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Sample records for paspalum notatum fluegge

  1. Expression of lorelei-like genes in aposporous and sexual Paspalum notatum plants.

    PubMed

    Felitti, Silvina Andrea; Seijo, José Guillermo; González, Ana María; Podio, Maricel; Laspina, Natalia Verónica; Siena, Lorena; Ortiz, Juan Pablo Amelio; Pessino, Silvina Claudia

    2011-11-01

    Gametophytic apomictic plants form non-reduced embryo sacs that generate clonal embryos by parthenogenesis, in the absence of both meiosis and egg-cell fertilization. Here we report the sequence and expression analysis of a lorelei-like Paspalum notatum gene, n20gap-1, which encodes a GPI-anchored protein previously associated with apomixis in this species. Phylogeny trees showed that n20gap-1 was evolutionary related to the Arabidopsis thaliana lorelei genes At4g26466 and At5g56170. The lorelei At4g26466 disruption was shown to be detrimental to sperm cell release in arabidopsis. RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) analysis revealed the occurrence of several homologous sequences in the Paspalum notatum genome, exhibiting polymorphisms genetically linked to apomixis. Real-time PCR showed that lorelei-family genes present a minor activity peak at pre-meiosis and a major one at anthesis. The apomictic genotype analyzed showed a significantly increased activity at pre-meiosis, post-meiosis and anthesis with respect to a sexual genotype. In situ hybridization assays revealed expression in integuments, nucellus and the egg-cell apparatus. Several n20gap-1 alleles differing mainly at the 3' UTR sequence were identified. Allele-specific real-time PCR experiments showed that allele 28 was significantly induced in reproductive tissues of the apomictic genotype with respect to the sexual genotype at anthesis. Our results indicate that P. notatum lorelei-like genes are differentially expressed in representative sexual (Q4188) and apomictic (Q4117) genotypes, and might play a role in the final stages of the apomixis developmental cascade. However, the association of n20gap-1 expression with the trait should be confirmed in significant number of sexual and apomictic genotypes. PMID:21826430

  2. Characterization of retrotransposon sequences expressed in inflorescences of apomictic and sexual Paspalum notatum plants.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana Claudia; Seijo, José Guillermo; González, Ana María; Podio, Maricel; Duarte Silveira, Erica; Machado Lacerda, Ana Luiza; Tavares de Campos Carneiro, Vera; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A; Pessino, Silvina Claudia

    2011-09-01

    Apomixis, an asexual mode of reproduction through seeds, holds much promise for agricultural advances. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this trait are still poorly understood. We previously isolated several transcripts representing novel sequences differentially expressed in reproductive tissues of sexual and apomictic plants. Here, we report the characterization of two of these unknown RNA transcripts (experimental codes N17 and N22). Since original fragments showed no significant homologies to sequences at databases, preliminary genomic PCR experiments were carried out to discard possible contaminations. RACE extension on flanking regions provided longer sequences for the candidates and additional related transcripts, which revealed similarity to LTR retrotransposons carrying short transduplicated segments of protein-coding genes. Interestingly, some transduplicated segments corresponded to genes previously associated with apomictic development. Gene copy number estimations revealed a moderate representation of the elements in the genome, with significantly increased numbers in a sexual genotype with respect to an apomictic one. Genetic mapping of N17 showed that a copy of this particular element was located onto Paspalum notatum linkage group F3c, at a central non-recombinant region resembling a centromere. Expression analysis showed an increased activity of N17 and N22 sense strands in ovules of the sexual genotypes. A retrotransposon-specific differential display analysis aimed at detecting related sequences allowed the identification of a complex family, with the majority of its members represented in the sexual genotype. Our results suggest that these elements could be participating in regulatory pathways related to apomixis and sexuality. PMID:21394488

  3. Characterization and expression analysis of SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR KINASE (SERK) genes in sexual and apomictic Paspalum notatum.

    PubMed

    Podio, Maricel; Felitti, Silvina Andrea; Siena, Lorena Adelina; Delgado, Luciana; Mancini, Micaela; Seijo, José Guillermo; González, Ana María; Pessino, Silvina Claudia; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A

    2014-03-01

    The SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (SERK) gene plays a fundamental role in somatic embryogenesis of angiosperms, and is associated with apomixis in Poa pratensis. The objective of this work was to isolate, characterize and analyze the expression patterns of SERK genes in apomictic and sexual genotypes of Paspalum notatum. A conserved 200-bp gene fragment was amplified from genomic DNA with heterologous primers, and used to initiate a chromosomal walking strategy for cloning the complete sequence. This procedure allowed the isolation of two members of the P. notatum SERK family; PnSERK1, which is similar to PpSERK1, and PnSERK2, which is similar to ZmSERK2 and AtSERK1. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that PnSERK1 and PnSERK2 represent paralogous sequences. Southern-blot hybridization indicated the presence of at least three copies of SERK genes in the species. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that PnSERK2 was expressed at significantly higher levels than PnSERK1 in roots, leaves, reproductive tissues and embryogenic calli. Moreover, in situ hybridization experiments revealed that PnSERK2 displayed a spatially and chronologically altered expression pattern in reproductive organs of the apomictic genotype with respect to the sexual one. PnSERK2 is expressed in nucellar cells of the apomictic genotype at meiosis, but only in the megaspore mother cell in the sexual genotype. Therefore, apomixis onset in P. notatum seems to be correlated with the expression of PnSERK2 in nucellar tissue. PMID:24146222

  4. Sward characteristics, nutritive value and choice by cattle of conterminous monocultures of centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides) and bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum).

    PubMed

    Hirata, Masahiko; Okuma, Toshiro; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Tobisa, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    In south-western Japan, centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides; CG) offers a novel option for a warm-season perennial for grazing use in areas where bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum; BG) can be grown. However, the potential of CG as a forage has not been fully explored because of the short history as a forage crop. We conducted four experiments to evaluate CG (cv. TifBlair) in comparison with BG (cv. Pensacola) in terms of sward characteristics, nutritive value and choice by animals. In each experiment, four Japanese Black cows (Bos taurus) were individually allowed to graze conterminous monocultures of CG and BG (5 × 10 m each) for 30 min. Irrespective of regrowth durations and fertilizer rates, CG was consistently shorter, leafier and denser, contained lower acid detergent fiber and cellulose, and was preferred or equally selected by cows, as compared with BG. Furthermore, CG maintained sufficient levels of crude protein (80-89 g/kg DM) to ensure voluntary intake of ruminant animals under extended regrowth(‡) and without fertilizer, whereas BG failed to do so (65 g/kg DM). CG provided higher digestible dry matter than BG when crude protein concentration exceeded 86 g/kg DM. The results indicate advantages of CG as a forage. PMID:26355386

  5. Sequence characterization, in silico mapping and cytosine methylation analysis of markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum.

    PubMed

    Podio, Maricel; Rodríguez, María P; Felitti, Silvina; Stein, Juliana; Martínez, Eric J; Siena, Lorena A; Quarin, Camilo L; Pessino, Silvina C; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A

    2012-12-01

    In previous studies we reported the identification of several AFLP, RAPD and RFLP molecular markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum. The objective of this work was to sequence these markers, obtain their flanking regions by chromosome walking and perform an in silico mapping analysis in rice and maize. The methylation status of two apospory-related sequences was also assessed using methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments. Fourteen molecular markers were analyzed and several protein-coding sequences were identified. Copy number estimates and RFLP linkage analysis showed that the sequence PnMAI3 displayed 2-4 copies per genome and linkage to apospory. Extension of this marker by chromosome walking revealed an additional protein-coding sequence mapping in silico in the apospory-syntenic regions of rice and maize. Approximately 5 kb corresponding to different markers were characterized through the global sequencing procedure. A more refined analysis based on sequence information indicated synteny with segments of chromosomes 2 and 12 of rice and chromosomes 3 and 5 of maize. Two loci associated with apomixis locus were tested in methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments using genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although both target sequences were methylated no methylation polymorphisms associated with the mode of reproduction were detected. PMID:23271945

  6. Molecular cloning, expression and immunological characterisation of Pas n 1, the major allergen of Bahia grass Paspalum notatum pollen.

    PubMed

    Davies, Janet M; Mittag, Diana; Dang, Thanh D; Symons, Karen; Voskamp, Astrid; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2008-12-01

    Bahia grass, Paspalum notatum, is a clinically important subtropical grass with a prolonged pollination season from spring to autumn. We aimed to clone and characterise the major Bahia grass pollen allergen, Pas n 1. Grass pollen-allergic patients presenting to a tertiary hospital allergy clinic were tested for IgE reactivity with Bahia grass pollen extract by skin prick testing, ImmunoCAP, ELISA and immunoblotting. Using primers deduced from the N-terminal peptide sequence of a group 1 allergen of Bahia grass pollen extract separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the complete Pas n 1 cDNA was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and cloned. Biological relevance of recombinant Pas n 1 expressed in Escherichia coli was assessed by serum IgE reactivity and basophil activation. Twenty-nine of 34 (85%) consecutive patients presenting with grass pollen allergy were skin prick test positive to Bahia grass pollen. The Pas n 1 cDNA has sequence homology with the beta-expansin 1 glycoprotein family and is more closely related to the maize pollen group 1 allergen (85% identity) than to ryegrass Lol p 1 or Timothy grass Phl p 1 (64 and 66% identity, respectively). rPas n 1 reacted with serum IgE in 47 of 55 (85%) Bahia grass pollen-allergic patients, activated basophils and inhibited serum IgE reactivity with the 29 kDa band of Bahia grass pollen extract. In conclusion the cDNA for the major group 1 allergen of the subtropical Bahia grass pollen, Pas n 1, was identified and cloned. rPas n 1 is immunologically active and is a valuable reagent for diagnosis and specific immunotherapy of grass pollen allergy. PMID:18817975

  7. Final Report: The Rhizosphere Association of the Nitrogen Fixing Bacterial Species Azotobacter Paspali with the Tropical Grass Paspalum Notatum: Specificity of Colonization and Contribution to Plant Nutrition, July 1, 1995 - February 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Christina K.

    1997-02-14

    The nitrogen fixing bacterium azotobacter paspali was first isolated from the roots of the sub-tropical grass, palpium notatum, and added to the clenus in 1996, by Dr. J. Dobereiner (Brazil). It is mentioned that this root association bacteria shows remarkable signs of host-plant specificity to one eco-type of this grass. This specificity is rare in non-symbiotic plant microbe interactions so far identified.

  8. Genetic variation in polyploid forage grass: Assessing the molecular genetic variability in the Paspalum genus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Paspalum (Poaceae) is an important genus of the tribe Paniceae, which includes several species of economic importance for foraging, turf and ornamental purposes, and has a complex taxonomical classification. Because of the widespread interest in several species of this genus, many accessions have been conserved in germplasm banks and distributed throughout various countries around the world, mainly for the purposes of cultivar development and cytogenetic studies. Correct identification of germplasms and quantification of their variability are necessary for the proper development of conservation and breeding programs. Evaluation of microsatellite markers in different species of Paspalum conserved in a germplasm bank allowed assessment of the genetic differences among them and assisted in their proper botanical classification. Results Seventeen new polymorphic microsatellites were developed for Paspalum atratum Swallen and Paspalum notatum Flüggé, twelve of which were transferred to 35 Paspalum species and used to evaluate their variability. Variable degrees of polymorphism were observed within the species. Based on distance-based methods and a Bayesian clustering approach, the accessions were divided into three main species groups, two of which corresponded to the previously described Plicatula and Notata Paspalum groups. In more accurate analyses of P. notatum accessions, the genetic variation that was evaluated used thirty simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci and revealed seven distinct genetic groups and a correspondence of these groups to the three botanical varieties of the species (P. notatum var. notatum, P. notatum var. saurae and P. notatum var. latiflorum). Conclusions The molecular genetic approach employed in this study was able to distinguish many of the different taxa examined, except for species that belong to the Plicatula group, which has historically been recognized as a highly complex group. Our molecular genetic approach represents a

  9. Registration of 'Aloha' Seashore Paspalum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Aloha’ (Reg. No. ________; PI 652948) seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum O. Swartz) was developed at the Everglades Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, and jointly released by the Florida and Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Stations. It was initially approved for releas...

  10. Yield and uptake of bahiagrass under flooded environment as affected by nitrogen fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Fluegge) is one of the most important forage grasses in subtropical region of USA and other tropical regions of the world. Although tolerant to short term flooding, bahiagrass is classified as a facultative upland (FACU+) species that suggest dry matter production and pl...

