Science.gov

Sample records for parts manufacturing complex

  1. Manufacturing complexity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of the complexity of a typical system is presented. Starting with the subsystems of an example system, the step-by-step procedure for analysis of the complexity of an overall system is given. The learning curves for the various subsystems are determined as well as the concurrent numbers of relevant design parameters. Then trend curves are plotted for the learning curve slopes versus the various design-oriented parameters, e.g. number of parts versus slope of learning curve, or number of fasteners versus slope of learning curve, etc. Representative cuts are taken from each trend curve, and a figure-of-merit analysis is made for each of the subsystems. Based on these values, a characteristic curve is plotted which is indicative of the complexity of the particular subsystem. Each such characteristic curve is based on a universe of trend curve data taken from data points observed for the subsystem in question. Thus, a characteristic curve is developed for each of the subsystems in the overall system.

  2. Intelligent freeform manufacturing of complex organs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong

    2012-11-01

    Different from the existing tissue engineering strategies, rapid prototyping (RP) techniques aim to automatically produce complex organs directly from computer-aided design freeform models with high resolution and sophistication. Analogous to building a nuclear power plant, cell biology (especially, renewable stem cells), implantable biomaterials, tissue engineering, and single/double/four nozzle RP techniques currently enable researchers in the field to realize a part of the task of complex organ manufacturing. To achieve this multifaceted undertaking, a multi-nozzle rapid prototyping system which can simultaneously integrate an anti-suture vascular system, multiple cell types, and a cocktail of growth factors in a construct should be developed. This article reviews the pros and cons of the existing cell-laden RP techniques for complex organ manufacturing. It is hoped that with the comprehensive multidisciplinary efforts, the implants can virtually replace the functions of a solid internal organ, such as the liver, heart, and kidney. PMID:22888830

  3. Software for integrated manufacturing systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, R. A.; Naylor, A. W.

    1987-01-01

    Part 1 presented an overview of the unified approach to manufacturing software. The specific characteristics of the approach that allow it to realize the goals of reduced cost, increased reliability and increased flexibility are considered. Why the blending of a components view, distributed languages, generics and formal models is important, why each individual part of this approach is essential, and why each component will typically have each of these parts are examined. An example of a specification for a real material handling system is presented using the approach and compared with the standard interface specification given by the manufacturer. Use of the component in a distributed manufacturing system is then compared with use of the traditional specification with a more traditional approach to designing the system. An overview is also provided of the underlying mechanisms used for implementing distributed manufacturing systems using the unified software/hardware component approach.

  4. Manufacturing of GLARE Parts and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinke, J.

    2003-07-01

    GLARE is a hybrid material consisting of alternating layers of metal sheets and composite layers, requiring special attention when manufacturing of parts and structures is concerned. On one hand the applicable manufacturing processes for GLARE are limited, on the other hand, due to the constituents and composition of the laminate, it offers new opportunities for production. One of the opportunities is the manufacture of very large skin panels by lay-up techniques. Lay-up techniques are common for full composites, but uncommon for metallic structures. Nevertheless, large GLARE skin panels are made by lay-up processes. In addition, the sequences of forming and laminating processes, that can be selected, offer manufacturing options that are not applicable to metals or full composites. With respect to conventional manufacturing processes, the possibilities for Fibre Metal Laminates in general, are limited. The limits are partly due to the different failure modes, partly due to the properties of the constituents in the laminate. For machining processes: the wear of the cutting tools during machining operations of GLARE stems from the abrasive nature of the glass fibres. For the forming processes: the limited formability, expressed by a small failure strain, is related to the glass fibres. However, although these manufacturing issues may restrict the use of manufacturing processes for FMLs, application of these laminates in aircraft is not hindered.

  5. Software for integrated manufacturing systems, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naylor, A. W.; Volz, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    For several years, a broad, unified approach to programming manufacturing cells, factory floors, and other manufacturing systems has been developed. It is based on a blending of distributed Ada, software components, generics and formal models. Among other things the machines and devices which make up the components, and the entire manufacturing cell is viewed as an assembly of software components. The purpose of this project is to reduce cost, increase the reliability and increase the flexibility of manufacturing software. An overview is given of the approach and an experimental generic factory floor controller that was developed using the approach is described. The controller is generic in the sense that it can control any one of a large class of factory floors making an arbitrary mix of parts.

  6. Visual inspection reliability for precision manufactured parts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    See, Judi E.

    2015-09-04

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted an experiment for the National Nuclear Security Administration to determine the reliability of visual inspection of precision manufactured parts used in nuclear weapons. In addition visual inspection has been extensively researched since the early 20th century; however, the reliability of visual inspection for nuclear weapons parts has not been addressed. In addition, the efficacy of using inspector confidence ratings to guide multiple inspections in an effort to improve overall performance accuracy is unknown. Further, the workload associated with inspection has not been documented, and newer measures of stress have not been applied.

  7. Manufacturing technology methodology for propulsion system parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, M. M.

    1992-07-01

    A development history and a current status evaluation are presented for lost-wax casting of such gas turbine engine components as turbine vanes and blades. The most advanced such systems employ computer-integrated manufacturing methods for high process repeatability, reprogramming versatility, and feedback monitoring. Stereolithography-based plastic model 3D prototyping has also been incorporated for the wax part of the investment casting; it may ultimately be possible to produce the 3D prototype in wax directly, or even to create a ceramic mold directly. Nonintrusive inspections are conducted by X-radiography and neutron radiography.

  8. Cleaning of parts for new manufacturing and parts rebuilding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Jeff

    1994-06-01

    Parts cleaning is the largest single expense, and the most time consuming activity, in rebuilding and new manufacturing. On average, 25% to 40% of the total labor and overhead burden is spent on cleaning. EPA and OSHA pressures add to the burden by making some methods and chemicals obsolete. Some of the processes and chemicals in current use will be curtailed and or outlawed in the future. How can a shops and industries make long term decisions or capital investments in cleaning and process improvements when the government keeps changing its rules? At the MART Corporation in Saint Louis, Missouri, we manufacture a line of cabinet-style batch cleaning machines known as Power Washers. Twenty years ago MART invented and patented the Power Washer process, a cleaning method that recycles wash solution and blasts contaminates as they are washed off the more heavily contaminated parts. Since the initial invention MART has continued to R&D the washing process and develop ancillary systems that comply with EPA and OSHA regulations. For applications involving new industrial parts or items requiring specification cleaned surfaces. MART provides filtration and solution conditioning systems, part drying operations, and triple rinsing. Units are available in stainless steel or higher alloys. We are not alone in the washer manufacturing business. You have many choices of cleaning solutions (no pun intended) which will perform in your operations and yield good results. As a manufacturer, we are interested in your success with our equipment. We have all heard the horror stories of companies having selected inappropriate cleaning systems and or processes which then brought the company to its knees, production wise. Assembly, appearance, warranty, and performance shortcomings of finished products can often be directly related to the cleaning process and its shortcomings.

  9. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  10. Inspection of additive manufactured parts using laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, D.; Bescond, C.; Lord, M.; Cao, X.; Wanjara, P.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2016-02-01

    Additive manufacturing is a novel technology of high importance for global sustainability of resources. As additive manufacturing involves typically layer-by-layer fusion of the feedstock (wire or powder), an important characteristic of the fabricated metallic structural parts, such as those used in aero-engines, is the performance, which is highly related to the presence of defects, such as cracks, lack of fusion or bonding between layers, and porosity. For this purpose, laser ultrasonics is very attractive due to its non-contact nature and is especially suited for the analysis of parts of complex geometries. In addition, the technique is well adapted to online implementation and real-time measurement during the manufacturing process. The inspection can be performed from either the top deposited layer or the underside of the substrate and the defects can be visualized using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). In this work, a variety of results obtained off-line on INCONEL® 718 and Ti-6Al-4V coupons that were manufactured using laser powder, laser wire, or electron beam wire deposition are reported and most defects detected were further confirmed by X-ray micro-computed tomography.

  11. Anomaly Detection In Additively Manufactured Parts Using Laser Doppler Vibrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-09-29

    Additively manufactured parts are susceptible to non-uniform structure caused by the unique manufacturing process. This can lead to structural weakness or catastrophic failure. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and frequency response analysis, non-contact detection of anomalies in additively manufactured parts may be possible. Preliminary tests show promise for small scale detection, but more future work is necessary.

  12. Manufacturing and fabrication, part 3. [extraterrestrial resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar; Duke, Michael B.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    The accessibility of material and energy off the Earth and the leverage that these nonterrestrial resources can exert on the space transportation system are important influences on the long-term goal of exploring the solar system. Research on separation of lunar materials and manufacturing of useful products from them is in its infancy. A few possible processes and products are described in this report. Specific attention is given to oxygen, metal, and silicate products.

  13. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  14. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part I. Morphology.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography has been applied to the study of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM). The AM method employed here was the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V), as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Samples were chosen to examine the effect of build direction and complexity of design on the surface morphology and final dimensions of the piece. PMID:27359150

  15. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts. PMID:27359151

  16. The role of variation, error, and complexity in manufacturing defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, C.M.; Barkan, P.

    1994-03-01

    Variation in component properties and dimensions is a widely recognized factor in product defects which can be quantified and controlled by Statistical Process Control methodologies. Our studies have shown, however, that traditional statistical methods are ineffective in characterizing and controlling defects caused by error. The distinction between error and variation becomes increasingly important as the target defect rates approach extremely low values. Motorola data substantiates our thesis that defect rates in the range of several parts per million can only be achieved when traditional methods for controlling variation are combined with methods that specifically focus on eliminating defects due to error. Complexity in the product design, manufacturing processes, or assembly increases the likelihood of defects due to both variation and error. Thus complexity is also a root cause of defects. Until now, the absence of a sound correlation between defects and complexity has obscured the importance of this relationship. We have shown that assembly complexity can be quantified using Design for Assembly (DFA) analysis. High levels of correlation have been found between our complexity measures and defect data covering tens of millions of assembly operations in two widely different industries. The availability of an easily determined measure of complexity, combined with these correlations, permits rapid estimation of the relative defect rates for alternate design concepts. This should prove to be a powerful tool since it can guide design improvement at an early stage when concepts are most readily modified.

  17. Femtosecond laser additive manufacturing of iron and tungsten parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Bai; Yang, Lihmei; Huang, Huan; Bai, Shuang; Wan, Peng; Liu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    For the first time, femtosecond laser additive manufacturing is demonstrated. Pure iron and tungsten powders, having very different melting temperature and mechanical properties, are used for the demonstration. Parts with various shapes, such as ring and cube, are fabricated. Micro-hardness and ultimate tensile strength are investigated for the fabricated samples. The results are also compared to the similar parts made by a continuous-wave laser. It is found that fs laser additive manufacturing can obtain better mechanical properties and fabricate materials that are not possible before.

  18. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  19. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  20. Manufacture of superconducting niobium cavity parts by hydropercussion punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaryan, N. S.; Shirkov, G. D.; Zhurauski, A. Yu.; Petrakovski, V. S.; Batouritski, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    A complete cycle of manufacturing all parts of superconducting niobium cavities which comprise two half-cells, two drift tubes, and two flanges each has been developed. The cavity half-cells are manufactured by hydropercussion punching, which has a number of advantages over the instrumental stamping technique. For the first time, the diagram of formability of ultrapure niobium has been experimentally obtained for hydropercussion punching and the key parameters of the process have been determined that ensure complete deep-drawing of workpieces, viz., the value of the limit drawing ratio of ultrapure niobium that is 1.92 at a specific impact energy of 0.42 MJ/m2. The deviations of the half-cell dimensions from the rated values do not exceed 0.1 mm. Production tools required for all manufacturing steps have been created. The parameters of machining of the niobium cavity parts prior to welding have been experimentally established.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS FROM AN AIRPLANE PARTS MANUFACTURING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater from an airplane parts manufacturing plant was sampled using the U.S. EPA screening protocol for the 129 priority pollutants. The wastewater treatment facilities at this site include batch systems to destroy cyanides, remove oil, and reduce hexavalent chromium to the t...

  2. Fabrication of Flex Joint Utilizing Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddleman, David; Richard, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Selective Laser Melting (SLM) manufacturing technique has been utilized in the manufacture of a flex joint typical of those found in rocket engine and main propulsion system ducting. The SLM process allowed for the combination of parts that are typically machined separately and welded together. This resulted in roughly a 65% reduction of the total number of parts, roughly 70% reduction in the total number of welds, and an estimated 60% reduction in the number of machining operations. The majority of the new design was in three SLM pieces. These pieces, as well as a few traditionally fabricated parts, were assembled into a complete unit, which has been pressure tested. The design and planned cryogenic testing of the unit will be presented.

  3. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann; Day, Robert D; Espinoza, Brent F; Hatch, Doug; Patterson, Brian M; Feng, Shihai

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  4. Computerized parts list system coordinates engineering releases, parts control, and manufacturing planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, W.; Kinsey, M.

    1967-01-01

    Computerized parts list system compiles and summarize all pertinent and available information on complex new systems. The parts list system consists of three computer subroutines - list of parts, parts numerical sequence list, and specifications list.

  5. Design and manufacturing of complex optics: the dragonfly eye optic.

    SciTech Connect

    Claudet, Andre A.; Sweatt, William C.; Hodges, V. Carter; Adams, David Price; Gill, David Dennis; Vasile, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The ''Design and Manufacturing of Complex Optics'' LDRD sought to develop new advanced methods for the design and manufacturing of very complex optical systems. The project team developed methods for including manufacturability into optical designs and also researched extensions of manufacturing techniques to meet the challenging needs of aspherical, 3D, multi-level lenslet arrays on non-planar surfaces. In order to confirm the applicability of the developed techniques, the team chose the Dragonfly Eye optic as a testbed. This optic has arrays of aspherical micro-lenslets on both the exterior and the interior of a 4mm diameter hemispherical shell. Manufacturing of the dragonfly eye required new methods of plunge milling aspherical optics and the development of a method to create the milling tools using focused ion beam milling. The team showed the ability to create aspherical concave milling tools which will have great significance to the optical industry. A prototype dragonfly eye exterior was created during the research, and the methods of including manufacturability in the optical design process were shown to be successful as well.

  6. Cement manufacture and the environment - Part I: Chemistry and technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oss, H. G.; Padovani, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Hydraulic (chiefly portland) cement is the binding agent in concrete and mortar and thus a key component of a country's construction sector. Concrete is arguably the most abundant of all manufactured solid materials. Portland cement is made primarily from finely ground clinker, which itself is composed dominantly of hydraulically active calcium silicate minerals formed through high-temperature burning of limestone and other materials in a kiln. This process requires approximately 1.7 tons of raw materials perton of clinker produced and yields about 1 ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, of which calcination of limestone and the combustion of fuels each contribute about half. The overall level of CO2 output makes the cement industry one of the top two manufacturing industry sources of greenhouse gases; however, in many countries, the cement industry's contribution is a small fraction of that from fossil fuel combustion by power plants and motor vehicles. The nature of clinker and the enormous heat requirements of its manufacture allow the cement industry to consume a wide variety of waste raw materials and fuels, thus providing the opportunity to apply key concepts of industrial ecology, most notably the closing of loops through the use of by-products of other industries (industrial symbiosis). In this article, the chemistry and technology of cement manufacture are summarized. In a forthcoming companion article (part II), some of the environmental challenges and opportunities facing the cement industry are described. Because of the size and scope of the U.S. cement industry, the analysis relies primarily on data and practices from the United States.

  7. Dimensional Stability of Complex Shapes Manufactured by the VARTM Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubert, Pascal; Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Pipes, R. Byron

    2002-01-01

    The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process is a cost effective, innovative method that is being considered for manufacture of large aircraft-quality components where high mechanical properties and dimensional tolerance are essential. In the present work, carbon fiber SAERTEX fabric/SI-ZG-5A epoxy resin C-shaped laminates were manufactured by VARTM using different cure cycles followed by the same post-cure cycle. The final part thickness was uniform except at the corner were thinning was observed. The cure cycle selected is shown to significantly affect the part spring-in and a long cycle at 66 C followed by a 178 C post-cure produced a part with negligible spring-in.

  8. Cleaning and Cleanliness Measurement of Additive Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, Roger W.; Mitchell, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The successful acquisition and utilization of piece parts and assemblies for contamination sensitive applications requires application of cleanliness acceptance criteria. Contamination can be classified using many different schemes. One common scheme is classification as organic, ionic and particulate contaminants. These may be present in and on the surface of solid components and assemblies or may be dispersed in various gaseous or liquid media. This discussion will focus on insoluble particle contamination on the surface of piece parts and assemblies. Cleanliness of parts can be controlled using two strategies, referred to as gross cleanliness and precision cleanliness. Under a gross cleanliness strategy acceptance is based on visual cleanliness. This approach introduces a number of concerns that render it unsuitable for controlling cleanliness of high technology products. Under the precision cleanliness strategy, subjective, visual assessment of cleanliness is replaced by objective measurement of cleanliness. When a precision cleanliness strategy is adopted there naturally arises the question: How clean is clean enough? The six commonly used methods for establishing objective cleanliness acceptance limits will be discussed. Special emphasis shall focus on the use of multiple extraction, a technique that has been demonstrated for additively manufactured parts.

  9. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  10. Strengthening of 3D Printed Fused Deposition Manufactured Parts Using the Fill Compositing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Belter, Joseph T.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications. PMID:25880807

  11. 40 CFR 63.5787 - What if I also manufacture fiberglass boats or boat parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Manufacturing NESHAP (40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV), you are subject to this subpart regardless of the final use of the parts you manufacture. (b) If your source is subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and all... subject to this subpart. (c) If you are subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and meet...

  12. 40 CFR 63.5787 - What if I also manufacture fiberglass boats or boat parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Manufacturing NESHAP (40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV), you are subject to this subpart regardless of the final use of the parts you manufacture. (b) If your source is subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and all... subject to this subpart. (c) If you are subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and meet...

  13. 40 CFR 63.5787 - What if I also manufacture fiberglass boats or boat parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Manufacturing NESHAP (40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV), you are subject to this subpart regardless of the final use of the parts you manufacture. (b) If your source is subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and all... subject to this subpart. (c) If you are subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and meet...

  14. 40 CFR 63.5787 - What if I also manufacture fiberglass boats or boat parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Manufacturing NESHAP (40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV), you are subject to this subpart regardless of the final use of the parts you manufacture. (b) If your source is subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and all... subject to this subpart. (c) If you are subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and meet...

  15. 40 CFR 63.5787 - What if I also manufacture fiberglass boats or boat parts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Manufacturing NESHAP (40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV), you are subject to this subpart regardless of the final use of the parts you manufacture. (b) If your source is subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and all... subject to this subpart. (c) If you are subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart VVVV, and meet...

  16. Preliminary Comparison of Properties between Ni-electroplated Stainless Steel Parts Fabricated with Laser Additive Manufacturing and Conventional Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Mika; Jauhiainen, Eeva; Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Riihimäki, Jaakko; Ritvanen, Jussi; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is a fabrication technology, which enables production of complex parts from metallic materials with mechanical properties comparable to those of conventionally machined parts. These LAM parts are manufactured via melting metallic powder layer by layer with laser beam. Aim of this study is to define preliminarily the possibilities of using electroplating to supreme surface properties. Electrodeposited nickel and chromium as well as electroless (autocatalytic) deposited nickel was used to enhance laser additive manufactured and machined parts properties, like corrosion resistance, friction and wearing. All test pieces in this study were manufactured with a modified research AM equipment, equal to commercial EOS M series. The laser system used for tests was IPG 200 W CW fiber laser. The material used in this study for additive manufacturing was commercial stainless steel powder grade named SS316L. This SS316L is not equal to AISI 316L grade, but commercial name of this kind of powder is widely known in additive manufacturing as SS316L. Material used for fabrication of comparison test pieces (i.e. conventionally manufactured) was AISI 316L stainless steel bar. Electroplating was done in matrix cell and electroless was done in plastic sink properties of plated parts were tested within acetic acid salt spray corrosion chamber (AASS, SFS-EN-ISO 9227 standard). Adhesion of coating, friction and wearing properties were tested with Pin-On-Rod machine. Results show that in these preliminary tests, LAM parts and machined parts have certain differences due to manufacturing route and surface conditions. These have an effect on electroplated and electroless parts features on adhesion, corrosion, wearing and friction. However, further and more detailed studies are needed to fully understand these phenomena.

  17. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF COATED PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effeort to assist these manufacturers, Waste Minimization Assessment Ce...

  18. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Springfield, Robert M.

