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1

Nye unders0kelser og nye tolkninger av det danske eikekistematerialet fra bronsealderen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kyvik, G. 2004. Nye undersökelser og nye tolkninger av det danske eikekiste­ materialet fra bronsealderen. (New investigations and interpretations of the Danish Bronze Age oak log coffins.) Fornvännen gg. Stockholm. Some of Denmark's Bronze Age barrows with oak log cjiffins have remarkable conditions for preservation and have been the subject of much research. A thin iron pan encapsulating the cores

Av Gro Kyvik

2

76 FR 41451 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Forest Service White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY...SUMMARY: The White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee will meet...review and recommend funding allocation for any additional projects...expenses, Recommend funding allocation for proposed projects,...

2011-07-14

3

77 FR 45331 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Forest Service White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY...SUMMARY: The White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee will meet...review and recommend funding allocation for proposed projects. DATES...expenses, Recommend funding allocation for proposed projects,...

2012-07-31

4

78 FR 52498 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...AGRICULTURE Forest Service White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service...SUMMARY: The White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet...2) Review and recommend funding allocations for proposed projects; and (3)...

2013-08-23

5

76 FR 41859 - Waiver Petition Docket Numbers FRA-2011-0002, CSX Transportation Railroad, and FRA-2004-17565...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Waiver Petition Docket Numbers FRA-2011-0002, CSX Transportation Railroad, and FRA-2004-17565, Union Pacific Railroad; Public Hearing On February 23,...

2011-07-15

6

The transcriptional response to hypoxic insult controlled by FRA-2.  

PubMed

FRA-2 is involved in cellular differentiation and is also upregulated in response to ischemic injury to the brain. To shed light on the function of this transcription factor, a novel microarray analysis was utilized to identify FRA-2-dependent gene expression increased in the hypoxic response. Genes were identified that were upregulated by exposure of neuronally differentiated PC12 cells to hypoxia. Using a dominant negative construct to block FRA-2, a second subset of genes that were FRA-2 dependent was found. Cross comparison then allowed isolation of a list of genes that were induced in response to hypoxia in a FRA-2-dependent manner. These data suggest that FRA-2 is involved in the transcriptional control of neuroprotective genes and in the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. PMID:15892448

Butler, Tanya L; Pennypacker, Keith R

2005-01-01

7

Topographic maps of Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of 6 topographic maps of Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada. These maps are preliminary and have not been reviewed for conformity with US Geological Survey editorial standards and stratigraphic nomenclature. (AT)

Wu, S.S.C. (comp.)

1985-12-31

8

75 FR 59322 - Notice of Availability of Answers to Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Buy America & FRA's...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Buy America & FRA's High-Speed Intercity Passenger...Frequently Asked Questions regarding Buy America and FRA's High Speed Intercity [[Page...DATES: Written comments on FRA's Buy America Answers to Frequently Asked...

2010-09-27

9

75 FR 34213 - Solicitation of Applications and Notice of Funding Availability for the FRA Railroad System...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Solicitation of Applications...of Funding Availability for the FRA Railroad System Issues Research and Development Program AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA),...

2010-06-16

10

76 FR 25298 - White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Service White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY...The White Pine-Nye County Resource Advisory Committee will meet...review and recommend funding allocation for proposed projects. DATES...expenses, Recommend funding allocation for proposed projects,...

2011-05-04

11

Experimental Investigation on FRA Diagnosis of Transformer Faults  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need for economical, reliable and effective delivery of electric power leads to the search for new, efficient and effective methods for diagnosing the high voltage equipments in the industries all over the world. As the average usage period of transformers increases, the necessity to know the internal condition of transformers is increasing. It is therefore critically important to establish monitoring and diagnostic techniques that can perform transformer condition assessment. Frequency response analysis, generally known as FRA, is one of the technologies to diagnose transformers. Using case studies, this paper presents the effectiveness of FRA as measurements for detecting transformer faults. This paper introduces the fact that FRA waveforms have useful information about diagnosis of fault on winding shield and core earths, and that the condition outside transformers can affect frequency response characteristics. The FRA measurement results are further investigated through a simulation study using a computer model.

Sano, Takahiro; Miyagi, Katsunori

12

[Screening of the candidate proteins interacting with TaFRA].  

PubMed

F-box protein is an important subunit of SCF complex, an E3 ligase in ubiquitin system, and its function is determined through mediating the specific recognition and combining with substrate protein. TaFRA (F-box protein related to abiotic stress) was identified by RACE based on the fragments diferently expressing in wheat seedling exposed to salt stress and encodes an F-box protein. In this study, pBD-TaFRA bait expression vector was constructed, and cDNA+pGAD+pBD was directly co-transformed into yeast hybrid system to screen condidate proteins interacting with TaFRA. Fourty-four candidate proteins were obtained, in which 32 were known proteins and transcript factors related to stress tolerance such as thioredoxin, metallothinein, ATP synthase, and serine/threonine protein kinase etc. This indicates that TaFRA participates in stress response through regulating above condidate genes, which will provide basis for revealing the mechanism of TaFRA reaction to abiotic stress. PMID:21377964

Wen, Xiao-Jie; Hao, Chen-Yang; Pu, Wen; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Xue-Yong

2011-01-01

13

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...meet with FRA regional specialists on a regular basis to discuss new regulations, persistent safety concerns, emerging technology, and compliance issues. Also, FRA regional offices hold periodic conferences, in which specific blocks of...

2009-10-01

14

49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate. 219.602 Section 219.602 ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.602 FRA...

2011-10-01

15

Solution structure of the strawberry allergen Fra a 1.  

PubMed

The PR10 family protein Fra a 1E from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) is down-regulated in white strawberry mutants, and transient RNAi (RNA interference)-mediated silencing experiments confirmed that Fra a 1 is involved in fruit pigment synthesis. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of Fra a 1E. The protein fold is identical with that of other members of the PR10 protein family and consists of a seven-stranded antiparallel ?-sheet, two short V-shaped ?-helices and a long C-terminal ?-helix that encompass a hydrophobic pocket. Whereas Fra a 1E contains the glycine-rich loop that is highly conserved throughout the protein family, the volume of the hydrophobic pocket and the size of its entrance are much larger than expected. The three-dimensional structure may shed some light on its physiological function and may help to further understand the role of PR10 proteins in plants. PMID:22913709

Seutter von Loetzen, Christian; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwab, Wilfried; Rösch, Paul; Hartl-Spiegelhauer, Olivia

2012-12-01

16

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 241 - Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...The mailing address of the Regional Headquarters is: 300 West Adams Street, Rm 310, Chicago, Illinois 60606. The fax number...E-mail address of the Regional Administrator for Region 5 is: John.Megary@fra.dot.gov. (6) Region 6...

2011-10-01

17

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 241 - Geographical Boundaries of FRA's Regions and Addresses of FRA's Regional Headquarters  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...The mailing address of the Regional Headquarters is: 300 West Adams Street, Rm 310, Chicago, Illinois 60606. The fax number...E-mail address of the Regional Administrator for Region 5 is: John.Megary@fra.dot.gov. (6) Region 6...

2012-10-01

18

Fra-1/AP-1 Transcription Factor Negatively Regulates Pulmonary Fibrosis In Vivo  

PubMed Central

The Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor plays a key role in tumor epithelial cell progression; however, its role in pathogenic lung fibrosis remains unclear. In the present study, using a genetic approach (Fra-1 deficient mice), we have demonstrated a novel regulatory (protective) role for Fra-1 in lung fibrosis. We found greater levels of progressive interstitial fibrosis, characterized by increased levels of inflammation, collagen accumulation, and profibrotic and fibrotic gene expression in the lungs of Fra-1?/? mice than in those of Fra-1+/+ mice following bleomycin treatment. Fra-1 knockdown in human lung epithelial cells caused the upregulation of mesenchymal marker N-cadherin, concomitant with a downregulation of the epithelial phenotype marker E-cadherin, under basal conditions and in response to bleomycin and TGF-?1. Furthermore, Fra-1 knockdown caused an enhanced expression of type 1 collagen and the downregulation of collagenase (MMP-1 and MMP-13) gene expression in human lung epithelial cells. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that Fra-1 mediates anti-fibrotic effects in the lung through the modulation of proinflammatory, profibrotic and fibrotic gene expression, and suggests that the Fra-1 transcription factor may be a potential target for pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive disorder with poor prognosis and treatment.

Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Vaz, Michelle; Reddy, Sekhar P.

2012-01-01

19

DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: WATER-LEVEL DATA FROM THE NYE COUNTY EARLY WARNING DRILLING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate unqualified, water-level data gathered under the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and to determine whether the status of the data should be changed to ''qualified'' data in accordance with AP-SIII.2Q (Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data). The corroboration method (as defined in Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q) was implemented to qualify water-level data from Nye County measurements obtained directly from the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Program Office (NWRPO). Comparison of United States Geological Survey (USGS) measurements contained in DTN GS990608312312.003 with the Nye County water-level data has shown that the differences in water-level altitudes for the same wells are significantly less than 1 meter. This is an acceptable finding. Evaluation and recommendation criteria have been strictly applied to qualify Nye County measurements of water levels in selected wells measured by the USGS. However, the process of qualifying measured results by corroboration also builds confidence that the Nye County method for measurement of water levels is adequate for the intended use of the data (which is regional modeling). Therefore, it is reasonable to extend the term of ''qualified'' to water-level measurements in the remaining Nye County Phase I wells on the basis that the method has been shown to produce adequate results for the intended purpose of supporting large-scale modeling activities for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The Data Qualification Team recommends the Nye County, water-level data contained in Appendix D of this report be designated as ''qualified''. These data document manual measurements of water-levels in eight (8) EWDP Phase I drillholes that were obtained prior to the field installation of continuous monitoring equipment.

F. H. Dove, P. Sanchez, and L. Saraka

2000-04-21

20

49 CFR Appendix A to Part 229 - Form FRA 6180-49A  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Form FRA 6180-49A...21118, Mar. 31, 1980, as part of the original document, is not carried in the CFR. Copies of Form FRA F6180-49A are available by contacting the Federal...

2012-10-01

21

49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Post-Accident Toxicological Testing § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results....

2011-10-01

22

49 CFR 219.206 - FRA access to breath test results.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false FRA access to breath test results. 219.206...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Post-Accident Toxicological Testing § 219.206 FRA access to breath test results....

2012-10-01

23

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code C Appendix C to...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 215, App. C Appendix C to Part 215âFRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code The...

2009-10-01

24

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code C Appendix C to...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Pt. 215, App. C Appendix C to Part 215âFRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code The...

2010-10-01

25

49 CFR 228.407 - Analysis of work schedules; submissions; FRA review and approval of submissions; fatigue...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Analysis of work schedules; submissions; FRA review and approval of submissions; fatigue mitigation plans. 228.407...228.407 Analysis of work schedules; submissions; FRA review and approval of...

2012-10-01

26

Identification of a pharmacologically tractable Fra-1/ADORA2B axis promoting breast cancer metastasis  

PubMed Central

Metastasis confronts clinicians with two major challenges: estimating the patient's risk of metastasis and identifying therapeutic targets. Because they are key signal integrators connecting cellular processes to clinical outcome, we aimed to identify transcriptional nodes regulating cancer cell metastasis. Using rodent xenograft models that we previously developed, we identified the transcription factor Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) as a key coordinator of metastasis. Because Fra-1 often is overexpressed in human metastatic breast cancers and has been shown to control their invasive potential in vitro, we aimed to assess the implication and prognostic significance of the Fra-1–dependent genetic program in breast cancer metastasis and to identify potential Fra-1–dependent therapeutic targets. In several in vivo assays in mice, we demonstrate that stable RNAi depletion of Fra-1 from human breast cancer cells strongly suppresses their ability to metastasize. These results support a clinically important role for Fra-1 and the genetic program it controls. We show that a Fra-1–dependent gene-expression signature accurately predicts recurrence of breast cancer. Furthermore, a synthetic lethal drug screen revealed that antagonists of the adenosine receptor A2B (ADORA2B) are preferentially toxic to breast tumor cells expressing Fra-1. Both RNAi silencing and pharmacologic blockade of ADORA2B inhibited filopodia formation and invasive activity of breast cancer cells and correspondingly reduced tumor outgrowth in the lungs. These data show that Fra-1 activity is causally involved in and is a prognostic indicator of breast cancer metastasis. They suggest that Fra-1 activity predicts responsiveness to inhibition of pharmacologically tractable targets, such as ADORA2B, which may be used for clinical interference of metastatic breast cancer.

Desmet, Christophe J.; Gallenne, Tristan; Prieur, Alexandre; Reyal, Fabien; Visser, Nils L.; Wittner, Ben S.; Smit, Marjon A.; Geiger, Thomas R.; Laoukili, Jamila; Iskit, Sedef; Rodenko, Boris; Zwart, Wilbert; Evers, Bastiaan; Horlings, Hugo; Ajouaou, Abderrahrim; Zevenhoven, John; van Vliet, Martin; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Peeper, Daniel S.

2013-01-01

27

MicroRNA-34 suppresses breast cancer invasion and metastasis by directly targeting Fra-1.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs have key roles in tumor metastasis. Here, we describe the regulation and function of miR-34a and miR-34c (miR-34a/c) in breast cancer metastasis. Expression analysis verified that miR-34a/c expression is significantly decreased in metastatic breast cancer cells and human primary breast tumors with lymph node metastases. Overexpression of miR-34a/c could inhibit breast cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and distal pulmonary metastasis in vivo. Further studies revealed that Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1 or Fosl1) is a downstream target of miR-34a/c as miR-34a/c bound directly to the 3'untranslated region of Fra-1, subsequently reducing both the mRNA and protein levels of Fra-1. Silencing of Fra-1 recapitulated the effects of miR-34a/c overexpression, whereas enforced expression of Fra-1 reverses the suppressive effects of miR-34a/c. Moreover, significant downregulation of miR-34a in metastatic breast cancer tissues was found to be inversely correlated with Fra-1 expression. Our results demonstrate that miR-34a/c functions as a metastasis suppressor to regulate breast cancer migration and invasion through targeting Fra-1 oncogene and suggest a therapeutic application of miR-34 in breast cancer. PMID:23001043

Yang, S; Li, Y; Gao, J; Zhang, T; Li, S; Luo, A; Chen, H; Ding, F; Wang, X; Liu, Z

2012-09-24

28

Signal-dependent fra-2 regulation in skeletal muscle reserve and satellite cells  

PubMed Central

Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that paradoxically also has some tissue-specific functions. In skeletal muscle cells, we document that the AP-1 subunit, Fra-2, is expressed in the resident stem cells (Pax7-positive satellite cells) and also in the analogous undifferentiated ‘reserve' cell population in myogenic cultures, but not in differentiated myofiber nuclei. Silencing of Fra-2 expression enhances the expression of differentiation markers such as muscle creatine kinase and myosin heavy chain, indicating a possible role of Fra-2 in undifferentiated myogenic progenitor cells. We observed that Fra-2 is a target of cytokine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 signaling in cultured muscle cells, and extensive mass spectrometry and mutational analysis identified S320 and T322 as regulators of Fra-2 protein stability. Interestingly, Fra-2 S320 phosphorylation occurs transiently in activated satellite cells and is extinguished in myogenin-positive differentiating cells. Thus, cytokine-mediated Fra-2 expression and stabilization is linked to regulation of myogenic progenitor cells having implications for the molecular regulation of adult muscle stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

Alli, N S; Yang, E C; Miyake, T; Aziz, A; Collins-Hooper, H; Patel, K; McDermott, J C

2013-01-01

29

Signal-dependent fra-2 regulation in skeletal muscle reserve and satellite cells.  

PubMed

Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that paradoxically also has some tissue-specific functions. In skeletal muscle cells, we document that the AP-1 subunit, Fra-2, is expressed in the resident stem cells (Pax7-positive satellite cells) and also in the analogous undifferentiated 'reserve' cell population in myogenic cultures, but not in differentiated myofiber nuclei. Silencing of Fra-2 expression enhances the expression of differentiation markers such as muscle creatine kinase and myosin heavy chain, indicating a possible role of Fra-2 in undifferentiated myogenic progenitor cells. We observed that Fra-2 is a target of cytokine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 signaling in cultured muscle cells, and extensive mass spectrometry and mutational analysis identified S320 and T322 as regulators of Fra-2 protein stability. Interestingly, Fra-2 S320 phosphorylation occurs transiently in activated satellite cells and is extinguished in myogenin-positive differentiating cells. Thus, cytokine-mediated Fra-2 expression and stabilization is linked to regulation of myogenic progenitor cells having implications for the molecular regulation of adult muscle stem cells and skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23807221

Alli, N S; Yang, E C; Miyake, T; Aziz, A; Collins-Hooper, H; Patel, K; McDermott, J C

2013-06-27

30

Individual variation and specific cognitive deficits in the fra(X) syndrome.  

PubMed

Mental retardation has been associated with fra(X) but comprehensive psychological evaluation has rarely been applied to 2 major behavioral questions 1) the extent of individual variation in IQ among fra(X) males and the possibility of some fra(X) males being of normal IQ; and 2) whether there is a depression in general IQ or whether specific abilities are impaired. The problems of developing an effective battery of tests for assessing fra(X) are discussed. These questions were examined in 54 individuals, comprising fra(X) males, their obligate carrier mothers and those sisters shown to have the fra(X). Among noninstitutionalised males nonverbal IQ as measured on a Block Design test ranged from 100 to 0, and vocabulary scores while generally higher, ranged from 79-33. The males scored low on a digit span memory task, while performance on a memory of objects task was adequate. Despite lower overall scores, a similar pattern and variability emerged in institutionalised males. Daughters were extremely variable in performance and the mothers performed much better, supporting the view that women who have children are a selected subset of fra(X) syndrome individuals. The performance of one male is discussed in detail. His vocabulary and nonverbal IQ scores were normal, despite his having other specific cognitive deficits. The pattern of abilities and behavior seen in fra(X) may result in an overestimation of intelligence and underestimation of penetrance when based on clinical impressions rather than formal psychological assessment. The implications of this for molecular and for population genetic approaches to fra(X) are discussed. PMID:3674104

Theobald, T M; Hay, D A; Judge, C

1987-09-01

31

Geological map of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Bare Mountain comprises the isolated complex of mountain peaks southeast of the town of Beatty in southern Nye County, Nevada. This small mountain range lies between the alluvial basins of Crater Flat to the east and the northern Amargosa Desert to the southwest. The northern boundary of the range is less well defined, but for this report, the terrane of faulted Miocene volcanic rocks underlying Beatty Mountain and the unnamed hills to the east are considered to be the northernmost part of Bare Mountain. The southern tip of the mountain range is at Black Marble, the isolated hill at the southeast corner of the map. The main body of the range, between Fluorspar Canyon and Black Marble, is a folded and complexly faulted, but generally northward-dipping (or southward-dipping and northward-overturned), sequence of weakly to moderately metamorphosed upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic marine strata, mostly miogeoclinal (continental shelf) rocks. The geology of Bare Mountain is mapped at a scale of 1:24,000.

Monsen, S.A.; Carr, M.D.; Reheis, M.C.; Orkild, P.P.

1992-12-31

32

49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608...

2012-10-01

33

49 CFR 219.608 - FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... FRA Administrator's determination of random alcohol testing rate. 219.608 Section 219.608...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Random Alcohol and Drug Testing Programs § 219.608...

2011-10-01

34

49 CFR 240.103 - Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION QUALIFICATION AND CERTIFICATION OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.103 Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA. (a)...

2012-10-01

35

49 CFR 240.103 - Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION QUALIFICATION AND CERTIFICATION OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS Component Elements of the Certification Process § 240.103 Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA. (a)...

2011-10-01

36

From Filippo Lippi to Piero della Francesca: Fra Carnevale and the Making of a Renaissance Master  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This special Web feature from the Metropolitan Museum centers around two fifteenth century paintings acquired by two US museums (the Metropolitan and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston) from the Barberini Collection in Rome in the 1930s, that have puzzled scholars for more than a century, and have only recently been identified as the work of Giovanni di Bartolomeo Corradini of Urbino, also known as Fra Carnevale. In addition to investigating the mystery of Fra Carnevale, the Web feature also examines the concepts of artistic identity, in contrast with the Renaissance practice of artworks that issue from the studio of a named artist, that are actually the work of many unnamed artists. To do this, the feature is divided into three sections: "Filippo Lippi", 29 works by Lippi and others trained in his workshop; "An Alternative Vision", seven paintings by artists working within the studio system, but, similar to Fra Carnevale's works, containing unusual elements; and "The Mystery of Fra Carnevale", including the two panels, most likely parts of Fra Carnevale's altarpiece for Santa Maria della Bella in Urbino, The Birth of the Virgin and The Presentation of the Virgin in the Temple, done in what has come to be recognized as Fra Carnevale's style-paintings so full of architectural details that the figures seem incidental to the architecture.

37

Folate-sensitive fragile site FRA10A is due to an expansion of a CGG repeat in a novel gene, FRA10AC1, encoding a nuclear protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fragile sites appear visually as nonstaining gaps on chromosomes that are inducible by specific cell culture conditions. Expansion of CGG\\/CCG repeats has been shown to be the molecular basis of all five folate-sensitive fragile sites characterized molecularly so far, i.e., FRAXA, FRAXE, FRAXF, FRA11B, and FRA16A. In the present study we have refined the localization of the FRA10A folate-sensitive fragile

Theologia Sarafidou; Christina Kahl; Isabel Martinez-Garay; Marie Mangelsdorf; Stefan Gesk; Elizabeth Baker; Maria Kokkinaki; Polly Talley; Edna L. Maltby; Lisa French; Lana Harder; Bernd Hinzmann; Carlo Nobile; Kathy Richkind; Merran Finnis; Panagiotis Deloukas; Grant R. Sutherland; Kerstin Kutsche; Nicholas K. Moschonas; Reiner Siebert; Jozef Gécz

2004-01-01

38

Geohydrologic data for test well USW G-4, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents data on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, hydrologic monitoring, core analysis, water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests for test well USW G-4. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. These

1984-01-01

39

Reconnaissance geologic map of the northern Kawich and southern Reveille ranges, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A geological survey was performed in Nye County, Nevada. Results of that survey are summarized in the maps included. The general geology of the area is discussed. Major structures are described. The economics resulting from the mineral exploitation in the area are discussed. The hydrogeology and water chemistry of the area are also discussed.

Gardner, J.N.; Eddy, A.C.; Goff, F.E.; Grafft, K.S.

1980-06-01

40

Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model, Tiva Canyon tuff, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional discrete fracture model was completed to investigate the potential effects of fractures on the flow of water at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. A fracture network of the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area was simulated and calibrated with field data. Two modeled volumes were used to simulate three-dimensional fracture networks of the Tiva Canyon tuff. One volume

Anna

1998-01-01

41

The PKC? pathway participates in the aberrant accumulation of Fra-1 protein in invasive ER-negative breast cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Fra-1 is aberrantly expressed in a large number of cancer cells and tissues, and emerging evidence suggests an important role for this Fos family protein in both oncogenesis and the progression or maintenance of many tumour types. Here, we show that the concentration of Fra-1 is high in invasive oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative (ER?) breast cancer cell lines, regardless of their Ras pathway status. All of the ER? cells express high levels of activated PKC?, and the inhibition of PKC? activity using RNA interference or the expression of a dominant-negative mutant results in a dramatic reduction in Fra-1 abundance. Conversely, the ectopic expression of constitutively active PKC? leads to Fra-1 phosphorylation and accumulation in poorly invasive ER+ cells. This accumulation is due to the stabilisation of the Fra-1 protein through PKC? signalling, whereas other members of the PKC family are ineffective. Both SPAK and ERK1/2, whose activities are up-regulated by PKC?, participate in PKC?-driven Fra-1 stabilisation. Interestingly, their relative contributions appear to be different depending on the cell line studied. ERK1/2 signalling has a major role in ER- MDA-MB-231 cells whereas Fra-1 accumulation occurs mainly through SPAK signalling in ER? BT549 cells. Fra-1 mutational analysis shows that the phosphorylation of S265, T223 and T230 is critical for PKC?-driven Fra-1 stabilisation. Phosphorylation of the protein was confirmed using specific antisera against Fra-1 phosphorylated on T223 or S265. In addition, Fra-1 participates in PKC?-induced cell invasion and is necessary for PKC?-induced cell migration. In summary, we identified PKC? signalling as an important regulator of Fra-1 accumulation in ER- breast cancer cells. Moreover, our results suggest that PKC? could participate in progression of some breast cancers and could be a new therapeutic target.

Belguise, Karine; Milord, Sandrine; Galtier, Florence; Moquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Piechaczyk, Marc; Chalbos, Dany

2012-01-01

42

HGF Mediates Cell Proliferation of Human Mesothelioma Cells through a PI3K/MEK5/Fra-1 Pathway  

PubMed Central

The ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Met, are highly expressed in most human malignant mesotheliomas (MMs) and may contribute to their increased growth and viability. Based upon our observation that RNA silencing of fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1) inhibited c-met expression in rat mesotheliomas (1), we hypothesized that Fra-1 was a key player in HGF-induced proliferation in human MMs. In three of seven human MM lines evaluated, HGF increased Fra-1 levels and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal–regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) and AKT that were inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY290042. HGF-dependent phosphorylation and Fra-1 expression were decreased after knockdown of Fra-1, whereas overexpression of Fra-1 blocked the expression of mitogen/extracellular signal–regulated kinase kinases (MEK)5 at the mRNA and protein levels. Stable MM cell lines using a dnMEK5 showed that basal Fra-1 levels were increased in comparison to empty vector control lines. HGF also caused increased MM cell viability and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression that were abolished by knockdown of MEK5 or Fra-1. Data suggest that HGF-induced effects in some MM cells are mediated via activation of a novel PI3K/ERK5/Fra-1 feedback pathway that might explain tumor-specific effects of c-Met inhibitors on MM and other tumors.

Ramos-Nino, Maria E.; Blumen, Steven R.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Pass, Harvey; Carbone, Michele; Testa, Joseph R.; Altomare, Deborah A.; Mossman, Brooke T.

2008-01-01

43

Oxidant-Induced Cell Death and Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidative Response Are Controlled by Fra-1/AP-1  

PubMed Central

AP-1 (Jun/Fos) transcription factors play key roles in various biological processes, including cell death. Here we report a novel role for Fra-1 in oxidant-induced cell death controlled by modulating antioxidant gene expression. Fra-1-deficient (Fra-1?/?) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts (PLFs) were remarkably resistant to H2O2- and diquat-induced cell death, compared to their wild-type (Fra-1+/+) counterparts. Fra-1 deficiency ablated oxidant-induced mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis. Fra-1?/? cells had elevated basal levels of antioxidant enzymes and intracellular glutathione (GSH), which were further stimulated by oxidants. Loss of Fra-1 led to an increased half-life of transcription factor Nrf2 and increased recruitment of this protein to the promoters of antioxidant genes and increased their expression. Depletion of intracellular GSH or RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of Nqo1, Hmox1, and Nrf2 restored oxidant-induced cell death in Fra-1?/? cells. Thus, Fra-1 appears to increase susceptibility to oxidants and promotes cell death by attenuating Nrf2-driven antioxidant responses.

Vaz, Michelle; Machireddy, Narsa; Irving, Ashley; Potteti, Haranatha R.; Chevalier, Karinne; Kalvakolanu, Dhananjaya

2012-01-01

44

NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA No. 2003-0368-2961, Nye County Justice Court Building, Pahrump, Nevada, March 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On September 12, 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a confidential request from employees to evaluate health concerns thought to be related to the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of the Nye County Justice C...

2005-01-01

45

Fra proteins influencing filament integrity, diazotrophy and localization of septal protein SepJ in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.  

PubMed

Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can fix N(2) in differentiated cells called heterocysts, which exchange nutritional and regulatory compounds with the neighbouring photosynthetic vegetative cells. The cells in the filament appear to be joined by some protein structures, of which SepJ (FraG) that is located at the cell poles in the intercellular septa and is needed for filament integrity seems to be a component. Other known proteins required for filament integrity include FraC and FraH. Whereas fraC (alr2392) was constitutively expressed as an operon together with two downstream genes, alr2393 (fraD) and alr2394 (fraE), fraH (alr1603) was induced under nitrogen deprivation. Single mutants of these genes showed filament fragmentation under nitrogen deprivation and did not grow diazotrophically, although they formed heterocysts. The fraC and fraD mutants showed an impaired localization of SepJ at the intercellular septa and were hampered in the intercellular transfer of the fluorescent probe calcein. As shown with GFP fusions, FraC and FraD are also located at the intercellular septa. Therefore, at least three different proteins, SepJ, FraC and FraD, influence the architecture and function of the intercellular septa in the Anabaena filaments. PMID:20487302

Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Mariscal, Vicente; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

2010-03-01

46

Frequency of Fra X syndrome among institutionalized mentally retarded males in Poland  

SciTech Connect

Results of cytogenetic studies, performed in a group of 201 institutionalized mentally retarded males, are presented. At least two cytogenetic methods for eliciting the Xq27.3 fragile site, recommended by the Fourth International Workshop on the Fra X Syndrome were used. A subgroup of 67 out of 201 studied males was also examined using molecular methods. In 6 (2.9%) males fra X syndrome was diagnosed. All cytogenetic positive results were confirmed by molecular analysis. Five patients had full expansion CGG repeats and one had both premutation and full mutation. Postulated frequency of fra X syndrome in Polish population being 0.2-0.4 / 1,000 males seems to be lower than it could be expected on the basis of previous literature data. 19 refs., 4 tabs.

Mazurczak, T.; Bocian, E.; Milewski, M. [National Research Inst. of Mother and Child, Warsaw (Poland)] [and others

1996-07-12

47

Increased bone formation and osteosclerosis in mice overexpressing the transcription factor Fra-1.  

PubMed

Bone formation by osteoblasts is essential for skeletal growth and remodeling. Fra-1 is a c-Fos-related protein belonging to the AP-1 family of transcription factors. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing Fra-1 in various organs develop a progressive increase in bone mass leading to osteosclerosis of the entire skeleton, which is due to a cell-autonomous increase in the number of mature osteoblasts. Moreover, osteoblast differentiation, but not proliferation, was enhanced and osteoclastogenesis was also elevated in vitro. These data indicate that, unlike c-Fos, which causes osteosarcomas, Fra-1 specifically enhances bone formation, which may be exploited to stimulate bone formation in pathological conditions. PMID:10973316

Jochum, W; David, J P; Elliott, C; Wutz, A; Plenk, H; Matsuo, K; Wagner, E F

2000-09-01

48

Implications of FRA 16A structure for the mechanism of chromosomal fragile site genesis  

SciTech Connect

Fragile sites are chemically induced nonstaining gaps in chromosomes. Different fragile sites vary in frequency in the population and in the chemistry of their induction. DNA sequences encompassing and including the rare, autosomal, folate-sensitive fragile site, FRA16A, were isolated by positional cloning. The molecular basis of FRA16A was found to be expansion of a normally polymorphic p(CCG)[sub n] repeat. This repeat was adjacent to a CpG island that was methylated in fragile site-expressing individuals. The FRA16A locus in individuals who do not express the fragile site is not a site of DNA methylation (imprinting), which suggests that the methylation associated with fragile sites may be a consequence and not a cause of their genesis.

Nancarrow, J.K.; Kremer, E.; Holman, K.; Eyre, H.; Callen, D.F.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I. (Centre for Medical Genetics, North Adelaide (Australia)); Doggett, N.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Paslier, D.Le (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain, Paris (France))

1994-06-24

49

49 CFR 214.307 - Review and approval of individual on-track safety programs by FRA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Review and approval of individual on-track safety programs by FRA. 214.307 Section...OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214...Review and approval of individual on-track safety programs by FRA. (a) Each...

2011-10-01

50

49 CFR 214.307 - Review and approval of individual on-track safety programs by FRA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Review and approval of individual on-track safety programs by FRA. 214.307 Section...OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Roadway Worker Protection § 214...Review and approval of individual on-track safety programs by FRA. (a) Each...

2012-10-01

51

Expression profiling of genes regulated by Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis  

PubMed Central

Background The Fra-1/AP-1 transcription factor regulates the expression of genes controlling various processes including migration, invasion, and survival as well as extracellular remodeling. We recently demonstrated that loss of Fra-1 leads to exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, accompanied by enhanced expression of various inflammatory and fibrotic genes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which Fra-1 confers protection during bleomycin-induced lung injury, genome-wide mRNA expression profiling was performed. Results We found that Fra-1 regulates gene expression programs that include: 1) several cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation, 2) several genes involved in the extracellular remodeling and cell adhesion, and 3) several genes involved in programmed cell death. Conclusion Loss of Fra-1 leads to the enhanced expression of genes regulating inflammation and immune responses and decreased the expression of genes involved in apoptosis, suggesting that this transcription factor distinctly modulates early pro-fibrotic cellular responses.

2013-01-01

52

Business Model for Commingled Operations of Freight and Non-FRA-Compliant Passenger Rail Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is a challenge to develop a business model of commingled operations of freight and non-FRA-compliant passenger rail services because there are no domestic cases of such operations and the number of cases in which freight and light rail transit (LRT) equipment share tracks on a temporal basis of separation is limited. Greater opportunities for commingling may be created, however,

David O Nelson; Alexander Lu

2009-01-01

53

Habitat use by female desert bighorn sheep in the Fra Cristobal Mountains, New Mexico, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mexican desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) populations have declined since the 1980s, and restoration efforts are necessary to establish viable populations. Mexican desert bighorn sheep were translocated to the Fra Cristobal Mountains of south-central New Mexico in 1995. We described seasonal habitats used by female desert bighorn sheep by comparing characteristics of radiolocations with random locations within their home

Peter D. Bangs; Paul R. Krausman; Kyran E. Kunkel; Zachary D. Parsons

2005-01-01

54

MicroRNA-34a inhibits migration and invasion of colon cancer cells via targeting to Fra-1.  

PubMed

MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a), a transcriptional target of p53, is a well-known tumor suppressor gene. Here, we identified Fra-1 as a new target of miR-34a and demonstrated that miR-34a inhibits Fra-1 expression at both protein and messenger RNA levels. In addition, we found that p53 indirectly regulates Fra-1 expression via a miR-34a-dependant manner in colon cancer cells. Overexpression of miR-34a strongly inhibited colon cancer cell migration and invasion, which can be partially rescued by forced expression of the Fra-1 transcript lacking the 3'-untranslated region. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9, two enzymes involved in cell migration and invasion, was decreased in miR-34a-transfected cells, and this can be rescued by Fra-1 overexpression. Moreover, we found that miR-34a was downregulated in 25 of 40 (62.5%) colon cancer tissues, as compared with the adjacent normal colon tissues and that the expression of miR-34a was correlated with the DNA-binding activity of p53. Unexpectedly, the DNA-binding activity of p53 was not inversely correlated with Fra-1 expression, and a significant statistical inverse correlation between miR-34a and Fra-1 expression was only observed in 14 of 40 (35%) colon cancer tissues. Taken together, our in vitro data suggest that p53 regulates Fra-1 expression, and eventually cell migration/invasion, via a miR-34a-dependent manner. However, in vivo data indicate that the p53-miR-34a pathway is not the major regulator of Fra-1 expression in human colon cancer tissues. PMID:22198213

Wu, Jianmin; Wu, Gang; Lv, Lu; Ren, Yong-Feng; Zhang, Xue-Jiao; Xue, Yong-Feng; Li, Guiling; Lu, Xincheng; Sun, ZhongSheng; Tang, Kai-Fu

2011-12-22

55

49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes...existing FRA-approved locomotive crashworthiness design standards. 229...SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements §...

2010-10-01

56

49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 false New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes...existing FRA-approved locomotive crashworthiness design standards. 229...SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements §...

2009-10-01

57

Analysis of Single-Hole and Cross-Hole Tracer Tests Conducted at the Nye County Earl Warning Drilling Program Well Complex, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

As part of the effort to understand the flow and transport characteristics downgradient from the proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, single- and cross-hole tracer tests were conducted from December 2004 through October 2005 in boreholes at the Nye County 22 well complex. The results were analyzed for transport properties using both numerical and analytical solutions of the governing advection dispersion equation. Preliminary results indicate effective flow porosity values ranging from 1.0 x 10{sup -2} for an individual flow path to 2.0 x 10{sup -1} for composite flow paths, longitudinal dispersivity ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, and a transverse horizontal dispersivity of 0.03 m. Individual flow paths identified from the cross-hole testing indicate some solute diffusion into the stagnant portion of the alluvial aquifer.

A. Umari; J.D. Earle; M.F. Fahy

2006-03-17

58

Pathogenicity Induced by Feline Leukemia Virus, Rickard Strain, Subgroup A Plasmid DNA (pFRA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new provirus clone of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), which we named FeLV-A (Rickard) or FRA, was characterized with respect to viral interference group, host range, complete genome sequence, and in vivo pathogenicity in specific-pathogen-free newborn cats. The in vitro studies indicated the virus to be an ecotropic subgroup A FeLV with 98% nucleotide sequence homology to another FeLV-A clone

HANG CHEN; MARTA K. BECHTEL; YAN SHI; ANDREW PHIPPS; LAWRENCE E. MATHES; KATHLEEN A. HAYES; PRADIP ROY-BURMAN

1998-01-01

59

Single molecule analysis of the Arabidopsis FRA1 kinesin shows that it is a functional motor protein with unusually high processivity.  

