and we dissected the molecular mechanism of its induction. Deletion mapping and mutagenesis analysis of the LOXL4 promoter demonstrated the absolute requirement of a distal enhancer containing an activator protein 1 (AP-1) site and a Smad binding element for TGF-?1 to induce LOXL4 expression. Functional cooperation between Smad proteins and the AP-1 complex composed of JunB/Fra2 accounted for the action of TGF-?1, which involved the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent phosphorylation of Fra2. We furthermore provide evidence that LOXL4 was extracellularly secreted and significantly contributed to ECM deposition and assembly. These results suggest that TGF-?1-dependent expression of LOXL4 plays a role in vascular ECM homeostasis, contributing to vascular processes associated with ECM remodeling and fibrosis.

Busnadiego, Oscar; Gonzalez-Santamaria, Jose; Lagares, David; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Muller, Laurent

2013-01-01

123

Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--1990; Water-resources investigations report 93-4025  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suit-ability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment

Boucher

1994-01-01

124

Multicolor FISH mapping of YAC clones in 3p14 and identification of a YAC spanning both FRA3B and the t(3;8) associated with hereditary renal cell carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human chromosome band 3p14 contains two tightly linked cytogenetic markers of broad interest, FRA3B and the t(3;8) breakpoint associated with hereditary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The common fragile site at 3p14.2 (FRA3B) is the most sensitive site on normal human chromosomes to breakage when DNA replication is perturbed by aphidicolon or folate stress. The t(3;8)(p14.2;q24.1) translocation segregates with RCC in

C. M. Wilke; S. W. Guo; B. K. Hall

1994-01-01

125

Addendum for the Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect

This document, which makes changes to Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--076, Revision 0 (June 2006) was prepared to address review comments of this final document by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated July 19, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • On Plate 1 (inserted in the back of the document), the ET Unit legend has been revised. The revised Plate 1 is included and replaces the original Plate 1. • Some of the Appendix D perturbation sensitivity analysis plots included on the CD for Sections D.3.1 and D.3.2 were not properly aligned. A revised CD is provided with all plots properly aligned.

John McCord

2007-05-01

126

Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988--1990; Water-resources investigations report 93-4025  

SciTech Connect

Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the US Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suit-ability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988--90.

Boucher, M.S.

1994-05-01

127

Precision and accuracy of manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, 1988-90  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-level measurements have been made in deep boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada, since 1983 in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project, which is an evaluation of the area to determine its suitability as a potential storage area for high-level nuclear waste. Water-level measurements were taken either manually, using various water-level measuring equipment such as steel tapes, or they were taken continuously, using automated data recorders and pressure transducers. This report presents precision range and accuracy data established for manual water-level measurements taken in the Yucca Mountain area, 1988-90. Precision and accuracy ranges were determined for all phases of the water-level measuring process, and overall accuracy ranges are presented. Precision ranges were determined for three steel tapes using a total of 462 data points. Mean precision ranges of these three tapes ranged from 0.014 foot to 0.026 foot. A mean precision range of 0.093 foot was calculated for the multiconductor cable, using 72 data points. Mean accuracy values were calculated on the basis of calibrations of the steel tapes and the multiconductor cable against a reference steel tape. The mean accuracy values of the steel tapes ranged from 0.053 foot, based on three data points to 0.078, foot based on six data points. The mean accuracy of the multiconductor cable was O. 15 foot, based on six data points. Overall accuracy of the water-level measurements was calculated by taking the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual accuracy values. Overall accuracy was calculated to be 0.36 foot for water-level measurements taken with steel tapes, without accounting for the inaccuracy of borehole deviations from vertical. An overall accuracy of 0.36 foot for measurements made with steel tapes is considered satisfactory for this project.

Boucher, M. S.

1994-01-01

128

Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model of the Topopah Spring tuff in the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Discrete-fracture modeling is part of site characterization for evaluating Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, as a potential high-level radioactive-waste repository site. Because most of the water and gas flow may be in fractures in low-porosity units, conventional equivalent-continuum models do not adequately represent the flow system. Discrete-fracture modeling offers an alternative to the equivalent-continuum method. This report describes how discrete-fracture networks can be constructed and used to answer concerns about the flow system at Yucca Mountain, including quantifying fracture connectivity, deriving directional-permeability distributions for one-and two-phase flow, determining parameters of anisotropy at different scales, and determining at what scale the rock functions as an equivalent continuum. A three-dimensional discrete-fracture model was developed to investigate the effects of fractures on flow of water and gas in the Topopah Spring tuff of Miocene age in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Fracture data, used as model input, were taken exclusively from detailed line surveys in the Exploratory Studies Facility and converted into input parameters for simulation. A simulated fracture network was calibrated to field data. The simulated discrete fracture network was modified by eliminating nonconductive fractures determined from field-derived permeabilities. Small fractures also were removed from the simulated network without affecting the overall connectivity. Fractures, as much as 1.50 meters in length, were eliminated (a large percentage of the total number of fractures) from the network without altering the number of connected pathways. The analysis indicates that the fracture system in the Exploratory Studies Facility has numerous connected fractures that have relatively large permeabilities, but there are relatively few connected pathways across the simulated region. The fracture network was, therefore, sparse.

Anna, L.O.

1998-09-01

129

Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect

This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

John McCord

2007-05-01

130

Geohydrologic data collected from shallow neutron-access boreholes and resultant-preliminary geohydrologic evaluations, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy, 74 neutron-access boreholes were drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drilling, coring, sample collection and handling, and lithologic and preliminary geohydrologic data are presented in this report. The boreholes were drilled in a combination of alluvium/colluvium, ash-flow tuff, ash-fall tuff, or bedded tuff to depths of 4.6 to 36.6 meters. Air was used as a drilling medium to minimize disturbance of the water content and water potential of drill cuttings, core, and formation rock. Drill cuttings were collected at approximately 0.6-meter intervals. Core was taken at selected intervals from the alluvium/colluvium using drive-coring methods and from tuff using rotary-coring methods. Nonwelded and bedded tuffs were continuously cored using rotary-coring methods. Gravimetric water-content and water-potential values of core generally were greater than those of corresponding drill cuttings. Gravimetric water-content, porosity, and water-potential values of samples generally decreased, and bulk density values increased, as the degree of welding increased. Grain-density values remained fairly constant with changes in the degree of welding. A high degree of spatial variability in water-content and water-potential profiles was noted in closely spaced boreholes that penetrate similar lithologic subunits and was also noted in adjacent boreholes located in different topographic positions. Variability within a thick lithologic unit usually was small. 18 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Blout, D.O. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hammermeister, D.P.; Loskot, C.L.; Chornack, M.P.

1994-12-31

131

A C-terminal domain in FosB, absent in FosB/SF and Fra-1, which is able to interact with the TATA binding protein, is required for altered cell growth.  

PubMed Central

Transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes is thought to occur through interactions between specific transcription factors and the general transcription machinery. We show that the regulatory protein FosB, but not FosB/SF or Fra-1, specifically and stably associates with the TATA box binding protein (TBP) and the multiprotein complex TFIID. The binding to TBP is specified by the last 55 C-terminal amino acids of FosB, requiring a small amino acid sequence, termed the 'TBP binding motif' (TBM). Deletion of the TBM affects transcriptional activity slightly, but it is adjacent to a proline-rich sequence which constitutes the major transactivation domain. However, both regions are required for the transformation of Rat-1A cells by FosB. Transfection experiments demonstrate that inhibition of transactivation due to excess levels of Gal4-FosB (squelching) can be partially relieved by the co-expression of TBP, which establishes that TFIID is a functional target of FosB. Since TBP binding is not exhibited by FosB/SF or Fra-1, we suggest that the activity mediated by the TBP interaction is one differentiating characteristic that distinguishes the FosB functions from those of FosB/SF and Fra-1. Images

Metz, R; Kouzarides, T; Bravo, R

1994-01-01

132

Monitoring thermal stresses and incipient buckling of continuous-welded rails: results from the UCSD/BNSF/FRA large-scale laboratory test track  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most modern railways use Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). A major problem is the almost total absence of expansion joints that can create buckling in hot weather and breakage in cold weather due to the rail thermal stresses. In June 2008 the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), under the sponsorship of a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, began work to develop a technique for in-situ measurement of stress and detection of incipient buckling in CWR. The method under investigation is based on ultrasonic guided waves, and the ultimate goal is to develop a prototype that can be used in motion. A large-scale full rail track (70 feet in length) has been constructed at UCSD's Powell Structural Laboratories, the largest laboratories in the country for structural testing, to validate the CWR stress measurement and buckling detection technique under rail heating conditions well controlled in the laboratory. This paper will report on the results obtained from this unique large-scale test track to date. These results will pave the road for the future development of the rail stress measurement & buckling detection prototype.

Phillips, Robert; Nucera, Claudio; Coccia, Stefano; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Bartoli, Ivan; Fateh, Mahmood; Carr, Gary

2011-03-01

133

Short-term (Fos) and long-term (FRA) protein expression in rat locus coeruleus neurons during the neurolab mission: contribution of altered gravitational fields, stress, and other factors.  

PubMed

Changes in immediate-early gene (IEG) expression during and after space flight were studied in the rat locus coeruleus (LC) during the NASA Neurolab mission. The LC sends widespread projections throughout the brain and releases the neuromodulator norepinephrine. LC neurons respond to natural vestibular stimulation; their firing rate also increases during waking and decreases or ceases during sleep. LC neurons express IEGs such as c-fos after activation. Adult male albino Fisher 344 rats were killed at four mission time points, and the number of Fos- and Fos-related antigen (FRA)-positive LC cells were counted in flight and ground-based control rats. Half of the subjects at each time point were exposed to light for 60 min prior to killing to standardize their sleep-waking state. FRA-expressing cells were more numerous than Fos-expressing cells in both flight- and ground-based subjects. The difference between FRA- and Fos-expressing cells within individuals was significantly larger 24 h after landing in subjects exposed to both space flight and light pulse than in all other subjects at any mission time point. Fos and FRA responses scaled in proportion to the maximum response observed in any single individual showed similar patterns of variation. Analysis of the scaled and combined responses showed that LC IEG levels responded to both gravity changes and light pulses. Subjects exposed to either single stimulus had equivalent responses, significantly greater than those of control subjects maintained in dim light. The combination of gravity change and light pulse gave significantly higher LC responses than either stimulus alone 24 h after takeoff, and to a lesser extent after 12 days in space; the highest responses were obtained 24 h after landing. By 14 days after landing, animals exposed to space flight and light pulse responded no differently than ground-based subjects. No difference in LC IEG expression was clearly attributable to changes in the sleep-waking state of subjects. Activity of noradrenergic LC neurons has been previously shown to modulate IEG expression in target structures. The increased IEG LC activity (seen most especially 24 h after landing) may reflect large-scale activation of noradrenergic neurons that may serve as a trigger for molecular changes in target structures, and be critical for adaptation to gravity changes. PMID:12401326

Pompeiano, M; d'Ascanio, P; Centini, C; Pompeiano, O; Balaban, E

2002-01-01

134

Addendum for the Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect

This document, which makes changes to Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--077, Revision 0 (June 2006), was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 4, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made for the two plates inserted in the back of the document: • Plate 4: Disregard the repeat of legend text ‘Drill Hole Name’ and ‘Drill Hole Location’ in the lower left corner of the map. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-16-1 location (white dot on the lower left side of the map) is not color-coded because no water level has been determined. The well location is included for reference. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-12-1 location (upper left corner of the map), a yellow dot, represents the lower water level elevation. The higher water level elevation, represented by a red dot, was overprinted.

John McCord

2007-05-01

135

The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial  

PubMed Central

Background Group-based social skills training (SST) has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manualised SOSTA–FRA program will result in improved social responsiveness (measured by the parent rated social responsiveness scale, SRS) compared to treatment as usual (TAU). It is further expected, that parent and self reported anxiety and depressive symptoms will decline and pro-social behaviour will increase in the treatment group. A neurophysiological study in the Frankfurt HFASD subgroup will be performed pre- and post treatment to assess changes in neural function induced by SST versus TAU. Methods/design The SOSTA – net trial is designed as a prospective, randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with two parallel groups. The primary outcome is change in SRS score directly after the intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Several secondary outcome measures are also obtained. The target sample consists of 220 individuals with ASD, included at the six study centres. Discussion This study is currently one of the largest trials on SST in children and adolescents with HFASD worldwide. Compared to recent randomised controlled studies, our study shows several advantages with regard to in- and exclusion criteria, study methods, and the therapeutic approach chosen, which can be easily implemented in non-university-based clinical settings. Trial registration ISRCTN94863788 – SOSTA – net: Group-based social skills training in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder.

2013-01-01

136

Skurlastkvalitet fra Sandeskur (Sawn Timber Quality from Sandeskur).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this report the results from grading of sawn timber from a timber quality called Sandeskur is shown. The timber quality is between pulpwood and the lowest saw wood quality. The sawn timber is graded according to NS-INSTA 142 and the commercial grading ...

A. Ovrum

2002-01-01

137

Avloepsvann fra Blekerier (Waste Water from Bleaching Works).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a survey of the literature regarding the bleaching of chemical substances and the compounds which are released from bleaching works. In conventional bleaching with chlorine, a number of chlorinated organic compounds are formed. It has been ...

V. Loras

1976-01-01

138

Geologic evaluation of the Oasis Valley basin, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a geologic study of the area between the underground-nuclear-explosion testing areas on Pahute Mesa, in the northwesternmost part of the Nevada Test Site, and the springs in Oasis Valley, to the west of the Test Site. The new field data described in this report are also presented in a geologic map that is a companion product(Fridrich and others, 1999) and that covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles centered on Thirsty Canyon SW, the quadrangle in which most of the Oasis Valley springs are located. At the beginning of this study, published detailed maps were available for 3 of the 9 quadrangles of the study area: namely Thirsty Canyon (O'Connor and others, 1966); Beatty (Maldonado and Hausback, 1990); and Thirsty Canyon SE (Lipman and others, 1966). Maps of the last two of these quadrangles, however, required extensive updating owing to recent advances in understanding of the regional structure and stratigraphy. The new map data are integrated in this re port with new geophysical data for the Oasis Valley area, include gravity, aeromagnetic, and paleomagnetic data (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Hudson and others, 1994; Hudson, unpub. data).

Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; and Mankinen, E.A.

2000-01-13

139

Huebnerite veins near Round Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Small huebnerite-bearing quartz veins occur in and near Cretaceous (about 95 m.y. old) granite east and south of Round Mountain. The veins are short, lenticular, and strike mostly northeast and northwest in several narrow east-trending belts. The quartz veins were formed about 80 m.y. ago near the end of an episode of doming and metamorphism of the granite and emplacement of aplite and pegmatite dikes in and near the granite. An initial hydrothermal stage involved deposition of muscovite, quartz, huebnerite, fluorite, and barite in the veins. Veins were then sheared, broken, and recrystallized. A second hydrothermal stage, possibly associated with emplacement of a rhyolite dike swarm and granodiorite stock about 35 m.y. ago, saw deposition of more muscovite, quartz, fluorite, and barite, and addition of scheelite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, several sulfide minerals, and chalcedony. Finally, as a result of near-surface weathering, secondary sulfide and numerous oxide, tungstate, carbonate, sulfate, phosphate, and silicate minerals formed in the veins. Depth of burial at the time of formation of the veins, based on geologic reconstruction, was about 3-3.5 km. The initial hydrothermal stage ended with deposition of quartz at a temperature of about 210/sup 0/C and pressures of about 240 to 280 bars from fluids with salinity of about 5 wt % sodium chloride. Fluorite then was deposited at about 250/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/C from solutions of similar salinity and containing a small amount of carbon dioxide. During shearing that followed initial mineralization, quartz was recrystallized at a temperature of 270/sup 0/ to 290/sup 0/C and in association with fluids of about 5 wt % sodium chloride equivalent and containing carbon dioxide. Late-stage fluorite was deposited from fluids with similar salinity but devoid of carbon dioxide at a temperature of about 210/sup 0/C. 76 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs.

Shawe, D.R.; Foord, E.E.; Conklin, N.M.

1984-01-01

140

Geohydrology of Pahute Mesa-3 test well, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Pahute Mesa-3 test well is on Pahute Mesa about 3 miles west of the Nevada Test Site and 20 miles northeast of Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nevada. The well was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Migration Program to monitor conditions near the western edge of the Nevada Test Site. The well was drilled with conventional rotary methods and an air-foam drilling fluid to a depth of 3,019 feet. A 10.75-inch diameter steel casing was installed to a depth of 1,473 feet. The test well penetrates thick units of non-welded to partly welded ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age with several thin layers of densely welded tuff, rhyolite and basalt flows, and breccia. Geophysical logs indicate that fractures are significant in the Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group and this was confirmed by high flow in this unit during a borehole-flow survey. The geophysical logs also show that the effective porosity in tuffaceous units ranges from 19 to 38 percent and averages 30 percent, and the total porosity ranges from 33 to 55 percent and averages 42 percent. The measured temperature gradient of 1.00 degree Celsius per 100 feet is steep, but is similar to that of other nearby wells, one of which penetrates a buried granite intrusion. Injection tests for six intervals of the well yielded transmissivities that ranged from 3.1 x 10{sup -3} to 25 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivities that ranged from 6 x 10{sup -5} to 0.12 foot per day. The sum of the transmissivities is 28 feet squared per day and the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity is 1.7 x 10{sup -3} foot per day. Estimates of storage coefficient range from 2.1 x 10{sup -5} to 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, indicating that the aquifer responded to the injection tests in a confined manner. An aquifer test produced a drawdown of 78 feet during 31 hours of testing at 169 gallons per minute.

Kilroy, K.C.; Savard, C.S.

1997-02-01

141

1989 wildlife studies at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of the field investigations were to assess the late summer/early autumn conditions in the Focused Baseline Study Area (FBSA), to make observations useful in developing reclamation strategies and impact models, to compare data with those developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), and to obtain information that can be used for monitoring DOE activities during Site Characterization. The studies were being conducted in conjunction with a portion of the work program presented in the Nevada Environmental Studies Plan, for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Project Office. The investigations entail the collection of primary data on the vegetation, wildlife, and soils and landforms of the study area. 9 refs., 4 tabs.

NONE

1990-03-01

142

78 FR 30847 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...funding. DATES: The meetings will be held Wednesday, June 26, 2013, at 9:00 a.m. (PST) and Monday, August 19, 2013, at 9:00 a.m. (PST). ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the Eureka County Annex, 701 S. Main...

2013-05-23

143

New Rural Public Transport Solutions (Ny Kollektivtransport pa Landsbygda. Erfaringer Fra et forsoksprosjekt i Vest-Agder Sammenholdt med Erfaringer fra Liknende forsk Andre Steder).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report summarizes a trial scheme for the development of rural public transport in Vet-Agder county, based on dial-a-bus services, and compares the results with trial schemes elsewhere. The project is part of the Norwegian Department of Transport and C...

E. Froeysadal B. Norheim

2000-01-01

144

Hydrokarbonanalyse av Blaskjell og Sedimenter fra Brofjorden (Analysis of Hydrocarbons in Mussels and Sediments from Brofjorden).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mussels and sediments were analysed for volatile, petrogenic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon levels in mussels are relatively low compared to other chronically polluted coastal areas. In sediments, petroleum hydrocarbons were defected beside of...

R. G. Lichtenthaler F. Oreld N. Berg B. Sortland

1980-01-01

145

Katalytisk rensning af gas fra halmforgasning. Parameterforsoeg. (Catalytic cleaning of gas from straw gasification. Parameter experiment).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Various catalysts were tested in relation to different gas compositions and temperatures in order to find their modes of operation. The three types examined were a sulphidic one incorporating nickel and molybdenum on alumina, an oxidic one with chromium o...

K. Pedersen

1995-01-01

146

Geomorphology of crater and basin deposits - Emplacement of the Fra Mauro formation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Characteristics of continuous deposits near lunar craters larger than about 1 km wide are considered, and it is concluded that (1) concentric dunes, radial ridges, and braided lineations result from deposition of the collision products of ejecta from adjacent pairs of similarly oriented secondary-crater chains and are, therefore, concentrations of secondary-crater ejecta; (2) intracrater ridges are produced within preexisting craters surrounding a fresh primary crater by ricocheting and focusing of secondary-crater ejecta from the preexisting craters' walls; and (3) secondary cratering has produced many of the structures of the continuous deposits of relatively small lunar craters and is the dominant process for emplacement of most of the radial facies of the continuous deposits of large lunar craters and basins. The percentages of Imbrium ejecta in deposits and the nature of Imbrium sculpturing are investigated.

Morrison, R. H.; Oberbeck, V. R.

1975-01-01

147

EXACT: EXercise or Advice after ankle fraCTure. Design of a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Ankle fractures are common. Management of ankle fractures generally involves a period of immobilisation followed by rehabilitation\\u000a to reduce pain, stiffness, weakness and swelling. The effects of a rehabilitation program are still unclear. However, it has\\u000a been shown that important components of rehabilitation programs may not confer additional benefits over exercise alone. The\\u000a primary aim of this trial is to

Paula R Beckenkamp; C Christine Lin; Robert D Herbert; Marion Haas; Kriti Khera; Anne M Moseley

2011-01-01

148

Osteoclast size is controlled by Fra2 through LIF\\/LIF-receptor signalling and hypoxia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoclasts are multinucleated haematopoietic cells that resorb bone. Increased osteoclast activity causes osteoporosis, a disorder resulting in a low bone mass and a high risk of fractures. Increased osteoclast size and numbers are also a hallmark of other disorders, such as Paget's disease and multiple myeloma. The protein c-Fos, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, is essential for

Aline Bozec; Latifa Bakiri; Astrid Hoebertz; Robert Eferl; Arndt F. Schilling; Vukoslav Komnenovic; Harald Scheuch; Matthias Priemel; Colin L. Stewart; Michael Amling; Erwin F. Wagner

2008-01-01

149

Confronto fra coatings abradibili ceramici e metallici per applicazioni in turbine a gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research and development of new materials for high temperature gas turbine applications promote improvements of all engine components, in particular of the turbine first stage, where it is possible to obtain a large increase in performance. Abradable seals reduce clearances between rotor and stator elements, in order to reduce thermal loss and secondary flows which decrease engine performances. A comparison

I. Giovannetti; G. Zonfrillo; M. Bigi; M. Giannozzi

150

Lunar surface closeup stereoscopic photography at Fra Mauro (Apollo 14 site)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A total of 17-1/2 stereopairs of lunar surface rocks and soil was taken on the Apollo 14 mission. The closeup stereopair photographs are presented with a preliminary interpretation for those interested in lunar soil formation, impact phenomena, and soil mechanics.

Carrier, W. D., III; Heiken, G.

1972-01-01

151

Exposure ages and neutron capture record in lunar samples from Fra Mauro.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cosmic-ray exposure ages of Apollo 14 rocks and rock fragments obtained by the Kr81-Kr83 method range from 27 to 700 m.y. Rock 14321, collected near the Cone crater rim, is one of the many approximately 27 m.y. old ejecta which were reported at the Third Lunar Science Conference. All the other rocks have considerably higher exposure ages. Isotopic anomalies from neutron capture in gadolinium, bromine, and barium are used to obtain information on the lunar neutron spectrum at various depths below the lunar surface. The flux ratio of resonance and slow (less than 0.3 eV) neutrons is found to be nearly constant in the topmost approximately 100 g/sq cm.

Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

1972-01-01

152

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...frequent and open communications with the national...before embarking on new policies that...basis to discuss new regulations, persistent...concerns, emerging technology, and compliance...addition to these communication practices...the development of new safety...

2013-10-01

153

75 FR 8785 - Agency Request for Emergency Processing of Collection of Information Associated With FRA's...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 37 (Thursday...After Publication of Second Agency Federal Register Notice Concerning Solicitation of...publication of this notice in the Federal Register. Title: Notice of Funding...

2010-02-25

154

49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...annual percentage rate for random alcohol testing determined...the railroad conducts random alcohol testing through a consortium, the number of employees to be tested...be based on the total number of covered employees...consortium who are subject to random testing at the same...

2009-10-01

155

49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...annual percentage rate for random drug testing determined...the railroad conducts random drug testing through a consortium, the number of employees to be tested...be based on the total number of covered employees...consortium who are subject to random drug testing at the...

2009-10-01

156

49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...percentage rate for random drug testing must be 50 percent of covered...percentage rate for random drug testing is based on the reported...this part. In order to ensure reliability of the data, the Administrator...percentage rate for random drug testing of covered employees....

2013-10-01

157

Energibesparelse ved rensning af luft fra sproejtekabiner. (Saving energy by cleaning air using spraying cabins).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The aim was to develop a varnishing-spray cabin, for use within the furniture manufacturing industry, with a suction system where air during recirculation and re-use for drying processes will contain a concentration of solvents organic which is high enoug...

1992-01-01

158

Nitrogen fra fjell til fjord. Aarsrapport 1993. (Nitrogen from mountain to fjord - Annual report 1993).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nitrogen from mountain to fjord is an interdisciplinary research programme which studies the nitrogen cycle from deposition to discharge into the sea. The project includes investigation of the nitrogen budgets for two catchments and selected areas of moun...