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  19. Assessing processes in uncertain, complex physical phenomena and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J. M.; Kerscher, W. J. III; Smith, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking) is a set of structured quantitative approaches for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources. The methodology integrates diverse types and sources of information, and their associated uncertainties, to develop full distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. The successful application of PREDICT has involved system performance assessment in automotive product development, aging nuclear weapons, and fatigued turbine jet engines. In each of these applications, complex physical, mechanical and materials processes affect performance, safety and reliability assessments. Processes also include the physical actions taken during manufacturing, quality control, inspections, assembly, etc. and the steps involved in product design, development and certification. In this paper, we will examine the various types of processes involved in the decision making leading to production in an automotive system reliability example. Analysis of these processes includes not only understanding their impact on performance and reliability, but also the uncertainties associated with them. The automotive example demonstrates some of the tools used in tackling the complex problem of understanding processes. While some tools and methods exist for understanding processes (man made and natural) and the uncertainties associated with them, many of the complex issues discussed are open for continued research efforts.

  20. Automated fiber placement composite manufacturing: The mission at MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.; Pelham, Larry I.

    1993-01-01

    Automated fiber placement is a manufacturing process used for producing complex composite structures. It is a notable leap to the state-of-the-art in technology for automated composite manufacturing. The fiber placement capability was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Productivity Enhancement Complex in 1992 in collaboration with Thiokol Corporation to provide materials and processes research and development, and to fabricate components for many of the Center's Programs. The Fiber Placement System (FPX) was developed as a distinct solution to problems inherent to other automated composite manufacturing systems. This equipment provides unique capabilities to build composite parts in complex 3-D shapes with concave and other asymmetrical configurations. Components with complex geometries and localized reinforcements usually require labor intensive efforts resulting in expensive, less reproducible components; the fiber placement system has the features necessary to overcome these conditions. The mechanical systems of the equipment have the motion characteristics of a filament winder and the fiber lay-up attributes of a tape laying machine, with the additional capabilities of differential tow payout speeds, compaction and cut-restart to selectively place the correct number of fibers where the design dictates. This capability will produce a repeatable process resulting in lower cost and improved quality and reliability.

  1. Continuous filament composite parts and articles of manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    Weisberg, Andrew H.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture according to one embodiment includes a plurality of plies in a stacked configuration, where each ply includes a plurality of tape winds having edges. A distance between the edges of adjacent tape winds in the same ply is about constant along a length of the wind. Each tape wind comprises elongated fibers and a matrix, axes of the fibers being oriented about parallel to a longitudinal axis of the tape wind. Additional systems, methods and articles of manufacture are also presented.

  2. Differences in microstructure and properties between selective laser melting and traditional manufacturing for fabrication of metal parts: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Zhao, Xiao; Li, Shuai; Han, Changjun; Wei, Qingsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Shi, Yusheng

    2015-06-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM), as one of the additive manufacturing technologies, is widely investigated to fabricate metal parts. In SLM, parts are manufactured directly from powders in a layer-by-layer fashion; SLM also provides several advantages, such as production of complex parts with high three-dimensional accuracy, compared with other additive manufacturing technologies. Therefore, SLM can be applied in aeronautics, astronautics, medicine, and die and mould industry. However, this technique differs from traditional methods, such as casting and forging; for instance, the former greatly differs in terms of microstructure and properties of products. This paper summarizes relevant studies on metal material fabrication through SLM. Based on a work completed in Huazhong Univ. Sci Tech., Rapid Manuf. Center (HUST-RMC) and compared with characteristics described in other reported studies, microstructure, properties, dimensional accuracy, and application of SLM are presented.

  3. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF MACHINED PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their-generation of waste bin who lack the expertise to do so. aste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected u...

  4. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER PRODUCING GALVANIZED STEEL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do so. aste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at ...

  5. Manufacturing Component Parts of Mining Equipment With Application of Hardening Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valuev, D. V.; Malushin, N. N.; Valueva, A. V.; Dariev, R. S.; Mamadaliev, R. A.

    2016-04-01

    To ensure highest hardness and wear resistance the authors develop an aggregate technology of manufacturing mining equipment component parts. The aggregate technology of manufacturing faced component parts includes the following operations: plasma-jet hard-facing with high-speed steels; high-temperature tempering after the facing, ultrasonic surface strengthening treatment, additional tempering, reconstructive facing.

  6. Laser cladding: repairing and manufacturing metal parts and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Leo

    2003-03-01

    Laser cladding is presently used to repair high volume aerospace, automotive, marine, rail or general engineering components where excessive wear has occurred. It can also be used if a one-off high value component is either required or has been accidentally over-machined. The ultimate application of laser cladding is to build components up from nothing, using a laser cladding system and a 3D CAD drawing of the component. It is thus emerging that laser cladding can be classified as a special case of Rapid Prototyping (RP). Up to this point in time RP was seen, and is still seen, as in intermediately step between the design stage of a component and a finished working product. This can now be extended so that laser cladding makes RP a one-stop shop and the finished component is made from tool-steel or some alloy-base material. The marriage of laser cladding with RP is an interesting one and offers an alternative to traditional tool builders, re-manufacturers and injection mould design/repair industries. The aim of this paper is to discuss the emergence of this new technology, along with the transference of the process out of the laboratory and into the industrial workplace and show it is finding its rightful place in the manufacturing/repair sector. It will be shown that it can be used as a cost cutting, strategic material saver and consequently a green technology.

  7. A manufactured solution for verifying CFD boundary conditions: part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Ryan Bomar; Ober, Curtis Curry; Knupp, Patrick Michael

    2005-01-01

    Order-of-accuracy verification is necessary to ensure that software correctly solves a given set of equations. One method to verify the order of accuracy of a code is the method of manufactured solutions. In this study, a manufactured solution has been derived and implemented that allows verification of not only the Euler, Navier-Stokes, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation sets, but also some of their associated boundary conditions (BC's): slip, no-slip (adiabatic and isothermal), and outflow (subsonic, supersonic, and mixed). Order-of-accuracy verification has been performed for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations and these BC's in a compressible computational fluid dynamics code. All of the results shown are on skewed, non-uniform meshes. RANS results will be presented in a future paper. The observed order of accuracy was lower than the expected order of accuracy in two cases. One of these cases resulted in the identification and correction of a coding mistake in the CHAD gradient correction that was reducing the observed order of accuracy. This mistake would have been undetectable on a Cartesian mesh. During the search for the CHAD gradient correction problem, an unrelated coding mistake was found and corrected. The other case in which the observed order of accuracy was less than expected was a test of the slip BC; although no specific coding or formulation mistakes have yet been identified. After the correction of the identified coding mistakes, all of the aforementioned equation sets and BC's demonstrated the expected (or at least acceptable) order of accuracy except the slip condition.

  8. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 783 - Manufacturing Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... better than 5 parts per million boron equivalent and with a density greater than 1.50 g/cm3; (11) The... irradiated fuel element chopping machines. Irradiated fuel element chopping machines means equipment as... or greater than the equivalent of 0.5 meters of concrete, with a density of 3.2 g/cm3 or...

  9. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 783 - Manufacturing Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... better than 5 parts per million boron equivalent and with a density greater than 1.50 g/cm3; (11) The... irradiated fuel element chopping machines. Irradiated fuel element chopping machines means equipment as... or greater than the equivalent of 0.5 meters of concrete, with a density of 3.2 g/cm3 or...

  10. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 783 - Manufacturing Activities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... better than 5 parts per million boron equivalent and with a density greater than 1.50 g/cm3; (11) The... irradiated fuel element chopping machines. Irradiated fuel element chopping machines means equipment as... or greater than the equivalent of 0.5 meters of concrete, with a density of 3.2 g/cm3 or...

  11. Cleaning and Cleanliness Measurement of Additive Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Mark A.; Raley, Randy

    2016-01-01

    The successful acquisition and utilization of piece parts and assemblies for contamination sensitive applications requires application of cleanliness acceptance criteria. Contamination can be classified using many different schemes. One common scheme is classification as organic, ionic and particulate contaminants. These may be present in and on the surface of solid components and assemblies or may be dispersed in various gaseous or liquid media. This discussion will focus on insoluble particle contamination on the surfaces of piece parts and assemblies. Cleanliness of parts can be controlled using two strategies, referred to as gross cleanliness and precision cleanliness. Under a gross cleanliness strategy acceptance is based on visual cleanliness. This approach introduces a number of concerns that render it unsuitable for controlling cleanliness of high technology products. Under the precision cleanliness strategy, subjective, visual assessment of cleanliness is replaced by objective measurement of cleanliness. When a precision cleanliness strategy is adopted there naturally arises the question: How clean is clean enough? The methods for establishing objective cleanliness acceptance limits will be discussed.

  12. Development of Spray on Bag for manufacturing of large composites parts: Diffusivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempah, Maxime Joseph

    Bagging materials are utilized in many composites manufacturing processes. The selection is mainly driven by cost, temperature requirements, chemical compatibility and tear properties of the bag. The air barrier properties of the bag are assumed to be adequate or in many cases are not considered at all. However, the gas barrier property of a bag is the most critical parameter, as it can negatively affect the quality of the final laminate. The barrier property is a function of the bag material, uniformity, thickness and temperature. Improved barrier properties are needed for large parts, high pressure consolidated components and structures where air stays entrapped on the part surface. The air resistance property of the film is defined as permeability and is investigated in this thesis. A model was developed to evaluate the gas transport through the film and an experimental cell was implemented to characterize various commercial films. Understanding and characterizing the transport phenomena through the film allows optimization of the bagging material for various manufacturing processes. Spray-on-Bag is a scalable alternative bagging method compared to standard films. The approach allows in-situ fabrication of the bag on large and complex geometry structures where optimization of the bag properties can be varied on a local level. An experimental setup was developed and implemented using a six axis robot and an automated spraying system. Experiments were performed on a flat surface and specimens were characterized and compared to conventional films. Air barrier properties were within range of standard film approaches showing the potential to fabricate net shape bagging structures in an automated process.

  13. Upgrading the steam and cooling systems at a machine tool manufacturing complex

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, G.R.; Drye, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Cincinnati Milacron, Inc., one of the world`s largest machine tool manufacturers, decided to upgrade the steam and cooling systems that serve Milacron`s multibuilding 1.5 million square foot (139,350 m{sup 2}) headquarters complex in Cincinnati, Ohio. The upgrades were begun in 1993 and were operational by March 1995. Program objectives were to: (1) Provide mechanical cooling of manufacturing areas for better temperature control to gain closer tolerances on machined parts. This was to support a corporate objective to obtain ISO 9000 Certification which has been achieved. (2) Phase-out use of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants in existing electric chillers and packaged air-conditioning (DX) units. (3) Minimize waste oil and wood leaving the complex to reduce disposal costs and environmental liabilities. (4) Reduce operating and maintenance costs to enhance industrial competitiveness. With co-funding help from the local utility company, Cinergy Corporation, the authors assisted Milacron in analyzing the feasibility of various mechanical cooling concepts such as single vs. two-stage steam absorption vs. electric chillers. This analysis provided the data needed to select the concepts which best met the program objectives.

  14. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings B Appendix B to Part 191 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191—Sample Formats...

  15. 19 CFR Appendix to Part 102 - Textile and Apparel Manufacturer Identification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and Apparel Manufacturer Identification...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES OF ORIGIN Pt. 102, App. Appendix to Part 102—Textile and Apparel... § 102.23(a) of this part, all entries of textile or apparel products listed in § 102.21(b)(5)...

  16. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  17. Logic For Qualification And Industrialisation Of Additive Layer Manufacturing Parts For Spatial Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindeau, Aymeric; Lopes, Jean-Louis; Brivot, Frederic; Bourneaud, Florent; Desagulier, Christian

    2012-07-01

    ASTRIUM Space Transportation has been manufacturing composite equipments for satellite for 25 years. For this business, the development of Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) processes has been identified as a real opportunity to improve design and performances. For satellite equipments, ASTRIUM ST has chosen to investigate in the Electron Beam Melting process (patented EBM® process from Arcam AB company) for the manufacturing of Titanium parts, in collaboration with MECACHROME who has developed strong skills in this ALM process. This first development step has been achieved by introducing a titanium part realised by EBM on an equipment of Atlantic Bird 7 satellite launched in September 2011. The new step consists in the formal industrialisation of the EBM process for the procurement of titanium parts for satellite equipments. The present paper describes the logic retained for this industrialisation. It includes the technical requirements but also the verifications and inspections which have to be performed to guarantee that technical requirements are met.

  18. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing, Part II: Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Draper, Robert D.; Shin, Eugene; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Lao, Chao; Rhein, Morgan; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the second part of the three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce aircraft engine components by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using commercially available polyetherimides-Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 mixed with 10% chopped carbon fiber. A property comparison between FDM-printed and injection molded coupons for Ultem 9085, Ultem 1000 resin and the fiber-filled composite Ultem 1000 was carried out. Furthermore, an acoustic liner was printed from Ultem 9085 simulating conventional honeycomb structured liners and tested in a wind tunnel. Composite compressor inlet guide vanes were also printed using fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and tested in a cascade rig. The fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and composite vanes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and acid digestion to determine the porosity of FDM-printed articles which ranged from 25 to 31%. Coupons of Ultem 9085, experimental Ultem 1000 composites and XH6050 resin were tested at room temperature and 400F to evaluate their corresponding mechanical properties. A preliminary modeling was also initiated to predict the mechanical properties of FDM-printed Ultem 9085 coupons in relation to varied raster angles and void contents, using the GRC-developed MAC/GMC program.

  19. In Situ Manufacturing is a Necessary Part of Any Planetary Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunson, Jennifer E.; McLemore, Carole A.

    2012-01-01

    The key to any sustainable presence in space is the ability to manufacture necessary tools, parts, structures, spares, etc. in situ and on demand. Cost, volume, and up-mass constraints prohibit launching everything needed for long-duration or long-distance missions from Earth, including spare parts and replacement systems. There are many benefits to building items as-needed in situ using computer aided drafting (CAD) models and additive manufacturing technology: (1) Cost, up-mass, and volume savings for launch due to the ability to manufacture specific parts when needed. (2) CAD models can be generated on Earth and transmitted to the station or spacecraft, or they can be designed in situ for any task. Thus, multiple people in many locations can work on a single problem. (3) Items can be produced that will enhance the safety of crew and vehicles (e.g., latches or guards). (4) Items can be produced on-demand in a small amount of time (i.e., hours or days) compared to traditional manufacturing methods and, therefore, would not require the lengthy amount of time needed to machine the part from a solid block of material nor the wait time required if the part had to be launched from Earth. (5) Used and obsolete parts can be recycled into powder or wire feedstock for use in later manufacturing. (6) Ultimately, the ability to produce items as-needed will reduce mission risk, as one will have everything they need to fix a broken system or fashion a new part making it available on a more timely basis.

  20. Mechanical Properties of INCONEL 718 Parts Manufactured by Shaped Metal Deposition (SMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baufeld, Bernd

    2012-07-01

    INCONEL 718 parts have been manufactured by shaped metal deposition (SMD), an additive layer manufacturing technique applying wire-based tungsten inert gas welding. This technique is aimed toward mass customization of parts, omitting time- and scrap-intensive, subtractive fabrication routes. SMD results in dense, "near net-shaped" parts without pores, cracks, or fissures. The microstructure of the SMD parts exhibit large, columnar grains with a fine dendritic microstructure. The interdendritic boundaries are decorated by small Laves phase precipitates and by MC carbides. Tensile tests were performed with different strain rates (10-4, 10-3, and 2 × 10-3 1/s), but no dependency on strength or strain at failure was observed. The ultimate tensile strength was 828 ± 8 MPa, the true plastic strain at failure 28 ± 2%, the micro Vickers hardness 266 ± 21 HV200, and the dynamically measured Young's module was 154 ± 1 GPa.

  1. Improving Energy Efficiency in Pharmaceutical ManufacturingOperations -- Part I: Motors, Drives and Compressed Air Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chien; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet,Eric

    2006-04-01

    In Part I of this two-part series, we focus on efficient use of motors, drives and pumps, both for process equipment and compressed air systems. Pharmaceutical manufacturing plants in the U.S. spend nearly $1 billion each year for the fuel and electricity they need to keep their facilities running (Figure 1, below). That total that can increase dramatically when fuel supplies tighten and oil prices rise, as they did last year. Improving energy efficiency should be a strategic goal for any plant manager or manufacturing professional working in the drug industry today. Not only can energy efficiency reduce overall manufacturing costs, it usually reduces environmental emissions, establishing a strong foundation for a corporate greenhouse-gas-management program. For most pharmaceutical manufacturing plants, Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) is typically the largest consumer of energy, as shown in Table 1 below. This two-part series will examine energy use within pharmaceutical facilities, summarize best practices and examine potential savings and return on investment. In this first article, we will focus on efficient use of motors, drives and pumps, both for process equipment and compressed air systems. Part 2, to be published in May, will focus on overall HVAC systems, building management and boilers.

  2. Potential of direct metal deposition technology for manufacturing thick functionally graded coatings and parts for reactors components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Laget, B.; Smurov, I.

    2009-03-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D deposition process arising from laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection to refine or refurbish parts. Recently DMD has been extended to manufacture large-size near-net-shape components. When applied for manufacturing new parts (or their refinement), DMD can provide tailored thermal properties, high corrosion resistance, tailored tribology, multifunctional performance and cost savings due to smart material combinations. In repair (refurbishment) operations, DMD can be applied for parts with a wide variety of geometries and sizes. In contrast to the current tool repair techniques such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), metal inert gas (MIG) and plasma welding, laser cladding technology by DMD offers a well-controlled heat-treated zone due to the high energy density of the laser beam. In addition, this technology may be used for preventative maintenance and design changes/up-grading. One of the advantages of DMD is the possibility to build functionally graded coatings (from 1 mm thickness and higher) and 3D multi-material objects (for example, 100 mm-sized monolithic rectangular) in a single-step manufacturing cycle by using up to 4-channel powder feeder. Approved materials are: Fe (including stainless steel), Ni and Co alloys, (Cu,Ni 10%), WC compounds, TiC compounds. The developed coatings/parts are characterized by low porosity (<1%), fine microstructure, and their microhardness is close to the benchmark value of wrought alloys after thermal treatment (Co-based alloy Stellite, Inox 316L, stainless steel 17-4PH). The intended applications concern cooling elements with complex geometry, friction joints under high temperature and load, light-weight mechanical support structures, hermetic joints, tubes with complex geometry, and tailored inside and outside surface properties, etc.

  3. Human factoring the procedures element in a complex manufacturing system

    SciTech Connect

    Caccamise, D.J.; Mecherikoff, M.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of Human Factors evaluations of procedures associated with incidents at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) it was determined that the existing procedure format created significant opportunities for confusion in their attempt to convey information about a work process. For instance, there was no mechanism to clearly identify the participants and their roles during the instructions portion of the procedure. In addition, procedure authors frequently used complex logic to convey a series of contingent actions within steps. It was also difficult to discern the actual procedure steps from other types of information in the procedure. These and other inadequacies prompted the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) department to propose solutions to these problems that followed well-researched principles of cognitive psychology, dealing with how humans process information. Format and style contribute to procedure usability, and therefore to safety and efficiency in operations governed by the procedures. Since it was difficult to tie specific performance failures to specific format and style characteristics and thereby dearly define costs and benefits, it was difficult on that basis to sell the idea that changes in procedure format and style were really necessary to improve safety and efficiency. In addition, we found that the socio-political systems governing this process, particularly at the subprocess interface level, were not functioning efficiently. Both the technological aspects of the process and the socio-political aspects were contributing to waste and considerable re-work. Fixing the customer feedback loop to the process owners not only minimized re-work and waste, but also provided the data to persuade subprocess owners to make the necessary changes that heretofore were being met with great resistance.

  4. Manufacturing near dense metal parts via indirect selective laser sintering combined with isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. H.; Shi, Y. S.; Lu, Z. L.; Huang, S. H.

    2007-11-01

    To fabricate metal parts via indirect selective laser sintering (SLS), isostatic pressing technology, including hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and cold isostatic pressing (CIP), are exploited to reform SLS green parts and make them near dense. The processes of SLS/HIP and SLS/CIP/HIP technologies are investigated respectively and the densification of AISI304 stainless steel specimens is mainly discussed. It is indicated that green parts made by indirect SLS can be pressed into near dense parts with the relative densities of 67.3% and more than 80% in SLS/HIP and SLS/CIP/HIP routes, respectively, and their densities rise if much higher CIP pressure is employed. Compared with SLS/HIP, SLS/CIP/HIP technology is regarded as a better method to manufactured dense parts, and it enlarges the application domain of indirect SLS simultaneously.