PubMed

The Arabidopsis FRA1 kinesin contributes to the organization of cellulose microfibrils through an unknown mechanism. The cortical localization of this kinesin during interphase raises the possibility that it transports cell wall-related cargoes along cortical microtubules that either directly or indirectly influence cellulose microfibril patterning. To determine whether FRA1 is an authentic motor protein, we combined bulk biochemical assays and single molecule fluorescence imaging to analyze the motor properties of recombinant, GFP-tagged FRA1 containing the motor and coiled-coil domains (designated as FRA1(707)-GFP). We found that FRA1(707)-GFP binds to microtubules in an ATP-dependent manner and that its ATPase activity is dramatically stimulated by the presence of microtubules. Using single molecule studies, we found that FRA1(707)-GFP moves processively along microtubule tracks at a velocity of about 0.4? ?m?s(-1). In addition, we found that FRA1(707)-GFP is a microtubule plus-end-directed motor and that it moves along microtubules as a dimer. Interestingly, our single molecule analysis shows that the processivity of FRA1(707)-GFP is at least twice the processivity of conventional kinesin, making FRA1 the most processive kinesin to date. Together, our data show that FRA1 is a bona fide motor protein that has the potential to drive long-distance transport of cargo along cortical microtubules. PMID:21914648

Zhu, Chuanmei; Dixit, Ram

2011-09-13

60

Quality assurance and analysis of water levels in wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Periodic and continual water-level data from 1963-1998 were compiled and quality assured for 65 observation wells on Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada. As part of the quality assurance of all water levels, ancillary data pertinent to computing ...

J. M. Fenelon

2000-01-01

61

Feasibility study of the seismic reflection method in Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) working under an Interagency agreement with the Department of Energy is engaged in a broad geoscience program to assess and identify potential repositories for high level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The USGS program, referred to as the Yucca Mountain Projects, or YMP, consists of integrated geologic, hydrologic and geophysical studies which range in nature from site specific to regional. This report is an evaluation of different acquisition methods for future regional seismic reflection studies to be conducted in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, located in the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In January 1988, field studies were conducted to investigate the feasibility of using the common-depth point (CDP) seismic reflection method to map subsurface geological horizons within the Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada. The goal of the field study was to investigate which seismic reflection method(s) should be used for mapping shallow to lower-crustal horizons. Therefore, a wide-variety of field acquisition parameters were tested, included point versus linear receiver group arrays; Vibroseis (service and trademark of Conoco, Inc.) versus explosive sources; Vibroseis array patterns; and Vibroseis sweep and frequency range.

Brocher, Thomas M.; Hart, Patrick E.; Carle, Steven F.

62

A revised lithostratigraphic framework for the southern Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An informal, revised lithostratigraphic framework for the southern Yucca Mountain area, Nevada has been developed to accommodate new information derived from subsurface investigations of the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program. Lithologies penetrated by recently drilled boreholes at locations between Stagecoach Road and Highway 95 in southern Nye County include Quaternary and Pliocene alluvium and alluvial breccia, Miocene pyroclastic flow deposits, Miocene intercalated lacustrine siltstone and claystone sequences, early Miocene to Oligocene pre-volcanic sedimentary rocks, and Paleozoic strata. Of the 37 boreholes currently drilled, 21 boreholes have sufficient depth, spatial distribution, or traceable pyroclastic flow, pyroclastic fall, and reworked tuff deposits to aid in the lateral correlation of lithostrata. Medial and distal parts of regional pyroclastic flow deposits of Miocene age can be correlated with the Timber Mountain, Paintbrush, Crater Flat, and Tram Ridge Groups. Rocks intercalated between these regional pyroclastic flow deposits are substantially thicker than in the central part of Yucca Mountain, particularly near the downthrown side of major faults and along the southern extent of exposures at Yucca Mountain.

Spengler, R. W.; Byers, F. M.; Dickerson, R. P.

2006-01-01

63

Geohydrologic data collected from shallow neutron-access boreholes and resultant-preliminary geohydrologic evaluations, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy, 74 neutron-access boreholes were drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drilling, coring, sample collection and handling, and lithologic and preliminary geohy...

D. O. Blout D. P. Hammermeister C. L. Loskot M. P. Chornack

1994-01-01

64

A floristic survey of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the vascular flora of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, was conducted from March to June 1994, and from March to October 1995. An annotated checklist of recorded taxa was compiled. Voucher plant specimens were collected and accessioned into the Herbarium at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Collection data accompanying these specimens were entered into that herbarium`s electronic data base. Combined results from this survey and the works of other investigators reveal the presence of a total of 375 specific and intraspecific taxa within the area these allocated to 179 genera and 54 families. No taxon currently listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act was encountered during this study. Several candidate species for listing under this Act were present, and distributional data for these were recorded. No change in the status of these candidate species is recommended as the result of this study.

Niles, W.E.; Leary, P.J.; Holland, J.S.; Landau, F.H.

1995-12-01

65

Flood Assessment Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A flood assessment was conducted at the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada (Figure 1-1). The study area encompasses the watershed of Yucca Flat, a closed basin approximately 780 square kilometers (km2) (300 square miles) in size. The focus of this effort was on a drainage area of approximately 94 km2 (36 mi2), determined from review of topographic maps and aerial photographs to be the only part of the Yucca Flat watershed that could directly impact the Area 3 RWMS. This smaller area encompasses portions of the Halfpint Range, including Paiute Ridge, Jangle Ridge, Carbonate Ridge, Slanted Buttes, Cockeyed Ridge, and Banded Mountain. The Area 3 RWMS is located on coalescing alluvial fans emanating from this drainage area.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-07-01

66

Surveys for Astragalus beatleyae on Nellis Bombing Range, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Aerial and ground surveys of western portions of the US Air Force's Nellis Bombing Range, Nye County, Nevada, were conducted to determine if the rare plant, Astragalus beatleyae (Barneby), was widely distributed there. Additional information on its distribution will assist the US Department of Energy and the Fish and Wildlife Service in assessing the need to provide federal protection for this plant under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Eleven areas were surveyed on foot between 18 and 20 July 1983 in potential habitat identified during a helicopter reconnaissance. Astragalus beatleyae was found in seven discrete groups at three major locations on contiguous portions of Pahute Mesa. Plants were distributed between 4.75 and 8.5 miles west of the species' type locality on the Nevada Test Site. One population was growing on an atypical habitat having deep, clay soils. 11 references, 4 figures.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Collins, E.

1984-04-01

67

Geohydrologic data for test well UE-25p1, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the following data for test well UE-25p 1 in Nye County, Nevada: drilling operations, lithology, availability of borehole geophysical logs, water levels, future availability of core analyses, water chemistry, pumping tests, borehole-flow surveys, and packer-injection tests. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for underground storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well UE-25p 1 was the first in the Yucca Mountain area to penetrate rocks of Paleozoic age. To a depth of 1,244 meters, the rocks are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age. From 1,244 meters to a total depth of 1,805 meters, the rock is dolomite of Paleozoic age. (USGS)

Craig, R. W.; Johnson, K. A.

1984-01-01

68

Perennial vegetation data from permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Perennial vegetation data from 68 permanent plots on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, are given for the period of 1963 through 2002. Dr. Janice C. Beatley established the plots in 1962 and then remeasured them periodically from 1963 through 1975. We remeasured 67 of these plots between 2000 and 2003; the remaining plot was destroyed at some time between 1975 and 1993. The plots ranged from 935 to 2,274 m in elevation and are representative of common plant associations of the Mojave Desert, the transition to Great Basin Desert, and pinyon-juniper woodlands. The purpose of this report is to describe the complete set of ecological data that Beatley collected from the Nevada Test Site from 1963 through 1975 and to present the data for perennial vegetation collected from 2000 through 2003.

Webb, Robert H.; Murov, Marilyn B.; Esque, Todd C.; Boyer, Diane E.; DeFalco, Lesley A.; Haines, Dustin F.; Oldershaw, Dominic; Scoles, Sara J.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Blainey, Joan B.; Medica, Philip A.

2003-01-01

69

Ground-water altitudes and well data, Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report contains ground-water altitudes and well data for wells located in Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California, south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Data are from wells whose coordinates are within the Beatty and Death Valley Junction, California-Nevada maps from the US Geological Survey, scale 1:100,000 (30-minute {times} 60-minute quadrangle). Compilation of these data was made to provide a reference for numerical models of ground-water flow at Yucca Mountain and its vicinity. Water-level measurements were obtained from the US Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, and span the period of October 1951 to May 1991; most measurements were made from 1980 to 1990.

Ciesnik, M.S.

1995-05-01

70

Expression of AP-1 family transcription factors in the amygdala during conditioned taste aversion learning: role for Fra-2  

PubMed Central

Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning occurs after the pairing of a novel taste with a toxin (e.g. sucrose with LiCl). The immediate-early gene c-Fos is necessary for CTA learning, but c-Fos alone cannot be sufficient for consolidation. The expression of other AP-1 proteins from the Fos- and Jun-families may also be required shortly after conditioning for CTA consolidation. To screen for the expression of AP-1 transcription factors within small subregions, RT-PCR analysis was used after laser capture microdissection of the amygdala. Rats were infused intraorally with 5% sucrose (6ml/6min) or injected with LiCl (12ml/kg, 0.15M, i.p.) or given sucrose paired with LiCl (sucrose/LiCl), or not treated; 1 h later their brains were dissected. The lateral (LA), basolateral (BLA), and central (CeA) subnuclei of the amgydala of single 5 ?m sections from individual rats were dissected using the Arcturus PixCell II system. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed the consistent presence of c-Fos, Fra-2, c-Jun, and JunD in the amygdala. In situ hybridization confirmed that c-Fos and Fra-2 mRNA expression was increased in the CeA after LiCl and sucrose/LiCl treatment. Immunohistochemistry for Fra-2 revealed high baseline levels of Fra-2 protein in the BLA and CeA, but also an increase in Fra-2 in the BLA and CeA after LiCl and sucrose/LiCl treatment. The similarity of response in LiCl and sucrose/LiCl treated groups might reflect activation by LiCl in both groups. To control for the effects of LiCl, rats were tested in a learned safety experiment. Fra-2 and c-Fos were examined in response to sucrose/LiCl in rats with prior familiarity with sucrose compared to rats without prior exposure to sucrose. The familiar (pre-exposure) group showed a significantly decreased number of Fra-2-positive cells compared with the novel group in the BLA, but not in the CeA. Because pre-exposure to sucrose attenuates CTA learning, a decreased cellular response in pre-exposed rats suggests a specific correlation with CTA learning. Changes in Fra-2 and c-Fos expression in the BLA and CeA at the time of conditioning, together with constitutive expression of c-Jun and JunD, may contribute to CTA learning.

Kwon, Bumsup; Goltz, Marion; Houpt, Thomas A.

2009-01-01

71

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-01-01

72

Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

2013-10-01

73

In Viaggio Fra le Stelle: The making of the GSC II  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present here "IN VIAGGIO FRA LE STELLE" (Journey amongst the Stars), a project to develop an educational application for Microsoft Windows based on multimedia and interactive tools that will be distributed as a CD-ROM. The uniqueness of this project consists in using the making of an astrometric catalogue (GSC II) as its guiding theme in the explanation of many different branches of astronomy from the Solar System to Cosmology. The choice of such a specialized subject, apparently so ill-suited for popularisation at first sight, as the guiding theme, will highlight the process of research instead of focusing only on the final achievements, giving a clear idea of how science evolves in practice. Its modular structure will permit its use as a classical tool for the popularization of the many fields of astronomy and astrophysics.

Bernardi, G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Ferreri, W.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Morbidelli, R.; Pannunzio, R.; Smart, R. L.; Vecchiato, A.

2005-12-01

74

Matrix attachment region (MAR) properties and abnormal expansion of AT island minisatellites in FRA16B fragile sites in leukemic CEM cells  

PubMed Central

AT-rich minisatellites (AT islands) are sites of genomic instability in cancer cells and targets for extremely lethal AT-specific drugs, such as bizelesin. Here we investigated the AT islands in the FRA16B fragile site region for their possible roles in the organization of DNA on the nuclear matrix. The FRA16B AT island nominally spans ?3 kb of mostly >90% A/T DNA. In silico analysis indicates that this domain exhibits characteristics of nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs): an exceptionally intense computed ‘MAR potential’ and profound duplex destabilization and flexibility. FRA16B repeats specifically bind to isolated nuclear matrices, which indicates their in vitro MAR function. This binding is several-fold greater than that of a known MAR in the c-myc gene. AT islands in fragile sites FRA16B and FRA16D are significantly more abundant in CEM cells that are hypersensitive to bizelesin compared to normal WI-38 cells. FRA16B overabundance in CEM is due to an ?10-fold expansion of FRA16B repeats. The expanded FRA16B minisatellites in CEM cells preferentially localize to the nuclear matrix-associated DNA indicating their in vivo MAR function. The unexpanded repeats in WI-38 cells localize to the loop DNA. The c-myc MAR is also matrix-associated in CEM cells while localizing to loop DNA in WI-38 cells. These results are the first to demonstrate that AT islands in fragile sites can function as MARs both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of FRA16B-mediated MAR sites to rearrange depending on the repeat expansion status could be relevant to both genomic instability of cancer cells and their sensitivity to AT-island targeting drugs.

Jackson, Jennifer A.; Trevino, Alex V.; Herzig, Maryanne C.; Herman, Terence S.; Woynarowski, Jan M.

2003-01-01

75

A floristic survey of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the vascular flora of Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, was conducted from March to June 1994. An annotated checklist of recorded taxa was compiled. Voucher plant specimens were collected and accessioned into the Herbarium at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Collection data accompanying these specimens were entered into that herbarium`s electronic data base. Combined results from this survey and the works of other investigators reveal the presence of a total of 325 specific and intraspecific taxa within the area, these allocated to 162 genera and 53 families. Owing to drought conditions prevalent throughout the area, the annual floristic component was largely absent during the period of study, and it is likely much under-represented in the tabulation of results. No taxon currently listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act was encountered during this study. Several candidate species for listing under this Act were present, and distributional data for these were recorded. No change in the status of these candidate species is recommended as the result of this survey.

Niles, W.E.; Leary, P.J.; Holland, J.S.; Landau, F.H.

1994-12-01

76

Preliminary survey of tuff distribution in Esmeralda, Nye, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report inventories the surface distribution of silicic tuffs in Nye, Esmeralda, and Lincoln Counties, NV, based on a review of available literature. The inventory was taken to provide a data base in evaluating tuff sites for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Silicic ash-flow tuffs that are about 11 to 34 million years (my) old are widespread in these counties. These rocks are locally deformed by right-lateral movement along Walker Lane and the Las Vegas Shear Zone, and left-lateral movement along a zone from near the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to the Utah border, and are commonly offset by steeply dipping normal faults. The normal faults that bound horsts, grabens, and tilted-fault blocks of the Basin-and-Range Province began to form 30 my ago; some are still active. Tuff distribution is discussed on a regional basis. Tuff thicknesses and alterations, structural complexity, and proximity to recent faulting, recent volcanism, and mineral resources are discussed for each area. Although the literature on which it is based is often incomplete and sketchy, this report is intended to serve as a basis for future, more detailed work that includes initial field inspection, detailed field and laboratory studies, and extrapolations to the subsurface.

Smith, G.V.; Pink, T.S.; Lawrence, J.R.; Woodward, L.A.; Keil, K.; Lappin, A.R.

1981-02-01

77

Environmental assessment for double tracks test site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), with appropriate approvals from the U.S. Air Force (USAF), proposes to conduct environmental restoration operations at the Double Tracks test site located on the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in Nye County, Nevada. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental consequences of four alternative actions for conducting the restoration operation and of the no action alternative. The EA also identifies mitigation measures, where appropriate, designed to protect natural and cultural resources and reduce impacts to human health and safety. The environmental restoration operation at the Double Tracks test site would serve two primary objectives. First, the proposed work would evaluate the effectiveness of future restoration operations involving contamination over larger areas. The project would implement remediation technology options and evaluate how these technologies could be applied to the larger areas of contaminated soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), and the NAFR. Second, the remediation would provide for the removal of plutonium contamination down to or below a predetermined level which would require cleanup of 1 hectare (ha) (2.5 acres), for the most likely case, or up to 3.0 ha (7.4 acres) of contaminated soil, for the upper bounding case.

NONE

1996-04-01

78

Inter and intrasite analyses of cultural materials from U20aw, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This archaeological presents the results of the analyses of the data derived from all sites investigated during the data recovery operations on Drill Hole U20aw on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada. These sites were determined to be potentially eligible for inclusion in the national Register of Historic Places. Detailed analyses were focused on the spatial distribution of artifacts and features within and between sites in the southern portion of the study area. These analyses indicate that one area served principally as a temporary camp, while the area around the canyonhead to the east seems to have been used as a site for both temporary camps and special activity loci. Projectile point styles suggest that the area was occupied from the Early Archaic into the early Historic period. Analyses of the artifacts that were recovered indicate that obsidian was the preferred material for all classes of flaked stone tools. All stages of lithic reduction are represented on the sites, but core reduction and thinning of bifaces appear to have been the primary activities. Processing of floral foods is indicated by the presence of several ground stone artifacts. Pinyon nuts and other items appear to have been stored in several areas as evidenced by the presence of several rock features that may have served as caches.

Hicks, P.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.

1991-12-01

79

Bedrock geologic map of the central block area, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Bedrock geologic maps form the foundation for investigations that characterize and assess the viability of the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study was funded by the US Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project to provide a detailed (1:6,000-scale) bedrock geologic map for the area within and adjacent to the potential repository area at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to this study, the 1:12,000-scale map of Scott and Bon, (1984) was the primary source of bedrock geologic data for the Yucca Mountain Project. However, targeted detailed mapping within the central block at Yucca Mountain revealed structural complexities along some of the intrablock faults that were not evident at 1:12,000 (Scott and Bonk, 1984). As a result, this study was undertaken to define the character and extent of the dominant structural features in the vicinity of the potential repository. In addition to structural considerations, ongoing subsurface excavation and geologic mapping within the exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), development of a three-dimensional-framework geologic model, and borehole investigations required use of a constituent stratigraphic system to facilitate surface to underground comparisons. The map units depicted in this report correspond as closely as possible to the proposed stratigraphic nomenclature by Buesch and others (1996), as described here.

Day, W.C.; Potter, C.J.; Sweetkind, D.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dickerson, R.P.; San Juan, C.A. [Pacific Western Technologies Ltd., Denver, CO (United States)

1998-11-01

80

Geohydrologic data for test well USW G-4, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data are presented on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, hydrologic monitoring, core analysis, water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests for test well USW G-4. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for underground storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW G-4 was drilled to a total depth of 915 meters through volcanic rocks, consisting mostly of ash-flow tuff. Depth of water in the well during and after drilling and testing ranged from 538 to 544 meters below land surface, at approximate altitude of 728 meters above sea level. Drawdown in the well was about 3 meters after test pumping more than 5,000 minutes at a rate of 16 liters per second. A borehold-flow survey indicated that almost all water withdrawn from the well was contributed by the zone between a depth of about 865 and 915 meters below land surface. Analysis of a composite water sample collected after well completion showed the water to contain 216 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, with relatively large concentrations of silica, sodium, and bicarbonate. (USGS)

Bentley, C. B.

1984-01-01

81

Geohydrologic data for test well USW H-5, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents data on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, water-level monitoring, core analysis, ground-water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests for test well USW H-5. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-5 was drilled to a total depth of 1,219 meters through volcanic rocks consisting mostly of ash-flow tuff. Depth to water in the well ranged between 703.8 and 707.2 meters below land surface, at an approximate altitude of 704 meters above sea level. Drawdown in the well exceeded 6 meters after test pumping more than 3,000 minutes at a rate of 10 liters per second. Borehole-flow surveys showed that about 90 percent of the water in the well is contributed by the zone between 707 and about 820 meters below land surface. Two composite water samples collected after well completion contained 206 and 220 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Sodium and bicarbonate were the predominant dissolved anion and cation. The concentration of dissolved silica was 48 milligrams per liter in both samples, which is a relatively large concentration for most natural waters.

Bentley, C. B.; Robison, J. H.; Spengler, R. W.

1983-01-01

82

Geohydrologic data for test well USW H-6 Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The following data are presented for test well USW H-6: drilling operations, lithology, availability of borehole geophysical logs , water levels, future availability of core analyses, water chemistry, pumping tests, and packer-injection tests. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near Yucca Mountain adjacent to the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These investigations are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify suitable sites for underground storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-6 was drilled to a total depth of 1,220 m. Rocks penetrated are predominantly ash-flow tuffs. Lava was encountered from 877 to 1 ,126 m. The composite static water level is approximately 526 m below land surface. The well was pumped during two periods. Maximum drawdown was about 18 m after pumping for 4,822 min at 28 L/sec, and 12 m after pumping for 2,226 min at 27 L/sec. A borehole flow survey showed that 91% of the water withdrawn from the well came from the depth intervals from 616 to 631 m, and from 777 to 788 m. (Author 's abstract)

Craig, R. W.; Reed, R. L.; Spengler, R. W.

1983-01-01

83

Breakages at common fragile sites set boundaries of amplified regions in two leukemia cell lines K562 - Molecular characterization of FRA2H and localization of a new CFS FRA2S.  

PubMed

Genome amplification is often observed in human tumors. The breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle is the mechanism that often underlies duplicated regions. Some research has indicated common fragile sites (CFS) as possible sites of chromosome breakages at the origin of BFB cycles. Here we searched two human genome regions known as amplification hot spots for any DNA copy number amplifications by analyzing 21 cancer cell lines to investigate the relationship between genomic fragility and amplification. We identified a duplicated region on a chromosomes der(2) present in the karyotype of two analysed leukemia cell lines K562. The two duplicated regions are organized into large palindromes, which suggests that one BFB cycle has occurred. Our findings show that the three breakpoints are localized in the sequence of three CFSs: FRA2H (2q32.1-q32.2), which here has been characterized molecularly; FRA2S (2q22.3-q23.3), a newly localized aphidicolin inducible CFS; and FRA2G (2q24.3-q31). PMID:20851513

Pelliccia, Franca; Bosco, Nazario; Rocchi, Angela

2010-09-18

84

Surveys for plant species of concern on northern and eastern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Ground surveys of the northern and eastern portions of the Yucca Flat drainage basin on the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, were conducted to determine the distribution of rare plants, or species of concern. This information was needed to help DOE evaluate whether all proposed surface disturbances in the basin must be preceded by a preconstruction survey to assess possible impacts on species of concern. Fourteen areas in both bajada and mountainous habitats were surveyed between August 11 and 25, 1983. Six species of concern were found at 11 localities in mountainous terrain, but none were found on bajadas. 11 references, 7 figures.

Collins, E.; O'Farrell, T.P.

1984-04-01

85

Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model, Tiva Canyon tuff, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional discrete fracture model was completed to investigate the potential effects of fractures on the flow of water at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. A fracture network of the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area was simulated and calibrated with field data. Two modeled volumes were used to simulate three-dimensional fracture networks of the Tiva Canyon tuff. One volume had a width and length of 150 meters, and the other had a width and length of 200 meters; both volumes were 60 meters thick. The analysis shows that the fracture system in the Exploratory Studies Facility starter tunnel area has numerous connected fractures that have relatively large permeabilities. However, pathway analysis between three radial boreholes indicated there were few pathways and little connection, which is consistent with results of cross-boreholes pressure testing. Pathway analysis also showed that at the scales used there was only one pathway connecting one end of the flow box to the opposite end. The usual vertical pathway was along one large fracture, whereas in four horizontal directions the pathway was from multiple fracture connections. As a result, the fracture network can be considered sparse. The fracture network was refined by eliminating nonconductive fractures determined from field-derived permeabilities. Small fractures were truncated from the simulated network without any effect on the overall connectivity. Fractures as long as 1.25 meters were eliminated (a large percentage of the total number of fractures) from the network without altering the number of pathways. Five directional permeabilities were computed for the 150- and 200-meter-scale flow box areas. Permeabilities for the 150-meter scale vary by almost two orders of magnitude, with the principal permeability direction being easterly. At the 200-meter scale, however, the flow box permeabilities only vary by a factor of four, with the principal permeability direction being vertical.

Anna, L.O.

1998-09-01

86

Inter and intrasite analyses of cultural materials from U20aw, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the Spring of 1986 Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted a Class III archaeological survey of Drill Hole U20aw on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Seven archaeological sites were located during the course of this survey including two temporary camps, four lithic scatters, and a possible pinyon cache. This report presents the results of the analyses of the data derived from all sites investigated during the data recovery operations on Drill Hole U20aw. Detailed analyses were focused on the spatial distribution of artifacts and features within and between sites in the southern portion of the study area (26Ny4867, 26Ny4869, and 26Ny4871). These analyses indicate that 26Ny4871 served principally as a temporary camp, while the area around the canyonhead to the east (which includes 26Ny4867 and 26Ny4869) seems to have been used as a site for both temporary camps and special activity loci. Projectile point styles suggest that the area was occupied from the Early Archaic into the early Historic period. Analyses of the artifacts that were recovered indicate that obsidian was the preferred material for all classes of flaked stone tools. All stages of lithic reduction are represented on the sites, but core reduction and thinning of bifaces appear to have been the primary activities. Processing of floral foods is indicated by the presence of several ground stone artifacts. Pinyon nuts and other items appear to have been stored in the area of 26Ny4869 and to the north of the drill hole as evidenced by the presence of several rock features that may have served as caches.

Hicks, P.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Lockett, C.L.

1991-12-01

87

Analysis of Laramide basement-involved deformation, Fra Cristobal Range, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

In the Fra Cristobal Range near Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, 250 to 500 m(820 to 1640 ft) of relative basement uplift is present. The contact between Precambrian crystalline basement and cover strata (Cambrian and younger) is folded along a north-south deformation front defining the margin of the Laramide uplift. The style of deformation changes along strike from an overturned fold to a central domain of imbricate thrusts of Precambrian granite, overlying a gentle anticline of cover strata, and then back to an overturned fold. These changes in style occur across narrow transition zones characterized by transverse folds and tear faults, suggesting some control from basement structure. West-dipping, high-angle reverse faults and south-plunging S-folds on the overturned eastern limb of the south-plunging, basement-involved anticline suggest eastward vergence with the basement, in part forcing the fold in the cover strata. Closely spaced fractures are present in the granite hinge of the main overturned, basement-cored fold. Abundant microfaults with grains visibly offset are present in thin section. These features indicate a cataclastic flow mechanism to accommodate shortening strain in the core of the fold. The structural styles of the basement-involved Laramide deformation are similar to Berg's fold-thrust model; shortening in the basement is accommodated by imbricate thrusting in the central domain and cataclastic flow on a small scale in the basement-cored folds. Preexisting basement structure may have controlled the location of structural transitions within the belt of crustal shortening and uplift, and movement of basement blocks may have in part forced the observed folding.

Chapin, M.A.; Nelson, E.P.

1986-08-01

88

UCSD/FRA non-contact ultrasonic guided-wave system for rail inspection: an update  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of California at San Diego (UCSD), under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, is developing a system for high-speed and non-contact rail defect detection. A prototype has been designed and field tested with the support of Volpe National Transportation Systems Center and ENSCO, Inc. The goal of this project is to develop a rail defect detection system that provides (a) better defect detection reliability (including internal transverse head defects under shelling and vertical split head defects), and (b) higher inspection speed than achievable by current rail inspection systems. This effort is also in direct response to Safety Recommendations issued by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) following the disastrous train derailments at Superior, WI in 1992 and Oneida, NY in 2007 among others. The UCSD prototype uses non-contact ultrasonic probing of the rail head (laser and air-coupled), ultrasonic guided waves, and a proprietary real-time statistical analysis algorithm that maximizes the sensitivity to defects while minimizing false positives. The current design allows potential inspection speeds up to 40 mph, although all field tests have been conducted up to 15 mph so far. This paper summarizes (a) the latest technology development test conducted at the rail defect farm of Herzog, Inc. in St Joseph, MO in June 2010, and (b) the completion of the new Rail Defect Farm facility at the UCSD Camp Elliott Field Station with partial in-kind donations from the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Railway.

Coccia, Stefano; Phillips, Robert; Nucera, Claudio; Bartoli, Ivan; Salamone, Salvatore; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood; Carr, Gary

2011-03-01

89

Geology Report: Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Surficial geologic studies near the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) were conducted as part of a site characterization program. Studies included evaluation of the potential for future volcanism and Area 3 fault activity that could impact waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS. Future volcanic activity could lead to disruption of the Area 3 RWMS. Local and regional studies of volcanic risk indicate that major changes in regional volcanic activity within the next 1,000 years are not likely. Mapped basalts of Paiute Ridge, Nye Canyon, and nearby Scarp Canyon are Miocene in age. There is a lack of evidence for post-Miocene volcanism in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and the hazard of basaltic volcanism at the Area 3 RWMS, within the 1,000-year regulatory period, is very low and not a forseeable future event. Studies included a literature review and data analysis to evaluate unclassified published and unpublished information regarding the Area 3 and East Branch Area 3 faults mapped in Area 3 and southern Area 7. Two trenches were excavated along the Area 3 fault to search for evidence of near-surface movement prior to nuclear testing. Allostratigraphic units and fractures were mapped in Trenches ST02 and ST03. The Area 3 fault is a plane of weakness that has undergone strain resulting from stress imposed by natural events and underground nuclear testing. No major vertical displacement on the Area 3 fault since the Early Holocene, and probably since the Middle Pleistocene, can be demonstrated. The lack of major displacement within this time frame and minimal vertical extent of minor fractures suggest that waste disposal operations at the Area 3 RWMS will not be impacted substantially by the Area 3 fault, within the regulatory compliance period. A geomorphic surface map of Yucca Flat utilizes the recent geomorphology and soil characterization work done in adjacent northern Frenchman Flat. The approach taken was to adopt the map unit boundaries (line work) of Swadley and Hoover (1990) and re-label these with map unit designations like those in northern Frenchman Flat (Huckins-Gang et al, 1995a,b,c; Snyder et al, 1995a,b,c,d).

NSTec Environmental Management

2006-07-01

90

Insulin-stimulated expression of c-fos, fra1 and c-jun accompanies the activation of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional complex.  

PubMed Central

The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcriptional complex is made up of members of the Fos (c-Fos, FosB, Fra1, Fra2) and Jun (c-Jun, JunB, JunD) families and is stimulated by insulin in several cell types. The mechanism by which insulin activates this complex is not well understood but it is dependent on the activation of the Erk1 and Erk2 isoforms of mitogen-activated protein kinases. In the current study we show that the AP-1 complex isolated from insulin-stimulated cells contained c-Fos, Fra1, c-Jun and JunB. The activation of the AP-1 complex by insulin was accompanied by (i) a transient increase in c-fos expression, and the transactivation of the ternary complex factors Elk1 and Sap1a, in an Erk1/Erk2-dependent fashion; (ii) a substantial increase in the expression of Fra1 protein and mRNA, which was preceded by a transient decrease in its electrophoretic mobility upon SDS/PAGE, indicative of phosphorylation; and (iii) a sustained increase in c-jun expression without increasing c-Jun phosphorylation on serines 63 and 73 or activation of the stress-activated kinase JNK/SAPK. In conclusion, insulin appears to stimulate the activity of the AP-1 complex primarily through a change in the abundance of the components of this complex, although there may be an additional role for Fra1 phosphorylation.

Griffiths, M R; Black, E J; Culbert, A A; Dickens, M; Shaw, P E; Gillespie, D A; Tavare, J M

1998-01-01

91

Correlated break at PARK2/FRA6E and loss of AF-6/Afadin protein expression are associated with poor outcome in breast cancer.  

PubMed

Common fragile sites (CFSs) are regions of chromosomal break that may play a role in oncogenesis. The most frequent alteration occurs at FRA3B, within the FHIT gene, at chromosomal region 3p14. We studied a series of breast carcinomas for break of a CFS at 6q26, FRA6E, and its associated gene PARK2, using fluorescence in situ hybridization on tissue microarrays (TMA). We found break of PARK2 in 6% of cases. We studied the PARK2-encoded protein Parkin by using immunohistochemistry on the same TMA. Loss of Parkin was found in 13% of samples but was not correlated with PARK2 break. PARK2 break but not Parkin expression was correlated with prognosis. Alteration of PARK2/FRA6E may cause haplo-insufficiency of one or several telomeric potential tumor suppressor genes (TSG). The AF-6/MLLT4 gene, telomeric of PARK2, encodes the Afadin scaffold protein, which is essential for epithelial integrity. Loss of Afadin was found in 14.5% of cases, and 36% of these cases showed PARK2 break. Loss of Afadin had prognostic impact, suggesting that AF-6 may be a TSG. Loss of Afadin was correlated with loss of FHIT expression, suggesting fragility of FRA6E and FRA3B in a certain proportion of breast tumors. PMID:16819513

Letessier, A; Garrido-Urbani, S; Ginestier, C; Fournier, G; Esterni, B; Monville, F; Adélaïde, J; Geneix, J; Xerri, L; Dubreuil, P; Viens, P; Charafe-Jauffret, E; Jacquemier, J; Birnbaum, D; Lopez, M; Chaffanet, M

2006-07-03

92

Learning-dependent activation of Fra1: Involvement of ventral hippocampus and SNc\\/VTA complex in learning and habit formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the effect of overtraining on learning processes in rats has long been studied, only few studies have specifically assessed the differential involvement of brain areas in habit formation. We used the analysis of expression of the immediate early gene Fra-1 as a tool to differentiate the areas involved in training and overtraining. Behavioural experiments showed that instrumental performance (signalled

Alexis Faure; Françoise Conde; Fabrice Cheruel; Nicole el Massioui

2006-01-01

93

Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 2A Promotes Invasion of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells through ERK/Fra-1-Mediated Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9  

PubMed Central

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly metastatic, and this malignant feature may be promoted by an EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A). Acting as a signal regulator, LMP2A can enhance invasiveness and motility of epithelial cells. Downstream from the LMP2A-triggered signaling events, it is largely unknown what key effector proteins are induced and essentially promote cell invasion. In the present study, we found that in NPC cells, LMP2A upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a metastasis-associated protease. LMP2A increased MMP9 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. It also activated the MMP9 promoter, in which two AP-1 elements were required for the promoter activation. Among AP-1 transcription factors, Fra-1 was induced by LMP2A and is essential for LMP2A-triggered MMP9 expression. Induction of Fra-1 was dependent on the LMP2A-activated ERK1/2 pathway, and induction of the ERK1/2–Fra-1–MMP9 axis required PY motifs in the amino-terminal domain of LMP2A. Notably, LMP2A-promoted invasion of NPC cells was blocked when MMP9 expression, Fra-1 induction, or ERK1/2 activation was inhibited. In addition, we found an association of LMP2A with MMP9 expression in NPC tumor biopsy specimens, where Fra-1 was a major mediation factor. This study reveals an underlying mechanism of LMP2A-induced cell invasion, from signal transduction to upregulation of a critical protease. Considering that MMP9 can also be upregulated by another EBV oncoprotein, LMP1, this protease may be a pivotal effector at which the EBV-induced, invasion-promoting mechanisms converge, serving as an attractive therapeutic target for NPC treatment.

Lan, Yu-Yan; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Chang, Kung-Chao; Chang, Jeffrey Shu-Ming; Chen, Chaio-Wei; Lai, Hsiao-Ching; Wu, Shih-Yi; Yeh, Tzu-Hao; Chang, Fang-Hsin; Lin, Wei-Hung; Su, Ih-Jen

2012-01-01

94

ATR Preferentially Interacts with Common Fragile Site FRA3B and the Binding Requires its Kinase Activity in Response to Aphidicolin Treatment  

PubMed Central

The instability of common fragile sites (CFSs) contributes to the development of a variety of cancers. The ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint pathway has been implicated in maintaining CFS stability, but the mechanism is incompletely understood. The goal of our study was to elucidate the action of the ATR protein in the CFS-specific ATR-dependent checkpoint response. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that ATR protein preferentially binds (directly or through complexes) to fragile site FRA3B as compared to non-fragile site regions, under conditions of mild replication stress. Interestingly, the amount of ATR protein that bound to three regions of FRA3B peaked at 0.4 ?M aphidicolin (APH) treatment and decreased again at higher concentrations of APH. The total amounts of cellular ATR and several ATR-interacting proteins remained unchanged, suggesting that ATR binding to the fragile site is guided initially by the level of replication stress signals generated at FRA3B due to APH treatment and then sequestered from FRA3B regions by successive signals from other non-fragile site regions, which are produced at the higher concentrations of APH. This decrease in ATR binding to fragile site FRA3B at the higher concentrations of APH may account for the increasing number of chromosome gaps and breaks observed under the same conditions. Furthermore, inhibition of ATR kinase activity by treatment with 2-aminopurine (2-AP) or by over-expression of a kinase-dead ATR mutant showed that the kinase activity is required for the binding of ATR to fragile DNAs in response to APH treatment. Our results provide novel insight into the mechanism for the regulation of fragile site stability by ATR.