  11. Steroids' transformations in Penicillium notatum culture.

    PubMed

    Bartmańska, Agnieszka; Dmochowska-Gładysz, Jadwiga; Huszcza, Ewa

    2005-03-01

    The application of Penicillium notatum genus for biotransformations of steroids has been investigated. The reactions observed include insertion of an oxygen atom into D-ring of steroids, 15alpha-hydroxylation of 17alpha-methyl testosterone derivatives, ester bond hydrolysis, and degradation of a testosterone derivatives side chain. Microbial production of testolactones, the biologically active compounds, was also achieved using this strain in up to 98% yield. PMID:15763598

  12. Reminiscence of phospholipase B in Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Since the phospholipase B (PLB) was reported as a deacylase of both lecithin and lysolecithin yielding fatty acids and glycerophosphocholine (GPC), there was a question as to whether it is a single enzyme or a mixture of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a lysophospholipase (LPL). We purified the PLB in Penicillium notatum and showed that it catalyzed deacylation of sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acids of 1,2-diacylphospholipids and also sn-1 or sn-2 fatty acids of 1- or 2-monoacylphospholipids (lysophospholipids). Further, it also has a monoacyllipase activity. The purified PLB is a glycoprotein with m.w. of 91,300. The sugar moiety is M9 only and the protein moiety consists of 603 amino acids. PLB, different from PLA2, shows other enzymatic activities, such as transacylase, lipase and acylesterase. PLB activity is influenced by various substances, e.g. detergents, deoxycholate, diethylether, Fe(3+), and endogenous protease. Therefore, PLB might have broader roles than PLA2 in vivo. The database shows an extensive sequence similarity between P. notatum PLB and fungal PLB, cPLA2 and patatin, suggesting a homologous relationship. The catalytic triad of cPLA2, Ser, Asp and Arg, is also present in P. notatum PLB. Other related PLBs, PLB/Lipases are discussed. PMID:25391318

  13. Reminiscence of phospholipase B in Penicillium notatum

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Since the phospholipase B (PLB) was reported as a deacylase of both lecithin and lysolecithin yielding fatty acids and glycerophosphocholine (GPC), there was a question as to whether it is a single enzyme or a mixture of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a lysophospholipase (LPL). We purified the PLB in Penicillium notatum and showed that it catalyzed deacylation of sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acids of 1,2-diacylphospholipids and also sn-1 or sn-2 fatty acids of 1- or 2-monoacylphospholipids (lysophospholipids). Further, it also has a monoacyllipase activity. The purified PLB is a glycoprotein with m.w. of 91,300. The sugar moiety is M9 only and the protein moiety consists of 603 amino acids. PLB, different from PLA2, shows other enzymatic activities, such as transacylase, lipase and acylesterase. PLB activity is influenced by various substances, e.g. detergents, deoxycholate, diethylether, Fe3+, and endogenous protease. Therefore, PLB might have broader roles than PLA2 in vivo. The database shows an extensive sequence similarity between P. notatum PLB and fungal PLB, cPLA2 and patatin, suggesting a homologous relationship. The catalytic triad of cPLA2, Ser, Asp and Arg, is also present in P. notatum PLB. Other related PLBs, PLB/Lipases are discussed. PMID:25391318

  14. A molecular map of the apomixis-control locus in Paspalum procurrens and its comparative analysis with other species of Paspalum.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, D H; Martínez, E J; Acuña, C A; Quarin, C L; Pupilli, F

    2011-10-01

    Since apomixis was first mapped in Paspalum, the absence of recombination that characterizes the related locus appeared to be the most difficult bottleneck to overcome for the dissection of the genetic determinants that control this trait. An approach to break the block of recombination was developed in this genus through an among-species comparative mapping strategy. A new apomictic species, P. procurrens (Q4094) was crossed with a sexual plant of P. simplex and their progeny was classified for reproductive mode with the aid of morphological, embryological and genetic analyses. On this progeny, a set of heterologous rice RFLP markers strictly co-segregating in coupling phase with apomixis was identified. These markers were all located on the telomeric region of the long arm of the chromosome 12 of rice. In spite of the lack of recombination exhibited by the apomixis-linked markers in P. procurrens, a comparative mapping analysis among P. simplex, P. malacophyllum, P. notatum and P. procurrens, allowed us to identify a small group of markers co-segregating with apomixis in all these species. These markers bracketed a chromosome region that likely contains all the genetic determinants of apomictic reproduction in Paspalum. The implications of this new inter-specific approach for overcoming the block of recombination to isolate the genetic determinants of apomixis and gain a better comprehension of genome structure of apomictic chromosome region are discussed. PMID:21713535

  15. A methylation status analysis of the apomixis-specific region in Paspalum spp. suggests an epigenetic control of parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Podio, Maricel; Cáceres, Maria E; Samoluk, Sergio S; Seijo, José G; Pessino, Silvina C; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A; Pupilli, Fulvio

    2014-12-01

    Apomixis, a clonal plant reproduction by seeds, is controlled in Paspalum spp. by a single locus which is blocked in terms of recombination. Partial sequence analysis of the apomixis locus revealed structural features of heterochromatin, namely the presence of repetitive elements, gene degeneration, and de-regulation. To test the epigenetic control of apomixis, a study on the distribution of cytosine methylation at the apomixis locus and the effect of artificial DNA demethylation on the mode of reproduction was undertaken in two apomictic Paspalum species. The 5-methylcytosine distribution in the apomixis-controlling genomic region was studied in P. simplex by methylation-sensitive restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and in P. notatum by fluorescene in situ hybridization (FISH). The effect of DNA demethylation was studied on the mode of reproduction of P. simplex by progeny test analysis of apomictic plants treated with the demethylating agent 5'-azacytidine. A high level of cytosine methylation was detected at the apomixis-controlling genomic region in both species. By analysing a total of 374 open pollination progeny, it was found that artificial demethylation had little or no effect on apospory, whereas it induced a significant depression of parthenogenesis. The results suggested that factors controlling repression of parthenogenesis might be inactivated in apomictic Paspalum by DNA methylation. PMID:25180110

  16. Variation among hexaploid Paspalum dilatum Poir. regenerants from tissue culture.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common biotype of Paspalum dilatatum, called paspalum in Australia and dallisgrass in the U.S.A., is a pentaploid obligate apomict and efforts to improve the grass have not been successful because of its asexual reproduction and irregular meiosis. An apomictic hexaploid biotype, known as Urugua...

  17. Development and characterization of seashore paspalum SSR markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing use of secondary water sources for irrigation, which is highly linked to salinization, creates a demand for salt tolerant turf. Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) is a warm-season turfgrass that survives in sand dunes along coastal sites, brackish ponds, and in estuaries. S...

  18. Identification or creation of a putative triploid seashore paspalum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) is a salt tolerant, predominately diploid (2n = 2x = 20) species that is well adapted to coastal regions in tropical and subtropical environments. Because a majority of the available cultivars are propagated vegetatively and most genotypes are cross-fertile, a...

  19. Biology and biotype determination of greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on seashore paspalum turfgrass (Paspalum vaginatum).

    PubMed

    Nuessly, G S; Nagata, R T; Burd, J D; Hentz, M G; Carroll, A S; Halbert, S E

    2008-04-01

    Greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), was first discovered damaging seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) turfgrass in November 2003 at Belle Glade, FL. Inquiries to several golf courses with seashore paspalum turf across southern Florida indicated infestation was wide spread by April 2004. Damage symptoms progress from water soaked lesions surrounding feeding sites within 24 h to chlorosis and necrosis of leaf tips within 96 h. Problems caused by greenbug feeding were initially misdiagnosed as fertilizer, disease, other insects, or water management problems because aphids were not previously found on warm season turfgrasses. Greenbug development and fecundity studies were conducted on six seashore paspalum varieties: 'Aloha,' 'SeaDwarf,' 'SeaGreen,' 'SeaIsle,' 'SeaWay,' and 'SeaWolf.' Greenbug did not survive on 'SeaWolf.' Development rates (mean +/- SEM) ranged from 7.6 +/- 0.2 to 8.2 +/- 0.2 d on the remaining varieties. Greenbug longevity and fecundity on 'Aloha' were significantly less than on the other varieties. The estimated intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) for greenbug ranged from 0.24 to 0.26 across tested varieties. Values for net reproductive rate (R(o)) ranged from 12.3 on 'Aloha' to 40.4 on 'SeaWay.' In feeding trials on indicator plants, the Florida isolate of greenbug exhibited a unique biotypic profile most commonly found on noncultivated grass hosts. It was virulent on the wheat variety GRS1201 that is resistant to the principal agricultural biotypes attacking small grains and to all currently available resistant sorghum varieties. PMID:18419932

  20. Application of the FluEgg model to predict transport of Asian carp eggs in the Saint Joseph River (Great Lakes tributary)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Tatiana; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2015-01-01

    The Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) is a three-dimensional Lagrangian model that simulates the movement and development of Asian carp eggs until hatching based on the physical characteristics of the flow field and the physical and biological characteristics of the eggs. This tool provides information concerning egg development and spawning habitat suitability including: egg plume location, egg vertical and travel time distribution, and egg-hatching risk. A case study of the simulation of Asian carp eggs in the Lower Saint Joseph River, a tributary of Lake Michigan, is presented. The river hydrodynamic input for FluEgg was generated in two ways — using hydroacoustic data and using HEC-RAS model data. The HEC-RAS model hydrodynamic input data were used to simulate 52 scenarios covering a broad range of flows and water temperatures with the eggs at risk of hatching ranging from 0 to 93% depending on river conditions. FluEgg simulations depict the highest percentage of eggs at risk of hatching occurs at the lowest discharge and at peak water temperatures. Analysis of these scenarios illustrates how the interactive relation among river length, hydrodynamics, and water temperature influence egg transport and hatching risk. An improved version of FluEgg, which more realistically simulates dispersion and egg development, is presented. Also presented is a graphical user interface that facilitates the use of FluEgg and provides a set of post-processing analysis tools to support management decision-making regarding the prevention and control of Asian carp reproduction in rivers with or without Asian carp populations.

  1. Mixed Pulmonary Infection with Penicillium notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Shabnam; Hemmatian, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium notatum is a fungus that widely exists in the environment and is often non-pathogenic to humans. However, in immunocompromised hosts it may be recognized as a cause of systemic mycosis. A 44-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was admitted to our hospital with fever and neutropenia. Due to no improvement after initial treatment, he underwent bronchoscopy. The patient was found to have P. notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection, and therefore was given voriconazole, primaquine and clindamycin. The patient was successfully treated and suffered no complications. Conclusion: This case highlights P. notatum as a cause of infection in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge, mixed lung infection with P. notatum and P. jiroveci in a patient with AML has not been previously reported. PMID:27403180

  2. Discovery and characterization of a turf-type triploid seashore paspalum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) is a salt tolerant, predominantly diploid (2n = 2x = 20) species that is well adapted to coastal regions in tropical and subtropical environments. Because a majority of the available cultivars are propagated vegetatively and most genotypes are cross-fer...

  3. Genetic variation within Florida Paspalum as detected by SSR analysis and flow cytometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida paspalum (Paspalum floridanum Michx.) is a perennial warm-season bunchgrass native to the southeastern United States. The grass is grazed by livestock and its seed are a source of food for wildlife. Efforts to improve the species through breeding have not been attempted because it is cytol...

  4. Effects of genotype and isolate on expression of dollar spot in seashore paspalum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) is a warm-season turfgrass species primarily utilized on golf courses and athletic fields and is often impacted by dollar spot disease. Dollar spot, caused by Sclerotinia homoeocarpa F.T. Bennett, is a major fungal disease and the most common turfgrass p...

  5. Unusual chromosome numbers in Paspalum L. (Poaceae: Paniceae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Peñaloza, A P S; Côrtes, A L; Pozzobon, M T; Santos, S; Rua, G H; Valls, J F M

    2008-01-01

    Somatic chromosome numbers were determined for 20 new germplasm accessions of Paspalum, belonging to 17 species collected in Brazil. Chromosome number is reported for the first time for P. reduncum (2n = 18), P. cinerascens (2n = 20), P. cordatum (2n = 20), P. filgueirasii (2n = 24), P. ammodes (2n = 36), P. bicilium (2n = 40), P. heterotrichon (2n = 40), and P. burmanii (2n = 48). New cytotypes were confirmed for two germplasm accessions of P. carinatum (2n = 30) and P. trachycoleon (2n = 36), one of P. clavuliferum (2n = 40) and one of P. lanciflorum (2n = 40), indicating variability in these species. The remaining chromosome numbers reported here confirm previous counts. The unexpected chromosome numbers 2n = 18, 24, 36, and 48 in Paspalum species, which are usually shown to be multiples of 10, suggest that much more collection and cytogenetic characterization are necessary to assess the whole chromosomal and genomic multiplicity present in the genus, which seems to be much more diverse than currently thought to be. PMID:18551406

  6. Genetic response of Paspalum plicatulum to genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Weihmüller, Emilse; Beltrán, Celina; Sartor, María; Espinoza, Francisco; Spampinato, Claudia; Pessino, Silvina

    2014-06-01

    Paspalum plicatulum is a perennial rhizomatous grass with natural diploid and polyploid cytotypes. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of sequence polymorphisms arising immediately after genome autoduplication in this species. Two mixoploid plants (4C and 7D) were previously obtained through colchicine treatment of seeds generated by open pollination of a diploid plant (H14-2x). Diploid and tetraploid sectors from both mixoploids were dissected to generate two ploidy series (4C-2x/4C-4x and 7D-2x/7D-4x). Molecular fingerprints were generated from the maternal plant H14-2x, both ploidy series (4C-2x/4C-4x and 7D-2x/7D-4x), and a tetraploid plant (C1) produced by selfing 7D-4x. Our results indicate that immediately after polyploidization P. plicatulum suffers genetic rearrangements affecting ~28-38 % of the genome. Band gain and loss were equally prevalent at a statistically significant level. At least 5.62 % of the genome experimented recurrent genetic variation in a non-random basis with a confidence of 94.88 %. A significant proportion of novel bands (36 out of 195; 18.4 %) was detected in the C1 tetraploid plant. Half of these bands were not amplified in either H14-2x or 7D-4x, while the remainders were present in H14-2x but absent in 7D-4x. Our results indicate the occurrence of a considerable number of genetic changes in P. plicatulum immediately after polyploidization, some of which were recurrently detected in different independent events. Moreover, we confirmed that after polyploidization, lost ancestral alleles were spontaneously recovered in further generations, a phenomenon previously reported by other research groups. PMID:24858395

  7. Antibiosis among selected paspalum taxa to the fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty six accessions of the warm-season perennial grass, Paspalum spp., were evaluated for response to the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), an important pest of turfgrass. In growth chamber, excised clipping studies, P. vaginatum 03-539-31 and P. vaginatum 03-525-22 were the most ...