O. Kaste M. Bechmann K. Toerset

1994-01-01

159

Geohydrology of rocks penetrated by test well USW H-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well USW H-4 is one of several wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for hydraulic testing, hydrologic monitoring, and geophysical logging. The work was performed in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The rocks penetrated by the well to a total depth of 1,219 m were volcanic tuffs of Tertiary age. Hydraulic coefficients calculated from pumping test data indicate that transmissivity ranged from 200 to 790 sq m/day. A radioactive tracer, borehole flow survey indicated that the two most productive zones during this borehole flow survey occurred in the upper part of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, depth interval from 721 to 731.5m, and in the underlying part of the Tram Member, depth interval from 864 to 920m. The water is predominantly a sodium biocarbonate type with small concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and sulfate. The apparent age of this composite water sample was determined by carbon-14 date of 17,200 years before present. (USGS)

Whitfield, M. S.; Eshom, E. P.; Thordarson, William; Schaefer, D. H.

1985-01-01

160

Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

NONE

1995-05-01

161

Nye Lecture: We're All Glaciologists Now: Ice in the Climate System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cryosphere plays a disproportionately important role in the climate system and in global-change research. Ice cores provide the best histories of climate change, and the most compelling evidence for linkage of atmospheric carbon-dioxide concentration and temperature over long times. Over shorter times, outburst floods and ice-sheet surges triggered abrupt climate changes, flipping the North Atlantic "switch" that controls whether water sinks before it freezes or freezes before it sinks; sea ice provided the main feedbacks, with strong wintertime changes. Cryospheric feedbacks are important in future climate change, and sea-level rise from glacier and ice-sheet melting is probably the clearest and most quantifiable cost of warming. Too much warming will melt ice, and numerous recent events and studies suggest that sufficient warming to melt one or more of the big ice sheets may be reached if available fossil fuels are burned rapidly. Feedbacks on oceanic circulation and other processes are possible, with poorly understood impacts that could be large. The convergence of cryospheric research impresses me greatly. For example, the joint efforts of ice geochemists and glacier-flow dynamicists together develop and calibrate the ice-core records of abrupt climate changes that were forced by ice dynamics and amplified by sea ice and snow cover. Research priorities are clear, exciting and compelling, with much work yet to occur at the interfaces among cryospheric subdisciplines.

Alley, R. B.

2004-12-01

162

Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM-2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analysis of water collected during August and September 1993 from well PM-2, on Pahute Mesa at\\x11the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations of\\x1121,000 Bq/L at 610 m below land surface. The Schooner event (U-20u) was detonated in 1968 approximately 270 meterssoutheast of well PM-2 at a working depth of 108.2 meters. The crater created by the Schooner event was about 129.8 meters in radius and\\x1163.4 meters in depth. Geologic and hydrologic properties of the stratigraphic units are summarized from historical data. The soil around the well and water in the well were analyzed for radionuclides and water in the well was also analyzed for inorganic constituents and organic (volatile and semivolatile) substances. Close agreement between tritium analyses of water from well PM-2, at different times and at the same depths, confirms the elevated levels of tritium. The highest tritium values in the borehole were at 610 meters below land surface-above the shallowest perforations at 765 meters below land surface. These values were only slightly higher than values found at greater depth in the well.

Russell, G. M.; Locke, G. L.

1997-01-01

163

Hydrogeology of rocks penetrated by test well JF-3, Jackass Flats, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Geological Survey are monitoring water levels in southern Nevada and adjacent parts of California in response to concern about the potential effects of pumping ground water to support the Yucca Mountain Site-Characte...

R. W. Plume R. J. La Camera

1996-01-01

164

Petroleum geology of Kate Spring field, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Kate Spring field was opened by Marathon Oil Company at the 1 Kate Spring well in December 1985. Because of poor market conditions and production problems, the well was not produced and the field was not confirmed until the Evans 1 Taylor well was completed in October 1987. As of August 1990, five wells have produced over 575,000 bbl of oil and have the capacity to flow at rates of several hundred to several thousand barrels per day. The oil is 10-12{degrees} API and is saturated with gas. The oil is used for road asphalt which limits its marketability. Production is from landslide blocks of Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata that were emplaced in Miocene-Pliocene time, during the structural development of the Railroad Valley basin. The slide blocks are overlain by valley fill and probably correspond to similar blocks encountered within the valley fill at Eagle Springs field, adjacent to the north. The pay is at a depth of 4,500 ft. Kate Spring is a part of the fault-block bench that contains Eagle Springs field and is situated on the east flank of the Railroad Valley graben. There is east-west closure on the structure of the field, but the north end of the field has not been defined. The accumulation is sealed by the unconformity at the slide block-valley fill contact. The nature of the reservoir implies that the production is controlled by fractures and precludes useful extrapolation of any measurable matrix porosity. Based on volumetric calculations, the field will probably produce 2-3 million bbl of oil.

French, D.E.

1991-06-01

165

75 FR 5114 - Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, NV  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FWS-R8-R-2009-N222; 80230-1265-0000-S3] Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Clark...Impact Statement (CCP/ EIS) for the Desert National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex...EIS Alternative C, for Ash Meadows, Desert, and Moapa Valley NWRs and...

2010-02-01

166

Geohydrologic data from test hole USW UZ-7, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains a description of the methods used in drilling and coring of the test-hole USW UZ-7, a description of the methods used in collecting, handling, and testing of test-hole samples; Lithologic information from the test hole; and water-content, water-potential, bulk-density, grain-density, porosity, and tritium data for the test hole. Test-hole USW UZ-7 was drilled and cored to a total depth of 62.94 m. The drilling was done using air as a drilling fluid to minimize disturbance to the water content of cores, drill-bit cuttings, and borehole wall-rock. Beginning at the land surface, the unsaturated-zone rock that was penetrated consisted of alluvium; welded and partially to nonwelded ash-flow tuff; bedded and reworked ash-fall tuff; nonwelded ash-flow tuff; and welded ash-flow tuff. Values of gravimetric water content and water potential of alluvium were intermediate between the extreme values in welded and nonwelded units of tuff. Gravimetric water content was largest in bedded and nonwelded ash-fall tuffs and was smallest in welded ash-flow tuff. Values of water potential were more negative in densely welded ash-flow tuffs and were less negative in bedded and nonwelded ash-fall tuffs. Bulk density was largest in densely welded ash-flow tuffs and smallest in nonwelded and bedded ash-fall tuffs. Grain density was uniform but was slightly larger in nonwelded and bedded ash-fall tuffs than in welded ash-flow tuffs. Porosity trends were opposite to bulk-density trends. Tritium content in alluvium was smallest near the alluvium-bedrock contact, markedly increased in the middle of the deposit, and decreased in the near-surface zone of the deposit. (Author 's abstract)

Kume, Jack; Hammermeister, D. P.

1990-01-01

167

Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences] [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

1995-12-01

168

Hydraulic Characterization of Overpressured Tuffs in Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A sequence of buried, bedded, air-fall tuffs has been used extensively as a host medium for underground nuclear tests detonated in the central part of Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Water levels within these bedded tuffs have been elevated hundreds of meters in areas where underground nuclear tests were detonated below the water table. Changes in the ground-water levels within these tuffs and changes in the rate and distribution of land-surface subsidence above these tuffs indicate that pore-fluid pressures have been slowly depressurizing since the cessation of nuclear testing in 1992. Declines in ground-water levels concurrent with regional land subsidence are explained by poroelastic deformation accompanying ground-water flow as fluids pressurized by underground nuclear detonations drain from the host tuffs into the overlying water table and underlying regional carbonate aquifer. A hydraulic conductivity of about 3 x 10-6 m/d and a specific storage of 9 x 10-6 m-1 are estimated using ground-water flow models. Cross-sectional and three-dimensional ground-water flow models were calibrated to measured water levels and to land-subsidence rates measured using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Model results are consistent and indicate that about 2 million m3 of ground water flowed from the tuffs to the carbonate rock as a result of pressurization caused by underground nuclear testing. The annual rate of inflow into the carbonate rock averaged about 0.008 m/yr between 1962 and 2005, and declined from 0.005 m/yr in 2005 to 0.0005 m/yr by 2300.

K.J. Halford; R.J. Laczniak; D.L. Galloway

2005-10-07

169

Preliminary results of gravity investigations of the Calico Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A total of 211 recently established gravity stations supplement 128 existing regional stations in providing data for a detailed gravity interpretation of the Calico Hills area of the Nevada Test Site. Reduction of these data to complete Bouguer anomalies combined with a regional correction of -0.8 mGal/km N.15{sup 0} E. reveals an elliptical gravity high centered over the exposed Paleozoic rocks. The anomaly has an amplitude of about 7.5 mGal and extent of about 8 km, elongate in an east-west direction. A log from a 770-m drill hole and data from detailed surface geologic mapping, a seismic refraction line, electrical soundings, and magnetic traverses all provide some control on the interpretation of density variations or rock structure within the study area. Two nearly perpendicular gravity profiles interpreted by 2 1/2-dimensional modelling suggest the Calico Hills gravity anomaly can be entirely attributed to a lateral density contrast of 0.50 g/cm{sup 3} between Paleozoic rocks (= 2.60 g/cm{sup 3}) and the overlying Tertiary tuff (= 2.10 g/cm{sup 3}). This boundary can be constrained vertically to within several hundred meters and thus defines the domical structure of the Paleozoic rocks in this region. The strong contrast of this boundary produces anomalies that mask any gravity anomalies of smaller amplitude that might arise from structure internal to the Paleozoic rocks. Therefore, the existence of a relatively high- or low-density intrusive body in those rocks cannot be confirmed or denied.

Snyder, D.B.; Oliver, H.W.

1981-12-31

170

Preliminary gravity investigations of the Wahmonie Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A gravity survey of the southwest corner of the Nevada Test Site was completed during 1979 to 1980 as part of an effort to characterize a possible radioactive waste storage site in granitic rocks. The survey outlined a large, broad, and flat gravity high centered near Wahmonie Site. Combined geophysical data indicate that the anomalous area is underlain by a dense, magnetic, and possibly intrusive body. Gravity data show a +15 milligal Bouguer anomaly coincident with a large positive aeromagnetic anomaly. The data reveal a prominent fault at the west edge of the inferred intrusive. Both gravity and magnetic anomalous highs extend NNE over a horst composed predominantly of rhyodacite of the Tertiary Salyer Formation. Local aeromagnetic highs are closely associated with two granodiorite exposures on the eastern edge of the horst. A local gravity high of about +2 milligal is centered directly over the southern granodiorite exposure and another high is centered over the northern exposure. A steep gravity gradient outlining the gravity high coincides with the outer edge of a zone of hydrothermal alteration which surrounds the horst. The gravity gradient probably marks the approximate limit of an intrusive body.

Ponce, D.A.

1981-12-31

171

Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 443 Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The drilling program described in this report is part of a new corrective action strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The drilling program included drilling two boreholes, geophysical well logging, construction of two monitoring/validation (MV) wells with piezometers (MV-4 and MV-5), development of monitor wells and piezometers, recompletion of two existing wells (HTH-1 and UC-1-P-1S), removal of pumps from existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), redevelopment of piezometers associated with existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), and installation of submersible pumps. The new corrective action strategy includes initiating a new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period to validate the compliance boundary at CNTA (DOE 2007). The new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period begins upon completion of the new monitor wells and collection of samples for laboratory analysis. The new strategy is described in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan addendum (DOE 2008a) that the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved (NDEP 2008).

None

2009-12-01

172

Environmental assessment for liquid waste treatment at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment (EA) examines the potential impacts to the environment from treatment of low-level radioactive liquid and low-level mixed liquid and semi-solid wastes generated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The potential impacts of the proposed action and alternative actions are discussed herein in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended in Title 42 U.S.C. (4321), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) policies and procedures set forth in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1021 and DOE Order 451.1, ``NEPA Compliance Program.`` The potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, construction and operation of a centralized liquid waste treatment facility, were addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada. However, DOE is reevaluating the need for a centralized facility and is considering other alternative treatment options. This EA retains a centralized treatment facility as the proposed action but also considers other feasible alternatives.

NONE

1997-01-01

173

Contributions to Astrogeology: Geology of the lunar crater volcanic field, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Lunar Crater volcanic field in east-central Nevada includes cinder cones, maars, and basalt flows of probably Quaternary age that individually and as a group resemble some features on the moon. Three episodes of volcanism are separated by intervals of relative dormancy and erosion. Changes in morphology of cinder cones, degree of weathering, and superposition of associated basalt flows provide a basis for determining the relative ages of the cones. A method has been devised whereby cone heights, base radii, and angles of slope are used to determine semiquantitatively the age relationships of some cinder cones. Structural studies show that cone and crater chains and their associated lava flows developed along fissures and normal faults produced by tensional stress. The petrography of the basalts and pyroclastics suggests magmatic differentiation at depth which produced interbedded subalkaline basalts, alkali-olivine basalts, and basanitoids. The youngest flows in the field are basanitoids.

Scott, D. H.; Trask, N. J.

1971-01-01

174

Geologic map of the Mound Spring quadrangle, Nye and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mound Spring quadrangle, the southwestern-most 7.5' quadrangle of the area of the Las Vegas 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, is entirely within the Pahrump Valley, spanning the Nevada/California State line. New geologic mapping of the predominantly Quaternary materials is combined with new studies of gravity and geochronology in this quadrangle. Eleven predominantly fine-grained units are delineated, including playa sediment, dune sand, and deposits associated with several cycles of past groundwater discharge and distal fan sedimentation. These units are intercalated with 5 predominantly coarse-grained alluvial-fan and wash gravel units mainly derived from the Spring Mountains. The gravel units are distinguished on the basis of soil development and associated surficial characteristics. Thermoluminescence and U-series geochronology constrain most of the units to the Holocene and late and middle Pleistocene. Deposits of late Pleistocene groundwater discharge in the northeast part of the quadrangle are associated with a down-to-the-southwest fault zone that is expressed by surface fault scarps and a steep gravity gradient. The gravity field also defines a northwest-trending uplift along the State line, in which the oldest sediments are poorly exposed. About 2 km to the northeast a prominent southwest-facing erosional escarpment is formed by resistant beds in middle Pleistocene fine-grained sediments that dip northeast away from the uplift. These sediments include cycles of groundwater discharge that were probably caused by upwelling of southwesterly groundwater flow that encountered the horst.

Lundstrom, Scott C.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Paces, James B.; Young, Owen D.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Dixon, Gary L.

2003-01-01

175

Site environmental report for calendar year 1997, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document is the seventh annual Site Environmental Report (SER) submitted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office (YMSCO) to describe the environmental program implemented by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain. As prescribed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA, 1982), this program ensures that site characterization activities are conducted in a manner that minimizes any significant adverse impacts to the environment and complies with all applicable laws and regulations. The most recent guidelines for the preparation of the SER place major emphasis on liquid and gaseous emissions of radionuclides, pollutants or hazardous substances; human exposure to radionuclides; and trends observed by comparing data collected over a period of years. To date, the YMP has not been the source of any radioactive emissions or been responsible for any human exposure to radionuclides. Minuscule amounts of radioactivity detected at the site are derived from natural sources or from dust previously contaminated by nuclear tests conducted in the past at the NTS. Because data for only a few years exist for the site, identification of long-term trends is not yet possible. Despite the lack of the aforementioned categories of information requested for the SER, the YMP has collected considerable material relevant to this report. An extensive environmental monitoring and mitigation program is currently in place and is described herein. Also, as requested by the SER guidelines, an account of YMP compliance with appropriate environmental legislation is provided.

NONE

1998-10-01

176

Site environmental report for calendar year 1996: Yucca Mountain site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The environmental program established by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office (YMSCO) has been designed and implemented to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE, 1990a), to be superseded by DOE Order 231.1 (under review), the status of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) environmental program has been summarized in this annual Site Environmental Report (SER) to characterize performance, document compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during calendar year 1996.

NONE

1997-11-01

177

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31

178

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01

179

Effect of irrigation pumping on desert pupfish habitats in the Ash Meadows, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ash Meadows area, at the southern tip of the Amargosa Desert in southern Nevada, discharges ground water collected over several thousand square miles of a regional flow system developed in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water moves westward across fault contacts from the bedrock into poorly interconnected gravel, sand, and terrestrial-limestone aquifers in the upper few hundred feet of the basin sediments at Ash Meadows. A small pool in Devils Hole, which is a collapse depression in Cambrian limestone, and numerous springs in the adjacent desert valley contain rare fish species of the genus Cyprinodon, faunal remnants of Pleistocene lakes. The Devils Hole pupfish, C. diabolis, is the most endangered of the several surviving species that have evolved since the post-pluvial isolation of their ancestors. This population feeds and reproduces on a slightly submerged rock ledge. Recent irrigation pumping has nearly exposed this ledge. Correlation of pumping histories with the stage in Devils Hole allows identification of several wells that affect the pool level most severly. Some springs that are habitats for other species of Cyprinodon have reduced discharge because of pumping. Hydraulic testing, long-term water-level monitoring, water quality, and geologic evidence aid in defining the principal flow paths and hydraulic interconnections in the Ash Meadows area. (Woodard-USGS)

Dudley, William W., Jr.; Larson, J. D.

1976-01-01

180

Estimated ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration, Ash Meadows Area, Nye County, Nevada, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Ground water discharges from the regional ground-water flow system that underlies the eastern part of the Nevada Test Site through numerous springs and seeps in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada. The total spring discharge was estimated to be about 17,000 acre-feet per year by earlier studies. Previous studies estimated that about 10,500 acre-feet of this discharge was lost to evapotranspiration. The present study was undertaken to develop a more rigorous approach to estimating ground-water discharge in the Ash Meadows area. Part of the study involves detailed field investigation of evapotranspiration. Data collection began in early 1994. The results of the first year of study provide a basis for making preliminary estimates of ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration. An estimated 13,100 acre-feet of ground water was evapotranspired from about 6,800 acres of marsh and salt-grass. Additional 3,500 acre-feet may have been transpired from the open water and from about 1,460 acres of other areas of Ash Meadows in which field studies have not yet been made.

Nichols, W.D.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Rapp, T.R.

1997-05-01

181

Geohydrology of test well USW H-3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well USW H-3 is one of several wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for hydraulic testing, hydrologic monitoring, and geophysical logging. The work was performed in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The rocks penetrated by the well to a total depth of 1,219 meters were volcanic tuffs of Tertiary age. The most transmissive zone in this well is in the upper part of the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff that was penetrated at a depth from 809 to 841 meters; transmissivity is about 7 x 10 -1 meter squared per day. The remainder of the rocks penetrated between the depths of 841 to 1,219 meters have a transmissivity of about 4 x 10 -1 meter squared per day and are predominatly in the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff and the Lithic Ridge Tuff in the depths from 841 to 1,219 meters. (USGS)

Thordarson, William; Rush, F. E.; Waddell, S. J.

1985-01-01

182

Site environmental report for calendar year 1994, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization office has established an environmental program to ensure that facilities are operated in order to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US DOE orders. The status of the environmental program has been summarized in this annual report to characterize performance, confirm compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during CY 1994. Monitoring, archaeology, groundwater, ecosystems, tortoise conservation, waste minimization, etc., are covered.

NONE

1995-06-01

183

Evidence for Active Westward Tilting of Fortymile Wash, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fortymile Wash is located east and south of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Several lines of evidence suggest that this may be an area of active westward tilting associated with the continued development of Crater Flat basin and slip on the Bare Mountain normal fault. Near the southern end of Busted Butte, the incised channel of Fortymile Wash changes trend downgradient from south to south-southwest. Further southward, the incised main channel grades to a divergent distributary channel system that shows evidence of increasingly westward tilt. Viewed in profiles oriented normal to the incised channel and across the Fortymile Wash distributary system, topographic elevation of the western margin of the fan decreases southward, resulting in the elevation of the western margin of Fortymile Basin being as much as 18 m [59 ft] lower than the channel system on the eastern fan margin. Mapping of the surficial deposits within the distributary channel system (Pelletier, et al., 2005; Geophy. Res. Ltr., Vol. 32) may be interpreted to show a westward shift (downslope) of the locus of erosional activity toward the topographically lower western fan margin. Most of the older alluvium (Qa3 {86±40-16 ka}) has been eroded from the eastern portion, while incipient incision into the older alluvium is occurring on the western side of the distributary channel system. The results from level-line benchmark surveys (Gilmore, 1992; USGS OFR 92- 450) from 1915 and 1984 show gradual and systematic elevation changes east of the Bare Mountain fault to just east of Amargosa City, Nevada, where a step-like increase occurs. The level-line surveys are near and along the path of U.S. Highway 95, which traverses the distributary channel system of the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan in the southern portion of the Fortymile Wash basin. These lines of evidence indicate disequilibrium in the channel system that would result from active westward tilting of the Fortymile Wash basin. The active tilting in Fortymile Wash may be associated with continued development of Crater Flat basin and slip on the Bare Mountain fault, with the steeply dipping southern segment of the Bare Mountain fault not only controlling the southward-increasing subsidence in Southern Crater Flat, but also the changes observed in the southern Fortymile Wash basin 20 km [12.5 mi] to the southeast. An alternative interpretation is westward tilting, which is the result of active, but not evident, faulting beneath or near Fortymile Wash. Additional evidence indicating the presence of a fault beneath Fortymile Wash is the easterly dip of Miocene tuffs in Fran Ridge north of Busted Butte. This abstract is an independent product of the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses and does not necessarily reflect the view or regulatory position of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

McKague, H. L.; Sims, D. W.; Waiting, D. J.

2006-12-01

184

Free-air gradient observations in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, the free-air gradient (F) has been calculated from international formulas and from surface gravity data. It has also been determined from measurements on, or near, the ground surface and at an elevated position vertically above. The latter (measured), has been the principal method of determining F at Yucca Flat. The free-air gradient is used

P. S. Powers; D. L. Healey

1985-01-01

185

Hydraulic Characterization of Overpressured Tuffs in Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sequence of buried, bedded, air-fall tuffs has been used extensively as a host medium for underground nuclear tests detonated in the central part of Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Water levels within these bedded tuffs have been elevated hundreds of meters in areas where underground nuclear tests were detonated below the water table. Changes in the ground-water

K. J. Halford; R. J. Laczniak; D. L. Galloway

2005-01-01

186

Geohydrology of rocks penetrated by test well USW H-6, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Test well USW H-6 is one of several wells drilled in the Yucca Mountain area near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for investigations related to isolation of high-level nuclear waste. This well was drilled to a depth of 1,220 meters. Rocks penetrated are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age, with the principal exception of dacitic(?) lave penetrated at a depth from 877 to 1,126 meters. The composite static water level was about 526 meters below the land surface; the hydraulic head increased slightly with depth. Most permeability in the saturated zone is in two fractured intervals in Crater Flat Tuff. Based on well-test data using the transitional part of a dual-porosity solution, an interval of about 15 meters in the middle part of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has a calculated transmissivity of about 140 meters squared per day, and an interval of about 11 meters in the middle part of the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff has a calculated transmissivity of about 75 meters squared per day. The upper part of the Bullfrog Member has a transmissivity of about 20 meters squared per day. The maximum likely transmissivity of any rocks penetrated by the test well is about 480 meters squared per day, based on a recharge-boundary model. The remainder of the open hole had no detectable production. Matrix hydraulic conductivity ranges from less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} meter per day. Ground water is a sodium bicarbonate type that is typical of water from tuffaceous rock of southern Nevada. The apparent age of the water is about 14,6000 years. 29 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.

Craig, R.W. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Reed, R.L. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

1991-12-01

187

Origins of secondary silica within Yucca Mountain, Nye County, southwestern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The accuracy of predictions of the hydrologic response of Yucca Mountain to future climate depends largely on how well relations between past climate and hydrology can be resolved. To advance this reconstruction, secondary minerals in and near Yucca Mountain, deposited by ground waters that originated both as surficial recharge at Yucca Mountain and from regional aquifers, are being studied to determine past ground-water sources and chemistries. Preliminary data on stable oxygen isotopes indicate that, although silica (opal, quartz, and chalcedony) and calcite and have formed in similar settings and from somewhat similar fluids, the authors have found no compelling evidence of coprecipitation or formation from identical fluids. If verified by further analyses, this precludes the use of silica-calcite mineral pairs for precise geothermometry. The preliminary data also indicate that opal and calcite occurrences in pedogenic and unsaturated-zone settings are invariably compatible with formation under modern ambient surface or subsurface temperatures. Silica and calcite stable-isotope studies are being integrated with soil geochemical modeling. This modeling will define the soil geochemical condition (climate) leading to opal or calcite deposition and to the transfer functions that may apply at the meteorologic soil unsaturated-zone interfaces. Additional study of pedogenic and unsaturated-zone silica is needed to support these models. The hypothesis that the transformation of vapor-phase tridymite to quartz requires saturated conditions is being tested through stable oxygen-isotope studies of lithophysal tridymite/quartz mixtures. Should this hypothesis be verified, mineralogic analysis by X-ray diffraction theoretically would permit reconstruction of past maximum water-table elevations.

Moscati, R.J.; Whelan, J.F.

1996-09-01

188

Field trip report: Observations made at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Special report No. 2  

SciTech Connect

A field trip was made to the Yucca Mountain area on December 5-9, 1992 by Jerry Frazier, Don Livingston, Christine Schluter, Russell Harmon, and Carol Hill. Forty-three separate stops were made and 275 lbs. of rocks were collected during the five days of the field trip. Key localities visited were the Bare Mountains, Yucca Mountain, Calico Hills, Busted Butte, Harper Valley, Red Cliff Gulch, Wahmonie Hills, Crater Flat, and Lathrop Wells Cone. This report only describes field observations made by Carol Hill. Drawings are used rather than photographs because cameras were not permitted on the Nevada Test Site during this trip.