Wan, Cheng; Kulkarni, Atul; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

2010-01-01

95

Geologic Characterization of Young Alluvial Basin-Fill Deposits from Drill Hole Data in Yucca Flat, Nye County, Nevada.  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Flat is a topographic and structural basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada, that has been the site of numerous underground nuclear tests; many of these tests occurred within the young alluvial basin-fill deposits. The migration of radionuclides to the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer involves passage through this thick, heterogeneous section of Tertiary and Quaternary rock. An understanding of the lateral and vertical changes in the material properties of young alluvial basin-fill deposits will aid in the further development of the hydrogeologic framework and the delineation of hydrostratigraphic units and hydraulic properties required for simulating ground-water flow in the Yucca Flat area. This report by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, presents data and interpretation regarding the three-dimensional variability of the shallow alluvial aquifers in areas of testing at Yucca Flat, data that are potentially useful in the understanding of the subsurface flow system. This report includes a summary and interpretation of alluvial basin-fill stratigraphy in the Yucca Flat area based on drill hole data from 285 selected drill holes. Spatial variations in lithology and grain size of the Neogene basin-fill sediments can be established when data from numerous drill holes are considered together. Lithologic variations are related to different depositional environments within the basin including alluvial fan, channel, basin axis, and playa deposits.

Donald S. Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

2007-01-22

96

Geohydrologic and drill-hole data for test well USW H-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data are presented on drilling operations, lithology, geophysical well logs, sidewall-core samples, water-level monitoring, pumping tests, injection tests, radioactive-tracer borehole flow survey, and water chemistry for test well USW H-4. The well is one of a series of test wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. These test wells are part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations to identify sites for storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Test well USW H-4 was drilled in ash-flow tuff to a total depth of 1,219 meters. Depth to water below land surface was 519 meters or at an altitude of 730 meters above sea level. After test pumping at a rate of 17.4 liters per second for approximately 9 days, the drawdown was 4.85 meters. A radioactive borehole-flow survey indicated that the Bullfrog Member was the most productive geologic unit, producing 36.5 percent of the water in the well. The second most productive geologic unit was the Tram Member, which produced 32 percent of the water. The water in test well USW H-4 is predominantly a soft, sodium bicarbonate type of water typical of water produced in tuffaceous rocks in southern Nevada. (USGS)

Whitfield, M. S.; Thordarson, William; Eshom, E. P.

1984-01-01

97

Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to provide information on potential environmental impacts that could result from a Proposed Action to construct, operate and monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain site in Nye County, Nevada. The EIS also provides information on potential environmental impacts from an alternative referred to as the No-Action Alternative, under which there would be no development of a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain.

N /A

2002-10-25

98

Common chromosome fragile sites in human and murine epithelial cells and FHIT/FRA3B loss-induced global genome instability.  

PubMed

Chromosomal positions of common fragile sites differ in lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, with positions dependent on the epigenetically determined density of replication origins at these loci. Because rearrangement of fragile loci and associated loss of fragile gene products are hallmarks of cancers, we aimed to map common fragile sites in epithelial cells, from which most cancers derive. Among the five most frequently activated sites in human epithelial cells were chromosome bands 2q33 and Xq22.1, which are not among top fragile sites identified in lymphoblasts or fibroblasts. FRA16D at 16q23 was among the top three fragile sites in the human epithelial cells examined, as it is in lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, while FRA3B at 3p14.2, the top fragile locus in lymphoblasts, was not fragile in most epithelial cell lines tested. Epithelial cells exhibited varying hierarchies of fragile sites; some frequent epithelial cell fragile sites are apparently not frequently altered in epithelial cancers and sites that are frequently deleted in epithelial cancers are not necessarily among the most fragile. Since we have reported that loss of expression of the FRA3B-encoded FHIT protein causes increased replication stress-induced DNA damage, we also examined the effect of FHIT-deficiency on markers of genome instability in epithelial cells. FHIT-deficient cells exhibited increases in fragile breaks and in ?H2AX and 53BP1 foci in G1 phase cells, confirming in epithelial cells that the FHIT gene and encompassing FRA3B, is a "caretaker gene" necessary for maintenance of genome stability. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23929738

Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Horton, Susan; Saldivar, Joshua C; Miuma, Satoshi; Stampfer, Martha R; Heerema, Nyla A; Huebner, Kay

2013-08-09

99

The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3\\/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However, the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which

Haoran Li; Daphne T. Mapolelo; Nin N. Dingra; Sunil G. Naik; Nicolas S. Lees; Brian M. Hoffman; Pamela J. Riggs-Gelasco; Boi Hanh Huynh; Michael K. Johnson; Caryn E. Outten

2009-01-01

100

Inter and intrasite analyses of cultural materials from U20aw, Nye County, Nevada. Technical report No. 66  

SciTech Connect

In the Spring of 1986 Desert Research Institute (DRI) conducted a Class III archaeological survey of Drill Hole U20aw on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Seven archaeological sites were located during the course of this survey including two temporary camps, four lithic scatters, and a possible pinyon cache. This report presents the results of the analyses of the data derived from all sites investigated during the data recovery operations on Drill Hole U20aw. Detailed analyses were focused on the spatial distribution of artifacts and features within and between sites in the southern portion of the study area (26Ny4867, 26Ny4869, and 26Ny4871). These analyses indicate that 26Ny4871 served principally as a temporary camp, while the area around the canyonhead to the east (which includes 26Ny4867 and 26Ny4869) seems to have been used as a site for both temporary camps and special activity loci. Projectile point styles suggest that the area was occupied from the Early Archaic into the early Historic period. Analyses of the artifacts that were recovered indicate that obsidian was the preferred material for all classes of flaked stone tools. All stages of lithic reduction are represented on the sites, but core reduction and thinning of bifaces appear to have been the primary activities. Processing of floral foods is indicated by the presence of several ground stone artifacts. Pinyon nuts and other items appear to have been stored in the area of 26Ny4869 and to the north of the drill hole as evidenced by the presence of several rock features that may have served as caches.

Hicks, P.A.; Pippin, L.C.; Henton, G.H.; Hemphill, M.L.; Lockett, C.L.

1991-12-01

101

A scientific approach to the characterization of the painting materials of Fra Mattia della Robbia polychrome terracotta altarpiece  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last restoration (2008-2011) of the polychrome terracotta altarpiece called Coronation of Virgin between Saints Rocco, Sebastian, Peter martyr and Antonio abbot, located in the collegiate church of S. Maria Assunta in Montecassiano (Macerata, Italy), scientific investigations were carried out to acquire detailed information about the painting technique. The identification of materials allowed a correct restoration. The altarpiece is almost entirely realized by Marco della Robbia (Fra Mattia), dates back to the first half of the XVI century and represents an interesting example of painted terracotta produced by using two different techniques: glazed polychrome terracotta and the "cold painting" technique. The characterization of the samples' material constituents was obtained by analysing the cross-sections and the fragments by different techniques (optical, SEM-EDS and ATR-FTIR microscopy as well as GC-MS), as the real nature of a component is often difficult to assess with one single technique. The optical microscope examination of paint cross-sections shows the presence of many layers, indicating the complexity of the paint stratigraphic morphologies. The original polychromy of della Robbia's masterpiece is constituted of cinnabar, red lake, red lead, orpiment, red ochre, lead white, lead tin yellow, green earth and raw umber. Two different types of gilding technique have been distinguished. The first one presents a glue mordant, and the second one shows an oil mordant composed by a mixture of red lead, red ochre, cinnabar and orpiment. The GC-MS analysis allowed the characterisation of linseed oil and a mixture of animal glue and egg as binding media stratigraphically located by the use of ATR-FTIR mapping microscopy. The analytical results of the painted terracotta integrated investigations show that original technique adopted is characterised by the application of pigments in an oil-binding medium directly applied on the substrates, probably treated with oil and animal glue. A large number of overpaintings above the original scheme of polychromy was found, which could be ascribed to almost three different interventions; the absence of modern pigments suggests that they could be realized long ago.

Amadori, M. L.; Barcelli, S.; Casoli, A.; Mazzeo, R.; Prati, S.

2013-05-01

102

LOXL4 is induced by transforming growth factor ?1 through Smad and JunB/Fra2 and contributes to vascular matrix remodeling.  

PubMed

Transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1) is a pleiotropic factor involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and remodeling. In search for novel genes mediating the action of TGF-?1 on vascular ECM, we identified the member of the lysyl oxidase family of matrix-remodeling enzymes, lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4), as a direct target of TGF-?1 in aortic endothelial cells, and we dissected the molecular mechanism of its induction. Deletion mapping and mutagenesis analysis of the LOXL4 promoter demonstrated the absolute requirement of a distal enhancer containing an activator protein 1 (AP-1) site and a Smad binding element for TGF-?1 to induce LOXL4 expression. Functional cooperation between Smad proteins and the AP-1 complex composed of JunB/Fra2 accounted for the action of TGF-?1, which involved the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent phosphorylation of Fra2. We furthermore provide evidence that LOXL4 was extracellularly secreted and significantly contributed to ECM deposition and assembly. These results suggest that TGF-?1-dependent expression of LOXL4 plays a role in vascular ECM homeostasis, contributing to vascular processes associated with ECM remodeling and fibrosis. PMID:23572561

Busnadiego, Oscar; González-Santamaría, José; Lagares, David; Guinea-Viniegra, Juan; Pichol-Thievend, Cathy; Muller, Laurent; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

2013-04-09

103

Relative abundance and distribution of fishes and crayfish at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 2007-08  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study provides baseline data of native and non-native fish populations in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Nye County, Nevada, that can serve as a gauge in native fish enhancement efforts. In support of Carson Slough restoration, comprehensive surveys of Ash Meadows NWR fishes were conducted seasonally from fall 2007 through summer 2008. A total of 853 sampling stations were created using Geographic Information Systems and National Agricultural Imagery Program. In four seasons of sampling, Amargosa pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) was captured at 388 of 659 stations. The number of captured Amargosa pupfish ranged from 5,815 (winter 2008) to 8,346 (summer 2008). The greatest success in capturing Amargosa pupfish was in warm water spring-pools with temperature greater than 25 degrees C, headwaters of warm water spring systems, and shallow (depths less than 10 centimeters) grassy marshes. In four seasons of sampling, Ash Meadows speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus nevadesis) was captured at 96 of 659 stations. The number of captured Ash Meadows speckled dace ranged from 1,009 (summer 2008) to 1,552 (winter 2008). The greatest success in capturing Ash Meadows speckled dace was in cool water spring-pools with temperature less than 20 degrees C and in the high flowing water outflows. Among 659 sampling stations within the range of Amargosa pupfish, red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) was collected at 458 stations, western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) at 374 stations, and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) at 128 stations. School Springs was restored during the course of this study. Prior to restoration of School Springs, maximum Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis pectoralis) captured from the six springs of the Warm Springs Complex was 765 (fall 2007). In four seasons of sampling, Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish were captured at 85 of 177 stations. The greatest success in capturing Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish when co-occurring with red swamp crayfish and western mosquitofish was in water with temperature greater than 26 degrees C near the springhead, and in shallow (depths less than 10 centimeters) grassy marshes. Among 177 sampling stations within the range of Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish, red swamp crayfish were collected at 96 stations and western mosquitofish were collected at 49 stations. Removal of convict cichlid (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) from Fairbanks Spring was followed by a substantial increase in Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) captures from 910 pre-removal to 3,056 post-removal. Red swamp crayfish was continually removed from Bradford 1 Spring, which seemed to cause an increase in the speckled dace population. Restoration of Kings Pool and Jackrabbit Springs promoted the success of native fishes with the greatest densities in restored reaches. Ongoing restoration of Carson Slough and its tributaries, as well as control and elimination of invasive species, is expected to increase abundance and distribution of Ash Meadows' native fish populations. Further analysis of data from this study will help determine the habitat characteristic(s) that promote native species and curtail non-native species.

Scoppettone, G. Gary; Rissler, Peter; Johnson, Danielle; Hereford, Mark

2011-01-01

104

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01

105

The comparative behavior of apatite-zircon U-Pb systems in Apollo 14 breccias: Implications for the thermal history of the Fra Mauro Formation.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) U-Pb analyses of zircon and apatite from four breccia samples from the Apollo 14 landing site. The zircon and apatite grains occur as cogenetic minerals in lithic clasts in two of the breccias and as unrelated mineral clasts in the matrices of the other two. SIMS U-Pb analyses show that the ages of zircon grains range from 4023 ± 24 Ma to 4342 ± 5 Ma, whereas all apatite grains define an isochron corresponding to an age of 3926 ± 3 Ma. The disparity in the ages of cogenetic apatite and zircon demonstrates that the apatite U-Pb systems have been completely reset at 3926 ± 3 Ma, whereas the U-Pb system of zircon has not been noticeably disturbed at this time. The apatite U-Pb age is slightly older than the ages determined by other methods on Apollo 14 materials highlighting need to reconcile decay constants used for the U-Pb, Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr systems. We interpret the apatite age as a time of formation of the Fra Mauro Formation. If the interpretation of this Formation as an Imbrium ejecta is correct, apatite also determines the timing of Imbrium impact. The contrast in the Pb loss behavior of apatite and zircon places constraints on the temperature history of the Apollo 14 breccias and we estimate, from the experimentally determined Pb diffusion constants and an approximation of the original depth of the excavated samples in the Fra Mauro Formation, that the breccias experienced an initial temperature of about 1300-1100 °C, but cooled within the first five to ten years.

Nemchin, A. A.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Healy, D.; Grange, M. L.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Vaughan, J.

2009-12-01

106

Knockdown of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus blocks prolactin surges and alters FRA expression in the locus coeruleus of female rats.  

PubMed

The nature of the circadian signal from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) required for prolactin (PRL) surges is unknown. Because the SCN neuronal circadian rhythm is determined by a feedback loop of Period (Per) 1, Per2, and circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) gene expressions, we investigated the effect of SCN rhythmicity on PRL surges by disrupting this loop. Because lesion of the locus coeruleus (LC) abolishes PRL surges and these neurons receive SCN projections, we investigated the role of SCN rhythmicity in the LC neuronal circadian rhythm as a possible component of the circadian mechanism regulating PRL surges. Cycling rats on proestrous day and estradiol-treated ovariectomized rats received injections of antisense or random-sequence deoxyoligonucleotide cocktails for clock genes (Per1, Per2, and Clock) in the SCN, and blood samples were taken for PRL measurements. The percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons immunoreactive to Fos-related antigen (FRA) was determined in ovariectomized rats submitted to the cocktail injections and in a 12:12-h light:dark (LD) or constant dark (DD) environment. The antisense cocktail abolished both the proestrous and the estradiol-induced PRL surges observed in the afternoon and the increase of FRA expression in the LC neurons at Zeitgeber time 14 in LD and at circadian time 14 in DD. Because SCN afferents and efferents were probably preserved, the SCN rhythmicity is essential for the magnitude of daily PRL surges in female rats as well as for LC neuronal circadian rhythm. SCN neurons therefore determine PRL secretory surges, possibly by modulating LC circadian neuronal activity. PMID:17726143

Poletini, Maristela O; McKee, De'Nise T; Kennett, Jessica E; Doster, Jamie; Freeman, Marc E

2007-08-28

107

Addendum for the Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect

This document, which makes changes to Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--076, Revision 0 (June 2006) was prepared to address review comments of this final document by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated July 19, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • On Plate 1 (inserted in the back of the document), the ET Unit legend has been revised. The revised Plate 1 is included and replaces the original Plate 1. • Some of the Appendix D perturbation sensitivity analysis plots included on the CD for Sections D.3.1 and D.3.2 were not properly aligned. A revised CD is provided with all plots properly aligned.

John McCord

2007-05-01

108

Digitally Available Interval-Specific Rock-Sample Data Compiled from Historical Records, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Between 1951 and 1992, underground nuclear weapons testing was conducted at 828 sites on the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Prior to and following these nuclear tests, holes were drilled and mined to collect rock samples. These samples are organized and stored by depth of borehole or drift at the U.S. Geological Survey Core Library and Data Center at Mercury, Nevada, on the Nevada Test Site. From these rock samples, rock properties were analyzed and interpreted and compiled into project files and in published reports that are maintained at the Core Library and at the U.S. Geological Survey office in Henderson, Nevada. These rock-sample data include lithologic descriptions, physical and mechanical properties, and fracture characteristics. Hydraulic properties also were compiled from holes completed in the water table. Rock samples are irreplaceable because pre-test, in-place conditions cannot be recreated and samples cannot be recollected from the many holes destroyed by testing. Documenting these data in a published report will ensure availability for future investigators.

David B. Wood

2009-10-08

109

Genes encoding human caveolin-1 and -2 are co-localized to the D7S522 locus (7q31.1), a known fragile site (FRA7G) that is frequently deleted in human cancers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The (CA)n microsatellite repeat marker D7S522 is located on human chromosome 7q31.1 and is frequently deleted in a variety of human cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, prostate cancers, renal cell carcinomas, ovarian adenocarcinomas, colon carcinomas, and breast cancers. In addition, D7S522 spans FRA7G, a known common fragile site on human chromosome 7. Based on these

Jeffrey A Engelman; Xiao Lan Zhang; Michael P Lisanti

1998-01-01

110

Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect

This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

John McCord

2007-05-01

111

Preliminary three-dimensional discrete fracture model of the Topopah Spring tuff in the Exploratory Studies Facility, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Discrete-fracture modeling is part of site characterization for evaluating Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, as a potential high-level radioactive-waste repository site. Because most of the water and gas flow may be in fractures in low-porosity units, conventional equivalent-continuum models do not adequately represent the flow system. Discrete-fracture modeling offers an alternative to the equivalent-continuum method. This report describes how discrete-fracture networks can be constructed and used to answer concerns about the flow system at Yucca Mountain, including quantifying fracture connectivity, deriving directional-permeability distributions for one-and two-phase flow, determining parameters of anisotropy at different scales, and determining at what scale the rock functions as an equivalent continuum. A three-dimensional discrete-fracture model was developed to investigate the effects of fractures on flow of water and gas in the Topopah Spring tuff of Miocene age in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain. Fracture data, used as model input, were taken exclusively from detailed line surveys in the Exploratory Studies Facility and converted into input parameters for simulation. A simulated fracture network was calibrated to field data. The simulated discrete fracture network was modified by eliminating nonconductive fractures determined from field-derived permeabilities. Small fractures also were removed from the simulated network without affecting the overall connectivity. Fractures, as much as 1.50 meters in length, were eliminated (a large percentage of the total number of fractures) from the network without altering the number of connected pathways. The analysis indicates that the fracture system in the Exploratory Studies Facility has numerous connected fractures that have relatively large permeabilities, but there are relatively few connected pathways across the simulated region. The fracture network was, therefore, sparse.

Anna, L.O.

1998-09-01

112

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.  

SciTech Connect

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

2007-08-07

113

Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

A steady-state groundwater flow model of the Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit (CAU) has been constructed using a suite of hydrostratigraphic frameworks, recharge distributions, and hydraulic parameter assignment conceptualizations. Model calibration and sensitivity analyses, and geochemical verification were conducted and documented. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office initiated the Underground Test Area Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater on the Nevada Test Site and vicinity through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The processes that will be used to complete Underground Test Area corrective actions are described in the "Corrective Action Strategy" in the FFACO Appendix VI, Rev. 1 (December 7, 2000). The objective of the strategy is to analyze and evaluate each Underground Test Area CAU through a combination of data and information collection and evaluation, and modeling groundwater flow and contaminant transport, including uncertainty. The FFACO corrective action process for the Central and Western Pahute Mesa CAUs was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan identified a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of testing on groundwater and simulate a contaminant boundary. The first step is the compilation and evaluation of existing and new data for use in the flow model and is documented in a series of data compilation and analysis reports, including Hydrologic Data for Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada. The second step is the development of the groundwater flow model, documented in this report. The third step is the development of the transport model to assess the migration of radionuclides away from underground nuclear test cavities on Pahute Mesa. Underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa that are of interest to the Underground Test Area Project are those detonated in deep vertical shafts, or drilled into volcanic rock near or below the water table. A total of 82 such underground nuclear tests were conducted in Pahute Mesa. Sixty-four of these tests were detonated on Central Pahute Mesa (CAU 101), and 18 tests were detonated in Western Pahute Mesa (CAU 102). Transport in groundwater is the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from Pahute Mesa underground nuclear tests.

Greg Ruskauff

2006-06-01

114

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Futo, Kiyoto; Oliver, Thomas A.; Marshall, Brian D.

2007-01-01

115

A functional activating protein 1 (AP-1) site regulates matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) transcription by cardiac cells through interactions with JunB-Fra1 and JunB-FosB heterodimers.  

PubMed Central

Enhanced synthesis of a specific matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-2, has been demonstrated in experimental models of ventricular failure and in cardiac extracts from patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Cultured neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes were used to analyse the determinants of MMP-2 synthesis, including the effects of hypoxia. Culture of rat cardiac fibroblasts for 24 h in 1% oxygen enhanced MMP-2 synthesis by more than 5-fold and augmented the MMP-2 synthetic responses of these cells to endothelin-1, angiotensin II and interleukin 1beta. A series of MMP-2 promoter-luciferase constructs were used to map the specific enhancer element(s) that drive MMP-2 transcription in cardiac cells. Deletion studies mapped a region of potent transactivating function within the 91 bp region from -1433 to -1342 bp, the activity of which was increased by hypoxia. Oligonucleotides from this region were cloned in front of a heterologous simian-virus-40 (SV40) promoter and mapped the enhancer activity to a region between -1410 and -1362 bp that included a potential activating protein 1 (AP-1)-binding sequence, C(-1394)CTGACCTCC. Site-specific mutagenesis of the core TGAC sequence (indicated in bold) eliminated the transactivating activity within the -1410 to -1362 bp sequence. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using the -1410 to -1362 bp oligonucleotide and rat cardiac fibroblast nuclear extracts demonstrated specific nuclear-protein binding that was eliminated by cold competitor oligonucleotide, but not by the AP-1-mutated oligonucleotide. Antibody-supershift EMSAs of nuclear extracts from normoxic rat cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated Fra1 and JunB binding to the -1410 to -1362 bp oligonucleotide. Nuclear extracts isolated from hypoxic rat cardiac fibroblasts contained Fra1, JunB and also included FosB. Co-transfection of cardiac fibroblasts with Fra1-JunB and FosB-JunB expression plasmids led to significant increases in transcriptional activity. These studies demonstrate that a functional AP-1 site mediates MMP-2 transcription in cardiac cells through the binding of distinctive Fra1-JunB and FosB-JunB heterodimers. The synthesis of MMP-2 is widely considered, in contrast with many members of the MMP gene family, to be independent of the AP-1 transcriptional complex. This report is the first demonstration that defined members of the Fos and Jun transcription-factor families specifically regulate this gene under conditions relevant to critical pathophysiological processes.

Bergman, Marina R; Cheng, Sunfa; Honbo, Norman; Piacentini, Lucia; Karliner, Joel S; Lovett, David H

2003-01-01

116

Fermentering af sukkerstoffer fra lignocellulose (træstof) til ethanol (sprit) og andre værdifulde produkter For at få en økonomisk rentabel proces baseret på lignocellulose er det vigtigt, at både glucose og hemicellulose omdannes til ethanol. Mucor indicus har stort potentiale som mikroorganisme i denne produktion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bioethanol (sprit) er det flydende biobrændstof, der produceres mest af i verden. Biobrændstoffer er flydende eller gasformige brændstoffer (bioethanol, biogas, biodiesel, planteolie eller biobrint) til transportsektoren fremstillet især ved fermentering. Biobrændstof er en vedvarende energibærer, da energikilden er solenergi lagret i plante-biomasse i form af kemisk energi, især sukkere, hvor kulstoffet er fikseret fra luftens kuldioxid ved fotosyntese. Det resulterer

Af Mette; Hedegaard Thomsen

117

Addendum for the Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect

This document, which makes changes to Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--077, Revision 0 (June 2006), was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 4, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made for the two plates inserted in the back of the document: • Plate 4: Disregard the repeat of legend text ‘Drill Hole Name’ and ‘Drill Hole Location’ in the lower left corner of the map. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-16-1 location (white dot on the lower left side of the map) is not color-coded because no water level has been determined. The well location is included for reference. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-12-1 location (upper left corner of the map), a yellow dot, represents the lower water level elevation. The higher water level elevation, represented by a red dot, was overprinted.

John McCord

2007-05-01

118

The group-based social skills training SOSTA-FRA in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder - study protocol of the randomised, multi-centre controlled SOSTA - net trial  

PubMed Central

Background Group-based social skills training (SST) has repeatedly been recommended as treatment of choice in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD). To date, no sufficiently powered randomised controlled trial has been performed to establish efficacy and safety of SST in children and adolescents with HFASD. In this randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with 220 children and adolescents with HFASD it is hypothesized, that add-on group-based SST using the 12 weeks manualised SOSTA–FRA program will result in improved social responsiveness (measured by the parent rated social responsiveness scale, SRS) compared to treatment as usual (TAU). It is further expected, that parent and self reported anxiety and depressive symptoms will decline and pro-social behaviour will increase in the treatment group. A neurophysiological study in the Frankfurt HFASD subgroup will be performed pre- and post treatment to assess changes in neural function induced by SST versus TAU. Methods/design The SOSTA – net trial is designed as a prospective, randomised, multi-centre, controlled trial with two parallel groups. The primary outcome is change in SRS score directly after the intervention and at 3 months follow-up. Several secondary outcome measures are also obtained. The target sample consists of 220 individuals with ASD, included at the six study centres. Discussion This study is currently one of the largest trials on SST in children and adolescents with HFASD worldwide. Compared to recent randomised controlled studies, our study shows several advantages with regard to in- and exclusion criteria, study methods, and the therapeutic approach chosen, which can be easily implemented in non-university-based clinical settings. Trial registration ISRCTN94863788 – SOSTA – net: Group-based social skills training in children and adolescents with high functioning autism spectrum disorder.

2013-01-01

119

Avloepsvann fra Blekerier (Waste Water from Bleaching Works).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a survey of the literature regarding the bleaching of chemical substances and the compounds which are released from bleaching works. In conventional bleaching with chlorine, a number of chlorinated organic compounds are formed. It has been ...

V. Loras

1976-01-01

120

Skurlastkvalitet fra Sandeskur (Sawn Timber Quality from Sandeskur).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this report the results from grading of sawn timber from a timber quality called Sandeskur is shown. The timber quality is between pulpwood and the lowest saw wood quality. The sawn timber is graded according to NS-INSTA 142 and the commercial grading ...

A. Ovrum

2002-01-01

121

76 FR 48800 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...9 a.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Williams, RAC Designated Federal Official, Austin Ranger District, 100 Midas Canyon Road, P.O. Box 130, Austin, Nevada 89310, 775-964-2671, e-mail swilliams01@fs.fed.us. Dated:...

2011-08-09

122

77 FR 58095 - White Pine-Nye Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Williams, RAC Designated Federal Official, Austin Ranger District, 100 Midas Canyon Road, P.O. Box 130, Austin, Nevada 89310, 775-964-2671, email swilliams01@fs.fed.us. Individuals...

2012-09-19

123

Nye Lecture: Water Under Ice: Curiosities, Complexities, and Catastrophes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meltwater beneath glaciers and ice sheets activates some of the most curious and impressive phenomena known to glaciology. These range from the generation of miniscule electrokinetic currents by water flow through subglacial sediment to massive outburst floods that rearrange landscapes and deliver freshwater pulses to the ocean. The source of this water varies but is some mix of surface water

G. K. Clarke

2006-01-01

124

1989 wildlife studies at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of the field investigations were to assess the late summer/early autumn conditions in the Focused Baseline Study Area (FBSA), to make observations useful in developing reclamation strategies and impact models, to compare data with those developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), and to obtain information that can be used for monitoring DOE activities during Site Characterization. The studies were being conducted in conjunction with a portion of the work program presented in the Nevada Environmental Studies Plan, for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Project Office. The investigations entail the collection of primary data on the vegetation, wildlife, and soils and landforms of the study area. 9 refs., 4 tabs.

NONE

1990-03-01

125

Longitudinal oscillations of bars. (Prodol'nye kolebaniya sterzhnei).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper takes up longitudinal oscillations of bars whose materials do not follow Hooke's law, as well as non-elastic longitudinal oscillations. The first part discusses non-linear problems of longitudinal oscillation: propagation of one-directional wave...

G. S. Shapiro

1989-01-01

126

Geohydrology of Pahute Mesa-3 test well, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Pahute Mesa-3 test well is on Pahute Mesa about 3 miles west of the Nevada Test Site and 20 miles northeast of Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nevada. The well was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy Radionuclide Migration Program to monitor conditions near the western edge of the Nevada Test Site. The well was drilled with conventional rotary methods and an air-foam drilling fluid to a depth of 3,019 feet. A 10.75-inch diameter steel casing was installed to a depth of 1,473 feet. The test well penetrates thick units of non-welded to partly welded ash-flow and air-fall tuff of Tertiary age with several thin layers of densely welded tuff, rhyolite and basalt flows, and breccia. Geophysical logs indicate that fractures are significant in the Tiva Canyon Tuff of the Paintbrush Group and this was confirmed by high flow in this unit during a borehole-flow survey. The geophysical logs also show that the effective porosity in tuffaceous units ranges from 19 to 38 percent and averages 30 percent, and the total porosity ranges from 33 to 55 percent and averages 42 percent. The measured temperature gradient of 1.00 degree Celsius per 100 feet is steep, but is similar to that of other nearby wells, one of which penetrates a buried granite intrusion. Injection tests for six intervals of the well yielded transmissivities that ranged from 3.1 x 10{sup -3} to 25 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivities that ranged from 6 x 10{sup -5} to 0.12 foot per day. The sum of the transmissivities is 28 feet squared per day and the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity is 1.7 x 10{sup -3} foot per day. Estimates of storage coefficient range from 2.1 x 10{sup -5} to 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, indicating that the aquifer responded to the injection tests in a confined manner. An aquifer test produced a drawdown of 78 feet during 31 hours of testing at 169 gallons per minute.

Kilroy, K.C.; Savard, C.S.

1997-02-01

127

EXACT: EXercise or Advice after ankle fraCTure. Design of a randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Ankle fractures are common. Management of ankle fractures generally involves a period of immobilisation followed by rehabilitation\\u000a to reduce pain, stiffness, weakness and swelling. The effects of a rehabilitation program are still unclear. However, it has\\u000a been shown that important components of rehabilitation programs may not confer additional benefits over exercise alone. The\\u000a primary aim of this trial is to

Paula R Beckenkamp; C Christine Lin; Robert D Herbert; Marion Haas; Kriti Khera; Anne M Moseley

2011-01-01

128

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...in: (1) rim, (2) flange, (3) plate or (4) hub area. (E) Wheel chip...or cracked with visible separation of metal. (B) Gouge between wheel seats... (E) Truck bolster and center plate interference preventing...

2012-10-01

129

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 215 - FRA Freight Car Standards Defect Code  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...in: (1) rim, (2) flange, (3) plate or (4) hub area. (E) Wheel chip...or cracked with visible separation of metal. (B) Gouge between wheel seats... (E) Truck bolster and center plate interference preventing...

2011-10-01

130

L'importanza dei suoni nella vita psichica e nel legame fra madre e figlio  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of sounds in our psychic life and in mother-child relationship A child in his mother's womb is immersed in a bath of stimulations (the ones coming from heart beat, blood flow, breathing, sleep-awake cycle, his mother's voice) and he is able to perceive them through amniotic fluid vibrations. De Casper has shown how, soon after birth, newborns recognize

Luigi Gualtieri

131

Familial fragility on chromosome 16 (Fra 16q22) enhanced by both interferon and distamycin A  

Microsoft Academic Search

A family with a “fragile site” at 16q22, inducible by both interferon and Distamycin A, is reported. Immunological problems were found in the family. In a sibship of ten, eight children had died in infancy. Our study led to the conclusions that interferon and Distamycin A induce fragility at the same site, which has the same characteristics as the spontaneous

Fiorella Shabtai; Dvora Klar; S. Bichacho; J. Hart; I. Halbrecht

1983-01-01

132

[Exact localization of several fragile sites remains uncertain. The example of fra(10) sensitive to folate].  

PubMed

The localization of the folate-sensitive fragile site first proposed to be at 10q24.2 was further assigned to 10q23. The study of one case using several banding techniques, and of 12 other unpublished cases studied with R-banding confirm the original localization, at the junction between 10q24.1 and 10q24.2. Because many reports propose that fragile sites induce further anomalies, we suggest that a re-study of the exact location of these sites with accurate methods is in order if misinterpretations are to be avoided. PMID:3879149

Dutrillaux, B; Muleris, M; Prieur, M

1985-01-01

133

VE-initiativ fra gulvet. (Renewable energy initiatives taken from the scratch).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The aim of the project was to stimulate further activity with regard to renewable energy initiatives already begun on the island of Bornholm, Denmark, especially in the case of wind energy. Local authorities provided funding for the establishment of windm...

M. Poulsen N. Vendelbo J. Stenberg

1992-01-01

134

49 CFR 219.602 - FRA Administrator's determination of random drug testing rate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...employee has a substantially equal statistical chance of being selected within a specified time frame. The method may not permit subjective factors to play a role in selection, i.e., no employee may be selected as a result of the exercise of discretion...

2012-10-01

135

Sulla relazione fra la teoria di Tomonaga-Schwinger e quella di Dirac-Fock-Podolsky  

Microsoft Academic Search

Riassunto  Si dimostra, mediante una opportuna estensione covariante di un metodo proposto daBecker eLeibfried, che, per particelle tutte di un solo tipo, la teoria di Dirac-Fock-Podolsky è equivalente a una formulazione della teoria\\u000a di Tomonaga-Schwinger relativa ad un numero finito di particelle.

P. Bocchieri; A. Loinger

1955-01-01

136

49 CFR 242.103 - Approval of design of individual railroad programs by FRA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... QUALIFICATION AND CERTIFICATION OF CONDUCTORS Program and Eligibility Requirements...accept responsibility for the training of conductors and thereby obtain authority for that...railroad to initially certify a person as a conductor in an appropriate type of...

2012-10-01

137

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31

138

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500’ deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400’ encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105’ but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01

139

Distribution and Chemistry of Diagenetic Minerals at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site in southern Nevada for an underground, high-level nuclear waste repository. A major consideration for selecting this site is the presence of abundant zeolites in Miocene ash-flow tufts underlying the region. Beneath Yucca Mountain four diagenetic mineral zones have been recognized that become progressively less hydrous with depth. Zone I, the shallowest

D. E. Broxton; R. G. WARREN

1987-01-01

140

Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences] [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, Division of Earth Sciences; Shevenell, L., Garside, L. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Mackay School of Mines, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology

1995-12-01

141

Hydraulic Characterization of Overpressured Tuffs in Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A sequence of buried, bedded, air-fall tuffs has been used extensively as a host medium for underground nuclear tests detonated in the central part of Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Water levels within these bedded tuffs have been elevated hundreds of meters in areas where underground nuclear tests were detonated below the water table. Changes in the ground-water levels within these tuffs and changes in the rate and distribution of land-surface subsidence above these tuffs indicate that pore-fluid pressures have been slowly depressurizing since the cessation of nuclear testing in 1992. Declines in ground-water levels concurrent with regional land subsidence are explained by poroelastic deformation accompanying ground-water flow as fluids pressurized by underground nuclear detonations drain from the host tuffs into the overlying water table and underlying regional carbonate aquifer. A hydraulic conductivity of about 3 x 10-6 m/d and a specific storage of 9 x 10-6 m-1 are estimated using ground-water flow models. Cross-sectional and three-dimensional ground-water flow models were calibrated to measured water levels and to land-subsidence rates measured using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Model results are consistent and indicate that about 2 million m3 of ground water flowed from the tuffs to the carbonate rock as a result of pressurization caused by underground nuclear testing. The annual rate of inflow into the carbonate rock averaged about 0.008 m/yr between 1962 and 2005, and declined from 0.005 m/yr in 2005 to 0.0005 m/yr by 2300.

K.J. Halford; R.J. Laczniak; D.L. Galloway

2005-10-07

142

Archaeological investigations at sample unit U19ax, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the procedures and findings of archaeological investigations sample unit U19ax on Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site. Data recovery was conducted at sites 26NY4182, 26NY5428, 26NY7842, and 26NY7843. The investigation consisted of mapping and surface collection. Four surface artifact concentrations were defined, three it site 26NY4182 and one at site 26NY7843. Only chipped-stone and groundstone artifacts were recovered. Lithic technology at these locales was perceived to be primarily core reduction and biface thinning, possibly of intermediate stage biface production. The time frame for occupancy of the area ranges from Early Archaic to Historic based on temporally diagnostic artifacts and radiocarbon dates. The greatest intensity of occupation seems to be around the late Middle Archaic and the early Late Archaic. The test excavation at site 26NY5428 revealed significant cultural deposits that can contribute to the research objectives of the Long Range Study Plan for the archaeological work on Pahute Mesa. The site possesses stratified deposits and datable material. Radiocarbon dates place the site in the Middle and Late Archaic periods. Based on data from the test excavation, site 26NY5428 may be viewed as the primary locus of settlement and subsistence strategies within the immediate area. Due to large pieces of rockfall covering portions of the site, full-scale excavations are not possible at this time. Full-scale excavation of site 26NY5428 is recommended if no comparable site is found in other sample units.