  8. Harnessing apomictic reproduction in grasses: what we have learned from Paspalum

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Juan Pablo A.; Quarin, Camilo L.; Pessino, Silvina C.; Acuña, Carlos; Martínez, Eric J.; Espinoza, Francisco; Hojsgaard, Diego H.; Sartor, Maria E.; Cáceres, Maria E.; Pupilli, Fulvio

    2013-01-01

    Background Apomixis is an alternative route of plant reproduction that produces individuals genetically identical to the mother plant through seeds. Apomixis is desirable in agriculture, because it guarantees the perpetuation of superior genotypes (i.e. heterotic hybrid seeds) by self-seeding without loss of hybrid vigour. The Paspalum genus, an archetypal model system for mining apomixis gene(s), is composed of about 370 species that have extremely diverse reproductive systems, including self-incompatibility, self-fertility, full sexual reproduction, and facultative or obligate apomixis. Barriers to interspecific hybridization are relaxed in this genus, allowing the production of new hybrids from many different parental combinations. Paspalum is also tolerant to various parental genome contributions to the endosperm, allowing analyses of how sexually reproducing crop species might escape from dosage effects in the endosperm. Scope In this article, the available literature characterizing apomixis in Paspalum spp. and its use in breeding is critically reviewed. In particular, a comparison is made across species of the structure and function of the genomic region controlling apomixis in order to identify a common core region shared by all apomictic Paspalum species and where apomixis genes are likely to be localized. Candidate genes are discussed, either as possible genetic determinants (including homologs to signal transduction and RNA methylation genes) or as downstream factors (such as cell-to-cell signalling and auxin response genes) depending, respectively, on their co-segregation with apomixis or less. Strategies to validate the role of candidate genes in apomictic process are also discussed, with special emphasis on plant transformation in natural apomictic species. PMID:23864004

  9. Functional Identification and Characterization of Genes Cloned from Halophyte Seashore Paspalum Conferring Salinity and Cadmium Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Chuanming; Tan, Zhiqun; Liu, Jun; Zhuang, Lili; Yang, Zhimin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Salinity-affected and heavy metal-contaminated soils limit the growth of glycophytic plants. Identifying genes responsible for superior tolerance to salinity and heavy metals in halophytes has great potential for use in developing salinity- and Cd-tolerant glycophytes. The objective of this study was to identify salinity- and Cd-tolerance related genes in seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum), a halophytic perennial grass species, using yeast cDNA expression library screening method. Based on the Gateway-compatible vector system, a high-quality entry library was constructed, which contained 9.9 × 106 clones with an average inserted fragment length of 1.48 kb representing a 100% full-length rate. The yeast expression libraries were screened in a salinity-sensitive and a Cd-sensitive yeast mutant. The screening yielded 32 salinity-tolerant clones harboring 18 salinity-tolerance genes and 20 Cd-tolerant clones, including five Cd-tolerance genes. qPCR analysis confirmed that most of the 18 salinity-tolerance and five Cd-tolerance genes were up-regulated at the transcript level in response to salinity or Cd stress in seashore paspalum. Functional analysis indicated that salinity-tolerance genes from seashore paspalum could be involved mainly in photosynthetic metabolism, antioxidant systems, protein modification, iron transport, vesicle traffic, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Cd-tolerance genes could be associated with regulating pathways that are involved in phytochelatin synthesis, HSFA4-related stress protection, CYP450 complex, and sugar metabolism. The 18 salinity-tolerance genes and five Cd-tolerance genes could be potentially used as candidate genes for genetic modification of glycophytic grass species to improve salinity and Cd tolerance and for further analysis of molecular mechanisms regulating salinity and Cd tolerance. PMID:26904068

  10. Functional Identification and Characterization of Genes Cloned from Halophyte Seashore Paspalum Conferring Salinity and Cadmium Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Chuanming; Tan, Zhiqun; Liu, Jun; Zhuang, Lili; Yang, Zhimin; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Salinity-affected and heavy metal-contaminated soils limit the growth of glycophytic plants. Identifying genes responsible for superior tolerance to salinity and heavy metals in halophytes has great potential for use in developing salinity- and Cd-tolerant glycophytes. The objective of this study was to identify salinity- and Cd-tolerance related genes in seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum), a halophytic perennial grass species, using yeast cDNA expression library screening method. Based on the Gateway-compatible vector system, a high-quality entry library was constructed, which contained 9.9 × 10(6) clones with an average inserted fragment length of 1.48 kb representing a 100% full-length rate. The yeast expression libraries were screened in a salinity-sensitive and a Cd-sensitive yeast mutant. The screening yielded 32 salinity-tolerant clones harboring 18 salinity-tolerance genes and 20 Cd-tolerant clones, including five Cd-tolerance genes. qPCR analysis confirmed that most of the 18 salinity-tolerance and five Cd-tolerance genes were up-regulated at the transcript level in response to salinity or Cd stress in seashore paspalum. Functional analysis indicated that salinity-tolerance genes from seashore paspalum could be involved mainly in photosynthetic metabolism, antioxidant systems, protein modification, iron transport, vesicle traffic, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Cd-tolerance genes could be associated with regulating pathways that are involved in phytochelatin synthesis, HSFA4-related stress protection, CYP450 complex, and sugar metabolism. The 18 salinity-tolerance genes and five Cd-tolerance genes could be potentially used as candidate genes for genetic modification of glycophytic grass species to improve salinity and Cd tolerance and for further analysis of molecular mechanisms regulating salinity and Cd tolerance. PMID:26904068

  11. Microsporogenesis in Paspalum conspersum Schrad. (Virgata group) with different ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Janke, L; Souza, F H D; Valls, J F M; Pagliarini, M S

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about the cytology and reproductive behavior of a species is indispensable for hybridization programs. This is especially true for species belonging to the genus Paspalum, among which apomixis and a wide range of ploidy levels are frequently found. Paspalum conspersum Schrad. is a robust and warm-season perennial bunchgrass native to South America. Previous studies have indicated that both tetraploid and hexaploid races exist in this species; however, only information related to tetraploids has been applied to another taxon. In this study, a cytological investigation in two Brazilian accessions collected in different regions revealed tetraploidy in the accession BRA-012823 (2n = 4x = 40), with chromosome pairing in bivalents and normal meiosis and tetrad formation, and pentaploidy (2n = 5x = 50) in the accession BRA-022748, which presented total asynapsis. In this latter accession, 50 univalents could be scored at diakinesis. After alignment at the metaphase plate, sister chromatids segregated to the poles. Only one meiotic division (equational) occurred, and after cytokinesis, 100% of the dyads that formed had 2n microspores. The meiotic behavior during microsporogenesis, which showed 10 delayed univalents to reach the metaphase plate, suggests that this accession is a recent natural hybrid constituted by a parental genome with 40 chromosomes and another with 10 chromosomes. The potential usage of these accessions in Paspalum breeding has been discussed. PMID:24301755

  12. Microdochium paspali, a new species causing seashore paspalum disease in southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu; Nan, Zhibiao; Tian, Pei; Hu, Meijiao; Gao, Zhaoyin; Li, Min; Liu, Guodαo

    2015-01-01

    A new species of Microdochium was identified as the causal agent of leaf blight of seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum), a turf grass widely used in tropical and subtropical golf courses. In 2010 foliar necrosis and canopy thinning were observed on 11 surveyed golf courses in Hainan province, China, especially on fairways and putting greens. The infected leaves initially appeared water-soaked and dark green, rapidly faded to yellow or became chlorotic and quickly died, resulting in a sparse appearance in infected areas, leading to the disease name "sparse leaf patch." Isolates with rich and light pink to yellow mycelia and salmon-colored pionnotes were cultured from diseased turf foliage. Pathogenicity was demonstrated by inoculating these isolates onto "seaspray" seashore paspalum. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1-5.8S-internal transcribed spacer 2 region (ITS), translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1-α) and β-tubulin (BenA) indicated these isolates formed as a distinct clade within Microdochium (Xylariales). Further microscopic examination demonstrated that the species was morphologically distinct from three similar species of Microdochium. The name Microdochium paspali sp. nov. is proposed for this novel fungal pathogen. PMID:25261493

  13. Evidence for two distinct intracellular pools of inorganic sulfate in Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, D R; Segel, I H

    1985-01-01

    A strain of Penicillium notatum unable to metabolize inorganic sulfate can accumulate sulfate internally to an apparent equilibrium concentration 10(5) greater than that remaining in the medium. The apparent Keq is near constant at all initial external sulfate concentrations below that which would eventually exceed the internal capacity of the cells. Under equilibrium conditions of zero net flux, external 35SO42- exchanges with internal, unlabeled SO42- at a rate consistent with the kinetic constants with the sulfate transport system. Efflux experiments demonstrated that sulfate occupies two distinct intracellular pools. Pool 1 is characterized by the rapid release of 35SO42- when the suspension of preloaded cells is adjusted to 10 mM azide at pH 8.4 (t 1/2, 0.38 min). 35SO42- in pool 1 also rapidly exchanges with unlabeled medium sulfate. Pool 2 is characterized by the slow release of 35SO42- induced by azide at pH 8.4 or unlabeled sulfate (t 1/2, 32 to 49 min). Early in the 35SO42- accumulation process, up to 78% of the total transported substrate is found in pool 1. At equilibrium, pool 1 accounts for only about 2% of the total accumulated 35SO42-. The kinetics of 35SO42- accumulation is consistent with the following sequential process: medium----pool 1----pool 2. Monensin (33 microns) accelerates the transfer of 35SO42- from pool 1 to pool 2. Valinomycin (0.2 microM) and tetraphenylboron- (1 mM) retard the transfer of 35SO42- from pool 1 to pool 2. At the concentrations used, neither of the ionophores nor tetraphenylboron- affect total 35SO42- uptake. Pool 2 may reside in a vacuole or other intracellular organelle. A model for the transfer of sulfate from pool 1 to pool 2 is presented. PMID:3997782

  14. Simulation of hypothetical Asian carp egg and larvae development and transport in the Lockport, Brandon Road, Dresden Island, and Marseilles Pools of the Illinois Waterway by use of the Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Garcia, Tatiana; Jackson, P. Ryan; Duncker, James J.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting an assessment of the vulnerability of the Chicago Area Waterway System and Des Plaines River to Asian carp (specifically, Hypophthalmichthys nobilis (bighead carp) and Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (silver carp)) spawning and recruitment. As part of this assessment, the USACE requested the help of the U.S. Geological Survey in predicting the fate and transport of Asian carp eggs hypothetically spawned at the electric dispersal barrier on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and downstream of the Brandon Road Lock and Dam on the Des Plaines River under dry weather flow and high water temperature conditions. The Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) model predicted that approximately 80 percent of silver carp eggs spawned near the electric dispersal barrier would hatch within the Lockport and Brandon Road pools (as close as 3.6 miles downstream of the barrier) and approximately 82 percent of the silver carp eggs spawned near the Brandon Road Dam would hatch in the Des Plaines River (as close as 1.6 miles downstream from the gates of Brandon Road Lock). Extension of the FluEgg model to include the fate and transport of larvae until gas bladder inflation—the point at which the larvae begin to leave the drift—suggests that eggs spawned at the electric dispersal barrier would reach the gas bladder inflation stage primarily within the Dresden Island Pool, and those spawned at the Brandon Road Dam would reach this stage primarily within the Marseilles and Starved Rock Pools.

  15. Evidence for two distinct intracellular pools of inorganic sulfate in Penicillium notatum

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.R.; Segel, I.H.

    1985-06-01

    A strain of Penicillium notatum unable to metabolize inorganic sulfate can accumulate sulfate internally to an apparent equilibrium concentration 10/sup 5/ times greater than that remaining in the medium. The apparent K/sub eq/ is near constant at all initial external sulfate concentrations below that which would eventually exceed the internal capacity of the cells. Under equilibrium conditions of zero net flux, external /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ exchanges with internal, unlabeled SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ at a rate consistent with the kinetic constants with the sulfate transport system. Efflux experiments demonstrated that sulfate occupies two distinct intracellular pools. Pool 1 is characterized by the rapid release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ when the suspension of preloaded cells is adjusted to 10 mM azide at pH 8.4 (t/sub 1/2/, 0.38 min). /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in pool 1 also rapidly exchanges with unlabeled medium sulfate. Pool 2 is characterized by the slow release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ induced by azide at pH 8.4 or unlabeled sulfate (t/sub 1/2/, 32 to 49 min). Early in the /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ accumulation process, up to 78% of the total transported substrate is found in pool 1. At equilibrium, pool 1 accounts for only about 2% of the total accumulated /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Monensin (33 ..mu..m) accelerates the transfer of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ from pool 1 to pool 2. Valinomycin (0.2 ..mu..M) and tetraphynylboron/sup -/ (1 mM) retard the transfer of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ from pool 1 to pool 2. Pool 2 may reside in a vacuole or other intracellular organelle. A model for the transfer of sulfate from pool 1 to pool 2 is presented.

  16. Experimental Microbiology of Saturated Salt Solutions and Other Harsh Environments. III. Growth of Salt-Tolerant Penicillium notatum in Boron-Rich Media 1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Karen; Siegel, S. M.