  5. New policy to manage tools in flexible manufacturing systems using network part programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Andrea; Tolio, Tullio; Grieco, Antonio; Nucci, Francesco

    2000-10-01

    The high investment related to the acquisition of Flexible Manufacturing Systems forces firms to a better utilization of the machines. Different actions can be taken in order to avoid idle times of the machines: reduction of the unproductive times (time dedicated to rapid movements, tool exchange, pallet exchange, etc.), improvement of machines and, not last, a better management of the resources. The paper proposes a new policy for the management of tool operations in parallel machine FMS to minimize the idle times due to the lack of tools. The proposed policy uses new opportunities in manufacturing technology related with the use of network part programs in NC machines. It is already known in literature the potentiality of network part programs, more flexible than traditional sequential part programs that execute simply the rigid list of operations. Network part programs allow the different alternative ways to process each part. The way in which network part programs are executed by machines depends on the state of the tools and availability of the tools. The proposed method has been compared with other existing ones based on a real test case, a parallel machine FMS with two machines and a tool carrier.

  6. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  7. Are Agile and Lean Manufacturing Systems Employing Sustainability, Complexity and Organizational Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flumerfelt, Shannon; Siriban-Manalang, Anna Bella; Kahlen, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to peruse theories and practices of agile and lean manufacturing systems to determine whether they employ sustainability, complexity and organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The critical review of the comparative operational similarities and difference of the two systems was conducted while the new views…

  8. A Complex Shaped Reinforced Thermoplastic Composite Part Made of Commingled Yarns With Integrated Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risicato, Jean-Vincent; Kelly, Fern; Soulat, Damien; Legrand, Xavier; Trümper, Wolfgang; Cochrane, Cedric; Koncar, Vladan

    2015-02-01

    This paper focuses on the design and one shot manufacturing process of complex shaped composite parts based on the overbraiding of commingled yarns. The commingled yarns contain thermoplastic fibres used as the matrix and glass fibres as the reinforcement material. This technology reduces the flow path length for the melted thermoplastic and aims to improve the impregnation of materials with high viscosity. The tensile strength behaviour of the material was firstly investigated in order to evaluate the influence of the manufacturing parameters on flat structured braids that have been consolidated on a heating press. A good compatibility between the required geometry and the braiding process was observed. Additionally, piezo-resistive sensor yarns, based on glass yarns coated with PEDOT: PSS, have been successfully integrated within the composite structure. The sensor yarns have been inserted into the braided fabric, before consolidation. The inserted sensors provide the ability to monitor the structural health of the composite part in a real time. The design and manufacture of the complete complex shaped part has then been successfully achieved.

  9. Explicit correlation model of multi-source constraints for Re-design parts with complex curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhenyuan; Wang, Fuji; Wang, Yongqing; Guo, Dongming

    2014-03-01

    In precision machining of complex curved surface parts with high performance, geometry accuracy is not the only constraint, but the performance should also be met. Performance of this kind of parts is closely related to the geometrical and physical parameters, so the final actual size and shape are affected by multiple source constraints, such as geometry, physics, and performance. These parts are rather difficult to be manufactured and new manufacturing method according to performance requirement is urgently needed. Based on performance and manufacturing requirements for complex curved surface parts, a new classification method is proposed, which divided the complex curved surface parts into two categories: surface re-design complex curved surface parts with multi-source constraints(PRCS) and surface unique complex curved surface parts with pure geometric constraints(PUCS). A correlation model is constructed between the performance and multi-source constraints for PRCS, which reveals the correlation between the performance and multi-source constraints. A re-design method is also developed. Through solving the correlation model of the typical part's performance-associated surface, the mapping relation between the performance-associated surface and the related removal amount is obtained. The explicit correlation model and the method for the corresponding related removal amount of the performance-associated surface are built based on the classification of surface re-design complex curved surface parts with multi-source constraints. Research results have been used in the actual processing of the typical parts such as radome, common bottom components, nozzle, et al., which shows improved efficiency and accuracy of the precision machining for the surface re-design parts with complex curved surface.

  10. Fuzzy Set Theory Applied to Measurement Data for Exposure Control in Beryllium Part Manufacturing.

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, W. J. ,; Abeln, S. P.; Creek, K. L.; Mortensen, F. N.; Wantuck, P. J.; Ross, Timothy J.; Jamshidi, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory has been applied to some exposure control problems encountered in the machining and the manufacturing of beryllium parts at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A portion of that work is presented here. The major driving force for using fuzzy techniques in this case rather than classical statistical process control is that beryllium exposure is very task dependent and this manufacturing plant is quite atypical. It is feared that standard techniques produce too many false alarms. Our beryllium plant produces parts on a daily basis, but every day is different. Some days many parts are produced and some days only a few. Some times the parts are large and sometimes the parts are small. Some machining cuts are rough and some are fine. These factors and others make it hard to define a typical day. The problem of concern, for this study, is the worker beryllium exposure. Even though the plant is new and very modern and the exposure levels are expected to be well below the required levels, the Department of Energy (DOE), who is our major customer, has demanded that the levels for this plant be well below required levels. The control charts used to monitor this process are expected to answer two questions: (1) Is the process out of Control? Do we need to instigate special controls such as requiring workers to use respirators? (2) Are new, previously untested, controls making a difference? The standard Schewart type control charts, based on consistent plant operating conditions do not adequately answer this question. The approach described here is based upon a fuzzy modification to the Schewart Xbar-R chart. This approach is expected to yield better results than work based upon the classical probabilistic control chart.

  11. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part II.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    This second of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts their roles at different stages of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators appear in SMC Protein Complexes Part I (available at http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674%2815%2901690-6.pdf). To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26871638

  12. Monitoring deep twist drilling for a rapid manufacturing of light high-strength parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López de Lacalle, L. N.; Fernández, A.; Olvera, D.; Lamikiz, A.; Olvera, D.; Rodríguez, C.; Elias, A.

    2011-10-01

    In this work the manufacturing of high strength and/or high functional components is presented, using a new technique based on considerably long twist drills, called Deep Twist Drilling (DTD). This technology opens a rapid and economical method to manufacture parts for structural applications. Components made with this technique can reach high mass reduction and better stress distribution in comparison with welding or bolted parts with the same weight. However the application of DTD must be optimized to improve the reliability of the process and to make it economically feasible. In order to reach it, previous optimization by process monitoring was performed in AISI 1045, stainless steels, Ti6Al4V and nodular cat iron GGG70(AISI A536, SAE-ASTM 100-70-03). These materials are commonly used for structural applications in several sectors. Monitoring opened the way to improve cutting conditions and allow the application of the DTD technique focusing on a new design concept. In the same way monitoring makes drilling process reliable enough to be systematically used in industrial applications by a controlled increase of the performance demanded from the tool. In this manner, not only the objective to produce high-strength and light pieces is achieved, but also a high repetitive process is reached. In this research work a case of study is presented. A monolithic satellite-type component, its mass were reduced from 25 to 4.5 kg. The structural behavior of the component was studied under FEM analysis and the results showed high strength to compression and shear forces. During the machining of this element there was a serious risk of drill breakage due to the depth of the holes and crossing points between them; however, the previous process optimization eliminated this drawback. As a matter of fact, this paper brings out a good example where manufacturing technology allows a better performance of mechanical components within the philosophy of "new processes drive to new

  13. Scanning laser ultrasound and wavenumber spectroscopy for in-process inspection of additively manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new in-process laser ultrasound inspection technique for additive manufacturing. Ultrasonic energy was introduced to the part by attaching an ultrasonic transducer to the printer build-plate and driving it with a single-tone, harmonic excitation. The full-field response of the part was measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer after each printer layer. For each scan, we analyzed both the local amplitudes and wavenumbers of the response in order to identify defects. For this study, we focused on the detection of delamination between layers in a fused deposition modeling process. Foreign object damage, localized heating damage, and the resulting delamination between layers were detected in using the technique as indicated by increased amplitude and wavenumber responses within the damaged area.

  14. Process combinations for the manufacturing of metal-plastic hybrid parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drossel, W.-G.; Lies, C.; Albert, A.; Haase, R.; Müller, R.; Scholz, P.

    2016-03-01

    The usage of innovative lightweight materials and processing technologies gains importance in manifold industrial scopes. Especially for moving parts and mobility products the weight is decisively. The aerospace and automotive industries use light and high-strength materials to reduce weight and energy consumption and thereby improve the performance of their products. Composites with reinforced plastics are of particular importance. They offer a low density in combination with high specific stiffness and strength. A pure material substitution through reinforced plastics is still not economical. The approach of using hybrid metal-plastic structures with the principle of “using the right material at the right place” is a promising solution for the economical realization of lightweight structures with a high achievement potential. The article shows four innovative manufacturing possibilities for the realization of metal-plastic-hybrid parts.

  15. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part I.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-01-14

    This first of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts the composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators. Their roles at different stages of the cell cycle will appear in Part II. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26771499

  16. Net shape manufacturing of ceramic micro parts with tailored graded layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanin, H.; Jiang, K.

    2014-01-01

    Presented in this paper is a novel net shape manufacturing technology for making three-dimensional micro parts with functionally graded layers. Alumina/zirconia micro parts with either core-shell or top-bottom functionally graded material (FGM) profiles have been successfully fabricated by altering both the surface characteristics of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro moulds and ceramic suspensions composition. PDMS surface modifications were performed to achieve moulds with hydrophilic surfaces, which were used to form core/shell FGM green layers. On the other hand, moulds with hydrophobic surfaces were used to form top-bottom green layers. Cracks have been found between consecutive layers in both the green and sintered micro parts. It was found that, at dispersant concentration of about 9.0 mg g-1, the differences in the drying shrinkage between layers is less than 0.5%. In addition, layers of composition of 100% Al2O3-0% YSZ, 20% Al2O3-80% YSZ and 40% Al2O3-60% YSZ were found to produce less shrinkage difference during sintering. After optimization of both green and sintering layers, crack free core/shell and top-bottom alumina/zirconia FGM micro parts were successfully obtained. The proposed process enables the production of micro patterns tailored with functionally graded microstructures to locally enhance properties and performance.

  17. Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, M.; Harris, J.J.; Handmaker, A.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide. The WMAC team at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures iron castings and fabricated sheet metal parts. Foundry operations include mixing and mold formation, core making, metal pouring, shakeout, finishing, and painting. Cutting, shaping, and welding are the principal metal fabrication operations. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations indicated that paint-related wastes are generated in large quantities, and that significant waste reduction and cost savings could be realized by installing a dry powder coating system or by replacing conventional air spray paint guns with high-volume low-pressure spray guns. This research brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  18. Practical aspects of modern interferometry for optical manufacturing quality control, Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, Robert A.

    2012-09-01

    Modern phase shifting interferometers enable the manufacture of optical systems that drive the global economy. Semiconductor chips, solid-state cameras, cell phone cameras, infrared imaging systems, space-based satellite imaging, and DVD and Blu-Ray disks are all enabled by phase-shifting interferometers. Theoretical treatments of data analysis and instrument design advance the technology but often are not helpful toward the practical use of interferometers. An understanding of the parameters that drive the system performance is critical to produce useful results. Any interferometer will produce a data map and results; this paper, in three parts, reviews some of the key issues to minimize error sources in that data and provide a valid measurement.

  19. Practical aspects of modern interferometry for optical manufacturing quality control: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Modern phase shifting interferometers enable the manufacture of optical systems that drive the global economy. Semiconductor chips, solid-state cameras, cell phone cameras, infrared imaging systems, space based satellite imaging and DVD and Blu-Ray disks are all enabled by phase shifting interferometers. Theoretical treatments of data analysis and instrument design advance the technology but often are not helpful towards the practical use of interferometers. An understanding of the parameters that drive system performance is critical to produce useful results. Any interferometer will produce a data map and results; this paper, in three parts, reviews some of the key issues to minimize error sources in that data and provide a valid measurement.

  20. 10 CFR 2.501 - Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear... part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. 2.501 Section 2.501 Energy NUCLEAR... Procedures Applicable to Proceedings for the Issuance of Licenses To Manufacture Nuclear Power Reactors To...

  1. 10 CFR 2.501 - Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. (a) In the... part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. 2.501 Section 2.501 Energy NUCLEAR... for the Issuance of Licenses To Manufacture Nuclear Power Reactors To Be Operated at Sites...

  2. 10 CFR 2.501 - Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear... part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. 2.501 Section 2.501 Energy NUCLEAR... Procedures Applicable to Proceedings for the Issuance of Licenses To Manufacture Nuclear Power Reactors To...

  3. 10 CFR 2.501 - Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. (a) In the... part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. 2.501 Section 2.501 Energy NUCLEAR... for the Issuance of Licenses To Manufacture Nuclear Power Reactors To Be Operated at Sites...

  4. Remediation of manufactured gas plant soils contaminated with free and complex cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Maka, A.; Aronstein, B.N.; Srivastava, V.J.; Theis, T.L.; Young, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Cyanide is one of the main contaminants present in soil from manufactured gas plants (MGP) . Several treatment methods including thermal treatment, chemical treatment, ultraviolet irradiation, and biological treatment were evaluated for their ability to degrade the cyanide present in these soils. In the thermal treatment, raising the temperature of the purified waste to 2000--3000C resulted in complete removal of complex cyanide from the soil; however, the cyanide emitted was in a the toxic gaseous HCN form. Chemical treatment, using the oxidant Fenton`s reagent in a 10% soil slurry, resulted in the destruction of 80% of the free cyanide but little, if any, complex cyanide. Ultraviolet irradiation of the basic leachate from MGP wastes in the presence of the chelating agent EDTA yielded 90% degradation of the complex cyanide. For biological treatment, using an aerobic mixed culture, almost 60% of the free cyanide disappeared from the system with minimal degradation of the complex cyanide. Each treatment has its limitations. Thus, a combined physical-chemical-biological treatment in which the complex cyanide is degraded to free cyanide by photodegradation under alkaline conditions, the free cyanide then chemically (by Fenton`s reagent) or biologically converted to NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, is proposed for the removal of cyanide from MGP sites.

  5. Next-generation biomedical implants using additive manufacturing of complex, cellular and functional mesh arrays.

    PubMed

    Murr, L E; Gaytan, S M; Medina, F; Lopez, H; Martinez, E; Machado, B I; Hernandez, D H; Martinez, L; Lopez, M I; Wicker, R B; Bracke, J

    2010-04-28

    In this paper, we examine prospects for the manufacture of patient-specific biomedical implants replacing hard tissues (bone), particularly knee and hip stems and large bone (femoral) intramedullary rods, using additive manufacturing (AM) by electron beam melting (EBM). Of particular interest is the fabrication of complex functional (biocompatible) mesh arrays. Mesh elements or unit cells can be divided into different regions in order to use different cell designs in different areas of the component to produce various or continually varying (functionally graded) mesh densities. Numerous design elements have been used to fabricate prototypes by AM using EBM of Ti-6Al-4V powders, where the densities have been compared with the elastic (Young) moduli determined by resonant frequency and damping analysis. Density optimization at the bone-implant interface can allow for bone ingrowth and cementless implant components. Computerized tomography (CT) scans of metal (aluminium alloy) foam have also allowed for the building of Ti-6Al-4V foams by embedding the digital-layered scans in computer-aided design or software models for EBM. Variations in mesh complexity and especially strut (or truss) dimensions alter the cooling and solidification rate, which alters the alpha-phase (hexagonal close-packed) microstructure by creating mixtures of alpha/alpha' (martensite) observed by optical and electron metallography. Microindentation hardness measurements are characteristic of these microstructures and microstructure mixtures (alpha/alpha') and sizes. PMID:20308113

  6. Waste-minimization assessment for a manufacturer producing galvanized-steel parts. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, F.W.; Maginn, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant producing galvanized steel parts - approximately 10,000 tons/yr. The major process operations are degreasing and rinsing, acid pickling and rinsing, prefluxing, and galvanizing. All these operations, except galvanizing, result in the formation of waste streams requiring off-site disposal. Bottom dross from the galvanizing kettle and zinc oxide skimmed from the surface of the molten zinc are sold as usable products. The team's report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that most waste was generated in acid pickling and rinsing and that the greatest savings could be obtained by continuous air agitation to extend the life of the pickling acid and rinse by enabling more complete removal of dissolved iron when those solutions are treated.

  7. Part A - Advanced turbine systems. Part B - Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karnitz, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy have initiated a program to develop advanced turbine systems for power generation. The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial applications. One of the supporting elements of the ATS Program is the Materials/Manufacturing Technologies Task. The objective of this element is to address the critical materials and manufacturing issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF METAL PARTS COATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION FOR A MANUFACTURER OF ALUMINUM AND STEEL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  10. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF ALUMINUM AND STEEL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-sized manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers, Waste Minimization Assessment Ce...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION FOR A MANUFACTURER OF FINISHED METAL AND PLASTIC PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  12. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF FINISHED METAL AND PLASTIC PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers, Waste Minimization Assessment Ce...

  13. Greening up Auto Part Manufacturing: A Collaboration between Academia and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneas, Kristi A.; Armstrong, Drew L.; Brank, Alice R.; Johnson, Amanda L.; Kissinger, Chelsea A.; Mabe, Adam R.; Sezer, Ozge; Fontinell, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Historically, manufacture of automotive electronic components and screen-printing of automotive instrument clusters at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee, Inc. required washing of equipment such as screens, stencils, and jigs with sizable quantities of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Collaborative efforts between the Maryville…

  14. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF PARTS FOR TRUCK ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION FOR A MANUFACTURER OF PARTS FOR TRUCK ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  16. Vertical movement of iron-cyanide complexes in soils of a former Manufactured Gas Plant site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Germany, soil and groundwater at more than a thousand sites are contaminated with iron-cyanide complexes. These contaminations originate from the gas purification process that was conducted in Manufactured Gas Plants (MGP). The phenomenon of iron-cyanide complexes mobility in soil, according to the literature, is mainly governed by the dissolution and precipitation of ferric ferrocyanide, which is only slightly soluble (< 1 mg L-1) under acidic conditions. This study suggests vertical transport of a colloidal ferric ferrocyanide, in the excess of iron and circum-neutral pH conditions, as an alternative process that influences the retardation of the pollutant movement through the soil profile. Preliminary in situ investigations of the two boreholes implied transport of ferric ferricyanide from the initial deposition in the wastes layer towards the sandy loam material (secondary accumulation), which possibly retarded the mobility of cyanide (CN). The acidic character of the wastes and the accumulation of the blue patches suggested the potential filter function of a sandy loam material due to colloidal transport of the ferric ferricyanide. Series of batch and column experiments, using sandy loam soil, revealed reduction of CN concentration due to mechanical filtration of precipitated solid iron-cyanide complexes and due to the formation of potassium manganese iron-cyanide (K2Mn[Fe(CN)6]).

  17. Annual book of ASTM standards. Part 17. Refractories, glass, and other ceramic materials; manufactured carbon and graphite products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The standards are assembled in each part in alphanumeric sequence of their ASTM designation numbers. Each part has two tables of contents: a list of the standards in alphanumeric sequence of their ASTM designations; and a list of the standards classified according to subject. A subject index of the standards and tentatives in each part appears at the back of each volume. This part contains standards concerning refractories; glass and glass products; ceramic whitewares; porcelain enamel and related ceramic-metal systems; ceramics for electronics; manufactured carbon and graphite products; and general methods of testing.

  18. An Assessment of Nondestructive Evaluation Capability for Complex Additive Manufacturing Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Beshears, Ron; Lambert, Dennis; Tilson, William

    2016-01-01

    The primary focus of this work is to investigate some of the fundamental relationships between processing, mechanical testing, materials characterization, and NDE for additively manufactured (AM) components using the powder bed fusion direct melt laser sintered process. The goal is to understand the criticality of defects unique to the AM process and then how conventional nondestructive evaluation methods as well as some of the more non-traditional methods such as computed tomography, are effected by the AM material. Specific defects including cracking, porosity and partially/unfused powder will be addressed. Besides line-of-site NDE, as appropriate these inspection capabilities will be put into the context of complex AM geometries where hidden features obscure, or inhibit traditional NDE methods.

  19. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Scholand, Michael; Dillon, Heather E.

    2012-05-01

    Part 2 of the project (this report) uses the conclusions from Part 1 as a point of departure to focus on two objectives: producing a more detailed and conservative assessment of the manufacturing process and providing a comparative LCA with other lighting products based on the improved manufacturing analysis and taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. In this study, we first analyzed the manufacturing process for a white-light LED (based on a sapphire-substrate, blue-light, gallium-nitride LED pumping a yellow phosphor), to understand the impacts of the manufacturing process. We then conducted a comparative LCA, looking at the impacts associated with the Philips Master LEDbulb and comparing those to a CFL and an incandescent lamp. The comparison took into account the Philips Master LEDbulb as it is now in 2012 and then projected forward what it might be in 2017, accounting for some of the anticipated improvements in LED manufacturing, performance and driver electronics.