Beck, C.M.; Johnson, W.G.; McArthur, R.D. (eds.); Drollinger, H.; McLane, A.R.; Nowack, C.; Pippin, L.C.

1992-01-01

143

Environmental assessment for liquid waste treatment at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment (EA) examines the potential impacts to the environment from treatment of low-level radioactive liquid and low-level mixed liquid and semi-solid wastes generated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The potential impacts of the proposed action and alternative actions are discussed herein in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended in Title 42 U.S.C. (4321), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) policies and procedures set forth in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1021 and DOE Order 451.1, ``NEPA Compliance Program.`` The potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, construction and operation of a centralized liquid waste treatment facility, were addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada. However, DOE is reevaluating the need for a centralized facility and is considering other alternative treatment options. This EA retains a centralized treatment facility as the proposed action but also considers other feasible alternatives.

NONE

1997-01-01

144

Summary of data concerning radiological contamination at well PM-2, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of water from well Pahute Mesa No. 2 (PM-2), on Pahute Mesa in the extreme northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, indicated tritium concentrations above background levels in August 1993. A coordinated investigation of the tritium occurrence in well PM-2 was undertaken by the Hydrologic Resources Management Program of the US Department of Energy. Geologic and hydrologic properties of the hydrogeologic units were characterized using existing information. Soil around the well and water quality in the well were characterized during the investigation. The purpose of this report is to present existing information and results from a coordinated investigation of tritium occurrence. The objectives of the overall investigation include: (1) determination of the type and concentration of contamination; (2) identification of the source and mechanism of contamination; (3) estimation of the extent of radiological contamination; (4) initiation of appropriate monitoring of the contamination; and (5) reporting of investigation results. Compiled and tabulated data of the area are presented. The report also includes characterization of geology, soil, hydrology, and water quality data.

Russell, G.M.; Locke, G.L.

1997-02-01

145

Field trip report: Observations made at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Special report No. 2  

SciTech Connect

A field trip was made to the Yucca Mountain area on December 5-9, 1992 by Jerry Frazier, Don Livingston, Christine Schluter, Russell Harmon, and Carol Hill. Forty-three separate stops were made and 275 lbs. of rocks were collected during the five days of the field trip. Key localities visited were the Bare Mountains, Yucca Mountain, Calico Hills, Busted Butte, Harper Valley, Red Cliff Gulch, Wahmonie Hills, Crater Flat, and Lathrop Wells Cone. This report only describes field observations made by Carol Hill. Drawings are used rather than photographs because cameras were not permitted on the Nevada Test Site during this trip.

Hill, C.A.

1993-03-01

146

Atmospheric overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report discusses atmospheric considerations for a nuclear waste repository at NTS. It presents the climatology of Nevada, and NTS in particular, including paleoclimatology for past climatic changes, present climatology for mean meterological conditions, feature climatological expectations, and occurrence of extreme weather. It discusses air quality aspects including an estimation of present air quality and possible dispersion conditions on NTS.

J. L. Bowen; R. T. Egami

1983-01-01

147

Mineral Resources of the Antelope Wilderness Study Area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At the request of the U.S. Bureau of land Management, 83,100 acres of the Antelope Wilderness Study Area (NV-4)60-231/241) was studied. In this report the studied area is called the 'wilderness study area', or simply the 'study area.' No identified mineral or energy resources occur within the study area. The southern part of the area has moderate mineral resource potential for undiscovered gold and silver, and the Woodruff Formation in the southern part of the area has high resource potential for undiscovered vanadium, zinc, selenium, molybdenum, and silver (fig. 1). This assessment is based on field geochemical studies in 1984 and 1985 by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and field geochemical studies and geologic mapping by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1984 and 1985. The remainder of the study area has low resource potential for undiscovered gold, silver, lead, zinc, manganese, tin, and molybdenum. The study area also has low resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. The Antelope Wilderness Study Area is about midway between Tonopah and Eureka, Nev., in the northern Hot Creek Range and southern Antelope Range of central Nevada. It is accessible by unimproved dirt roads extending 20 mi (miles) north from U.S. Highway 6 and 40 mi south from U.S. Highway 50 (fig. 2). Most of the study area consists of rugged mountainous terrain having approximately 2,600 ft (feet) of relief. The mountain range is a block tilted gently to the east and bounded on both sides by normal faults that dip steeply to moderately west and have major displacements. Most of the study area is underlain by a thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks that predominantly consist of silicic ash-flow tuff, the Windous Butte Formation. Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic (see geologic time chart in appendix) marine sediments occur along the southern margin of the study area, and lower Paleozoic rocks are exposed in the northeast corner. The areas of exposed Paleozoic-Mesozoic rocks along the southern margin of the study area have moderate mineral resource potential for gold and silver in sediment-hosted, disseminated, epithermal (low-temperature) gold-silver deposits (fig. 1). These rocks consist of folded and thrust-faulted, fine-grained clastic sediments and limestone and dolomite that locally have been brecciated and hydrothermally altered. The alteration (locally, strong silicification) and geochemical associations of these rocks indicate a favorable environment for such deposits. Exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the same geologic environment is currently being conducted just south of the study area. The remainder of the study area has low resource potential for epithermal gold and silver vein deposits in the Tertiary volcanic rocks. The Cenozoic sedimentary basins adjacent to the fault-bounded mountain block have moderate potential for petroleum resources; the study area itself has low potential for petroleum resources.

Hardyman, Richard F.; Poole, Forrest G.; Kleinhampl, Frank J.; Turner, Robert L.; Plouff, Donald; Duval, Joe S.; Johnson, Fredrick L.; Benjamin, David A.

1987-01-01

148

Geophysical studies of the Syncline Ridge area, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A wide variety of geophysical methods were employed to study a proposed nuclear waste site at Syncline Ridge on the Nevada Test Site, Nev. The proposed site was believed to be a relatively undisturbed synclinal structure containing a thick argillite unit of Misslsslppian age, the Eleana Formation unit J, which would be the emplacement medium. Data acquisition for the geophysical studies was constrained because of rugged topography in a block of Tipplpah Limestone overlying the central part of the proposed site. This study employed gravity, magnetic, seismic refraction and reflection, and four distinct electrical methods to try and define the structural integrity and shape of the proposed repository medium. Detailed and regional gravity work revealed complex structure at the site. Magnetics helped only in identifying small areas of Tertiary volcanic rocks because of low magnetization of the rocks. Seismic refraction assisted in identifying near surface faulting and bedrock structure. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining good quality reflection data. This implied significant structural complexity but also revealed the principal features that were supported by other data. Electrical methods were used for fault identification and for mapping of a thick argillaceous unit of the Eleana Formation in which nuclear waste was to be emplaced. The geophysical studies indicate that major faults along the axis of Syncline Ridge and on both margins have large vertical offsets displacing units so as not only to make mining difficult, but also providing potential paths for waste migration to underlying carbonate aquifers. The Eleana Formation appeared heterogeneous, which was inferred to be due to structural complexity. Only a small region in the northwest part of the study area was found to contain a thick and relatively undisturbed volume of host rock.

Hoover, D. B.; Hanna, W. F.; Anderson, L. A.; Flanigan, V. J.; Pankratz, L. W.

1982-01-01

149

Inflow to a crack in playa deposits of Yucca Lake, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A crack about 1 mile long opened in 1969 in the dry bed of Yucca Lake, a playa on the Nevada Test Site. Accumulation of water from precipitation on the lakebed drained rapidly into the crack and led to concern whether the water entering the crack was directly recharging the very transmissive Paleozoic carbonate comprising the aquifer for the regional

G. C. Doty; F. E. Rush

1985-01-01

150

Ground-water levels beneath eastern Pahute Mesa and vicinity, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents water-level and basic construction data for drill holes in and around the primary are of underground testing on eastern Pahute Mesa, and water-level contours based on the most recent water-level measurement made in each drill hole. Measurements are presented for 72 wells and span about 30 years. The map complements and earlier publication. Information is intended to benefit those involved in: the siting, drilling, and design of drill holes to house nuclear devices, the study of ground water hydrology and radionuclide transport beneath the Pahute Mesa, and investigations of regional ground water flow at and near the NTS.

O`Hagan, M.D.; Laczniak, R.J.

1996-08-01

151

Geohydrologic data from test hole USW UZ-7, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains a description of the methods used in drilling and coring of the test-hole USW UZ-7, a description of the methods used in collecting, handling, and testing of test-hole samples; Lithologic information from the test hole; and water-content, water-potential, bulk-density, grain-density, porosity, and tritium data for the test hole. Test-hole USW UZ-7 was drilled and cored to a total depth of 62.94 m. The drilling was done using air as a drilling fluid to minimize disturbance to the water content of cores, drill-bit cuttings, and borehole wall-rock. Beginning at the land surface, the unsaturated-zone rock that was penetrated consisted of alluvium; welded and partially to nonwelded ash-flow tuff; bedded and reworked ash-fall tuff; nonwelded ash-flow tuff; and welded ash-flow tuff. Values of gravimetric water content and water potential of alluvium were intermediate between the extreme values in welded and nonwelded units of tuff. Gravimetric water content was largest in bedded and nonwelded ash-fall tuffs and was smallest in welded ash-flow tuff. Values of water potential were more negative in densely welded ash-flow tuffs and were less negative in bedded and nonwelded ash-fall tuffs. Bulk density was largest in densely welded ash-flow tuffs and smallest in nonwelded and bedded ash-fall tuffs. Grain density was uniform but was slightly larger in nonwelded and bedded ash-fall tuffs than in welded ash-flow tuffs. Porosity trends were opposite to bulk-density trends. Tritium content in alluvium was smallest near the alluvium-bedrock contact, markedly increased in the middle of the deposit, and decreased in the near-surface zone of the deposit. (Author 's abstract)

Kume, Jack; Hammermeister, D. P.

1990-01-01

152

Nye Lecture: Snow Crystals, Shrubs, and the Changing Climate of the Arctic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the peak of winter, snow covers more than 45 million km2 of the northern hemisphere. More than 90 percent of this snow will melt before the end of the following summer. In the southern part of this snow-covered area, the seasonal pack is ephemeral, lasting but a few short weeks, but with increasing latitude (or altitude), it lasts much longer. In arctic and alpine locations it can persist for 9 months of the year. In these more extreme locations, the snow is an essential element of the ecosystem, both acting upon, and being acted on, by the biota. For historical reasons, our understanding of snow cover and its interactions has come from two disparate scientific sources: geophysicists working on glaciers and avalanches who were trying to understand snow properties and to develop a physical basis for snow science, and ecologists who were trying to understand the impact of snow on plants, animals, and humans. With the recognition now that snow is both a passive and active agent, we are seeing an increasing number of studies wherein both of these traditional approaches are combined. Geophysicists are learning the Latin names of shrubs while botanist can now identify wind slab. A personal example that illustrates the necessity of this melding process has been our effort to understand the climatic implications of Arctic snow-shrub interactions. We have had to combine traditional snow geophysical studies (i.e., crystal growth, thermal processes, light reflection) with traditional ecological studies (i.e., competition, carbon and nitrogen cycling). Through this process we have discovered that snow-shrub interactions, or more broadly, snow-vegetation interactions, are helping to push the Arctic down a warming trajectory that has global implications. Soil microbes and snow crystals, wind-blown snow and shrubs, are all leading actors in a climate change drama whose outcome is of concern to us all.

Sturm, M.

2005-12-01

153

FY-92 report on the isotope hydrology characterization of the Faultless test site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In January of 1968 the Faultless test shot at 975m below the surface had an estimated magnitude range between 200kt to 1Mt. The detonation resulted in a surface crater estimated at 1km in diameter accompanied by a > 3m collapse escarpment at the surface. Careful monitoring of outlying observation wells before, during and after the shot has provided valuable data on the hydrodynamic response of the groundwater. This report of FY92 investigations at Faultless by the Nuclear Chemistry Division at LLNL serves to outline new and previous isotopic data of natural and shot-related nuclides measured in the drillback hole and the two closest satellite wells. The goals of this study are: (1) to investigate and characterize the geochemical and isotopic variabilities of groundwater, as a function of groundwater source and age, (2) to determine concentrations of event-related nuclide activity and investigate any possible migration of the hydrologic source term. A more comprehensive source and age characterization from isotopic and geochemical variations of natural groundwater in the Hot Creek Valley would require a regional scale investigation.

Davisson, M.L.; Nimz, G.J.; Hudson, G.B.; Smith, D.K.; Rego, J.H.; Kenneally, J.M.

1994-02-01

154

A Hydrostratigraphic Model of the Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley Area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A 3-D hydrostratigraphic framework model has been built for the use of hydrologic modelers who are tasked with developing a model to determine how contaminants are transported by groundwater flow in an area of complex geology. The area of interest includes Pahute Mesa, a former nuclear testing area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and Oasis Valley, a groundwater discharge area down-gradient from contaminant source areas on Pahute Mesa. To build the framework model, the NTS hydrogeologic framework was integrated with an extensive collection of drill-hole data (stratigraphic, lithologic, and alteration data); a structural model; and several recent geophysical, geological, and hydrological studies to formulate a hydrostratigraphic system. The authors organized the Tertiary volcanic units in the study area into 40 hydrostratigraphic units that include 16 aquifers, 13 confining units, and 11 composite units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks were divided into six hydrostratigraphic units, including two aquifers and four confining units. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units (''layers'' in the model) along with all the major structural features that control them, including calderas and faults. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to address alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Six of these alternatives were developed so they could be modeled in the same fashion as the base model.

S. L. Drellack, Jr.; L. B. Prothro; J. L. Gonzales

2001-12-01

155

Archaeological data recovery at drill pad U19au, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Construction activities accompanying underground nuclear tests result in the disturbance of the surface terrain at the Nevada Test Site. In compliance with Federal legislation (National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (PL 89-665) and National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190)), the US Department of Energy (DOE), Field Office, Nevada, has long required that cultural resources studies must precede all land-disturbing activities on the Nevada Test Site. In accordance with 36 CFR Part 800, these studies consist of archaeological surveys conducted prior to the land-disturbing activities. The intent of these surveys is to identify and evaluate all cultural resources that might be adversely affected by the proposed construction activity. This report presents the final analysis of the data recovered from archaeological investigations conducted at the U19au drill site and access road. This report includes descriptions of the archaeological sites as recorded during the original survey, the research design used to guide the investigations, the method and techniques used to collect and analyze the data, and the results and interpretations of the analysis. 200 refs., 112 figs., 53 tabs.

Henton, G.H.; Pippin, L.C.

1991-01-01

156

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01

157

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-01-01

158

Hydrogeology of rocks penetrated by test well JF-3, Jackass Flats, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Geological Survey are monitoring water levels in southern Nevada and adjacent parts of California in response to concern about the potential effects of pumping ground water to support the Yucca Mountain Site-Characterization Program. Well JF-3 was drilled in the western part of Jackass Flats for monitoring water levels, for determining the likelihood of a hydraulic connection between well JF-3 and production wells J-12 and J-13, and for measuring the hydraulic properties of the Topopah Spring Tuff. The borehole for JF-3 penetrated about 480 feet of alluvium and 818 feet of underlying volcanic rock. The well was finished at a depth of 1,138 feet below land surface near the base of the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the principal volcanic-rock aquifer in the area. The Topopah Spring Tuff at well JF-3 extends from depths of 580 feet to 1,140 feet and consists of about 10 feet of partly to moderately welded ash-flow tuff; 10 feet of vitrophyre; 440 feet of devitrified, moderately to densely welded ash-flow tuff; 80 feet of densely welded ash-flow tuff; 10 feet of vitric, nonwelded to partly welded ash-flow tuff; and 10 feet of ashfall tuff. Fractures and lithophysae are most common in the devitrified tuff, especially between depths of 600 feet and 1,040 feet. Much of the water produced in well JF-3 probably comes from the sequence of these devitrified tuffs that is below the water table. The transmissivity of the aquifer is an estimated 140,000-160,000 feet squared per day and hydraulic conductivity is 330-370 feet per day. These values exceed estimates made at well J-13 by two orders of magnitude. Such large differences may be accounted for by differences in the development of fractures and lithophysae in the Topopah Spring Tuff at the two wells.

Plume, R.W.; La Camera, R.J.

1996-12-31

159

Site environmental report for calendar year 1997, Yucca Mountain Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document is the seventh annual Site Environmental Report (SER) submitted by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office (YMSCO) to describe the environmental program implemented by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain. As prescribed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA, 1982), this program ensures that site characterization activities are conducted in a manner that minimizes any significant adverse impacts to the environment and complies with all applicable laws and regulations. The most recent guidelines for the preparation of the SER place major emphasis on liquid and gaseous emissions of radionuclides, pollutants or hazardous substances; human exposure to radionuclides; and trends observed by comparing data collected over a period of years. To date, the YMP has not been the source of any radioactive emissions or been responsible for any human exposure to radionuclides. Minuscule amounts of radioactivity detected at the site are derived from natural sources or from dust previously contaminated by nuclear tests conducted in the past at the NTS. Because data for only a few years exist for the site, identification of long-term trends is not yet possible. Despite the lack of the aforementioned categories of information requested for the SER, the YMP has collected considerable material relevant to this report. An extensive environmental monitoring and mitigation program is currently in place and is described herein. Also, as requested by the SER guidelines, an account of YMP compliance with appropriate environmental legislation is provided.

NONE

1998-10-01

160

Geohydrology of rocks penetrated by test well USW H-4, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well USW H-4 is one of several wells drilled in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for hydraulic testing, hydrologic monitoring, and geophysical logging. The work was performed in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The rocks penetrated by the well to a total depth of 1,219 m were volcanic tuffs of Tertiary age. Hydraulic coefficients calculated from pumping test data indicate that transmissivity ranged from 200 to 790 sq m/day. A radioactive tracer, borehole flow survey indicated that the two most productive zones during this borehole flow survey occurred in the upper part of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, depth interval from 721 to 731.5m, and in the underlying part of the Tram Member, depth interval from 864 to 920m. The water is predominantly a sodium biocarbonate type with small concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and sulfate. The apparent age of this composite water sample was determined by carbon-14 date of 17,200 years before present. (USGS)

Whitfield, M. S.; Eshom, E. P.; Thordarson, William; Schaefer, D. H.

1985-01-01

161

Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-04-01

162

Geohydrology of monitoring wells drilled in Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Twelve monitoring wells were installed in 1997 at seven sites in and near Oasis Valley, Nevada. The wells, ranging in depth from 65 to 642 feet, were installed to measure water levels and to collect water-quality samples. Well-construction data and geologic and geophysical logs are presented in this report. Seven geologic units were identified and described from samples collected during the drilling: (1) Ammonia Tanks Tuff; (2) Tuff of Cutoff Road; (3) tuffs, not formally named but informally referred to in this report as the "tuff of Oasis Valley"; (4) lavas informally named the "rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond"; (5) Teritary colluvial and alluvial gravelly deposits; (6) Tertiary and Quaternary colluvium; and (7) Quaternary alluvium. Water levels in the wells were measured in October 1997 and February 1998 and ranged from about 18 to 350 feet below land surface. Transmissive zones in one of the boreholes penetrating volcanic rock were identified using flowmeter data. Zones with the highest transmissitviy are at depths of about 205 feet in the "rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond" and 340 feet within the "tuff of Oasis Valley."

Fenelon, J.M.; Paillet, F.L.; Robledo, A.R.; Ryder, P.L.

1998-12-09

163

Geohydrology of monitoring wells drilled in Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Twelve monitoring wells were installed in 1997 at seven sites in and near Oasis Valley, Nevada. The wells, ranging in depth from 65 to 642 feet, were installed to measure water levels and to collect water-quality samples. Well-construction data and geologic and geophysical logs are presented in this report. Seven geologic units were identified and described from samples collected during the drilling: (1) Ammonia Tanks Tuff; (2) Tuff of Cutoff Road; (3) tuffs, not formally named but informally referred to in this report as the Tuff of Oasis Valley; (4) lavas informally named the Rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond; (5) Tertiary colluvial and alluvial gravelly deposits; (6) Tertiary and Quaternary colluvium; and (7) Quaternary alluvium. Water levels in the wells were measured in October 1997 and February 1998 and ranged from about 18 to 350 feet below land surface. Transmissive zones in one of the boreholes penetrating volcanic rock were identified using flowmeter data. Zones with the highest transmissivity are at depths of about 205 feet in the rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond and 340 feet within the tuff of Oasis Valley.

Robledo, A.R.; Ryder, P.L.; Fenelon, J.M.; Paillet, F.L.

1998-12-01

164

Geologic map of the Oasis Valley basin and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This map and accompanying cross sections present an updated synthesis of the geologic framework of the Oasis Valley area, a major groundwater discharge site located about 15 km west of the Nevada Test Site. Most of the data presented in this compilation is new geologic map data, as discussed below. In addition, the cross sections incorporate new geophysical data that

C. J. Fridrich; S. A. Minor; P. L. Ryder; J. L. Slate

2000-01-01

165

Final Environmental Assessment for solid waste disposal, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

New solid waste regulations require that the existing Nevada Test Site (NTS) municipal landfills, which receive less than 20 tons of waste per day, be permitted or closed by October 9, 1995. In order to be permitted, the existing landfills must meet specific location, groundwater monitoring, design, operation, and closure requirements. The issuance of these regulations has resulted in the need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a practical, cost-effective, environmentally sound means of solid waste disposal at the NTS that is in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. The current landfills in Areas 9 and 23 on the Nevada Test Site do not meet design requirements specified in new state and federal regulations. The DOE Nevada Operations Office prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential impacts of the proposal to modify the Area 23 landfill to comply with the new regulations and to close the Area 9 landfill and reopen it as Construction and Demolition debris landfill. Based on information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1995-08-01

166

Site environmental report for calendar year 1996: Yucca Mountain site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The environmental program established by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office (YMSCO) has been designed and implemented to protect, maintain, and restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to the environment and the public, and comply with environmental policies and US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE, 1990a), to be superseded by DOE Order 231.1 (under review), the status of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) environmental program has been summarized in this annual Site Environmental Report (SER) to characterize performance, document compliance with environmental requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts during calendar year 1996.

NONE

1997-11-01

167

Radioelement distribution in drill-hole USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Drill-hole USW-G1 is one of series of test holes drilled in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain to acquire geologic, geophysical, hydrologic, and geochemical data to determine the feasibility of using the area for long-term storage of nuclear waste. The borehole is at lat 36{sup 0}52`00" N., long 116{sup 0}27`29" W.; the collar elevation is 4348.6 ft above mean sea level. The hole was drilled to 6000 ft. The radioelement contents (radium equivalent uranium (RaeU), thorium, and potassium) of samples collected from drill hole USW-G1 were measured to characterize the geologic units penetrated by the hole, to determine the homogeneity of the units, and to ascertain where redistribution of the radioelements may have occurred. Evidence of radioelement migration is important in potential waste-disposal sites because it suggests previous fluid movement through permeable sections of the geologic units that, in turn, reflects the relative permeability and physical competence of the units. Thorium is insoluble in high-temperature fluids or groundwater, and variations in its content probably indicate variations in original magma composition or variations in the physical mechanisms of eruptive processes. In contrast, RaeU and potassium are more soluble, and variations in the concentrations of these radioelements that are independent of thorium variations probably indicate postemplacement alteration. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Bush, C.A.; Bunker, C.M.; Spengler, R.W.

1983-12-31

168

Geohydrology of Monitoring Wells Drilled in Oasis Valley near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada, 1997  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Twelve monitoring wells were installed in 1997 at seven sites in and near Oasis Valley, Nevada. The wells, ranging in depth from 65 to 642 feet, were installed to measure water levels and to collect water-quality samples. Well-construction data and geologic and geophysical logs are presented in this report. Seven geologic units were identified and described from samples collected during the drilling: (1) Ammonia Tanks Tuff; (2) Tuff of Cutoff Road; (3) tuffs, not formally named but informally referred to in this report as the 'tuff of Oasis Valley'; (4) lavas informally named the 'rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond'; (5) Tertiary colluvial and alluvial gravelly deposits; (6) Tertiary and Quaternary colluvium; and (7) Quaternary alluvium. Water levels in the wells were measured in October 1997 and February 1998 and ranged from about 18 to 350 feet below land surface. Transmissive zones in one of the boreholes penetrating volcanic rock were identified using flowmeter data. Zones with the highest transmissivity are at depths of about 205 feet in the 'rhyolitic lavas of Colson Pond' and 340 feet within the 'tuff of Oasis Valley.'

Robledo, Armando R.; Ryder, Philip L.; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Paillet, Frederick L.

1999-01-01

169

Petroleum geology of Kate Spring field, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Kate Spring field was opened by Marathon Oil Company at the 1 Kate Spring well in December 1985. Because of poor market conditions and production problems, the well was not produced and the field was not confirmed until the Evans 1 Taylor well was completed in October 1987. As of August 1990, five wells have produced over 575,000 bbl of oil and have the capacity to flow at rates of several hundred to several thousand barrels per day. The oil is 10-12{degrees} API and is saturated with gas. The oil is used for road asphalt which limits its marketability. Production is from landslide blocks of Paleozoic and lower Tertiary strata that were emplaced in Miocene-Pliocene time, during the structural development of the Railroad Valley basin. The slide blocks are overlain by valley fill and probably correspond to similar blocks encountered within the valley fill at Eagle Springs field, adjacent to the north. The pay is at a depth of 4,500 ft. Kate Spring is a part of the fault-block bench that contains Eagle Springs field and is situated on the east flank of the Railroad Valley graben. There is east-west closure on the structure of the field, but the north end of the field has not been defined. The accumulation is sealed by the unconformity at the slide block-valley fill contact. The nature of the reservoir implies that the production is controlled by fractures and precludes useful extrapolation of any measurable matrix porosity. Based on volumetric calculations, the field will probably produce 2-3 million bbl of oil.

French, D.E.

1991-06-01

170

Preliminary study of quaternary faulting on the east side of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Active faults bound the east side of Bare Mountain. Geomorphic features, stratigraphy, and soil development indicate that two 3-km-long segments of the range-front fault probably last moved in Holocene or late Pleistocene time. Other segments of the fault have been quiescent since the late Pleistocene. Both late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits bury many faults east of the northern end of Bare Mountain. Two prospect pits on the range-front fault reveal evidence of recurrent late Quaternary movements. Both older and younger deposits in one pit are faulted, but fractures in the older unit do not extend up into the younger unit. Based on soil development, the older and younger fault episodes respectively are probably late Pleistocene and Holocene in age. Another pit shows carbonate-cemented fractures with slickensides in a late Pleistocene deposit, suggesting at least two late Pleistocene or Holocene fault movements. Middle to early Pleistocene and Tertiary deposits show evidence of recurrent faulting in many locations. Faults in these deposits are pervaded by secondary CaCO{sub 3} and silica that commonly exhibit slickensides.

Reheis, M.C.

1986-12-31

171

Restprodukter fra CFB-anlaeg. Anvendelse af restprodukter fra multi cirkulerende fluid bed. (Residues from a circulating fluidized-bed system. Utilization of residual products from a multi-circulating fluid bed).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In solid fuel combustion processes the residual product is usually left in form of ashes. In the 20 MW multi-circulating fluidized bed demonstration plant of the Aalborg Ciserv Int., designed to combust coal or straw, lime is used to bind sulfur and chlor...

M. Stenholm S. Westborg

1993-01-01

172

Null Drepte i Trafikken-Fra Visjon til Gjennomforbare Tiltak. Sammendragsrapport Fra en Studie av Gjennomforingspotensialet for Mulige tiltak under Null-Visjonen (Zero Killed in Traffic - From Vision to Implementation).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The success of vision zero is only possible through the implementation of various strong measures, in road infrastructure, against high speed in sparsely populated areas, in housing areas, in urban settings and through the existence of relatively new tech...

T. Solheim

1999-01-01

173

Alternativ Transportteknologi: Reduserte CO2-Utslipp fra Transportsektoren (Alternative Transport Technology: Reduced CO2 Emissions from the Transport Sector).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose is to shed light on how new transport technology can make a contribution to reducing transport-specific and overall CO2-emissions in Norway. An important question is whether the use of eco-friendly transport technology can reduce the socio-eco...

T. Jensen

1998-01-01

174

The Frankfurt Patient Safety Climate Questionnaire for General Practices (FraSiK): analysis of psychometric properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundSafety culture has been identified as having a major impact on how safety is managed in healthcare. However, it has not received much attention in general practices. Hence, no instrument yet exists to assess safety climate—the measurable artefact of safety culture—in this setting. This study aims to evaluate psychometric properties of a newly developed safety climate questionnaire for use in

Barbara Hoffmann; Olga Maria Domanska; Zeycan Albay; Vera Mueller; Corina Guethlin; Eric J Thomas; Ferdinand M Gerlach

2011-01-01

175

Prikkbelastning for Foererkort: Delutredning 1 og 2 fra en Arbeidsgruppe Oppnevnt av Samferdselsdepartementet (Penalty Point System for Driving Licenses).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report suggests that a penalty point system should be introduced. Three traffic offenses shall lead to a conditional suspension of the driving license. A fourth offense in a test period can lead to unconditional suspension. A computerized record must ...

1987-01-01

176

49 CFR 229.207 - New locomotive crashworthiness design standards and changes to existing FRA-approved locomotive...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...title, address, telephone number and e-mail address of the primary person to be...title, address, telephone number and e-mail address of the primary person to be...title, address, telephone number and e-mail address of the primary person to...

2012-10-01

177

Afsvovlingsprodukt fra sprayabsorption stabiliseret med sand og flyveaske. (Desulfurization product from spray absorption stabilized with sand and fly ash).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The spray-absorption method used in Denmark at the power plant Studstrupvaerket, produces a dry-product containing calcium sulphite as a main ingredient. The yearly production of the dry-product is about 200.000 tons. The purpose of the project was to stu...

B. Thagesen

1990-01-01

178

Il canone di Telecom Italia e lo strano scontro fra Cheli e Monti: una storia, tante morali  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the end of last year, the Italian incumbent on vocal (fixed) telephony raised private and business monthly connection bills. Due to a complex and controversial regulatory framework, the significant increase obtained by Telecom Italia gave to consumers and observers the impression that nobody was playing its role: why did the incumbent insist in a strategy apparently inconsistent with the

Frova Sandro

2001-01-01

179

Electrical studies at the proposed Wahmonie and Calico Hills nuclear waste sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two sites in the southwest quadrant of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were investigated as potential repositories for high-level nuclear waste. These are designated the Wahmonie and Calico Hills sites. The emplacement medium at both sites was to be an inferred intrusive body at shallow depth; the inference of the presence of the body was based on aeromagnetic and regional gravity data. This report summarizes results of Schlumberger VES, induced polarization dipole-dipole traverses and magnetotelluric soundings made in the vicinity of the sites in order to characterize the geoelectric section. At the Wahmonie site VES work identified a low resistivity unit at depth surrounding the inferred intrusive body. The low resistivity unit is believed to be either the argillite (Mississippian Eleana Formation) or a thick unit of altered volcanic rock (Tertiary). Good electrical contrast is provided between the low resistivity unit and a large volume of intermediate resistivity rock correlative with the aeromagnetic and gravity data. The intermediate resistivity unit (100-200 ohm-m) is believed to be the intrusive body. The resistivity values are very low for a fresh, tight intrusive and suggest significant fracturing, alteration and possible mineralization have occurred within the upper kilometer of rock. Induced polarization data supports the VES work, identifies a major fault on the northwest side of the inferred intrusive and significant potential for disseminated mineralization within the body. The mineralization potential is particularly significant because as late as 1928, a strike of high grade silver-gold ore was made at the site. The shallow electrical data at Calico Hills revealed no large volume high resistivity body that could be associated with a tight intrusive mass in the upper kilometer of section. A drill hole UE 25A-3 sunk to 762 m (2500 ft) at the site revealed only units of the Eleana argillite thermally metamorphosed below 396 m (1300 ft) and in part highly magnetic. Subsequent work has shown that much if not all of the magnetic and gravity anomalies can be attributed to the Eleana Formation. The alteration and doming, however, still argue for an intrusive but at greater depth than originally thought. The electrical, VES, and IP data show a complex picture due to variations in structure and alteration within the Eleana and surrounding volcanic units. These data do not suggest the presence of an intrusive in the upper kilometer of section. The magnetotelluric data however gives clear evidence for a thick, resistive body in the earth's crust below the site. While the interpreted depth is very poorly constrained due to noise and structural problems, the top of the resistive body is on the order of 2.5 km deep. The IP data also identifies area of increased polarizability at Calico Hills, which may also have future economic mineralization.

Hoover, D. B.; Chornack, M. P.; Nervick, K. H.; Broker, M. M.

1982-01-01

180

Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

Greg Ruskauff

2010-04-01

181

Addendum 1 Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A disposal authorization statement (DAS) was issued by the U.S. Department of Energy/Headquarters (DOE/HQ) on December 5, 2000, authorizing the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office to continue the operation of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site for the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste. Prior to the issuance of the DAS, the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) had conducted reviews of the performance assessment (PA) and the composite analysis (CA) for the Area 5 RWMS, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order DOE O 435.1. A brief history of the reviews is as follows. (The reviews were conducted by independent review teams chartered by the LFRG; the review findings and recommendations were issued in review team reports to the LFRG.) The LFRG accepted the initial PA, with conditions, on August 30, 1996. Revision 2.1 to the PA was issued in January 1998, implementing the conditions of acceptance of the 1996 PA. The LFRG reviewed Revision 2.1 as part of the Area 5 RWMS CA review during 2000, and found it acceptable. The CA and the Supplemental Information provided in response to issues identified during the initial review of the CA were accepted by the LFRG. The Supplemental Information (including the responses to four key issues) is included in the Review Team Report to the LFRG, which recommends that it be incorporated into the CA and issued to all known holders of the CA. The Area 5 RWMS DAS requires that the Supplemental Information generated during the DOE/HQ review of the CA be incorporated into the CA within one year of the date of issuance of the DAS. This report, the first addendum to the Area 5 CA, is prepared to fulfill that requirement. The Supplemental Information includes the following: Issues Identified in the Review Team Report; Crosswalk Presentation; and Maintaining Doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable. A summary of this information is included in this report, with the complete text presented in the appendices.

Vefa Yucel

2001-11-01

182

Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

V. Yucel

2001-09-01

183

Principal facts for new gravity stations in the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley areas, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Regional gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley region indicate the presence of several structures that may influence the flow of groundwater. For example, several prominent linear features expressed by both gravity and aeromagentic data could act either as barriers or conduits for groundwater. The current gravity study was undertaken to better define the boundaries of the interpreted major regional structures in the area.

Davidson, J.G.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Mankinen, E.A.; Roberts, C.W.

1998-12-15

184

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 4 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

185

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 3 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

186

Well ER-6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of limestone and dolomite, and is pervasively fractured. Groundwater flow in this aquifer is primarily in the fractures, and the hydraulic properties are primarily related to fracture frequency and fracture characteristics (e.g., mineral coatings, aperture, connectivity). The objective of the multiple-well aquifer test (MWAT) was to determine flow and hydraulic characteristics for the LCA in Yucca Flat. The data were used to derive representative flow model and parameter values for the LCA. The items of specific interest are: Hydraulic conductivity; Storage parameters; Dual-porosity behavior; and Fracture flow characteristics. The objective of the tracer transport experiment was to evaluate the transport properties and processes of the LCA and to derive representative transport parameter values for the LCA. The properties of specific interest are: Effective porosity; Matrix diffusion; Longitudinal dispersivity; Adsorption characteristics; and Colloid transport characteristics. These properties substantially control the rate of transport of contaminants in the groundwater system and concentration distributions. To best support modeling at the scale of the corrective action unit (CAU), these properties must be investigated at the field scale. The processes represented by these parameters are affected by in-situ factors that are either difficult to investigate at the laboratory scale or operate at a much larger scale than can be reproduced in the laboratory. Measurements at the field scale provide a better understanding of the effective average parameter values. The scale of this tracer test is still small compared to the scale of a CAU, but is of sufficient scale to be generally representative of the processes that affect in-situ transport. The scale of the tracer test undertaken is limited by the rate of transport in the formation and the resultant time frame required for completing such a test. The measurements at the field scale will provide information for relating laboratory measurements for transport processes to the larger scale. This report describes the analysis of the tracer test data and development of a conceptual model of transport in the LCA in Yucca Flat.