    1967-01-01

    A stress-tolerant strain of Penicillium notatum, isolated by passage through a nutrient solution saturated with calcium acetate, was found to have a tolerance to boron in several states of oxidation. Growth in the presence of elementary boron, saturating amounts of boric acid, and with various concentrations of sodium borohydride was observed and mycelial mats were spectrographically analyzed for boron accumulation. PMID:6076112

  17. Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) of Pencilluim notatum lipase enzyme with improved activity, stability and reusability characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saima; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) are considered as an effective tool for the immobilization of enzyme. In this study, Pencillium notatum lipase (PNL) was immobilized as carrier free cross-linked enzyme aggregates using glutaraldehyde (GLA) and Ethylene glycol-bis [succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide] (EG-NHS) as cross-linking agents. The optimal conditions for the synthesis of an efficient lipase CLEAs such as precipitant type, the nature and amount of cross-linking reagent, and cross-linking time were optimized. The recovered activities of CLEAs were considerably dependent on the concentration of GLA; however, the activity recovery was not severely affected by EG-NHS as a mild cross-linker. The EG-NHS aggregates displayed superior hydrolytic (52.08±2.52%) and esterification (64.42%) activities as compared to GLA aggregates which showed 23.8±1.86 and 34.54% of hydrolytic and esterification activity, respectively. Morphological analysis by fluorescence and scanning electron microscope revealed that EG-NHS aggregates were smaller in size with larger surface area compared to GLA aggregates. The pH optima of both types of CLEAs were displaced to slightly alkaline region and higher temperature as compared to native enzyme. Highest enzyme activity of CLEAs was achieved at the pH of 9.0 and 42°C temperature. Moreover, a significant improvement in the thermal resistance was also recorded after immobilization. After ten reusability cycles in aqueous medium, GLA and EG-NHS cross-linked lipase CLEAs preserved 63.62% and 70.9% of their original activities, respectively. The results suggest that this novel CLEA-lipase is potentially usable in many industrial applications. PMID:27365121

  18. Dorsoventral variations in dark chilling effects on photosynthesis and stomatal function in Paspalum dilatatum leaves

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Cordeiro, Ana Sofia; Driscoll, Simon P.; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of dark chilling on the leaf-side-specific regulation of photosynthesis were characterized in the C4 grass Paspalum dilatatum. CO2- and light-response curves for photosynthesis and associated parameters were measured on whole leaves and on each leaf side independently under adaxial and abaxial illumination before and after plants were exposed to dark chilling for one or two consecutive nights. The stomata closed on the adaxial sides of the leaves under abaxial illumination and no CO2 uptake could be detected on this surface. However, high rates of whole leaf photosynthesis were still observed because CO2 assimilation rates were increased on the abaxial sides of the leaves under abaxial illumination. Under adaxial illumination both leaf surfaces contributed to the inhibition of whole leaf photosynthesis observed after one night of chilling. After two nights of chilling photosynthesis remained inhibited on the abaxial side of the leaf but the adaxial side had recovered, an effect related to increased maximal ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation rates (Vcmax) and enhanced maximal electron transport rates (Jmax). Under abaxial illumination, whole leaf photosynthesis was decreased only after the second night of chilling. The chilling-dependent inhibition of photosynthesis was located largely on the abaxial side of the leaf and was related to decreased Vcmax and Jmax, but not to the maximal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase carboxylation rate (Vpmax). Each side of the leaf therefore exhibits a unique sensitivity to stress and recovery. Side-specific responses to stress are related to differences in the control of enzyme and photosynthetic electron transport activities. PMID:21030386

  19. An apomixis-linked ORC3-like pseudogene is associated with silencing of its functional homolog in apomictic Paspalum simplex.

    PubMed

    Siena, Lorena A; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A; Calderini, Ornella; Paolocci, Francesco; Cáceres, Maria E; Kaushal, Pankaj; Grisan, Simone; Pessino, Silvina C; Pupilli, Fulvio

    2016-03-01

    Apomixis in plants consists of asexual reproduction by seeds. Here we characterized at structural and functional levels an apomixis-linked sequence of Paspalum simplex homologous to subunit 3 of the ORIGIN RECOGNITION COMPLEX (ORC3). ORC is a multiprotein complex which controls DNA replication and cell differentiation in eukaryotes. Three PsORC3 copies were identified, each one characterized by a specific expression profile. Of these, PsORC3a, specific for apomictic genotypes, is a pseudogene that was poorly and constitutively expressed in all developmental stages of apomictic flowers, whereas PsORC3b, the putative functional gene in sexual flowers, showed a precise time-related regulation. Sense transcripts of PsORC3 were expressed in the female cell lineage of both apomictic and sexual reproductive phenotypes, and in aposporous initials. Although strong expression was detected in sexual early endosperm, no expression was present in the apomictic endosperm. Antisense PsORC3 transcripts were revealed exclusively in apomictic germ cell lineages. Defective orc3 mutants of rice and Arabidopsis showed normal female gametophytes although the embryo and endosperm were arrested at early phases of development. We hypothesize that PsORC3a is associated with the down-regulation of its functional homolog and with the development of apomictic endosperm which deviates from the canonical 2(maternal):1(paternal) genome ratio. PMID:26842983

  20. Relative DNA content in diploid, polyploid, and multiploid species of Paspalum (Poaceae) with relation to reproductive mode and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Galdeano, Florencia; Urbani, M H; Sartor, M E; Honfi, A I; Espinoza, F; Quarin, C L

    2016-07-01

    It is generally accepted that polyploids have downsized basic genomes rather than additive values with respect to their related diploids. Changes in genome size have been reported in correlation with several biological characteristics. About 75 % of around 350 species recognized for Paspalum (Poaceae) are polyploid and most polyploids are apomictic. Multiploid species are common with most of them bearing sexual diploid and apomictic tetraploid or other ploidy levels. DNA content in the embryo and the endosperm was measured by flow cytometry in a seed-by-seed analysis of 47 species including 77 different entities. The relative DNA content of the embryo informed the genome size of the accession while the embryo:endosperm ratio of DNA content revealed its reproductive mode. The genome sizes (2C-value) varied from 0.5 to 6.5 pg and for 29 species were measured for the first time. Flow cytometry provided new information on the reproductive mode for 12 species and one botanical variety and supplied new data for 10 species concerning cytotypes reported for the first time. There was no significant difference between the mean basic genome sizes (1Cx-values) of 32 sexual and 45 apomictic entities. Seventeen entities were diploid and 60 were polyploids with different degrees. There were no clear patterns of changes in 1Cx-values due to polyploidy or reproductive systems, and the existing variations are in concordance with subgeneric taxonomical grouping. PMID:26965283

  1. Purification and Characterization of Tannin Acyl Hydrolase Produced by Mixed Solid State Fermentation of Wheat Bran and Marigold Flower by Penicillium notatum NCIM 923

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Saswati; Ghosh, Uma

    2013-01-01

    Tannin acyl hydrolase produced extracellularly by the fungal strain Penicillium notatum NCIM 923 in mixed solid state fermentation of wheat bran and marigold flower in the ratio 4 : 1 was purified from the cell-free extract broth by ammonium sulphate fractionation followed by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose column chromatography. Tannase was purified by 19.89-fold with yield of 11.77%. The specific activity of crude tannase was found to be 1.31 U/mg protein while that of purified tannase was 22.48 U/mg protein. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the enzyme is dimeric with one major band of molecular mass 97 kDa and a very light band of molecular mass 43 kDa. Temperature of 35 to 40°C and pH 5 were optimum for tannase activity. The enzyme retained more than 60% of its stability at 60°C and 40% stability at pH 3 and 8, respectively. Km was found to be 0.33 × 10−2 M and Vmax = 40 U/mg. Since the enzyme is active over a wide range of pH and temperature, it could find potential use in the food processing industry. PMID:24350277

  2. Productivity, utilization, and nutritive quality of dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum) as influenced by stocking density and rest period under continuous or rotational stocking.

    PubMed

    Bungenstab, E J; Pereira, A C; Lin, J C; Holliman, J L; Muntifering, R B

    2011-02-01

    Dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum) is well adapted to the Black Belt physiographic region of the southeastern United States, and information on its productivity and nutritive quality as influenced by grazing management is needed. In a 2-yr grazing experiment, replicate 0.40-ha paddocks in established dallisgrass pasture were continuously stocked, or replicate 0.40-ha paddocks were subdivided into two 0.20-ha (RS2), three 0.13-ha (RS3), or four 0.10-ha (RS4) cells and rotationally stocked with yearling beef steers. Individual cells within the RS2, RS3, and RS4 treatments were stocked for 7 d followed by 7, 14, or 21 d of rest, respectively. In 2007, 3 Angus × Simmental crossbred steers (initial BW, 354 ± 6 kg) were assigned randomly to each paddock on July 16; in 2008, 3 Angus × Simmental crossbred steers (initial BW, 310 ± 6 kg) were assigned randomly to each paddock on July 14. In 2007, there was no effect (P = 0.25) of stocking treatment on ADG. Steers grazing RS4, RS2, and continuously stocked paddocks had 106 (P = 0.01), 86 (P = 0.03), and 83 (P = 0.03) kg greater total BW gain per ha, respectively, than steers grazing RS3 paddocks. In 2008, there were no differences among treatments in ADG (P = 0.43) or total BW gain per ha (P = 0.90). Correlation and regression analyses revealed positive associations between steer performance and forage concentration of CP, areal mass (kg/ha) of forage DM, and areal mass of forage CP. Results indicate that productivity and quality of dallisgrass for stocker cattle production were comparable between continuous and rotational-stocking methods. PMID:20971886

  3. Defoliation Management of Bahiagrass Germplasm Affects Dry Matter Yeild and Herbage Nutritive Value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flügge) cultivars are daylength-sensitive and have minimal cool-season production. A new genotype is less daylength sensitive and more cold tolerant, but its dry matter (DM) yield and nutritive value responses to defoliation treatments are unknown. A 3-yr field experimen...

  4. Defoliation Management of Bahiagrass Germplasm Affects Cover and Persistence-Related Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flügge) cultivars are daylength-sensitive and have minimal cool-season production, resulting in high winter feeding costs in forage-based livestock systems. A new genotype is less daylength-sensitive, possesses greater cold tolerance, and is more productive during the co...

  5. EVALUATION OF COMPONENTS FOR HARDWOOD SILVOPASTORES FOR COW-CALF OPERATORS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silvopasture systems consisting of bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and pines (Pinus spp.) are common in the southeastern United States. However, some producers prefer other forages to bahiagrass and there are increasing opportunities for marketing hardwoods in the region. Warm season forages and hardw...

  6. Expression of crylFa in bahiagrass enhances resistance to fall armyworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum var. Flugge) is the predominant forage grass in Florida and in subtropical regions worldwide. To improve pest resistance against fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith), an optimized cry1Fa gene encoding a '-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis was synthesized...

  7. Persistence of cool- and warm-season forages in competition with bahiagrass in east Texas.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) has become a dominant forage species in many pastures and grasslands in America’s Deep South region. Many beef producers are seeking alternative forages that can compete with bahiagrass, because they believe that beef production is not optimum when grazing cattle are gr...

  8. Polyploidy and Interspecific Hybridization in Cynodon, Paspalum, Pennisetum, and Zoysia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many examples of agronomically or economically important characteristics in wild species, such as disease tolerance or quality, that are difficult to incorporate into related cultivated species due to differences in ploidy levels. Sterility, or at least reduced fertility, is common when w...

  9. Bahiagrass for the Management of Meloidogyne arenaria in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Weaver, C. F.; Robertson, D. G.; Ivey, H.

    1988-01-01

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) cultivars Argentine, Pensacola, and Tifton-9 were non-hosts for Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and Heterodera glycines in a greenhouse experiment using field soil infested with these nematodes. The effect of Pensacola bahiagrass in rotation with peanut (Arachis hypogaea) on M. arenaria was studied in 1986 and 1987 in a field at the Wiregrass substation near Headland, Alabama. Each year soil densities of second-stage juveniles of M. arenaria, determined near peanut harvest, were 96-98% lower under bahiagrass than under peanut. In 1987 peanut yields in plots following bahiagrass were 27% higher than in plots under peanut monoculture. Juvenile population densities in bahiagrass-peanut plots were 41% lower than in plots with continuous peanut. Using bahiagrass for reducing population densities of M. arenaria and increasing peanut yield was as effective as using aldicarb at the recommended rates for peanut. PMID:19290315

  10. Effect of Soils from Six Management Systems on Root-knot Nematodes and Plant Growth in Greenhouse Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Chellemi, D. O.; Périès, X.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of soil management systems on root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) eggs and gall incidence on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) following tomato were evaluated. Soil was collected from a replicated field experiment in which six management systems were being assessed for vegetable production. Soil management systems were conventional production, organic production, bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) pasture, bahiagrass: Stylosanthes (Stylosanthes guianensis) pasture, bare ground fallow, and weed fallow. Soil was collected from field plots and used in greenhouse experiments. Identification of egg-parasitic fungi and the incidence of root-knot nematode galling were assessed both on tomato and cucumber planted in the same pots following the removal of tomato plants. Organic, bare ground fallow and conventional production treatments reduced galling both on tomato and on cucumber following tomato. Although no treatment consistently enhanced egg-parasitic fungi, management system did affect egg viability and the types of fungi isolated from parasitized eggs. PMID:19262892

  11. Water quality of runoff from revegetated mine spoil.

    PubMed

    Trouart, J E; Knight, R W

    1985-03-01

    Permanent vegetation plots were established on mixed overburden and topsoiled overburden on a lignite test pit in eastern Texas in 1982. Vegetative treatments included two grass-legume treatments [switchgrass (panicum virgattun) - sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) - subterrancan elover (Trifolitun subterranean) and litte bluestem (Schizachyriun scoparium) - sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) - Illinois hundleflower (Dessmanthus illinoiensis)] and three monocultures [Coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon), bahia grass (paspalum notatum) and yellow Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans)]. Water was applied to the 0.5m(2) plots using a sprinklertype rainfall simulator and quality of runoff was determined for each plot. Parameters analyzed included: settleable solids, total filterable solids, sediment production, infiltration rate, nitrites, nitrates, total iron and total manganese. Topsoiling significantly increased inliltration and significantly decreased filterable sediments, sediment production and settleable solids. The hydrologie qualities of the switchgrass-sideoats grama-subterranean elover mixture coincided closely with those of the Coastal bermudagrass monoculture. PMID:24221679

  12. Influence of Palea and Lemma Removal on Seed Viability in Long Term Storage of Paspalum spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the greatest challenges in managing a germplasm collection is the loss of seed viability during long term storage. Many factors influence viability in long term storage including seed condition at harvesting (ripeness, vigor), drying seed prior to storage, and storage conditions (temperature...