  20. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was held in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  1. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was held in Hampton, Va., on October 16-18, 1990. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant on-going results of the NASA/FAA joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 180 - Eddy Current Examination With Visual Inspection for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for DOT 3AL Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 C Appendix C to Part 180 Transportation... Cylinders Manufactured of Aluminum Alloy 6351-T6 1. Examination Procedure. Each facility performing eddy... ring and probe for each DOT-3AL cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy 6351-T6 to be inspected must...

  7. Complexation of buffer constituents with neutral complexation agents: part I. Impact on common buffer properties.

    PubMed

    Riesová, Martina; Svobodová, Jana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Beneš, Martin; Tesařová, Eva; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2013-09-17

    The complexation of buffer constituents with the complexation agent present in the solution can very significantly influence the buffer properties, such as pH, ionic strength, or conductivity. These parameters are often crucial for selection of the separation conditions in capillary electrophoresis or high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and can significantly affect results of separation, particularly for capillary electrophoresis as shown in Part II of this paper series (Beneš, M.; Riesová, M.; Svobodová, J.; Tesařová, E.; Dubský, P.; Gaš, B. Anal. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ac401381d). In this paper, the impact of complexation of buffer constituents with a neutral complexation agent is demonstrated theoretically as well as experimentally for the model buffer system composed of benzoic acid/LiOH or common buffers (e.g., CHES/LiOH, TAPS/LiOH, Tricine/LiOH, MOPS/LiOH, MES/LiOH, and acetic acid/LiOH). Cyclodextrins as common chiral selectors were used as model complexation agents. We were not only able to demonstrate substantial changes of pH but also to predict the general complexation characteristics of selected compounds. Because of the zwitterion character of the common buffer constituents, their charged forms complex stronger with cyclodextrins than the neutral ones do. This was fully proven by NMR measurements. Additionally complexation constants of both forms of selected compounds were determined by NMR and affinity capillary electrophoresis with a very good agreement of obtained values. These data were advantageously used for the theoretical descriptions of variations in pH, depending on the composition and concentration of the buffer. Theoretical predictions were shown to be a useful tool for deriving some general rules and laws for complexing systems. PMID:23889602

  8. Complex foamed aluminum parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings

    SciTech Connect

    Simancik, F.; Schoerghuber, F.

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of complex shaped aluminum foam parts as permanent cores in aluminum castings has been investigated. The foamed samples were prepared by injection of the foam into sand molds. It turned out that sound castings can be produced if the foam core is properly preheated and/or surface treated before casting. The effect of the foam core on the performance of the casting was evaluated by in compression testing and by measuring structural damping. The gain in the related properties turned out to be much higher than the weight increase of the casting due to the presence of the core. The weight increase may be partially offset through a reduction of the wall-thickness of the shell.

  9. Modern Endodontic Planning Part 1: Assessing Complexity and Predicting Success.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Sarra; Taylor, Carly; Roudsari, Reza Vahid; Darcey, James; Qualtrough, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Following a diagnosis of irreversible pulpal disease, periapical disease or failed endodontic therapy, the options for the tooth are extraction or root canal treatment. There is increasing evidence that certain factors may allow the clinician to predict the likely outcome of root canal therapy (RCT) and thus better inform the patient of the possible success rates. Should the patient choose root canal treatment, the clinician must also be able to gauge the potential difficulties that may be encountered and consequently determine whether it is within their competency. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Assessing outcomes and complexity of care is an essential part of informed consent. Knowing when to refer is an essential component of best clinical practice. PMID:26630858

  10. 1. TEST AREA 1115, SOUTH PART OF SUPPORT COMPLEX, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TEST AREA 1-115, SOUTH PART OF SUPPORT COMPLEX, LOOKING TO EAST FROM ABOVE BUILDING 8655, THE FUEL STORAGE TANK FARM, IN FOREGROUND SHADOW. AT THE RIGHT IS BUILDING 8660, ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION; TO ITS LEFT IS BUILDING 8663, THE HELIUM COMPRESSION PLANT. THE LIGHT TONED STRUCTURE IN THE MIDDLE DISTANCE, CENTER, IS THE MACHINE SHOP FOR TEST STAND 1-3. IN THE FAR DISTANCE IS TEST STAND 1-A, WITH THE WHITE SPHERICAL TANKS, AND TEST STAND 2-A TO ITS RIGHT. ALONG THE HORIZON FROM FAR LEFT ARE TEST STAND 1-D, TEST STAND 1-C, WATER TANKS ABOVE TEST AREA 1-125, AND TEST STAND 1-B IN TEST AREA 1-120. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  12. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts.

    PubMed

    Stavroulakis, P I; Leach, R K

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement. PMID:27131645

  13. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulakis, P. I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement.

  14. Manufacturing of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) that can actuate into complex curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoimenov, Boyko L.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2007-04-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMC) are soft actuators with potential applications in the fields of medicine and biologically inspired robotics. Typically, an IPMC bends with approximately constant curvature when voltage is applied to it. More complex shapes were achieved in the past by pre-shaping the actuator or by segmentation and separate actuation of each segment. There are many applications for which fully independent control of each segment of the IPMC is not required and the use of external wiring is objectionable. In this paper we propose two key elements needed to create an IPMC, which can actuate into a complex curve. The first is a connection between adjacent segments, which enables opposite curvature. This can be achieved by reversing the polarity applied on each side of the IPMC, for example by a through-hole connection. The second key element is a variable curvature segment. The segment is designed to bend with any fraction of its full bending ability under given electrical input by changing the overlap of opposite charge electrodes. We demonstrated the usefulness of these key elements in two devices. One is a bi-stable buckled IPMC beam, also used as a building block in a linear actuator device. The other one is an IPMC, actuating into an S-shaped curve with gradually increasing curvature near the ends. The proposed method of manufacturing holds promise for a wide range of new applications of IPMCs, including applications in which IPMCs are used for sensing.

  15. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spady, Amos A., Jr. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on October 18 to 20, 1988. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Herbrt Schlickenmaier of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant, ongoing results gained during the second year of the joint NASA/FAA Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements.

  16. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems. Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference was hosted jointly by NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 14-16, 1992. The meeting was co-chaired by Dr. Roland Bowles of LaRC and Bob Passman of the FAA. The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA Joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document has been compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  17. Cutting orientations for non-complex parts in 4th axis machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Zahid, M. N.; Case, K.; Watts, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    The application of Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machining for Rapid Manufacturing processes (CNC-RM) exploits the innate potential of 4th axis machining. The use of an indexer allows the workpiece to be rotated to various orientations which directly increased the region accessible to the cutting tool. However, in order to avoid thin webs and preserve tool life, cutting must be executed with a minimum of three orientations even for geometrically simple parts. Recent findings have suggested the separation of cutting orientations into roughing and finishing operations. Thus, the selection of orientations in finishing processes becomes more flexible and independent. This study was conducted to identify the effects of using a minimum of two cutting orientations in finishing operations for CNC-RM applications. This method is only applicable for non-complex parts where all the features can be machined from two directions. The results of the study illustrate the positive effects of minimizing the number of orientations. Despite improvement in machining operations, the complexity in defining the cutting orientations was also reduced.

  18. Integrated Design for Manufacturing of Braided Preforms for Advanced Composites Part I: 2D Braiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan Tao; Ko, Frank K.; Hu, Hong

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a 2D braiding design system for advanced textile structural composites was based on dynamic models. A software package to assist in the design of braided preform manufacturing has been developed. The package allows design parameters (machine speeds, fiber volume fraction, tightness factor, etc.) to be easily obtained and the relationships between said parameters to be demonstrated graphically. The fabirc geometry model (FGM) method was adopted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the composites. Experimental evidence demonstrates the success of the use of dynamic models in the design software for the manufacture of braided fabric preforms.

  19. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Fourth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Passman, Robert H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to transfer significant ongoing results of the NASA/FAA joint Airborne Wind Shear Program to the technical industry and to pose problems of current concern to the combined group. It also provided a forum for manufacturers to review forward-look technology concepts and for technologists to gain an understanding of the problems encountered by the manufacturers during the development of airborne equipment and the FAA certification requirements. The present document was compiled to record the essence of the technology updates and discussions which follow each.

  20. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF SHEET METAL CABINETS AND PRECISION METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do so. aste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at ...

  1. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF IRON CASTINGS AND FABRICATED SHEET METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected u...

  2. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF ETHANOL MANUFACTURING FACILITIES. PART II: PROCESS ENGINEERING CONSIDERATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol manufacturing facilities represent an important segment of our agricultural production system. The ethanol industry is currently experiencing a rapid expansion throughout the country, and is poised to substantially contribute to our country’s growing need for energy, especially as non-renew...

  3. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 191 - General Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives (T.D. 84-49) X. General... drawback ruling; 7. Only for General Manufacturing Drawback Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives, the name of each article to be exported or, if the identity of the product is...

  4. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 191 - General Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives (T.D. 84-49) X. General... drawback ruling; 7. Only for General Manufacturing Drawback Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives, the name of each article to be exported or, if the identity of the product is...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chemical preparations, not elsewhere classified. 29 1 Petroleum refining and related industries. 291 1... devices. 279 1 Service industries for the printing trade. 2796 1 Platemaking and related services. 28 1... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage...

  6. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 191 - General Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives (T.D. 84-49) X. General... drawback ruling; 7. Only for General Manufacturing Drawback Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives, the name of each article to be exported or, if the identity of the product is...

  7. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... published in the Customs Bulletin, as provided in 19 CFR 191.8. In these application formats, remarks in... obligations to obtain the appropriate certificates of delivery (19 CFR 191.10), certificates of manufacture and delivery (19 CFR 191.24), or both?) 2. Will an agent be used to process the designated or...

  8. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chemical preparations, not elsewhere classified. 29 1 Petroleum refining and related industries. 291 1... devices. 279 1 Service industries for the printing trade. 2796 1 Platemaking and related services. 28 1... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage...

  9. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 191 - General Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives (T.D. 84-49) X. General... drawback ruling; 7. Only for General Manufacturing Drawback Ruling Under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) for Petroleum or Petroleum Derivatives, the name of each article to be exported or, if the identity of the product is...

  10. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... published in the Customs Bulletin, as provided in 19 CFR 191.8. In these application formats, remarks in... obligations to obtain the appropriate certificates of delivery (19 CFR 191.10), certificates of manufacture and delivery (19 CFR 191.24), or both?) 2. Will an agent be used to process the designated or...

  11. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chemical preparations, not elsewhere classified. 29 1 Petroleum refining and related industries. 291 1... devices. 279 1 Service industries for the printing trade. 2796 1 Platemaking and related services. 28 1... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage...

  12. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemical preparations, not elsewhere classified. 29 1 Petroleum refining and related industries. 291 1... devices. 279 1 Service industries for the printing trade. 2796 1 Platemaking and related services. 28 1... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage...

  13. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... published in the Customs Bulletin, as provided in 19 CFR 191.8. In these application formats, remarks in... obligations to obtain the appropriate certificates of delivery (19 CFR 191.10), certificates of manufacture and delivery (19 CFR 191.24), or both?) 2. Will an agent be used to process the designated or...

  14. 19 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Sample Formats for Applications for Specific Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... published in the Customs Bulletin, as provided in 19 CFR 191.8. In these application formats, remarks in... obligations to obtain the appropriate certificates of delivery (19 CFR 191.10), certificates of manufacture and delivery (19 CFR 191.24), or both?) 2. Will an agent be used to process the designated or...

  15. 10 CFR 2.501 - Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture nuclear power reactors. 2.501 Section 2.501 Energy NUCLEAR... Notice of hearing on application under subpart F of 10 CFR part 52 for a license to manufacture...

  16. The Effectiveness of Hot Isostatic Pressing for Closing Porosity in Titanium Parts Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammas-Williams, Samuel; Withers, Philip J.; Todd, Iain; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2016-05-01

    Ti-6Al-4V parts, produced by selective electron beam melting additive manufacturing, have been studied by X-ray computed tomography (XCT) to track pore closure during a standard hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) cycle. Comparison of repeated XCT scans before and after HIPing, on worst-case samples with different geometries, confirmed that all internal porosity was shrunk to below the resolution limit of the equipment used (~5 µm) following the HIPing cycle, apart from defects with surface connected ligaments.

  17. Waste-minimization audit report: case studies of corrosive and heavy-metal waste minimization at a specialty steel-manufacturing complex

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expanding its efforts to promote waste-minimization activity in the private sector by providing technical assistance to generators of hazardous waste. As part of the effort, the EPA Office of Research and Development/Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory (ORD/HWERL), Cincinnati, Ohio, is promoting the development of a generalized or model waste-minimization audit (WMA) procedure and testing this procedure in actual production facilities agreeing to cooperate with the audit teams selected for this task. In the report, results are presented of WMAs conducted at generators of corrosive heavy metals wastes. A specialty steel manufacturing complex employing electric arc furnaces (EAFs) for the manufacture of stainless and electrical steels, hot and cold rolling facilities for fabrication of the various steel grades into strip, and annealing and pickling facilities for finishing the strip, agreed to provide host facilities for the WMA effort reported herein.

  18. Design and development of a layer-based additive manufacturing process for the realization of metal parts of designed mesostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher Bryant

    Low-density cellular materials, metallic bodies with gaseous voids, are a unique class of materials that are characterized by their high strength, low mass, good energy absorption characteristics, and good thermal and acoustic insulation properties. In an effort to take advantage of this entire suite of positive mechanical traits, designers are tailoring the cellular mesostructure for multiple design objectives. Unfortunately, existing cellular material manufacturing technologies limit the design space as they are limited to certain part mesostructure, material type, and macrostructure. The opportunity that exists to improve the design of existing products, and the ability to reap the benefits of cellular materials in new applications is the driving force behind this research. As such, the primary research goal of this work is to design, embody, and analyze a manufacturing process that provides a designer the ability to specify the material type, material composition, void morphology, and mesostructure topology for any conceivable part geometry. The accomplishment of this goal is achieved in three phases of research: (1) Design---Following a systematic design process and a rigorous selection exercise, a layer-based additive manufacturing process is designed that is capable of meeting the unique requirements of fabricating cellular material geometry. Specifically, metal parts of designed mesostructure are fabricated via three-dimensional printing of metal oxide ceramic powder followed by post-processing in a reducing atmosphere. (2) Embodiment ---The primary research hypothesis is verified through the use of the designed manufacturing process chain to successfully realize metal parts of designed mesostructure. (3) Modeling & Evaluation ---The designed manufacturing process is modeled in this final research phase so as to increase understanding of experimental results and to establish a foundation for future analytical modeling research. In addition to an analysis of

  19. Airborne Windshear Detection and Warning Systems. Fifth and Final Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Fifth Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Airborne Windshear Review Meeting was hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration in Hampton, Virginia, on September 28-30, 1993. The purpose was to report on the highly successful windshear experiments conducted by government, academic institutions, and industry; to transfer the results to regulators, manufacturers, and users; and to set initiatives for future aeronautics technology research. The formal sessions covered recent developments in windshear flight testing, windshear modeling, flight management, and ground-based systems, airborne windshear detection systems, certification and regulatory issues, and development and applications of sensors for wake vortices and for synthetic and enhanced vision systems. This report was compiled to record and make available the technology updates and materials from the conference.

  20. Airborne Windshear Detection and Warning Systems. Fifth and Final Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The Fifth (and Final) Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Airborne Windshear Review Meeting was hosted jointly by the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Hampton, Virginia, on September 28-30, 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to report on the highly successful windshear experiments conducted by government, academic institutions, and industry; to transfer the results to regulators, manufacturers, and users; and to set initiatives for future aeronautics technology research. The formal sessions covered recent developments in windshear flight testing; windshear modeling, flight management, and ground-based systems; airborne windshear detection systems; certification and regulatory issues; development and applications of sensors for wake vortex detection; and synthetic and enhanced vision systems.

  1. Optimisation of Shape Parameters and Process Manufacturing for an Automotive Safety Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildemyn, Eric; Dal Santo, Philippe; Potiron, Alain; Saïdane, Delphine

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, the weight and the cost of automotive vehicles have considerably increased due to the importance devoted to safety systems. It is therefore necessary to reduce the weight and the production cost of components by improving their shape and manufacturing process. This work deals with a numerical approach for optimizing the manufacturing process parameters of a safety belt anchor using a genetic algorithm (NSGA II). This type of component is typically manufactured in three stages: blanking, rounding of the edges by punching and finally, bending with a 90° angle. In this study, only the rounding and the bending will be treated. The numerical model is linked to the genetic algorithm in order to optimize the process parameters. This is implemented by using ABAQUSscript files developed in the Python programming language. The algorithm modifies the script files and restarts the FEM analysis automatically. Lemaitre's damage model is introduced in the material behaviour laws and implemented in the FEM analysis by using a FORTRAN subroutine. The influence of two process parameters (die radius and the rounding punch radius) and five shape parameters were investigated. The objective functions are (i) the material damage state at the end of the forming process, (ii) the stress field and (iii) the maximum Von Mises stress in the folded zone.

  2. Laser beam welding of high stressed, complex aircraft structural parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Hummel, Peter; Ferstl, Stefan; Sengotta, Marcus; Lang, Roland

    2003-03-01

    Laser beam welding of primary aircraft structures manufactured from aluminum alloys is considered to have a great potential in cost saving. In order to evaluate this advantage, a technology program has been adopted at EADS, Military Aircraft. The goal was to manufacture air intake shells for the Eurofighter in a cost efficient way. Stretch formed skins and machined stiffeners are joined together with laser beam welding. The baseline for a comparison in terms of cost and weight was the conventional process based on stretch forming of thick plates and subsequent milling. The major tasks of the program have been the optimization of the twin focus laser beam welding process and the proof of the structural integrity including weld strength evaluation.

  3. Microstructural Development and Technical Challenges in Laser Additive Manufacturing: Case Study with a 316L Industrial Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marya, Manuel; Singh, Virendra; Marya, Surendar; Hascoet, Jean Yves

    2015-08-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) brings disruptive changes to the ways parts, and products are designed, fabricated, tested, qualified, inspected, marketed, and sold. These changes introduce novel technical challenges and concerns arising from the maturity and diversity of today's AM processes, feedstock materials, and process parameter interactions. AM bears a resemblance with laser and electron beam welding in the so-called conduction mode, which involves a multitude of dynamic physical events between the projected feedstock and a moving heat source that eventually influence AM part properties. For this paper, an air vent was selected for its thin-walled, hollow, and variable cross section, and limited size. The studied air vents, randomly selected from a qualification batch, were fabricated out of 316L stainless steel using a 4 kW fiber laser powder-fed AM system, referred to as construction laser additive direct (CLAD). These were systematically characterized by microhardness indentation, visual examination, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and electron-back-scattering diffraction in order to determine AM part suitability for service and also broadly discuss metallurgical phenomena. The paper then briefly expands the discussion to include additional engineering alloys and further analyze relationships between AM process parameters and AM part properties, consistently utilizing past experience with the same powder-fed CLAD 3D printer, the well-established science and technology of welding and joining, and recent publications on additive manufacturing.

  4. Practical aspects of modern interferometry for optical manufacturing quality control: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Modern phase shifting interferometers enable the manufacture of optical systems that drive the global economy. Semiconductor chips, solid-state cameras, cell phone cameras, infrared imaging systems, space based satellite imaging and DVD and Blu-Ray disks are all enabled by phase shifting interferometers. Theoretical treatments of data analysis and instrument design advance the technology but often are not helpful towards the practical use of interferometers. An understanding of the parameters that drive system performance is critical to produce useful results. Any interferometer will produce a data map and results; this paper reviews some of the key issues to minimize error sources in that data and provide a valid measurement.

  5. Methods for tape fabrication of continuous filament composite parts and articles of manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    Weisberg, Andrew H

    2013-10-01

    A method for forming a composite structure according to one embodiment includes forming a first ply; and forming a second ply above the first ply. Forming each ply comprises: applying a bonding material to a tape, the tape comprising a fiber and a matrix, wherein the bonding material has a curing time of less than about 1 second; and adding the tape to a substrate for forming adjacent tape winds having about a constant distance therebetween. Additional systems, methods and articles of manufacture are also presented.

  6. 40 CFR 60.4247 - What parts of the mobile source provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What parts of the mobile source provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer of equipment containing such engines? 60.4247 Section 60.4247 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4247 - What parts of the mobile source provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... containing stationary SI internal combustion engines meeting the provisions of 40 CFR part 1054 must meet the... provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer... Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Mobile Source......

  8. 40 CFR 60.4247 - What parts of the mobile source provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... containing stationary SI internal combustion engines meeting the provisions of 40 CFR part 1054 must meet the... provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer... Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Mobile Source......

  9. 40 CFR 60.4247 - What parts of the mobile source provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... containing stationary SI internal combustion engines meeting the provisions of 40 CFR part 1054 must meet the... provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer... Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Mobile Source......