Greg Ruskauff

2006-09-01

187

Fran Ridge horizontal coring summary report hole UE-25h No. 1, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Hole UE-25h No. 1 was core drilled during December 1982 and January 1983 within several degrees of due west, 400 ft horizontally into the southeast slope of Fran Ridge at an altitude of 3409 ft. The purpose of the hole was to obtain data pertinent for radionuclide transport studies in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff. This unit had been selected previously as the host rock for the potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, adjacent to the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site. The hole was core drilled first with air, then with air mist, and finally with air, soap, and water. Many problems were encountered, including sloughing of tuff into the uncased hole, vibration of the drill rods, high rates of bit wear, and lost circulation of drilling fluids. On the basis of experience gained in drilling this hole, ways to improve horizontal coring with air are suggested in this report. All of the recovered core, except those pieces that were wrapped and waxed, were examined for lithophysal content, for fractures, and for fracture-fill mineralization. The results of this examination are given in this report. Core recovery greater than 80% at between 209 and 388 ft permitted a fracture frequency analysis. The results are similar to the fracture frequencies observed in densely welded nonlithophysal tuff from holes USW GU-3 and USW G-4. The fractures in core from UE-25h No. 1 were found to be smooth and nonmineralized or coated with calcite, silica, or manganese oxide. Open fractures with caliche (porous, nonsparry calcite) were not observed beyond 83.5 ft, which corresponds to an overburden depth of 30 ft.

Norris, A.E.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Merson, T.J.

1986-10-01

188

Analysis of Responses From Hydraulic Testing of the Lower Carbonate Aquifer at Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Yucca Flat corrective action unit extends over an approximately 120 square-mile basin at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), southern Nevada, and was the site for over 650 historical underground nuclear tests. The lower carbonate aquifer (LCA), roughly 1,800 feet below ground surface at Yucca Flat and with a confined thickness of several thousand feet, is the primary aquifer for

E. W. Bhark; G. Ruskauff

2005-01-01

189

Streamflow and selected precipitation data for Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years 1983-85  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streamflow and precipitation data collected at and near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, during water years 1983-85, are presented. The data were collected and compiled as part of the studies the U.S. Geological Survey is making, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, to characterize surface water hydrology in the Yucca Mountain area. Streamflow data include daily mean discharges and peak discharges at 4 complete-record gaging stations and peak discharges at 10 crest-stage, partial-record stations and 12 miscellaneous sites. Precipitation data include cumulative totals at 12 stations maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey and daily totals at 17 stations maintained by the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Pabst, M. E.; Beck, D. A.; Glancy, P. A.; Johnson, J. A.

1993-01-01

190

Geohydrology of Rocks Penetrated by Test Well UE-25P No. 1, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Test well UE-25p No. 1 was drilled to a total depth of 1805 meters. To a depth of 1244 meters, the rocks are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age. From 1244 to 1805 meters, the rock is dolomite of Paleozoic age. The composite static water level wa...

R. W. Craig J. H. Robison

1984-01-01

191

Thoughts Regarding the Dimensions of Faults at Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas, Nye County, Nevada, Based on Surface and Underground Mapping  

SciTech Connect

The geologic setting and history, along with observations through 50 years of detailed geologic field work, show that large-displacement (i.e., greater than 30 meters of displacement) syn- to post-volcanic faults are rare in the Rainier Mesa area. Faults observed in tunnels and drill holes are mostly tight, with small displacements (most less than 1.5 meters) and small associated damage zones. Faults are much more abundant in the zeolitized tuffs than in the overlying vitric tuffs, and there is little evidence that faults extend downward from the tuff section through the argillic paleocolluvium into pre-Tertiary rocks. The differences in geomechanical characteristics of the various tuff lithologies at Rainier Mesa suggest that most faults on Rainer Mesa are limited to the zeolitic units sandwiched between the overlying vitric bedded tuffs and the underlying pre-Tertiary units (lower carbonate aquifer–3, lower clastic confining unit–1, and Mesozoic granite confining unit).

Drellack, S.L.; Prothro, L.B.; Townsend, M.J.; Townsend, D.R.

2011-02-01

192

Digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

This digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity, as well as its accompanying digital geophysical maps, are compiled at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers two 30 Ã 60-minute quadrangles-the Pahute Mesa quadrangle to the north and the Beatty quadrangle to the south-plus a strip of 7 1\\/2-minute quadrangles on the east side. In addition to

J. L. Slate; M. E. Berry; P. D. Rowley; C. J. Fridrich; K. S. Morgan; J. B. Workman; O. D. Young; G. L. Dixon; V. S. Williams; E. H. McKee; D. A. Ponce; T. G. Hildenbrand; W. C. Swadley; S. C. Lundstrom; E. B. Ekren; R. G. Warren; J. C. Cole; R. J. Fleck; M. A. Lanphere; D. A. Sawyer; S. A. Minor; D. J. Grunwald; R. J. Laczniak; C. M. Menges; J. C. Yount; A. S. Jayko

2000-01-01

193

Micrometeorological data for energy-budget studies near Rogers Spring, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The data were collected at two sites near Rogers Spring for use in energy-budget studies beginning in 1994. The data collected at each site included net radiation, air temperature at two heights, dew- point temperature at two heights, windspeed at two heights, soil heat flux, and soil temperature in the interval between the land surface and the buried heat-flux plates.

Nichols, W.D.; Rapp, T.R.

1996-05-01

194

Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

1996-07-01

195

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

196

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

197

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

198

A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2009-02-01

199

Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone at the burial site for low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-level radioactive solid waste has been buried in trenches at a site near Beatty, Nev., since 1962. In 1976, as part of a national program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the geohydrology of the waste-burial site to provide a basis for estimating the potential for radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste-burial trenches. Data collected include meteorological information for calibration of a long-term water-budget analysis, soil-moisture profiles, soil-water potentials, and hydraulic properties of representative unsaturated sediment samples to a depth of about 10 meters (m). The waste-burial facility is in the northern Amargosa Desert about 170 kilometers (km) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevo The region is arid; mean annual precipitation at Lathrop Wells, 30 km south of the site, is only 7.4 centimeters (cm). The mean daily maximum temperature at Lathrop Wells in July, the hottest month, is 37 ?C. The site is underlain by poorly stratified deposits of gravelly or silty sand and sandy gravel, and thick beds of clayey sediments. The total thickness of valley-fill deposits beneath the site is about 175 m; the unsaturated zone is about 85 m thick. Volumetric soil moisture to depths of 4 m ranges from 4 to 10 percent but commonly is in the range of 6 to 8 percent. Soil-water potential, measured to depths of 3 to 10 m, ranged from -10 to -70 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity computed from laboratory analyses of representative samples ranges from 10 -13 to 10 -14 centimeters per day (cm/d). Evaporation studies over a 2-year (yr) period were used to calibrate a numerical procedure for analyzing long-term precipitation data and estimating annual water budgets during the 15-yr period 1962-76. This analysis (1) demonstrated that a potential exists for deep percolation (greater than 2 m), despite high annual evaporation demands, and (2) provided predictions of the time of year and the antecedent conditions that enhance the probability of deep percolation. Soil-moisture profiles obtained monthly over an 18-month (mo) period demonstrate that deep percolation does occur. Soil-moisture conditions antecedent to an observed deep-percolation event, and the time of year when the percolation occurred, support the interpretations based on long-term meteorological records. Calculation of downward moisture movement through the waste-trench backfill material, on the basis of simplified assumptions, suggests that moisture could have penetrated as much as 6 m below land surface from 1963, when the oldest trenches were closed, to 1980, but that the moisture requirement for such penetration far exceeded the amount of moisture actually available. Steady-state downward movement of moisture at depths greater than 10 m and beneath the waste-burial trenches would be on the order of 4 cm per 1,000 yr, assuming a steady flux rate of 1x10 -5 cm/d.

Nichols, William D.

1987-01-01

200

Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone at the burial site for low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low-level radioactive solid waste has been buried in trenches at a site near Beatty, Nevada, since 1962. In 1976, as part of a national program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the geohydrology of the waste burial site to provide a basis for estimating the potential for radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste burial trenches. Data collected include meteorological information for calibration of a long-term water budget analysis, soil moisture profiles, soil water potentials, and hydraulic properties of representative unsaturated sediment samples to a depth of about 10 m. The waste burial facility is in the northern Amargosa Desert about 170 km northwest of Las Vegas, NV. The region is arid; mean annual precipitation at Lathrop Wells, 30 km south of the site, is only 7.4 cm. The mean daily maximum temperature at Lathrop Wells in July, the hottest month, is 37 C. The site is underlain by poorly stratified deposits of gravelly or silty sand and sandy gravel, and thick beds of clayey sediments. The total thickness of valley fill deposits beneath the site is about 175 m; the unsaturated zone is about 85 m thick. Volumetric soil moisture to depths of 4 m ranges from 4% to 10%, but commonly is in the range from 6% to 8%. Soil water potential, measured to depths of 3 to 10 m, ranged from -10 to -70 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity computed from laboratory analyses of representative samples ranges from 10 to the -13th power to 10 to the -4th power cm/day. Evaporation studies over a 2-yr period were used to calibrate a numerical procedure for analyzing long-term precipitation data and estimating annual water budgets during the 15-yr period 1962-76. This analysis (1) demonstrated that a potential exists for deep percolation (> 2 m), despite high annual evaporation demands, and (2) provided predictions of the time of yr and the antecedent conditions which enhance the probability of deep percolation. Soil moisture profiles obtained monthly over an 18-mo period demonstrate that deep percolation does occur. Soil moisture conditions antecedent to an observed deep-percolation event, and the time of yr when the percolation occurred, support the interpretations based on long-term meteorological records. (Author 's abstract)

Nichols, W. D.

1986-01-01

201

Analysis of ER12-3 FY 2005 Hydrologic Testing, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-3 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa\\/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Well ER-12-3 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa\\/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities

Bill Fryer

2006-01-01

202

Ground-water data collected at the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada, water years 1988--89  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Geological Survey, in support of the US Department of Energy Hydrology\\/Radionuclide Migration Program, collects and compiles hydrologic and geohydrologic data to aid in characterizing the regional and local ground-water flow systems underlying the Nevada Test Site. This report presents selected ground-water data collected from wells and test holes at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site.

Wood

1992-01-01

203

Oxygen isotopes and trace elements in the Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. Because Yucca Mountain is located in a resource-rich geologic setting, one aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation of ...

B. D. Marshall T. K. Kyser Z. E. Peterman

1996-01-01

204

Oxygen isotopes and trace elements in the Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. Because Yucca Mountain is located in a resource-rich geologic setting, one aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation of the resource potential at Yucca Mountain. The Tiva Canyon Tuff (TCT) is a widespread felsic ash-flow sheet that is well exposed in the Yucca Mountain area. Samples of the upper part of the TCT were selected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposits within the Miocene volcanic section. These samples of the upper cliff and caprock subunits have been analyzed for oxygen isotopes and a large suite of elements. Oxygen isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 18}O) of the TCT are typical of felsic igneous rocks but range from 6.9 to 11.8 permil, indicating some post-depositional alteration. There is no evidence of the low {delta}{sup 18}O values (less than 6 permil) that are typical of epithermal precious-metal deposits in the region. The variation in oxygen isotope ratios is probably the result of deuteric alteration during late-stage crystallization of silica and low-temperature hydration of glassy horizons; these processes are also recorded by the chemical compositions of the rocks. However, most elemental contents in the TCT reflect igneous processes, and the effects of alteration are observed only in some of the more mobile elements. These studies indicate that the TCT at Yucca Mountain has not been affected by large-scale meteoric-water hydrothermal circulation. The chemical compositions of the TCT, especially the low concentrations of most trace elements including typical pathfinder elements, show no evidence for epithermal metal deposits. Together, these data indicate that the potential for economic mineralization in this part of the volcanic section at Yucca Mountain is small.

Marshall, B.D.; Kyser, T.K.; Peterman, Z.E.

1996-12-31

205

Geohydrologic and drill-hole data for test well USW H-3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well USW H-3 is one of a series of test wells drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site for hydraulic testing, hydrologic monitoring, and geophysical logging. The work was performed in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage investigations. The well penetrated volcanic tuffs of Tertiary age to a depth of 1,219 meters. This report presents data collected to determine the hydraulic characteristics of rocks penetrated. Data on drilling operations, lithology, borehole geophysics, hydrologic monitoring, pumping, swabbing, and injection tests for the well are contained in this report. (USGS)

Thordarson, William; Rush, F. E.; Spengler, R. W.; Waddell, S. J.

1984-01-01

206

Dual-porosity analysis of conservative tracer testing in saturated volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A radially convergent conservative tracer injection test was conducted between boreholes UE-25 #2 and UE-25 c #3 of the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain to determine effective porosity and longitudinal dispersivity. Approximately 47% of the tracer mass was recovered and a dual-porosity analytical model replicates the breakthrough curve. Fractured-rock analyses focus on the fracture-porosity and geometry as the controlling factors in transport.

Fahy, M. F.

1997-01-01

207

Geohydrology of rocks penetrated by test well UE-25p#1, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Test well UE-25pNo1 was drilled in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy in the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site, for investigations related to the isolation of high-level nuclear wastes. Rocks penetrated in the well are predominantly ash-flow tuffs of Tertiary age to a depth of 1,244 meters and dolomite of Paleozoic age to a total depth of 1,805 meters. Hydraulic head is 20 meters higher in the Paleozoic dolomite than in most of the Tertiary tuffs; this hydraulic-head difference indicates a major hydrologic barrier to the downward movement of fluid. Any vertical fluid movement from the Tertiary to the Paleozoic sections would be small, as would be movement from the Paleozoic rocks into the Tertiary rocks. In the Tertiary section, an interval of less than 30 meters in the upper Prow Pass Member of Crater Flat Tuff has an apparent transmissivity of 14 meters squared per day. In the Paleozoic section, an interval of less than 22 meters has an apparent transmissivity of 69 meters squared per day. Compositions of water from the Tertiary and Paleozoic sections are similar to regional waters from rocks of the same ages. (USGS)

Craig, R. W.; Robison, J. H.

1984-01-01

208

Preliminary mapping of surficial geology of Midway Valley Yucca Mountain Project, Nye County, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The tectonics program for the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada must evaluate the potential for surface faulting beneath the prospective surface facilities. To help meet this goal, Quaternary surficial mapping studies and photolineament analyses were conducted to provide data for evaluating the location, recency, and style of faulting with Midway Valley at the eastern base of Yucca Mountain, the preferred location of these surface facilities. This interim report presents the preliminary results of this work.

Wesling, J.R.; Bullard, T.F.; Swan, F.H.; Perman, R.C.; Angell, M.M. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Gibson, J.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-04-01

209

Ages of igneous and hydrothermal events in the Round Mountain and Manhattan gold districts, Nye County, Nevada.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Isotopic age determinations of rocks and minerals separated from them are applied to refining and correlating the geological history of igneous and mineralizing events in a part of the Basin and Range province. -G.J.N.

Shawe, D. R.; Marvin, R. F.; Andriessen, P. A. M.; Mehnert, H. H.; Merritt, V. M.

1986-01-01

210

Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 340, Pesticide Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. As required by the FFACO (1996), this document provides or references all of the specific information for planning investigation activities associated with three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These CASs are collectively known as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340, Pesticide Release Sites. According to the FFACO, CASs are sites that may require corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. These sites are CAS 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 (Q800) Pesticide Release Ditch; CAS 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and CAS 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage (Q15-11). The purpose of this CAIP for CAU 340 is to direct and guide the investigation for the evaluation of the nature and extent of pesticides, herbicides, and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that were stored, mixed, and/or disposed of at each of the CASs.

NONE

1998-01-01

211

Natural groundwater colloids from the USGS J-13 well in Nye County, NV : a study using SAXS and TEM.  

SciTech Connect

We report results from ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of dilute silicate colloids that occur naturally in ground water from the U.S. Geological Society J-13 well, located near the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. Also included are results from our examination of a separate sample of this groundwater that had been treated by heating to 90 {sup o}C in contact with crushed Topopah Spring Tuff from the Yucca Mountain site. The USAXS measurements were done at the UNICAT undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Power-law plots (scattering intensity versus momentum transfer) were fitted to the USAXS data. Colloids in the untreated J-13 groundwater were shown to have a fractal dimension of nearly 3, whereas colloids in the treated groundwater (EJ-13) have a dimensionality of approximately 2.4 over a length scale of approximately 3 to 300 nm. Similar power-law plots with dimension 3 characterized concurrent SAXS measurements from aqueous suspensions of Na-montmorillonite and NIST Brick Clay (NBS-67). We attribute these results to the sheet-silicate-layered structure of the clay colloids present in J-13 well water, montmorillonite, and 'brick clay' systems. The differences between EJ-13 and as-received J-13 are perhaps owing to exchange of calcium for sodium with the tuff. Radionuclide incorporation into, adsorption onto, or ion exchange with existing groundwater colloids may promote colloidal transport of radionuclides in groundwater. Such radionuclide-bearing colloids could thereby increase the concentrations of actinides in groundwater and enhance migration into human-accessible aquifers. Our results demonstrate the first application of USAXS to study the physical nature of such groundwater colloids, and represent perhaps one of the most dilute systems ever studied by small-angle scattering.

Fortner, J. A.; Mertz, C. J.; Wolf, S. F.; Jemain, P. R.; Univ. of Illinois

2003-01-01

212

Estimates of deep percolation beneath native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-river channel, Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence and approximate rates of deep percolation beneath areas of native vegetation, irrigated fields, and the Amargosa-River channel in the Amargosa Desert of southern Nevada were evaluated using the chloride mass-balance method and inferred downward velocities of chloride and nitrate peaks. Estimates of deep-percolation rates in the Amargosa Desert are needed for the analysis of regional ground-water flow and

D. A. Stonestrom; D. E. Prudic; R. J. Laczniak; K. C. Akstin; R. A. Boyd; K. K. Henkelman

2003-01-01

213

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30

214

Economic potential of alternative land and natural resource uses at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The economic potentials of several alternative land uses at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are estimated. Alternatives considered include mining, agriculture, grazing, and hunting. There are two known tungsten ore bodies located in the Oak Spring mining district. The economic potential of the reserves is estimated to be $42,840. It is also possible that there are other economic mineral resources on the NTS whose values are yet unknown. There are an estimated 5000 ha of agricultural land on the Test Site; the cash value of alfalfa grown on this acreage is approximately $564,030. The economic potential of grazing at the Test Site lies somewhere in the range of $10,340 to $41,220. The assumed annual worth of mule deer to hunters is $90,440. The gross potential of hunting at the NTS is probably somewhat higher if trophy species, game birds and fur-bearing animals are also considered. It should be noted that the above values indicate gross worth; no costs are included in the estimates.

Richard-Haggard, K.

1983-03-01

215

Relative abundance and distribution of fishes and crayfish at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 2010-11  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR) was established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (with the assistance of The Nature Conservancy) in 1984 to protect one of the highest concentrations of endemic flora and fauna in North America (Pister, 1985; Sada, 1990). Prior to federal acquisition, Ash Meadows had been anthropogenically altered, and non-native species had been introduced to the detriment of native species; reports and published literature document the negative effects to the Ash Meadows flora and fauna (Deacon and others, 1964; U.S. Department of the Interior, 1971; Landye, 1973; Pister, 1974; Soltz and Naiman, 1978; Taylor, 1980; Williams and others, 1985; Williams and Sada, 1985; Baugh and others, 1986; Hershler and Sada, 1987; Knight and Clemmer, 1987; Sada, 1990; Deacon and Williams, 1991; Scoppettone and others, 2005; Kennedy and others, 2006). Such activities led to the extinction of the endemic Ash Meadows poolfish (Empetrichthyes merriami) (Miller, 1961; Soltz and Naiman, 1978), and subsequently the federal government listed three local endemic fish as endangered pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1989)—Warm springs pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis pectoralis), Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes), and Ash Meadows speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus nevadensis). Public ownership of a large portion of Ash Meadows provided the opportunity to restore the landscape to some semblance of its historical condition. Elimination of invasive aquatic species may be more difficult than landscape restoration, and their persistence can cause additional native fish decline or extirpation (Taylor and others, 1984; Moyle and others, 1986; Miller and others, 1989; Minckley and Deacon, 1991; Olden and Poff, 2005). Chemical treatment to remove invasive fishes is often unsuccessful (Meffe, 1983; Rinne and Turner, 1991; Meronek and others, 1996). In Ash Meadows, there has been some success in chemical eradication of localized populations of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) (St. George, 1998, 1999; Weissenfluh, 2008b), as well as convict cichlid (Archocentrus nigrofasciatus) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) (Weissenfluh,2008a). However, there has been less success in removing western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) from Ash Meadows's larger spring systems, and sailfin molly maintains strongholds in several spring systems (Scoppettone and others, 2011b). Perhaps the more destructive invasive species are two invertebrates: red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and red-rim melania (Melanoides tuberculata). Following the appearance of red swamp crayfish within the Warm Springs Complex, Warm Springs pupfish was believed to be extirpated from one spring system (St. George, 2000) and near extirpation in two others (Darrick Weissenfluh, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, oral commun., 2008, 2011). Crayfish also were demonstrated to greatly suppress the Bradford Springs population of Ash Meadows speckled dace population (McShane and others, 2004). Red-rim melania is known to displace native snail populations (Mitchell and others, 2007), and has been implicated as an agent of extinction of native Ash Meadows spring-snails (Donald Sada, Desert Research Institute, oral commun., 2011). Both invasive invertebrates are difficult to control or eradicate (Mitchell and others, 2007; Freeman and others, 2010). Habitat restoration that favors native species can help control non-native species (McShane and others, 2004; Scoppettone and others, 2005; Kennedy and others, 2006). Restoration of Carson Slough and its tributaries present an opportunity to promote habitat types that favor native species over non-natives. Historically, the majority of Ash Meadows spring systems were tributaries to Carson Slough. In 2007 and 2008, a survey of Ash Meadows spring systems was conducted to generate baseline information on the distribution of fishes throughout AMNWR (Scoppettone and others, 2011b). In this study, we conducted a follo

Scoppettone, G. G.; Johnson, D. M.; Hereford, M. E.; Rissler, Peter; Fabes, Mark; Salgado, Antonio; Shea, Sean

2012-01-01

216

Annotated bibliography for atmospheric overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This bibliography covers a number of aspects which will go into an environment of the effects of a nuclear waste repository on the air quality of the Nevada Test Site and its environs. The following categories are included: weather and climate of Nevada; long-term climatology of the Nevada Test Site; diffusion associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station at Jackass

J. L. Bowen; R. T. Egami

1983-01-01

217

Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration N...

H. Drollinger L. J. Ashbaugh R. C. Jones T. F. Bullard W. R. Griffin

2009-01-01

218

Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Volume 1 of 6.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration N...

H. Drollinger L. J. Ashbaugh R. C. Jones T. F. Bullard W. R. Griffin

2009-01-01

219

Preliminary description of quaternary and late pliocene surficial deposits at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain area, in the south-central part of the Great Basin, is in the drainage basin of the Amargosa River. The mountain consists of several fault blocks of volcanic rocks that are typical of the Basin and Range province. Yucca Mountain is dissected by steep-sided valleys of consequent drainage systems that are tributary on the east side to Fortymile Wash and on the west side to an unnamed wash that drains Crater Flat. Most of the major washes near Yucca Mountain are not integrated with the Amargosa River, but have distributary channels on the piedmont above the river. Landforms in the Yucca Mountain area include rock pediments, ballenas, alluvial pediments, alluvial fans, stream terraces, and playas. Early Holocene and older alluvial fan deposits have been smoothed by pedimentation. The semiconical shape of alluvial fans is apparent at the junction of tributaries with major washes and where washes cross fault and terrace scarps. Playas are present in the eastern and southern ends of the Amargosa Desert. 39 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Hoover, D.L.

1989-11-01

220

Preliminary permeability and water-retention data for nonwelded and bedded tuff samples, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Measurements of rock-matrix hydrologic properties at Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository, are needed to predict rates and direction of water flow in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study is to provide pre...

L. E. Flint A. L. Flint

1990-01-01

221

Forum on Aging and the Family: Discussions with F. Ivan Nye, Bernice L. Neugarten and David and Vera Mace.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper represents an attempt to lessen the schisms between family sociology, gerontology, and family practice. An interview format is used to illustrate one way through which specific issues may be addressed. (Author)

Brubaker, Timothy H; And Others

1978-01-01

222

Evidence of prehistoric flooding and the potential for future extreme flooding at Coyote Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Coyote Wash, an approximately 0.3-square-mile drainage on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain, is the potential location for an exploratory shaft to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for construction of an underground repository for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. An ongoing investigation is addressing the potential for hazards to the site and surrounding areas from flooding and related fluvial-debris movement. Unconsolidated sediments in and adjacent to the channel of North Fork Coyote Wash were examined for evidence of past floods. Trenches excavated across and along the valley bottom exposed multiple flood deposits, including debris-flow deposits containing boulders as large as 2 to 3 feet in diameter. Most of the alluvial deposition probably occurred during the late Quaternary. Deposits at the base of the deepest trench overlie bedrock and underlie stream terraces adjacent to the channel; these sediments are moderately indurated and probably were deposited during the late Pleistocene. Overlying nonindurated deposits clearly are younger and may be of Holocene age. This evidence of intense flooding during the past indicates that severe flooding and debris movement are possible in the future. Empirical estimates of large floods of the past range from 900 to 2,600 cubic feet per second from the 0.094-square-mile drainage area of North Fork Coyote Wash drainage at two proposed shaft sites. Current knowledge indicates that mixtures of water and debris are likely to flow from North Fork Coyote Wash at rates up to 2,500 cubic feet per second. South Fork Coyote Wash, which has similar basin area and hydraulic characteristics, probably will have concurrent floods of similar magnitudes. The peak flow of the two tributaries probably would combine near the potential sites for the exploratory shaft to produce future flow of water and accompanying debris potentially as large as 5,000 cubic feet per second.

Glancy, P.A.

1994-09-01

223

Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern zone of fractures is within Quaternary alluvial sediments, but no bedrock was encountered in trenches and soil pits in this part of the prospective surface facilities site; thus, the direct association of this zone with one or more bedrock faults is uncertain. No displacement of lithologic contacts and soil horizons could be detected in the fractured Quaternary deposits. The results of these investigations imply the absence of any appreciable late Quaternary faulting activity at the prospective surface-facilities site.

Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

2002-01-17

224

Dopolnitel'nye kontrollery dlya s''ema informatsii s blokov ATsP. (Auxiliary controllers for ADC data readout).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Auxiliary controllers KD-334 and KD-336 developed for data readout, filtering and buffering of from 16-channel ADC modules, respectively P-267 and P-267T, are described. Controllers are made in SUMMA standard and offer better effective application of ADC ...

Y. Kozyaev M. Matveev

1995-01-01

225

Utility of drill-stem tests in determination of the geothermal regime of Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Accurate representation of geothermal conditions is necessary to determine generation potential of source rocks buried in Railroad Valley. Boreholes, provide the best source of geothermal information, but formation temperature data must be screened for variations caused by drilling. Bottomhole temperatures from wireline logs are affected by initial formation conditions, drilling fluid that moves into the formation while drilling, and lag time between cessation of drilling fluid circulation and acquisition of logs. More accurate indicators of formation conditions are temperatures recorded during drill-stem tests, especially for tests that recovered large amounts of fluid. Over 130 drill-stem tests were examined to establish the viability of this source of data and to determine the geothermal conditions of the Railroad Valley basin. Results indicate that 500 feet or more of fluid recovery on a test is necessary to get a temperature recorded that is not influenced by drilling perturbations. The formation temperature data collected for Railroad Valley indicate the possibility of 2 thermal regimes. A low-temperature gradient regime is probably influenced by meteoric water. The high-temperature gradient regime probably reflects the regional heat flow associated with the thin crust of the Great Basin.

French, D.E. [Independent Geologist, Billings, MT (United States)

1995-06-01

226

Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites, Corrective Action Unit 443'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first phase involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data, and inputting the data into a three-dimensional numerical model to depict groundwater flow. The output from the groundwater flow model was used in a transport model to simulate the migration of a radionuclide release (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second phase of modeling (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after NDEP reviewed the first model. This phase was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third phase of modeling updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003). Corrective action alternatives were evaluated and an alternative was submitted in the ''Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for CAU 443 is Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and will control inadvertent exposure to contaminated groundwater at CAU 443.

Tim Echelard

2006-01-01

227

Stratigraphic evidence for multiple small Quaternary displacements on the Bow Ridge fault at northeast Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of Trench 14D on the Bow Ridge fault, a north-trending, steeply dipping (75 [degree] W) normal fault that bounds the northeast edge of Yucca Mountain, indicates that 5--6 small displacements with long recurrence intervals took place during the middle to late Quaternary. Five to six individual surface-rupture events are recognized at discrete stratigraphic intervals in the sequence based on (a) incremental up-section decreases in offset marker horizons, (b) the position of small fault-displacement colluvial wedges deposited adjacent to the fault above downthrown marker horizons, and (c) development of buried degraded fault scarps. Vertical displacements on individual events vary between 5 and 20 cm (ave. 10 cm), which collectively sum to 45 cm of cumulative vertical offset across the lowermost units. Many left-oblique striation sets (65[degree]--20[degree] plunges) are observed on carbonate fault laminae, which, if tectonic, suggest cumulative and average-event net slip amounts of 76--132 cm and 11--28 cm, respectively. The four oldest events occurred during the middle Pleistocene, based on correlations of faulted units with a dated chronosequence; the fifth and a possible sixth event are bracketed within a late Pleistocene unit. Generally long recurrence intervals (10[sup 4]--10[sup 5]yrs) and very low slip rates ([approx] 0.001 mm/yr) are indicated by the small cumulative offsets and stratigraphic separation of events between nontectonic colluvium containing buried paleosols and (or) degraded fault scarps. Other ongoing studies suggest that generally similar behavior characterizes many normal faults in the Yucca Mountain area.

Menges, C.M. (Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States)); Vadurro, G. (Humboldt Univ., Arcata, CA (United States). Geology Dept.); Cress, R.; Coe, J.; Simonds, F.W. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-04-01

228

Preliminary permeability and water-retention data for nonwelded and bedded tuff samples, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of rock-matrix hydrologic properties at Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository, are needed to predict rates and direction of water flow in the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study is to provide preliminary data on intrinsic and relative permeability and moisture retention on rock core samples and to present the methods used to

L. E. Flint; A. L. Flint

1990-01-01

229

Analysis of ER-12-3 FY 2005 Hydrologic Testing, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-3 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Well ER-12-3 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-3 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 4,908 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 7,390.8 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was YUBA (U-12b.10), conducted in the U-12b Tunnel approximately 1,529 ft northeast of the well site. The YUBA test working point elevation was located at approximately 6,642 ft amsl. The YUBA test had an announced yield of 3.1 kilotons (kt) (SNJV, 2006b). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer-thrust plate (LCA3) located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Development and hydraulic testing of ER-12-3 took place between June 3 and July 22, 2005. The development objectives included removing residual drilling fluids and improving the hydraulic connection of the well within the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA). The hydraulic testing objectives focused on obtaining further hydrogeologic, geochemical, and radiochemical data for the site. Details on the data collected during the testing program are presented in the report ''Rainier Mesa Well ER-12-3 Data Report for Well Development and Hydraulic Testing'' (SNJV, 2006b). Participants in ER-12-3 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-3 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted.

Bill Fryer

2006-07-01

230

Natural Ground Water Colloids from the USGS J-13 Well in Nye County, NV: A Study Using SAXS and TEM  

SciTech Connect

We report results from ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of dilute silicate colloids that occur naturally in ground water from the U.S. Geological Society J-13 well, located near the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. Also included are results from our examination of a separate sample of this groundwater that had been treated by heating to 90 {sup o}C in contact with crushed Topopah Spring Tuff from the Yucca Mountain site. The USAXS measurements were done at the UNICAT undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Power-law plots (scattering intensity versus momentum transfer) were fitted to the USAXS data. Colloids in the untreated J-13 groundwater were shown to have a fractal dimension of nearly 3, whereas colloids in the treated groundwater (EJ-13) have a dimensionality of approximately 2.4 over a length scale of approximately 3 to 300 nm. Similar power-law plots with dimension 3 characterized concurrent SAXS measurements from aqueous suspensions of Na-montmorillonite and NIST Brick Clay (NBS-67). We attribute these results to the sheet-silicate-layered structure of the clay colloids present in J-13 well water, montmorillonite, and 'brick clay' systems. The differences between EJ-13 and as-received J-13 are perhaps owing to exchange of calcium for sodium with the tuff. Radionuclide incorporation into, adsorption onto, or ion exchange with existing groundwater colloids may promote colloidal transport of radionuclides in groundwater. Such radionuclide-bearing colloids could thereby increase the concentrations of actinides in groundwater and enhance migration into human-accessible aquifers. Our results demonstrate the first application of USAXS to study the physical nature of such groundwater colloids, and represent perhaps one of the most dilute systems ever studied by small-angle scattering.

Fortner, J.; Mertz, C.; Jemian, P.; Wolf, S.

2004-01-29

231

Gamma-radioactivity investigations at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Interim report, February 1960 to July 1961  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a part of continuous geologic and geophysical investigations at the Nevada Test Site, gamma-radioactivity measurements are being made in tunnels and drill holes to determine semiquantitatively the natural gamma radioactivity of geologic formations and the distribution of nuclear-explosion-produced radioisotopes. Tunnel walls were surveyed with portable scintillation detection equipment and drill holes were logged with Geiger-Mueller detectors. These measurements were

C. M. Bunker; M. D. Shutler

1962-01-01

232

Natural Ground Water Colloids from the USGS J-13 Well in Nye County, NV: A Study Using SAXS and TEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report results from ultra-small-angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of dilute silicate colloids that occur naturally in ground water from the U.S. Geological Society J-13 well, located near the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. Also included are results from our examination of a separate sample of this groundwater that had been treated by heating to 90

J. Fortner; C. Mertz; P. Jemian; S. Wolf

2004-01-01

233

Estimates of ground-water discharge as determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, Ash Meadows area, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ash Meadows is one of the major discharge areas within the regional Death Valley ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Ash Meadows is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the eastern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, contaminants introduced into the subsurface by past nuclear testing at NTS are the subject of study by the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration Program. The transport of any contaminant in contact with ground water is controlled in part by the rate and direction of ground-water flow, which itself depends on the location and quantity of ground water discharging from the flow system. To best evaluate any potential risk associated with these test-generated contaminants, studies were undertaken to accurately quantify discharge from areas downgradient from the NTS. This report presents results of a study to refine the estimate of ground-water discharge at Ash Meadows. The study estimates ground-water discharge from the Ash Meadows area through a rigorous quantification of evapotranspiration (ET). To accomplish this objective, the study identifies areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineates unique areas of ET defined on the basis of similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and computes ET rates for each of the delineated areas. A classification technique using spectral-reflectance characteristics determined from satellite images recorded in 1992 identified seven unique units representing areas of ground-water ET. The total area classified encompasses about 10,350 acres dominated primarily by lush desert vegetation. Each unique area, referred to as an ET unit, generally consists of one or more assemblages of local phreatophytes. The ET units identified range from sparse grasslands to open water. Annual ET rates are computed by energy-budget methods from micrometeorological measurements made at 10 sites within six of the seven identified ET units. Micrometeorological data were collected for a minimum of 1 year at each site during 1994 through 1997. Evapotranspiration ranged from 0.6 foot per year in a sparse, dry saltgrass environment to 8.6 feet per year over open water. Ancillary data, including water levels, were collected during this same period to gain additional insight into the evapotranspiration process. Water levels measured in shallow wells showed annual declines of more than 10 feet and daily declines as high as 0.3 foot attributed to water losses associated with evapotranspiration. Mean annual ET from the Ash Meadows area is estimated at 21,000 acre-feet. An estimate of ground-water discharge, based on this ET estimate, is presented as a range to account for uncertainties in the contribution of local precipitation. The estimates given for mean annual ground-water discharge range from 18,000 to 21,000 acre-feet. The low estimate assumes a large contribution from local precipitation in computed ET rates; whereas, the high estimate assumes no contribution from local precipitation. The range presented is only slightly higher than previous estimates of ground-water discharge from the Ash Meadows area based primarily on springflow measurements.

Laczniak, R. J.; DeMeo, G. A.; Reiner, S. R.; Smith, J. L.; Nylund, W. E.

1999-01-01

234

Micrometeorological data for energy-budget studies near Rogers Spring, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 1994  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Micrometeorological data were collected at two sites near Rogers Spring in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge for use in energy-budget studies beginning in 1994. The data collected at each site included net radiation, air temperature at two heights, dew-point temperature at two heights, windspeed at two heights, soil heat flux, and soil temperature in the interval between the land surface and the buried heat-flux plates.

Nichols, W. D.; Rapp, T. R.