Hill, C.A.

1993-03-01

189

Archaeological investigations at sample unit U19ax, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the procedures and findings of archaeological investigations sample unit U19ax on Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Data recovery was conducted at sites 26NY4182, 26NY5428, 26NY7842, and 26NY7843. The investigation consisted of mapping and surface collection. Four surface artifact concentrations were defined, three it site 26NY4182 and one at site 26NY7843. Only chipped-stone and groundstone artifacts were recovered. Lithic technology at these locales was perceived to be primarily core reduction and biface thinning, possibly of intermediate stage biface production. The time frame for occupancy of the area ranges from Early Archaic to Historic based on temporally diagnostic artifacts and radiocarbon dates. The greatest intensity of occupation seems to be around the late Middle Archaic and the early Late Archaic. The test excavation at site 26NY5428 revealed significant cultural deposits that can contribute to the research objectives of the Long Range Study Plan for the archaeological work on Pahute Mesa. The site possesses stratified deposits and datable material. Radiocarbon dates place the site in the Middle and Late Archaic periods. Based on data from the test excavation, site 26NY5428 may be viewed as the primary locus of settlement and subsistence strategies within the immediate area. Due to large pieces of rockfall covering portions of the site, full-scale excavations are not possible at this time. Full-scale excavation of site 26NY5428 is recommended if no comparable site is found in other sample units.

Beck, C.M.; Johnson, W.G.; McArthur, R.D. [eds.; Drollinger, H.; McLane, A.R.; Nowack, C.; Pippin, L.C.

1992-12-31

190

Archaeological investigations at sample unit U19ax, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the procedures and findings of archaeological investigations sample unit U19ax on Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Data recovery was conducted at sites 26NY4182, 26NY5428, 26NY7842, and 26NY7843. The investigation consisted of mapping and surface collection. Four surface artifact concentrations were defined, three it site 26NY4182 and one at site 26NY7843. Only chipped-stone and groundstone artifacts were recovered. Lithic technology at these locales was perceived to be primarily core reduction and biface thinning, possibly of intermediate stage biface production. The time frame for occupancy of the area ranges from Early Archaic to Historic based on temporally diagnostic artifacts and radiocarbon dates. The greatest intensity of occupation seems to be around the late Middle Archaic and the early Late Archaic. The test excavation at site 26NY5428 revealed significant cultural deposits that can contribute to the research objectives of the Long Range Study Plan for the archaeological work on Pahute Mesa. The site possesses stratified deposits and datable material. Radiocarbon dates place the site in the Middle and Late Archaic periods. Based on data from the test excavation, site 26NY5428 may be viewed as the primary locus of settlement and subsistence strategies within the immediate area. Due to large pieces of rockfall covering portions of the site, full-scale excavations are not possible at this time. Full-scale excavation of site 26NY5428 is recommended if no comparable site is found in other sample units.

Beck, C.M.; Johnson, W.G.; McArthur, R.D. (eds.); Drollinger, H.; McLane, A.R.; Nowack, C.; Pippin, L.C.

1992-01-01

191

Modeling Tritium Transport Through a Deep Unsaturated Zone, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contaminant-transport processes in deep unsaturated zones of arid environments are poorly understood. Studies at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS; http://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/) are investigating tritium transport away from a closed low-level radioactive waste facility. The unsaturated zone at the ADRS is 110 m thick; annual precipitation averages 0.11 m. Soil-gas samples collected from deep boreholes that are as far as 100 m from the waste facility and 160 m from the nearest waste-burial trench show elevated levels of tritium in water vapor throughout the unsaturated zone. Field data indicate that tritium movement primarily occurs in the gas phase with preferential transport through coarse-textured sediment layers. Preliminary models for diffusive movement of tritiated water vapor from the waste source in an isothermal, homogeneous material failed to predict the lateral extent of the transport indicated by field measurements. Homogeneous and heterogeneous models of the unsaturated zone system were used to test possible mechanisms driving tritium transport. Material properties assigned to the model domain were based on drillers' and gamma logs, and on physical- and hydraulic-property data. Diffusive and advective processes were simulated with the TOUGH2 numerical code. Comparative results illustrate possible lithological controls on tritium transport. Discrepancies between measured and modeled results are used to highlight uncertainties in the characterization and understanding of arid-site transport processes.

Mayers, C. J.; Andraski, B. J.; Wheatcraft, S. W.; Prudic, D. E.; Stonestrom, D. A.

2002-12-01

192

The generalized F?nyes-Nelson model for free scalar field theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The generalized Fenyes--Nelson model of quantum mechanics is applied to the\\u000afree scalar field. The resulting Markov field is equivalent to the Euclidean\\u000aMarkov field with the times scaled by a common factor which depends on the\\u000adiffusion parameter. This result is consistent between Guerra's earlier work on\\u000astochastic quantization of scalar fields. It suggests a deep connection between\\u000aEuclidean

Mark Davidson

1980-01-01

193

1982 biotic survey of Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In 1981 an extensive literature review was conducted to determine the current state of knowledge about the ecological characteristics of the Yucca Mountain study area and to identify what site-specific information was lacking. Based on the findings of the review a field study was initiated in 1982 to gather site-specific information on the ecological characteristics of the project area. The biota observed were representative of either the Mojave or Transition deserts that are widely distributed in southern Nevada and the arid Southwest. No unusual vegetation associations or assemblages of animals were observed. Based on observations of tracks and scats it was concluded that low numbers of both mule deer and feral burros used the area seasonally, and that neither species should be severely threatened by the proposed activities. The Mojave fishhook cactus and desert tortoise, both under consideration for federal protection as threatened species, were found to occur in the study area. The former was distributed in notable densities on the rocky ridgelines of Yucca Mountain in areas that should not be greatly disturbed by site characterization or future repository activities. Evidence of desert tortoise was observed throughout the project area to elevations of 5240 ft; however, relative densities were estimated to be low (less than 20 per square mile). Physical destruction of soils and native vegetation was determined to be the most significant negative effect associated with current and proposed characterization activities. Solution holes in exposed flat rock on ridgelines that served as passive collectors of precipitation and runoff were the only sources of free water observed. While these water supplies were not adequate to support riparian vegetation, there was evidence that they served as an important ephemeral source of water for wildlife.

O`Farrell, T.P.; Collins, E.

1983-02-01

194

Surrogate Indicators of Radionuclide Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contaminant-transport processes are being investigated at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), adjacent to the Nation's first commercial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. Gases containing tritium and radiocarbon are migrating through a 110-m thick unsaturated zone from unlined trenches that received waste from 1962 to 1992. Information on plume dynamics comes from an array of shallow (<2 m) and two vertical arrays of deep (5-109 m) gas-sampling ports, plus ground-water monitoring wells. Migration is dominated by lateral transport in the upper 50 m of sediments. Radiological analyses require ex-situ wet-chemical techniques, because in-situ sensors for the radionuclides of interest do not exist. As at other LLRW-disposal facilities, radionuclides at the ADRS are mixed with varying amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other substances. Halogenated-methanes, -ethanes, and -ethenes dominate the complex mixture of VOCs migrating from the disposal area. These compounds and their degradates provide a distinctive "fingerprint" of contamination originating from low-level radioactive waste. Carbon-dioxide and VOC anomalies provide indicator proxies for radionuclide contamination. Spatial and temporal patterns of co-disposed and byproduct constituents provide field-scale information about physical and biochemical processes involved in transport. Processes include reduction and biorespiration within trenches, and largely non-reactive, barometrically dispersed diffusion away from trenches.

Stonestrom, D. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Baker, R. J.; Luo, W.; Michel, R. L.

2005-05-01

195

Surrogate Indicators of Radionuclide Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contaminant-transport processes are being investigated at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), adjacent to the Nation's first commercial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. Gases containing tritium and radiocarbon are migrating through a 110-m thick unsaturated zone from unlined trenches that received waste from 1962 to 1992. Information on plume dynamics comes from an array of shallow

D. A. Stonestrom; B. J. Andraski; R. J. Baker; W. Luo; R. L. Michel

2005-01-01

196

Geomechanics investigations in support of the large block test at Fran Ridge, Nye County, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is investigating the Topopah Spring Tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for its suitability as a host rock for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is planning a large block test (LBT) to investigate coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological and geochemical processes that may occur in the repository near-field environment.

Blair, S.C.; Berge, P.; Kansa, E.; Lin, Wunan; Roberts, J.

1994-07-21

197

Borehole gravity meter survey in drill hole USW G-4, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Drill hole USW G-4 was logged with the US Geological Survey borehole gravity meter (BHGM) BH-6 as part of a detailed study of the lithostratigraphic units penetrated by this hole. Because the BHGM measures a larger volume of rock than the conventional gamma-gamma density tool, it provides an independent and more accurate measurement of the in situ average bulk density of thick lithologic units. USW G-4 is an especially important hole because of its proximity to the proposed exploratory shaft at Yucca Mountain. The BHGM data were reduced to interval densities using a free-air gradient (F) of 0.3083 mGal./m (0.09397 mGal/ft) measured at the drill site. The interval densities were further improved by employing an instrument correction factor of 1.00226. This factor was determined from measurements obtained by taking gravity meter BH-6 over the Charleston Peak calibration loop. The interval density data reported herein, should be helpful for planning the construction of the proposed shaft.

Healey, D.L.; Clutsom, F.G.; Glover, D.A.

1986-12-31

198

Lithic technology studies: Archaeological research at drill hole U19ba, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Desert Research Institute conducted two archaeological reconnaissances of drill hole U19ba on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). Eighteen archaeological sites were located there, nine of which were collected when recorded. The DOE/NV chose to investigate these sites and requested a data recovery plan for 26NY4183, 26NY4184, 26NY5914, 26NY5916, 26NY5917, and 26NY5922. Field investigations, primarily controlled surface collections, were carried out in May 1990 and, in the process, another two sites, 26NY7357 and 26NY7358, were discovered. Theses studies focused on core-biface technology, cultural thermal alteration, techniques used to analyze lithic debitage, and the recovery of small sized artifacts. Results of these analyses indicate that flake blanks produced from cores were an important component of biracial technology at these sites, thermal alteration was important throughout the reduction sequence, the techniques used to analyze debitage mask variability, and that the recovery of small sized artifacts reveals biracial final finishing and notching activity at 26NY5917. Based on projectile point chronology, the project area was periodically visited from about 7,000 years ago to about 400 years ago.

Walsh, L.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.; McLane, A.

1992-12-31

199

Archaeological data recovery related to the U20at project, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 1986, the Desert Research institute surveyed, tested, and conducted data recovery of the archaeological materials on land associated with the Department of Energy`s U20at event site. The area, located on the west side of the Nevada Test Site, actually consists of four project areas. Three are contiguous (the U20at drill pad, the access road/skid trail, and the borrow location {number_sign}2), and one is east of the main survey area (the borrow location {number_sign}1). The survey identified and recorded 16 sites. Of these, 13 were isolates or localities with two artifacts. Artifacts from these sites were collected during the survey. Data recovery was conducted at the remaining three sites (26NY4791, 26NY4854, and 26NY4856) following the development of an acceptable research design and data recovery plan. This report presents the final analysis for all the sites, but it concentrates on 26NY4791, 26NY4854, and 26NY4856, and on data concerning artifact quantities by artifact type, distribution, and lithic raw material type.

William, J.D.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

1992-12-31

200

Lithic technology studies: Archaeological research at drill hole U19ba, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Desert Research Institute conducted two archaeological reconnaissances of drill hole U19ba on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV). Eighteen archaeological sites were located there, nine of which were collected when recorded. The DOE/NV chose to investigate these sites and requested a data recovery plan for 26NY4183, 26NY4184, 26NY5914, 26NY5916, 26NY5917, and 26NY5922. Field investigations, primarily controlled surface collections, were carried out in May 1990 and, in the process, another two sites, 26NY7357 and 26NY7358, were discovered. Theses studies focused on core-biface technology, cultural thermal alteration, techniques used to analyze lithic debitage, and the recovery of small sized artifacts. Results of these analyses indicate that flake blanks produced from cores were an important component of biracial technology at these sites, thermal alteration was important throughout the reduction sequence, the techniques used to analyze debitage mask variability, and that the recovery of small sized artifacts reveals biracial final finishing and notching activity at 26NY5917. Based on projectile point chronology, the project area was periodically visited from about 7,000 years ago to about 400 years ago.

Walsh, L.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.; McLane, A.

1992-01-01

201

Archaeological data recovery related to the U20at project, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the spring of 1986, the Desert Research institute surveyed, tested, and conducted data recovery of the archaeological materials on land associated with the Department of Energy's U20at event site. The area, located on the west side of the Nevada Test Site, actually consists of four project areas. Three are contiguous (the U20at drill pad, the access road/skid trail, and the borrow location [number sign]2), and one is east of the main survey area (the borrow location [number sign]1). The survey identified and recorded 16 sites. Of these, 13 were isolates or localities with two artifacts. Artifacts from these sites were collected during the survey. Data recovery was conducted at the remaining three sites (26NY4791, 26NY4854, and 26NY4856) following the development of an acceptable research design and data recovery plan. This report presents the final analysis for all the sites, but it concentrates on 26NY4791, 26NY4854, and 26NY4856, and on data concerning artifact quantities by artifact type, distribution, and lithic raw material type.

William, J.D.; Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

1992-01-01

202

Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-04-01

203

Geohydrologic data for test well UE25b No. 1, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents data collected to determine the hydraulic characteristics of rocks penetrated in test well UE-25b No. 1. This well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site in a program conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada

D. H. Lobmeyer; M. S. Jr. Whitfield; R. G. Lahoud; L. Bruckheimer

1983-01-01

204

Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis of water from well Pahute Mesa No. 2 (PM-2), on Pahute Mesa in the extreme northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations above background levels in August 1993. A coordinated investigation of the tritium occurrence in well PM-2 was undertaken by the Hydrologic Resources Management Program of the US Department of Energy. Geologic and hydrologic properties

G. M. Russell; G. L. Locke

1997-01-01

205

Archaeological investigations at drill hole U19bg, Nevada Test Site Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1983 and 1989, the Desert Research Institute conducted cultural resources reconnaissances of the U19bg drill hole area on the Nevada Test Site for the Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office (DOE\\/NV). These reconnaissances identified several archaeological sites, two of which were considered eligible to the National Register of Historic Places. DOE\\/NV chose to mitigate adverse impacts to one of

J. Klimowicz; L. C. Pippin; G. J. Henton; L. A. Walsh

1992-01-01

206

INTERIM GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS IN THE U12e.04 TUNNEL, NEVADA TEST SITE, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABS>The U12e.04 tunnel is a part of the U12e tunnel system, which has ; been driven southwestward beneath Rainier Mesa in the northern part of the Nevada ; Test Site. The U12e.04 tunnel was driven about S. 15 deg W. in zeolitic tuff of ; subunits E and F of Tunnel Bed 4 near the top of the lower member

W. L. Emerick; D. D. Dickey; F. A. McKeown

1962-01-01

207

Preliminary results of gravity investigations of the Calico Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 211 recently established gravity stations supplement 128 existing regional stations in providing data for a detailed gravity interpretation of the Calico Hills area of the Nevada Test Site. Reduction of these data to complete Bouguer anomalies combined with a regional correction of -0.8 mGal\\/km N.15° E. reveals an elliptical gravity high centered over the exposed Paleozoic rocks.

D. B. Snyder; H. W. Oliver

1981-01-01

208

Geohydrologic data for test well UE25B number 1, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data were collected to determine the hydraulic characteristics of rocks penetrated in test well UE-25b number 1. This well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site in a program conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste

D. H. Lobmeyer; M. S. Whitfield; R. G. Lahoud; L. Bruckheimer

1983-01-01

209

TRITIUM-AGE OF GROUND WATER AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tritium in the ground water from the Nevada Test Site and vicinity ; suggested a much shorter residence time for water in perched aquifers than for ; water in the main aquifer. Analyses of water samples collected in l958 and l959 ; from a tunnel, a spring, and five wells are reported. The tritium analyses ; indicated that water in

Clebsch; A. Jr

1961-01-01

210

Inflow to a crack in playa deposits of Yucca Lake, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A crack about 1 mile long opened in 1969 in the dry bed of Yucca Lake, a playa on the Nevada Test Site. Accumulation of water from precipitation on the lakebed drained rapidly into the crack and led to concern whether the water entering the crack was directly recharging the very transmissive Paleozoic carbonate comprising the aquifer for the regional

G. C. Doty; F. E. Rush

1985-01-01

211

Breakages at common fragile sites set boundaries of amplified regions in two leukemia cell lines K562 – Molecular characterization of FRA2H and localization of a new CFS FRA2S  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genome amplification is often observed in human tumors. The breakage–fusion–bridge (BFB) cycle is the mechanism that often underlies duplicated regions. Some research has indicated common fragile sites (CFS) as possible sites of chromosome breakages at the origin of BFB cycles.Here we searched two human genome regions known as amplification hot spots for any DNA copy number amplifications by analyzing 21

Franca Pelliccia; Nazario Bosco; Angela Rocchi

2010-01-01

212

Oceanographical Observations from Danish Light-Vessels and Coastal Stations, 1973 Oceanografiske Observationer Fra Danske Fyrskibe Og Kyststationer, 1973.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data on water currents, water temperature and salinity, and surface sample characteristics, taken from oceanographical observations made at the Danish light vessel stations, are recorded in tabular form.

1974-01-01

213

Methotrexate treatment of FraX fibroblasts results in FMR1 transcription but not in detectable FMR1 protein levels  

PubMed Central

Background Fragile X syndrome is caused by the loss of FMRP expression due to methylation of the FMR1 promoter. Treatment of fragile X syndrome patients’ lymphoblastoid cells with 5-azadeoxycytidine results in demethylation of the promoter and reactivation of the gene. The aim of the study was to analyze if methotrexate, an agent which also reduces DNA methylation but with less toxicity than 5-azadeoxycytidine, has therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome. Methods Fibroblasts of fragile X syndrome patients were treated with methotrexate in concentrations ranging from 1 to 4 ?g/ml for up to 14 days. FMR1 and FMRP expression were analyzed by quantitative PCR and western blotting. Results FMR1 mRNA was detected and levels correlated positively with methotrexate concentrations and time of treatment, but western blotting did not show detectable FMRP levels. Conclusions We show that it is possible to reactivate FMR1 transcription in fibroblasts of fragile X syndrome patients by treatment with methotrexate. However, we were not able to show FMRP expression, possibly due to the reduced translation efficacy caused by the triplet repeat extension. Unless FMR1 reactivation is more effective in vivo our results indicate that methotrexate has no role in the treatment of fragile X syndrome.

2013-01-01

214

Undersoegelse af solvarmeanlaeg fra Zen B.V. (Investigation of solar heating system from Zen B.V).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A small, inexpensive solar water heating system marketed by the Dutch company Zen B.V. was investigated. The system makes use of the drain back principle. Water is used as the solar collector fluid. The heat storage consist of two small hot water tanks, a...

S. Furbo K. Ellehauge

1994-01-01

215

Maling af Ekstern Stoj fra Virksomheder. Prototypemalinger (Measurement of Noise Coming from Businesses or Activities. Prototype Cases of Such Measurement).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Basic manual on noise coming from businesses or activities, divided into two parts: a description of the process of measuring such noise and the presentation of detailed accounts of the actual measurement of it in four different instances. Terms used in d...

1978-01-01

216

Adattamento tecnologico, relazioni fra imprese e istituzioni di supporto nei distretti industriali. Un modello di simulazione basata su agenti  

Microsoft Academic Search

Industrial districts can be conceived as complex systems characterised by a network of interactions amongst heterogeneous, localised, functionally integrated and complementary firms. The paper introduces an industrial district computational prototype that allows to simulate fundamental industrial districts' mechanisms. The paper aims at showing firstly that economic performance of industrial districts proceeds to the behavior of firms and the form through

Squazzoni Flaminio; Boero Riccardo

2004-01-01

217

49 CFR 228.407 - Analysis of work schedules; submissions; FRA review and approval of submissions; fatigue...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...of fatigue mitigation tools, and that the railroad...proposed fatigue mitigation tools, and determinations...and fatigue mitigation tools every two years to ensure...for the purpose of making part or all of the analysis...Associate Administrator. Decisions of the Associate...

2013-10-01

218

Straalingsdoser fra forurenede levnedsmidler efter uheld paa et atomkraftvaerk. (Radiation doses from contaminated food after a nuclear accident).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents estimates of radiation doses from contaminated food after a hypothetical accident at a nuclear power plant. The calculations are made from assumptions intended to represent Swedish conditions. The accident scenario is based on a hypot...

M. Oehlenschlaeger S. P. Nielsen

1991-01-01

219

Avgassutslipp fra innenriks sjoetransport. Aktuelle utslippsreduserende tiltak. (Exhaust emissions from the coastal fleet in Norway. Possible measures to reduce emissions).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes possible technological measures to reduce emissions of NOx, HC, CO and particles from engines in use in the Norwegian coastal fleet. The costs and applicability of the most probable measures are discussed for various engine types. 45 ...

O. Melhus P. K. Bremnes

1989-01-01

220

Rail transportation risk and accident severity: A statistical analysis of variables in FRA's accident\\/incident data base  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Federal Railroad Administration (US DOT) maintains a file of carrier-reported railroad accidents and incidents that meet stipulated threshold criteria for damage cost and\\/or casualties. A thoroughly-cleaned five-year time series of this data base was subjected to unbiased statistical procedures to discover (a) important causative variables in severe (high damage cost) accidents and (b) other key relationships between objective accident

C. L. Saricks; I. Janssen

1991-01-01

221

Rail transportation risk and accident severity: A statistical analysis of variables in FRA's accident/incident data base  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Railroad Administration (US DOT) maintains a file of carrier-reported railroad accidents and incidents that meet stipulated threshold criteria for damage cost and/or casualties. A thoroughly-cleaned five-year time series of this data base was subjected to unbiased statistical procedures to discover (a) important causative variables in severe (high damage cost) accidents and (b) other key relationships between objective accident conditions and frequencies. Just under 6000 records, each representing a single event involving rail freight shipments moving on mainline track, were subjected to statistical frequency analysis, then included in the construction of classification and regression trees as described by Breimann et al. (1984). Variables related to damage cost defined the initial splits,'' or branchings of the tree. An interesting implication of the results of this analysis with respect to transportation of hazardous wastes by rail is that movements should be avoided when ambient temperatures are extreme (significantly < 20{degrees} or > 80{degrees}F), but that there should be no a priori bias against shipping wastes in longer train consists. 2 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Saricks, C.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Energy Systems Div.); Janssen, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

1991-01-01

222

Stratigraphy and structure of volcanic rocks in drill hole USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed subsurface studies in connection with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations program are being conducted to investigate the stratigraphic and structural features of volcanic rocks underlying Yucca Mountain, a volcanic highland situated along the western boundary of the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. As part of this continuing effort, drill hole USW-G1 was cored from 292 ft to a depth of 6000 ft from March to August 1980. The stratigraphic section is composed of thick sequences of ash-flow tuff and volcanic breccia interbedded with subordinate amounts of fine- to coarse-grained volcaniclastic rocks. All rocks are of Tertiary age and vary in composition from rhyolite to dacite. The 3005-ft level in the drill hole represents a significant demarcation between unaltered and altered volcanic rocks. For the most part, tuff units above 3005 ft appear devitrified and show little secondary alteration except within tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills.

Spengler, R. W.; Byers, F. M., Jr.; Warner, J. B.

223

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02

224

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02

225

Characterization of the Highway 95 Fault in lower Fortymile Wash using electrical and electromagnetic methods, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coordinated application of electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods provided better characterization of the Highway 95 Fault. The comparison of dipole-dipole resistivity, TEM, and CSAMT data confirm faulting of an uplifted block of resistive Paleozoic Carbonate that lies beneath a more conductive sandstone unit. A more resistive alluvial basin-fill unit is found above the sandstone unit, and it constitutes only about 150 m of the uppermost subsurface.

Macy, Jamie P.; Kryder, Levi; Walker, Jamieson

2012-01-01

226

Preliminary appraisal of gravity and magnetic data at Syncline Ridge, Western Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A gravity and magnetic study of the Syncline Ridge area was conducted as part of an investigation of argillite rocks of the Eleana Formation under consideration as a medium for the possible storage of high-level radioactive waste. Bouguer gravity anomaly, low-level aeromagnetic anomaly, density, and magnetization data collectively indicate the following, relative to the Eleana Formation, the principal target of the investigation: (1) in an area extending northwestward from Mine Mountain, through Syncline Ridge, to the Eleana Range, the Eleana Formation, where not exposed, occurs at depths of less than {similar_to}200 m, except for a small region of exposed older Paleozoic rocks; (2) in the region of shallowly buried Eleana Formation, occurrences of volcanic rock cover are delineated by low-level aeromagnetic anomaly data, which also discriminate normally polarized from reversely polarized tuff units; and (3) selective detection of high-quartz argillite relative to low-quartz argillite using surface gravity data is not feasible if the high-quartz and low-quartz varieties are intimately interbedded, as observed in boreholes. 4 figures, 2 tables.