  13. Fate and distribution of nitrogen in soil and plants irrigated with landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C Y; Chu, L M

    2011-06-01

    Landfill leachate contains a high concentration of ammoniacal substances which can be a potential supply of N for plants. A bioassay was conducted using seeds of Brassica chinensis and Lolium perenne to evaluate the phytotoxicity of the leachate sample. A soil column experiment was then carried out in a greenhouse to study the effect of leachate on plant growth. Two grasses (Paspalum notatum and Vetiver zizanioides) and two trees (Hibiscus tiliaceus and Litsea glutinosa) were irrigated with leachate at the EC50 levels for 12 weeks. Their growth performance and the distribution of N were examined and compared with columns applied with chemical fertilizer. With the exception of P. notatum, plants receiving leachate and fertilizer grew better than those receiving water alone. The growth of L. glutinosa and V. zizanioides with leachate irrigation did not differ significantly from plants treated with fertilizer. Leachate irrigation significantly increased the levels of NH(x)-N in soil. Although NO(x)-N was below 1 mg NL(-1) in the leachate sample, the soil NO(x)-N content increased by 9-fold after leachate irrigation, possibly as a result of nitrification. Leachate irrigation at EC50 provided an N input of 1920 kg N ha(-1) over the experimental period, during which up to 1050 kg N ha(-1) was retained in the soil and biomass, depending on the type of vegetation. The amount of nutrient added seems to exceed beyond the assimilative capability. Practitioners should be aware of the possible consequence of N saturation when deciding the application rate if leachate irrigation is aimed for water reuse. PMID:21349695

  14. Availability of residual phosphorus from broiler litter ash and layer manure ash amended soil for Paspalum vaginatum uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized by several scientists that poultry litter ash could be used as a slow releasing phosphorus fertilizer that will become available over time. To test this hypothesis, a greenhouse study was conducted using a broiler litter ash, layer manure ash and calcium phosphate to determ...

  15. Warm-Season (C4) Turfgrass Genotypes Resistant to Spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Cercopidae).

    PubMed

    Gusmão, M R; Valério, J R; Matta, F P; Souza, F H D; Vigna, B B Z; Fávero, A P; Barioni, W; Inácio, G R

    2016-08-01

    Screening for resistance to insect pests is one of the early stages of grass breeding programs. Pasture spittlebugs are sap-sucking insects that potentially cause severe damage to turfgrasses, including the loss of functional quality and perenniallity. The Brazilian flora has a large number of grass species with wide morphological variability and adaptability to different soil and climate conditions that can potentially be used as lawns. However, no study has screened turfgrass genotypes for resistance to spittlebug attack. In this study, we evaluated the intra- and interspecific variability of 35 turfgrass genotypes in the genera Paspalum, Axonopus, and Zoysia for resistance to the pasture spittlebugs, Deois flavopicta (Stal) and Notozulia entreriana (Berg) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae), as measured by damage scores, densities of nymphs and adults, and level of antibiosis resistance. Genotypes were grouped into three groups using cluster analysis and principal component analysis: GroupI had genotypes associated with low damage scores and high density of adult spittlebugs; GroupII had genotypes with intermediate damage scores and low density of nymphs and adults; and GroupIII was formed by genotypes with high damage scores and high nymph density. Intra- and interspecific genotypic variability was related to antibiosis resistance and morphological variation among genotypes with some indicating nonpreference resistance and others indicating tolerance resistance. Our results indicate that besides antibiosis resistance studies, it is essential to evaluate the morphological variability of grass genotypes when screening for resistance to insects. Further studies are needed to elucidate the intraspecific variability of Paspalum notatum Flüggé genotypes for resistance to spittlebug attack. PMID:27329631

  16. Rotations with Coastal Bermudagrass, Cotton, and Bahiagrass for Management of Meloidogyne arenaria and Southern Blight in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Robertson, D. G.; King, P. S.; Wells, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) as a rotation crop for controt of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) in 'Florunner' peanut (Arachis hypogoea) was evaluated in a 3-year field trial. Coastal bermudagrass-peanut rotation (CBP) was compared with peanut monoculture without nematicide (P - ) and peanut monoculture with aldicarb (P + ). The performance of CBP was also compared with 'Pensacola' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum)-peanut (BP), and 'Deltapine 90' cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-peanut (CP) rotations. Each rotation crop was grown for 2 years (1991, 1992) and peanut was planted without nematicide the third year (1993). In contrast with peanut, the alternate crops of bahiagrass, bermudagrass, and cotton did not support M. arenaria populations. In 1993, the lowest numbers of M. arenaria second-stage juveniles (J2) in soil were in plots with CP and BP; these rotations resulted in the highest peanut yields. CBP failed to increase peanut yield and resulted in the highest population densities of M. arenaria J2. In 1993, aldicarb reduced J2 densities in the soil but did not increase peanut yields. Rotations of BP and CP reduced incidence of southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) in peanut, but neither CBP nor aldicarb affected the disease. PMID:19279945

  17. Velvetbean and Bahiagrass as Rotation Crops for Management of Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, D. B.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Carden, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) yield often is limited by the phytoparasitic nematodes Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines in the southeastern United States. We studied the effects of rotation with bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum), velvetbean (Mucuna pruiens), or continuous soybean, aldicarb, and soybean cultivar on yield and population densities in two fields infested with a mixture of Meloidogyne spp. and H. glycines. Velvetbean and bahiagrass reduced population levels of both nematode species to near zero prior to planting soybean. At harvest, both nematode populations were equal in soybean following bahiagrass and continuous soybean but were lower following velvetbean. Both bahiagrass and velvetbean as previous crops were equal in producing significantly (P < 0.003) higher yield than continuous soybean. Velvetbean increased subsequent soybean yield by 98% and bahiagrass increased subsequent soybean yield by 85% as previous crops compared to continuous soybean. The major differences between the two rotation crops were yield response of the nematode-susceptible cultivars and at-harvest nematode populations. Velvetbean tended to mask genetic differences among cultivars more so than bahiagrass. Velvetbean also produced a more long-term effect on nematode populations, with numbers of both Meloidogyne spp. and H. glycines lower in soybean following velvethean than following bahiagrass or continuous soybean. PMID:19274247

  18. Rotations of Bahiagrass and Castorbean with Peanut for the Management of Meloidogyne arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Robertson, D. G.; Weaver, C. F.; Wells, L.

    1991-01-01

    The relative value of 'Hale' castorbean (Ricinus communis) and 'Pensacola' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) as rotational crops for the management of Meloidogyne arenaria and southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) in 'Florunner' peanut (Arachis hypogaea) production was studied for 3 years in a field experiment in southeast Alabama. Peanut following 2 years of castorbean (C-C-P) yielded 43% higher than monocultured peanut without nematicide. At-plant application of aldicarb (30.5 g a.i./100 m row in a 20-cm-wide band) to monocultured peanut resulted in an average 38.9% increase in yield over the 3 years of the experiment. Peanut yield following 2 years of bahiagrass (B-B-P) was 36% higher than monocultured peanut without nematicide. Aldicarb application had no effect on southern blight, but both C-C-P and B-B-P rotations reduced the incidence of the disease in peanut. Juvenile populations of M. arenaria in soil at peanut harvest time were lower in plots with C-C-P than in those with the B-B-P rotation, and both rotations resulted in lower numbers of juveniles in soil than in the untreated monocultured peanut. PMID:19283180

  19. Presence of a Vanadium Nitrogenase in Azotobacter paspali.

    PubMed

    Fallik, E; Hartel, P G; Robson, R L

    1993-06-01

    There have been no previous studies on the genetics of Azotobacter paspali, an aerobic bacterium which forms a highly specific diazotrophic association with Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum). We constructed A. paspali strains defective in the molybdenum nitrogenase so that alternative N(2)ases could be studied. The cosmid vector pTBE and genomic DNA fragments ( approximately 50 kb) of A. paspali ATCC 23367 were used to construct a gene library in Escherichia coli. Recombinant cosmids containing sequences homologous to molybdenum nitrogenase nifDK structural genes were identified by hybridization. A 2.9-kb fragment bearing the putative nifDK genes of A. paspali was subcloned and mutagenized in vitro by the insertion of a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The mutation was recombined into the chromosome of A. paspali with the suicide vector pCU101. One resultant mutant strain, AP2, was incapable of diazotrophic growth in a molybdenum-containing medium (Nif) without vanadium but grew well in a molybdenum-deficient medium with vanadium. The nitrogenase system in AP2 reduced acetylene to ethylene and produced ethane as 2.4% of the total products. Molybdenum levels as low as 10 nM prevented the diazotrophic growth of AP2, even in the presence of vanadium at levels up to 10 muM. These results are consistent with the existence of a vanadium nitrogenase system in A. paspali. PMID:16348965

  20. Nutrient dynamics and tree growth of silvopastoral systems: impact of poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Blazier, Michael A; Gaston, Lewis A; Clason, Terry R; Farrish, Kenneth W; Oswald, Brian P; Evans, Hayden A

    2008-01-01

    Fertilizing pastures with poultry litter has led to an increased incidence of nutrient-saturated soils, particularly on highly fertilized, well drained soils. Applying litter to silvopastures, in which loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) production are integrated, may be an ecologically desirable alternative for upland soils of the southeastern USA. Integrating subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) into silvopastures may enhance nutrient retention potential. This study evaluated soil nutrient dynamics, loblolly pine nutrient composition, and loblolly pine growth of an annually fertilized silvopasture on a well drained soil in response to fertilizer type, litter application rate, and subterranean clover. Three fertilizer treatments were applied annually for 4 yr: (i) 5 Mg litter ha(-1) (5LIT), (ii) 10 Mg litter ha(-1) (10LIT), and (iii) an inorganic N, P, K pasture blend (INO). Litter stimulated loblolly pine growth, and neither litter treatment produced soil test P concentrations above runoff potential threshold ranges. However, both litter treatments led to accumulation of several nutrients (notably P) in upper soil horizons relative to INO and unfertilized control treatments. The 10LIT treatment may have increased N and P leaching potential. Subterranean clover kept more P sequestered in the upper soil horizon and conferred some growth benefits to loblolly pine. Thus, although these silvopasture systems had a relatively high capacity for nutrient use and retention at this site, litter should be applied less frequently than in this study to reduce environmental risks. PMID:18574187

  1. Floristic and structural patterns in South Brazilian coastal grasslands.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Luciana S; Müller, Sandra C; Overbeck, Gerhard E

    2015-01-01

    The natural vegetation of Southern Brazil's coastal region includes grasslands formations that are poorly considered in conservation policy, due to the lack of knowledge about these systems. This study reports results from a regional-scale survey of coastal grasslands vegetation along a 536 km gradient on southern Brazil. We sampled 16 sites along the coastal plain with 15 plots (1 m²) per site. All sites were grazed by cattle. We estimated plant species cover, vegetation height, percentage of bare soil, litter and manure, and classified species according to their growth forms. We found 221 species, 14 of them exotic and two threatened. The prostate grasses: Axonopus aff.affinis, Paspalum notatum and P. pumilumwere among the most important species. Prostrate graminoids species represented the most important vegetation cover, followed by cespitose grasses. Vegetation height, bare soil, litter and manure were similar among all areas, highlighting the homogeneity of sampling sites due to similar management. In comparison to other grasslands formations in Southern Brazil, the coastal grasslands presented rather low species richness. The presence of high values for bare soil at all sampling sites indicates the need to discuss management practices in the region, especially with regard to the intensity of livestock grazing. PMID:26628017

  2. Vegetation trends in reclaimed areas at Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine, Grimes County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, C.A.

    1997-12-31

    Vegetation productivity and cover studies have been conducted annually at the Gibbons Creek Lignite Mine since 1989, and multiple annual clippings have been collected since 1991. The primary purpose of these studies was to examine revegetation success, in terms of herbaceous productivity, for various post-mine soil types. However, the studies also contain detailed information on species composition. For the years in which multiple annual clippings have been collected (1991 through 1996), total vegetation cover increased, with the mean proportion of bare ground dropping from 12% in 1991 to 1% in 1996. Relative proportions of most introduced and native grasses were virtually static from 1991 through 1994; in 1995, however, herbicide applications to reduce clover cover resulted in a dramatic increase in total grass cover, especially in bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and Indiangrass (Sorgastrum nutans). In contrast to the trends of other introduced and native grasses, bahiagrass increased in cover throughout the study period, increasing from 7% in 1991 to 21 % in 1996. Annual and weedy grass species decreased in cover throughout the study period, falling from 12% cover in 1991 to 2% in 1996. This trend of displacement of annuals by perennials is typically observed during ecological succession in natural vegetation communities, and appears to have been accelerated by the herbicide application.