1996-01-01

235

Interpretation of time-domain electromagnetic soundings in the Calico Hills area, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A controlled source, time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) sounding survey was conducted in the Calico Hills area of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The geoelectric structure was determined as an aid in the evaluation of the site for possible future storage of spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. The data were initially interpreted with a simple scheme that produces an apparent resistivity versus depth curve from the vertical magnetic field data. These curves are qualitatively interpreted much like standard Schlumberger resistivity sounding curves. Final interpretation made use of a layered earth Marquardt inversion computer program. The results combined with those from a set of Schlumberger soundings in the area show that there is a moderately resistive basement at a depth no greater than 800 meters. The basement resistivity is greater than 100 ohm meters.

Kauahikaua, J.

236

Evidence of prehistoric flooding and the potential for future extreme flooding at Coyote Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coyote Wash, an approximately 0.3-square-mile drainage on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain, is the potential location for an exploratory shaft to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for construction of an underground repository for the storage o...

P. A. Glancy

1994-01-01

237

Evidence of prehistoric flooding and the potential for future extreme flooding at Coyote Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coyote Wash, an approximately 0.3-square-mile drainage on the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain, is the potential location for an exploratory shaft to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for construction of an underground repository for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. An ongoing investigation is addressing the potential for hazards to the site and surrounding areas from flooding and related

Glancy

1994-01-01

238

Evidence of prehistoric flooding and the potential for future extreme flooding at Coyote Wash, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coyote Wash, east of Yucca Mountain and southwest of the Nevada Test Site, is the potential location for an exploratory shaft to investigate the feasibility of underground storage of radioactive waste. The potential for flooding and related fluvial-debris hazards was investigated with respect to the potential shaft location. Trenches excavated through fluvial sediment deposits revealed interstratified rock detritus emplaced by floods and debris flows. Most of the deposits are believed to be of late Quaternary age. Debros-flow deposits contain boulders as large as 3 feet in diameter. This evidence of intense prehistoric flooding and debris movement indicates the possibility of similar continuing activity. Empirical estimates of extreme flood flows in North Fork Coyote Wash, a 0.094- square-mile drainage to the shaft site, range from 900 to 2,600 cubic feet per second. Current (1992) knowledge indicates that flows of water and debris as much as 2,500 cubic feet per second can occur in the vicinity of the shaft from this drainage. Similar size flows from adjacent South Fork Coyote Wash, could arrive simultaneously in the vicinity of the shaft. Thus, cumulative water and debris from both tributaries could subject the alluvial flood plain near the shaft site to flows of as much as 5,000 cubic feet per second.

Glancy, Patrick A.

1994-01-01

239

76 FR 38456 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Procedures; Part 228.11 Hours of Safety Recordkeeping Requirements; and Part 229.125 Headlights and Auxiliary Headlights Candela Requirements. FRA assigned the petition Docket Number FRA-2011- 0048. TriMet has petitioned FRA for a waiver of...

2011-06-30

240

49 CFR Appendix B to Part 221 - Approved Rear End Marking Devices  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Headlight & Lantern Co., 168 West Main Street, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. FRA identification Nos. FRA-PLE-STAR-845-F...McDermott Corp., 1639 Stephen Street, Ridgewood, Long Island, NY 11227. FRA identification Nos....

2012-10-01

241

77 FR 4395 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Federal Railroad Administration [Docket Number FRA-2011-0101] Petition for Waiver of Compliance In accordance with part 211...part 236. FRA assigned the petition Docket Number FRA-2011-0101. Metra seeks relief from the 2-year periodic testing...

2012-01-27

242

Epithermal Gold Deposits-Part 1. (Chapter H).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: The Goldfield Gold District, Esmeralda and Nye Counties, Nevada; The Tonopah Precious-metal District, Esmeralda and Nye Counties, Nevada; The Republic Gold District, Ferry County, Washington; The Comstock Lode Precious-metal District, Washoe and...

R. P. Ashley M. H. Staatz R. C. Pearson W. C. Bagby

1990-01-01

244

LE DONNE E LO STUDIO DELLA TORÀ: UNO SCAMBIO EPISTOLARE FRA DINA E RABBI SAMUELE ARCHIVOLTI NELL'ITALIA DEL RINASCIMENTO  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of Torah, and in particular of the so-called Oral Torah, i.e. the Talmud, was traditionally a prerogative of men only, although notable exceptions of learned women are recorded in the course of Jewish history. In modern times the request by women to take full part in the world of Jewish studies has become an important issue, even though

David Gianfranco Di Segni

2001-01-01

245

Yersinia pestis pFra Shows Biovar-Specific Differences and Recent Common Ancestry with a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Plasmid  

PubMed Central

Population genetic studies suggest that Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague, is a clonal pathogen that has recently emerged from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Plasmid acquisition is likely to have been a key element in this evolutionary leap from an enteric to a flea-transmitted systemic pathogen. However, the origin of Y. pestis-specific plasmids remains obscure. We demonstrate specific plasmid rearrangements in different Y. pestis strains which distinguish Y. pestis bv. Orientalis strains from other biovars. We also present evidence for plasmid-associated DNA exchange between Y. pestis and the exclusively human pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

Prentice, Michael B.; James, Keith D.; Parkhill, Julian; Baker, Stephen G.; Stevens, Kim; Simmonds, Mark N.; Mungall, Karen L.; Churcher, Carol; Oyston, Petra C. F.; Titball, Richard W.; Wren, Brendan W.; Wain, John; Pickard, Derek; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Dougan, Gordon

2001-01-01

246

Byoekologiske anbefalinger. Betaenkning fra Det raadgivende udvalg om byoekologi. (Recommendations on urban ecology. Report from the advisory committee on urban ecology).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recommendations on urban ecology given by an advisory committee under the national planning department of the Danish Ministry of the Environment. Urban ecology is defined as initiatives taken in order to protect/improve the environment in a specified urba...

1994-01-01

247

Aske fra halm- og flisfyrede vaerker til jordbrugsmaessig anvendelse. Forprojekt. (Ashes from straw and wood-chip fired plants for agricultural usage. Pilot project).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The content of nutrients and heavy metals in ashes from the combustion of straw and wood chips at district heating plants is studied, on the basis of results of analyses from Danish municipalities, to determine whether such ashes are suitable for use as f...

M. Morsing S. Westborg

1994-01-01

248

Afgivelse af Metaller (Bly, Cadmium, Kobber, Zink, Nikkel og Krom) fra Husholdningsblendere (Release of Metals (Lead, Cadmium, Copper, Zinc, Nickel and Chromium) from Kitchen Blenders).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The investigation includes 21 mixers of 8 different makes. Also, 2 different mixer-sticks and 3 food-processors of 2 different makes were investigated. Some of the samples had been used in householdings before the testing. The samples were analyzed for re...

1984-01-01

249

Optimering af stoerre tilslutningsanlaeg for fjernvarme ud fra driftsforsoeg. (Optimization of major house stations for district heating, based on performance testing).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The series of tests have taken place in two approximately identical apartment blocks in Broendby. Two district heating house stations with different domestic hot water systems were constructed. In block I the domestic hot water system was constructed as a...

B. Svendsen Libing Yang B. Boehm H. Poulsen A. Lindegaard-Andersen

1994-01-01

250

A major quantitative trait locus for cold-responsive gene expression is linked to frost-resistance gene Fr-A2 in common wheat  

PubMed Central

Low temperature induces expression of Cor (cold-responsive)/Lea (late embryogenesis-abundant) gene family members through C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors in common wheat. However, the relationship between the genetic loci controlling cold-responsive gene expression and freezing tolerance is unclear. In expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis, accumulated transcripts of Cor/Lea and CBF genes were quantified in recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two common wheat cultivars with different levels of freezing tolerance. Four eQTLs controlling five cold-responsive genes were found, and the major eQTL with the greatest effect was located on the long arm of chromosome 5A. At least the 1D and 5A eQTLs played important roles in development of freezing tolerance in common wheat. The chromosomal location of the 5A eQTL, controlling four cold-responsive genes, coincided with a region homoeologous to a frost-tolerance locus (Fr-Am2) reported as a CBF cluster region in einkorn wheat. The 5A eQTL plays a significant role through Cor/Lea gene expression in cold acclimation of wheat. In addition, our results suggest that one or more CBF copies at the Fr-2 region positively regulate other copies, which might amplify the positive effects of the CBF cluster on downstream Cor/Lea gene activation.

Motomura, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Fuminori; Iehisa, Julio C. M.; Takumi, Shigeo

2013-01-01

251

Projektarbejde i fremmedsprogene: Rapport fra seminar pa Roskilde Universitetscenter (Project Work in Foreign Languages: Report from a Seminar at Roskilde University Center). ROLIG-papir 38.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes a seminar at Roskilde University Center (Denmark) on project work in foreign languages, which brought together language teachers and theorists from different schools, including universities, business schools, technical schools, merchants schools, and high schools, to discuss their experiences with project work in foreign…

Jakobsen, Karen Sonne, Ed.

252

Zoobenthos in the Littoral and Profundal Zones of Four Faroese Lakes Botndjór í strandaøkinum og profundala økinum í f?ra føroyskum vøtnum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Density and species composition of macroinvertebrates in the littoral and profundal zones of the four Faroese lakes Leynavatn, Eystara Mjáavatn, Saksunarvatn and Toftavatn were studied in early August 2000. Mean density of macroinvertebrates on rocky substrate in the littoral zone ranged between 11,272 and 37,239 ind m-2, and mean density in the profundal ranged between 30,199 and 175,387 ind m-2.

Hilmar J. Malmquist; Finnur Ingimarsson; Erlín E. Jóhannsdóttir

253

Rapid Reduction of Tetrachloro(D,L-fraJis)l,2-diaminocyclohexaneplatinum(IV) (Tetraplatin) in RPMI1640 Tissue Culture Medium1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tetrachloro(D,L-franj)l,2-diaminocyclohexaneplatinum(IV) (tetra- platin) is a new platinum analogue which is less nephrotoxic than cisplatin and is effective in some cell lines which have becomeresistant to cisplatin. Since platinum(IV) compounds are thought to require reduction to their platinum(II) analogues for activity, the biotransformations of tetraplatin and its platinimeli) analogue, dichloro(D,L-rra\\/u)l,2-diaminocyclohex- aneplatinum(II) (PtCl2(rra\\/is-dach)|, were studied. For 1.121(1cells cul tured in RPMI 1640

Gregory R. Gibbons; Steven Wyrick; Stephen G. Chaney

254

Gradert Forekort fra 17 Eller 17 1/2 ar: Beregning av Mulige Effekter pa Ulykker. (Graduated Licensing in Norway: Estimated Effect on Crash Involvement.)  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Estimates show possible crash reduction as a result of allowing solo driving from 17 or 1712years of age (compared to the current 18-year age limit) under restrictions like night driving curfew, ban on taking young passengers, and ban on using a telephone...

R. Sagberg T. Bjornskau

2012-01-01

255

Sammenligning af goedningsvirkning og tab af kvaelstof fra ubehandlet og afgasset kvaeggylle. (Comparison of fertilizing effect and loss of nitrogen from untreated and degassed cattle manures).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During a period of three years experiments have been carried out in order to compare the fertilizing effect of untreated cattle slurries, and cattle slurries that have been used for the conversion of biomass to methane, on spring barley with undersown gra...

H. Oertenblad E. Hvelplund K. Henriksen

1992-01-01

256

THE DETECTION OF FRA MAURO BASALTS IN THE LUNAR HIGHLANDS BY REMOTE SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE TECHNIQUES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CRUSTAL STRATIGRAPHY 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because the lunar highland crust down to 60km accounts for about 10% of the lunar volume, a knowledge of the abundance of elements such as A1 and the rare earths within the crust is critical for theories of lunar petrogenesis and the bulk composition of the moon (1-3). Evidence available from the lunar orbital x-ray and y-ray experiments (4-5) covers

Michael P. Charette; S. Ross; Thomas B. McCord

257

75 FR 27053 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257; Notice No. 61] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of...

2010-05-13

258

77 FR 28421 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257: Notice No. 70] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of...

2012-05-14

259

?Framework for a Risk-Informed Groundwater Compliance Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Note: This document was prepared before the NTS was renamed the Nevada National Security Site (August 23, 2010); thus, all references to the site herein remain NTS. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location of ten underground nuclear tests between 1965 and 1971. As a result, radionuclides were released in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Corrective Action Unit 98 and other CAUs at the NTS and offsite locations are being investigated. The Frenchman Flat CAU is one of five Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs at the NTS that are being evaluated as potential sources of local or regional impact to groundwater resources. For UGTA sites, including Frenchman Flat, contamination in and around the test cavities will not be remediated because it is technologically infeasible due to the depth of the test cavities (150 to 2,000 feet [ft] below ground surface) and the volume of contaminated groundwater at widely dispersed locations on the NTS. Instead, the compliance strategy for these sites is to model contaminant flow and transport, estimate the maximum spatial extent and volume of contaminated groundwater (over a period of 1,000 years), maintain institutional controls, and restrict access to potentially contaminated groundwater at areas where contaminants could migrate beyond the NTS boundaries.

Sam Marutzky

2010-09-01

260

Modeling Approach/Strategy for Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1, with ROTC-1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an approach for preliminary (Phase I) flow and transport modeling for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This modeling will take place before the planned Phase II round of data collection to better identify the remaining data gaps before the fieldwork begins. Because of the geologic complexity, limited number of borings, and large vertical gradients, there is considerable uncertainty in the conceptual model for flow; thus different conceptual models will be evaluated, in addition to different framework and recharge models. The transport simulations will not be used to formally calculate the Contaminant Boundary at this time. The modeling (Phase II) will occur only after the available data are considered sufficient in scope and quality.

Greg Ruskauff

2008-06-01

261

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01

262

Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

The Pahute Mesa groundwater flow model supports the FFACO UGTA corrective action strategy objective of providing an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU in order to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear testing above background conditions exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. The FFACO (1996) requires that the contaminant transport model predict the contaminant boundary at 1,000 years and “at a 95% level of confidence.” The Pahute Mesa Phase I flow model described in this report provides, through the flow fields derived from alternative hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) and recharge models, one part of the data required to compute the contaminant boundary. Other components include the simplified source term model, which incorporates uncertainty and variability in the factors that control radionuclide release from an underground nuclear test (SNJV, 2004a), and the transport model with the concomitant parameter uncertainty as described in Shaw (2003). The uncertainty in all the above model components will be evaluated to produce the final contaminant boundary. This report documents the development of the groundwater flow model for the Central and Western Pahute Mesa CAUs.

Greg Ruskauff

2006-06-01

263

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

2012-09-01

264

Predevelopment Water-Level Contours for Aquifers in the Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. Although contaminants were introduced into low-permeability rocks above the regional flow system, the potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test

Joseph M. Fenelon; Randell J. Laczniak; Keith J. Halford

2008-01-01

265

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General

J. M. Fenelon

2005-01-01

266

Logs and paleoseismic interpretations from trenches 14C and 14D on the Bow Ridge fault, northeastern Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Detailed studies of trenches 14D and 14C on the Bow Ridge fault indicate two to three displacements and long recurrence intervals during the middle to late Quaternary. The main trace of the fault is marked by a thick (20--40 centimeters wide) subvertical shear zone coated with multiple carbonate-silica laminae and several generations of fine-grained fissure-fill debris. Exposed in the trenches is a vertically stacked sequence of thin (0.3--1.5 meters thick) fine-grained colluvial, alluvial, and eolian deposits that commonly contain smaller wedge-shaped units or several weakly to strongly developed buried paleosols, or both. The two to three surface-rupture events are recognized at discrete stratigraphic intervals in the sequence based on (1) incremental up-section decreases in offset of marker horizons, (b) upward terminations of shear zones, fissure fills, and fractures, and (c) the position of small scarp-derived colluvial wedges deposited adjacent to the fault above downfaulted marker horizons. Preferred estimates of the vertical displacement per event are 12 and 40 centimeters. Left-oblique striations are observed on carbonate fault laminae, which, if tectonic in origin, increase the vertical displacement by factors of 1.1 to 1.7, yielding preferred net slip displacements per event of 13 to 70 centimeters. Thermoluminescence ages of 48 {+-} 20 and 132 {+-} 23 thousand years bracket the ages of the events, which probably occurred near the bounding ages of the time interval. These age constraints suggest long, average recurrence intervals between the three events of 75 to 210 ky; the preferred values range between 100 to 140 ky. The small net cumulative displacement of two dated reference horizons yield very low fault slip rates of 0.002 to 0.007 millimeters per year; the preferred value is 0.003 millimeters per year.

Menges, C.M.; Taylor, E.M.; Vadurro, G.; Oswald, J.A.; Cress, R.; Murray, M.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Paces, J.B.; Mahan, S.A.

1997-12-31

267

Determination of barometric efficiency and effective porosity, boreholes UE-25 cNo.1, UE-25 cNo.3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous records of water-level altitudes in boreholes UE-25 cNo.1, UE-25 cNo.2, and UE-25 cNo.3 (the C-holes) and atmospheric pressure at and near the C-holes were obtained from July 15 to September 8, 1993, to determine the barometric efficiency of the entire uncased section of each of the C-holes, for the purpose of analyzing pumping tests. Each of the C-holes is 3,000 feet deep. About 1,600 feet of each borehole is open in Miocene tuffaceous rocks. Water-level altitudes in the C-holes fluctuate in response to Earth tides and changes in atmospheric pressure, which are characteristics of wells completed in an elastic, confined aquifer. The barometric efficiency of the C-holes in this study was analyzed by filtering simultaneously collected water-level-altitude and atmospheric-pressure data to remove the influences of Earth tides and semi-diurnal heating and cooling and then regressing filtered water-level-altitude changes as a function of filtered changes in atmospheric pressure. The average barometric efficiency of the uncased sections of boreholes UE-25 cNo.1 and UE-25 cNo.3 was determined to be 0.94. Malfunctioning equipment prevented determining the barometric efficiency of bore-hole UE-25 cNo.2. An average effective porosity of 0.36 was calculated from barometric efficiency values determined in this study and a specific storage value of 0.497 x 10{sup -6} per foot that was determined previously from geophysical logs of the C-holes. A porosity of 0.36 is consistent with values determined from geophysical logs and core analyses for the Calico Hills Formation.

Geldon, A.L.; Earle, J.D.; Umari, A.M.A.

1997-12-31

268

Analysis of a multiple-well interference test in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-Hole complex, May--June 1995, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multiple-well interference (pumping) test was conducted in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain, Nev., from May 22 to June 12, 1995, by the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. This pumping test was conducted as part of investigations to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for

A. L. Geldon; A. M. A. Umari; J. D. Earle; M. F. Fahy; J. M. Gemmell; J. Darnell

1998-01-01

269

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada, (DE2009-950714).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Moun...

D. Campbell I. Kavouras J. Engelbrecht S. Campbell S. Kohl

2009-01-01

270

Report on televiewer log and stress measurements in holes USW G-3 and Ue25p1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and televiewer observations were made in drill holes USW G-3 and Ue-25p1 on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of a continuing investigation of the tectonic stress field in the vicinity of a proposed site for the disposal of nuclear waste. The results from USW G-3 are similar to the results reported previously from USW G-1 and

J. M. Stock; J. H. Healy; J. Svitek; L. Mastin

1986-01-01

271

Analysis of ground-water levels and associated trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

Fenelon, Joseph M.

2005-01-01

272

Flerstrenget energisystem til nye etageboliger. Boliger egnede for aeldre. Slutrapport. (Many dimensioned energy system for new apartment buildings. Homes suitable for the elderly. Final report).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In Denmark the idea of elderly people living together in buildings where each single person has their own flat, but where there are several common facilities and increased possibilities for social contact and mutual support, is gaining in popularity. The ...

1991-01-01

273

Geochemistry of altered and mineralized rocks from the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, northern Hot Creek Range, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey and the St. Johns River Water Management District are investigating the hydrogeology of the Floridan aquifer system. An essential element of this investigation is the design and construction of a monitor well network in the lower saline water-bearing zone which occurs at about 2,000 ft below land surface. During 1985, a well near Ponte Vedra in northeast St. Johns County was completed into the lower saline water-bearing zone at a depth of 1,980 to 2,035 ft below land surface. This well and other wells drilled under this or other programs will be used to monitor water levels and water chemistry of the lower saline zone. Chloride concentrations in water above the lower saline zone ranged from 14 to 270 mg/L and specific conductance ranged from 450 to 1,440 micromhos/cm c. In the lower zone, chloride concentrations were as much as 16,210 mg/L and specific conductance as much as 46,000 micromhos per centimeter. Aquifer head and artesian flow from the well generally increased with depth. Water temperatures also increased from 23 C in the upper part of the aquifer to more than 28 C in the lower saline zone. (USGS)

Nash, J. T.; John, D. A.; Malcolm, M. J.; Briggs, P. H.; Crock, J. G.

1986-01-01

274

Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

John McCord

2004-12-01

275

Special Analysis of Transuranic Waste in Trench T04C at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Special Analysis (SA) was prepared to assess the potential impact of inadvertent disposal of a limited quantity of transuranic (TRU) waste in classified Trench 4 (T04C) within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is a low-level radioactive waste disposal site in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS is regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under DOE Order 435.1 and DOE Manual (DOE M) 435.1-1. The primary objective of the SA is to evaluate if inadvertent disposal of limited quantities of TRU waste in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 RWMS is in compliance with the existing, approved Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) issued under DOE M 435.1-1. In addition, supplemental analyses are performed to determine if there is reasonable assurance that the requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, can be met. The 40 CFR 191 analyses provide supplemental information regarding the risk to human health and the environment of leaving the TRU waste in T04C. In 1989, waste management personnel reviewing classified materials records discovered that classified materials buried in trench T04C at the Area 5 RWMS contained TRU waste. Subsequent investigations determined that a total of 102 55-gallon drums of TRU waste from Rocky Flats were buried in trench T04C in 1986. The disposal was inadvertent because unclassified records accompanying the shipment indicated that the waste was low-level. The exact location of the TRU waste in T04C was not recorded and is currently unknown. Under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.5, low-level waste disposal facilities must obtain a DAS. The DAS specifies conditions that must be met to operate within the radioactive waste management basis, consisting of a performance assessment (PA), composite analysis (CA), closure plan, monitoring plan, waste acceptance criteria, and a PA/CA maintenance plan. The DOE issued a DAS for the Area 5 RWMS in 2000. The Area 5 RWMS DAS was, in part, based on review of a CA as required under DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV, Section P.(3). A CA is a radiological assessment required for DOE waste disposed before 26 September 1988 and includes the radiological dose from all sources of radioactive material interacting with all radioactive waste disposed at the Area 5 RWMS. The approved Area 5 RWMS CA, which includes the inventory of TRU waste in T04C, indicates that the Area 5 RWMS waste inventory and all interacting sources of radioactive material can meet the 0.3 mSv dose constraint. The composite analysis maximum annual dose for a future resident at the Area 5 RWMS was estimated to be 0.01 mSv at 1,000 years. Therefore, the inadvertent disposal of TRU in T04C is protective of the public and the environment, and compliant with all the applicable requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated 40 CFR 191 to establish standards for the planned disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high level, and transuranic wastes in geologic repositories. Although not required, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office requested a supplemental analysis to evaluate the likelihood that the inadvertent disposal of TRU waste in T04C meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The SA evaluates the likelihood of meeting the 40 CFR 191 containment requirements (CRs), assurance requirements, individual protection requirements (IPRs), and groundwater protection standards. The results of the SA indicate that there is a reasonable expectation of meeting all the requirements of 40 CFR 191. The conclusion of the SA is that the Area 5 RWMS with the TRU waste buried in T04C is in compliance with all requirements in DOE M 435.1-1 and the DAS. Compliance with the DAS is demonstrated by the results of the Area 5 RWMS CA. Supplemental analyses in the SA indicate there is a

Greg Shott, Vefa Yucel, Lloyd Desotell

2008-05-01

276

2006 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2006) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted as an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 2000; 2002). The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2006 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2006 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, and closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities, were reviewed in FY 2006 for determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

Gregory J, Shott, Vefa Yucel

2007-03-01

277

Description of Major Vegetation Associations and Their Potential Contribution to Range Fires Generated by LNG Combustion Tests on Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is planning to conduct tests at the Nevada Test Site on the physical and environmental effects of controlled spills of liquefied natural gas. Large combustion tests may cause range fires that could threaten adjacent ...

T. P. O'Farrell E. Collins M. L. Sauls

1982-01-01

278

Geohydrologic data from test holes UE-25 UZ {number_sign}4 and UE-25 UZ {number_sign}5, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Data collected to determine the hydraulic characteristics of rocks penetrated by test holes UE-25 UZ No. 4 and UE-25 UZ No. 5 are presented. These test holes are part of a series of test holes drilled in and near the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site in an investigation conducted by the US Geological Survey in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. This investigation is part of the Yucca Mountain Project Branch, Hydrologic Investigations Program (formerly Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations) to determine the suitability of this site for storage of high-level radioactive wastes in an underground mined repository. Data on drilling operations, lithology, coring, and laboratory analyses of hydrologic characteristics of core and cuttings samples are included in this report.

Loskot, C.L.; Hammermeister, D.P.

1992-12-01

279

Fiscal Year 2005 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Performance Assessment (PA) maintenance plan requires an annual review to determine if current operations and conditions at the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) remain consistent with PA and composite analysis (CA) assumptions and models. This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 2005 annual review findings for the Area 3 RWMS PA only. The PA Maintenance Plan states that no annual review or summary reporting will be carried out in years that a PA or CA revision is undertaken (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2002). Updated PA results for the Area 5 RWMS were published in an addendum to the Area 5 RWMS PA report in September 2005. A federal review of the draft addendum report took place in early FY 2006 (October November 2005). The review team found the addendum acceptable without conditions. The review team's recommendation will be presented to the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group in early 2006. The addendum was revised in January 2006 and incorporated comments from the review team (BN, 2006). Table 1 summarizes the updated Area 5 RWMS PA results presented in the addendum.

Vefa Yucel

2006-01-01

280

Channel Transmission Loss Studies During Ephemeral Flow Events: ER-5-3 Channel and Cambric Ditch, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Transmission losses along ephemeral channels are an important, yet poorly understood, aspect of rainfall-runoff prediction. Losses occur as flow infiltrates channel bed, banks, and floodplains. Estimating transmission losses in arid environments is difficult because of the variability of surficial geomorphic characteristics and infiltration capacities of soils and near-surface low-permeability geologic layers (e.g., calcrete). Transmission losses in ephemeral channels are nonlinear functions of discharge and time (Lane, 1972), and vary spatially along the channel reach and with soil antecedent moisture conditions (Sharma and Murthy, 1994). Rainfall-runoff models used to estimate peak discharge and runoff volume for flood hazard assessment are not designed specifically for ephemeral channels, where transmission loss can be significant because of the available storage volume in channel soils. Accuracy of the flow routing and rainfall-runoff models is dependent on the transmission loss estimate. Transmission loss rate is the most uncertain parameter in flow routing through ephemeral channels. This research, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), is designed to improve understanding of the impact of transmission loss on ephemeral flood modeling and compare various methodologies for predicting runoff from rainfall events. Various applications of this research to DOE projects include more site-specific accuracy in runoff prediction; possible reduction in size of flood mitigation structures at the NTS; and a better understanding of expected infiltration from runoff losses into landfill covers. Two channel transmission loss field experiments were performed on the NTS between 2001 and 2003: the first was conducted in the ER-5-3 channel (Miller et al., 2003), between March and June 2001, and the second was conducted in the Cambric Ditch (Mizell et al., 2005), between April and July 2003. Both studies used water discharged from unrelated drilling activities during well development and aquifer pump tests. Discharge measurements at several flumes located along the channels were used to directly measure transmission losses. Flume locations were chosen in relation to geomorphic surface types and ages, vegetative cover and types, subsurface indurated layers (calcrete), channel slopes, etc. Transmission losses were quantified using three different analysis methods. Method 1 uses Lane's Method (Lane, 1983) for estimating flood magnitude in ephemeral channels. Method 2 uses heat as a subsurface tracer for infiltration. Numerical modeling, using HYDRUS-2D (Simunek et al., 1999), a finite-element-based flow and transport code, was applied to estimate infiltration from soil temperature data. Method 3 uses hydraulic gradient and water content in a Darcy's Law approach (Freeze and Cherry, 1979) to calculate one-dimensional flow rates. Heat dissipation and water content data were collected for this analysis.

J.J. Miller; S.A. Mizell; R.H. French; D.G. Meadows; M.H. Young

2005-10-01

281

Legacy Compliance Final Report: Results of the Navy/Encapo Soil Stabilization Study at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Historic atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has resulted in large areas of plutonium-contaminated surface soils. The potential transport of these contaminated soils to onsite and offsite receptors is a concern to the land steward and local stakeholders. The primary transport pathways of interest at the NTS are sediment entrained in surface water runoff and windblown dust. This project was initially funded by the U.S. Navy and subsequently funded by the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship Program. Field tests were conducted over a 20.5 month period to evaluate the efficacy of an organic-based, surface applied emulsion to reduce sediment transport from plutonium-contaminated soils. The patented emulsion was provided by Encapco Technologies LLC. Field tests were conducted within the SMOKY radioactive contamination area (CA). The SMOKY above ground nuclear test was conducted on 08/31/1957, with a reported yield of 44 kilotons and was located at N 37 degrees 10.5 minutes latitude and W 116 degrees 04.5 minutes longitude. Three 'safety tests' were also conducted within approximately 1,500 meters (5,000 feet) of the SMOKY ground zero in 1958. Safety tests are designed to test the response of a nuclear device to an unplanned external force (e.g., nearby detonation of conventional explosives). These three safety tests (CERES, OBERON, and TITANIA) resulted in dispersal of plutonium over a wide area (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). Ten 3 x 4.6 meter test plots were constructed within the SMOKY CA to conduct rainfall-runoff simulations. Six of the ten test plots were treated with the emulsion at the manufacturer recommended loading of 1.08 gallons per square meter, and four plots were held untreated as experimental controls. Separate areas were also treated to assess impacts to native vegetation and surface infiltration rate. Field tests were conducted at approximately 6, 13, and 20.5 months post emulsion treatment. Field tests consisted of rainfall-runoff simulations and double ring infiltrometer measurements. Plant vigor assessments were conducted during peak production time, approximately seven months post treatment. Rainfall was simulated at the approximate 5 minute intensity of a 50-year storm (5.1 inches per hour) for durations of four to five minutes. All runoff generated from each test plot was collected noting the time for each liter of volume. Five gallon carboys containing the runoff water and sediment were shipped to Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory for analysis. The samples were separated into liquid and solid fractions. Liquid and solid fractions were weighed and analyzed for Americium-241 (Am-241) by gamma spectrometry. Quality control measures used at the laboratory indicate the analytical data are accurate and reproducible. A weather station was deployed to the field site to take basic meteorological measurements including air temperature, incoming solar radiation, wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, relative humidity, precipitation, and volumetric soil moisture content. Meteorological monitoring data indicate the climate over the test period was hot and dry with 41 days having measurable precipitation. The total precipitation for the study period was 12.5 centimeters, 37% of the long-term average. For the 20.5 month test period, 64 freeze-thaw cycles occurred. Vegetation assessments indicate the emulsion treatment did not negatively impact existing vegetation. The three rounds of double ring infiltration tests on treated surfaces indicate the infiltration rate was relatively constant over time and not significantly different from measurements taken on untreated surfaces. Significant differences were observed in the amount of runoff and sediment collected from treated and untreated plots for the first two but not the third round of rainfall-runoff simulations, indicating significant emulsion degradation after 20.5 months of exposure. Treated plots had higher total runoff volumes and sediment loads as compared to untreated plots for the first two rounds of simulations. These

Lloyd Desotell, David Anderson, Stuart Rawlinson, David Hudson, Vefa Yucel

2008-03-01

282

Geochemical and Pb, Sr, and O isotopic study of the Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain is currently being studied as a potential site for an underground repository for high-level radioactive waste. One aspect of the site characterization studies is an evaluation o the resource potential at Yucca Mountain. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of past alteration of the welded tuffs that underlie Yucca Mountain provide a means of assessing the probability of hydrothermal ore deposits being present within Yucca Mountain. In this preliminary report, geochemical and isotopic measurements of altered Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff collected from fault zones exposed on the east flank of Yucca Mountain and from one drill core are compared to their unaltered equivalents sampled both in outcrop and drill core. The geochemistry and isotopic compositions of unaltered Tiva Canyon Tuff and Topopah Spring Tuff (high-silica rhyolite portions) are fairly uniform; these data provide a good baseline for comparisons with the altered samples. Geochemical analyses indicate that the brecciated tuffs are characterized by addition of calcium carbonate and opaline silica; this resulted in additions of calcium and strontium,increases in oxygen-18 content, and some redistribution of trace elements. After leaching the samples to remove authigenic carbonate, no differences in strontium or lead isotope compositions between altered and unaltered sections were observed. These data show that although localized alteration of the tuffs has occurred and affected their geochemistry, there is no indication of additions of exotic components. The lack of evidence for exotic strontium and lead in the most severely altered tuff samples at Yucca Mountain strongly implies a similar lack of exotic base or precious metals.

Neymark, L.A.; Marshall, B.D.; Kwak, L.M.; Futa, Kiyoto; Mahan, S.A.

1995-12-31

283

Analysis of Conservative Tracer Tests in the Bullfrog, Tram, and Prow Pass Tuffs, 1996 to 1998, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To evaluate the potential for transport of radionuclides in ground water from the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted among three boreholes, known as the C-hole Complex, and values for transport (or flow) porosity, storage (or matrix) porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and the extent of matrix diffusion were obtained. The C-holes are completed in a sequence of Miocene tuffaceous rock, consisting of nonwelded to densely welded ash-flow tuff with intervals of ash-fall tuff and volcaniclastic rocks, covered by Quaternary alluvium. The lower part of the tuffaceous-rock sequence includes the Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram Tuffs of the Crater Flat Group. The rocks are pervaded by tectonic and cooling fractures. Paleozoic limestone and dolomite underlie the tuffaceous rocks. Four radially convergent and one partially recirculating conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted at the C-hole Complex from 1996 to 1998 to establish values for flow porosity, storage porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and extent of matrix diffusion in the Bullfrog and Tram Tuffs and the Prow Pass Tuff. Tracer tests included (1) injection of iodide into the combined Bullfrog-Tram interval; (2) injection of 2,6 difluorobenzoic acid into the Lower Bullfrog interval; (3) injection of 3-carbamoyl-2-pyridone into the Lower Bullfrog interval; and (4) injection of iodide and 2,4,5 trifluorobenzoic acid, followed by 2,3,4,5 tetrafluorobenzoic acid, into the Prow Pass Tuff. All tracer tests were analyzed by the Moench single- and dual-porosity analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation or by superposition of these solutions. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to corroborate tracer solution results, to obtain optimal parameter values from the solutions, and to quantify parameter uncertainty resulting from analyzing two of the three radially convergent conservative tracer tests conducted in the Bullfrog and Tram intervals. Longitudinal dispersivity values in the Bullfrog and Tram Tuffs ranged from 1.83 to 2.6 meters, flow-porosity values from 0.072 to 0.099, and matrix-porosity values from 0.088 to 0.19. The flow-porosity values indicate that the pathways between boreholes UE-25 c#2 and UE-25 c#3 in the Bullfrog and Tram intervals are not connected well. Tracer testing in the Prow Pass interval indicates different transport characteristics than those obtained in the Bullfrog and Tram intervals. In the Prow Pass Tuff, longitudinal dispersivity was 0.27 meter, flow porosity was 4.5 ? 10?4, and matrix porosity was 0.01. This indicates that the flow network in the Prow Pass is dominated by interconnected fractures, whereas in the Bullfrog and Tram, the flow network is dominated by discontinuous fractures with connecting segments of matrix.