Ponce, D.A.; Hanna, W.F.

1982-12-31

227

Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites, Corrective Action Unit 443'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first phase involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data, and inputting the data into a three-dimensional numerical model to depict groundwater flow. The output from the groundwater flow model was used in a transport model to simulate the migration of a radionuclide release (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second phase of modeling (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after NDEP reviewed the first model. This phase was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third phase of modeling updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003). Corrective action alternatives were evaluated and an alternative was submitted in the ''Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for CAU 443 is Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and will control inadvertent exposure to contaminated groundwater at CAU 443.

Tim Echelard

2006-01-01

228

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01

229

Portable Chamber Measurements of Evapotranspiration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site Near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 2003-06.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Portable chamber measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) were made at the U.S. Geological Surveys Amargosa Desert Research Site in southern Nevada to help quantify component- and landscape-scale contributions to ET in an arid environment. Evapotranspirati...

B. J. Andraski C. A. Garcia C. J. Mayers K. J. Halford M. J. Johnson

2008-01-01

230

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

231

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

232

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

233

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

234

Digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity, as well as its accompanying digital geophysical maps, are compiled at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers two 30 {times} 60-minute quadrangles-the Pahute Mesa quadrangle to the north and the Beatty quadrangle to the south-plus a strip of 7 1/2-minute quadrangles on the east side. In addition to the NTS, the map area includes the rest of the southwest Nevada volcanic field, part of the Walker Lane, most of the Amargosa Desert, part of the Funeral and Grapevine Mountains, some of Death Valley, and the northern Spring Mountains. This geologic map improves on previous geologic mapping of the same area by providing new and updated Quaternary and bedrock geology, new geophysical interpretations of faults beneath the basins, and improved GIS coverages. This publication also includes a new isostatic gravity map and a new aeromagnetic map. The primary purpose of the three maps is to provide an updated geologic framework to aid interpretation of ground-water flow through and off the NTS. The NTS is centrally located within the area of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southwestern Nevada and adjacent California. During the last 40 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have conducted about 900 nuclear tests on the NTS, of which 100 were atmospheric tests and the rest were underground tests. More than 200 of the tests were detonated at or beneath the water table, which commonly is about 500 to 600 m below the surface. Because contaminants introduced by these test may move into water supplies off the NTS, rates and directions of ground-water flow must be determined. Knowledge about the ground water also is needed to properly appraise potential future effects of the possible nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, adjacent to the NTS.

Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Rowley, P.D.; Fridrich, C.J.; Morgan, K.S.; Workman, J.B.; Young, O.D.; Dixon, G.L.; Williams, V.S.; McKee, E.H.; Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Swadley, W.C.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Ekren, E.B.; Warren, R.G.; Cole, J.C.; Fleck, R.J.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sawyer, D.A.; Minor, S.A.; Grunwald, D.J.; Laczniak, R.J.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.; Jayko, A.S.

2000-03-08

235

Evaluation of Color and Color Infrared Photography from the Goldfield Mining District, Esmerelda and Nye Countries, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The determination of geological features characteristic of the Goldfield epithermal ore deposits is considered and which of them can be identified from color and color infrared aerial photography. The Goldfield mining district in the western part of the B...

R. P. Ashley

1970-01-01

236

Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

V. Yucel

2001-09-01

237

Trench logs from a strand of the Rock Valley Fault System, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Rock Valley fault system trends northeasterly through the southeast corner of the Nevada Test Site. The system records left-lateral offset of Paleozoic and Tertiary rocks, although total offset amounts to only a few kilometers. Distinct scarps in alluvial deposits of Quaternary age and a concentration of seismicity, particularly at its north end, suggest that the Rock Valley fault system may be active. Two trenches were excavated by backhoe in 1978 across a 0.5-m-high scarp produced by a strand of the Rock Valley fault system. A detailed logging of the two Rock Valley fault trenches was undertaken during the spring of 1984. This report presents: (1) logs of both walls of the two trenches, (2) a general description of the lithologic units and the soils formed in these units that are exposed in and near the fault trenches, (3) observations of the clast fabric of unfaulted and faulted deposits exposed in the trench walls, and (4) a map of the surficial deposits in the vicinity of the trenches.

Yount, J.C.; Shroba, R.R.; McMasters, C.R.; Huckins, H.E.; Rodriguez, E.A.

1987-12-31

238

Digital Aeromagnetic Map of the Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An aeromagnetic map of the Nevada Test Site area was prepared from publicly available aeromagnetic data described by McCafferty and Grauch (1997). Magnetic surveys were processed using standard techniques. Southwest Nevada is characterized by magnetic anomalies that reflect the distribution of thick sequences of volcanic rocks, magnetic sedimentary rocks, and the occurrence of granitic rocks. In addition, aeromagnetic data reveal the presence of linear features that reflect faulting at both regional and local scales.

Ponce, David A.

2000-01-01

239

Preliminary appraisal of gravity and magnetic data of Syncline Ridge, western Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A gravity and magnetic study of the Syncline Ridge area was conducted as part of an investigation of argillite rocks of the Eleana Formation under consideration as a medium for the possible storage of high-level radioactive waste. Bouguer gravity anomaly data, viewed in light of densities obtained by gamma-gamma logs and previous work of D. L. Healey (1968), delineate two regions of steep negative gradient where Cenozoic rocks and sediments are inferred to abruptly thicken: (1) the western third of the study area where Tertiary volcanic rocks are extensively exposed and (2) the northeast corner of the area where Quaternary alluvium is exposed and where volcanic rocks are inferred to occur at depth. In the remainder of the area, a region extending contiguously from Mine Mountain northwestward through Syncline Ridge to the Eleana Range, the gravity data indicate that the Eleana Formation, where not exposed, is buried at depths of less than about 200 m, except in a limited area of exposed older Paleozoic rocks on Mine Mountain. Quaternary alluvium and Tertiary volcanic rocks are inferred to occur in this region as veneers or shallow dishes of deposit on Tippipah Limestone or Eleana Formation. Low-level aeromagnetic anomaly data, covering the western two-thirds of the study area, delineate relatively magnetic tuff units within the Tertiary volcanic rocks and provide a very attractive means for distinguishing units of normal polarization from units of reversed polarization. If used in conjunction with results of previous magnetization studies of G. D. Bath (1968), the low-level survey may prove to be an effective tool for mapping specific tuff members in the volcanic terrane. The important question of the feasibility of discriminating high-quartz argillite from low-quartz argillite of the Eleana Formation using surface gravity data remains unresolved. If the more highly competent, denser, high-quartz phase should occur as stratigraphic units many tens of meters thick, closely spaced gravity data may reliably detect these units. If the high-quartz phase occurs only as relatively thin units, interbedded with low-quartz phase, borehole gravity surveying can be used much more effectively than equivalent surface gravity surveying.

Ponce, David A.; Hanna, William F.

1982-01-01

240

Well ER-6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of limestone and dolomite, and is pervasively fractured. Groundwater flow in this aquifer is primarily in the fractures, and the hydraulic properties are primarily related to fracture frequency and fracture characteristics (e.g., mineral coatings, aperture, connectivity). The objective of the multiple-well aquifer test (MWAT) was to determine flow and hydraulic characteristics for the LCA in Yucca Flat. The data were used to derive representative flow model and parameter values for the LCA. The items of specific interest are: Hydraulic conductivity; Storage parameters; Dual-porosity behavior; and Fracture flow characteristics. The objective of the tracer transport experiment was to evaluate the transport properties and processes of the LCA and to derive representative transport parameter values for the LCA. The properties of specific interest are: Effective porosity; Matrix diffusion; Longitudinal dispersivity; Adsorption characteristics; and Colloid transport characteristics. These properties substantially control the rate of transport of contaminants in the groundwater system and concentration distributions. To best support modeling at the scale of the corrective action unit (CAU), these properties must be investigated at the field scale. The processes represented by these parameters are affected by in-situ factors that are either difficult to investigate at the laboratory scale or operate at a much larger scale than can be reproduced in the laboratory. Measurements at the field scale provide a better understanding of the effective average parameter values. The scale of this tracer test is still small compared to the scale of a CAU, but is of sufficient scale to be generally representative of the processes that affect in-situ transport. The scale of the tracer test undertaken is limited by the rate of transport in the formation and the resultant time frame required for completing such a test. The measurements at the field scale will provide information for relating laboratory measurements for transport processes to the larger scale. This report describes the analysis of the tracer test data and development of a conceptual model of transport in the LCA in Yucca Flat.

Greg Ruskauff

2006-09-01

241

Evaluation of the Location and Recency of Faulting Near Prospective Surface Facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern zone of fractures is within Quaternary alluvial sediments, but no bedrock was encountered in trenches and soil pits in this part of the prospective surface facilities site; thus, the direct association of this zone with one or more bedrock faults is uncertain. No displacement of lithologic contacts and soil horizons could be detected in the fractured Quaternary deposits. The results of these investigations imply the absence of any appreciable late Quaternary faulting activity at the prospective surface-facilities site.

Swan, F. H.; Wesling, J. R.; Angell, M. M.; Thomas, A. P.; Whitney, J. W.; Gibson, J. D.

2001-01-01

242

Oxygen isotopes and trace elements in the Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. Because Yucca Mountain is located in a resource-rich geologic setting, one aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation of ...

B. D. Marshall T. K. Kyser Z. E. Peterman

1996-01-01

243

Ground-Water Temperature Data, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Clark, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada, 2000-2006.  

SciTech Connect

Ground-water temperature data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in wells at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site during the years 2000–2006. Periodic ground-water temperatures were collected in 166 wells. In general, periodic ground-water temperatures were measured annually in each well at 5 and 55 feet below the water surface. Ground-water temperature profiles were collected in 73 wells. Temperatures were measured at multiple depths below the water surface to produce these profiles. Databases were constructed to present the ground-water temperature data.

Steven R. Reiner

2007-08-07

244

Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone at the burial site for low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-level radioactive solid waste has been buried in trenches at a site near Beatty, Nevada, since 1962. In 1976, as part of a national program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the geohydrology of the waste burial site to provide a basis for estimating the potential for radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste burial trenches. Data collected include meteorological information for calibration of a long-term water budget analysis, soil moisture profiles, soil water potentials, and hydraulic properties of representative unsaturated sediment samples to a depth of about 10 m. The waste burial facility is in the northern Amargosa Desert about 170 km northwest of Las Vegas, NV. The region is arid; mean annual precipitation at Lathrop Wells, 30 km south of the site, is only 7.4 cm. The mean daily maximum temperature at Lathrop Wells in July, the hottest month, is 37 C. The site is underlain by poorly stratified deposits of gravelly or silty sand and sandy gravel, and thick beds of clayey sediments. The total thickness of valley fill deposits beneath the site is about 175 m; the unsaturated zone is about 85 m thick. Volumetric soil moisture to depths of 4 m ranges from 4% to 10%, but commonly is in the range from 6% to 8%. Soil water potential, measured to depths of 3 to 10 m, ranged from -10 to -70 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity computed from laboratory analyses of representative samples ranges from 10 to the -13th power to 10 to the -4th power cm/day. Evaporation studies over a 2-yr period were used to calibrate a numerical procedure for analyzing long-term precipitation data and estimating annual water budgets during the 15-yr period 1962-76. This analysis (1) demonstrated that a potential exists for deep percolation (> 2 m), despite high annual evaporation demands, and (2) provided predictions of the time of yr and the antecedent conditions which enhance the probability of deep percolation. Soil moisture profiles obtained monthly over an 18-mo period demonstrate that deep percolation does occur. Soil moisture conditions antecedent to an observed deep-percolation event, and the time of yr when the percolation occurred, support the interpretations based on long-term meteorological records. (Author 's abstract)

Nichols, W. D.

1986-01-01

245

Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone at the burial site for low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-level radioactive solid waste has been buried in trenches at a site near Beatty, Nev., since 1962. In 1976, as part of a national program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the geohydrology of the waste-burial site to provide a basis for estimating the potential for radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste-burial trenches. Data collected include meteorological information for calibration of a long-term water-budget analysis, soil-moisture profiles, soil-water potentials, and hydraulic properties of representative unsaturated sediment samples to a depth of about 10 meters (m). The waste-burial facility is in the northern Amargosa Desert about 170 kilometers (km) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevo The region is arid; mean annual precipitation at Lathrop Wells, 30 km south of the site, is only 7.4 centimeters (cm). The mean daily maximum temperature at Lathrop Wells in July, the hottest month, is 37 ?C. The site is underlain by poorly stratified deposits of gravelly or silty sand and sandy gravel, and thick beds of clayey sediments. The total thickness of valley-fill deposits beneath the site is about 175 m; the unsaturated zone is about 85 m thick. Volumetric soil moisture to depths of 4 m ranges from 4 to 10 percent but commonly is in the range of 6 to 8 percent. Soil-water potential, measured to depths of 3 to 10 m, ranged from -10 to -70 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity computed from laboratory analyses of representative samples ranges from 10 -13 to 10 -14 centimeters per day (cm/d). Evaporation studies over a 2-year (yr) period were used to calibrate a numerical procedure for analyzing long-term precipitation data and estimating annual water budgets during the 15-yr period 1962-76. This analysis (1) demonstrated that a potential exists for deep percolation (greater than 2 m), despite high annual evaporation demands, and (2) provided predictions of the time of year and the antecedent conditions that enhance the probability of deep percolation. Soil-moisture profiles obtained monthly over an 18-month (mo) period demonstrate that deep percolation does occur. Soil-moisture conditions antecedent to an observed deep-percolation event, and the time of year when the percolation occurred, support the interpretations based on long-term meteorological records. Calculation of downward moisture movement through the waste-trench backfill material, on the basis of simplified assumptions, suggests that moisture could have penetrated as much as 6 m below land surface from 1963, when the oldest trenches were closed, to 1980, but that the moisture requirement for such penetration far exceeded the amount of moisture actually available. Steady-state downward movement of moisture at depths greater than 10 m and beneath the waste-burial trenches would be on the order of 4 cm per 1,000 yr, assuming a steady flux rate of 1x10 -5 cm/d.

Nichols, William D.

1987-01-01

246

Stratigraphic and volcano-tectonic relations of Crater Flat Tuff and some older volcanic units, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Crater Flat Tuff is herein revised to include a newly recognized lowest unit, the Tram member. The revised Crater Flat Tuff is stratigraphically below the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff and above the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff, and is approximately 13.6 m.y. old. In outcrops between Calico Hills and Yucca Flat, the Lithic

W. J. Carr; F. M. Byers Jr.; P. P. Orkild

1984-01-01

247

Analysis of Responses From Hydraulic Testing of the Lower Carbonate Aquifer at Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Yucca Flat corrective action unit extends over an approximately 120 square-mile basin at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), southern Nevada, and was the site for over 650 historical underground nuclear tests. The lower carbonate aquifer (LCA), roughly 1,800 feet below ground surface at Yucca Flat and with a confined thickness of several thousand feet, is the primary aquifer for much of southern Nevada and underlies the full extent of Yucca Flat. Within the last decade, long-term (multiple-day) single- and multiple-well hydraulic tests have been performed to better define aquifer properties over larger scales. The LCA is highly heterogeneous, both laterally and vertically across Yucca Flat, reflecting differences in fracturing and fault density. As such, analysis of the recent testing data requires the consideration of heterogeneous hydraulic properties at multiple spatial scales. Three individual hydraulic tests are presented that portray the marked spatial variability of hydraulic properties related to both local fracturing and basin-scale faulting across Yucca Flat. Two ten-day single-well tests (wells ER-7-1, ER-6-2) and one ninety-day multiple-well test (well cluster ER-6-1) are considered. Interpretive and numerical analyses are based upon the log-log diagnostic plots of drawdown and recovery from pumping, utilizing both the head change and derivative. Heterogeneity is considered using the flow dimension, which represents a variable formation area of flow away from the well, and proves to be a fundamental analytical tool. All hydraulic parameter estimates, including flow dimension, are complete with a measure of uncertainty. The composite interpretation of all data results in a conceptual flow model representative of two spatially continuous scales. At the larger basin (km) scale, the data indicate a fracture- or high permeability strip-dominated flow regime created by fault-related features. Ubiquitous north-south trending faults throughout Yucca Flat appear to act as both (east-west) flow barriers, by juxtaposing permeable and non-permeable formations or otherwise breaking the feature connection, and (north-south) high-permeability conduits. At the local well (tens-of-meters) scale, the response data appear controlled by the local flow geometry within fault blocks. In general, the log-log diagnostics indicate a primary (linear) fracture-flow dominated system, which at intermediate times is fed by the secondary block conductivity (bilinear), until the volume of influence becomes sufficiently large that the flow system is effectively radial. The results are pertinent to basin- and regional-scale flow and transport, and also to hydraulic development of the LCA.

Bhark, E. W.; Ruskauff, G.

2005-12-01

248

Relative abundance and distribution of fishes and crayfish at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR) was established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (with the assistance of The Nature Conservancy) in 1984 to protect one of the highest concentrations of endemic flora and fauna in North America (Pister, 1985; Sada, 1990). Prior to federal acquisition, Ash Meadows had been anthropogenically altered, and non-native species had been introduced to the detriment of native species; reports and published literature document the negative effects to the Ash Meadows flora and fauna (Deacon and others, 1964; U.S. Department of the Interior, 1971; Landye, 1973; Pister, 1974; Soltz and Naiman, 1978; Taylor, 1980; Williams and others, 1985; Williams and Sada, 1985; Baugh and others, 1986; Hershler and Sada, 1987; Knight and Clemmer, 1987; Sada, 1990; Deacon and Williams, 1991; Scoppettone and others, 2005; Kennedy and others, 2006). Such activities led to the extinction of the endemic Ash Meadows poolfish (Empetrichthyes merriami) (Miller, 1961; Soltz and Naiman, 1978), and subsequently the federal government listed three local endemic fish as endangered pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1989)—Warm springs pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis pectoralis), Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes), and Ash Meadows speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus nevadensis). Public ownership of a large portion of Ash Meadows provided the opportunity to restore the landscape to some semblance of its historical condition. Elimination of invasive aquatic species may be more difficult than landscape restoration, and their persistence can cause additional native fish decline or extirpation (Taylor and others, 1984; Moyle and others, 1986; Miller and others, 1989; Minckley and Deacon, 1991; Olden and Poff, 2005). Chemical treatment to remove invasive fishes is often unsuccessful (Meffe, 1983; Rinne and Turner, 1991; Meronek and others, 1996). In Ash Meadows, there has been some success in chemical eradication of localized populations of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) (St. George, 1998, 1999; Weissenfluh, 2008b), as well as convict cichlid (Archocentrus nigrofasciatus) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) (Weissenfluh,2008a). However, there has been less success in removing western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) from Ash Meadows's larger spring systems, and sailfin molly maintains strongholds in several spring systems (Scoppettone and others, 2011b). Perhaps the more destructive invasive species are two invertebrates: red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and red-rim melania (Melanoides tuberculata). Following the appearance of red swamp crayfish within the Warm Springs Complex, Warm Springs pupfish was believed to be extirpated from one spring system (St. George, 2000) and near extirpation in two others (Darrick Weissenfluh, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, oral commun., 2008, 2011). Crayfish also were demonstrated to greatly suppress the Bradford Springs population of Ash Meadows speckled dace population (McShane and others, 2004). Red-rim melania is known to displace native snail populations (Mitchell and others, 2007), and has been implicated as an agent of extinction of native Ash Meadows spring-snails (Donald Sada, Desert Research Institute, oral commun., 2011). Both invasive invertebrates are difficult to control or eradicate (Mitchell and others, 2007; Freeman and others, 2010). Habitat restoration that favors native species can help control non-native species (McShane and others, 2004; Scoppettone and others, 2005; Kennedy and others, 2006). Restoration of Carson Slough and its tributaries present an opportunity to promote habitat types that favor native species over non-natives. Historically, the majority of Ash Meadows spring systems were tributaries to Carson Slough. In 2007 and 2008, a survey of Ash Meadows spring systems was conducted to generate baseline information on the distribution of fishes throughout AMNWR (Scoppettone and others, 2011b). In this study, we conducted a follo

Scoppettone, G. G.; Johnson, D. M.; Hereford, M. E.; Rissler, Peter; Fabes, Mark; Salgado, Antonio; Shea, Sean

2012-01-01

249

Preliminary mapping of surficial geology of Midway Valley Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The tectonics program for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada must evaluate the potential for surface faulting beneath the prospective surface facilities. To help meet this goal, Quaternary surficial mapping studies and photolineament analyses were conducted to provide data for evaluating the location, recency, and style of faulting with Midway Valley at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, the preferred location of these surface facilities. This interim report presents the preliminary results of this work.

Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Swan, F.H.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-04-01

250

Preliminary description of quaternary and late pliocene surficial deposits at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain area, in the south-central part of the Great Basin, is in the drainage basin of the Amargosa River. The mountain consists of several fault blocks of volcanic rocks that are typical of the Basin and Range province. Yucca Mountain is dissected by steep-sided valleys of consequent drainage systems that are tributary on the east side to Fortymile Wash and on the west side to an unnamed wash that drains Crater Flat. Most of the major washes near Yucca Mountain are not integrated with the Amargosa River, but have distributary channels on the piedmont above the river. Landforms in the Yucca Mountain area include rock pediments, ballenas, alluvial pediments, alluvial fans, stream terraces, and playas. Early Holocene and older alluvial fan deposits have been smoothed by pedimentation. The semiconical shape of alluvial fans is apparent at the junction of tributaries with major washes and where washes cross fault and terrace scarps. Playas are present in the eastern and southern ends of the Amargosa Desert. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Hoover, D.L.

1989-11-01

251

Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

1996-07-01

252

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01

253

Groundwater withdrawals and associated well descriptions for the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From 1951 to 2008, groundwater withdrawals totaled more than 25,000 million gallons from wells on and directly adjacent to the Nevada National Security Site. Total annual groundwater withdrawals ranged from about 30 million gallons in 1951 to as much as 1,100 million gallons in 1989. Annual withdrawals from individual wells ranged from 0 million gallons to more than 325 million gallons. Monthly withdrawal data for the wells were compiled in a Microsoft(copyright) Excel 2003 spreadsheet. Groundwater withdrawal data are a compilation of measured and estimated withdrawals obtained from published and unpublished reports, U.S. Geological Survey files, and/or data reported by other agencies. The withdrawal data were collected from 42 wells completed in 33 boreholes. A history of each well is presented in terms of its well construction, borehole lithology, withdrawals, and water levels.

Elliott, Peggy E.; Moreo, Michael T.

2011-01-01

254

Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River Channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and transport. An understanding of regional flow patterns is important because ground water originating on the Nevada Test Site may pass through the area before discharging from springs at lower elevations in the Amargosa Desert and in Death Valley. Nine boreholes 10 to 16 meters deep were cored nearly continuously using a hollow-stem auger designed for gravelly sediments. Two boreholes were drilled in each of three irrigated fields in the Amargosa-Farms area, two in the Amargosa-River channel, and one in an undisturbed area of native vegetation. Data from previously cored boreholes beneath undisturbed, native vegetation were compared with the new data to further assess deep percolation under current climatic conditions and provide information on spatial variability. The profiles beneath native vegetation were characterized by large amounts of accumulated chloride just below the root zone with almost no further accumulation at greater depths. This pattern is typical of profiles beneath interfluvial areas in arid alluvial basins of the southwestern United States, where salts have been accumulating since the end of the Pleistocene. The profiles beneath irrigated fields and the Amargosa-River channel contained more than twice the volume of water compared to profiles beneath native vegetation, consistent with active deep percolation beneath these sites. Chloride profiles beneath two older fields (cultivated since the 1960?s) as well as the upstream Amargosa-River site were indicative of long-term, quasi-steady deep percolation. Chloride profiles beneath the newest field (cultivated since 1993), the downstream Amargosa-River site, and the edge of an older field were indicative of recently active deep percolation moving previously accumulated salts from the upper profile to greater depths. Results clearly indicate that deep percolation and ground-water recharge occur not only beneath areas of irrigation but also beneath ephemeral stream channels, despite the arid climate and infrequency of runoff. Rates of deep percolation beneath irrigated fields ranged from 0.1 to 0.5 m/yr. Estimated rates of deep percolation beneath the Amargosa-River channel ranged from 0.02 to 0.15 m/yr. Only a few decades are needed for excess irrigation water to move through the unsaturated zone and recharge ground water. Assuming vertical, one-dimensional flow, the estimated time for irrigation-return flow to reach the water table beneath the irrigated fields ranged from about 10 to 70 years. In contrast, infiltration from present-day runoff takes centuries to move through the unsaturated zone and reach the water table. The estimated time for water to reach the water table beneath the channel ranged from 140 to 1000 years. These values represent minimum times, as they do not take lateral flow into account. The estimated fraction of irrigation water becoming deep percolation averaged 8 to 16 percent. Similar fractions of infiltration from ephemeral flow events were estimated to become deep percolation beneath the normally dry Amargosa-River channel. In areas where flood-induced channel migration occurs at sub-centennial frequencies, residence times in the unsaturated zone beneath the Amargosa channel could be longer. Estimates of deep percolation presented herein provide a basis for evaluating the importance of recharge from irrigation and channel infiltration in models of ground-water flow from the Nevada Test Site.