  10. 40 CFR 60.4247 - What parts of the mobile source provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... containing stationary SI internal combustion engines meeting the provisions of 40 CFR part 1054 must meet the... provisions apply to me if I am a manufacturer of stationary SI internal combustion engines or a manufacturer... Standards of Performance for Stationary Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engines Mobile Source......

  11. Complex Moving Parts: Assessment Systems and Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Martha J.; Robertson, Royce L.

    2013-01-01

    The largest college within an online university of over 50,000 students invested significant resources in translating a complex assessment system focused on continuous improvement and national accreditation into an effective and efficient electronic portfolio (ePortfolio). The team building the system needed a model to address problems met…

  12. Layered YSZ/SCSZ/YSZ Electrolytes for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Part I: Design and Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Orlovskaya, Nina; Klimov, Mikhail; Huang, Xinyu; Cullen, David A; Graule, Thomas; Kuebler, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    (Sc2O3)0.1(CeO2)0.01(ZrO2)0.89 (SCSZ) ceramic electrolyte has superior ionic conductivity in the intermediate temperature range (700 800 C), but it does not exhibit good phase and chemical stability in comparison with 8 mol% Y2O3 ZrO2 (YSZ). To maintain high ionic conductivity and improve the stability in the whole electrolyte, layered structures with YSZ outer layers and SCSZ inner layers were designed. Because of a mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion and Young's moduli of SCSZ and YSZ phases, upon cooling of the electrolytes after sintering, thermal residual stresses will arise, leading to a possible strengthening of the layered composite and, therefore, an increase in the reliability of the electrolyte. Laminated electrolytes with three, four, and six layers design were manufactured using tape-casting, lamination, and sintering techniques. After sintering, while the thickness of YSZ outer layers remained constant at 30 m, the thickness of the SCSZ inner layer varied from 30 m for a Y SC Y three-layered electrolyte, 60 m for a Y 2SC Y four-layered electrolyte, and 120 m for a Y 4SC Y six-layered electrolyte. The microstructure, crystal structure, impurities present, and the density of the sintered electrolytes were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and water immersion techniques.

  13. 75 FR 12148 - Airworthiness Directives; Ontic Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc. Propeller Governors, Part...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Would not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Ontic...

  14. How to Build a Complex, Functional Propeller Protein, From Parts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Patricia L

    2016-04-01

    By combining ancestral sequence reconstruction and in vitro evolution, Smock et al. identified single motifs that assemble into a functional five-bladed β-propeller, and a likely route for conversion into the more complex, extant single chain fusion. Interestingly, although sequence diversification destabilized five-motif fusions, it also destabilized aggregation-prone intermediates, increasing the level of functional protein in vivo. PMID:26971075

  15. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 191 - General Manufacturing Drawback Rulings

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR 146.53) which meets the Grade A standard of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (7 CFR 52.1557, Table IV... regulations and rulings (see 19 CFR 191.11). H. Stock In Process Stock in process does not result; or if it... applicable, as well as 19 CFR part 191 (see particularly, § 191.9). A. Name and Address of Principal...

  16. Mortality of workers in an automobile engine and parts manufacturing complex.

    PubMed

    Vena, J E; Sultz, H A; Fiedler, R C; Barnes, R E

    1985-02-01

    A proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) study was conducted using data on workers from three local unions representing an integrated automobile factory composed of forge, foundry, and engine (machine and assembly) plants. Ninety four percent of the death certificates were obtained for all active and non-active workers who died during the period 1 January 1970 to 31 December 1979 and were vested in union and company benefit programmes. Observed numbers of deaths were compared with expected numbers based on two standards, the proportionate mortality among men in the United States 1970-9 and among men in Erie County 1975. There was close agreement between the number of observed and expected deaths by either standard of comparison among white auto workers in the forge and foundry plants. Valid analyses of cause specific mortality among non-whites could be conducted for the foundry plant only. Although there was raised PMR for deaths due to diseases of the circulatory system using the Erie County standard, none of the other cause specific PMRs was significant. Although based on small numbers, the risk of cancer of the lung was significantly high in non-whites under age 50 in the foundry (PMR = 2.6; p less than 0.05). The cause specific PMRs for whites in the engine plant were statistically significant for malignant neoplasms (1.2) and all external causes (0.62) based on the US white male standard. Analysis of cancer specific mortality among white men in the machining/assembly plant showed significant excesses for cancer of the digestive system (PMR=1.5), particularly of the liver (PMR=2.6) and pancreas (PMR=1.9); cancers of the respiratory system (PMR=1.4 using the Erie County standard); and cancer of the urinary bladder (PMR=2.3). Workers employed for more than 20 years showed statistically increased mortality ratios for cancers of the digestive system (1.9), particularly cancer of the pancreas (2.3) and cancer of the rectum (2.8). Individuals whose employment began during or before 1950 exhibited increased PMRs for cancers of the digestive organs (1.8), particularly of the pancreas (2.5) and of the bladder (3.4). Workers whose employment began after 1950, on the other hand, exhibited raised PMRs for cancers of the respiratory system (1.5) and of the kidney (3.2). Since the foundry and forge plants did not start production until 1955, mortality associated with those work settings may be greater in the future. PMID:3970876

  17. Mortality of workers in an automobile engine and parts manufacturing complex.

    PubMed Central

    Vena, J E; Sultz, H A; Fiedler, R C; Barnes, R E

    1985-01-01

    A proportionate mortality ratio (PMR) study was conducted using data on workers from three local unions representing an integrated automobile factory composed of forge, foundry, and engine (machine and assembly) plants. Ninety four percent of the death certificates were obtained for all active and non-active workers who died during the period 1 January 1970 to 31 December 1979 and were vested in union and company benefit programmes. Observed numbers of deaths were compared with expected numbers based on two standards, the proportionate mortality among men in the United States 1970-9 and among men in Erie County 1975. There was close agreement between the number of observed and expected deaths by either standard of comparison among white auto workers in the forge and foundry plants. Valid analyses of cause specific mortality among non-whites could be conducted for the foundry plant only. Although there was raised PMR for deaths due to diseases of the circulatory system using the Erie County standard, none of the other cause specific PMRs was significant. Although based on small numbers, the risk of cancer of the lung was significantly high in non-whites under age 50 in the foundry (PMR = 2.6; p less than 0.05). The cause specific PMRs for whites in the engine plant were statistically significant for malignant neoplasms (1.2) and all external causes (0.62) based on the US white male standard. Analysis of cancer specific mortality among white men in the machining/assembly plant showed significant excesses for cancer of the digestive system (PMR=1.5), particularly of the liver (PMR=2.6) and pancreas (PMR=1.9); cancers of the respiratory system (PMR=1.4 using the Erie County standard); and cancer of the urinary bladder (PMR=2.3). Workers employed for more than 20 years showed statistically increased mortality ratios for cancers of the digestive system (1.9), particularly cancer of the pancreas (2.3) and cancer of the rectum (2.8). Individuals whose employment began during or before 1950 exhibited increased PMRs for cancers of the digestive organs (1.8), particularly of the pancreas (2.5) and of the bladder (3.4). Workers whose employment began after 1950, on the other hand, exhibited raised PMRs for cancers of the respiratory system (1.5) and of the kidney (3.2). Since the foundry and forge plants did not start production until 1955, mortality associated with those work settings may be greater in the future. PMID:3970876

  18. Developments in Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Clinesmith, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    As part of a project design initiative, Sandia National Laboratories and AlliedSignal Inc. Kansas City Division have joined efforts to develop a concurrent engineering capability for the manufacturing of complex precision components. The primary effort of this project, called Agile Manufacturing, is directed toward: (1) Understand the error associated with manufacturing and inspection. (2) Develop methods for correcting error. (3) Integrate diverse software technologies into a compatible process. The Agile Manufacturing System (AMS) is a system that integrates product design, manufacturing, and inspection into a closed loop, concurrent engineering process. The goal of developing the Agile Manufacturing System is to: (1) Optimize accuracy in manufacturing and inspection. (A) Use of softgage software for product evaluation. This will ensure ANSI Y14.5 compliance. (B) Establish and monitor bias between CMM and machine center. (C) Map probe deflection error and apply correction to inspection results. This applies to both on machine probing and CMM inspections. (D) Inspection process. (2) Compress the cycle time from product concept to production level manufacturing and verification. (3) Create a self-correcting process that feeds inspection results back into the machining process. (4) Link subordinate processes (cutting/probing path, softgage model, etc.) to the solid model definition.

  19. Research in manufacturing of micro-structured injection molded polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucyshyn, Thomas; Struklec, Tobias; Burgsteiner, Martin; Graninger, Georg; Holzer, Clemens

    2015-12-01

    An overview of current research results is given for the topic of injection molding of micro-structured polymer parts regarding filling behavior and demolding process of micro-structures as well as the production of micro-structures on curved surfaces. In order to better understand how micro-structures are formed during the filling stage of injection molding, a study was performed on a test part with micro-channels placed parallely and perpendicularly to flow direction. Short shots with a highly fluent Polypropylene grade were injection molded with the melt front stopping in the structure fields. The melt and mold temperature, the injection rate as well as the use of a variotherm heating system were varied in a systematic Design of Experiments. The shape of the flow front was investigated with the optical measurement system Alicona InfiniteFocus. The data gained was analyzed with Matlab scripts and provided the needed distance to completely fill the structures as a reference value. The next topic covers the demolding step, which is a crucial process step in injection molding of micro-structured parts as the successfully replicated structures often get destroyed in the following demolding step. In order to evaluate the influence of the four aspects polymer, mold surface (coatings), structure (geometry and placement) and process settings on the demolding behavior, an injection mold with integrated measurement system was built, which makes it possible to measure the demolding force respectively a demolding energy under process conditions. These values can be used to quantitatively compare the impact of the above mentioned influencing factors on demolding. Finally, a concept to produce micro-structures on curved surfaces with injection molding is shown: A flat metal premaster structure is used to produce an elastomeric polymer (dimethylsiloxane) master in a casting process. This master is fixed in a conventional injection mold and a thermoplastic polymer is replicated

  20. Diffusion bonding and its application to manufacturing. [for joining of metal parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurgeon, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    In its simplest form diffusion bonding is accomplished by placing clean metal surfaces together under a sufficient load and heating. The natural interatomic attractive force between atoms transforms the interface into a natural grain boundary. Therefore, in principle, the properties of the bond area are identical to those of the parent metal. Other advantages of diffusion bonding over conventional methods of bonding include freedom from residual stresses, excessive deformation, foreign metals, or changed crystal structures. Stainless steels, nickel-base superalloys, and aluminum alloys have all been successfully joined. Complex hardware, including integrated flueric devices, jet engine servovalves, and porous woven structures have been fabricated. The processing involved is discussed, along with such theoretical considerations as the role of metal surfaces, the formation of metal contact junctions, and the mechanisms of material transport in diffusion bonding.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 414 - Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams B Appendix B to Part 414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Pt. 414, App. B Appendix B to Part 414—Complexed Metal-Bearing...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 414 - Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams B Appendix B to Part 414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Pt. 414, App. B Appendix B to Part 414—Complexed Metal-Bearing...

  3. [Music therapy as a part of complex healing].

    PubMed

    Sliwka, Agnieszka; Jarosz, Anna; Nowobilski, Roman

    2006-10-01

    Music therapy is a method which takes the adventage of therapeutic influence of musie on psychological and somatic sphere of the human body. Its therapeutic properties are more and more used. Current scientific research have proved its modifying influence on vegetative, circulatory, respiratory and endocrine systems. Works devoted to the effects of musie on the patients' psychological sphere have also confirmed that it reduces psychopathologic symptoms (anxiety and depression), improves self-rating, influences quality and disorders of sleep, reduces pain, improves moral immunity and patients' openness, readiness, co-operation in treatment process. Music therapy is treated as a method which complements conventional treatment and makes up part of an integral whole together with physiotherapy, kinesitherapy and recuperation. PMID:17205788

  4. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  5. Experimental and computational investigation of an electromagnetic pump used for manufacturing aluminium parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morinigo, D.; Rodrigues, M. A.; Rivas, A.; Duque, O.; Vazquez, V.; Maroto, J. A.; Cuesta, R.

    2007-03-01

    An experimental and computational investigation was carried out on an electromagnetic pump for molten aluminum. The electromagnetic pump is a MHD device to drive molten metals by means of electromagnetic fields and without mechanical parts in contact with the metal at high temperature. An exact computer simulation of the electromagnetic pump would require the simultaneous solution of electromagnetic and fluid dynamics problems. However, in this study we divide the simulation into two independent stages. First, the electromagnetic system is simulated by ANSYS considering the secondary of the pump as a solid. This simulation is experimentally validated in a test bed with a solid secondary replacing the molten metal. Secondly, a 3D field of electromagnetic forces provided by the ANSYS simulation is imported into the FLUENT CFD code to simulate the fluid dynamic problem, considering now the secondary of the pump as a liquid. This second simulation is also experimentally validated by measuring the static head provided by the pump. This simulation process is valid only if the electromagnetic system and the fluid dynamic problem are uncoupled, which has been verified by calculating the magnetic Reynolds number and the interaction parameter. Tables 4, Figs 14, Refs 15.

  6. Research and Development: A Complex Relationship Part I [and] Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John Douglas Edward

    Part 1 of this document describes the background, format, and early groundwork that went into the development of a test sponsored entirely by private enterprise. The discipline imposed by a financial bottom line imposes special pressures but also offers new opportunities. This private enterprise model is a multi-constructional process where…

  7. The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J; Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Blue, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing holds tremendous promise in terms of revolutionizing manufacturing. However, fundamental hurdles limit mass adoption of the technology. First, production rates are extremely low. Second, the physical size of parts is generally small, less than a cubic foot. Third, while there is much excitement about metal additive manufacturing, the major growth area is in polymer additive manufacturing systems. Unfortunately, the mechanical properties of the polymer parts are poor, limiting the potential for direct part replacement. To address this issue, we describe three benefits of blending carbon fiber with polymer additive manufacturing. First, development of carbon fiber reinforced polymers for additive manufacturing achieves specific strengths approaching aerospace quality aluminum. Second, carbon fiber radically changes the behavior of the material during deposition, enabling large scale, out-of-the-oven, high deposition rate manufacturing. Finally, carbon fiber technology and additive manufacturing complement each other. Merging the two manufacturing processes enables the construction of complex components that would not be possible otherwise.

  8. A Case of Complicated Silicosis with a Complex Clinical Course in a Glass Manufacturing Worker

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We reported a case of complicated silicosis that occurred in a glass manufacturing plant worker who had presumably been exposed to low-concentration free silica for almost 20 years. To the best of our knowledge this report is the first in the Republic of Korea. The physician’s first impression was cancer since the enlargement of neck and supraclavicuar lymph nodes had clearly progressed and metastasis was suspected in ultrasonography. However, it turned out to be reactive hyperplasia and anthracosis. Although lung cancer was suspected and tests were performed in 2 hospitals due to repetitive cough and dyspnea, along with weight loss of approximately 10% over the course of 7 months, the patient was eventually diagnosed with complicated silicosis and pneumothorax occurred after 1 year. Herein, we report this case with a literature review. PMID:24914413

  9. Design and manufacture of a pick & place apparatus for manipulation of the SMD parts along with the glue head manipulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosouhi, R.; Koupaei, M. Shams; Rabiei, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    A pick & place apparatus is designed and manufactured to manipulate the Surface Mounting Devices (known as SMD) parts on the glue pattern on a flat surface. SMD parts are little resistors which transmit light whenever an appropriate voltage is applied on them. Manipulation of these small parts on a flat surface which is supposed to form an electric circuit is of a great importance. Also to locate the SMD parts on the flat surface, a glue pattern should have been produced primarily. These objectives are achieved by design and manufacture of an apparatus which manipulates the SMD parts on the flat surface. The flat surface is being located in the appropriate position under the apparatus by a CNC machine where the pick & place operations along with glue head operation is carried out.

  10. Toward Failure Modeling In Complex Dynamic Systems: Impact of Design and Manufacturing Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; McAdams, Daniel A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When designing vehicle vibration monitoring systems for aerospace devices, it is common to use well-established models of vibration features to determine whether failures or defects exist. Most of the algorithms used for failure detection rely on these models to detect significant changes during a flight environment. In actual practice, however, most vehicle vibration monitoring systems are corrupted by high rates of false alarms and missed detections. Research conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center has determined that a major reason for the high rates of false alarms and missed detections is the numerous sources of statistical variations that are not taken into account in the. modeling assumptions. In this paper, we address one such source of variations, namely, those caused during the design and manufacturing of rotating machinery components that make up aerospace systems. We present a novel way of modeling the vibration response by including design variations via probabilistic methods. The results demonstrate initial feasibility of the method, showing great promise in developing a general methodology for designing more accurate aerospace vehicle vibration monitoring systems.

  11. Tectonostratigraphy of the Mesozoic complexes of the northwestern part of the Koryak Highland, Ust' Belaya Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palechek, T. N.; Moiseev, A. V.; Gul'pa, I. V.

    2016-07-01

    New data on the structure, age, and composition of the tectonostratigraphic complexes of the western part of the Koryak Highland are presented. The conclusions on the sedimentation conditions are drawn and primary relations are interpreted for most complexes. New Kimmeridgian-Tithonian and Berriasian assemblages of radiolarians are established. Campanian radiolarians are found for the first time in the region.

  12. Development of a pilot-scale manufacturing process for protein-coated microcrystals (PCMC): mixing and precipitation - part I.

    PubMed

    König, Corinna; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Baum, Verena; Schultz-Fademrecht, Torsten; Bassarab, Stefan; Steffens, Klaus-Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    A novel protein-coated microcrystal (PCMC) technology offers the possibility to produce dry protein formulations suitable for inhalation or, after reconstitution, for injection. Micron-sized particles are hereby produced by co-precipitation via a rapid dehydration method. Thus, therapeutic proteins can be stabilised and immobilised on crystalline carrier surfaces. In this study, the development of a continuous manufacturing process is described, which can produce grams to kilograms of PCMC. The process chain comprises three steps: mixing/precipitation, solvent reduction (concentration) and final drying. The process is published in two parts. This part describes the mixing and precipitation performed using continuous impingement jet mixers. Mixing efficiency was improved by dividing the anti-solvent flow into two or four jets, which were combined again inside the mixer to achieve an embracing of the aqueous solution (sandwich effect). The jets provided high energy dissipation rates. The anti-solvent jets (95% of the total volume) efficiently mixed the protein-carrier containing aqueous solution (5% of the total volume), which was demonstrated with computational fluid dynamics and the Villermaux-Dushman reaction. The improved mixing performance of the double jet impingement (DJI) or the quadruple jet impingement (QJI) mixers showed a positive effect on easily crystallising carriers (e.g. dl-valine) at laminar flow rates. The mixer and outlet tube bore size was 2.0-3.2 mm, because smaller sizes showed a high tendency to block the mixer. The mixing effect by impaction was sufficiently high in the flow rate range of 250-2000 mL/min, which corresponds to the transition from laminar to turbulent flow characteristics. At lower flow rates, mixing was enhanced by ultrasound. 50-80L PCMC suspension was readily produced with the QJI mixer. PMID:22137999

  13. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  14. A comparative study of multi-sensor data fusion methods for highly accurate assessment of manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Ammar; Kohler, Sophie; Lallement, Alex; Hirsch, Ernest

    2015-04-01

    3D modeling of scene contents takes an increasing importance for many computer vision based applications. In particular, industrial applications of computer vision require efficient tools for the computation of this 3D information. Routinely, stereo-vision is a powerful technique to obtain the 3D outline of imaged objects from the corresponding 2D images. As a consequence, this approach provides only a poor and partial description of the scene contents. On another hand, for structured light based reconstruction techniques, 3D surfaces of imaged objects can often be computed with high accuracy. However, the resulting active range data in this case lacks to provide data enabling to characterize the object edges. Thus, in order to benefit from the positive points of various acquisition techniques, we introduce in this paper promising approaches, enabling to compute complete 3D reconstruction based on the cooperation of two complementary acquisition and processing techniques, in our case stereoscopic and structured light based methods, providing two 3D data sets describing respectively the outlines and surfaces of the imaged objects. We present, accordingly, the principles of three fusion techniques and their comparison based on evaluation criterions related to the nature of the workpiece and also the type of the tackled application. The proposed fusion methods are relying on geometric characteristics of the workpiece, which favour the quality of the registration. Further, the results obtained demonstrate that the developed approaches are well adapted for 3D modeling of manufactured parts including free-form surfaces and, consequently quality control applications using these 3D reconstructions.

  15. Radiation decontamination of pharmaceutical raw materials as an integral part of the good pharmaceutical manufacturing practice (GPMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ražem, D.; Katušin-Ražem, B.; Starčević, M.; Galeković, B.