  3. On-farm production of inoculum of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and assessment of diluents of compost for inoculum production.

    PubMed

    Douds, David D; Nagahashi, Gerald; Hepperly, Paul Reed

    2010-04-01

    On-farm production of arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungus inoculum can be employed to make the benefits of the symbiosis more available to vegetable farmers. Experiments were conducted to modify an existing method for the production of inoculum in temperate climates to make it more readily adoptable by farmers. Perlite, vermiculite, and peat based potting media were tested as diluents of yard clippings compost for the media in which the inoculum was produced using bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) as host plant. All produced satisfactory concentrations of AM fungus propagules, though vermiculite proved to be better than potting media (89 vs. 25 propagules cm(-3), respectively). Two methods were tested for the growth of AM fungi indigenous to the farm: (1) adding field soil into the vermiculite and compost mixture and (2) pre-colonizing the bahiagrass seedlings in media inoculated with field soil prior to transplant into that mixture. Adding 100 cm(3) of field soil to the compost and vermiculite produced 465 compared to 137 propagules cm(-3) for the pre-colonization method. The greater flexibility these modifications give will make it easier for farmers to produce inoculum of AM fungi on-the-farm. PMID:20031395

  4. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.A.; Walton, B.T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  5. Phytoextraction of lead-contaminanted soil using Vetiver grass (Vetiveria Zizanioides L.), Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica L.) and Caraboagrass (Paspalum conjugatum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global problem concerning contamination of the environment as a consequence of human activities is increasing. Most of the environmental contaminants are chemical by-products and heavy metals such as lead (Pb). Lead released into the environment makes its way into the air, soil and water. Lead c...

  6. Conversion of Grazed Pastures to Energy Cane as a Biofuel Feedstock Alters Soil GHG Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in land use profoundly affect climate through variations in soil Greenhouse Gas (GHG) exchange. The need for alternative energies is accelerating land use change as marginal land or managed ecosystems are being converted to highly productive second-generation bioenergy crops such as energy cane (Saccharum spp. L). Although the deployment of energy cane is a promising strategy to meet global bioenergy industry demands, few studies have investigated soil GHG fluxes in these crops and sub-tropical low-intensity grazing pasture (bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum L., as forage for cattle, Bos taurus L.) with which they are competing for land. Here, we showed that soil N2O fluxes in bioenergy crops were higher (>250%) than those observed in pastures following fertilization when soil moisture and temperature were high. In the absence of recent fertilization, the N2O source strength in energy cane and pasture sites was similar. Under drier and cooler soil conditions, both pastures and bioenergy crops were weak sources of N2O even when energy cane plots were recently fertilized. Soils on grazed pastures were sources of CH4 during the wet season but became sinks under drier, colder conditions. Energy cane plantations were weak sources of CH4 over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle. The heterotrophic component of soil respiration was larger (139-155%) in pastures than in energy cane crops, suggesting lower decomposition of SOC in bioenergy crops. In terms of global warming potential, grazed pastures were stronger (120-150%) soil GHG emitters than energy cane crops over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle. Moreover, pastures became a substantial source of GHG emitters when including estimates of CH4 flux from cattle. Our results suggest that the conversion of pasture to energy cane will be beneficial in relation to GHGs emitted from soils and cattle. Improved understanding of land use impact on soil GHG dynamics will provide valuable information for decision makers debating

  7. Predictive modeling of hazardous waste landfill total above-ground biomass using passive optical and LIDAR remotely sensed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Brian Christopher

    This dissertation assessed remotely sensed data and geospatial modeling technique(s) to map the spatial distribution of total above-ground biomass present on the surface of the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) hazardous waste landfill. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, regression kriging, and tree-structured regression were employed to model the empirical relationship between in-situ measured Bahia (Paspalum notatum Flugge) and Centipede [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack.] grass biomass against an assortment of explanatory variables extracted from fine spatial resolution passive optical and LIDAR remotely sensed data. Explanatory variables included: (1) discrete channels of visible, near-infrared (NIR), and short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectance, (2) spectral vegetation indices (SVI), (3) spectral mixture analysis (SMA) modeled fractions, (4) narrow-band derivative-based vegetation indices, and (5) LIDAR derived topographic variables (i.e. elevation, slope, and aspect). Results showed that a linear combination of the first- (1DZ_DGVI), second- (2DZ_DGVI), and third-derivative of green vegetation indices (3DZ_DGVI) calculated from hyperspectral data recorded over the 400--960 nm wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum explained the largest percentage of statistical variation (R2 = 0.5184) in the total above-ground biomass measurements. In general, the topographic variables did not correlate well with the MWMF biomass data, accounting for less than five percent of the statistical variation. It was concluded that tree-structured regression represented the optimum geospatial modeling technique due to a combination of model performance and efficiency/flexibility factors.

  8. Ecological rehabilitation and phytoremediation with four grasses in oil shale mined land.

    PubMed

    Xia, H P

    2004-01-01

    Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides), bahia grass (Paspalum notatum), St. Augustine grass (Stenotaphrum secundatum), and bana grass (Pennisetum glaucumxP. purpureum) were selected to rehabilitate the degraded ecosystem of an oil shale mined land of Maoming Petro-Chemical Company located in Southwest of Guangdong Province, China. Among them, vetiver had the highest survival rate, up to 99%, followed by bahia and St. Augustine, 96% and 91%, respectively, whereas bana had the lowest survival rate of 62%. The coverage and biomass of vetiver were also the highest after 6-month planting. Fertilizer application significantly increased biomass and tiller number of the four grasses, of which St. Augustine was promoted most, up to 70% for biomass, while vetiver was promoted least, only 27% for biomass. Two heavy metals, lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) tested in this trial had different concentrations in the oil shale residue, and also had different contents and distributions in the four grass species. Concentrations of Pb and Cd in the four grasses presented a disparity of only 1.6-3.8 times, but their uptake amounts to the two metals were apart up to 27.5-35.5 times, which was chiefly due to the significantly different biomasses among them. Fertilizer application could abate the ability of the four species to accumulate heavy metals, namely concentration of heavy metals in plants decreased as fertilizer was applied. The total amount of metals accumulated by each plant under the condition of fertilization did not decrease due to an increase of biomass. In summary, vetiver may be the best species used for vegetation rehabilitation in oil shale disposal piles. PMID:14575747

  9. Evapotranspiration parameterizations at a grass site in Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizou, M.; Sumner, David M.; Nnadi, F.

    2007-01-01

    In spite of the fact that grasslands account for about 40% of the ice-free global terrestrial land cover, their contribution to the surface exchanges of energy and water in local and regional scale is so far uncertain. In this study, the sensitivity of evapotranspiration (ET) and other energy fluxes to wetness variables, namely the volumetric Soil Water Content (SWC) and Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), over a non-irrigated grass site in Central Florida, USA (28.049 N, 81.400 W) were investigated. Eddy correlation and soil water content measurements were taken by USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) at the grass study site, within 100 m of a SFWMD (South Florida Water Management District) weather station. The soil is composed of fine sands and it is mainly covered by Paspalum notatum (bahia grass). Variable soil wetness conditions with API bounds of about 2 to 160 mm and water table levels of 0.03 to 1.22 m below ground surface, respectively, were observed throughout the year 2004. The Bowen ratio exhibited an average of 1 and values larger than 2 during few dry days. The daytime average ET was classified into two stages, first stage (energy-limited) and second stage (water- limited) based on the water availability. The critical values of API and SWC were found to be about 56 mm and 0.17 respectively, with the second one being approximately 33% of the SWC at saturation. The ET values estimated by the simple Priestley-Taylor (PT) method were compared to the actual values. The PT coefficient varied from a low bound of approximately 0.4 to a peak of 1.21. Simple relationships for the PT empirical factor were employed in terms of SWC and API to improve the accuracy of the second stage observations. The results of the ET parameterizations closely match eddy-covariance flux values on daily and longer time steps.

  10. Comparison of soil bacterial communities under diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tiehang; Chellemi, Dan O; Graham, Jim H; Martin, Kendall J; Rosskopf, Erin N

    2008-02-01

    The composition and structure of bacterial communities were examined in soil subjected to a range of diverse agricultural land management and crop production practices. Length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) of bacterial DNA extracted from soil was used to generate amplicon profiles that were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Five land management programs were initiated in July 2000: conventional, organic, continuous removal of vegetation (disk fallow), undisturbed (weed fallow), and bahiagrass pasture (Paspalum notatum var Argentine). Similar levels in the diversity of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons were detected in soil samples collected from organically and conventionally managed plots 3 and 4 years after initiation of land management programs, whereas significantly lower levels of diversity were observed in samples collected from bahiagrass pasture. Differences in diversity were attributed to effects on how the relative abundance of individual amplicons were distributed (evenness) and not on the total numbers of bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons detected (richness). Similar levels of diversity were detected among all land management programs in soil samples collected after successive years of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cultivation. A different trend was observed after a multivariate examination of the similarities in genetic composition among soil bacterial communities. After 3 years of land management, similarities in genetic composition of soil bacterial communities were observed in plots where disturbance was minimized (bahiagrass and weed fallow). The genetic compositions in plots managed organically were similar to each other and distinct from bacterial communities in other land management programs. After successive years of tomato cultivation and damage from two major hurricanes, only the composition of soil bacterial communities within organically managed plots continued to maintain a high degree of similarity

  11. Methane emissions of beef cattle on forages: efficiency of grazing management systems.

    PubMed

    DeRamus, H Alan; Clement, Terry C; Giampola, Dean D; Dickison, Peter C

    2003-01-01

    Fermentation in the rumen of cattle produces methane (CH4). Methane may play a role in global warming scenarios. The linking of grazing management strategies to more efficient beef production while reducing the CH4 emitted by beef cattle is important. The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique was used to determine the effects of best management practices (BMP) grazing compared with continuous grazing on CH4 production in several Louisiana forages during 1996-1998. Cows and heifers (Bos taurus) grazed common bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge), and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) pastures and were wintered on bahiagrass hay with supplements of protein molasses blocks (PMB), cottonseed meal and corn (CSMC), urea and corn (URC), or limited ryegrass grazing (LRG). Daily CH4 emissions were between 89 and 180 g d(-1) for young growing heifers and 165 to 294 g d(-1) for mature Simbrah cows. Heifers on "ad lib" ryegrass in March and April produced only one-tenth the CH4 per kg of gain as heifers on LRG of 1 h. Using BMP significantly reduced the emission of CH4 per unit of animal weight gain. Management-intensive grazing (MIG) is a BMP that offers the potential for more efficient utilization of grazed forage crops via controlled rotational grazing and more efficient conversion of forage into meat and milk. Projected CH4 annual emissions in cows reflect a 22% reduction from BMP when compared with continuous grazing in this study. With the BMP application of MIG, less methane was produced per kilogram of beef gain. PMID:12549566

  12. Soil nitrate leaching in silvopastures compared with open pasture and pine plantation.

    PubMed

    Bambo, Susan K; Nowak, Jarek; Blount, Ann R; Long, Alan J; Osiecka, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Wide acceptance of silvopasture as an alternative sustainable agricultural system in the southeastern United States will depend on an improved understanding of the tree-forage interactions and recognition of its environmental benefits. The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in soil nitrate leaching in different land-use systems, in north Florida. An 18-yr-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation was thinned in the summer of 2002 to create a fifth-row thinned, nontraditional intensive pine plantation (FO), silvopastures (HE = fourth-row conventionally thinned with random tree distribution and DO = double-row sets of trees with 15-m wide alleys), and an open pasture (PA). 'Argentine' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flügge.) was established as understory vegetation in HE, DO, and PA. From 2004 to 2005 soil nitrate leaching was sampled and compared in the DO, HE, PA, and FO systems at 0.3 and 1.2 m depths after fertilizer application. Significant nitrate peaks were observed at 0.3 m depth after N fertilizer application in all systems. At the 1.2 m depth, the maximum nitrate concentrations were 67, 18, and 8 mg L(-1), in the forest plantation, open pasture, and both silvopastures, respectively. In general, reduced nitrate leaching at 1.2 m depth was observed in silvopastures compared with other land-used systems. These results are not intended to have a direct bearing on traditional pine plantation management, but rather support the potential role of silvopasture systems in reducing nitrate losses from the soil. PMID:19643752

  13. Carbon storage of different soil-size fractions in Florida silvopastoral systems.

    PubMed

    Haile, Solomon G; Nair, P K Ramachandran; Nair, Vimala D

    2008-01-01

    Compared with open (treeless) pasture systems, silvopastoral agroforestry systems that integrate trees into pasture production systems are likely to enhance soil carbon (C) sequestration in deeper soil layers. To test this hypothesis, total soil C contents at six soil depths (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-50, 50-75, and 75-125 cm) were determined in silvopastoral systems with slash pine (Pinus elliottii) + bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) and an adjacent open pasture (OP) with bahiagrass at four sites, representing Spodosols and Ultisols, in Florida. Soil samples from each layer were fractionated into three classes (250-2000, 53-250, and <53 microm), and the C contents in each were determined. Averaged across four sites and all depths, the total soil organic carbon (SOC) content was higher by 33% in silvopastures near trees (SP-T) and by 28% in the alleys between tree rows (SP-A) than in adjacent open pastures. It was higher by 39% in SP-A and 20% in SP-T than in open pastures in the largest fraction size (250-2000 microm) and by 12.3 and 18.8%, respectively, in the intermediate size fraction (53-250 microm). The highest SOC increase (up to 45 kg m(-2)) in whole soil of silvopasture compared with OP was at the 75- to 125-cm depth at the Spodosol sites. The results support the hypothesis that, compared with open pastures, silvopastures contain more C in deeper soil layers under similar ecological settings, possibly as a consequence of a major input to soil organic matter from decomposition of dead tree-roots. PMID:18689740