Stonestrom, David A.; Prudic, David E.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Akstin, Katherine C.; Boyd, Robert A.; Henkelman, Katherine K.

2003-01-01

255

Well ER6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of

Greg Ruskauff

2006-01-01

256

Geomorphic Characterization of the FortyMile Wash Alluvial Fan, Nye County, Nevada, In Support of the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unlikely volcanic eruption through the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, contaminated ash would be deposited in portions of the Fortymile Wash drainage basin and would subsequently be redistributed to the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan by fluvial processes. As part of an effort to quantify the transport of contaminated ash throughout the fluvial system, characterization of the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan is required, especially the spatial distribution of fluvial activity over time scales of repository operation, and the rates of radionuclide migration into different soils on the fan. The Fortymile Wash alluvial fan consists of extremely low relief terraces as old as 70 ka. By conducting soils-geomorphic mapping and correlating relative surface ages with available geochronology from the Fortymile Wash fan and adjacent piedmonts, we identified 4 distinct surfaces on the fan. Surface ages are used to predict the relative stability of different areas of the fan to fluvial activity. Pleistocene-aged surfaces are assumed to be fluvially inactive over the 10 kyr time scale, for example. Our mapping and correlation provides a map of the depozone for contaminated ash that takes into account long-term channel migration the time scales of repository operation, and it provides a geomorphic framework for predicting radionuclide dispersion rates into different soils across the fan. The standard model for vertical migration of radionuclides in soil is diffusion; therefore we used diffusion profiles derived from {sup 137}Cs fallout to determine infiltration rates on the various geomorphic surfaces. The results show a strong inverse correlation of the geomorphic surface age and diffusivity values inferred from the {sup 137}Cs profiles collected on the different surfaces of the fan.

Cline; De Long; Pelletier; Harrington

2005-09-06

257

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; Thomas F. Bullard; Laurence J. Ashbaugh; Wayne R. Griffin; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-01-01

258

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 4 of 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; Thomas F. Bullard; Laurence J. Ashbaugh; Wayne R. Griffin; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-01-01

259

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; Thomas F. Bullard; Laurence J. Ashbaugh; Wayne R. Griffin; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-01-01

260

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; Thomas F. Bullard; Laurence J. Ashbaugh; Wayne R. Griffin; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-01-01

261

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern;\\u000aNevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S.;\\u000aDepartment of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S.;\\u000aDepartment of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; Thomas F. Bullard; Laurence J. Ashbaugh; Wayne R. Griffin; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-01-01

262

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; Thomas F. Bullard; Laurence J. Ashbaugh; Wayne R. Griffin; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-01-01

263

A Summary interpretation of geologic, hydrologic, and geophysical data for Yucca Valley, Nevada test site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report summarizes an interpretation of the geology of Yucca Valley to depths of about 2,300 feet below the surface, the characteristics features of ground water in Yucca and Frenchman Valleys, and the seismic, gravity, and magnetic data for these valleys. Compilation of data, preparation of illustrations, and writing of the report were completed during the period December 26, 1958 to January 10, 1959. Some of the general conclusions must be considered as tentative until more data are available. This work was done by the U.S. Geological Survey on behalf of Albuquerque Operations Office, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

Wilmarth, Verl Richard; Healey, D. L.; Clebsch, Alfred Jr.; Winograd, I. J.; Zietz, Isadore; Oliver, H. W.

1959-01-01

264

77 FR 13142 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified-Competitive Sale of Public Land in Pahrump, Nye County, NV  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...include a completed and signed Certificate of Eligibility. Sealed bids...is evidenced by presenting a birth certificate, passport, or naturalization...submit the name change on the Certificate of Eligibility to the BLM...

2012-03-05

265

Streamflow and selected precipitation data for Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years 1983--85  

SciTech Connect

Streamflow and precipitation data collected at and near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, during water years 1983--85, are presented in this report. The data were collected and compiled as part of the studies the US Geological Survey is making, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, to characterize surface-water hydrology in the Yucca Mountain area. Streamflow data include daily mean discharges and peak discharges at 4 complete-record gaging stations and peak discharges at 10 crest-stage, partial-record stations and 12 miscellaneous sites. Precipitation data include cumulative totals at 12 stations maintained by the US Geological Survey and daily totals at 17 stations maintained by the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Pabst, M.E.; Beck, D.A.; Glancy, P.A.; Johnson, J.A.

1993-01-01

266

Ages of igneous and hydrothermal events in the Round Mountain and Manhattan gold districts, Nye County, Nevada.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Isotopic age determinations of rocks and minerals separated from them are applied to refining and correlating the geological history of igneous and mineralizing events in a part of the Basin and Range province. -G.J.N.

Shawe, D. R.; Marvin, R. F.; Andriessen, P. A. M.; Mehnert, H. H.; Merritt, V. M.

1986-01-01

267

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30

268

Dual-porosity analysis of conservative tracer testing in saturated volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A radially convergent conservative tracer injection test was conducted between boreholes UE-25 #2 and UE-25 c #3 of the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain to determine effective porosity and longitudinal dispersivity. Approximately 47% of the tracer mass was recovered and a dual-porosity analytical model replicates the breakthrough curve. Fractured-rock analyses focus on the fracture-porosity and geometry as the controlling factors in transport.

Fahy, M. F.

1997-01-01

269

Neogene structural evolution of Gold Mountain, Slate Ridge and adjacent areas, Esmeralda and Nye counties, SW Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The onset of crustal instability in the Gold Mountain-Slate Ridge (GMSR) area took place prior to middle Miocene time, as shown by the irregular topography upon which the 16.8 Ma tuff of Mount Dunfee was deposited. Local wedges of fanglomerate and conglomerate between four overlying ash-flow sheets and complex patterns of thinning and thickening, nondeposition, and erosion show that normal faulting took place more-or-less continuously between 16.8 and 11.5 Ma. More intense listric( ) faulting, tilting, uplift, erosion and deposition of wedges of fanglomerate and conglomerate occurred between emplacement of the 11.5 Ma Timber Mountain Tuff (TMT) and the 7.5 Ma Stonewall Flat Tuff (SFT). The present topography west of long. 117[degree]W developed mostly after 7.5 Ma following deposition of the widespread SFT, which thickens westward with increasing elevation on the east end of Slate Ridge. major uplifted blocks include the GMSR area, Magruder Mountain, and Palmetto Mountain, where erosional remnants of the SFT are found at elevations as high as 8,200 ft. Uplift was accommodated by high-angle faulting with little tilting and by warping. In the GMSR area pre-7.5 Ma tilting was mainly to the south-southeast reflecting movement along N-dipping listric( ) faults, indicating northwest-directed extension. In contrast, southeast of Gold Mountain and in the northeastern part of the Grapevine Mountains post-11.5 Ma tilting resulted from movement on normal faults that dip to the SSE beneath Sarcobatus Flat and toward the WNW-vergent Boundary Canyon-Original Bullfrog detachment fault system further south; this implies SE-directed extensional strain within a general region of NW-directed extension. Slate Ridge also acted as a barrier to the 11.5 Ma TMT. These relations suggest that certain areas within this section of the Walker Lane belt tended to remain high from middle Miocene time until the present, with a major exception being the time of deposition of the SFT.

Noble, D.C.; Weiss, S.I.; Worthington, J.E. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines); McKee, E.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-04-01

270

Electrical studies at the proposed Wahmonie and Calico Hills nuclear waste sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two sites in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were investigated as potential repositories for high-level nuclear waste. These are designated the Wahmonie and Calico Hills sites. The emplacement medium at both sites was to be an inferred intrusive body at shallow depth; the inference of the presence of the body was based on aeromagnetic and regional gravity data. This report summarizes results of Schlumberger VES, induced polarization dipole-dipole traverses and magnetotelluric soundings made in the vicinity of the sites in order to characterize the geoelectric section. At the Wahmonie site VES work identified a low resistivity unit at depth surrounding the inferred intrusive body. The low resistivity unit is believed to be either the argillite (Mississippian Eleana Formation) or a thick unit of altered volcanic rock (Tertiary). Good electrical contrast is provided between the low resistivity unit and a large volume of intermediate resistivity rock correlative with the aeromagnetic and gravity data. The intermediate resistivity unit (100-200 ohm-m) is believed to be the intrusive body. The resistivity values are very low for a fresh, tight intrusive and suggest significant fracturing, alteration and possible mineralization have occurred within the upper kilometer of rock. Induced polarization data supports the VES work, identifies a major fault on the northwest side of the inferred intrusive and significant potential for disseminated mineralization within the body. The mineralization potential is particularly significant because as late as 1928, a strike of high grade silver-gold ore was made at the site. The shallow electrical data at Calico Hills revealed no large volume high resistivity body that could be associated with a tight intrusive mass in the upper kilometer of section. A drill hole UE 25A-3 sunk to 762 m (2500 ft) at the site revealed only units of the Eleana argillite thermally metamorphosed below 396 m (1300 ft) and in part highly magnetic. Subsequent work has shown that much if not all of the magnetic and gravity anomalies can be attributed to the Eleana Formation. The alteration and doming, however, still argue for an intrusive but at greater depth than originally thought. The electrical, VES, and IP data show a complex picture due to variations in structure and alteration within the Eleana and surrounding volcanic units. These data do not suggest the presence of an intrusive in the upper kilometer of section. The magnetotelluric data however gives clear evidence for a thick, resistive body in the earth's crust below the site. While the interpreted depth is very poorly constrained due to noise and structural problems, the top of the resistive body is on the order of 2.5 km deep. The IP data also identifies area of increased polarizability at Calico Hills, which may also have future economic mineralization.

Hoover, D. B.; Chornack, M. P.; Nervick, K. H.; Broker, M. M.

1982-01-01

271

Analysis of Responses From Hydraulic Testing of the Lower Carbonate Aquifer at Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Yucca Flat corrective action unit extends over an approximately 120 square-mile basin at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), southern Nevada, and was the site for over 650 historical underground nuclear tests. The lower carbonate aquifer (LCA), roughly 1,800 feet below ground surface at Yucca Flat and with a confined thickness of several thousand feet, is the primary aquifer for

E. W. Bhark; G. Ruskauff

2005-01-01

272

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

273

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 4 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

274

Chronology of diving activities and underground surveys in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave, Nye County, Nevada, 1950-86  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A Chronology of diving activities and underground surveys in Devils Hole and Devils Hole Cave, southern Nevada, is presented for the period 1950-86. The report acknowledges the efforts of past underwater explorers, scientists, and observers of the cavern system, and provides a historical perspective for comparison with present investigations at that site. (Thacker-USGS, WRD)

Hoffman, Ray J.

1988-01-01

275

Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2004-06-24

276

Reconnaissance Seismic Refraction Studies at Calico Hills, Wahmonie, and Yucca Mountain, Southwest Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reconnaissance refraction surveys consisting off a total of 5 spreads were conducted in the Calico Hills, Wahmonie and Yucca Mountain areas, southwestern Nevada Test Site (NTS). Data from Calico Hills and Wahmonie are generally high in quality; data from Yucca Mountain are for the most part low in quality. At Calico Hills and Wahmonie, special attention was focused on the possible occurrence of a major intrusive body at depth. At Calico Hills this occurrence is supported by an inferred dome-shaped velocity interface. possibly associated with the roof of an altered phase of argillite. However, if an intrusive body is present, its top must be buried deeper than 3 km or it must be so pervasively altered that its velocity is similar to that of the calcareous argillite encountered at the bottom of drill hole DE 25a-3. At Wahmonie, the seismic data suggest the occurrence of a massive lenticular unit within 60 m of the ground surface, probably consisting of argillite but possibly consisting of intensively altered intrusive rock. At Yucca Mountain, preliminary interpretations of the most reliable data suggest the occurrence of a major, steeply inclined velocity interface 500 m from the southwest end of the Yucca C spread. This interface may represent a major fault or erosional feature separating the Topopah Spring and Tiva Canyon Members with Paintbrush Tuff at depth. This interface is 800 m east of a previously mapped fault. On the basis of poor-quality data obtained at Yucca Mountain, the subsurface velocity distribution appears to be complex. For example, one spread near drill hole UE25 a-I suggests not only a much thicker section of Tiva but also that this material is down thrown in the valley. This may suggest faulting with throws exceeding 100 meters or an equivalent erosional feature.

Pankratz, L. W.

1982-01-01

278

74 FR 61364 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Tonopah Solar...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project, Nye County, NV AGENCY: Bureau of...impact statement (EIS) for the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project located on public lands in Nye...

2009-11-24

279

Two activator protein-1 elements in the matrix metalloproteinase-1 promoter have differential effects on transcription and bind Jun D, c-Fos, and Fra2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-1, MMP-1) plays a central role in connective tissue metabolism as the only enzyme capable of degrading interstitial collagens at neutral pH. We used fragments of the rabbit collagenase promoter ranging from 1800 to 182 bp to measure transcriptional activity of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) site at ?77. Mutation at ?77 in this sequence greatly reduced basal transcription

Lori A. White; Constance E. Brinckerhoff

1995-01-01

280

Petrogenesis of the western highlands of the moon - Evidence from a diverse group of whitlockite-rich rocks from the Fra Mauro formation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A group of KREEPy basalts has been discovered in Apollo 14 soils. These samples exhibit similarities to both HA and VHK basalts, albeit with much higher REE abundances, and contain up to 2 vol pct whitlockite and can be explained by assimilation of a K-, REE- and P-rich fluids by an original HA or VHK basalt. This KREEP component could have been produced late in the evolution of the lunar magma ocean and is similar in composition to QMD at Apollo 14. Two rocks have trace element compositions that are representative of actual KREEP. One of the samples appears to be petrographically pristine and could represent an actual KREEP basalt rock. Five subophitic high-Al basalts represent sampling of either a slowly cooled impact melt sheet or, more likely, the same basalt flow. Two 'quasi-pristine' highland rocks confirm the postulate of a connection between KREEP and the alkali suite. A newly discovered alkali anorthosite is a plagioclase cumulate with about 15 percent trapped KREEPy liquid.

Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

1992-01-01

281

49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES...Based on these analyses, the reviewer...analyze the Hazard Log and/or...Criticality Analysis (FMECA), and other hazard analyses for completeness...reviewer; (4) Identification of any...

2013-10-01

282

Informasjonsbearbeiding og Beslutningstaking: En Gjennomgang av Litteratur med Eksempler fra Trafikk (Information Processing and Decisionmaking: A Literature Survey with Examples from Traffic).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Literature on information processing and behavior are surveyed. Theories on information processing are presented. Failures in the information processing are defined, possible consequences of these are listed and examples of such on ensuing driver behavior...

K. Midtland A. Glad

1998-01-01

283

49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation...Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation...independent third-party assessment of PTC system safety verification and...

2010-10-01

284

Expression of the fragile site Xq27 in fibroblasts. I. Detection of Fra(X)(q27) in fibroblast clones from males with X-linked mental retardation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twelve fibroblast clones from two males with X-linked mental retardation expressed the fragile site Xq27 in 3%–38% of metaphases analyzed. The number of in vitro doublings during the cloning procedure had no evident influence on the induction of fragile X expression. The variability of fragile X expression seems to depend on cell properties acquired during culture rather than on properties

P. Steinbach; G. Barbi; S. Baur; A. Wiedenmann

1983-01-01

285

Physical fine mapping of genes underlying X-linked deafness and non fra(X)-X-linked mental retardation at Xq21  

Microsoft Academic Search

Linkage studies and cytogenetically visible deletions associated with nonspecific X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) and a specific form of deafness (DFN3) have indicated that the genes responsible for these disorders are located at Xq21. Using DNA probes from this region, we have studied several overlapping deletions spanning different parts of Xq21. This has enabled us to assign the DFN3 gene and

I. Bach; D. Robinson; N. Thomas; H.-H. Ropers; F. P. M. Cremers

1992-01-01

286

Risanamento Trofico Negli Ecosistemi Lacustri: Confronto Fra i Laghi di Bracciano e Martignano (Trophic Recovering of Freshwater Ecosystem: Comparison between Bracciano and Martignano Lakes).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The volcanic monomictic lakes of Central Italy are generally influenced by agricultural and antropic pressure. Eutrophy can follow these conditions, leading to negative consequences for both environment and human uses, as the occurrence of toxic algal blo...

M. Bruno, E. Marchiori, M. Mecozzi, R. Congestri, S. Melchiorre

2006-01-01

287

H 2O 2-induced egr-1, fra-1, and c-jun gene expression is mediated by tyrosine kinase in aortic smooth muscle cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has recently been shown to have a dual effect on cell growth by stimulating proliferation and triggering apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by H2O2 is a direct consequence of oxidant injury, while the proliferative response to H2O2 is thought to be a protective mechanism against oxidant injury. Signaling of the H2O2-induced proliferative effect has been proposed to occur via

Najia Jin; Nathan D Hatton; Maureen A Harrington; Xiaolin Xia; Steve H Larsen; Rodney A Rhoades

2000-01-01

288

Videreudvikling af soft-top til opsamling af biogas fra lagertanke. (Further development of Soft-Top for the accumulation of biogas from storage tanks).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since the first prototype of Soft-Top for covering storage tanks was invented and tested on the biomass conversion plant at Farsoe, Denmark, in 1990-91, the interest in coverings for storage tanks has grown. The advantages these coverings give are a bette...

K. Henriksen

1993-01-01

289

Studie om forskningsprosjekt vedroerende utslipp fra fly i oevre luftlag. (Study on research projects concerning aircraft emissions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report from NILU (Norwegian Institute for Air Research) relates to a study on the level of air pollution from aircraft emissions. The study covers an evaluation of finished, ongoing or planned research projects comprising the effects from aircraft emi...

A. G. Kraaboel F. Stordal

1996-01-01

290

Sammenligning af goedningsvirkning og tab af kvaelstof fra ubehandlet og afgasset kvaeggylle. (Comparison of fertilizing effect and loss of nitrogen from untreated and degassed cattle manures).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During a period of three years experiments have been carried out in order to compare the fertilizing effect of untreated cattle slurries, and cattle slurries that have been used for the conversion of biomass to methane, on spring barley with undersown gra...

H. Oertenblad E. Hvelplund K. Henriksen

1992-01-01

291

Utslipp av olje og kjemikalier fra plattformene paa norsk kontinentalsokkel 1991. (Discharges of oil and chemicals from the platforms on the Norwegian continental shelf 1991).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report gives an overview regarding the discharges to sea of oil and chemicals from offshore installations on the Norwegian Continental shelf in 1991. The figures are based on the oil companies own discharge report to the State Pollution Control Author...

I. Valvatne

1993-01-01

292

Utslipp av olje og kjemikalier fra plattformene paa norsk kontinentalsokkel 1992. (Discharges of oil and chemicals from the platforms on the Norwegian continental shelf 1992).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report gives an overview regarding the discharges to sea of oil and chemicals from offshore installations on the Norwegian Continental shelf in 1992. The figures are based on the oil companies own discharge reports to the State Pollution Control Autho...

I. Valvatne

1993-01-01

293

49 CFR Appendix A to Part 211 - Statement of Agency Policy Concerning Waivers Related to Shared Use of Trackage or Rights-of-Way...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...is likely to expedite FRA's processing of the petition. FRA will...the crossing are governed by a signal system, FRA's signal rules (49 CFR parts 233, 235, and 236) apply, as do the signal provisions of the hours...

2011-10-01

294

49 CFR Appendix A to Part 211 - Statement of Agency Policy Concerning Waivers Related to Shared Use of Trackage or Rights-of-Way...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...is likely to expedite FRA's processing of the petition. FRA will...the crossing are governed by a signal system, FRA's signal rules (49 CFR parts 233, 235, and 236) apply, as do the signal provisions of the hours...

2012-10-01

295

Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985-86  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites in Yucca Flat, about 56 kilometers north of Mercury, Nevada. Three sites (one in each of two craters and one at an undisturbed site at the original land surface) were instrumented to collect meteorological data for calculating bare-soil evaporation. These data include (1) long-wave radiation, (2) short-wave radiation, (3) net radiation, (4) air temperae, and (5) soil surface temperature. Meteorological data also were collected at a weather station at an undisturbed site near the study craters. Data collected at this site include (1) air temperature, (2) relative humidity, (3) wind velocity, and (4) wind direction.

Carman, Rita L.

1994-01-01

296

Stratigraphy, structure, and some petrographic features of Tertiary volcanic rocks in the USW G-2 drill hole, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A continuously cored drill hole designated as USW G-2, located at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, penetrated 1830.6 m of Tertiary volcanic strata composed of abundant silicic ash-flow tuffs, minor lava and flow breccias, and subordinate volcaniclastic rocks. The volcanic strata penetrated are comprised of the following in descending order: Paintbrush Tuff (Tiva Canyon Member, Yucca Mountain Member, bedded tuff, Pah Canyon Member, and Topopah Spring Member), tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills, Crater Flat Tuff (Prow Pass Member, Bullfrog Member, and Tram unit), lava and flow breccia (rhyodacitic), tuff of Lithic Ridge, bedded and ash-flow tuff, lava and flow breccia (rhyolitic, quartz latitic, and dacitic), bedded tuff, conglomerate and ash-flow tuff, and older tuffs of USW G-2. Comparison of unit thicknesses at USW G-2 to unit thicknesses at previously drilled holes at Yucca Mountain indicate the following: (1) thickening of the Paintbrush Tuff members and tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills toward the northern part of Yucca Mountain; (2) thickening of the Prow Pass Member but thinning of the Bullfrog Member and Tram unit; (3) thinning of the tuff of Lithic Ridge; (4) presence of approximately 280 m of lava and flow breccia not previously penetrated by any drill hole; and (5) presence of an ash-flow tuff unit at the bottom of the drill hole not previously intersected, apparently the oldest unit penetrated at Yucca Mountain to date. Petrographic features of some of the units include: (1) decrease in quartz and K-feldspar and increases in biotite and plagioclase with depth in the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills; (2) an increase in quartz phenocrysts from the top to the bottom members of the Crater Flat Tuff; (3) a low quartz content in the tuff of Lithic Ridge, suggesting tapping of the magma chamber at quartz-poor levels; (4) a change in zeolitic alteration from heulandite to clinoptilolite to mordenite with increasing depth; (5) lavas characterized by a rhyolitic top and dacitic base, suggesting reverse compositional zoning; and (6) presence of hydrothermal mineralization in the lavas that could be related to an intrusive under Yucca Mountain or to volcanism associated with the Timber Mountain-Claim Canyon caldera complex. A fracture analysis of the core resulted n tabulation of 7,848 fractures, predominately open and high angle. The fractures were filled or coated with material in various combinations and include the following in decreasing abundance: CaCo3, iron oxides and hydroxides, SiO2, manganese oxides and hydroxides, clays and zeolites. An increase in the intensity of fracturing can be correlated with the following: (1) densely welded zones, (2) lithophysal zones, (3) vitrophyre, (4) silicified zones, (5) fault zones, and (6) cooling joints. Numerous fault zones were penetrated by the drill hole, predominately in the lithophysal zone of the Topopah Spring Member and below the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills. The faults are predominately high angle with both a vertical and lateral component. Three major faults were penetrated, two of which intersect the ground surface, with displacements of at least 20 m and possibly as much as 52 m. The faults and some fractures are probably related to the regional doming of the area associated with the volcanism-tectonism of the Timber Mountain-Claim Canyon caldera complex, and to Basin and Range tectonism.

Maldonado, Florian; Koether, S. L.

1983-01-01

297

Stratigraphy, Structure, and Some Petrographic Features of Tertiary Volcanic Rocks at the USW G-2 Drill Hole, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A continuously cored drill hole penetrated 1830.6 m of Tertiary volcanic strata comprised of the following in descending order: Paintbrush Tuff, tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills, Crater Flat Tuff, lava and flow breccia (rhyodacitic), tuff of Lithic Ridge, ...

F. Maldonado S. L. Koether

1983-01-01

298

Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of the NTS, the U.S. Department of Energy currently is investigating the potential transport of these radionuclides by ground water flow. To better evaluate any potential risk associated with these test-generated contaminants, a number of studies were undertaken to accurately quantify discharge from areas downgradient in the regional ground-water flow system from the NTS. This report refines the estimate of ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley. Ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley was estimated by quantifying evapotranspiration (ET), estimating subsurface outflow, and compiling ground-water withdrawal data. ET was quantified by identifying areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineating areas of ET defined on the basis of similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions and computing ET rates for each of the delineated areas. A classification technique using spectral-reflectance characteristics determined from satellite imagery acquired in 1992 identified eight unique areas of ground-water ET. These areas encompass about 3,426 acres of sparsely to densely vegetated grassland, shrubland, wetland, and open water. Annual ET rates in Oasis Valley were computed with energy-budget methods using micrometeorological data collected at five sites. ET rates range from 0.6 foot per year in a sparse, dry saltgrass environment to 3.1 feet per year in dense meadow vegetation. Mean annual ET from Oasis Valley is estimated to be about 7,800 acre-feet. Mean annual ground-water discharge by ET from Oasis Valley, determined by removing the annual local precipitation component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-feet in 1996 and 6,300 acre-feet in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by E T, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased.