    The microbiological quality of many raw materials used in the manufacture of pharmaceutical and adjuvants often fails to meet the standards set by the pharmaceutical industry. Raw materials of biological provenience are particularly susceptible to contamination. This work describes the present situation regarding the microbial load of corn starch. Given the accepted microbiological criteria, irradiation treatment is proposed as integral to Good Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Practice (GPMP). The use of total viable count as a guide for specifying microbial limits for non-sterile materials is supported. Criteria for the choice of dose are discussed.

  16. Retrieval of complex χ(2) parts for quantitative analysis of sum-frequency generation intensity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Matthias J.; Koelsch, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has become an established technique for in situ surface analysis. While spectral recording procedures and hardware have been optimized, unique data analysis routines have yet to be established. The SFG intensity is related to probing geometries and properties of the system under investigation such as the absolute square of the second-order susceptibility |χ(2)|. A conventional SFG intensity measurement does not grant access to the complex parts of χ(2) unless further assumptions have been made. It is therefore difficult, sometimes impossible, to establish a unique fitting solution for SFG intensity spectra. Recently, interferometric phase-sensitive SFG or heterodyne detection methods have been introduced to measure real and imaginary parts of χ(2) experimentally. Here, we demonstrate that iterative phase-matching between complex spectra retrieved from maximum entropy method analysis and fitting of intensity SFG spectra (iMEMfit) leads to a unique solution for the complex parts of χ(2) and enables quantitative analysis of SFG intensity spectra. A comparison between complex parts retrieved by iMEMfit applied to intensity spectra and phase sensitive experimental data shows excellent agreement between the two methods.

  17. Why Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing Makes Sense for the Plants and Laboratories of the Nuclear Weapon Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, K W; Howell, L N; Lewis, D G; Neugebauer, C A; O'Brien, D W; Schilling, S A

    2001-05-15

    The purpose of this White Paper is to outline the benefits we expect to receive from Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing (MBE/M) for the design, analysis, fabrication, and assembly of nuclear weapons for upcoming Life Extension Programs (LEPs). Industry experiences with model-based approaches and the NNSA/DP investments and experiences, discussed in this paper, indicate that model-based methods can achieve reliable refurbished weapons for the stockpile with less cost and time. In this the paper, we list both general and specific benefits of MBE/M for the upcoming LEPs and the metrics for determining the success of model-based approaches. We also present some outstanding issues and challenges to deploying and achieving long-term benefit from the MBE/M. In conclusion, we argue that successful completion of the upcoming LEPs--with very aggressive schedule and funding restrictions--will depend on electronic model-based methods. We ask for a strong commitment from LEP managers throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex to support deployment and use of MBE/M systems to meet their program needs.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF IRON CASTINGS AND FABRICATED SHEET METAL PARTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expense to do so. aste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACS) were established at selected univ...

  19. Instructional Materials in Manufacturing for Junior High School Industrial Arts. Final Report and Parts I-IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus.

    This Title XI Institute was designed and conducted to introduce the participants to inquiry and invention taking place in industrial arts curriculum across the United States. The institute participated in the inquiry stage through advanced study of manufacturing technology and industrial arts curriculum, and in the invention stage through the…

  20. Plant Utility Improvements Increase Profits and Productivity at a Clothing Manufacturing Complex (MJ Soffee's Wastewater Heat Recovery System)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    In response to increased marketplace competition and the need for expanded production capacity, MJ Soffee's manufacturing facility in Fayetteville, North Carolina implemented several energy improvement projects,

  1. UTILITY OF BIG AREA ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING (BAAM) FOR THE RAPID MANUFACTURE OF CUSTOMIZED ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J

    2015-08-01

    This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local Motors Inc. Phase 1was previously reported as Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Cyber Mechanical Devices through Community Engagement and Micro-manufacturing and demonstrated the integration of components onto a prototype body part for a vehicle. Phase 2 was reported as Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for the Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles and demonstrated the high profile live printing of an all-electric vehicle using ONRL s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology. This demonstration generated considerable national attention and successfully demonstrated the capabilities of the BAAM system as developed by ORNL and Cincinnati, Inc. and the feasibility of additive manufacturing of a full scale electric vehicle as envisioned by the CRADA partner Local Motors, Inc.

  2. Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) For The Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-08-01

    This Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Manufacturing Development Facility (MDF) technical collaboration project was conducted in two phases as a CRADA with Local Motors Inc. Phase 1 was previously reported as Advanced Manufacturing of Complex Cyber Mechanical Devices through Community Engagement and Micro-manufacturing and demonstrated the integration of components onto a prototype body part for a vehicle. Phase 2 was reported as Utility of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) for the Rapid Manufacture of Customized Electric Vehicles and demonstrated the high profile live printing of an all-electric vehicle using ONRL s Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology. This demonstration generated considerable national attention and successfully demonstrated the capabilities of the BAAM system as developed by ORNL and Cincinnati, Inc. and the feasibility of additive manufacturing of a full scale electric vehicle as envisioned by the CRADA partner Local Motors, Inc.

  3. Additive Manufacturing by selective laser melting the realizer desktop machine and its application for the dental industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Andreas; Schmidt, Frank-Michael; Hötter, Jan-Steffen; Sokalla, Wolfgang; Sokalla, Patrick

    Additive Manufacturing of metal parts by Selective Laser Melting has become a powerful tool for the direct manufacturing of complex parts mainly for the aerospace and medical industry. With the introduction of its desktop machine, Realizer targeted the dental market. The contribution describes the special features of the machine, discusses details of the process and shows manufacturing results focused on metal dental devices.

  4. Respiratory morbidity due to ammonia exposure among the employees of a urea manufacturing industry located in western part of India

    PubMed Central

    Zala, Naman; Kavishvar, Abhay

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is produced in the fertilizer industry. The amount of ammonia inhaled by employees of a urea manufacturing industry is very high. It would be interesting to study whether such an amount has any impact on the employees working there for many years. This study explores the magnitude of respiratory morbidity among employees of a urea manufacturing industry and to establish its association with exposure to ammonia. Data was collected related to significant respiratory illnesses of all the employees over a period of 10 years using computer-based medical record system of the industry′s hospital. The results obtained from the data analysis showed that there is no cause and effect relationship between exposure to ammonia and respiratory morbidity. Thus it was advised to the medical authority at industry to go for mass treatment with anthelmintics and that all the employees should be screened for specific allergens and this information should be used while managing respiratory morbidity. PMID:23776325

  5. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure Part I: Combinatorial geometry.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Slaba, Tony C; Badavi, Francis F; Reddell, Brandon D; Bahadori, Amir A

    2016-06-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z≤2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency. PMID:27345203

  6. Solar proton exposure of an ICRU sphere within a complex structure Part I: Combinatorial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2016-06-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z ≤ 2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency.

  7. Geochemistry of Mesozoic carbonatite complexes in the southwestern part of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, M.

    2013-12-01

    This is the results of geochemical analysis of carbonatite taken at the kimberlite and carbonatite complexes in Tikilusaag and Qaqarssuk located in the southwestern part of Greenland. These complexes have high grade of rare earth elements (REE), gold, olivine and diamond ore deposits. These kimberlite, lamprophyre and carbonatite are originated from complex carbonatitic and silicate magma. This kind of ultramafic alkaline complex is not common compared to other igneous bodies in the crust. Tikilusaag carbonatite complex in contains REE in calcite carbonatite. Carbonatite minerals are strontianite (SrCO3) and ancylite (SrCe(CO3)2(OH)H2O). Strontianite contains Ce and ancylite contains considerable amounts of La, Ce, Nd, respectively. Two minerals are the major components which have LREE in the complexes. Tikilussaaq carbonatite complex contain apatite which has maximum 200 micro meter in size and mostly euhedral. Most apatite crystals show compositional zoning under CL attached to SEM (JEOL, JSM-6610). This zoning reflects physiochemical condition of magma at the time of crystallization and the compositional difference of Ca, P, and F with the consideration of chemical composition of apatite. The apatite contain F instead of Cl, namely fluorine apatite. Compositional zoning reflect the difference of Ca and P according to CL image. Qaqarssuk carbonatite complex is consisted of several minerals containing Ba composition. Ba in calcite which is the major mineral of Ba carbonatite (Barytocalcite, CaBa(CO3)2) coexists with barite and Ba-Sr carbonatite. Fenitization near the complex is common process. Basic rocks formed during carbonatitization contain hornblendite predominantly, and high grade of fenitization produced albite-bearing granitic rocks in the area.

  8. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  9. Manufacturing technologies for photovoltaics and possible means of their development in Russia (Review). Part 1: General approach to the development of photoelectric converters and basic silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, A. B.; Popel', O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The state and key tendencies of the development of basic technologies for manufacture of photoelectric converters (PECs) in the world are considered, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The first part of the review gives short information on the development of photovoltaics in the world and planes of the development of solar power plants in Russia. Total power of photoelectric plants operating in various countries in 2015 exceeded 150 GW and increased in the last ten years with a rate of approximately 50% per year. Russia made important state decisions on the support of the development of renewable power engineering and developed mechanisms, which were attractive for business, on the stimulation of building of the network of solar power plants with a total power to 1.5 GW in the country to 2020. At the same time, the rigid demands are made with respect to the localization of the production of components of these plants that opens new abilities for the development of the domestic production of photovoltaics manufacture. Data on the efficiency of PECs of various types that are attained in the leading laboratories of the world are given. Particular emphasis has been placed on the consideration of basic silicon technologies of PEC manufacture, which had the widest commercial application. The basic methods for production of polycrystalline silicon and making single-crystal and multicrystal silicon are described. Fundamentals of making techniques for plates, PECs, and photoelectric modules based on single-crystal and polycrystalline silicon are considered. The second part will be devoted to modifications of manufacturing techniques for photoelectric converters, enhancement methods for contact structures, and recommendations of authors with respect to the choice of prospective technologies for the expansion of PEC production in Russia. It will involve formulations and substantiations of the most promising lines of the development of photoelectric

  10. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Kunc, Vlastimil; Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  11. Modeling complex force systems, Part 1: The cutting and pad forces in deep drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, B.J. )

    1993-05-01

    An understanding of the forces generated in machining processes is necessary because they are related to such things as wear, vibrations, accuracy, power, process planning, and computer integrated manufacture. Force magnitudes can be determined by a variety of techniques from empirical laws to theoretical analyses of the mechanics of idealized cutting situations. The force situation becomes significantly more difficult to assess when a complex force system exists in which several different force groupings exist simultaneously which cannot be separated and are therefore indeterminate. One such process is deep drilling in which not only cutting forces occur at a cutting edge, but also friction and burnishing forces exist at two separate locations (i.e., the pads). This work describes an approach to (1) model the forces at each location and (2) to determine the constituent and separate forces at each of the locations. This will be done in a two paper series with the first paper describing the former and the second paper describing the latter.

  12. Method of producing complex aluminum alloy parts of high temper, and products thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, I. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Fully annealed aluminum sheet is first stretch formed to the complex, doubly compound shape of a previously prepared forming die, e.g., an ejection seat blowout panel of a shuttlecraft. The part is then marked with a series of grid lines for monitoring later elongation. Thereafter it is solution heat treated and refrigerated to retard hardening. While still soft, it is stretched a second time on the same die to induce a modicum of work hardening, after which it is aged to the desired stress corrosion resistant temper, preferably the T8 level, to provide the desired hardness and stress corrosion resistance.

  13. Selective laser melting additive manufactured Inconel 718 superalloy parts: High-temperature oxidation property and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingbo; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    This work presented a comprehensive study of high-temperature oxidation behaviors and mechanisms of Selective laser melting (SLM) processed Inconel 718 superalloy parts using different methods including isothermal oxidation testing, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The experimental results revealed that the oxidation process of the tested parts processed at a lower volumetric laser energy density experienced the severe spallation. On reasonably increasing the applied volumetric laser energy density, the oxidation kinetics of the as-produced parts obeyed a parabolic law, exhibiting the significantly improved oxidation resistance performance. The constitutional phases within the oxidation film were identified and the corresponding formation mechanisms were elucidated in detail according to the thermodynamic principles. The cross-sectional morphologies of oxidized Inconel 718 parts indicated that the oxidation microstructure mainly consisted of an external oxidation layer and an internal oxidation zone. The oxidation process was controlled by the outward diffusion of oxide forming elements and inward penetration of oxygen, by which the interaction mechanisms between the microstructures and internal oxidation zones were clarified. On the basis of the experimental results and theoretical analyses, the physical oxidation mechanisms were accordingly established to illustrate the oxidation behaviors of SLM-processed Inconel 718 parts at elevated operative temperatures.

  14. Complex three-dimensional high aspect ratio microfluidic network manufactured in combined PerMX dry-resist and SU-8 technology

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Robert Ch.; Badilita, Vlad; Brunne, Jens; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new fabrication method that combines for the first time popular SU-8 technology and PerMX dry-photoresist lamination for the manufacturing of high aspect ratio three-dimensional multi-level microfluidic networks. The potential of this approach, which further benefits from wafer-level manufacturing and accurate alignment of fluidic levels, is demonstrated by a highly integrated three-level microfluidic chip. The hereby achieved network complexity, including 24 fluidic vias and 16 crossing points of three individual microchannels on less than 13 mm2 chip area, is unique for SU-8 based fluidic networks. We further report on excellent process compatibility between SU-8 and PerMX dry-photoresist which results in high interlayer adhesion strength. The tight pressure sealing of a fluidic channel (0.5 MPa for 1 h) is demonstrated for 150 μm narrow SU-8/PerMX bonding interfaces. PMID:22662038

  15. Computer program for calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions and applications. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the latest in a number of versions of chemical equilibrium and applications programs developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center over more than 40 years. These programs have changed over the years to include additional features and improved calculation techniques and to take advantage of constantly improving computer capabilities. The minimization-of-free-energy approach to chemical equilibrium calculations has been used in all versions of the program since 1967. The two principal purposes of this report are presented in two parts. The first purpose, which is accomplished here in part 1, is to present in detail a number of topics of general interest in complex equilibrium calculations. These topics include mathematical analyses and techniques for obtaining chemical equilibrium; formulas for obtaining thermodynamic and transport mixture properties and thermodynamic derivatives; criteria for inclusion of condensed phases; calculations at a triple point; inclusion of ionized species; and various applications, such as constant-pressure or constant-volume combustion, rocket performance based on either a finite- or infinite-chamber-area model, shock wave calculations, and Chapman-Jouguet detonations. The second purpose of this report, to facilitate the use of the computer code, is accomplished in part 2, entitled 'Users Manual and Program Description'. Various aspects of the computer code are discussed, and a number of examples are given to illustrate its versatility.

  16. Solving a mathematical model integrating unequal-area facilities layout and part scheduling in a cellular manufacturing system by a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ahmad; Kia, Reza; Komijan, Alireza Rashidi

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a novel integrated mixed-integer nonlinear programming model is presented for designing a cellular manufacturing system (CMS) considering machine layout and part scheduling problems simultaneously as interrelated decisions. The integrated CMS model is formulated to incorporate several design features including part due date, material handling time, operation sequence, processing time, an intra-cell layout of unequal-area facilities, and part scheduling. The objective function is to minimize makespan, tardiness penalties, and material handling costs of inter-cell and intra-cell movements. Two numerical examples are solved by the Lingo software to illustrate the results obtained by the incorporated features. In order to assess the effects and importance of integration of machine layout and part scheduling in designing a CMS, two approaches, sequentially and concurrent are investigated and the improvement resulted from a concurrent approach is revealed. Also, due to the NP-hardness of the integrated model, an efficient genetic algorithm is designed. As a consequence, computational results of this study indicate that the best solutions found by GA are better than the solutions found by B&B in much less time for both sequential and concurrent approaches. Moreover, the comparisons between the objective function values (OFVs) obtained by sequential and concurrent approaches demonstrate that the OFV improvement is averagely around 17 % by GA and 14 % by B&B. PMID:27536537

  17. Mechanical behavior of Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} MMC manufactured by PM techniques. Part 1: Scheme 1 processing parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mazen, A.A.; Ahmed, A.Y.

    1998-06-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC) were manufactured using hot pressing followed by hot extrusion of aluminum (Al) powder reinforced by alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) particles. Under tensile as well as compressive loads, a strength improvement of 64 to 100% compared to the matrix material strength was obtained. The percent elongation to fracture ranged from 20 to 30%, which indicates good ductility as compared to the ductility of MMC manufactured by other techniques. Optical as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations were used for characterization of the material microstructure and fracture behavior. Porosity retained in the microstructure was very limited in the case of pure aluminum billets. Microstructural examination revealed uniform distribution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in the Al-matrix. Under tensile loads, voids opened by decohesion between the matrix and reinforcement. Such behavior led to a decrease in strength properties of the MMC as a function of reinforcement volume fraction. The fracture surface is dominated by the ductile fracture features, that is, dimples. Voids were found to initiate at retained porosity sites at the Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface or in the matrix close to the interface due to stress concentration. The SEM revealed the formation of a complex fine subgrain structure. Such a polygonized structure is a major source of strengthening.

  18. Misho mafic complex - A part of paleotethyan oceanic crust or a magmatism in continental rift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimzadeh, Zohreh; Jahangiri, Ahmad; Saccani, Emilio; Dilek, Yildirim

    2013-04-01

    Misho Mafic Complex (NW Iran) represents a significant component of the West Cimmerian domain in Paleo-Tethys. The Misho Mafic Complex (MMC) consists of gabbro (mainly) and norıte,olivine gabbro, anorthosite and diorite with the east- west sereight. MMC has ıntrussıved ın Kahar sedımrtery Infta- Cambrıan rocks, crosscut by abundant basaltic dykes and the overlying basaltic sheeted dyke complex. Kahar sedimentary rocks are representing the northern margin of Gondwana. Misho mafic complex are covered by Permian sedimentary rocks. The gabbros and basaltic dykes have MORB affinities. MMC formed as a product of interactions between a depleted MORB-type asthenosphere and plume-type material. Mafic rocks represent an early Carboniferous magmatic event developed during the continental break-up of the northern edge of Gondwanaland that led to the opening of Paleotethys. Alternatively, these magmas may have been emplaced into the continental crust at the continental margin soon after the oceanic crust was formed (that is the oceanic crust was still narrow). There is no data for discriminating between these two hypotheses. In first hypothesis MMC is a part of ophiolites related to paleotethyan oceanic crust and the rocks that were above this crustal level should have necessarily been eroded. In another hypothesis Misho complex represents an aborted rift in a triple junction. Above a mantle plume, the continental crust breaks along three directions at 120 degrees. But, soon after, the extension proceeds along two of these three direction. Between them is formed the oceanic crust. The continental extension along the third direction is aborted. Here no oceanic crust if formed and there is only rifted, thinned continental crust. But, also in the aborted branch MORB magmatism can occur for short time. In this hypothesis, the Misho complex was never associated with oceanic crust, but was anyway associated with the opening of the Paleotethys. This magmatism was originally

  19. Challenges and Recent Developments in Hearing Aids: Part II. Feedback and Occlusion Effect Reduction Strategies, Laser Shell Manufacturing Processes, and Other Signal Processing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on the challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Feedback and the occlusion effect pose great challenges in hearing aid design and usage. Yet, conventional solutions to feedback and the occlusion effect often create a dilemma: the solution to one often leads to the other. This review discusses the advanced signal processing strategies to reduce feedback and some new approaches to reduce the occlusion effect. Specifically, the causes of three types of feedback (acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic) are discussed. The strategies currently used to reduce acoustic feedback (i.e., adaptive feedback reduction algorithms using adaptive gain reduction, notch filtering, and phase cancellation strategies) and the design of new receivers that are built to reduce mechanical and electromagnetic feedback are explained. In addition, various new strategies (i.e., redesigned sound delivery devices and receiver-in-the-ear-canal hearing aid configuration) to reduce the occlusion effect are reviewed. Many manufacturers have recently adopted laser shell-manufacturing technologies to overcome problems associated with manufacturing custom hearing aid shells. The mechanisms of selected laser sintering and stereo lithographic apparatus and the properties of custom shells produced by these two processes are reviewed. Further, various new developments in hearing aid transducers, telecoils, channel-free amplification, open-platform programming options, rechargeable hearing aids, ear-level frequency modulated (FM) receivers, wireless Bluetooth FM systems, and wireless programming options are briefly explained and discussed. Finally, the applications of advanced hearing aid technologies to enhance other devices such as cochlear implants, hearing protectors, and cellular phones are discussed. PMID:15735871

  20. Hybrid manufacturing : integrating direct write and sterolithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Donald W.; Inamdar, Asim; Lopes, Amit; Chavez, Bart D.; Gallegos, Phillip L.; Palmer, Jeremy Andrew; Wicker, Ryan B.; Medina, Francisco; Hennessey, Robert E.