Umari, Amjad; Fahy, Michael F.; Earle, John D.; Tucci, Patrick

2008-01-01

284

2007 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an annual review of conditions affecting the operation of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs). The Area 5 RWMS PA documentation consists of the original PA (Shott et al., 1998), referred to as the 1998 Area 5 RWMS PA and supporting addenda (Bechtel Nevada [BN], 2001b; 2006a). The Area 5 RWMS CA was issued as a single document (BN, 2001a) and has a single addendum (BN, 2001c). The Area 3 PA and CA were issued in a single document (Shott et al., 2000). The Maintenance Plan for the PAs and CAs (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2006) and the Disposal Authorization Statements (DASs) for the Area 3 and 5 RWMSs (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2000; 2002) require preparation of an annual summary and a determination of the continuing adequacy of the PAs and CAs. The annual summary report is submitted to DOE Headquarters. Following the annual report format in the DOE PA/CA Maintenance Guide (DOE, 1999), this report presents the annual summary for the PAs in Section 2.0 and the CAs in Section 3.0. The annual summary for the PAs includes the following: Section 2.1 summarizes changes in waste disposal operations; Section 2.1.5 provides an evaluation of the new estimates of the closure inventories derived from the actual disposals through fiscal year (FY) 2007; Section 2.2 summarizes the results of the monitoring conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's (NNSA/NSO's) Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (BN, 2005), and the research and development (R&D) activities; Section 2.4 is a summary of changes in facility design, operation, or expected future conditions; monitoring and R&D activities; and the maintenance program; and Section 2.5 discusses the recommended changes in disposal facility design and operations, monitoring and R&D activities, and the maintenance program. Similarly, the annual summary for the CAs (presented in Section 3.0) includes the following: Section 3.1 presents the assessment of the adequacy of the CAs, with a summary of the relevant factors reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.2 presents an assessment of the relevant site activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that would impact the sources of residual radioactive material considered in the CAs; Section 3.3 summarizes the monitoring and R&D results that were reviewed in FY 2007; Section 3.4 presents a summary of changes in relevant site programs (including monitoring, R&D, and the maintenance program) that occurred since the CAs were prepared; and Section 3.5 summarizes the recommended changes to these programs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01

285

Water-level data from wells and test holes through 1991 and potentiometric contours as of 1991 for Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The underground nuclear testing program of the US Department of Energy (USDOE) takes place at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 65 mi north-west of Las Vegas, Nevada. Underground nuclear tests at Yucca Flat, one of the USDOE test areas at NTS, have affected hydrologic conditions, including groundwater levels. The purpose of this map report, prepared in cooperation with USDOE, is to present selected water-level data collected from wells and test holes through December 1991, and to show potentiometric contours representing 1991 water-table conditions in the Yucca Flat area. The more generic term, potentiometric contours, is used herein rather than ``water-table contours`` because the hydrologic units contributing water to wells and test holes may not accurately represent the water table. The water table is that surface in an unconfined water body at which the pressure is atmospheric. It is defined by the altitude at which non- perched ground water is first found in wells and test holes. Perched ground water is defined as unconfined ground water separated from an underlying body of ground water by an unsaturated zone. This map report updates information on water levels in some wells and test holes and the resulting water-table contours in rocks of Cenozoic and Paleozoic age shown by Doty and Thordarson for 1980 conditions.

Hale, G.S.; Trudeau, D.A.; Savard, C.S.

1995-12-01

286

Report on Televiewer LOG and Stress Measurements in Holes USW G-3 and Ue-25P1, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydraulic fracturing stress measurements and televiewer observations were made in drill holes USW G-3 and Ue-25p1 on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of a continuing investigation of the tectonic stress field in the vicinity of a proposed site for the disp...

J. M. Stock J. H. Healy J. Svitek L. Mastin

1986-01-01

287

Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-07-01

288

Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of the NTS, the U.S. Department of Energy currently is investigating the potential transport of these radionuclides by ground water flow. To better evaluate any potential risk associated with these test-generated contaminants, a number of studies were undertaken to accurately quantify discharge from areas downgradient in the regional ground-water flow system from the NTS. This report refines the estimate of ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley. Ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley was estimated by quantifying evapotranspiration (ET), estimating subsurface outflow, and compiling ground-water withdrawal data. ET was quantified by identifying areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineating areas of ET defined on the basis of similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions, and computing ET rates for each of the delineated areas. A classification technique using spectral-reflectance characteristics determined from satellite imagery acquired in 1992 identified eight unique areas of ground-water ET. These areas encompass about 3,426 acres of sparsely to densely vegetated grassland, shrubland, wetland, and open water. Annual ET rates in Oasis Valley were computed with energy-budget methods using micrometeorological data collected at five sites. ET rates range from 0.6 foot per year in a sparse, dry saltgrass environment to 3.1 feet per year in dense meadow vegetation. Mean annual ET from Oasis Valley is estimated to be about 7,800 acre-feet. Mean annual ground-water discharge by ET from Oasis Valley, determined by removing the annual local precipitation component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-ft in 1996 and 6,300 acre-ft in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by ET, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased.

Reiner, S. R.; Laczniak, R. J.; Demeo, G. A.; Smith, J. L.; Elliott, P. E.; Nylund, W. E.; Fridrich, C. J.

2002-01-01

289

Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of the NTS, the U.S. Department of Energy currently is investigating the potential transport of these radionuclides by ground water flow. To better evaluate any potential risk associated with these test-generated contaminants, a number of studies were undertaken to accurately quantify discharge from areas downgradient in the regional ground-water flow system from the NTS. This report refines the estimate of ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley. Ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley was estimated by quantifying evapotranspiration (ET), estimating subsurface outflow, and compiling ground-water withdrawal data. ET was quantified by identifying areas of ongoing ground-water ET, delineating areas of ET defined on the basis of similarities in vegetation and soil-moisture conditions and computing ET rates for each of the delineated areas. A classification technique using spectral-reflectance characteristics determined from satellite imagery acquired in 1992 identified eight unique areas of ground-water ET. These areas encompass about 3,426 acres of sparsely to densely vegetated grassland, shrubland, wetland, and open water. Annual ET rates in Oasis Valley were computed with energy-budget methods using micrometeorological data collected at five sites. ET rates range from 0.6 foot per year in a sparse, dry saltgrass environment to 3.1 feet per year in dense meadow vegetation. Mean annual ET from Oasis Valley is estimated to be about 7,800 acre-feet. Mean annual ground-water discharge by ET from Oasis Valley, determined by removing the annual local precipitation component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-feet in 1996 and 6,300 acre-feet in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by E T, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased.

Reiner,S.R.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A.; Smith, J.LaRue; Elliott, P.E.; Nylund, W.E.; Fridrich, C.J.

2002-01-29

290

2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-03-01

291

A Hydrostratigraphic Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat-Climax Mine, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A new three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit was completed in 2005. The model area includes Yucca Flat and Climax Mine, former nuclear testing areas at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. The model area is approximately 1,250 square kilometers in size and is geologically complex. Yucca Flat is a topographically closed basin typical of many valleys in the Basin and Range province. Faulted and tilted blocks of Tertiary-age volcanic rocks and underlying Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks form low ranges around the structural basin. During the Cretaceous Period a granitic intrusive was emplaced at the north end of Yucca Flat. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the basin. These were integrated using EarthVision? software to develop the 3-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Fifty-six stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 25 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the alluvial section into 3 hydrostratigraphic units including 2 aquifers and 1 confining unit. The volcanic units in the model area are organized into 13 hydrostratigraphic units that include 8 aquifers and 5 confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into 7 hydrostratigraphic units, including 3 aquifers and 4 confining units. Other units include 1 Tertiary-age sedimentary confining unit and 1 Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units (''layers'' in the model) along with the major structural features (i.e., faults). The model incorporates 178 high-angle normal faults of Tertiary age and 2 low-angle thrust faults of Mesozoic age. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Five of these alternatives were developed so they could be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

Geotechnical Sciences Group Bechtel Nevada

2006-01-01

292

A Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Clark, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A new, revised three-dimensional (3-D) hydrostratigraphic framework model for Frenchman Flat was completed in 2004. The area of interest includes Frenchman Flat, a former nuclear testing area at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. Internal and external reviews of an earlier (Phase I) Frenchman Flat model recommended additional data collection to address uncertainties. Subsequently, additional data were collected for this Phase II initiative, including five new drill holes and a 3-D seismic survey.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-09-01

293

Status of image analysis methods to delineate stratigraphic position in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff is an ash-flow cooling unit that is the candidate host rock for a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The repository workings will be mostly confined to the member`s rhyolitic portion, which is chemically homogenous but texturally variable. This report describes the status of work to develop a useful internal stratigraphy for the rhyolitic portion of the member; our approach is to use an image analysis technique to map textural variations within the member as a function of stratigraphic height. Fifteen petrographic thin sections of Topopah Spring rhyolitic tuff were studied in each of two drill holes (USW GU-3 and USW G-4). Digital color images were collected in transmitted light for two scenes 1 cm on a side for each thin section. Objects within a scene were classified by color, and measurements of area, elongation, and roughness were determined for each object. Summary statistics were compiled for all measurements for each color component within a scene, and each variable was statistically examined for correlations with stratigraphic position. Our initial studies using image analysis have not yet produced a useful method for determining stratigraphic position within the Topopah Spring Member. Simplifications made in this preliminary application of image analysis may be largely responsible for these negative results. The technique deserves further investigation, and more detailed analysis of existing data is recommended. 9 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Campbell, K.; Broxton, D.E.; Spaw, J.

1989-10-01

294

Geologic and geophysical maps of the Las Vegas 30' x 60' quadrangle, Clark and Nye counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Las Vegas and Pahrump are two of the fastest growing cities in the US, and the shortage of water looms as among the greatest future problems for these cities. These new maps of the Las Vegas 30 x 60-minute quadrangle provide a geologic and geophysical framework and fundamental earth science database needed to address societal issues such as ground water supply and contamination, surface flood, landslide, and seismic hazards, and soil properties and their changing impact by and on urbanization. The mountain ranges surrounding Las Vegas and Pahrump consist of Mesozoic, Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks. A majority of these rocks are Paleozoic carbonate rocks that are part of Nevada's carbonate rock aquifer province. The Spring Mountains represent a major recharge site in the province, where maximum altitude is 3,632 m (Charleston Peak) above sea level. Rocks in the Sheep and Las Vegas Ranges and Spring Mountains contain correlative, northeast-striking, southeast-verging thrust faults that are part of the Cretaceous, Sevier orogenic belt. These thrusts were offset during the Miocene by the Las Vegas Valley shear system (LVVSZ). We conducted new mapping in the Blue Diamond area, highlighting refined work on the Bird Spring thrust, newly studied ancient landslides, and gravity-slide blocks. We conducted new mapping in the Las Vegas Range and mapped previously unrecognized structures such as the Valley thrust and fold belt; recognition of these structures has led to a refined correlation of Mesozoic thrust faults across the LVVSZ. New contributions in the quadrangle also include a greatly refined stratigraphy of Paleozoic bedrock units based on conodont biostragraphy. We collected over 200 conodont samples in the quadrangle and established stratigraphic reference sections used to correlate units across the major Mesozoic thrust faults. Quaternary deposits cover about half of the map area and underlie most of the present urbanized area. Deposits consist of large coalescing alluvial fans that grade downslope to extensive areas of fine-grained sediment indicative of groundwater-discharge during the Pleistocene. In the central areas of Las Vegas and Pahrump valleys, Quaternary fault scarps associated with past ground-water discharge deposits suggest a genetic relationship. In collaboration with NBMG and University of Nevada, a variety of ages of gravelly alluvium are newly mapped using surficial characteristics and soil development, along with reassessment of previously published mapping during compilation. Reconnaissance geochronology (thermoluminescence and U-series) of eolian and authigenic components of surficial and buried soils and spring deposits is applied to test hypotheses of geomorphic and hydrologic response to climate change over the past 100 k.y.). The major structure in the Las Vegas quadrangle is the LVVSZ. Because the LVVSZ is concealed by thick basin-fill deposits of Quaternary and Tertiary age, it was characterized primarily based on geophysics. Likewise, the newly described State line fault system in Pahrump Valley has also been characterized by geophysics, where geophysically inferred structures correlate remarkably with surface structures defined by our new geologic mapping in the Mound Spring and Hidden Hills Ranch 7.5-minute quadrangles.

Page, William R.; Lundstrom, Scott, C.; Harris, Anita G.; Langenheim, Victoria E.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Paces, James B.; Dixon, Gary L.; Rowley, Peter D.; Burchfiel, B. C.; Bell, John W.; Smith, Eugene I.

2005-01-01

295

Archaeological investigations at a toolstone source area and temporary camp: Sample Unit 19-25, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Technical report No. 77  

SciTech Connect

Archaeological investigations were initiated at Sample Unit 19--25 to retrieve information concerning settlement and subsistence data on the aboriginal hunter and gatherers in the area. Studies included collection and mapping of 35.4 acres at site 26NY1408 and excavation and mapping of 0.02 acres at site 26NY7847. Cultural resources include two rock and brush structures and associated caches and a large lithic toolstone source area and lithic artifact scatter. Temporally diagnostic artifacts indicate periodic use throughout the last 12,000 years; however dates associated with projectile points indicate most use was in the Middle and Late Archaic. Radiocarbon dates from the rock and brush structures at site 26NY7847 indicate a construction date of A.D. 1640 and repair between A.D. 1800 and 1950 for feature 1 and between A.D. 1330 and 1390 and repair at A.D. 1410 for feature 2. The dates associated with feature 2 place its construction significantly earlier than similar structures found elsewhere on Pahute Mesa. Activity areas appear to reflect temporary use of the area for procurement of available lithic and faunal resources and the manufacture of tools.

Jones, R.C.; DuBarton, A.; Edwards, S.; Pippin, L.C.; Beck, C.M.

1993-12-31

296

Analysis of FY 2005/2006 Hydrologic Testing and Sampling Results for Well ER-12-4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-4 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program'') and hydraulic response data from the FY 2006 Sampling Program. Well ER-12-4 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-4 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 3,715 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 6,883.7 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was MIGHTY OAK (U-12t.08), conducted in the U-12t Tunnel approximately 475 ft north of the well site. The MIGHTY OAK test working point elevation was located at approximately 5,620 ft amsl. The MIGHTY OAK test had an announced yield of ''less than 20 kilotons'' (DOE/NV, 2000). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer - thrust plate (LCA3), located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-4 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Participants in ER-12-4 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-4 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted. These same contractors participated in the FY 2006 Sampling Program.

Bill Fryer

2006-09-01

297

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01

298

Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003  

SciTech Connect

Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of depressurization following nuclear testing. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for wells with anthropogenic trends can be large, ranging from several feet to hundreds of feet. Vertical water-level differences at 27 sites in Yucca Flat with multiple open intervals were compared. Large vertical differences were noted in volcanic rocks and in boreholes where water levels were affected by nuclear tests. Small vertical differences were noted within the carbonate-rock and valley-fill aquifers. Vertical hydraulic gradients generally are downward in volcanic rocks and from pre-Tertiary clastic rocks toward volcanic- or carbonate-rock units.

J.M. Fenelon

2005-10-05

299

Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

2005-04-01

300

Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oasis Valley is an area of natural ground-water discharge within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southern Nevada and adjacent California. Ground water discharging at Oasis Valley is replenished from inflow derived from an extensive recharge area that includes the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because nuclear testing has introduced radionuclides into the subsurface of

S. R. Reiner; R. J. Laczniak; G. A. DeMeo; J. LaRue Smith; P. E. Elliott; W. E. Nylund; C. J. Fridrich

2002-01-01

301

Analysis of a multiple-well interference test in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-Hole complex, May--June 1995, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A multiple-well interference (pumping) test was conducted in Miocene tuffaceous rocks at the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain, Nev., from May 22 to June 12, 1995, by the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy. This pumping test was conducted as part of investigations to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository. During the test, borehole UE-25 c{number_sign}3 was pumped for 10 days at an average rate of 17.9 liters per second. Drawdown in 6 observation wells completed in Miocene tuffaceous rocks 29.0--3,525.6 meters from the pumping well ranged from 0 to 0.42 meters 14,000 minutes after pumping started. The spatial distribution of this drawdown indicates that a northwest-trending zone of discontinuous faults might be affecting ground-water movement in the Miocene tuffaceous rocks near the C-holes. No drawdown was observed in a borehole completed in a regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifer 630.0 meters from the pumping well. Consequently, it could not be determined during the pumping test if the Miocene tuffaceous rocks are connected hydraulically to the regional aquifer. Analyses of drawdown and recovery indicate that the Miocene tuffaceous rocks in the vicinity of the C-holes have transmissivity values of 1,600--3,200 meters squared per day, horizontal hydraulic conductivity values of 6.5--13 meters per day, vertical hydraulic conductivity values of 0.2--1.7 meters per day, storativity values of 0.001--0.003, and specific yield values of 0.01--0.2.

Geldon, A.L.; Umari, A.M.A.; Earle, J.D.; Fahy, M.F.; Gemmell, J.M.; Darnell, J.

1998-09-01

302

Ice core from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya (Russian Arctic), dated with a Nye model modified for a growing glacier  

Microsoft Academic Search

From 1999 to 2001 a 724 m deep ice core has been drilled from surface to bedrock close to summit of the Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya (Russian Arctic), within a joint German-Russian project. The analysis of stable water isotopes and major ion concentration in high resolution were used for reconstruction of past climate and environmental changes. The upper

Diedrich Fritzsche; Thomas Opel; Hanno Meyer

2010-01-01

303

Genanvendelse af restprodukter fra affaldsforbraending med kalkbaseret roeggasrensning. Laboratorieundersoegelser af mulighederne for oparbejdning af kalciumklorid fra toerre/semitoerre restprodukter. (Utilization of waste products from waste incineration with a limestone based flue gas cleaning. Bench-scale testing of calcium chloride recovery from dry/semidry residue products).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this study has been to explore the technical and economic feasibility of recovering calcium chloride from the acid flue gas cleaning residues produced at those Danish municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) which are equipped with dry ...

H. Birch O. Hjelmar G. Ploug Lorenzen

1993-01-01

304

49 CFR 211.45 - Petitions for emergency waiver of safety rules.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... ; (2) Facsimile to FRA at: 202-493-6309; or (3) Mail to FRA at: FRA Docket Clerk, Office of Chief Counsel, RCC-10, Mail Stop 10, 1200 New Jersey Ave. SE., Washington, DC 20590, facsimile no. 202-493-6068. (g) FRA...

2009-10-01

305

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 227 - Audiometric Baseline Revision  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...reportable on the Form FRA F 6180.55a. 1 OSHA and FRA use the same definition for Standard...FRA's definition is located in § 227.5. OSHA's definition is located in 29 CFR 1910...corrections are used or not. 2 FRA and OSHA use the same age-correction...

2011-10-01

306

Cluster of genes that encode positive and negative elements influencing filament length in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.  

PubMed

The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE?fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. PMID:23813733

Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

2013-09-01

307

Karakterisering og behandling af spildevand fra roeggasafsvovling ved vaadabsorptionsprocessen med efterfoelgende oxidation. (Characterization and management of waste water from desulphurization of flue gas by the wet absorption process with following oxidation).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The utilization of the wet absorption process for the desulphurization of flue gas from coal fired power plants produces calcium sulphate, and waste water containing nitrate, neutral salts and a certain amount of heavy metals. The conditions which influen...

B. Mose Pedersen G. Holm Kristensen

1990-01-01

308

Igor Candido - Il libro della Scrittura, il libro della Natura, il libro della Memoria: l'esegesi dantesca di C.S. Singleton fra tradizione giudaico-cristiana e trascendentalismo emersoniano - MLN 122:1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyzes the key function and meaning of Dante's imitation of God's creation through three Books of revelation (Scripture, Nature, History-Memory), as elaborated in Singleton's major critical works on Dante written between 1949 and 1958 (An Essay on the \\

Igor Candido

2007-01-01

309

Biogas af madaffald. Forbehandling, hygiejnisering og udraadning af madaffald fra husholdninger og institutioner i biogasfaellesanlaeg. Forprojekt. (Biogas of food wastes. Preliminary treatment, sanitizing and decomposition of food wastes, from institutions and households, in communal biomass conversion plants. Pilot project).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A pilot project to an experimental project the aim of which was to investigate and test equipment for preliminary treatment and sanitizing of sorted, organic/biological domestic wastes before anaerobic treatment in a communal biomass conversion plant, and...

1990-01-01

310

Logistikk i Fiskeri-og Havbruksnaeringen: Kunnskapsstatus og Forskningsbehov-Innstilling fra Arbeidsgruppen. (Logistics in Fisheries and the Aquaculture Industry: Knowledge and Research Needs-Recommendations from the Working Group.)  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report documents the work carried out by a Working Group established by the Norwegian Fishery and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund (FHF), concerning current knowledge and future research needs within logistics in the fisheries and the aquaculture i...

T. C. Askildsen G. Senneset

2006-01-01

311

Comparisons Between Analogical and Numerical Methods for Studying the Response of an Aircraft to Gusts . Confronti Fra Metodi Analogici E Numerici Per Lo Studio Della Risposta di UN Velivolo Alla Raffica.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two mathematical models for representing nonstationary aerodynamic characteristics of a wing subjected to sharp variations in the angle of attack are used to study the response of an airfoil to ascending vertical gusts. Considering the airfoil to be a rig...

L. Puccinelli

1970-01-01

312

76 FR 50359 - Hours of Service of Railroad Employees; Substantive Regulations for Train Employees Providing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...rule. Based on its literature review, FRA is confident...safety benefits FRA was able to quantify...provision effectively created a third category...It is not clear why that number of schedules was chosen, nor why the specific...

2011-08-12

313

77 FR 77183 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting Postponement  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257; Notice No. 73] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting Postponement AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2012-12-31

314

76 FR 27171 - Northwestern Pacific Railroad Co.; Notice of Partial Relief from Emergency Order No. 21  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [FRA Emergency Order...Notice No. 4] Northwestern Pacific Railroad Co.; Notice of Partial Relief...Emergency Order No. 21 AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA),...

2011-05-10

315

78 FR 42998 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2013-0067...Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials...Safety Administration (PHMSA), Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2013-07-18

316

78 FR 59754 - Notice of Application for Approval of Railroad Safety Program Plan and Product Safety Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket Number FRA-2013-0088...Notice of Application for Approval of Railroad Safety Program Plan and Product Safety...Railway (ATN) petitioned the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) for approval...

2013-09-27

317

77 FR 52393 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257Notice No. 69] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of...

2012-08-29

318

78 FR 48931 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Emergency Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257; Notice No. 75] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Emergency Meeting AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2013-08-12

319

78 FR 26423 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257: Notice No. 74] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of...

2013-05-06

320

78 FR 62002 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257; Notice No. 76] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of...

2013-10-10

321

75 FR 44051 - Resolicitation of Applications for the Railroad Safety Technology Program Grant Program (RS-TEC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2010-005-N-5...Resolicitation of Applications for the Railroad Safety Technology Program Grant Program (RS-TEC-10-001) AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2010-07-27

322

75 FR 11992 - Notice of Scheduling of Public Hearing; Association of American Railroads  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket Number FRA-2009-0111...Public Hearing; Association of American Railroads In a notice published January 4, 2010, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) announced...

2010-03-12

323

77 FR 73734 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2000-7257; Notice No. 72] Railroad Safety Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of...

2012-12-11

324

78 FR 37656 - Notice of Application for Approval of Discontinuance or Modification of a Railroad Signal System  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...signal system. FRA assigned the petition Docket Number FRA-2013-0059. Applicant: Long Island Rail Road, Mr. Kevin Tomlinson, Chief Engineer, Jamaica Station, Jamaica, New York 11435. LIRR seeks approval of the proposed modification of the...

2013-06-21

325

78 FR 47822 - Notice of Application for Approval of Discontinuance or Modification of a Railroad Signal System  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...signal system. FRA assigned the petition Docket Number FRA-2013-0082. Applicants: Long Island Rail Road, Mr. Kevin Tomlinson, Chief Engineer, 93-59 183rd Street, Hollis, NY 11428; New York & Atlantic Railway, Mr. Paul Victor,...

2013-08-06

326

49 CFR Appendix B to Part 221 - Approved Rear End Marking Devices  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...flasher), FRA-MEC-MCD-300-C (steady burn), and FRA-MEC-MCD-300-F (flasher). 3. Manufacturer: American Electronics, Inc., 1 40 Essex Street, Hackensack, NJ 07601. 1 Note: Yankee Metal Products Corp. previously produced...

2011-10-01

327

In the Absence of Frazzled Over-Expression of Abelson Tyrosine Kinase Disrupts Commissure Formation and Causes Axons to Leave the Embryonic CNS  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIn the Drosophila embryonic nerve cord, the formation of commissures require both the chemoattractive Netrin receptor Frazzled (Fra) and the Abelson (Abl) cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase. Abl binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Fra and loss-of-function mutations in abl enhance fra-dependent commissural defects. To further test Abl's role in attractive signaling, we over-expressed Abl in Fra mutants anticipating rescue of commissures.Methodology\\/Principal

Joy N. Dorsten; Bridget E. Varughese; Stephanie Karmo; Mark A. Seeger; Mark F. A. Vanberkum; Michael Hendricks

2010-01-01

328

Results and interpretation of preliminary aquifer tests in boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Pumping and injection tests conducted in 1983 and 1984 in boreholes UE-25c {number_sign}1, UE-25c {number_sign}2, and UE-25c {number_sign}3 (the c-holes) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were analyzed with respect to information obtained from lithologic and borehole geophysical logs, core permeameter tests, and borehole flow surveys. The three closely spaced c-holes, each of which is about 3,000 feet deep, are completed mainly in nonwelded to densely welded, ash-flow tuff of the tuffs and lavas of Calico Hills and the Crater Flat Tuff of Miocene age. Below the water table, tectonic and cooling fractures pervade the tuffaceous rocks but are distributed mainly in 11 transmissive intervals, many of which also have matrix permeability. Information contained in this report is presented as part of ongoing investigations by the US Geological Survey (USGS) regarding the hydrologic and geologic suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for the storage of high-level nuclear waste in an underground mined geologic repository. This investigation was conducted in cooperation with the US Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-78ET44802, as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

Geldon, A.L.

1996-07-01

329

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01

330

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.

John McCord

2006-06-01

331

Phase I Transport Model of Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada with Errata Sheet 1, 2, 3, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

As prescribed in the Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 1999) and Appendix VI of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended February 2008), the ultimate goal of transport analysis is to develop stochastic predictions of a contaminant boundary at a specified level of uncertainty. However, because of the significant uncertainty of the model results, the primary goal of this report was modified through mutual agreement between the DOE and the State of Nevada to assess the primary model components that contribute to this uncertainty and to postpone defining the contaminant boundary until additional model refinement is completed. Therefore, the role of this analysis has been to understand the behavior of radionuclide migration in the Pahute Mesa (PM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) model and to define, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the sensitivity of such behavior to (flow) model conceptualization and (flow and transport) parameterization.

Greg Ruskauff

2009-02-01

332

Statistical test of reproducibility and operator variance in thin-section modal analysis of textures and phenocrysts in the Topopah Spring member, drill hole USW VH-2, Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A thin-section operator-variance test was given to the 2 junior authors, petrographers, by the senior author, a statistician, using 16 thin sections cut from core plugs drilled by the US Geological Survey from drill hole USW VH-2 standard (HCQ) drill core. The thin sections are samples of Topopah Spring devitrified rhyolite tuff from four textural zones, in ascending order: (1) lower nonlithophysal, (2) lower lithopysal, (3) middle nonlithophysal, and (4) upper lithophysal. Drill hole USW-VH-2 is near the center of the Crater Flat, about 6 miles WSW of the Yucca Mountain in Exploration Block. The original thin-section labels were opaqued out with removable enamel and renumbered with alpha-numeric labels. The sliders were then given to the petrographer operators for quantitative thin-section modal (point-count) analysis of cryptocrystalline, spherulitic, granophyric, and void textures, as well as phenocryst minerals. Between operator variance was tested by giving the two petrographers the same slide, and within-operator variance was tested by the same operator the same slide to count in a second test set, administered at least three months after the first set. Both operators were unaware that they were receiving the same slide to recount. 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Moore, L.M.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Broxton, D.E.

1989-06-01

333

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document presents a summary and framework of available transport data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater transport model. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01

334

Phase I Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents transport data and data analyses for Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97. The purpose of the data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU transport model. Specific task objectives were as follows: • Identify and compile currently available transport parameter data and supporting information that may be relevant to the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. • Assess the level of quality of the data and associated documentation. • Analyze the data to derive expected values and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability. The scope of this document includes the compilation and assessment of data and information relevant to transport parameters for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU subsurface within the context of unclassified source-term contamination. Data types of interest include mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, matrix and effective porosity, dispersivity, matrix diffusion, matrix and fracture sorption, and colloid-facilitated transport parameters.

John McCord

2007-09-01

335

Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-06-01

336

2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-03-30

337

2011 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2007a) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs), with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (DOE, 1999a; 2000). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS PAs and CAs for fiscal year (FY) 2011. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2011 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R and D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R and D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs. Important developments in FY 2011 include the following: (1) Operation of a new shallow land disposal unit and a new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant lined disposal unit at the Area 5 RWMS; (2) Development of new closure inventory estimates based on disposals through FY 2011; (3) Evaluation of new or revised waste streams by special analysis; (4) Development of version 2.102 of the Area 3 RWMS GoldSim PA model; and (5) Development of version 4.113 of the Area 5 RWMS GoldSim PA model. Analysis of the latest available data using the Area 5 RWMS v4.113 GoldSim PA model indicates that all performance objectives can be met. The results and conclusions of the Area 5 RWMS PA are judged valid, and there is no need to the revise the PA. The Area 3 RWMS has been in inactive status since July 1, 2006, with the last shipment received in April 2006. In FY 2011, there were no operational changes, monitoring results, or R and D results for the Area 3 RWMS that would impact PA validity. Despite the increase in waste volume and inventory at the Area 3 RWMS since 1996 when the PA was approved, the facility performance evaluated with the Area 3 RWMS PA GoldSim model, version 2.0 (with the final closure inventory), remains well below the performance objectives set forth in U.S. Department of Energy Order DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management' (DOE, 2001). The conclusions of the Area 3 RWMS PA remain valid. A special analysis was prepared to update the PA and CA results for the Area 3 RWMS in FY 2011. Release of the special analysis is planned for FY 2012. The continuing adequacy of the CAs was evaluated with the new models, and no significant changes that would alter CA results or conclusions were found. Inclusion of the Frenchman Flat Underground Test Area (UGTA) results in the Area 5 RWMS CA is scheduled for FY 2016, pending the completion of the closure report for the Frenchman Flat UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) in FY 2015. An industrial site, CAU 547, with corrective action sites near the Area 3 RWMS was found to have a significant plutonium inventory in 2009. CAU 547 will be evaluated for inclusion of future revisions or updates of the Area 3 RWMS CA. The revision of the Area 3 RWMS CA, which will include the UGTA source terms, is expected in FY 2024, following the completion of the Yucca Flat CAU Corrective Action Decision Document, scheduled for FY 2023. Near-term R and D efforts will focus on continuing development of the Are

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-03-20

338

2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-03-15

339

Aberrant Neural Function during Emotion Attribution in Female Subjects with Fragile X Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The neurobiological systems which underlie emotion attribution among female patients with Fragile X (FraX) syndrome are examined. Results show that the emotion circuit which regulates responses to facial stimuli is potentially disrupted among female subjects with FraX syndrome. Anterior cingulate cortex activity in female subjects with FraX…

Hagan, Cindy C.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Mackey, Allyson; Mobbs, Dean; Reiss, Allan L.

2008-01-01

340

78 FR 36738 - Signal System Reporting Requirements  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRA-2012-0104, Notice No. 1] RIN 2130-AC44 Signal System Reporting Requirements AGENCY...that each carrier must file with FRA a signal system status report every five years...updated information regarding railroad signal systems to be available to FRA...

2013-06-19

341

49 CFR 225.21 - Forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Report. Form FRA F 6180.54 shall be...Grade Crossing Accident/Incident Report. Form FRA F 6180.57 shall be...Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Report (Form FRA F 6180.54), in...

2009-10-01

342

49 CFR 225.21 - Forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Report. Form FRA F 6180.54 shall be...Grade Crossing Accident/Incident Report. Form FRA F 6180.57 shall be...Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Report (Form FRA F 6180.54), in...

2012-10-01

343

49 CFR 225.21 - Forms.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Report. Form FRA F 6180.54 shall be...Grade Crossing Accident/Incident Report. Form FRA F 6180.57 shall be...Rail Equipment Accident/Incident Report (Form FRA F 6180.54), in...

2010-10-01

344

Economic Literature for Merchants: Handbooks, Dictionaries and Periodicals on Commerce during the 18th Century in Spain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Questo saggio delinea un profile di Daniel de Leon, figura fra le più carismatiche e discusse fra i leaders del socialismo Americano. Si approfondisce il suo contributo al pensiero marxista e radicale negli Stati Uniti fra la fine del 19° secolo e l’inizio del 20° secolo. In particolare questo saggio analizza lo sviluppo della teoria del sindacato di De Leon

Jesùs Astigarraga; Juan Zabalza

2010-01-01

345

76 FR 34801 - Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRA-2010-0174] Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures In accordance...FRA) grant a modification of the single car air brake test procedures as prescribed...FRA-2010-0174. PATH operates a fleet of 25 flat cars in consist with revenue cars utilized...

2011-06-14

346

The Conception of Soft Power and its Policy Implications: a comparative study of China and Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years the concept of ‘soft power’, popularized by the work of Joseph Nye, has gained currency in both China and Taiwan. This paper explores how the Chinese and Taiwanese understand soft power and its sources, and how their understanding differs from Nye's formulation. It discusses why this foreign concept has become so salient in the Chinese and the

Hongying Wang; Yeh-Chung Lu

2008-01-01

347

Free ferulic acid uptake in lactating cows.  

PubMed

Ferulic acid (FRA), a phenolic compound with antioxidant and anticancer activities, naturally occurs in plants as a lignin precursor. Many veins of research have been devoted to releasing FRA from the lignin complex to improve digestibility of ruminant feeds. Thus, the objective of this research was to investigate the transfer of a given dosage of the free form of FRA into the milk of dairy cattle. Six mid- to late-lactation Holstein cows at the Cornell Research Farm (Harford, NY) were given 14-d adaptation to diet and stall position. Ad libitum access to a total mixed ration based on haylage and maize silage (31.1% neutral detergent fiber containing 5.52 mg of FRA/g) was provided during the study. A crossover design was implemented so that each cow alternated weekly between FRA-dosed and control. On d 1, jugular cannulas and urine catheters were placed in all cows. On d 2, FRA-dosed cows received a single dosage of 150 g of pure FRA powder at 0830 h via their fistula (n=4) or a balling gun for nonfistulated cows (n=2). Plasma, urine, feces, feed, orts, milk, and rumen fluid were sampled intensively for the next 36 h and analyzed for FRA concentration. On d 8, the cows crossed over and the experiment was repeated. When compared with the control, FRA administration did not have an effect on dry matter intake, milk yield, milk fat yield, milk protein yield, somatic cell count, or neutral detergent fiber content of orts and feces. The concentration of FRA in the feces did not change as a result of FRA dosage. As expected, FRA concentration increased dramatically upon FRA dosage and decreased over time until returning to basal levels in rumen fluid (4 h after dosage), plasma (5.5 h after dosage), urine (10 h after dosage), and milk (14 h after dosage). Baseline values for FRA in urine and rumen fluid were variable among cows and had an effect on FRA concentration in FRA-dosed cows. From this study, it is observed that orally ingested FRA can be transported into the milk and that the physiological transfer of FRA occurs from rumen to milk within 6.5 h or the first milking after dosage. Ferulic acid may affect the functionality of milk due to its antioxidant, anticancer, and antibacterial activities. Future research will be required to elucidate whether FRA in milk is bioavailable and bioactive, and to evaluate the complete sensory and microbiological effects of increased FRA and FRA degradation products in milk. PMID:22921626

Soberon, M A; Cherney, J H; Liu, R H; Ross, D A; Cherney, D J R

2012-08-23

348

Antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities of chickpea protein hydrolysate (CPH)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chickpea protein hydrolysate (CPH) was fractionated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25. The antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities of four CPH fractions (Fra.I, Fra.II, Fra.III, and Fra.IV) were measured using reducing power, inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation, and 1,1-diphenyl-2- pycrylhydrazyl (DPPH)\\/superoxide\\/hydroxyl radical-scavenging assay. The antioxidant activity of Fra.IV (81.13%) was closer to that of ?-tocopherol (83.66%) but lower than that

Yanhong Li; Bo Jiang; Tao Zhang; Wanmeng Mu; Jian Liu

2008-01-01

349

Mind the gap: the distributional effects of raising the early eligibility age and full retirement age.  

PubMed

Policymakers have proposed increases to the early eligibility age (EEA) and/or full retirement age (FRA) to address increasing life expectancy and Social Security solvency issues. This analysis uses the Social Security Administration's Modeling Income in the Near Term, version 6 (MINT6) model to compare three retirement-age increases suggested by the Social Security Advisory Board: increase the gap between the EEA and FRA by raising only the FRA, increase both the EEA and FRA to maintain a 4-year gap between them, and increase both the EEA and FRA to maintain a 5-year gap between them. Although all three options would improve system solvency by similar proportions, their effect on individual beneficiaries in the future would vary. Benefit reductions are greater under the proposals with more months between the EEA and FRA, while the option that maintains a 4-year gap results in benefit increases for some beneficiaries compared with current law. PMID:23397744

Olsen, Anya

2012-01-01

350

View of EPA Farm metal weather tower, facing east, showing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm metal weather tower, facing east, showing thirty-acre irrigated field - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Weather Tower, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

351

32. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A HONEYWELL WALL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

32. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF A HONEYWELL WALL PRESSURE GAUGE IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

352

7 CFR 457.101 - Small grains crop insurance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Humboldt, Nye and Pershing Counties, Nevada; and Box Elder, Millard and Utah Counties, Utah October 31 November 30. ...County, New Mexico; all Utah counties except Box Elder, Millard and Utah; and all other states except Arizona, and...

2009-01-01

353

7 CFR 457.101 - Small grains crop insurance.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Humboldt, Nye and Pershing Counties, Nevada; and Box Elder, Millard and Utah Counties, Utah October 31 November 30. ...County, New Mexico; all Utah counties except Box Elder, Millard and Utah; and all other states except Arizona, and...