Reiner,S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith, J.LaRue; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

2002-01-29

299

Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985--1986  

SciTech Connect

Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites in Yucca Flat, about 56 kilometers north of Mercury, Nevada. Three sites (one in each of two craters and one at an undisturbed site at the original land surface) were instrumented to collect meteorological data for calculating bare-soil evaporation. These data include (1) long-wave radiation, (2) short-wave radiation, (3) net radiation, (4) air temperature, and (5) soil surface temperature. Meteorological data also were collected at a weather station at an undisturbed site near the study craters. Data collected at this site include (1) air temperature, (2) relative humidity, (3) wind velocity, and (4) wind direction.

Carman, R.L.

1994-12-01

300

Geologic Insights and Suggestions on Mineral Potential Based on Analyses of Geophysical Data of the Southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aeromagnetic and gravity data provide confirmation of major structural and lithologic units in the southern Toquima Range, Nevada. These units include Cretaceous granite plutons and Tertiary calderas. In addition, the geophysical maps pinpoint numerous faults and lesser intrusions, and they suggest locations of several inferred subsurface intrusions. They also corroborate a system of northwesterly and northeasterly conjugate structures that probably are fundamental to the structural framework of the Toquima Range. A combination of geophysical, geochemical, and geologic data available for the widely mineralized and productive area suggests additional mineral resource potential, especially in and (or) adjacent to the Round Mountain, Jefferson, Manhattan, and Belmont mining districts. Also, evidence for mineral potential exists for areas near the Flower mercury mine south of Mount Jefferson caldera, and in the Bald Mountain Canyon belt of gold-quartz veins in the Manhattan caldera. A few other areas also show potential for mineral resources. The various geologic environments indicated within the map area suggest base- and precious-metal potential in porphyry deposits as well as in quartz-vein and skarn deposits associated with intrusive stocks.

Shawe, D. R.; Kucks, R. P.; Hildenbrand, T. G.

2004-01-01

301

Geologic and geophysical maps of the Las Vegas 30' x 60' quadrangle, Clark and Nye counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Las Vegas and Pahrump are two of the fastest growing cities in the US, and the shortage of water looms as among the greatest future problems for these cities. These new maps of the Las Vegas 30 x 60-minute quadrangle provide a geologic and geophysical framework and fundamental earth science database needed to address societal issues such as ground water supply and contamination, surface flood, landslide, and seismic hazards, and soil properties and their changing impact by and on urbanization. The mountain ranges surrounding Las Vegas and Pahrump consist of Mesozoic, Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks. A majority of these rocks are Paleozoic carbonate rocks that are part of Nevada's carbonate rock aquifer province. The Spring Mountains represent a major recharge site in the province, where maximum altitude is 3,632 m (Charleston Peak) above sea level. Rocks in the Sheep and Las Vegas Ranges and Spring Mountains contain correlative, northeast-striking, southeast-verging thrust faults that are part of the Cretaceous, Sevier orogenic belt. These thrusts were offset during the Miocene by the Las Vegas Valley shear system (LVVSZ). We conducted new mapping in the Blue Diamond area, highlighting refined work on the Bird Spring thrust, newly studied ancient landslides, and gravity-slide blocks. We conducted new mapping in the Las Vegas Range and mapped previously unrecognized structures such as the Valley thrust and fold belt; recognition of these structures has led to a refined correlation of Mesozoic thrust faults across the LVVSZ. New contributions in the quadrangle also include a greatly refined stratigraphy of Paleozoic bedrock units based on conodont biostragraphy. We collected over 200 conodont samples in the quadrangle and established stratigraphic reference sections used to correlate units across the major Mesozoic thrust faults. Quaternary deposits cover about half of the map area and underlie most of the present urbanized area. Deposits consist of large coalescing alluvial fans that grade downslope to extensive areas of fine-grained sediment indicative of groundwater-discharge during the Pleistocene. In the central areas of Las Vegas and Pahrump valleys, Quaternary fault scarps associated with past ground-water discharge deposits suggest a genetic relationship. In collaboration with NBMG and University of Nevada, a variety of ages of gravelly alluvium are newly mapped using surficial characteristics and soil development, along with reassessment of previously published mapping during compilation. Reconnaissance geochronology (thermoluminescence and U-series) of eolian and authigenic components of surficial and buried soils and spring deposits is applied to test hypotheses of geomorphic and hydrologic response to climate change over the past 100 k.y.). The major structure in the Las Vegas quadrangle is the LVVSZ. Because the LVVSZ is concealed by thick basin-fill deposits of Quaternary and Tertiary age, it was characterized primarily based on geophysics. Likewise, the newly described State line fault system in Pahrump Valley has also been characterized by geophysics, where geophysically inferred structures correlate remarkably with surface structures defined by our new geologic mapping in the Mound Spring and Hidden Hills Ranch 7.5-minute quadrangles.

Page, William R.; Lundstrom, Scott, C.; Harris, Anita G.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Paces, James B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Rowley, Peter D.; Burchfiel, B. C.; Bell, John W.; Smith, Eugene I.

2005-01-01

302

Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

1993-01-01

303

A Hydrostratigraphic Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat-Climax Mine, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A new three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit was completed in 2005. The model area includes Yucca Flat and Climax Mine, former nuclear testing areas at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. The model area is approximately 1,250 square kilometers in size and is geologically complex. Yucca Flat is a topographically closed basin typical of many valleys in the Basin and Range province. Faulted and tilted blocks of Tertiary-age volcanic rocks and underlying Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks form low ranges around the structural basin. During the Cretaceous Period a granitic intrusive was emplaced at the north end of Yucca Flat. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the basin. These were integrated using EarthVision? software to develop the 3-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Fifty-six stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 25 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the alluvial section into 3 hydrostratigraphic units including 2 aquifers and 1 confining unit. The volcanic units in the model area are organized into 13 hydrostratigraphic units that include 8 aquifers and 5 confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into 7 hydrostratigraphic units, including 3 aquifers and 4 confining units. Other units include 1 Tertiary-age sedimentary confining unit and 1 Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units (''layers'' in the model) along with the major structural features (i.e., faults). The model incorporates 178 high-angle normal faults of Tertiary age and 2 low-angle thrust faults of Mesozoic age. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Five of these alternatives were developed so they could be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

Geotechnical Sciences Group Bechtel Nevada

2006-01-01

304

Archaeological investigations at a toolstone source area and temporary camp: Sample Unit 19-25, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Technical report No. 77  

SciTech Connect

Archaeological investigations were initiated at Sample Unit 19--25 to retrieve information concerning settlement and subsistence data on the aboriginal hunter and gatherers in the area. Studies included collection and mapping of 35.4 acres at site 26NY1408 and excavation and mapping of 0.02 acres at site 26NY7847. Cultural resources include two rock and brush structures and associated caches and a large lithic toolstone source area and lithic artifact scatter. Temporally diagnostic artifacts indicate periodic use throughout the last 12,000 years; however dates associated with projectile points indicate most use was in the Middle and Late Archaic. Radiocarbon dates from the rock and brush structures at site 26NY7847 indicate a construction date of A.D. 1640 and repair between A.D. 1800 and 1950 for feature 1 and between A.D. 1330 and 1390 and repair at A.D. 1410 for feature 2. The dates associated with feature 2 place its construction significantly earlier than similar structures found elsewhere on Pahute Mesa. Activity areas appear to reflect temporary use of the area for procurement of available lithic and faunal resources and the manufacture of tools.

Jones, R.C.; DuBarton, A.; Edwards, S.; Pippin, L.C.; Beck, C.M.

1993-12-31

305

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

SciTech Connect

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

J.M. Fenelon

2005-10-05

306

Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

Thomas G. Hildenbrand; Geoffrey A. Phelps; Edward A. Mankinen

2006-09-21

307

Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types—volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

Joseph M. Fenelon; Randell J. Laczniak; and Keith J. Halford

2008-06-24

308

Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Pahute Mesa groundwater flow model supports the FFACO UGTA corrective action strategy objective of providing an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU in order to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing above background conditions exceeding Safe Drinking

Greg Ruskauff

2006-01-01

309

Analysis of ground-water levels and associated trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

Fenelon, Joseph M.

2005-01-01

310

Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of

S. R. Reiner; R. J. Laczniak; G. A. DeMeo; J. LaRue Smith; P. E. Elliott; W. E. Nylund; C. J. Fridrich

2002-01-01

311

Selected Micrometeorological, Soil-Moisture, and Evapotranspiration Data at Amargosa Desert Research Site in Nye County near Beatty, Nevada, 2001-05  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radio-active waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nevada, 2001-05. Evapotranspiration data were collected from February 2002 through the end of December 2005. Data were col-lected in support of ongoing research to improve the understanding of hydrologic and con-taminant-transport processes in arid environments. Micrometeorological data include solar radiation, net radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, saturated and ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, precipita-tion, near-surface soil temperature, soil-heat flux and soil-water content. All micrometeorological data were collected using a 10-second sampling interval by data loggers that output daily and hourly mean values. Daily maximum and minimum values are based on hourly mean values. Precipitation data output includes daily and hourly totals. Selected soil-moisture profiles at depth include periodic measure-ments of soil volumetric water-content measurements at nine neutron-probe access tubes to depths ranging from 5.25 to 29.25 meters. Evapotranspiration data include measurement of daily evapotranspiration and 15-minute fluxes of the four principal energy budget components of latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, soil-heat flux, and net radiation. Other data collected and used in equations to determine evapotranspiration include temperature and water content of soil, temperature and vapor pressure of air, and covariance values. Evapotranspiration and flux estimates during 15-minute intervals were calculated at a 0.1-second execution interval using the eddy covariance method. Data files included in this report contain the complete micrometeorological, soil-moisture, and evapotranspiration field data sets. These data files are presented in tabular Excel spreadsheet format. This report highlights selected data con-tained in the computer generated data files using figures, tables, and brief discussions. Instrumentation used for data collection also is described. Water-content profiles are shown to demonstrate variability of water content with depth. Time-series data are plotted to illustrate temporal variations in micrometeorological, soil-water content, and evapotranspiration data.

Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, C. Justin; Garcia, C. Amanda; Andraski, B. J.

2007-01-01

312

Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data at Amargosa Desert Research Site, an arid site near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1998-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Selected micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radioactive waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nev., 1998-2000. Data were collected in support of ongoing research studies to improve the understanding of hydrologic and contaminant-transport processes in arid environments. Micrometeorological data include precipitation, air temperature, solar radiation, net radiation, relative humidity, ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, soil temperature, and soil-heat flux. All micrometeorological data were collected using a 10-second sampling interval by data loggers that output daily mean, maximum, and minimum values, and hourly mean values. For precipitation, data output consisted of daily, hourly, and 5-minute totals. Soil-moisture data included periodic measurements of soil-water content at nine neutron-probe access tubes with measurable depths ranging from 5.25 to 29.75 meters. The computer data files included in this report contain the complete micrometeorological and soil-moisture data sets. The computer data consists of seven files with about 14 megabytes of information. The seven files are in tabular format: (1) one file lists daily mean, maximum, and minimum micrometeorological data and daily total precipitation; (2) three files list hourly mean micrometeorological data and hourly precipitation for each year (1998-2000); (3) one file lists 5-minute precipitation data; (4) one file lists mean soil-water content by date and depth at four experimental sites; and (5) one file lists soil-water content by date and depth for each neutron-probe access tube. This report highlights selected data contained in the computer data files using figures, tables, and brief discussions. Instrumentation used for data collection also is described. Water-content profiles are shown to demonstrate variability of water content with depth. Time-series data are plotted to illustrate temporal variations in micrometeorological and soil-water content data. Substantial precipitation at the end of an El Ni?o cycle in early 1998 resulted in measurable water penetration to a depth of 1.25 meters at one of the four experimental soil-monitoring sites.

Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, Charles J.; Andraski, Brian J.

2002-01-01

313

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

2012-09-01

314

Breadth-Based Models of Women's Underrepresentation in STEM Fields: An Integrative Commentary on Schmidt (2011) and Nye et al. (2012)  

PubMed Central

Relative strength of math and verbal abilities and interests drive science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) career choices more than absolute math ability alone. Having one dominant aptitude (e.g., for mathematics) increases the likelihood of a strong self-concept in that domain and decreases the likelihood of equivocation about career choices in comparison with individuals with equivalent mathematical aptitude who have comparable strength in non-math areas. Males are more likely than females to have an asymmetrical cognitive profile of higher aptitude in math relative to verbal domains. Together, these two points suggest that the academic and career pursuits of high math ability males may be attributable to their narrower options among STEM fields, whereas females’ more symmetrical cognitive profile means their math and verbal interests compete in the formation of their ability self-concept and, hence, in their broader career choices. Such equivocation about STEM careers is in fact already evident in girls with high math aptitude as early as junior high school. Thus, we argue that asymmetry in interests and aptitudes is an underappreciated factor in sex differences in career choice. To the extent this is true, focusing on strengthening young women’s STEM-related abilities and ability self-concepts to increase female STEM representation may be an unproductive approach; to increase representation, it may be more effective to focus on harvesting the potential of those girls and women whose breadth of interest and high ability spans social/verbal and spatial/numerical domains. The use of interventions that play to this greater breadth by socially contextualizing STEM is one potential solution.

Valla, Jeffrey M.; Ceci, Stephen J.

2014-01-01

315

Geochemistry of altered and mineralized rocks from the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, northern Hot Creek Range, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey and the St. Johns River Water Management District are investigating the hydrogeology of the Floridan aquifer system. An essential element of this investigation is the design and construction of a monitor well network in the lower saline water-bearing zone which occurs at about 2,000 ft below land surface. During 1985, a well near Ponte Vedra in northeast St. Johns County was completed into the lower saline water-bearing zone at a depth of 1,980 to 2,035 ft below land surface. This well and other wells drilled under this or other programs will be used to monitor water levels and water chemistry of the lower saline zone. Chloride concentrations in water above the lower saline zone ranged from 14 to 270 mg/L and specific conductance ranged from 450 to 1,440 micromhos/cm c. In the lower zone, chloride concentrations were as much as 16,210 mg/L and specific conductance as much as 46,000 micromhos per centimeter. Aquifer head and artesian flow from the well generally increased with depth. Water temperatures also increased from 23 C in the upper part of the aquifer to more than 28 C in the lower saline zone. (USGS)

Nash, J. T.; John, D. A.; Malcolm, M. J.; Briggs, P. H.; Crock, J. G.

1986-01-01

316

Digital Isostatic Gravity Map of the Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An isostatic gravity map of the Nevada Test Site area was prepared from publicly available gravity data (Ponce, 1997) and from gravity data recently collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (Mankinen and others, 1999; Morin and Blakely, 1999). Gravity data were processed using standard gravity data reduction techniques. Southwest Nevada is characterized by gravity anomalies that reflect the distribution of pre-Cenozoic carbonate rocks, thick sequences of volcanic rocks, and thick alluvial basins. In addition, regional gravity data reveal the presence of linear features that reflect large-scale faults whereas detailed gravity data can indicate the presence of smaller-scale faults.

Ponce, David A.; Mankinen, E. A.; Davidson, J. G.; Morin, R. L.; Blakely, R. J.

2000-01-01

317

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Mult...

J. M. Fenelon

2005-01-01

318

Database of Ground-Water Levels in the Vicinity of Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1957-2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

More than 1,200 water-level measurements from 1957 to 2005 in the Rainier Mesa area of the Nevada Test Site were quality assured and analyzed. Water levels were measured from 50 discrete intervals within 18 boreholes and from 4 tunnel sites. An interpreti...

J. M. Fenelon

2006-01-01

319

Database of Ground-Water Levels in the Vicinity of Rainer Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1957-2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

More than 1,200 water-level measurements from 1957 to 2005 in the Rainier Mesa area of the Nevada Test Site were quality assured and analyzed. Water levels were measured from 50 discrete intervals within 18 boreholes and from 4 tunnel sites. An interpreti...

J. M. Fenelon

2006-01-01

320

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General

J. M. Fenelon

2005-01-01

321

Database of Ground-Water Levels in the Vicinity of Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada 1957-2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

More than 1,200 water-level measurements from 1957 to 2005 in the Rainier Mesa area of the Nevada Test Site were quality assured and analyzed. Water levels were measured from 50 discrete intervals within 18 boreholes and from 4 tunnel sites. An interpretive database was constructed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in the Rainier Mesa area. Multiple attributes

Joseph M. Fenelon

2006-01-01

322

Legacy Compliance Final Report: Results of the Navy/Encapo Soil Stabilization Study at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Historic atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has resulted in large areas of plutonium-contaminated surface soils. The potential transport of these contaminated soils to onsite and offsite receptors is a concern to the land steward and local stakeholders. The primary transport pathways of interest at the NTS are sediment entrained in surface water runoff and windblown dust. This project was initially funded by the U.S. Navy and subsequently funded by the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship Program. Field tests were conducted over a 20.5 month period to evaluate the efficacy of an organic-based, surface applied emulsion to reduce sediment transport from plutonium-contaminated soils. The patented emulsion was provided by Encapco Technologies LLC. Field tests were conducted within the SMOKY radioactive contamination area (CA). The SMOKY above ground nuclear test was conducted on 08/31/1957, with a reported yield of 44 kilotons and was located at N 37 degrees 10.5 minutes latitude and W 116 degrees 04.5 minutes longitude. Three 'safety tests' were also conducted within approximately 1,500 meters (5,000 feet) of the SMOKY ground zero in 1958. Safety tests are designed to test the response of a nuclear device to an unplanned external force (e.g., nearby detonation of conventional explosives). These three safety tests (CERES, OBERON, and TITANIA) resulted in dispersal of plutonium over a wide area (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). Ten 3 x 4.6 meter test plots were constructed within the SMOKY CA to conduct rainfall-runoff simulations. Six of the ten test plots were treated with the emulsion at the manufacturer recommended loading of 1.08 gallons per square meter, and four plots were held untreated as experimental controls. Separate areas were also treated to assess impacts to native vegetation and surface infiltration rate. Field tests were conducted at approximately 6, 13, and 20.5 months post emulsion treatment. Field tests consisted of rainfall-runoff simulations and double ring infiltrometer measurements. Plant vigor assessments were conducted during peak production time, approximately seven months post treatment. Rainfall was simulated at the approximate 5 minute intensity of a 50-year storm (5.1 inches per hour) for durations of four to five minutes. All runoff generated from each test plot was collected noting the time for each liter of volume. Five gallon carboys containing the runoff water and sediment were shipped to Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory for analysis. The samples were separated into liquid and solid fractions. Liquid and solid fractions were weighed and analyzed for Americium-241 (Am-241) by gamma spectrometry. Quality control measures used at the laboratory indicate the analytical data are accurate and reproducible. A weather station was deployed to the field site to take basic meteorological measurements including air temperature, incoming solar radiation, wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, relative humidity, precipitation, and volumetric soil moisture content. Meteorological monitoring data indicate the climate over the test period was hot and dry with 41 days having measurable precipitation. The total precipitation for the study period was 12.5 centimeters, 37% of the long-term average. For the 20.5 month test period, 64 freeze-thaw cycles occurred. Vegetation assessments indicate the emulsion treatment did not negatively impact existing vegetation. The three rounds of double ring infiltration tests on treated surfaces indicate the infiltration rate was relatively constant over time and not significantly different from measurements taken on untreated surfaces. Significant differences were observed in the amount of runoff and sediment collected from treated and untreated plots for the first two but not the third round of rainfall-runoff simulations, indicating significant emulsion degradation after 20.5 months of exposure. Treated plots had higher total runoff volumes and sediment loads as compared to untreated plots for the first two rounds of simulations. These

Lloyd Desotell, David Anderson, Stuart Rawlinson, David Hudson, Vefa Yucel

2008-03-01

323

Analysis of a multiple-well interference test in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-Hole complex, May--June 1995, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A multiple-well interference (pumping) test was conducted in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain, Nev., from May 22 to June 12, 1995, by the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. This pumping test was conducted as part of investigations to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository. During the test, borehole UE-25 c{number_sign}3 was pumped for 10 days at an average rate of 17.9 liters per second. Drawdown in 6 observation wells completed in Miocene tuffaceous rocks 29.0--3,525.6 meters from the pumping well ranged from 0 to 0.42 meters 14,000 minutes after pumping started. The spatial distribution of this drawdown indicates that a northwest-trending zone of discontinuous faults might be affecting ground-water movement in the Miocene tuffaceous rocks near the C-holes. No drawdown was observed in a borehole completed in a regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifer 630.0 meters from the pumping well. Consequently, it could not be determined during the pumping test if the Miocene tuffaceous rocks are connected hydraulically to the regional aquifer. Analyses of drawdown and recovery indicate that the Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the vicinity of the C-holes have transmissivity values of 1,600--3,200 meters squared per day, horizontal hydraulic conductivity values of 6.5--13 meters per day, vertical hydraulic conductivity values of 0.2--1.7 meters per day, storativity values of 0.001--0.003, and specific yield values of 0.01--0.2.

Geldon, A.L.; Umari, A.M.A.; Earle, J.D.; Fahy, M.F.; Gemmell, J.M.; Darnell, J.

1998-09-01

324

Hydrologic activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in support of the Radionuclide Migration Program, Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, fiscal year 1987  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrologic activities during the 1987 fiscal year by the U.S. Geological Survey in support of the Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. These activities included monitoring groundwater levels; compiling and entering geohydrologic data into the U.S. Geological Survey computerized groundwater database; providing technical support to the Radionuclide Migration Committee and the Containment Evaluation Panel; and the planning, drilling, and sampling of the UE20n-1 hole. Groundwater levels were monitored continuously at 2 wells and intermittently at 36 selected wells, test holes, and emplacement holes. Selected monthly water-level measurements are listed for the continuously monitored wells and intermittent measurements are listed for the selected wells, test holes, and emplacement holes. Progress continued on four groundwater hydrology reports of the Nevada Test Site area. (Thacker-USGS, WRD)

Scott, W. B.

1990-01-01

325

Pritsel'no-stolknovitel'naya ionno-rasseivatel'naya spektroskopiya. Ehksperimental'nye issledovaniya, teoreticheskie modeli. (Impact-collision ion-scattering spectroscopy. Experimental investigation, theoretical models).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The review of basic theoretical concepts and the description of possible practical applications of ICISS is presented. The algorithm developed by authors for a computer simulation and interpretation of ICISS experiments is described. 28 refs.; 29 figs. (A...

V. V. Zastavnyuk S. V. Teplov

1990-01-01

326

Privatization and Competition: Comments on S.314, the Freedom from Government Competition Act. Statement of L. Nye Stevens, Director Federal Management and Workforce Issues General Government Division.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Subcommittee is considering S.314, the Freedom From Government Competition Act. The bill would require that the government procure from the private sector, with some exceptions, the goods and services it needs to carry out its functions. The Subcommit...

1997-01-01

327

Dvojnye differentsial'nye poperechnye secheniya obrazovaniya nejtronov i protonov v yadro-yadernykh vzimodejstviyakh. (Double differential neutron and proton productions cross sections in nucleus-nucleus collisions).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experimental double differential neutron and proton production cross sections in nucleus-nucleus collisions (DDPCS) are analyzed. On the basis of ascertained regularities ADPCS are described in analytical form for the aim of radiation environment and shie...

M. M. Komochkov

1991-01-01

328

Channel Transmission Loss Studies During Ephemeral Flow Events: ER-5-3 Channel and Cambric Ditch, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Transmission losses along ephemeral channels are an important, yet poorly understood, aspect of rainfall-runoff prediction. Losses occur as flow infiltrates channel bed, banks, and floodplains. Estimating transmission losses in arid environments is difficult because of the variability of surficial geomorphic characteristics and infiltration capacities of soils and near-surface low-permeability geologic layers (e.g., calcrete). Transmission losses in ephemeral channels are nonlinear functions of discharge and time (Lane, 1972), and vary spatially along the channel reach and with soil antecedent moisture conditions (Sharma and Murthy, 1994). Rainfall-runoff models used to estimate peak discharge and runoff volume for flood hazard assessment are not designed specifically for ephemeral channels, where transmission loss can be significant because of the available storage volume in channel soils. Accuracy of the flow routing and rainfall-runoff models is dependent on the transmission loss estimate. Transmission loss rate is the most uncertain parameter in flow routing through ephemeral channels. This research, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), is designed to improve understanding of the impact of transmission loss on ephemeral flood modeling and compare various methodologies for predicting runoff from rainfall events. Various applications of this research to DOE projects include more site-specific accuracy in runoff prediction; possible reduction in size of flood mitigation structures at the NTS; and a better understanding of expected infiltration from runoff losses into landfill covers. Two channel transmission loss field experiments were performed on the NTS between 2001 and 2003: the first was conducted in the ER-5-3 channel (Miller et al., 2003), between March and June 2001, and the second was conducted in the Cambric Ditch (Mizell et al., 2005), between April and July 2003. Both studies used water discharged from unrelated drilling activities during well development and aquifer pump tests. Discharge measurements at several flumes located along the channels were used to directly measure transmission losses. Flume locations were chosen in relation to geomorphic surface types and ages, vegetative cover and types, subsurface indurated layers (calcrete), channel slopes, etc. Transmission losses were quantified using three different analysis methods. Method 1 uses Lane's Method (Lane, 1983) for estimating flood magnitude in ephemeral channels. Method 2 uses heat as a subsurface tracer for infiltration. Numerical modeling, using HYDRUS-2D (Simunek et al., 1999), a finite-element-based flow and transport code, was applied to estimate infiltration from soil temperature data. Method 3 uses hydraulic gradient and water content in a Darcy's Law approach (Freeze and Cherry, 1979) to calculate one-dimensional flow rates. Heat dissipation and water content data were collected for this analysis.