  14. Influence of water treatment residuals on phosphorus solubility and leaching.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Lu, P; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory and greenhouse studies compared the ability of water treatment residuals (WTRs) to alter P solubility and leaching in Immokalee sandy soil (sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquod) amended with biosolids and triple superphosphate (TSP). Aluminum sulfate (Al-WTR) and ferric sulfate (Fe-WTR) coagulation residuals, a lime softening residual (Ca-WTR) produced during hardness removal, and pure hematite were examined. In equilibration studies, the ability to reduce soluble P followed the order Al-WTR > Ca-WTR = Fe-WTR > hematite. Differences in the P-fixing capacity of the sesquioxide-dominated materials (Al-WTR, Fe-WTR, hematite) were attributed to their varying reactive Fe- and Al-hydrous oxide contents as measured by oxalate extraction. Leachate P was monitored from greenhouse columns where bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown on Immokalee soil amended with biosolids or TSP at an equivalent rate of 224 kg P ha(-1) and WTRs at 2.5% (56 Mg ha(-1)). In the absence of WTRs, 21% of TSP and 11% of Largo cake biosolids total phosphorus (PT) leached over 4 mo. With co-applied WTRs, losses from TSP columns were reduced to 3.5% (Fe-WTR), 2.5% (Ca-WTR), and <1% (Al-WTR) of applied P. For the Largo biosolids treatments all WTRs retarded downward P flux such that leachate P was not statistically different than for control (soil only) columns. The phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/ [Al(ox) + Fe(ox)], where Pox, Al, and Fe(ox) are oxalate-extractable P, Al, and Fe, respectively) based on a simple oxalate extraction of the WTR and biosolids is potentially useful for determining WTR application rates for controlled reduction of P in drainage when biosolids are applied to low P-sorbing soils. PMID:12175057

  15. Exserohilum rostratum: Characterization of a Cross-Kingdom Pathogen of Plants and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kalpana; Goss, Erica M.; Dickstein, Ellen R.; Smith, Matthew E.; Johnson, Judith A.; Southwick, Frederick S.; van Bruggen, Ariena H. C.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen host shifts represent a major source of new infectious diseases. There are several examples of cross-genus host jumps that have caused catastrophic epidemics in animal and plant species worldwide. Cross-kingdom jumps are rare, and are often associated with nosocomial infections. Here we provide an example of human-mediated cross-kingdom jumping of Exserohilum rostratum isolated from a patient who had received a corticosteroid injection and died of fungal meningitis in a Florida hospital in 2012. The clinical isolate of E. rostratum was compared with two plant pathogenic isolates of E. rostratum and an isolate of the closely related genus Bipolaris in terms of morphology, phylogeny, and pathogenicity on one C3 grass, Gulf annual rye grass (Lolium multiflorum), and two C4 grasses, Japanese stilt grass (Microstegium vimineum) and bahia grass (Paspalum notatum). Colony growth and color, as well as conidia shape and size were the same for the clinical and plant isolates of E. rostratum, while these characteristics differed slightly for the Bipolaris sp. isolate. The plant pathogenic and clinical isolates of E. rostratum were indistinguishable based on morphology and ITS and 28S rDNA sequence analysis. The clinical isolate was as pathogenic to all grass species tested as the plant pathogenic strains that were originally isolated from plant hosts. The clinical isolate induced more severe symptoms on stilt grass than on rye grass, while this was the reverse for the plant isolates of E. rostratum. The phylogenetic similarity between the clinical and plant-associated E. rostratum isolates and the ability of the clinical isolate to infect plants suggests that a plant pathogenic strain of E. rostratum contaminated the corticosteroid injection fluid and was able to cause systemic disease in the affected patient. This is the first proof that a clinical isolate of E. rostratum is also an effective plant pathogen. PMID:25285444

  16. Phosphorus leaching from biosolids-amended sandy soils.

    PubMed

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management underscores the need to understand P behavior in soils amended with biosolids and manures. Laboratory and greenhouse column studies characterized P forms and leachability of eight biosolids products, chicken manure (CM), and commercial fertilizer (triple superphosphate, TSP). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown for 4 mo on two acid, P-deficient Florida sands, representing both moderate (Candler series: hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments) and very low (Immokalee series: sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) P-sorbing capacities. Amendments were applied at 56 and 224 kg P(T) ha(-1), simulating P-based and N-based nutrient loadings, respectively. Column leachate P was dominantly inorganic and lower for biosolids P sources than TSP. For Candler soil, only TSP at the high P rate exhibited P leaching statistically greater (alpha = 0.05) than control (soil-only) columns. For the high P rate and low P-sorbing Immokalee soil, TSP and CM leached 21 and 3.0% of applied P, respectively. Leachate P for six biosolids was <1.0% of applied P and not statistically different from controls. Largo biosolids, generated from a biological P removal process, exhibited significantly greater leachate P in both cake and pelletized forms (11 and 2.5% of applied P, respectively) than other biosolids. Biosolids P leaching was correlated to the phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/[Al(ox) + Fe(ox)]) based on oxalate extraction of the pre-applied biosolids. For hiosolids with PSI < or = approximately 1.1, no appreciable leaching occurred. Only Largo cake (PSI = 1.4) and pellets (PSI = 1.3) exhibited P leaching losses statistically greater than controls. The biosolids PSI appears useful for identifying biosolids with potential to enrich drainage P when applied to low P-sorbing soils. PMID:11931462

  17. Evapotranspiration Parameterizations at a Grass Site in Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizou, M.; Sumner, D. M.; Nnadi, F.

    2007-05-01

    In spite of the fact that grasslands account for about 40% of the ice-free global terrestrial land cover, their contribution to the surface exchanges of energy and water in local and regional scale is so far uncertain. In this study, the sensitivity of evapotranspiration (ET) and other energy fluxes to wetness variables, namely the volumetric Soil Water Content (SWC) and Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), over a non-irrigated grass site in Central Florida, USA (28.049 N, 81.400 W) were investigated. Eddy correlation and soil water content measurements were taken by USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) at the grass study site, within 100 m of a SFWMD (South Florida Water Management District) weather station. The soil is composed of fine sands and it is mainly covered by Paspalum notatum (bahia grass). Variable soil wetness conditions with API bounds of about 2 to 160 mm and water table levels of 0.03 to 1.22 m below ground surface, respectively, were observed throughout the year 2004. The Bowen ratio exhibited an average of 1 and values larger than 2 during few dry days. The daytime average ET was classified into two stages, first stage (energy-limited) and second stage (water- limited) based on the water availability. The critical values of API and SWC were found to be about 56 mm and 0.17 respectively, with the second one being approximately 33% of the SWC at saturation. The ET values estimated by the simple Priestley-Taylor (PT) method were compared to the actual values. The PT coefficient varied from a low bound of approximately 0.4 to a peak of 1.21. Simple relationships for the PT empirical factor were employed in terms of SWC and API to improve the accuracy of the second stage observations. The results of the ET parameterizations closely match eddy-covariance flux values on daily and longer time steps.

  18. Grass pollen allergens globally: the contribution of subtropical grasses to burden of allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Davies, J M

    2014-06-01

    Grass pollens of the temperate (Pooideae) subfamily and subtropical subfamilies of grasses are major aeroallergen sources worldwide. The subtropical Chloridoideae (e.g. Cynodon dactylon; Bermuda grass) and Panicoideae (e.g. Paspalum notatum; Bahia grass) species are abundant in parts of Africa, India, Asia, Australia and the Americas, where a large and increasing proportion of the world's population abide. These grasses are phylogenetically and ecologically distinct from temperate grasses. With the advent of global warming, it is conceivable that the geographic distribution of subtropical grasses and the contribution of their pollen to the burden of allergic rhinitis and asthma will increase. This review aims to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the current global knowledge of (i) regional variation in allergic sensitivity to subtropical grass pollens, (ii) molecular allergenic components of subtropical grass pollens and (iii) allergic responses to subtropical grass pollen allergens in relevant populations. Patients from subtropical regions of the world show higher allergic sensitivity to grass pollens of Chloridoideae and Panicoideae grasses, than to temperate grass pollens. The group 1 allergens are amongst the allergen components of subtropical grass pollens, but the group 5 allergens, by which temperate grass pollen extracts are standardized for allergen content, appear to be absent from both subfamilies of subtropical grasses. Whilst there are shared allergenic components and antigenic determinants, there are additional clinically relevant subfamily-specific differences, at T- and B-cell levels, between pollen allergens of subtropical and temperate grasses. Differential immune recognition of subtropical grass pollens is likely to impact upon the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy of patients who are primarily sensitized to subtropical grass pollens. The literature reviewed herein highlights the clinical need to standardize allergen preparations for both

  19. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-01-01

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses. PMID:26782533

  20. Transcriptome analysis of differentially expressed genes during embryo sac development in apomeiotic non-parthenogenetic interspecific hybrid of Pennisetum glaucum.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Gupta, Sarika; Malaviya, D R; Roy, Ajoy Kumar; Kaushal, Pankaj; Prasad, Manoj

    2012-07-01

    Apomixis results in the production of genetically uniform progeny, derived from the fertilization independent development (parthenogenesis) of an unreduced egg cell (apomeiosis). To identify genes involved in the apomeiosis, a comparative transcriptome analysis of differentially expressed genes during embryo sac (ES) development in a sexual Pennisetum glaucum (genotype 81A1) and its apomeiotic (aposporic) non-parthenogenetic interspecific hybrid (BC1GO) was investigated. BC1GO exhibited the partitioned apomeiosis component, whereby the second apomixis component viz., parthenogenesis was completely lacking. A total of 96 non-redundant transcripts were recovered using suppression subtractive hybridization and classified into 11 different categories according to their putative functions. Amongst the identified transcripts, many of them belonged to unknown function (40%) followed by those involved in protein metabolism, stress response, pollen/ovule/embryo development, and translation/protein modification process. A data search of transcriptional profiling in other apomictic species revealed that 75% of the differentially expressed transcripts have not been reported in previous studies. By macroarray analysis, we identified differential expression pattern of 96 transcripts, 45 (47%) of which showed ≥2-fold induction in apomeiotic BC1GO. Further, the obtained results were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to have a comparative expression profiling of eight selected up-regulated transcripts (≥2.5-fold) between BC1GO and 81A1 at different phases of ovule development. In silico mapping demonstrated that 13 transcripts were located onto rice chromosome 2, region syntenic with the apospory locus as reported in Brachiaria brizantha and Paspalum notatum. The expression patterns of these transcripts showed a significant difference at differentiating megaspore mother cell and gametogenesis stages thereby suggesting their involvement in floral

  1. Applicability of leachates originating from solid-waste landfills for irrigation in landfill restoration projects.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Reyhan; Zaimoglu, Zeynep; Sucu, M Yavuz; Budak, Fuat; Kekec, Secil

    2008-09-01

    Since, landfill areas are still the most widely used solid waste disposal method across the world, leachate generated from landfills should be given importance. Leachate of landfills exerts environmental risks mostly on surface and groundwater with its high pollutant content, which may cause unbearable water quality. This leads to the obligation for decontamination and remediation program to be taken into progress for the landfill area. Among a number of alternatives to cope with leachate, one is to employ the technology of phytoremediation. The main objective of this study was to determine the N accumulation ratios and the effects of landfill leachate in diluted proportions of chosen ratios (as 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, 0), on the growth and development of Cynodon dactylon, Stenotaphrum secundatum, Paspalum notatum, Pennisetum clandestinum, Mentha piperita, Rosmarinus officinalis, Nerium oleander, Pelargonium peltatum and Kochia scoparia species. In order to simulate the actual conditions of the landfill, soil covering the landfill is taken and used as medium for the trials. The study showed that S. secundatum, K. scoparia and N. oleander species had an impressive survival rate of 100%, being irrigated with pure leachate, while the others' survival rates were between 0 to 35% under the same conditions. As expected, application of leachate to the plants caused an increase in the accumulation of N, in the upper parts of all plants except P. peltatum. The highest N content increase was observed at S. Secundatum set, accumulating 3.70 times higher than its control set, whereas P. clandestinum value was 3.41 times of its control set. PMID:19295082