    2005-07-01

    A commercial stereolithography (SL) machine was modified to integrate fluid dispensing or direct-write (DW) technology with SL in an integrated manufacturing environment for automated and efficient hybrid manufacturing of complex electrical devices, combining three-dimensional (3D) electrical circuitry with SL-manufactured parts. The modified SL system operates similarly to a commercially available machine, although build interrupts were used to stop and start the SL build while depositing fluid using the DW system. An additional linear encoder was attached to the SL platform z-stage and used to maintain accurate part registration during the SL and DW build processes. Individual STL files were required as part of the manufacturing process plan. The DW system employed a three-axis translation mechanism that was integrated with the commercial SL machine. Registration between the SL part, SL laser and the DW nozzle was maintained through the use of 0.025-inch diameter cylindrical reference holes manufactured in the part during SL. After depositing conductive ink using DW, the SL laser was commanded to trace the profile until the ink was cured. The current system allows for easy exchange between SL and DW in order to manufacture fully functional 3D electrical circuits and structures in a semi-automated environment. To demonstrate the manufacturing capabilities, the hybrid SL/DW setup was used to make a simple multi-layer SL part with embedded circuitry. This hybrid system is not intended to function as a commercial system, it is intended for experimental demonstration only. This hybrid SL/DW system has the potential for manufacturing fully functional electromechanical devices that are more compact, less expensive, and more reliable than their conventional predecessors, and work is ongoing in order to fully automate the current system.

  1. Transition metal complexes of neocryptolepine analogues. Part I: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and invitro anticancer activity of copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Sanaa Moustafa; El Sayed, Ibrahim El Tantawy; Nassar, Nagla

    2015-03-01

    New generation of copper(II) complexes with aminoalkylaminoneocryptolepine as bidentate ligands has been synthesized and it is characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moment, spectra (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and ESR) and thermal studies. The IR data suggest the coordination modes for ligands which behave as a bidentate with copper(II) ion. Based on the elemental analysis, magnetic studies, electronic and ESR data, binuclear square planar geometry was proposed for complexes 7a, 7b, square pyramidal for 9a, 9b and octahedral for 8a, 8b, 10a, 10b. The molar conductance in DMF solution indicates that all complexes are electrolyte except 7a and 7b. The ESR spectra of solid copper(II) complexes in powder form showed an axial symmetry with 2B1g as a ground state and hyperfine structure. The thermal stability and degradation of the ligands and their metal complexes were studied employing DTA and TG methods. The metal-free ligands and their copper(II) complexes were tested for their in vitro anticancer activity against human colon carcinoma (HT-29). The results showed that the synthesized copper(II) complexes exhibited higher anticancer activity than their free ligands. Of all the studied copper(II) complexes, the bromo-substituted complex 9b exhibited high anticancer activity at low micromolar inhibitory concentrations (IC50 = 0.58 μM), compared to the other complexes and the free ligands.

  2. Manufacturing Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    According to the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), "manufacturing is the engine that drives American prosperity". When NAM and its research and education arm, The Manufacturing Institute, released the handbook, "The Facts About Modern Manufacturing," in October 2006, NAM President John Engler noted, that manufacturing output in America…

  3. Integrated Processing: Quality Assurance Procedure of the Surface Layer of Machine Parts during the Manufacturing Step "Diamond Smoothing"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeeba, V. Yu; Ivancivsky, V. V.; Lobanov, D. V.; Zhigulev, A. K.; Skeeba, P. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The present study has found that during the integrated processing after the diamond smoothing, in the surface-hardened sample a cold-worked layer 0.01 ... 0.02 mm in thickness, the microhardness value of which reaches 868 HV, is formed. The intensity of compressive stresses on the part surface increases to στ = -678 MPa. The analysis of the experimental data has shown the relationship between the parameter Ra and the processing modes that can be used during diamond smoothing, based on the high performance and the desired surface roughness. It has been found that the minimum value of roughness Ra = 0.18±0.08 μm is reliably achieved by smoothing processing when the smoothing force Py ranges from 100 N to 150 N.

  4. Evidence for a rotating helical filament in L1641, part of the Orion cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Minoshima, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Iwata, T.

    1991-01-01

    The Nagoya 4-m radiotelescope has been used to study L1641, a streamer which is a part of the giant molecular-cloud complex ion Orion, lying south of the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula. The 110-GHz line of (C-=13)O (J = 1-0) has been used to obtain intensity and velocity data. A dense filament with a helical structure, spinning in the same sense as the gas in the Orion KL region, has been found. A model for this structure is proposed in which the streamer, through the action of the interstellar magnetic field, acts as an angular-momentum drain on the Orion KL region, allowing it to collapse. In this model, the approximately 30 pc long streamer is essential to the formation of the cloud, as well as the formation of stars within the dense cloud.

  5. Toward a fundamental theory of optimal feature selection: Part II - Implementation and computational complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Morgera, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    Certain algorithms and their computational complexity are examined for use in a VLSI implementation of the real-time pattern classifier described in Part I of this work. The most computationally intensive processing is found in the classifier training mode wherein subsets of the largest and smallest eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors of the input data covariance pair must be computed. It is shown that if the matrix of interest is centrosymmetric and the method for eigensystem decomposition is operator-based, the problem architecture assumes a parallel form. Such a matrix structure is found in a wide variety of pattern recognition and speech and signal processing applications. Each of the parallel channels requires only two specialized matrix-arithmetic modules.

  6. Numerical Prediction Of Elastic Springback In An Automotive Complex Structural Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Livan; Ingarao, Giuseppe; Micari, Fabrizio; Lo Franco, Andrea

    2007-05-01

    The routing and production of 3D complex parts for automotive applications is characterized by springback phenomena affecting the final geometry of the components both after the stamping operations and the trimming ones. FE analyses have to assure effectiveness and consistency in order to be utilized as design tool to be coupled to proper compensating techniques allowing to obtain the desired geometry at the and of the production sequence. In the present paper the full routing of a DP 600 steel automotive structural part is considered and the springback phenomena occurring after forming and trimming are investigated through FE analyses utilizing two different commercial codes. Althought finite element analysis is successful in simulating industrial sheet forming operations, the accurate and reliable applications of this phenomenon and its numerical prediction has not been widely demonstrated. In this paper the influence of the main numerical parameters has been considered i.e. type of the utilized shell element and number of integration points along the thickness, with the aim to improve the effectiveness and reliability of the numerical results. The obtained results have been compared with the experimental evidences derived from CMM acquisitions.

  7. Flexible and Array Eddy Current Probes for Fast Inspection of Complex Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, B.; Decitre, J. M.; Casula, O.

    2010-02-01

    Eddy Current is a powerful mean of detection of detects located in conductive parts. This technique has already proved great performances and brought solutions to different industrial issues in nuclear or aeronautics domains for instance. Probes used in Non Destructive Testing (NDT) are mainly based on winding coils. This technology has shown good efficiency and gave good results in a lot of applications. Nonetheless, it reveals some limits in some cases, when the part has a complex shape for instance or when the defect is deeply buried. Therefore, other technologies have been developed at CEA LIST. An original scheme, optimized using the NDT platform CIVA, led to the development of a 32-elements flexible probe, based on micro-coils. Experimental testing reveals its efficiency in the detection of small surface defects. In other hand, magnetic sensors are very attractive for NDT. Thanks to their small size, a 22-GMRs arrays probe and a 96-AMRs array probes have been achieved. Their high spatial resolution and efficiency in the detection of small defects are demonstrated. The high sensitivity of magnetic sensors at low frequency has been used to design a flexible probe dedicated to the detection of deep defects. Its design and experimental testing are given.

  8. Metrology Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, John A.; Garboczi, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes can produce highly complex and customized parts without the need for dedicated tooling and can produce parts directly from the part design information. These types of processes are poised to revolutionize the manufacturing industry, yet several challenges are currently preventing more widespread adoption of AM technologies. Among these challenges are metrology issues associated with the measurement and characterization of the metal powders used for AM systems. This article will describe the technical challenges and needs for characterizing metal AM powders, recent research efforts to address those needs, and current work to standardize characterization methods in ASTM and ISO, such as the recently released ASTM F3049, Standard Guide for Characterizing Properties of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing Processes.

  9. Advancements in asphere manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, Edward; DeFisher, Scott

    2013-09-01

    Aspheric optics can pose as a challenge to the manufacturing community due to the surface shape and level of quality required. The aspheric surface may have inflection points that limit the usable tool size during manufacturing, or there may be a stringent tolerance on the slope for mid-spatial frequencies that may be problematic for sub-aperture finishing techniques to achieve. As aspheres become more commonplace in the optics community, requests for more complex aspheres have risen. OptiPro Systems has been developing technologies to create a robust aspheric manufacturing process. Contour deterministic microgrinding is performed on a Pro80 or eSX platform. These platforms utilize software and the latest advancements in machine motion to accurately contour the aspheric shape. Then the optics are finished using UltraForm Finishing (UFF), which is a sub-aperture polishing process. This process has the capability to adjust the diameter and compliance of the polishing lap to allow for finishing over a wide range of shapes and conditions. Finally, the aspheric surfaces are qualified using an OptiTrace contact profilometer, or an UltraSurf non-contact 3D surface scanner. The OptiTrace uses a stylus to scan across the surface of the part, and the UltraSurf utilizes several different optical pens to scan the surface and generate a topographical map of the surface under test. This presentation will focus on the challenges for asphere manufacturing, how OptiPro has implemented its technologies to combat these challenges, and provide surface data for analysis.

  10. Effect of Voice-Part Training and Music Complexity on Focus of Attention to Melody or Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible effects of choral voice-part training/experience and music complexity on focus of attention to melody or harmony. Participants (N = 150) were members of auditioned university choral ensembles divided by voice-part (sopranos, n = 44; altos, n = 33; tenors, n = 35; basses, n = 38). The music…

  11. Applications of Metal Additive Manufacturing in Veterinary Orthopedic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrysson, Ola L. A.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.; Horn, Timothy J.

    2015-03-01

    Veterinary medicine has undergone a rapid increase in specialization over the last three decades. Veterinarians now routinely perform joint replacement, neurosurgery, limb-sparing surgery, interventional radiology, radiation therapy, and other complex medical procedures. Many procedures involve advanced imaging and surgical planning. Evidence-based medicine has also become part of the modus operandi of veterinary clinicians. Modeling and additive manufacturing can provide individualized or customized therapeutic solutions to support the management of companion animals with complex medical problems. The use of metal additive manufacturing is increasing in veterinary orthopedic surgery. This review describes and discusses current and potential applications of metal additive manufacturing in veterinary orthopedic surgery.

  12. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  13. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  14. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  15. POD evaluation using simulation: A phased array UT case on a complex geometry part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Nicolas; Reverdy, Frederic; Jenson, Frederic

    2014-02-01

    The use of Probability of Detection (POD) for NDT performances demonstration is a key link in products lifecycle management. The POD approach is to apply the given NDT procedure on a series of known flaws to estimate the probability to detect with respect to the flaw size. A POD is relevant if and only if NDT operations are carried out within the range of variability authorized by the procedure. Such experimental campaigns require collection of large enough datasets to cover the range of variability with sufficient occurrences to build a reliable POD statistics, leading to expensive costs to get POD curves. In the last decade research activities have been led in the USA with the MAPOD group and later in Europe with the SISTAE and PICASSO projects based on the idea to use models and simulation tools to feed POD estimations. This paper proposes an example of application of POD using simulation on the inspection procedure of a complex -full 3D- geometry part using phased arrays ultrasonic testing. It illustrates the methodology and the associated tools developed in the CIVA software. The paper finally provides elements of further progress in the domain.

  16. Airborne and ground reconnaissance of part of the syenite complex near Wausau, Marathon county, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vickers, R.C.

    1955-01-01

    Airborne and ground reconnaissance for radioactive minerals in part of the syenite complex near Wausau, Marathon county, Wis., found 12 radioactive mineral localities. The rocks in the area are of Precambrian age and consist of syenite and nepheline syenite, which have intruded older granite, greenstone, quartzite, and argillite. There are very few outcrops, and much of the bedrock is deeply weathered and covered by residual soil. Thorium-bearing zircon pegatite float was found within the area of syenite and nepheline syenite at four localities. Reddish-brown euhedral to subeuhedral crystals of well-zoned zircon (variety cyrtolite) comprise more than 40 percent of some of the specimens. The radioactive mineral at four localities outside the area of syneites was identified as thorogummite, which occurred in nodular masses in residual soil. Alinement of the thorogummite float and associated radioactivity suggests that the thorogummite has resulted from weathering of narrow veins or pegmatites containing thorium-bearing minerals. Unidentified thorium-bearing minerals were found at three localities, and a specimen of allanite weighing about 2 pounds was found at one locality. Shallow trenches at two of the largest radioactivity anomalies showed that the radioactive material extended down into weathered bedrock. The occurrences might warrant additional physical exploration should there be sufficient demand for thorium. Further reconnaissance in the area would probably result in the discovery of additional occurrences.

  17. Investigations on Manufacturability and Process Reliability of Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, H.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Selective laser melting is a layer-wise manufacturing process that enables the use of complex geometric shapes in part design and production. An infrared laser beam is focused on a thin layer of metallic powder and selectively deflected in order to scan the cross-section of the parts being built. The process quality is dominated by the consolidation of powder particles through laser beam interaction, the part geometry itself and the arrangement of multiple parts. In this paper, the manufacturability is investigated by characterizing single melt tracks and the buildup of thin wall structures consisting of a few aligned scan tracks.

  18. Complex Parts, Complex Data: Why You Need to Understand What Radiation Single Event Testing Data Does and Doesn't Show and the Implications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie D.

    2015-01-01

    Electronic parts (integrated circuits) have grown in complexity such that determining all failure modes and risks from single particle event testing is impossible. In this presentation, the authors will present why this is so and provide some realism on what this means. Its all about understanding actual risks and not making assumptions.

  19. Complex Parts, Complex Data: Why You Need to Understand What Radiation Single Event Testing Data Does and Doesn't Show and the Implications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie D.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic parts (integrated circuits) have grown in complexity such that determining all failure modes and risks from single particle event testing is impossible. In this presentation, the authors will present why this is so and provide some realism on what this means. Its all about understanding actual risks and not making assumptions.

  20. WASTE MINIMIZATION AUDIT REPORT: CASE STUDIES OF CORROSIVE AND HEAVY METAL WASTE MINIMIZATION AT A SPECIALTY STEEL MANUFACTURING COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expanding its efforts to promote waste minimization activity in the private sector by providing technical assistance to generators of hazardous waste. As part of the effort, the EPA Office of Research and Development/Hazardous Was...

  1. Granitoid generation and laxfordian tectonic evolution in the northern part of the lewisian complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, A.; Lopez, S.; Fernandez, C.

    2003-04-01

    Several terranes have been distinguished in the Lewisian complex of Scotland. The contact between the Rhiconich and Assynt terranes, in the northern part of the mainland Lewisian complex, is outlined by a major shear zone, the Laxford front. The tectonic activity in this shear zone took place mainly during the Early Proterozoic (1900 to 1600 Ma), defining a Laxfordian period of deformation and metamorphism. Generalized migmatization of the tonalite-trondhjemite (TT) gneisses developed coeval with the intrusion of abundant Fe-diorite tabular bodies in the Rhiconich terrane. Field structures indicate that both TT gneisses and Fe-diorites coexisted as melts or partially molten systems. The composition of the TT gneisses changes to granodioritic in the vicinity of the diorite intrusions. It is suggested that percolation of alkali-rich fluids released from the crystallising diorite magma through the TT migmatites could explain this compositional change. The presence of granite and pegmatite dikes is characteristic of the Rhiconich terrane. The observed structural relationships indicate that the migmatization of the TT gneisses and the intrusion of basic and granitic rocks are simultaneous processes, and that they developed in association with the Laxfordian deformation. In contrast, the Assynt terrane is almost devoid of basic and granitic intrusions during the Laxfordian period. The main structures developed within the Laxford front are a WNW-ESE oriented foliation, dipping to the north, and a lineation slightly plunging to the ESE. Kinematic criteria include composite planar fabrics, asymmetric porphyroclast systems and sheath folds, and allow us to deducing a dextral-reverse sense of movement. Similarly, the Laxfordian deformation in the Rhiconich terrane gave place to a pervasive foliation and lineation, north-verging folds and dextral-reverse minor shear zones. Accordingly, the Laxfordian period in the northern Lewisian can be wholly described as a dextral

  2. The Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Dissolving Silos

    ScienceCinema

    Danielson, David; Orr, Lynn; Sarkar, Reuben; Zayas, Jose; Johnson, Mark

    2016-06-24

    DOE?s work is closely tied to manufacturing because manufacturing is an important part of technology innovation and commercialization. Find out how DOE ? through the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative ? is helping America lead the clean energy revolution.

  3. Release of iron-cyanide complexes form contaminated soils - Batch and column experiments on substrates from Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Soils of former Manufactured Gas Plants (MGPs) are often contaminated with iron-cyanide (Fe-CN) complexes that originate from gas purification process. Cyanide is a potentially toxic substance and its presence in soil and groundwater may cause risk for human health as well as for the environment. MGPs were commonly built on the city suburban areas, which have spread ever since. Nowadays, these sites are typically located in inner cities, causing environmental thread, due to the leaching of pollutants. More recently, columns and batch experiments have been used to study fate and mobility of contaminants is soil. The release of iron-cyanide complexes under unsaturated flow conditions was evaluated with eight columns of 30 cm length and a diameter of 5,4 cm. Cyanide concentrations in the collected leachates were measured with Flow Injection Analysis (FIA). Additionally pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and various ion concentrations were determined. In order to compare the release of Fe-CN complexes in saturated conditions a batch experiment was conducted, where in defined time intervals, 1 ml of the extract water phase was analyzed for CN concentration. Study revealed an analogous trend of cyanide release in both experiments indicating primarily the release of formerly dissolved phase (hexacyanoferrates) followed by continual dissolution of ferric ferrocyanide. We conclude that batch experiments, conducted prior to column analysis, can serve as preliminary prediction of the water soluble cyanide fraction under unsaturated conditions.

  4. Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein complexes from aortas of hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Part 1. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, T P; Augustyn, J M; Fritz, K E

    1978-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein complexes were isolated from rabbit aortas exhibiting nearly confluent cholesterol-induced foam cell lesions by extraction with 0.15 M NaCl. Purification and characterization was achieved by gel chromatography, non-ionic differential flotation and by cellulose polyacetate electrophoresis. Analysis showed that these complexes consisted of very low density lipoproteins, heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate-C and hyaluronic acid. The demonstration that rabbit intimal foam cell lesions contain extractable glycosaminoglycan-lipoprotein complexes makes this animal model an excellent tool for further studies on the role of these complexes in the atherogenic process. PMID:215171

  5. Exploring Innovation Processes from a Complexity Perspective. Part II. Experiences from the Subsea Increased Oil Recovery Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Tone Merethe Berg; Johannessen, Stig

    2007-01-01

    In this second part of the papers, exploring innovation processes from a complexity perspective, we present an empirical example to strengthen further the relevance of the approach. The example draws on a longitudinal research initiative conducted in cooperation with the Norwegian petroleum company Statoil ASA. We conducted our research into the…

  6. Efficacy of viral clearance methods used in the manufacture of activated prothrombin complex concentrates: focus on AUTOPLEX T.

    PubMed

    Horwith, G; Revie, D R

    1999-09-01

    Various methods are described for the elimination of infectious viruses from activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCCs) and for the analysis of the final products (AUTOPLEX T and FEIBA VH). Viruses of concern in human plasma-derived products are enveloped (hepatitis B and C, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]) and nonenveloped (hepatitis A and parvovirus B19). Donated blood used for AUTOPLEX T is screened for antihepatitis C, HBsAg, anti-HIV types 1 and 2, and p24 antigen. Plasma pools utilized for raw materials are also tested by PCR for HIV and hepatitis C virus. Partial virus inactivation and partitioning are achieved by purification of the aPCC. Further reduction of virus infectivity is accomplished by lyophilization and dry-heat treatment. Each step undergoes virus elimination validation studies in which a relevant sample is 'spiked' with the appropriate virus or model virus. The total reduction in virus from raw material to final product can then be calculated. For AUTOPLEX T the cumulative log10 reduction factors for several viruses vary from 4.2 to 14.3. This ensures an exceptionally high margin of safety. Definitive evidence for product safety was obtained by clinical observation of treated patients. The viral inactivation process of AUTOPLEX T involves a four-tier viral safety program, including Cohn alcohol fractionation and dry-heat treatment, in place of the two-stage vapour-heating process for FEIBA. PMID:10597384

  7. Manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is at the core of Sandia National Laboratories' advanced manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process. The center's capabilities in product and process development are summarized in the following disciplines: (1) mechanical - rapid prototyping, manufacturing engineering, machining and computer-aided manufacturing, measurement and calibration, and mechanical and electronic manufacturing liaison; (2) electronics - advanced packaging for microelectronics, printed circuits, and electronic fabrication; and (3) materials - ceramics, glass, thin films, vacuum technology, brazing, polymers, adhesives, composite materials, and process analysis.