J.J. Miller; S.A. Mizell; R.H. French; D.G. Meadows; M.H. Young

2005-10-01

329

Summary and evaluation of existing geological and geophysical data near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Midway Valley, located at the eastern base of the Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, is the preferred location of the surface facilities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. One goal in siting these surface facilities is to avoid faults that could produce relative displacements in excess of 5 cm in the foundations of the waste-handling buildings. This study reviews existing geologic and geophysical data that can be used to assess the potential for surface fault rupture within Midway Valley. Dominant tectonic features in Midway Valley are north-trending, westward-dipping normal faults along the margins of the valley: the Bow Ridge fault to the west and the Paintbrush Canyon fault to the east. Published estimates of average Quaternary slip rates for these faults are very low but the age of most recent displacement and the amount of displacement per event are largely unknown. Surface mapping and interpretive cross sections, based on limited drillhole and geophysical data, suggest that additional normal faults, including the postulated Midway Valley fault, may exist beneath the Quaternary/Tertiary fill within the valley. Existing data, however, are inadequate to determine the location, recency, and geometry of this faulting. To confidently assess the potential for significant Quaternary faulting in Midway Valley, additional data are needed that define the stratigraphy and structure of the strata beneath the valley, characterize the Quaternary soils and surfaces, and establish the age of faulting. The use of new and improved geophysical techniques, combined with a drilling program, offers the greatest potential for resolving subsurface structure in the valley. Mapping of surficial geologic units and logging of soil pits and trenches within these units must be completed, using accepted state-of-the-art practices supported by multiple quantitative numerical and relative age-dating techniques.

Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M.; DiSilvestro, L.A. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1992-01-01

330

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01

331

Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of the available hydrologic data conducted in support of the development of a Corrective Action Unit (CAU) groundwater flow model for Central and Western Pahute Mesa: CAUs 101 and 102.

Drici, Warda

2004-02-01

332

Meteorological data for four sites at surface-disruption features in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1985--1986  

Microsoft Academic Search

Surface-disruption features, or craters, resulting from underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site may increase the potential for ground-water recharge in an area that would normally produce little, if any, recharge. This report presents selected meteorological data resulting from a study of two surface-disruption features during May 1985 through June 1986. The data were collected at four adjacent sites

Carman

1994-01-01

333

Water-level data from wells and test holes through 1991 and potentiometric contours as of 1991 for Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The underground nuclear testing program of the US Department of Energy (USDOE) takes place at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 65 mi north-west of Las Vegas, Nevada. Underground nuclear tests at Yucca Flat, one of the USDOE test areas at NTS, have affected hydrologic conditions, including groundwater levels. The purpose of this map report, prepared in cooperation with USDOE,

G. S. Hale; D. A. Trudeau; C. S. Savard

1995-01-01

334

Water-level data from wells and test holes through 1991 and potentiometric contours as of 1991 for Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The underground nuclear-testing program of the U.S. Department of Energy takes place at the Nevada Test Site, about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nev. Water levels in Yucca Flat may be affected by underground nuclear testing. The purpose of this map report is to present water-level data collected from wells and test holes through December 1991, and to present potentiometric contours representing 1991 water-table conditions in Yucca Flat. Water-level data from 91 sites are shown on the map and include information from 54 sites shown on a 1983 map. Water levels ranged from 519.5 to 2,162.9-feet below land surface. Potentiometric contours are drawn from water-level data to represent the altitude of the water table. Water-level altitudes ranged from about 2,377 ft to 2,770 ft above sea level in the central part of Yucca Flat and from about 4,060 ft to 2,503 ft above sea level in the western and northern parts of Yucca Flat. The water-level data were contoured considering the hydrologic setting, including the concept that water levels within the Cenozoic hydrologic units in the central part of the study area are elevated with respect to water levels in the adjacent and underlying Paleozoic hydrologic units. The most notable feature in the central part of the area is the presence of four ground-water mounds not shown on the 1983 map.

Hale, Glenn S.; Trudeau, Douglas A.; Savard, Charles S.

1995-01-01

335

Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by ground-water transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the water-level distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. The contoured water-level distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped, presented, and discussed in general terms as being one of three aquifer types?volcanic aquifer, upper carbonate aquifer, or lower carbonate aquifer. Each of these aquifer types was subdivided and mapped as independent continuous and isolated aquifers, based on the continuity of its component rock. Ground-water flow directions, as related to the transport of test-generated contaminants, were developed from water-level contours and are presented and discussed for each of the continuous aquifers. Contoured water-level altitudes vary across the study area and range from more than 5,000 feet in the volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,450 feet in the lower carbonate aquifer in the southern part of the study area. Variations in water-level altitudes within any single continuous aquifer range from a few hundred feet in a lower carbonate aquifer to just more than 1,100 feet in a volcanic aquifer. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly southward with minor eastward or westward deviations. Primary exceptions are westward flow in the northern part of the volcanic aquifer and eastward flow in the eastern part of the lower carbonate aquifer. Northward flow in the upper and lower carbonate aquifers in the northern part of the study area is possible but cannot be substantiated because data are lacking. Interflow between continuous aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form the regional ground-water flow system. The implications of these tributary flow paths in controlling transport away from the underground test areas at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain are discussed. The obvious data gaps contributing to uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers and development of water-level contours are identified and evaluated.

Fenelon, Joseph M.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Halford, Keith J.

2008-01-01

336

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada, (DE2009-950714).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Moun...

D. Campbell I. Kavouras J. Engelbrecht S. Campbell S. Kohl

2009-01-01

337

Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Assessment (PA) maintenance plan requires an annual review to determine if current operations and conditions at the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) remain consistent with PA and composite analysis (CA) assumptions and models. This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 2005 annual review findings for the Area 3 RWMS PA only. The PA Maintenance Plan states that no annual review or summary reporting will be carried out in years that a PA or CA revision is undertaken (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2002). Updated PA results for the Area 5 RWMS were published in an addendum to the Area 5 RWMS PA report in September 2005. A federal review of the draft addendum report took place in early FY 2006 (October November 2005). The review team found the addendum acceptable without conditions. The review team's recommendation will be presented to the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group in early 2006. The addendum was revised in January 2006 and incorporated comments from the review team (BN, 2006). Table 1 summarizes the updated Area 5 RWMS PA results presented in the addendum.

Vefa Yucel

2006-01-01

338

Comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer data for the Cuprite mining district, Esmeralda, and Nye counties, Nevada  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landsat TM images and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data were analyzed for the Cuprite mining district and compared to available geologic and alteration maps of the area. The TM data, with 30 m resolution and 6 broadbands, allowed discrimination of general mineral groups. Clay minerals, playa deposits, and unaltered rocks were mapped as discrete spectral units using the TM data, but specific minerals were not determined, and definition of the individual alteration zones was not possible. The GERIS, with 15 m spatial resolution and 63 spectral bands, permitted construction of complete spectra and identification of specific minerals. Detailed spectra extracted from the images provided the ability to identify the minerals alunite, kaolinite, hematite, and buddingtonite by their spectral characteristics. The GERIS data show a roughly concentrically zoned hydrothermal system. The mineralogy mapped with the aircraft system conforms to previous field and multispectral image mapping. However, identification of individual minerals and spatial display of the dominant mineralogy add information that can be used to help determine the morphology and genetic origin of the hydrothermal system.

Kierein-Young, Kathryn S.; Kruse, Fred A.

1989-01-01

339

Carbon Isotopes in Unsaturated-Zone Gases and Ground Water Near a Radioactive-Waste Disposal Area, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To test hypotheses about radionuclide distribution and transport, vertical profiles of 14C in carbon dioxide were determined on gas samples from a 110-m deep unsaturated zone 32, 100, and 3,000 m from a low-level radioactive-waste disposal area. A direct-scintillation-counting method for radiocarbon was developed that minimized sample handling and compared favorably with the more labor-intensive benzene-synthesis method. Values of ? 13C in pore gas were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Gross gas compositions were determined by chromatography. Gross gas compositions 100 m from the disposal area were similar to those at the 3,000-m site, i.e., relatively unperturbed, except that O2 levels at the 100-m site were slightly depleted in the 34-48 m depth interval ( ~19.5% versus ~20.8% O2 by volume). Radiocarbon levels at the 100-m site peaked at ~2,000 percent modern carbon (PMC) near land surface and decreased monotonically to <100 PMC at depths below 58 m. Gross gas composition 32 m from the disposal area displayed a well-defined CO2 peak that reached 2.0-2.5% by volume at a depth of 24 m. 14C levels showed a roughly coincident peak that reached 6x105 PMC at the 24 m depth. Elevated levels of tritium and volatile organic-carbon compounds accompanied the CO2 and 14C peaks. Corresponding ? 13CO2 values were shifted -7 to -10 permil from unperturbed values. This shift to lighter values is suggestive of fractionation during microbial production of 14CO2 from disposed waste. Core samples from the affected depths were dry and virtually devoid of microbes, with <4x103 colony forming units per gram of sediment, suggesting that the hypothesized microbial activity occurs closer to the emplacement trenches. Ground water at the 32-m site had a 14C level in dissolved inorganic carbon of 845 PMC in March 2000. Ground water from an adjacent well had a 14C level of 26 PMC in 1989 and 323 PMC in 1999. The low levels of 14C in ground water relative to those in unsaturated-zone gases suggest that radiocarbon transport is primarily by lateral gas diffusion through the unsaturated zone at this site.

Stonestrom, D. A.; Michel, R. L.; Evans, W. C.; Smith, T. R.; Smith, T. R.; Prudic, D. E.; Striegl, R. G.; Haas, H.; Brockman, F. J.; Andraski, B. J.

2001-12-01

340

Carbon Isotopes in Unsaturated-Zone Gases and Ground Water Near a Radioactive-Waste Disposal Area, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test hypotheses about radionuclide distribution and transport, vertical profiles of 14C in carbon dioxide were determined on gas samples from a 110-m deep unsaturated zone 32, 100, and 3,000 m from a low-level radioactive-waste disposal area. A direct-scintillation-counting method for radiocarbon was developed that minimized sample handling and compared favorably with the more labor-intensive benzene-synthesis method. Values of delta

D. A. Stonestrom; R. L. Michel; W. C. Evans; T. R. Smith; D. E. Prudic; R. G. Striegl; H. Haas; F. J. Brockman; B. J. Andraski

2001-01-01

341

Inversion of Gravity Data to Define the Pre-Cenozoic Surface and Regional Structures Possibly Influencing Groundwater Flow in the Rainier Mesa Region, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Rainier Mesa area and surrounding regions reveals a topographically complex pre-Cenozoic basement surface. This model of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks is intended for use in a 3D hydrogeologic model being constructed for the Rainier Mesa area. Prior to this study, our knowledge of the depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks was based on a regional model, applicable to general studies of the greater Nevada Test Site area but inappropriate for higher resolution modeling of ground-water flow across the Rainier Mesa area. The new model incorporates several changes that lead to significant improvements over the previous regional view. First, the addition of constraining wells, encountering old volcanic rocks lying above but near pre-Cenozoic basement, prevents modeled basement from being too shallow. Second, an extensive literature and well data search has led to an increased understanding of the change of rock density with depth in the vicinity of Rainier Mesa. The third, and most important change, relates to the application of several depth-density relationships in the study area instead of a single generalized relationship, thereby improving the overall model fit. In general, the pre-Cenozoic basement surface deepens in the western part of the study area, delineating collapses within the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, and shallows in the east in the Eleana Range and Yucca Flat regions, where basement crops out. In the Rainier Mesa study area, basement is generally shallow (< 1 km). The new model identifies previously unrecognized structures within the pre-Cenozoic basement that may influence ground-water flow, such as a shallow basement ridge related to an inferred fault extending northward from Rainier Mesa into Kawich Valley.

Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Mankinen, Edward A.

2006-01-01

342

Report on Televiewer LOG and Stress Measurements in Holes USW G-3 and Ue-25P1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and televiewer observations were made in drill holes USW G-3 and Ue-25p1 on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of a continuing investigation of the tectonic stress field in the vicinity of a proposed site for the disp...

J. M. Stock J. H. Healy J. Svitek L. Mastin

1986-01-01

343

Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a performance assessment (PA), composite analysis (CA), closure plan, monitoring plan, waste acceptance criteria, and a PA/CA maintenance plan. The DOE issued a DAS for the Area 5 RWMS in 2000. The Area 5 RWMS DAS was, in part, based on review of a CA as required under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.(3). A CA is a radiological assessment required for DOE waste disposed before 26 September 1988 and includes the radiological dose from all sources of radioactive material interacting with all radioactive waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The approved Area 5 RWMS CA, which includes the inventory of TRU waste in T04C, indicates that the Area 5 RWMS waste inventory and all interacting sources of radioactive material can meet the 0.3 mSv dose constraint. The composite analysis maximum annual dose for a future resident at the Area 5 RWMS was estimated to be 0.01 mSv at 1,000 years. Therefore, the inadvertent disposal of TRU in T04C is protective of the public and the environment, and compliant with all the applicable requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated 40 CFR 191 to establish standards for the planned disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high level, and transuranic wastes in geologic repositories. Although not required, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office requested a supplemental analysis to evaluate the likelihood that the inadvertent disposal of TRU waste in T04C meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The SA evaluates the likelihood of meeting the 40 CFR 191 containment requirements (CRs), assurance requirements, individual protection requirements (IPRs), and groundwater protection standards. The results of the SA indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of meeting all the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The conclusion of the SA is that the Area 5 RWMS with the TRU waste buried in T04C is in compliance with all requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. Compliance with the DAS is demonstrated by the results of the Area 5 RWMS CA. Supplemental analyses in the SA indicate there is a

Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

2008-05-01

344

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada, (DE2009-950712).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Moun...

D. Campbell J. Engelbrecht J. Kavouras S. Campbell S. Kohl

2008-01-01

345

Micrometeorological, evapotranspiration, and soil-moisture data at the Amargosa Desert Research site in Nye County near Beatty, Nevada, 2006-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes micrometeorological, evapotranspiration, and soil-moisture data collected since 2006 at the Amargosa Desert Research Site adjacent to a low-level radio-active waste and hazardous chemical waste facility near Beatty, Nevada. Micrometeorological data include precipitation, solar radiation, net radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, saturated and ambient vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, near-surface soil temperature, soil-heat flux, and soil-water content. Evapotranspiration (ET) data include latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, net radiation, soil-heat flux, soil temperature, air temperature, vapor pressure, and other principal energy-budget data. Soil-moisture data include periodic measurements of volumetric water-content at experimental sites that represent vegetated native soil, devegetated native soil, and simulated waste disposal trenches - maximum measurement depths range from 5.25 to 29.25 meters. All data are compiled in electronic spreadsheets that are included with this report.

Arthur, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Michael J.; Mayers, C. Justin; Andraski, Brian J.

2012-01-01

346

Determination of barometric efficiency and effective porosity, boreholes UE-25 cNo.1, UE-25 cNo.3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous records of water-level altitudes in boreholes UE-25 cNo.1, UE-25 cNo.2, and UE-25 cNo.3 (the C-holes) and atmospheric pressure at and near the C-holes were obtained from July 15 to September 8, 1993, to determine the barometric efficiency of the entire uncased section of each of the C-holes, for the purpose of analyzing pumping tests. Each of the C-holes is 3,000 feet deep. About 1,600 feet of each borehole is open in Miocene tuffaceous rocks. Water-level altitudes in the C-holes fluctuate in response to Earth tides and changes in atmospheric pressure, which are characteristics of wells completed in an elastic, confined aquifer. The barometric efficiency of the C-holes in this study was analyzed by filtering simultaneously collected water-level-altitude and atmospheric-pressure data to remove the influences of Earth tides and semi-diurnal heating and cooling and then regressing filtered water-level-altitude changes as a function of filtered changes in atmospheric pressure. The average barometric efficiency of the uncased sections of boreholes UE-25 cNo.1 and UE-25 cNo.3 was determined to be 0.94. Malfunctioning equipment prevented determining the barometric efficiency of bore-hole UE-25 cNo.2. An average effective porosity of 0.36 was calculated from barometric efficiency values determined in this study and a specific storage value of 0.497 x 10{sup -6} per foot that was determined previously from geophysical logs of the C-holes. A porosity of 0.36 is consistent with values determined from geophysical logs and core analyses for the Calico Hills Formation.

Geldon, A.L.; Earle, J.D.; Umari, A.M.A.

1997-12-31

347

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model

Jeff Wurtz

2009-01-01

348

Prehistoric spatial patterning and subsistence studies: Archaeological investigations at Sample Unit U19arP4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the methods and results of archaeological investigations at Sample Unit U19arP4 on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Eight sites were located there: four lithic artifact scatters (26NY1370, 26NY1372, 26NY3666 and 26NY3667), two temporary camps (26NY3665 and 26NY5418), one artifact locality (26NY5419), and one quarry (26NY3664). One of the lithic scatters, 26NY3667, incorporated a previously

W. G. Johnson; A. DuBarton; S. Edwards; H. Drollinger

1992-01-01

349

Channel Transmission Loss Studies During Ephemeral Flow Events: ER5-3 Channel and Cambric Ditch, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transmission losses along ephemeral channels are an important, yet poorly understood, aspect of rainfall-runoff prediction. Losses occur as flow infiltrates channel bed, banks, and floodplains. Estimating transmission losses in arid environments is difficult because of the variability of surficial geomorphic characteristics and infiltration capacities of soils and near-surface low-permeability geologic layers (e.g., calcrete). Transmission losses in ephemeral channels are nonlinear

J. J. Miller; S. A. Mizell; R. H. French; D. G. Meadows; M. H. Young

2005-01-01

350

Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

1997-04-01

351

Lithologic and geophysical logs of drill holes Felderhoff Federal 5-1 and 25-1, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Two wildcat oil and gas exploration holes drilled in 1991 on the northern edge of the Amargosa Desert penetrated Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary rocks, alluvium, and basalt, possible Tertiary volcanic or volcaniclastic rocks, and Tertiary (?) and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The easternmost of the two holes, Felderhoff-Federal 5-1, encountered about 200 feet of alluvium, underlain by 305 feet of basalt breccia and basalt, about 345 feet of probable Tertiary tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, and 616 feet of dense limestone and dolomite of uncertain age. Drill hole 25-1 penetrated 240 feet of alluvium and marl (?), and 250 feet of basalt breccia (?) and basalt, 270 feet of tuff (?) and/or tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, 360 feet of slide blocks (?) and large boulders of Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and 2,800 feet of Paleozoic limestone and dolomite. The two drill holes are located within a northerly trending fault zone defined largely by geophysical data; this fault zone lies along the east side of a major rift containing many small basalt eruptive centers and, farther north, several caldera complexes. Drill hole 25-1 penetrated an inverted paleozoic rock sequence; drill hole 5-1 encountered two large cavities 24-inches wide or more in dense carbonate rock of uncertain, but probable Paleozoic age. These openings may be tectonic and controlled by a regional system of northeast-striking faults.

Carr, W.J.; Grow, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Keller, S.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-10-01

352

Database of Ground-Water Levels in the Vicinity of Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1957-2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

More than 1,200 water-level measurements from 1957 to 2005 in the Rainier Mesa area of the Nevada Test Site were quality assured and analyzed. Water levels were measured from 50 discrete intervals within 18 boreholes and from 4 tunnel sites. An interpretive database was constructed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in the Rainier Mesa area. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes hydrograph narratives that describe the water-level history of each well.

Fenelon, Joseph M.

2006-01-01

354

Cluster of genes that encode positive and negative elements influencing filament length in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.  

PubMed

The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE?fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23813733

Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

2013-09-01

355

Doser fra ekstern og intern bestraaling i Norge foerste aar etter Tsjernobyl-ulykken. (Doses from external and internal radiation in Norway during the first year after the Chernobyl accident).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this article the estimation of monthly doses from external radiation from internal radiation due to ingestion of contaminated food is reported. The monthly doses is estimated for each municipality in Norway for the first 13 months after the Chernobyl a...

P. Strand G. Kjoelaas J. B. Reitan T. Strand T. Berthelsen

1990-01-01

356

Petroleumsvirksomhet i isfylte farvann - utbyggings- og driftsfase. Maalfokusering for eventuell konsekvensutredning. Arbeidsdokument fra AKU/AEAM-seminar, Stavanger 4. - 6. desember 1995. (Petroleum activity in ice covered waters - development and operation phase. Focus of eventual consequential explanation).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report from a seminar relates to the petroleum activities in the Barentshavet north. The focal point was to put on petroleum activities in ice covered waters covering the drilling and operation phase, to identify discharges from various technical sol...

J. Thomassen K. H. Andresen K. A. Moe

1996-01-01

357

Petroleumsvirksomhet i Barentshavet nord - letevirksomhet. Arbeidsdokument fra AKUP/AEAM-seminar i Trondheim 22 and 23 Feb 1995. (The Northern Barents Sea Assessment Program - Exploration Activities. Report from AKUP/AEAM seminar in Trondheim 22 and 23 Feb 1995).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An interdisciplinary working seminar was held in Trondheim, Norway, 22 and 23 Feb 1995 in order (1) to identify the relevant topics to concentrate on in an environmental impact assessment for exploration activities in the southern parts of the northern Ba...

J. Thomassen K. H. Andresen K. A. Moe

1995-01-01

358

An Investigation on 11 Products from the 54/74 Series in Plastic- or Ceramic Encapsulation . en Undersoegelse AF 11 Fabrikater Fra 54/74-Serien I Plast-Og Keramikindkapsling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The characteristics of digital integrated circuits are discussed. Through the use of a relatively simple apparatus, as well as a series of environmental exposures, the quality of small scale integration circuits is determined. It is shown that various man...

H. J. Nordby

1971-01-01

359

Foreloepig rapport fra NILU og DNMI om drivhuseffekten og klimautviklingen. (Preliminary report from the Norwegian Institute for Air Research and the Norwegian Meteorological Institute on the greenhouse effect and the climate development).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases will probably result in an effective doubling of the present CO(sub 2) concentration within year 2030. According to climate model calculations this will lead to an increase in the global mean temperature of 2 - ...

G. O. Braathen H. Dovland B. Aune

1989-01-01

360

Karakterisering og behandling af spildevand fra roeggasafsvovling ved vaadabsorptionsprocessen med efterfoelgende oxidation. (Characterization and management of waste water from desulphurization of flue gas by the wet absorption process with following oxidation).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The utilization of the wet absorption process for the desulphurization of flue gas from coal fired power plants produces calcium sulphate, and waste water containing nitrate, neutral salts and a certain amount of heavy metals. The conditions which influen...

B. Mose Pedersen G. Holm Kristensen

1990-01-01

361

Dall'italo-austrliano all'italiano: apprendmento linguistico fra gli scolari della seconda generazione (From Italian-Australian to Italian: Language Acquisition among the Students of the Second Generation).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the results of research to determine the success of the efforts currently being made in schools to teach pure Italian to the second generation of Italians in Australia in order to replace Italian Australian, a mixture of Italian dialects, Italian, and English. 33 references. (CFM)

Rubino, Antonia

1989-01-01

362

Levnedsmiddelforurening Omkring Industrielle Punktkilder 1982. 2: Arsen, Krom og Kobber i Afgroeder fra Hjoerring (Food Contamination Around Industrial Point Sources 1982. 2: Arsenic Chromium and Copper in Crops from Hjoerring, Northern Jutland, Denmark.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of the study was to monitor the level of contamination by As, Cr and Cu in soil and crops around a wood preservation plant in Hjorring, Jutland, and to evaluate whether the local population is exposed to unacceptable intakes of these elements ...

E. H. Larsen S. E. Lykke

1986-01-01

363

2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-03-30

364

2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-03-15

365

Addendum for Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Formation Access Interval and Hydrograph Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data analysis is the process of compiling, assessing, and interpreting available data in preparation for CAU groundwater flow modeling. The data needed for CAU modeling include a wide variety of types, from a wide variety of sources, and represent a wide ...

2007-01-01

366

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01

367

Lithology, fault displacement, and origin of secondary calcium carbonate and opaline silica at Trenches 14 and 14D on the Bow Ridge Fault at Exile Hill, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, a proposed site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository, is located in southern Nevada, 20 km east of Beatty, and adjacent to the southwest comer of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (fig. 1). Yucca Mountain is located within the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The climate is semiarid, and the flora is transitional between that of the Mojave Desert to the south and the Great Basin Desert to the north. As part of the evaluation, hydrologic conditions, especially water levels, of Yucca Mountain and vicinity during the Quaternary, and especially the past 20,000 years, are being characterized. In 1982, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (under interagency agreement DE-A104-78ET44802), excavated twenty-six bulldozer and backhoe trenches in the Yucca Mountain region to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting (Swadley and others, 1984). The trenches were oriented perpendicular to traces of suspected Quaternary faults and across projections of known bedrock faults into Quaternary deposits. Trench 14 exposes the Bow Ridge Fault on the west side of Exile Hill. Although the original purpose of the excavation of trench 14 was to evaluate the nature and frequency of Quaternary faulting on the Bow Ridge Fault, concern arose as to whether or not the nearly vertical calcium carbonate (the term ``carbonate`` in this study refers to calcium carbonate) and opaline silica veins in the fault zone were deposited by ascending waters (ground water). These veins resemble in gross morphology veins commonly formed by hydrothermal processes.