2010-01-01

354

75 FR 63469 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...20100407, Final EIS, BLM, NV, Amargosa Farm Road Solar Energy Project, Construction and Operation of Two Concentrated Solar Power Plant Facilties, Right-of-Way Application on Public Lands, Nye County, NV, Wait Period Ends:...

2010-10-15

355

1. GENERAL VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE EMAD FACILITY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. GENERAL VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE E-MAD FACILITY AND THE SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL SETTING. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

356

3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type B structure, facing east-northeast - Nevada Test Site, Japanese Village, Area 4, Yucca Flat, 4-04 Road near Rainier Mesa Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

357

22. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE LOWER LEVEL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

22. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE LOWER LEVEL OF ROOM 123, THE DISASSEMBLY BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

358

10. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE HALLWAY WITHIN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE HALLWAY WITHIN THE ADMINISTRATION PORTION OF THE COLD ASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

359

5. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing holding pens, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing holding pens, facing west-southwest. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

360

6. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF THE NORTH ELEVATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF THE NORTH ELEVATION OF THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

361

16. VIEW OF FIRST FLOOR EAST OPERATING GALLERY. NOTE THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. VIEW OF FIRST FLOOR EAST OPERATING GALLERY. NOTE THE SERIES OF MANIPULATOR ARMS ALONG THE LEFT WALL. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

362

2. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE SOUTH ELEVATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE SOUTH ELEVATION OF THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

363

4. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing radwaste tank, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing rad-waste tank, facing south-southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

364

6. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing cattle shelter, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing cattle shelter, facing southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

365

15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF ROOM 102, A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF ROOM 102, A MACHINE SHOP ADJACENT TO ASSEMBLY BAY NO. 1. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

366

23. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE UPPER SECTION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE UPPER SECTION OF ROOM 123, THE DISASSEMBLY BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

367

7. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE NORTH AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

368

5. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE HOT BAY AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE HOT BAY AND ATTACHED OPERATING GALLERIES ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF THE BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

369

14. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF ROOM 136, COLD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTH OF ROOM 136, COLD ASSEMBLY BAY NO. 2. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

370

7. VIEW OF E5 WORK STATION AND MANIPULATOR ARMS WITHIN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. VIEW OF E-5 WORK STATION AND MANIPULATOR ARMS WITHIN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE HOT BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

371

8. VIEW OF E3 WORK STATION WITH MANIPULATOR ARMS IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. VIEW OF E-3 WORK STATION WITH MANIPULATOR ARMS IN EAST OPERATING GALLERY LOOKING INTO THE HOT BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

372

1. View of rmad from jr. hot cell, facing north ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. View of r-mad from jr. hot cell, facing north - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

373

10. VIEW WITHIN THE EAST OPERATING GALLERY OF WORK STATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. VIEW WITHIN THE EAST OPERATING GALLERY OF WORK STATION WITH MANIPULATOR ARMS. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

374

4. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE WEST ELEVATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE WEST ELEVATION OF THE COLD ASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

375

9. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF THE SOUTH AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF THE SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

376

16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF ROOM 137, A ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF ROOM 137, A REACTOR CONTROL LAB ADJACENT TO ASSEMBLY BAY NO. 2. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

377

14. VIEW IN THE WEST OPERATING GALLERY OF POSTMORTEM CELL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. VIEW IN THE WEST OPERATING GALLERY OF POST-MORTEM CELL WORK STATION AND MANIPULATOR ARMS. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

378

21. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE LOWER LEVEL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE LOWER LEVEL OF ROOM 123, THE DISASSEMBLY BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

379

8. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE EAST ELEVATION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE HOT DISASSEMBLY AREA. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

380

13. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF ROOM 101, COLD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST OF ROOM 101, COLD ASSEMBLY BAY NO. 1. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

381

3. View of Japanese village, type C structure, facing eastsoutheast ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. View of Japanese village, type C structure, facing east-southeast - Nevada Test Site, Japanese Village, Type C Structure, Area 4, Yucca Flat, 4-04 Road near Rainier Mesa Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

382

24. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE UPPER SECTION ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE UPPER SECTION OF ROOM 123, THE DISASSEMBLY BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance Assembly & Dissassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Junction of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

383

2. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing milliongallon reservoir, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Contextual view of EPA Farm showing million-gallon reservoir, facing east-southeast. - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

384

14. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE SMALL ROOM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTH OF THE SMALL ROOM IN THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE BASEMENT. - Nevada Test Site, Test Cell C Facility, Building No. 3210, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Road J, Mercury, Nye County, NV

385

16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF ROOM 107, THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF ROOM 107, THE HOT STORAGE AND PACKAGING ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

386

15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF ROOM 107, THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

15. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF ROOM 107, THE HOT STORAGE AND PACKAGING ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

387

3. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF A PERSONNEL GATE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF A PERSONNEL GATE IN THE SECURITY FENCE SURROUNDING THE MAIN BUILDINGS. - Nevada Test Site, Super Kukla Facility, Area 27, Rock Valley, South of Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

388

4. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF THE SMALL BASEMENT ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHWEST OF THE SMALL BASEMENT OF THE CONTAINMENT BUILDING. - Nevada Test Site, Super Kukla Facility, Containment Building, Area 27, Rock Valley, South of Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

389

2. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE FIRST FLOOR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE FIRST FLOOR AND SHIELDING WALL OF THE CONTAINMENT BUILDING. - Nevada Test Site, Super Kukla Facility, Containment Building, Area 27, Rock Valley, South of Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

390

1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE ENTRANCE TO ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE EAST OF THE ENTRANCE TO THE SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT BUILDING. - Nevada Test Site, Super Kukla Facility, Containment Building, Area 27, Rock Valley, South of Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

391

3. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE FIRST FLOOR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST OF THE FIRST FLOOR AND EQUIPMENT OF THE CONTAINMENT BUILDING. - Nevada Test Site, Super Kukla Facility, Containment Building, Area 27, Rock Valley, South of Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

392

3. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE NORTH AND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. EXTERIOR VIEW TO THE WEST OF THE NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS OF THE HIGH BAY. - Nevada Test Site, Super Kukla Facility, High Bay, Area 27, Rock Valley, South of Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

393

View of EPA Farm quonset huts, facing southsouthwest Nevada ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm quonset huts, facing south-southwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Quonset Hut Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

394

View of EPA Farm cattle shelters (Building 1506 in background), ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm cattle shelters (Building 15-06 in background), facing southeast - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

395

Closeup view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close-up view of EPA Farm cattle shelter lamp, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

396

View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is in background - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Storage Shed, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

397

View of EPA Farm Sioux silo, facing east. Radsafe trailer ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm Sioux silo, facing east. Rad-safe trailer is to the left - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Silo Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

398

View of EPA Farm power substation, facing westsouthwest Nevada ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm power substation, facing west-southwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Power Substation, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

399

View of EPA Farm cattle shelter (featuring horse trailer), facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of EPA Farm cattle shelter (featuring horse trailer), facing northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Shelter Unit Type, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

400

81. PHOTOCOPY OF 1978 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

81. PHOTOCOPY OF 1978 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From National Park Service Environmental Review and Analysis, BullfroG Mine Plan of Operations, Death Valley Nat'l Monument (24 August 1978) - Bullfrog Mine, Rhyolite, Nye County, NV

401

80. PHOTOCOPY OF 1976 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

80. PHOTOCOPY OF 1976 AERIAL PHOTO OF BULLFROG MINE. From National Park Service Environmental Review and Analysis, Bullfrog Mine Plan of Operations, Death Valley Nat'l Monument (24 March 1976) - Bullfrog Mine, Rhyolite, Nye County, NV

402

Abnormalities of Fragile Histidine Triad Genomic and Complementary DNAs in Cervical Cancer: Association With Human Papillomavirus Type  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chromosome 3p14.2 contains FRA3B, the most active chromosome breakage site in the human genome. The fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene, a putative tumor sup- pressor gene, overlaps FRA3B. Human papillomavirus (HPV), a known cofactor in cervical carcinogenesis, can in- tegrate into FRA3B. We examined abnormalities in FHIT and its RNA transcripts in cervical cancer cell lines and tumors. We

Carolyn Y. Muller; John D. O'Boyle; Kwun M. Fong; Ignacio I. Wistuba; Eric Biesterveld; Mohsen Ahmadian; David S. Miller; Adi F. Gazdar; John D. Minna

403

Optimum design and experiment research of S-band hybrid dispersion compensation fiber Raman amplifier  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hybrid FRA consists of distributed FRA and discrete FRA. Optimum design of S-band hybrid dispersion compensation fiber Raman amplifier has been researched by OPTIAMP DESIGN 3.3 software (made in Canada Optiwave Corporation) and gain spectrum and gain vs. power of S-band hybrid dispersion compensation fiber Raman amplifier has been researched. The backscattering spectrum of optical fiber has been measured by

Zaixuan Zhang; Shangzhong Jin; Tao Liu; Honglin Liu; Jianfeng Wang

2002-01-01

404

Population cytogenetics of rare fragile sites in Japan.  

PubMed

A population cytogenetic study of three groups of rare fragile sites defined in Human Gene Mapping 8 (HGM8, Berger et al. 1985) has been conducted using peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy Japanese subjects. We have examined 1,022 blood donors for folate-sensitive and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-requiring, and 845 for distamycin A-inducible fragile sites. Out of 17 rare autosomal fragile sites defined in HGM8, the following six were identified in Japan; folate-sensitive fra(2)(q11), fra(11)(q13) and fra(11)(q23), distamycin A-inducible fra(16)(q22) and fra(17)(p12), and BrdU-requiring fra(10)(q25). The incidences of distamycin A-inducible fra(16)(q22) (1.42%) and fra(17)(p12) (3.08%) were considerably higher than those of the other sites in Japan. Furthermore, a folate-sensitive fra(17)(p12) and a distamycin A-inducible fra(8)(q24.1) have been newly found in the present study. Their incidences were 0.10% (1/1,022) and 0.71% (6/845), respectively. Since the expression of this fra(17)(p12) was induced by fluorodeoxyuridine, suppressed by thymidine, but not induced by distamycin A, it can be classified as a folate-sensitive site. The expression of the new distamycin A-inducible fra(8)(q24.1) was also enhanced by treatment with Hoechst 33258, berenil and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). This fragile site fulfils all four classical criteria suggested by Sutherland (1979) and also new criteria for a rare fragile site defined in HGM8 (Berger et al. 1985). PMID:3338799

Takahashi, E; Hori, T; Murata, M

1988-02-01

405

Autistic Behaviors Among Girls with Fragile X Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports of autistic behaviors were examined for 30 school-age girls with fragile X (fraX) and 31 age- and IQ-matched controls through a structured interview administered to each girl's parent(s). IQ scores were obtained for each participant; anxiety, neuroanatomical, and molecular-genetic data were derived for girls with fraX. Girls with fraX had significantly more autistic behaviors than controls. These behaviors were

Michèle M. M. Mazzocco; Wendy R. Kates; Thomas L. Baumgardner; Lisa S. Freund; Allan L. Reiss

1997-01-01

406

75 FR 26843 - Notification of Petition for Approval; Railroad Safety Program Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Notification of Petition for Approval; Railroad Safety Program Plan Although not required, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is providing notice that it...

2010-05-12

407

75 FR 65707 - Notice Regarding Consideration and Processing of Applications for Financial Assistance Under the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Notice Regarding...for Financial Assistance Under the Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing...RRIF) Program AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA),...

2010-10-26

408

76 FR 18623 - Notification of Petition for Approval; Railroad Safety Program Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Notification of Petition for Approval; Railroad Safety Program Plan Although not required, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is providing notice that it...

2011-04-04

409

75 FR 20038 - Railroad Safety Technology Grant Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration [Docket No. FRA-2010-005-N-5] Railroad Safety Technology Grant Program AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration, Department of Transportation....

2010-04-16

410

Assignment of human KH-box-containing genes by in situ hybridization: HNRNPK maps to 9q21.32-q21.33, PCBP1 to 2p12-p13, and PCBP2 to 12q13.12-q13.13, distal to FRA12A  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the localization of various human KH-box-containing genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Accordingly, HNRNPK was mapped to human chromosome 9q21.32-q21.33, PCBP1 was mapped to human chromosome 2p12-p13, and PCBP2 was mapped to human chromosome 12q13.12-q13.13. These proteins affect RNA-binding capability. 13 refs., 1 fig.

Tommerup, N. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark); Leffers, H. [Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

1996-03-01

411

Aterosclerosi e artrite reumatoide: analisi dei rapporti fra ispessimento intima-media della carotide comune e attività di malattia e disabilità* Atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis: relationships between intima-media thickness of the common carotid arteries and disease activity and disabilty  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Objectives. To investigate the intima-media thickness of the common carotid arteries (IMT-CCA) in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), and its relationships with classical atherosclerosis risk factors and disease features i.e. duration, activity and disability. Methods. 48 RA patients (35 F, 13 M; age ed 26-69 years median 55; disease duration 1-18 years, median 8), and 22 controls (16 F,

G. Cuomo; P. Di Micco; A. Niglio; G. La Montagna; G. Valentini

412

Udvikling af smaa ammoniakkoeleanlaeg. Aendring af skaelismaskiner ved overgang fra CFC- og HCFC-koelemidler til ammoniak. (Development of small cooling systems based on the use of ammonia. Retrofitting of scale-ice machines in relation to conversion from the use of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons as refrigerants to the use of ammonia).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A prototype scale-ice machine was developed and tested, using ammonia as a refrigerant. If all freezing machines produced at the Danish firm of 'BUUS Koeleteknik A/S' were converted to the use of ammonia as refrigerant, the reduction of chlorofluorocarbon...

G. Minds

1995-01-01

413

49 CFR 212.111 - Monitoring and other inspections.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...is the policy of the FRA to monitor State investigative and surveillance practices at the program level. (b) It is the policy...FRA may conduct such monitoring of State investigative and surveillance practices and such other inspection and investigation as...

2012-10-01

414

49 CFR 212.111 - Monitoring and other inspections.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...is the policy of the FRA to monitor State investigative and surveillance practices at the program level. (b) It is the policy...FRA may conduct such monitoring of State investigative and surveillance practices and such other inspection and investigation as...

2011-10-01

415

49 CFR 209.105 - Notice of probable violation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...FRA may change the civil penalty amount proposed to be assessed up to and including the maximum penalty amount of $55,000 for each...if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe...property, FRA may change the penalty amount proposed to be...

2011-10-01

416

49 CFR 209.105 - Notice of probable violation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...FRA may change the civil penalty amount proposed to be assessed up to and including the maximum penalty amount of $55,000 for each...if the violation results in death, serious illness or severe...property, FRA may change the penalty amount proposed to be...

2012-10-01

417

Spinal motor actions of the ?-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO in the cat  

Microsoft Academic Search

For further evaluation of opioidergic spinal motor functions the action of the ?-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO was tested on transmission in different non-nociceptive and nociceptive spinal reflex pathways from flexor reflex afferents (FRA), and in non-FRA reflex pathways in spinal cats. The action of DAMGO was complex, not following a simple pattern with selective depression of nociceptive pathways compared to

Heinz Steffens; Eike D. Schomburg

2011-01-01

418

On the History and Origin of LKFM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fra Mauro is the name of a geologic formation surrounding the Imbrium Basin of the Moon as well as the name of the region of the Apollo 14 lunar landing site. The formation was named for a 16th century Italian geographer and cartographer. In its original invocation in 1971 by the Apollo Soil Survey (ASS), Fra Mauro basalt was not

Randy L. Korotev

1998-01-01

419

78 FR 33754 - Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track Safety for Roadway Workers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 214 [Docket...FRA-2008-0059, Notice No. 7] RIN 2130-AC37 Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track...for Roadway Workers AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2013-06-05

420

77 FR 53164 - Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track Safety for Roadway Workers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 214 [Docket...FRA-2008-0059, Notice No. 6] RIN 2130-AC37 Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track...for Roadway Workers AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2012-08-31

421

77 FR 13978 - Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track Safety for Roadway Workers  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 214 [Docket...FRA-2008-0059, Notice No. 5] RIN 2130-AB96 Railroad Workplace Safety; Adjacent-Track On-Track...for Roadway Workers AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department...

2012-03-08

422

49 CFR Appendix C to Part 236 - Safety Assurance Criteria and Processes  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...listed below should be used unless otherwise provided. (i) IEEE 1483-2000, Standard for the Verification of Vital Functions...replication by FRA and for public examination in any public proceeding before the FRA to which they are relevant. [70 FR...

2009-10-01

423

78 FR 59086 - Proposed Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and its implementing regulations, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) hereby announces that it is seeking an extension of the following currently approved information collection activities. These information collection activities received a six-month emergency approval from OMB on August 29, 2013. FRA seeks this extension while it is......

2013-09-25

424

Call Level Performance Analysis for Multiservices Wireless Cellular Networks With Adaptive Resource Allocation Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a novel mathematical approach to evaluate the performance of adaptive or flexible resource allocation (FRA) strategies with uniform quality of service (QoS) provisioning in multiservices wireless cellular networks, in terms of the call blocking probabilities and transmission delay, is proposed. FRA strategies improve channel utilization by dynamically adjusting user transmission rates. Based on the available cell capacity,

Lauro Ortigoza-Guerrero; F. A. Cruz-Perez; H. Heredia-Ureta

2005-01-01

425

49 CFR 225.18 - Alcohol or drug involvement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...RAILROAD ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS: REPORTS CLASSIFICATION...In preparing Form FRA F 6180.54...Equipment Accident/Incident Report,â under...append to the Form FRA F 6180.54...Equipment Accident/Incident Report,â any...

2011-10-01

426

49 CFR 225.27 - Retention of records.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...12 (Part I of Form FRA F 6180.78...Equipment Accident/Incident Attributed to...Railroad Accident Reportâ), that have...Railroad Accident Reports described in...Part II of Form FRA F 6180.78...Equipment Accident/Incident Attributed to...Railroad Accident Reportâ), that...

2012-10-01

427

49 CFR 225.18 - Alcohol or drug involvement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...RAILROAD ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS: REPORTS CLASSIFICATION...In preparing Form FRA F 6180.54...Equipment Accident/Incident Report,â under...append to the Form FRA F 6180.54...Equipment Accident/Incident Report,â any...

2012-10-01

428

Improving freight rail safety with on-board monitoring and control systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Research and Development of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is sponsoring a revenue service demonstration of Advanced Train Systems to demonstrate new technologies for improving safety and efficiency in freight train operations. The project, which commenced in 1999, is part of the Rolling Stock Program Element in FRA's Five-Year Strategic Plan for Railroad Research, Development and Demonstrations.

M. C. Edwards; W. M. Zavis; A. Prabhakaran; D. C. Brabb; A. S. Jackson

2005-01-01

429

78 FR 28284 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...April 11, 2013, Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) has petitioned the Federal Railroad Administration...Number FRA-2013-0040. Specifically, CP requests relief from 49 CFR 232.205...operating in distributive power (DP) mode. CP requests that FRA allow 90 cubic feet...

2013-05-14

430

75 FR 65398 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FRA-2010-0024] The Canadian Pacific Railway (CP) hereby petitions FRA for a temporary waiver...measurement system. Over the course of 6 months, CP intends to test the new system on their...a frequency that is not possible today. CP asserts that the benefits that are...

2010-10-22

431

Geochemistry, geochronology, mineralogy, and geology suggest sources of and controls on mineral systems in the southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada; with geochemistry maps of gold, silver, mercury, arsenic, antimony, zinc, copper, lead, molybdenum, bismuth, iron, titanium, vanadium, cobalt, beryllium, boron, fluorine, and sulfur; and with a section on lead associations, mineralogy and paragenesis, and isotopes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemistry maps showing the distribution and abundance of 18 elements in about 1,400 rock samples, both mineralized and unmineralized, from the southern Toquima Range, Nev., indicate major structural and lithologic controls on mineralization, and suggest sources of the elements. Radiometric age data, lead mineralogy and paragenesis data, and lead-isotope data supplement the geochemical and geologic data, providing further insight into timing, sources, and controls on mineralization. Major zones of mineralization are centered on structural margins of calderas and principal northwest-striking fault zones, as at Round Mountain, Manhattan, and Jefferson mining districts, and on intersections of low-angle and steep structures, as at Belmont mining district. Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, mostly limestones (at Manhattan, Jefferson, and Belmont districts), and porous Oligocene ash-flow tuffs (at Round Mountain district) host the major deposits, although all rock types have been mineralized as evidenced by numerous prospects throughout the area. Principal mineral systems are gold-silver at Round Mountain where about 7 million ounces of gold and more than 4 million ounces of silver has been produced; gold at Gold Hill in the west part of the Manhattan district where about a half million ounces of gold has been produced; gold-mercury-arsenic-antimony in the east (White Caps) part of the Manhattan district where a few hundred thousand ounces of gold has been produced; and silver-lead-antimony at Belmont where more than 150,000 ounces of silver has been produced. Lesser amounts of gold and silver have been produced from the Jefferson district and from scattered mines elsewhere in the southern Toquima Range. A small amount of tungsten was produced from mines in the granite of the Round Mountain pluton exposed east of Round Mountain, and small amounts of arsenic, antimony, and mercury have been produced elsewhere in the southern Toquima Range. All elements show unique distribution patterns that suggest specific sources and lithologic influences on deposition, as well as multiple episodes of mineralization. Principal episodes of mineralization are Late Cretaceous (molybdenum and tungsten in and near granite; silver at Belmont and Silver Point mines), early Oligocene [tourmaline and base- and precious-metals around the granodiorite of Dry Canyon stock as well as at Manhattan(?)], late Oligocene (gold at Round Mountain and Jefferson), and Miocene (gold at Manhattan). Most likely principal sources of molybdenum, tungsten, silver, and bismuth are Cretaceous granites; of antimony, arsenic, and mercury are intermediate-composition early Oligocene intrusives; and of gold are early and late Oligocene and early Miocene magmas of the volcanic cycle. Lead may have been derived principally from Cretaceous granitic magma and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. Several areas prospective for undiscovered mineral deposits are suggested by spatial patterns of element distributions related to geologic features. The Manhattan district in the vicinity of the White Caps mine may be underlain by a copper-molybdenum porphyry system related to a buried stock; peripheral high-grade gold veins and skarn deposits may be present below deposits previously mined. The Jefferson district also may be underlain by a copper-molybdenum porphyry system related to a buried stock, it too with peripheral high-grade gold deposits. The Bald Mountain Canyon belt of small gold veins has potential for deeper deposits in buried porous ash-flow tuff similar to the huge Round Mountain low-grade gold-silver deposit. Several other areas have potential for a variety of mineral deposits. Altogether the geochemical, geochronologic, mineralogic, and geologic evidence suggests recurring mineralizing episodes of varied character, from Late Cretaceous to late Tertiary time, related to a long-lived hot spot deep in the crust or in the upper mantle. Granite plutons of Late Cretaceous age were minerali

Shawe, Daniel R.; Hoffman, James D.; Doe, Bruce R.; Foord, Eugene E.; Stein, Holly J.; Ayuso, Robert A.

2003-01-01

432

On the History and Origin of LKFM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fra Mauro is the name of a geologic formation surrounding the Imbrium Basin of the Moon as well as the name of the region of the Apollo 14 lunar landing site. The formation was named for a 16th century Italian geographer and cartographer. In its original invocation in 1971 by the Apollo Soil Survey (ASS), Fra Mauro basalt was not a crystalline basalt, but the designation of a "compositional group" of impact glasses found in the Apollo 14 soil that were basaltic in composition. The ASS noted the similarity between the Fra Mauro basalt glass composition and sample 14310, an unbrecciated, crystalline Apollo 14 rock that would now be designated an impact melt rock. In 1972 the term Fra Mauro basalt was first applied to a rock, sample 14310, although in related papers, Fra Mauro basaltic glass was equated with KREEP. In 1973 the ASS noted that a wide range of K concentrations occurred among glasses of Fra Mauro basaltic composition in the Apollo 15 regolith. The terms high-K, moderate-K and low-K Fra Mauro first occurred in that context, but always as an adjective. Lock Fra Mauro glasses were those with 0.12 +/- 0.07% K2O, compared with 0.47 +/- 0.17% and 1.1 +/- 0.4% for moderate and high-K Fra Mauro glasses and 0.6% for Apollo 15 KREEP basalt. An important evolutionary step in the concept of low Fra Mauro basalt occurred in 1973 when the composition was first used as a component in a mass-balance (mixing) model for Apollo 16 soils [8,9] and later average highlands crust, despite that the term had not yet been applied to an actual rock sample. The first use of the acronym LKFM occurred in a 1973 paper describing glass compositions in Apollo 16 soil.

Korotev, Randy L.

1998-01-01

433

Characterization of the Human Folate Receptor Alpha Via Novel Antibody-Based Probes  

PubMed Central

Folate receptor alpha (FRA) is a cell surface protein whose aberrant expression in malignant cells has resulted in its pursuit as a therapeutic target and marker for diagnosis of cancer. The development of immune-based reagents that can reproducibly detect FRA from patient tissue processed by varying methods has been difficult due to the complex post-translational structure of the protein whereby most reagents developed to date are highly structure-sensitive and have resulted in equivocal expression results across independent studies. The aim of the present study was to generate novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using modified full length FRA protein as immunogen in order to develop a panel of mAbs to various, non-overlapping epitopes that may serve as diagnostic reagents able to robustly detect FRA-positive disease. Here we report the development of a panel of FRA-specific mAbs that are able to specifically detect FRA using an array of diagnostic platforms and methods. In addition, the methods used to develop these mAbs and their diverse binding properties provide additional information on the three dimensional structure of FRA in its native cell surface configuration.

O'Shannessy, Daniel J.; Somers, Elizabeth B.; Albone, Earl; Cheng, Xin; Park, Young Chul; Tomkowicz, Brian E.; Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Kohl, Thomas O.; Forsyth, Tracy M.; Smale, Robert; Fu, Yao-Shi; Nicolaides, Nicholas C.

2011-01-01

434

Exposure to Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induces Fos-Related Antigen-Immunoreactivity Via Activation of Dopaminergic D1 Receptor  

PubMed Central

We previously demonstrated that repeated exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) increases locomotor activity via stimulation of dopaminergic D1 receptor (J. Pharmacol. Sci., 2007;105:367-371). Since it has been demonstrated that activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors, especially 35-kDa fos-related antigen (FRA), play a key role in the neuronal and behavioral adaptation in response to various stimuli, we examined whether repeated ELF-MF exposure induces FRA-immunoreactivity (FRA-IR) in the striatum and nucleus accumbens (striatal complex) of the mice. Repeated exposure to ELF-MF (0.3 or 2.4 mT, 1 h/day, for consecutive fourteen days) significantly induced hyperlocomotor activity and FRA-IR in the striatal complex in a field intensity-dependent manner. ELF-MF-induced FRA-IR lasted for at least 1 year, while locomotor activity returned near control level 3 months after the final exposure to ELF-MF. Pretreatment with SCH23390, a dopaminergic D1 receptor antagonist, but not with sulpiride, a dopaminergic D2 receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated hyperlocomotor activity and FRA-IR induced by ELF-MF. Our results suggest that repeated exposure to ELF-MF leads to prolonged locomotor stimulation and long-term expression of FRA in the striatal complex of the mice via stimulation of dopaminergic D1 receptor.

Shin, Eun-Joo; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Nguyen, Thuy-Ty Lan; Pham, Diem-Thu

2011-01-01

435

Characterization and visualization of the lattice misfit associated with dislocation cores  

SciTech Connect

Atomic misfit associated with a crystal dislocation is manifested by displacements of atoms from their positions in the perfect lattice. The discrete character of the crystal lattice and the nature of interatomic bonds distribute this misfit over the plane normal to the dislocation line. The Nye tensor, which describes the distribution of the resultant Burgers vector across a plane normal to the dislocation line, provides an excellent means of describing the spatial variation of the misfit. Relevant components of the Nye tensor are calculated from atomic positions in the dislocated crystal, represented by contour plots, and contrasted with the corresponding quantities obtained from a local continuum model. The comparison demonstrates that spatial distributions of components of the Nye tensor provide an accurate and instructive means of representing dislocation core structures. A numerical integration of these distributions permits an accurate calculation of the Burgers vector without constructing a Burgers circuit.

Hartley, C.S. [Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Directorate of Aerospace and Materials Sciences, 4015 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22203-1954 (United States)]. E-mail: craig.hartley@afosr.af.mil; Mishin, Y. [School of Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (United States)

2005-03-01

436

Fructus Aurantii induced antidepressant effect via its monoaminergic mechanism and prokinetic action in rat.  

PubMed

Depression could hardly get a satisfactory effect from the currently available antidepressants. To get a more effective treatment, antidepressant effect and monoaminergic mechanism of Fructus Aurantii (FRA) in the rat forced swimming test (FST) and open field test (OFT), and its prokinetics were examined. FST and OFT were respectively used to evaluate the antidepressant effect and locomotor activity of FRA. We observed the effects of monoamine receptor antagonists on FRA-induced antidepressant effect in rat. The effects of FRA on intestinal transit, gastric emptying and in vitro jejunum contractile activity were assessed. FRA decreased significantly the immobility time (32.6±8.5, 30.3±5.2 vs 56.4±9.4, all p<0.01) in FST, dose-dependent increased the locomotor activity (102±17.5, 120±18.5 vs 89±9.8, p<0.05 or 0.01), significantly accelerated gastric emptying (GE: 48.1±6.3, 39.5±5.7 vs 19.5±3.8, p<0.01) and intestinal transit (IT: 67.3±9.1, 64.2±6.3 vs 49.1±8.2, p<0.01) of the semi-liquid meal, compared with vehicle. And FRA (1 ?M, 10 ?M) significantly increased the mean amplitude (0.24±0.021 and 0.281±0.015) of contraction in jejunum of rat compared with vehicle (0.149±0.011) in vitro. FRA (10 ?M) could induce a largest amplitude (0.281±0.015) of contraction in jejunum. The anti-immobility effect of FRA in FST was prevented by pre-treatment of rat with p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester, WAY100635, ketanserin, haloperidol, SCH233390, sulpiride, yohimbine, but not prazosin. FRA could simultaneously induce prokinetics and antidepressant effect, deserves further to investigate. PMID:22770641

Zhang, Ying-Jin; Huang, Wei; Huang, Xi; Wang, Yang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Cheng; Zhong, Bing-Wu; Sheng, Chen-Xia; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Si-Fang; Su, Nan-Xiang; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Ren, Ping

2012-07-05

437

49 CFR 236.903 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...site-specific application programs, run timers, read inputs, drive outputs, perform self-diagnostics, access and check memory, and monitor the execution of the application software to detect unsolicited changes in outputs. FRA means the...

2012-10-01

438

49 CFR 236.903 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...site-specific application programs, run timers, read inputs, drive outputs, perform self-diagnostics, access and check memory, and monitor the execution of the application software to detect unsolicited changes in outputs. FRA means the...

2011-10-01

439

49 CFR 209.203 - Notice of investigation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Notice of investigation. 209.203 Section 209...Orders § 209.203 Notice of investigation. (a) FRA begins a compliance...proceeding by serving a notice of investigation on the respondent....

2011-10-01

440

Expression of the autosomal folate-sensitive fragile sites in ten kindreds with Martin-Bell syndrome.  

PubMed

The authors analyse the expression of all the folate-sensitive fra sites in a sample of 24 male patients with Martin-Bell syndrome (MBS) and their 12 mothers distributed in 10 kindreds. The cytogenetic results are compared with that of a control group, constituted by 8 unrelated normal subjects. Except for the fra Xq27, there was no autosomal folate-sensitive fra site significantly more expressed in patients with MBS than in the control group. On the basis of the present cytogenetic sample of about 6 500 R-banded mitoses, a list of all the in vitro folate-sensitive fra sites and their relative frequencies is given. PMID:3487280

Ventruto, V; Stabile, M; Gentile, G; de Tollis, G; Colantuoni, M; Sirone, P; Perone, L; Lonardo, F; Della Monica, M; Fiore, M

1986-01-01

441

Progress in Rail Integrity Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the work conducted over the past two decades on rail integrity research sponsored by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) and carried out by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. The research has involved both experi...

D. Y. Jeong

2001-01-01

442

75 FR 17203 - National Rail Plan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FRA-2010-0020] National Rail Plan AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration...development of the long-range National Rail Plan (NRP) through an open docket. In...INFORMATION: Background: The Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act of...

2010-04-05

443

78 FR 57450 - Notice Rescinding a Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Impact Statement for the Altamont Corridor Rail Project From Stockton to San Jose, California...statement (EIS) for the Altamont Corridor Rail Project from Stockton to San Jose, California...project sponsor, the California High Speed Rail Authority (Authority). FRA...

2013-09-18

444

77 FR 38388 - Notice of Decision to Grant Buy America Waiver to Washington Department of Transportation to...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation to Purchase Vossloh 101-LV Concrete Rail Ties AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration...waiver request from the FRA Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act (PRIIA...concrete ties in the Pacific Northwest Rail Corridor high-speed intercity...

2012-06-27

445

78 FR 28940 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Atlanta to Charlotte Portion of the Southeast High Speed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...to Charlotte Portion of the Southeast High Speed Rail Corridor AGENCY: Federal Rail Administration (FRA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...Statement (Study) to evaluate potential passenger rail improvements between Atlanta, GA and...

2013-05-16

446

77 FR 48591 - State Rail Plan Guidance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. FRA-2012-0066] State Rail Plan Guidance AGENCY: Federal Railroad...Request for Public Comment on Proposed State Rail Plan Guidance...submission, and acceptance of State rail plans. State rail plans are...

2012-08-14

447

77 FR 73456 - Update to the TR-12 Fuel Related Rate Adjustment Policy (SDDC Fuel Surcharge Policy)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Coordination (DTC) contract or the Protective Security Service...OTO) personal property movements, regardless of mode...INFORMATION CONTACT: Isis Green, (618) 220-5078...Policy. Background: The following FRA policy...and personal property movements within the United...

2012-12-10

448

75 FR 49551 - Petition for Waiver of Compliance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...requested, and the petitioner's arguments in favor of relief. Walden's Ridge Railroad Company; Heritage Railroad; Southern Appalachia...Museum [Waiver Petition Docket Number FRA-2010-0118] The Walden's Ridge Railroad Company (WRRC), Heritage Railroad...

2010-08-13

449

Discrete Simulation of Fractional Order Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fractional calculus has been shown useful for describing many real world systems, and studies are currently underway to generalize control theory to incorporate fractional states. This investigation derives a method for simulating the time response of fra...

J. A. Blank

1991-01-01

450

49 CFR 225.6 - Consolidated reporting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...the following: (1) A list of the subsidiary railroads controlled by the parent corporation... (2) An explanation as to how the subsidiary railroads operate as a single, seamless...agreement with FRA specifying which subsidiaries are included in its railroad...

2011-10-01

451

49 CFR 225.6 - Consolidated reporting.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...the following: (1) A list of the subsidiary railroads controlled by the parent corporation... (2) An explanation as to how the subsidiary railroads operate as a single, seamless...agreement with FRA specifying which subsidiaries are included in its railroad...

2012-10-01

452

National Rail Safety Action Plan Progress Report, 2005-2007.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On May 16, 2005, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) launched an aggressive and proactive National Rail Safety Action Plan to address important safety issues by: Targeting the most frequent, highest ri...

2007-01-01

453

49 CFR 229.201 - Purpose and scope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.201...This subpart prescribes minimum crashworthiness standards for locomotives. It also...obtaining FRA approval of: new locomotive crashworthiness design standards; changes to...

2011-10-01

454

49 CFR 229.201 - Purpose and scope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.201...This subpart prescribes minimum crashworthiness standards for locomotives. It also...obtaining FRA approval of: new locomotive crashworthiness design standards; changes to...

2010-10-01

455

49 CFR 229.205 - General requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.205...occupied service must meet the minimum crashworthiness performance requirements set forth... (1) Meeting an FRA-approved crashworthiness design standard (including AAR...

2009-10-01

456

49 CFR 229.205 - General requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.205...occupied service must meet the minimum crashworthiness performance requirements set forth... (1) Meeting an FRA-approved crashworthiness design standard (including AAR...

2010-10-01

457

49 CFR 229.201 - Purpose and scope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.201...This subpart prescribes minimum crashworthiness standards for locomotives. It also...obtaining FRA approval of: new locomotive crashworthiness design standards; changes to...

2009-10-01

458

49 CFR 229.201 - Purpose and scope.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.201...This subpart prescribes minimum crashworthiness standards for locomotives. It also...obtaining FRA approval of: new locomotive crashworthiness design standards; changes to...

2012-10-01

459

49 CFR 229.205 - General requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.205...occupied service must meet the minimum crashworthiness performance requirements set forth... (1) Meeting an FRA-approved crashworthiness design standard (including AAR...

2012-10-01

460

49 CFR 262.15 - Environmental assessment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...and fund any costs associated with environmental/historic preservation...can manage an environmental impact statement...FRA for these costs to the extent...may apply this cost to the 10...beginning any environmental or...

2012-10-01