  8. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  9. Hanford facility dangerous waste Part A, Form 3 and Part B permit application documentation, Central Waste Complex (WA7890008967)(TSD: TS-2-4)

    SciTech Connect

    Saueressig, D.G.

    1998-05-20

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the Central Waste Complex (this document, DOE/RL-91-17). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this Central Waste Complex permit application documentation is current as of May 1998.

  10. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  11. Energy 101: Clean Energy Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-09

    Most of us have a basic understanding of manufacturing. It's how we convert raw materials, components, and parts into finished goods that meet our essential needs and make our lives easier. But what about clean energy manufacturing? Clean energy and advanced manufacturing have the potential to rejuvenate the U.S. manufacturing industry and open pathways to increased American competitiveness. Watch this video to learn more about this exciting movement and to see some of these innovations in action.

  12. Kuranakh complex diabases in the western part of the Aldan-Stanovoi Shield: Age and tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, N. V.; Kotov, A. B.; Salnikova, E. B.; Postnikov, A. A.; Timofeev, V. F.; Berezkin, V. I.; Larin, A. M.; Fedoseenko, A. M.; Yakovleva, S. Z.

    2012-01-01

    The age of Kuranakh Complex diabases in the western part of the Aldan-Stanovoi Shield determined by the zircon U-Pb method is virtually identical to that of basic rocks in the Chinei stratified pluton and granites in the Kodar Complex. Thus, it is possible to suggest that they form a unified bimodal magmatic association and belong to the South Siberian postcollision magmatic belt, which extends along the southwestern framing of the Siberian Craton for more than 2500 km from the Yenisei mountain range to the Aldan-Stanovoi Shield. The occurrence of the diabase dike swarms in magmatic associations of this belt testifies to formation under lithospheric extension conditions.

  13. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 541: Metal Complexes of Heterocyclic Sulfonamides: A New Class of Antiglaucoma Agents

    PubMed Central

    Scozzafava, Andrea; Jitianu, Andrei

    1997-01-01

    Metal complexes of heterocyclic sulfonamides possessing carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitory properties were recently shown to be useful as intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering agents in experimental animals, and might be developed as a novel class of antiglaucoma drugs. Here we report the synthesis of a heterocyclic sulfonamide CA inhibitor and of the metal complexes containing main group metal ions, such as Be(II), Mg(II), Al(III), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) and the new sulfonamide as well as 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide as ligands. The new complexes were characterized by standard physico-chemical procedures, and assayed as inhibitors of three CA isozymes, CA I, II and IV. Some of them (but not the parent sulfonamides) strongly lowered IOP in rabbits when administered as a 2% solution into the eye. PMID:18475811

  14. Complex home care: Part 2- family annual income, insurance premium, and out-of-pocket expenses.

    PubMed

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Ross, Vicki M; Smith, Carol E; Clements, Faye; Williams, Arthur R

    2010-01-01

    Annual costs paid by families for intravenous infusion of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) health insurance premiums, deductibles, co-payments for health services, and the wide range of out-of-pocket home health care expenses are significant. The costs of managing complex chronic care at home cannot be completely understood until all out-of-pocket costs have been defined, described, and tabulated. Non-reimbursed and out-of-pocket costs paid by families over years for complex chronic care negatively impact the financial stability of families. National health care reform must take into account the long-term financial burdens of families caring for those with complex home care. Any changes that may increase the out-of-pocket costs or health insurance costs to these families can also have a negative long-term impact on society when greater numbers of patients declare bankruptcy or qualify for medical disability. PMID:21158253

  15. Additive manufacturing: Overview and NDE challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes are capable of producing highly complex and customized parts, without the need for dedicated tooling, and can produce parts directly from the part design information. These types of processes are poised to revolutionize the manufacturing industry, yet there are several challenges that are currently preventing more widespread adoption of AM technologies. Traditional Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods could be utilized in both in-process and post-process applications to help overcome these challenges, although currently there are very few examples of in-situ sensors for monitoring AM processes. This paper gives an overview of AM technology, and discusses the potential benefits and challenges of using NDE in AM applications.

  16. Cable manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, P.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of flat electrical cable manufacturing, with particular reference to patented processes. The economics of manufacture based on an analysis of material and operating costs is considered for the various methods. Attention is given to the competitive advantages of the several processes and their resulting products. The historical area of flat cable manufacture is presented to give a frame of reference for the survey.

  17. Izumo is part of a multiprotein family whose members form large complexes on mammalian sperm

    PubMed Central

    Ellerman, Diego A; Pei, Jimin; Gupta, Surabhi; Snell, William J; Myles, Diana; Primakoff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Izumo, a sperm membrane protein, is essential for gamete fusion in the mouse. It has an Ig (Immunoglobulin) domain and an N-terminal domain for which neither the functions nor homologous sequences are known. In the present work we identified three novel proteins showing an N-terminal domain with significant homology to the N-terminal domain of Izumo. We named this region "Izumo domain", and the novel proteins “Izumo 2”,”Izumo 3” and “Izumo 4”, retaining “Izumo 1” for the first described member of the family. Izumo 1, 2 and 3 are transmembrane proteins expressed specifically in the testis, and Izumo 4 is a soluble protein expressed in the testis and in other tissues. Electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions, followed by Western blot analysis, showed that Izumo 1, 3 and 4 formed protein complexes on sperm, Izumo 1 forming several larger complexes and Izumo 3 and 4 forming a single larger complex. Studies using different recombinant Izumo constructs suggested the Izumo domain possesses the ability to form dimers, whereas the transmembrane domain or the cytoplasmic domain or both of Izumo 1 are required for the formation of multimers of higher order. Co-immunoprecipitation studies showed the presence of other sperm proteins associated with Izumo-1, suggesting Izumo 1 forms a multi-protein membrane complex. Our results raise the possibility that Izumo 1 might be involved in organizing or stabilizing a multi-protein complex essential for the function of the membrane fusion machinery. PMID:19658160

  18. Vibration Characteristics of a Large-Capacity Complex Vibration Source Using a Titanium Alloy Complex Transverse Vibration Rod with Two Stepped Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Kikuchi, Yuya

    2004-05-01

    The configurations of large-capacity 27 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration sources with multiple longitudinal transducers are proposed and studied. Ultrasonic complex vibration systems are effective for various types of metal welding and essential for new applications in various industries. The large-capacity vibration source consists of a complex transverse rod with a welding tip (titanium alloy), a complex vibration rod with a flange and a stepped part for holding the system (stainless-steel), a one-wavelength longitudinal vibration disk (aluminum alloy) and six bolt-clamped Langevin type piezo-electric ceramic (PZT) transducers (BLTs) installed along the circumference of the disk at an angle difference of 60°. The vibration source is driven using three driving systems with three transformers at a phase difference of 120°, and the disk is driven in a circular locus. The transverse vibration rod installed at the center of the disk is driven transversally and the welding tip of the rod vibrates in a circular locus.

  19. Spectral transformation in the SOFI complex for processing photographic images on the ES computer, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debabov, A. S.; Usikov, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of three programs catalogued in the form of object modules in the library of a system for processing photographic images computer. PFT is the subprogram of the multi-dimensional BPF of real-valued information, in the operative computer memory. INRECO is a subprogram-interface between the real and complex formats for representing two-dimensional spectra and images. FFT2 is a subprogram for calculating the correlation functions of the image using the previous subprograms.

  20. Generalized model of electromigration with 1:1 (analyte:selector) complexation stoichiometry: part I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Pavel; Müllerová, Ludmila; Dvořák, Martin; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2015-03-01

    The model of electromigration of a multivalent weak acidic/basic/amphoteric analyte that undergoes complexation with a mixture of selectors is introduced. The model provides an extension of the series of models starting with the single-selector model without dissociation by Wren and Rowe in 1992, continuing with the monovalent weak analyte/single-selector model by Rawjee, Williams and Vigh in 1993 and that by Lelièvre in 1994, and ending with the multi-selector overall model without dissociation developed by our group in 2008. The new multivalent analyte multi-selector model shows that the effective mobility of the analyte obeys the original Wren and Row's formula. The overall complexation constant, mobility of the free analyte and mobility of complex can be measured and used in a standard way. The mathematical expressions for the overall parameters are provided. We further demonstrate mathematically that the pH dependent parameters for weak analytes can be simply used as an input into the multi-selector overall model and, in reverse, the multi-selector overall parameters can serve as an input into the pH-dependent models for the weak analytes. These findings can greatly simplify the rationale method development in analytical electrophoresis, specifically enantioseparations. PMID:25637010

  1. Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, James L.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high school industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in manufacturing technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to manufacturing, materials processing, personnel management, production management,…

  2. Petrology of the freetown layered complex, Sierra Leone: part II. Magma evolution and crystallisation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalokwu, C. I.

    2001-04-01

    The Freetown Layered Complex, Sierra Leone, is a 65 km long, 14 km wide and 7 km thick tholeiitic intrusion, which had been intruded in the West African Craton during the Jurassic (˜ 190 Ma) opening of the middle Atlantic Ocean. The complex consists of four zones of rhythmically layered sequences of Pl+Ol+Aug±Tmt-Ol+Opx+Pgt+Ol-Pgt. Cumulus inverted pigeonite first appeared at the bottom of Zone 2 before disappearing in the middle of Zone 3 only to reappear at the top of Zone 4 with cumulus titanomagnetite. Calculated emplacement pressures, based on the compositions of coexisting plagioclase-pyroxene and the CaTs reaction, range from 2.8 to 5.1 kbar. Two-pyroxene geothermometer gives crystallisation temperatures of 972-1305 ± 70°C, which compare favourably with temperatures estimated from O isotope thermometers (1040-1290 ± 60°C) and plagioclase-liquid thermometers (1045-1381°C) applied to the Freetown bulk composition and obtained by geochemical summation for each zone. Fe-Ti oxides have all re-equilibrated during subsolidus cooling of the complex, but yield fO 2 between quartz-fayalite-magnetite and wüstite-magnetite buffers at high pressure. Silica activity, based on the En = Fo + SiO 2 equilibrium, has been calculated for the entire stratigraphic section. Instead of a progressive increase from the bottom to the top of the complex, values of silica activity fluctuate within the zones, with major decreases corresponding to levels of new magma additions or the arrival of cumulus titanomagnetite. Stratigraphic summation of whole rock chemical composition of cumulates for zones 2-4, weighted according to the average density of the zones, indicates the zones were produced by multiple injection of high alumina (18.38-20.47 wt%) low Ti (0.46-0.70 wt%) hypersthene-normative tholeiites with moderately high activities of silica. Numerical simulation using the COMAGMAT computer algorithm indicates zone 4 bulk composition, interpreted as approximating the parental

  3. S1 excitation and zero kinetic energy spectra of partly deuterated 1:1 phenol-water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopfer, Otto; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    1994-11-01

    Two-photon, two-color resonant-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of the S1 state of isotopic 1:1 hydrogen-bonded phenol-water clusters have been recorded. Up to three deuterium atoms are introduced in the phenolic OH group and/or the water molecule. The intermolecular vibrational structure found is in reasonable agreement with previously reported one-color REMPI spectra, however, a partly different interpretation of the spectra is presented here. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron (ZEKE) spectra have been obtained via different intermediate S1 levels of the various isotopic complexes. The analysis of both the REMPI and the ZEKE spectra supports the new assignment of several vibrational bands observed in the REMPI spectra of the deuterated complexes where one or two hydrogen atoms are substituted by deuterium. For these deuterated complexes, the reassignment given here is based on the assumption that two different nonequivalent isomeric configurations are responsible for the structure observed in the REMPI spectra. This result is in clear contrast to the previously given interpretation where the spectra were analyzed in terms of only one isomer and the occurrence of Fermi resonances. Furthermore, accurate ionization energies are determined for all possible isomers of the various isotopic complexes and propensity rules for these values as a function of site-specific deuteration have been found. In addition, the analysis of the intermolecular vibrational structure of the complex cations confirmed the assignment of the intermolecular stretch vibration.

  4. Immediate Single-Stage Reconstruction of Complex Frontofaciobasal Injuries: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Akram Mohamed; Ezzeddine, Hichem; Fawzy, Naglaaa; Saeed, Mohammad Al; Ahmad, Mohammad R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if immediate (within 6 hours of adequate resuscitation) single-stage repair of complex craniofacial injuries could be accomplished with acceptable morbidity and mortality taking into consideration the cosmetic appearance of the patient. Patients and Methods A total of 26 patients (19 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 8 to 58 years with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 5 to 15 all had a combined single-stage repair of their complex craniofacial injuries within 6 hours of their admission. After initial assessment and adequate resuscitation, they were evaluated with three-dimensional computed tomography of the face and head. Coronal skin flap was used for maximum exposure for frontal sinus exenteration as well as dural repair, cortical debridement, calvarial reconstruction, and titanium mesh placement. Results Neurosurgical outcome at both the early and late evaluations was judged as good in 22 of 26 patients (85%), moderate in 3 of 26 (11%), and poor in 1 of the 26 (3.8%). Cosmetic surgical outcome at the early evaluation showed 17 of 26 (65%) to be excellent, 4 of 26 (15.5%) to be good, 4 patients (15.5%) to be fair, and 1 patient (3.8%) to be poor. At the late reevaluation, the fair had improved to good with an additional reconstructive procedure, and the poor had improved to fair with another surgery. There was no calvarial osteomyelitis, graft resorption, or intracranial abscess. Complications included three patients (11%): one (3.8%) had tension pneumocephaly and meningitis, one (3.8%) had delayed cerebrospinal fluid leak with recurrent attacks of meningitis, and one had a maxillary sinus infection (3.8%) secondary to front maxillary fistula. Conclusion The immediate single-stage repair of complex craniofacial injuries can be performed with acceptable results, a decreased need for reoperation, and improved cosmetic and functional outcomes. PMID:25844296

  5. Immediate single-stage reconstruction of complex frontofaciobasal injuries: part I.

    PubMed

    Awadalla, Akram Mohamed; Ezzeddine, Hichem; Fawzy, Naglaaa; Saeed, Mohammad Al; Ahmad, Mohammad R

    2015-03-01

    Objective To determine if immediate (within 6 hours of adequate resuscitation) single-stage repair of complex craniofacial injuries could be accomplished with acceptable morbidity and mortality taking into consideration the cosmetic appearance of the patient. Patients and Methods A total of 26 patients (19 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 8 to 58 years with Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 5 to 15 all had a combined single-stage repair of their complex craniofacial injuries within 6 hours of their admission. After initial assessment and adequate resuscitation, they were evaluated with three-dimensional computed tomography of the face and head. Coronal skin flap was used for maximum exposure for frontal sinus exenteration as well as dural repair, cortical debridement, calvarial reconstruction, and titanium mesh placement. Results Neurosurgical outcome at both the early and late evaluations was judged as good in 22 of 26 patients (85%), moderate in 3 of 26 (11%), and poor in 1 of the 26 (3.8%). Cosmetic surgical outcome at the early evaluation showed 17 of 26 (65%) to be excellent, 4 of 26 (15.5%) to be good, 4 patients (15.5%) to be fair, and 1 patient (3.8%) to be poor. At the late reevaluation, the fair had improved to good with an additional reconstructive procedure, and the poor had improved to fair with another surgery. There was no calvarial osteomyelitis, graft resorption, or intracranial abscess. Complications included three patients (11%): one (3.8%) had tension pneumocephaly and meningitis, one (3.8%) had delayed cerebrospinal fluid leak with recurrent attacks of meningitis, and one had a maxillary sinus infection (3.8%) secondary to front maxillary fistula. Conclusion The immediate single-stage repair of complex craniofacial injuries can be performed with acceptable results, a decreased need for reoperation, and improved cosmetic and functional outcomes. PMID:25844296

  6. Microgravity Manufacturing Via Fused Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. G.; Griffin, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing polymer hardware during space flight is currently outside the state of the art. A process called fused deposition modeling (FDM) can make this approach a reality by producing net-shaped components of polymer materials directly from a CAE model. FDM is a rapid prototyping process developed by Stratasys, Inc.. which deposits a fine line of semi-molten polymer onto a substrate while moving via computer control to form the cross-sectional shape of the part it is building. The build platen is then lowered and the process is repeated, building a component directly layer by layer. This method enables direct net-shaped production of polymer components directly from a computer file. The layered manufacturing process allows for the manufacture of complex shapes and internal cavities otherwise impossible to machine. This task demonstrated the benefits of the FDM technique to quickly and inexpensively produce replacement components or repair broken hardware in a Space Shuttle or Space Station environment. The intent of the task was to develop and fabricate an FDM system that was lightweight, compact, and required minimum power consumption to fabricate ABS plastic hardware in microgravity. The final product of the shortened task turned out to be a ground-based breadboard device, demonstrating miniaturization capability of the system.

  7. Taxonomy of 'Euconnus complex'. Part IV. Review of Euconnus subgenus Rhomboconnus (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae).

    PubMed

    Jałoszyński, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Morphological structures of the type species of Euconnus (Rhomboconnus Franz) are described and illustrated, and compared with those of Euconnus s. str. Rhomboconnus, although showing several peculiar character states (e.g., rudimentary or lacking basal elytral foveae) is maintained as a subgenus of Euconnus, and its revised diagnosis is given. Two species currently placed in Rhomboconnus, E. perplexus Franz (Venezuela) and E. trianguliceps Franz (Ecuador) are redescribed. A surprising and striking similarity of the aedeagus of Rhomboconnus to that of Plaumanniola Costa Lima (Plaumanniolini) is discussed as yet another structural evidence supporting a previously postulated close relationship between the enigmatic Plaumanniolini and the 'Euconnus complex'. PMID:26623739

  8. Greater Than the Sum of Parts: Complexity of the Dynamic Epigenome.

    PubMed

    Soshnev, Alexey A; Josefowicz, Steven Z; Allis, C David

    2016-06-01

    Information encoded in DNA is interpreted, modified, and propagated as chromatin. The diversity of inputs encountered by eukaryotic genomes demands a matching capacity for transcriptional outcomes provided by the combinatorial and dynamic nature of epigenetic processes. Advances in genome editing, visualization technology, and genome-wide analyses have revealed unprecedented complexity of chromatin pathways, offering explanations to long-standing questions and presenting new challenges. Here, we review recent findings, exemplified by the emerging understanding of crossregulatory interactions within chromatin, and emphasize the pathologic outcomes of epigenetic misregulation in cancer. PMID:27259201

  9. Fabrication of ceramic components using mold shape deposition manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Alexander G.

    Mold Shape Deposition Manufacturing (Mold SDM) is a new process for the fabrication of geometrically complex, structural ceramic components. This thesis describes the development of the Mold SDM process, including process steps, materials selection, planning strategies and automation. Initial characterization results are presented and these are used to compare the process to competing manufacturing processes. A range of current and potential applications for ceramic, as well as metal and polymer parts are discussed. The benefits and limitations of ceramic materials for structural applications are discussed to motivate the need for a manufacturing process capable of rapidly producing high quality, geometrically complex, structural ceramic components. The Mold SDM process was developed to address this need. Mold SDM is based on Shape Deposition Manufacturing (SDM) and uses SDM techniques to build fugitive wax molds which can then be used to build ceramic parts by gelcasting. SDM is an additive-subtractive layered manufacturing process which allows it to build geometrically complex parts. The subtraction step differentiates Mold SDM from other layered manufacturing processes and allows accurate, high quality surfaces to be produced. The performance of the process was increased by identifying the key material properties and then selecting improved materials combinations. Candidate materials were evaluated in terms of machinability, shrinkage, heat resistance and chemical compatibility. A number of preferred materials combinations were developed and used to produce ceramic, metal and polymer parts. A number of new process planning strategies and build techniques were developed. The manufacturability analysis determines whether a part is manufacturable and the orientation selection guidelines help in the selection of optimum build directions. New decomposition techniques take advantage of process capabilities to improve part quality and build rate. Initial process

  10. [Telephone hotlines as a part of complex services for tobacco dependence treatment].

    PubMed

    Králíková, E; Baska, T; Langrová, K; Vojta, M

    2005-01-01

    Telephone quitlines for smoking cessation should be included into the available tobacco dependence treatment and should be included into smoking cessation guidelines. Telephone quitlines does not mean only the help to the calling smoker, but also can increase the number of quit attempts in the general population. Especially minorities that not so often take part in the classic smoking cessation treatment, use quitlines more often (e.g. pregnant women). Quitlines are economically effective, although the most expensive form - individual counselling - should be reserved for those really willing to stop. Quitlines should be given governmental financial support (compared to other medical interventions, any smoking cessation treatment is economically more cost effective). PMID:16173615