Taylor, E.M.; Huckins, H.E.

1995-02-01

368

Phase I Flow and Transport Model Document for Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1 with ROTC 1  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, in the northeast part of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) requires environmental corrective action activities to assess contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing. These activities are necessary to comply with the UGTA corrective action strategy (referred to as the UGTA strategy). The corrective action investigation phase of the UGTA strategy requires the development of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models whose purpose is to identify the lateral and vertical extent of contaminant migration over the next 1,000 years. In particular, the goal is to calculate the contaminant boundary, which is defined as a probabilistic model-forecast perimeter and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary that delineate the possible extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing. Because of structural uncertainty in the contaminant boundary, a range of potential contaminant boundaries was forecast, resulting in an ensemble of contaminant boundaries. The contaminant boundary extent is determined by the volume of groundwater that has at least a 5 percent chance of exceeding the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (CFR, 2012).

Andrews, Robert

2013-09-01

369

2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-03-20

370

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.

John McCord

2006-06-01

371

Results and interpretation of preliminary aquifer tests in boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Pumping and injection tests conducted in 1983 and 1984 in boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3 (the c-holes) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were analyzed with respect to information obtained from lithologic and borehole geophysical logs, core permeameter tests, and borehole flow surveys. The three closely spaced c-holes, each of which is about 3,000 feet deep, are completed mainly in nonwelded to densely welded, ash-flow tuff of the tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills and the Crater Flat Tuff of Miocene age. Below the water table, tectonic and cooling fractures pervade the tuffaceous rocks but are distributed mainly in 11 transmissive intervals, many of which also have matrix permeability. Information contained in this report is presented as part of ongoing investigations by the US Geological Survey (USGS) regarding the hydrologic and geologic suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in an underground mined geologic repository. This investigation was conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-78ET44802, as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

Geldon, A.L.

1996-07-01

372

Alternative Evaluation Study: Methods to Mitigate/Accommodate Subsidence for the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada, with Special Focus on Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl  

SciTech Connect

An Alternative Evaluation Study is a type of systematic approach to problem identification and solution. An Alternative Evaluation Study was convened August 12-15, 1997, for the purpose of making recommendations concerning closure of Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl and other disposal cells and mitigation/accommodation of waste subsidence at the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. This report includes results of the Alternative Evaluation Study and specific recommendations.

Barker, L.

1997-09-01

373

Statistical test of reproducibility and operator variance in thin-section modal analysis of textures and phenocrysts in the Topopah Spring member, drill hole USW VH-2, Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A thin-section operator-variance test was given to the 2 junior authors, petrographers, by the senior author, a statistician, using 16 thin sections cut from core plugs drilled by the US Geological Survey from drill hole USW VH-2 standard (HCQ) drill core. The thin sections are samples of Topopah Spring devitrified rhyolite tuff from four textural zones, in ascending order: (1) lower nonlithophysal, (2) lower lithopysal, (3) middle nonlithophysal, and (4) upper lithophysal. Drill hole USW-VH-2 is near the center of the Crater Flat, about 6 miles WSW of the Yucca Mountain in Exploration Block. The original thin-section labels were opaqued out with removable enamel and renumbered with alpha-numeric labels. The sliders were then given to the petrographer operators for quantitative thin-section modal (point-count) analysis of cryptocrystalline, spherulitic, granophyric, and void textures, as well as phenocryst minerals. Between operator variance was tested by giving the two petrographers the same slide, and within-operator variance was tested by the same operator the same slide to count in a second test set, administered at least three months after the first set. Both operators were unaware that they were receiving the same slide to recount. 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Moore, L.M.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Broxton, D.E.

1989-06-01

374

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater benea...

J. McCord G. Ruskauff J. Pickens N. Bryant K. Brooks

2006-01-01

375

Kolebatel'nye spektry (XeF(sub 5))(sup +)-kationa v tverdoj faze i rastvore bezvodnogo ftoristogo vodoroda. (Vibrational spectra of (XeF(sub 5))(sup +)-cation in solids and in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride solution).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The vibrational spectra of (XeF(sub 5))(sup +) cation in solid state and in nonaqueous HF solutions have been studied. The assignment of the observable vibrational bands and the estimations of force constants have been fulfiled. The existence of a number ...

S. Nabiev

1994-01-01

376

Inversion of gravity data to define the pre-Tertiary surface and regional structures possibly influencing ground-water flow in the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Region, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-dimensional inversion of gravity data from the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley region reveals a topographically complex pre-Tertiary basement surface. Beneath Pahute Mesa, the thickness of the Tertiary volcanic deposits may exceed 5 km within the Silent Canyon caldera complex. South of Pahute Mesa in Oasis Valley, basement is shallower (< 1 km) but between this valley and the Timber Mountain caldera complex is a basin that probably represents, in part, a moat related to the Timber Mountain caldera complex. Of particular interest is a NE-trending lineament, named here the Thirsty Canyon lineament (TCL), separating terranes at significantly different elevations. Southeast of the TCL, a highly undulating basement surface descends deeply into several calderas, whereas NW of the TCL basement is relatively flat and shallow. Because as many as four calderas seem to abruptly terminate at the TCL, the TCL may reflect a major buried fault zone, which influenced caldera growth. This inferred Thirsty Canyon fault zone and several EW basement ridges in the derived 3-dimensional basin thickness model may influence the flow of ground water from the Pahute Mesa region to Oasis Valley.

Hildenbrand, T. G.; Langenheim, V. E.; Mankinen, E. A.; McKee, E. H.

1999-01-01

377

Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Special Analysis (SA) is to determine if the Oak Ridge (OR) Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) uranium-233 (233U) waste stream (DRTK000000050, Revision 0) is acceptable for shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The CEUSP 233U waste stream requires a special analysis because the concentrations of thorium-229 (229Th), 230Th, 232U, 233U, and 234U exceeded their NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria action levels. The acceptability of the waste stream is evaluated by determining if performance assessment (PA) modeling provides a reasonable expectation that SLB disposal is protective of human health and the environment. The CEUSP 233U waste stream is a long-lived waste with unique radiological hazards. The SA evaluates the long-term acceptability of the CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal as a two tier process. The first tier, which is the usual SA process, uses the approved probabilistic PA model to determine if there is a reasonable expectation that disposal of the CEUSP 233U waste stream can meet the performance objectives of U.S. Department of Energy Manual DOE M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” for a period of 1,000 years (y) after closure. The second tier addresses the acceptability of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream for near-surface disposal by evaluating long-term site stability and security, by performing extended (i.e., 10,000 and 60,000 y) modeling analyses, and by evaluating the effect of containers and the depth of burial on performance. Tier I results indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of compliance with all performance objectives if the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is disposed in the Area 5 RWMS SLB disposal units. The maximum mean and 95th percentile PA results are all less than the performance objective for 1,000 y. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is a high likelihood of compliance with all performance objectives. Tier II results indicate that the long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is protective of human health and the environment. The Area 5 RWMS is located in one of the least populated and most arid regions of the U.S. Site characterization data indicate that infiltration of precipitation below the plant root zone at 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) ceased 10,000 to 15,000 y ago. The site is not expected to have a groundwater pathway as long as the current arid climate persists. The national security mission of the NNSS and the location of the Area 5 RWMS within the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit require that access controls and land use restrictions be maintained indefinitely. PA modeling results for 10,000 to 60,000 y also indicate that the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream is acceptable for near-surface disposal. The mean resident air pathway annual total effective dose (TED), the resident all-pathways annual TED, and the acute drilling TED are less than their performance objectives for 10,000 y after closure. The mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density exceeds the performance objective at 4,200 y, but this is due to waste already disposed at the Area 5 RWMS and is only slightly affected by disposal of the CEUSP 233U. The peak resident all-pathways annual TED from CEUSP key radionuclides occurs at 48,000 y and is less than the 0.25 millisievert performance objective. Disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in a typical SLB trench slightly increases PA results. Increasing the depth was found to eliminate any impacts of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream. Containers could not be shown to have any significant impact on performance due to the long half-life of the waste stream and a lack of data for pitting corrosion rates of stainless steel in soil. The results of the SA indicate that all performance objectives can be met with disposal of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream in the SLB units at the Area 5 RWMS. The long-term performance of the OR CEUSP 233U waste stream disposed in the near surface is protective of human health

NSTec Environmental Management

2013-01-31

378

2012 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs), with the results submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE 1999a, 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2012. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2012 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2012 include the following: ? Release of a special analysis for the Area 3 RWMS assessing the continuing validity of the PA and CA ? Development of a new Area 5 RWMS closure inventory estimate based on disposals through FY 2012 ? Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis ? Development of version 4.114 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. The FY 2012 review of operations, facility design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D results for the Area 3 RWMS indicates no changes that would impact PA validity. A special analysis using the Area 3 RWMS v2.102 GoldSim PA model was prepared to update the PA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2012. The special analysis concludes that all performance objectives can be met and the Area 3 RWMS PA remains valid. There is no need to the revise the Area 3 RWMS PA. Review of Area 5 RWMS operations, design, closure plans, monitoring results, and R&D activities indicates no significant changes other than an increase in the inventory disposed. The FY 2012 PA results, generated with the Area 5 RWMS v4.114 GoldSim PA model, indicate that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of meeting all performance objectives. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. A review of changes potentially impacting the CAs indicates that no significant changes occurred in FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the Underground Test Area source term (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 97), is scheduled for FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU 97 Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan in FY 2016. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat CAU 98 results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the CAU 98 closure report in FY 2015. Near-term R&D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA/CA and inventory models.

Shott, G. [National Security Technologies, LLC

2013-03-18

379

Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-06-01

380

Sistematika i analiz svojstv yader nechetnykh izotopov itterbiya s A = 163-173. Vrashchatel'nye sostoyaniya. (Systematics and analysis of properties of ytterbium odd nuclei with A = 163-173. Rotational states).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The energies and structure of rotational states in odd ytterbium nuclei with A = 163-173 mass number are calculated in the framework of nonadiabatic rotational model and a modified rotational model taking into account the recoil term and quasiparticle-pho...

I. Adam K. Badalov J. Wawryszcruk W. Wagner K. Gromov

1988-01-01

381

Phase I Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada with Errata Sheet 1, 2, 3, Revision 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

As prescribed in the Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE\\/NV, 1999) and Appendix VI of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008), the ultimate goal of transport analysis is to develop stochastic predictions of a contaminant boundary at a specified level of uncertainty. However, because of the significant uncertainty of the model

Greg Ruskauff

2009-01-01

382

Summary of hydraulic data and abridged lithologic log of ground-water test well 6(J-13) Jackass Flats, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Technical letter NTS-50  

Microsoft Academic Search

This technical letter summarizes the results of drilling groundwater test well 6 and presents an abridged lithologic log, well construction information, and results of hydraulic tests made in the well. Test well 6 (designated well J-13 by NASA) is one of several wells drilled in support of the Long Range Program of the US Geological Survey to study the geology

A. C. Doyle; G. L. Meyer

1963-01-01

387

49 CFR 236.1023 - Errors and malfunctions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...vendor or supplier and FRA of the failure, malfunction, or defective condition that decreased or eliminated the safety functionality; (2) Keep the applicable vendor or supplier and FRA apprised on a continual basis of the status of any and all...

2013-10-01

388

75 FR 68861 - Miscellaneous Amendments to the Federal Railroad Administration's Accident/Incident Reporting...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...fatality data. This new data may help FRA, organizations promoting safety on and around railroad property, and suicide prevention agencies assess the problem and develop programs to decrease the incidence of suicides by train. FRA notes...

2010-11-09

389

77 FR 12407 - Statement of Agency Policy and Interpretation on the Hours of Service Laws as Amended; Response...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...4), FRA notes that an employee working for multiple railroads may nonetheless be subject to an excessive risk of human factors accidents caused by fatigue. Further, FRA does have the authority to pursue individual liability enforcement...

2012-02-29

390

78 FR 36738 - Signal System Reporting Requirements  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRA-2012-0104, Notice No. 1] RIN 2130-AC44 Signal System Reporting Requirements AGENCY...that each carrier must file with FRA a signal system status report every five years...updated information regarding railroad signal systems to be available to FRA...

2013-06-19

391

Aberrant Neural Function during Emotion Attribution in Female Subjects with Fragile X Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The neurobiological systems which underlie emotion attribution among female patients with Fragile X (FraX) syndrome are examined. Results show that the emotion circuit which regulates responses to facial stimuli is potentially disrupted among female subjects with FraX syndrome. Anterior cingulate cortex activity in female subjects with FraX…

Hagan, Cindy C.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Mackey, Allyson; Mobbs, Dean; Reiss, Allan L.

2008-01-01

392

49 CFR 225.21 - Forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and occupational illnesses that occurred during the preceding month. (d) Form FRA 6180.56âAnnual Railroad Report of Manhours by State. Form FRA 6180.56 shall be submitted as part of the monthly Railroad Injury and Illness Summary (Form FRA...

2010-10-01

393

Free ferulic acid uptake in lactating cows.  

PubMed

Ferulic acid (FRA), a phenolic compound with antioxidant and anticancer activities, naturally occurs in plants as a lignin precursor. Many veins of research have been devoted to releasing FRA from the lignin complex to improve digestibility of ruminant feeds. Thus, the objective of this research was to investigate the transfer of a given dosage of the free form of FRA into the milk of dairy cattle. Six mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows at the Cornell Research Farm (Harford, NY) were given 14-d adaptation to diet and stall position. Ad libitum access to a total mixed ration based on haylage and maize silage (31.1% neutral detergent fiber containing 5.52 mg of FRA/g) was provided during the study. A crossover design was implemented so that each cow alternated weekly between FRA-dosed and control. On d 1, jugular cannulas and urine catheters were placed in all cows. On d 2, FRA-dosed cows received a single dosage of 150 g of pure FRA powder at 0830 h via their fistula (n=4) or a balling gun for nonfistulated cows (n=2). Plasma, urine, feces, feed, orts, milk, and rumen fluid were sampled intensively for the next 36 h and analyzed for FRA concentration. On d 8, the cows crossed over and the experiment was repeated. When compared with the control, FRA administration did not have an effect on dry matter intake, milk yield, milk fat yield, milk protein yield, somatic cell count, or neutral detergent fiber content of orts and feces. The concentration of FRA in the feces did not change as a result of FRA dosage. As expected, FRA concentration increased dramatically upon FRA dosage and decreased over time until returning to basal levels in rumen fluid (4 h after dosage), plasma (5.5 h after dosage), urine (10 h after dosage), and milk (14 h after dosage). Baseline values for FRA in urine and rumen fluid were variable among cows and had an effect on FRA concentration in FRA-dosed cows. From this study, it is observed that orally ingested FRA can be transported into the milk and that the physiological transfer of FRA occurs from rumen to milk within 6.5 h or the first milking after dosage. Ferulic acid may affect the functionality of milk due to its antioxidant, anticancer, and antibacterial activities. Future research will be required to elucidate whether FRA in milk is bioavailable and bioactive, and to evaluate the complete sensory and microbiological effects of increased FRA and FRA degradation products in milk. PMID:22921626

Soberon, M A; Cherney, J H; Liu, R H; Ross, D A; Cherney, D J R

2012-11-01

394

Nyelabs.com  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Nyelabs.com is the web site of Bill Nye, the Science Guy. The site includes many science-related resources, including "Home Demos" (hands-on activities that students can try at home or in the classroom), "Questions of the Week" (an ask-the-expert feature), and "E-cards" (science-themed electronic greeting cards). There are also news features, guides to episodes of the television program "Bill Nye the Science Guy" that was originally broadcast on PBS, and biographical information on Mr. Nye.

Nye, Bill

395

Correction of fructosamine value for serum albumin and globulin concentrations.  

PubMed

Using the data of 131 patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), the correction formulas of fructosamine value ([FRA]) were devised to standardize the uncorrected [FRA] to serum albumin concentrations ([ALB]) of 4 g/dl, globulin concentrations ([GLB]) of 3 g/dl, and total protein concentrations ([TP]) of 7 g/dl. The following formula was derived for its maximum correlation coefficient (r) between corrected [FRA] ([FRAc]) and fasting blood glucose concentration ([G]); [FRAc] = [FRA]x33.3/(7.6 [ALB]+[GLB]). In these 131 diabetic patients, r between uncorrected [FRA] and [G] at 2 weeks ago was 0.562. When corrected by [FRA]x33.3/(7.6 [ALB]+[GLB]), [FRA]x4/[ALB], [FRA]+30 (4-[ALB]), [FRA]+23 (4-[ALB]), [FRA]+30 (7-[TP]), [FRA]x7/[TP], and [FRA]x3/[GLB], r was, respectively, 0.616, 0.612, 0.595, 0.589, 0.582, 0.581 and 0.478. In 24 patients with NIDDM whose [ALB] is either above 4.5 g/dl or below 3.5 g/dl, r between uncorrected [FRA] and [G] was as low as 0.389 without positive correlation. By using our correction formulas of [FRA]x33.3/(7.6 [ALB]+[GLB]) or [FRA] x 4/[ALB], r was statistically increased, respectively, to 0.769 or 0.788 (P less than 0.05 in both cases) in contrast to no significant increase of r by other formulas being at 0.598, 0.556, 0.540, 0.562 and 0.121. Based on these analyses, it is concluded that our correction formula of [FRA] by [FRAc]=[FRA]x33.3/(7.6 [ALB]+[GLB]) accurately reflects [G] in NIDDM even with hypo- or hyper-albuminemia, and [FRAc]=[FRA]x4/[ALB] is useful for practical application for its simplicity. PMID:1773712

Kunika, K; Itakura, M; Yamashita, K

1991-08-01

396

Substrate cleavage profiling suggests a distinct function of Bacteroides fragilis metalloproteinases (fragilysin and metalloproteinase II) at the microbiome-inflammation-cancer interface.  

PubMed

Enterotoxigenic anaerobic Bacteroides fragilis is a significant source of inflammatory diarrheal disease and a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Two distinct metalloproteinase types (the homologous 1, 2, and 3 isoforms of fragilysin (FRA1, FRA2, and FRA3, respectively) and metalloproteinase II (MPII)) are encoded by the B. fragilis pathogenicity island. FRA was demonstrated to be important to pathogenesis, whereas MPII, also a potential virulence protein, remained completely uncharacterized. Here, we, for the first time, extensively characterized MPII in comparison with FRA3, a representative of the FRA isoforms. We employed a series of multiplexed peptide cleavage assays to determine substrate specificity and proteolytic characteristics of MPII and FRA. These results enabled implementation of an efficient assay of MPII activity using a fluorescence-quenched peptide and contributed to structural evidence for the distinct substrate cleavage preferences of MPII and FRA. Our data imply that MPII specificity mimics the dibasic Arg?Arg cleavage motif of furin-like proprotein convertases, whereas the cleavage motif of FRA (Pro-X-X-Leu-(Arg/Ala/Leu)?) resembles that of human matrix metalloproteinases. To the best of our knowledge, MPII is the first zinc metalloproteinase with the dibasic cleavage preferences, suggesting a high level of versatility of metalloproteinase proteolysis. Based on these data, we now suggest that the combined (rather than individual) activity of MPII and FRA is required for the overall B. fragilis virulence in vivo. PMID:24145028

Shiryaev, Sergey A; Remacle, Albert G; Chernov, Andrei V; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Muranaka, Norihito; Dambacher, Corey M; Capek, Petr; Kukreja, Muskan; Kozlov, Igor A; Perucho, Manuel; Cieplak, Piotr; Strongin, Alex Y

2013-11-29

397

Arabidopsis Fragile Fiber8, Which Encodes a Putative Glucuronyltransferase, Is Essential for Normal Secondary Wall Synthesis  

PubMed Central

Secondary walls in vessels and fibers of dicotyledonous plants are mainly composed of cellulose, xylan, and lignin. Although genes involved in biosynthesis of cellulose and lignin have been intensively studied, little is known about genes participating in xylan synthesis. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana fragile fiber8 (fra8) is defective in xylan synthesis. The fra8 mutation caused a dramatic reduction in fiber wall thickness and a decrease in stem strength. FRA8 was found to encode a member of glycosyltransferase family 47 and exhibits high sequence similarity to tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia) pectin glucuronyltransferase. FRA8 is expressed specifically in developing vessels and fiber cells, and FRA8 is targeted to Golgi. Comparative analyses of cell wall polysaccharide fractions from fra8 and wild-type stems showed that the xylan and cellulose contents are drastically reduced in fra8, whereas xyloglucan and pectin are elevated. Further structural analysis of cell walls revealed that although wild-type xylans contain both glucuronic acid and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid residues, xylans from fra8 retain only 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, indicating that the fra8 mutation results in a specific defect in the addition of glucuronic acid residues onto xylans. These findings suggest that FRA8 is a glucuronyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of glucuronoxylan during secondary wall formation.

Zhong, Ruiqin; Pena, Maria J.; Zhou, Gong-Ke; Nairn, C. Joseph; Wood-Jones, Alicia; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Morrison, W. Herbert; Darvill, Alan G.; York, William S.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

2005-01-01

398

78. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTO SHOWING ORIGINAL BULLFROG MINE (LEFT BACKGROUND) ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

78. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTO SHOWING ORIGINAL BULLFROG MINE (LEFT BACKGROUND) AND BULLFROG WEST EXTENSION MINE (RIGHT FOREGROUND). From Rhyolite, Nevada Herald (22 March 1907) - Bullfrog Mine, Rhyolite, Nye County, NV

399

75 FR 54145 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Dunes Solar Energy Project, a 7,680-Acre Right-of-Way (ROW) on Public Lands to Construct a Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plant Facility, Nye County, NV, Comment Period Ends: 10/18/2010, Contact: Timothy Coward...

2010-09-03

400

26. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF ROOM 148, A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

26. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF ROOM 148, A POST-MORTEM CELL IN THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

401

29. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF ROOM 144, A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF ROOM 144, A POST-MORTEM CELL IN THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

402

1. View of rmad from jr. hot cell, facing north ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of r-mad from jr. hot cell, facing north - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

403

32. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A HONEYWELL WALL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

32. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A HONEYWELL WALL PRESSURE GAUGE IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

404

View of EPA Farm metal weather tower, facing east, showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm metal weather tower, facing east, showing thirty-acre irrigated field - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Weather Tower, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

405

13. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF EQUIPMENT IN ROOM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF EQUIPMENT IN ROOM 2, RADIATION EFFECTS ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell A Facility, Test Cell A Building & Addition, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road F, Mercury, Nye County, NV

406

View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is in background - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Storage Shed, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

407

Closeup view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close-up view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

408

View of EPA Farm quonset huts, facing southsouthwest Nevada ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm quonset huts, facing south-southwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Quonset Hut Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

409

View of EPA Farm cattle shelter (featuring horse trailer), facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm cattle shelter (featuring horse trailer), facing northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

410

1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506, facing south ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06, facing south - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

411

2. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing milliongallon reservoir, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing million-gallon reservoir, facing east-southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

412

5. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing holding pens, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing holding pens, facing west-southwest. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

413

View of EPA Farm Sioux silo, facing east. Radsafe trailer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm Sioux silo, facing east. Rad-safe trailer is to the left - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Silo Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

414

View of EPA Farm power substation, facing westsouthwest Nevada ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm power substation, facing west-southwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Power Substation, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

415

6. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 milking ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 milking area, facing northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

416

6. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing cattle shelter, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing cattle shelter, facing southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

417

4. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing radwaste tank, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing rad-waste tank, facing south-southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

418

View of EPA Farm cattle shelters (Building 1506 in background), ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm cattle shelters (Building 15-06 in background), facing southeast - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

419

7. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 milk ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 milk room, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

420

75 FR 68824 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease; Nevada  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Terminated Oil and Gas Lease; Nevada AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...competitive oil and gas lease NVN- 74793 for land in Nye County, Nevada...has not issued a valid lease affecting the lands to any other interest...

2010-11-09

421

74 FR 33458 - Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Solar Millennium...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Millennium, LLC, Amargosa Farm Road Solar Energy Project, Nye County, NV AGENCY...EIS) for the Amargosa Farm Road Solar Energy Project, located on public lands...sun's path throughout the day. The solar energy would heat a transfer fluid...

2009-07-13

422

74 FR 47820 - Notice of Reopening of Public Comment Period To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Solar Millennium, LLC, Amargosa Farm Road Solar Energy Project, Nye County, Nevada AGENCY: Bureau...Solar Millennium, LLC, Amargosa Farm Road Solar Energy Project. A notice published in the...

2009-09-17

423

40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Douglas Elko Esmeralda Eureka Humboldt Lander Lincoln Lyon Mineral Nye Pershing Storey Washoe White Pine State of New Mexico Bernalillo Catron Colfax Curry De Baca Grant Guadalupe Harding Hidalgo Lincoln...

2013-07-01

424

75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA...Wisconsin Route 213 and Nye School Road northwest of Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and...

2010-05-07

425

30. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A SECOND CONTROL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A SECOND CONTROL PANEL IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

426

33. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF A VIEWING WINDOW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

33. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF A VIEWING WINDOW IN ROOM 108, THE OPERATIONS AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

427

20. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE SOUTH OFFICE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE SOUTH OFFICE SPACE AT THE WEST END OF ROOM 101. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

428