  2. Source and level of energy supplementation for yearling cattle fed ammoniated hay.

    PubMed

    Royes, J B; Brown, W F; Martin, F G; Bates, D B

    2001-05-01

    Brahman x British crossbred steers were used in growth and digestion trials to evaluate the response of source (corn, sugar cane molasses, or soybean hulls) and feeding rate (0, 1.4, or 2.8 kg DM per steer daily in the growth trials; 0, 15, or 30% of the ration DM in the digestion trial) of energy supplementation in cattle fed ammoniated (4% of forage DM) stargrass (Cynodon nlemfuensis Vanderyst var. nlemfuensis) hay. Cattle on all treatments were fed 0.5 kg cottonseed meal daily. In the growth trials, steers grazed dormant bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) pasture. Increasing the levels of supplementation decreased hay intake but increased total dietary intake for all diets (P < 0.07). Daily gain and feed efficiency of steers were improved (P < 0.03) with supplementation. Steers supplemented with corn or soybean hulls at 2.8 kg DM/d had a higher ADG (0.92 kg) and gain/feed (0.103) than steers supplemented with molasses (0.78 kg, 0.08, respectively) at the same level. Seven crossbred steers (200 kg) were used in a five-period digestion trial to evaluate apparent OM, NDF, ADF, and hemicellulose digestibility. Apparent OM digestibility of all diets increased linearly (P = 0.02) as the level of supplementation increased. Apparent NDF and ADF digestibility decreased (P < 0.03) as the level of supplementation with corn or molasses increased, whereas increasing the level of soybean hulls in the diet increased (P < 0.06) apparent NDF and ADF digestibility. Four ruminally fistulated crossbred steers (472 kg) were used in a 4 x 4 latin square design to investigate ruminal characteristics with energy supplementation at 30% of ration DM. Ruminal pH in steers supplemented with soybean hulls or corn declined after feeding. Ruminal pH decreased more rapidly with corn supplementation and remained below 6.2 for a longer period of time than with the other diets. Ruminal pH did not change within 24 h after feeding for steers fed the control or molasses diets. No change in total VFA

  3. Diet selection by steers using microhistological and stable carbon isotope ratio analyses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, L L; Hammond, A C; Williams, M J; Chase, C C; Kunkle, W E

    1999-08-01

    Two methods of determining diet botanical composition, microhistological (MH), and stable carbon isotope ratio (CR) analyses were used to determine botanical composition of ingesta and fecal grab samples in steers grazing rhizoma peanut-mixed tropical grass pastures. Three pastures were used over two grazing seasons, 1992 and 1993, in Brooksville, FL. A weighted-disc double-sampling technique was used to determine forage mass and botanical composition, percentage of rhizoma peanut (Arachis glabrata), grass (Paspalum notatum and Cynodon dactlyon), and forb (primarily Chenopodium ambrosioides) on offer every 28 d throughout the grazing seasons. There was an effect of sampling date (P<.001), sampling date x pasture (P<.001), and sampling date x year (P<.001) on forage mass on offer. There was a pasture x year x sampling date interaction (P<.001) for all botanical components. In 1992 and 1993, using cannulated steers sampled every 56 d, there were interactions with year for rhizoma peanut and forb (P<.05), but not for grass with MH analysis (components: rhizoma peanut, grass, and forb). Ingesta and fecal rhizoma peanut (r = .73 and .92 for 1992 and 1993, respectively) and ingesta and fecal forb (r = .86 and .98 for 1992 and 1993, respectively) were positively correlated (P<.001). Ingesta and fecal grass were positively correlated (r = .52, P<.001), but the correlation was not as high. With the CR analysis (components: Calvin cycle [C3] plants and C4-dicarboxylic acid pathway [C4] plants), ingesta and corrected fecal (corrected for in vitro organic matter digestibility [IVOMD]) C3 plants were positively correlated (r = .62; P<.001). Diet composition of fecal grab samples from noncannulated steers, collected on the same sampling schedule as for hand-clipped pasture samples, differed at times due to the complexity of the sward (both rhizoma peanut and forb constituted a single component, C3, in the CR analysis). Based on these results, if there is a substantial

  4. Effect of early weaning on the performance of three-year-old, first-calf beef heifers and calves reared in the subtropics.

    PubMed

    Arthington, J D; Kalmbacher, R S

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of early weaning fall-born calves on heifer and calf performance in Florida. Over two consecutive years, 3-yr-old Braford and Brahman x Angus first-calf heifers were assigned randomly to one of two treatments; early-weaned (EW, n = 20 and 30 for yr 1 and 2, respectively) and normal-weaned (NW, n = 20 and 38 for yr 1 and 2, respectively). Calves were EW on January 23 and 3 for yr 1 and 2, respectively. Following EW, all first-calf heifers were returned to bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) pastures with the mature cowherd. Early-weaned calves were maintained on annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) pastures at 8.2 and 10.7 calves/ha for yr 1 and 2, respectively, and were provided supplemental grain mixture (14% CP) at 1.0% of BW daily. Normal-weaned calves remained with their dams in the mature cowherd on bahiagrass. Final calf BW was collected on April 17 (d 84) and April 24 (d 111) for yr 1 and 2, respectively. Early-weaned calves had a greater (P < 0.001) ADG (0.17 kg/d) in yr 1, but a lower (P < 0.001) ADG (-0.24 kg/d) in yr 2 compared with NW calves. Early weaning resulted in heavier first-calf heifers with greater BCS at the time of normal weaning (August 1; 491 vs. 452 kg, with BCS = 6.34 vs. 4.75 for EW and NW heifers, respectively; SEM = 5.0 and 0.07). Heifers with EW calves had a higher (P < 0.07) pregnancy rate during both years than normal-weaned heifers (89.5 vs. 50.0 and 96.7 vs. 80.0% pregnant during yr 1 and 2, respectively). Early-weaned, first-calf heifers also had a lower (P < 0.05) calving interval in yr 2 (384 vs. 404 d; SEM = 6.0). These data suggest that EW will improve body condition of first-calf heifers resulting in an increased pregnancy rate. Early-weaned calves maintained on winter ryegrass provide producers with the ability to optimize early-weaned calf performance, while capitalizing on low cost of gain and favorable spring markets. PMID:12772839

  5. Biological impact of divergent land management practices on tomato crop health.

    PubMed

    Chellemi, Dan O; Wu, Tiehang; Graham, Jim H; Church, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Development of sustainable food systems is contingent upon the adoption of land management practices that can mitigate damage from soilborne pests. Five diverse land management practices were studied for their impacts on Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici), galling of roots by Meloidogyne spp. and marketable yield of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and to identify associations between the severity of pest damage and the corresponding soil microbial community structure. The incidence of Fusarium wilt was >14% when tomato was cultivated following 3 to 4 years of an undisturbed weed fallow or continuous tillage disk fallow rotation and was >4% after 3 to 4 years of bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) rotation or organic production practices that included soil amendments and cover crops. The incidence of Fusarium wilt under conventional tomato production with soil fumigation varied from 2% in 2003 to 15% in 2004. Repeated tomato cultivation increased Fusarium wilt by 20% or more except when tomato was grown using organic practices, where disease remained less than 3%. The percent of tomato roots with galls from Meloidogyne spp. ranged from 18 to 82% in soil previously subjected to a weed fallow rotation and 7 to 15% in soil managed previously as a bahiagrass pasture. Repeated tomato cultivation increased the severity of root galling in plots previously subjected to a conventional or disk fallow rotation but not in plots managed using organic practices, where the percentage of tomato roots with galls remained below 1%. Marketable yield of tomato exceeded 35 Mg ha(-1) following all land management strategies except the strip-tillage/bahiagrass program. Marketable yield declined by 11, 14, and 19% when tomato was grown in consecutive years following a bahiagrass, weed fallow, and disk rotation. The composition of fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons isolated from soil fungal and bacterial communities corresponded with

  6. Effect of Boundary Conditions on the Axial Compression Buckling of Homogeneous Orthotropic Composite Cylinders in the Long Column Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Oremont, Leonard; Jegley, Dawn C.

    2011-01-01

    Buckling loads for long isotropic and laminated cylinders are calculated based on Euler, Fluegge and Donnell's equations. Results from these methods are presented using simple parameters useful for fundamental design work. Buckling loads for two types of simply supported boundary conditions are calculated using finite element methods for comparison to select cases of the closed form solution. Results indicate that relying on Donnell theory can result in an over-prediction of buckling loads by as much as 40% in isotropic materials.

  7. Antifungal activity of the stem bark of Ailanthus excelsa.

    PubMed

    Joshi, B C; Pandey, Anuj; Chaurasia, Leena; Pal, Mahesh; Sharma, R P; Khare, Anakshi

    2003-12-01

    The methanol extract of stem barks of Alianthus excelsa was partitioned with chloroform. The chloroform extract showed fungistatic and fungicidal activity against Aspergillus niger, A. fumigatus, Penicillium frequentence, P. notatum and Botrytis cinerea. PMID:14630175

  8. Land use change effects on GHG dynamics in Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C. J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.

    2012-12-01

    The need for alternative energies is accelerating land use change as native or managed ecosystems are being converted to intense agricultural crops for biofuel purposes. Agriculture represents the single largest terrestrial flux of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere resulting from nutrient applications. Livestock grazing also accounts for a significant release of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Together, CO2, N2O and CH4 represent the dominant greenhouse gasses (GHG) that are emitted to the atmosphere through anthropogenic influences. Significant alterations to the land surface, particularly associated with changes in nutrient application rates, ability of vegetation to uptake nutrients, or changes in the stocking density of livestock, could have a meaningful impact on GHG emissions. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect soil GHG dynamics is essential to quantify the impact of land use change on the global climate system. Large-scale changes to land cover type in Central Florida Highlands County is currently occurring in which improved pasture (bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum L., as forage for cattle, Bos taurus L.) is being replaced by energy cane (genus Saccharum L.). Fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) were obtained over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle in a grazed pasture and an energy cane plantation located in Highlands County, FL. In addition, we also investigated the biotic and environmental drivers that regulate soil GHG fluxes in these ecosystems. We predicted decreased rates of CH4 released to the atmosphere after the conversion process was completed to energy cane due to the absence of grazing cattle. We also predicted increased N2O emissions from aggressive fertilization of energycane. Using static chamber measurements, we collected gas samples from four energy cane crops at varying ages and improved pastures paired to each energy cane plot. The gas samples were analyzed using gas chromatography

  9. Bioenergy Crop Breeding and Production Research in the Southeast, Final Report for 1996 to 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bouton, J.H.

    2003-05-30

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a native grass species to much of the US. It has shown great potential for use in production of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass (Lynd et al., 1991). Work in Alabama demonstrated very high dry matter yields can be achieved with switchgrass (Maposse et al. 1995) in the southeastern US. Therefore, this region is thought to be an excellent choice for development of a switchgrass cropping system where farmers can produce the grass for either biomass or forage. Another report has shown success with selection and breeding to develop high yielding germplasm from adapted cultivars and ecotypes of switchgrass (Moser and Vogel 1995). In the mid 1990s, however, there was little plant breeding effort for switchgrass with a potential for developing a cultivar for the southeast region. The main goal of the project was to develop adaptive, high-yielding switchgrass cultivars for use in cropping systems for bioenergy production in the southeastern US. A secondary objective was to assess the potential of alternate herbaceous species such as bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.), bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge.), and napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) that may compete with switchgrass for herbaceous bioenergy production in the southeast. During the conduct of the project, another goal of developing molecular markers useful for genetic mapping was added. The ''lowland'' cultivars, Alamo and Kanlow, were found to be the highest yielding switchgrass cultivars. Although most summers during the project period were hot and dry, their annual dry matter yield continue to outperform the best ''upland'' cultivars such as Cave-in-Rock, Shawnee, NE Late, and Trailblazer. The use of a breeding procedure based on the ''honeycomb design'' and multi-location progeny testing, coupled with the solid heritability and genetic gain estimates for dry matter yield in lowland type switchgrass germplasm, indicated excellent potential to isolate parental

  10. Stocking rate and monensin supplemental level effects on growth performance of beef cattle consuming warm-season grasses.

    PubMed

    Vendramini, J M B; Sanchez, J M D; Cooke, R F; Aguiar, A D; Moriel, P; da Silva, W L; Cunha, O F R; Ferreira, P D S; Pereira, A C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of monensin supplementation on animals receiving warm-season grass with limited supplementation. In Exp. 1, treatments were a factorial combination of 2 stocking rates (1.2 and 1.7 animal unit [AU] [500 kg BW]/ha) and supplementation with monensin (200 mg/d) or control (no monensin) distributed in a complete randomized design with 3 replicates. Thirty Angus × Brahman crossbred heifers (Bos taurus × Bos indicus) with initial BW of 343 ± 8 kg were randomly allocated into 12 bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) pastures and supplemented with 0.4 kg DM of concentrate (14% CP and 78% TDN) daily for 86 d. Herbage mass (HM) and nutritive value evaluations were conducted every 14 d, and heifers were weighed every 28 d. There was no effect (P ≥ 0.97) of monensin on HM, herbage allowance (HA), and ADG; however, animals receiving monensin had greater (P = 0.03) plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) concentrations. The stocking rate treatments had similar HM in June (P = 0.20) and July (P = 0.18), but the higher stocking rate decreased (P < 0.01) HM and HA during August and September. Average daily gain was greater (P < 0.01) for the pastures with the lower stocking rate in August but not different in July and September (P ≥ 0.15). Gain per hectare tended to be greater on pastures with the higher stocking rate (P ≤ 0.06). In Exp. 2, treatments were 3 levels of monensin (125, 250, and 375 mg/animal per day) and control (no monensin) tested in a 4 × 4 Latin square with a 10-d adaptation period followed by 5 d of rumen fluid collection and total DMI evaluation. Blood samples were collected on d 4 and 5 of the collection period. Ground stargrass (Cynodon nlemfuensis) hay (11.0% CP and 52% in vitro digestible organic matter) was offered daily. The steers received the same supplementation regimen as in Exp. 1. Total DMI was not different among treatments (P = 0.64). There was a linear increase (P ≤ 0.01) in propionate and a tendency

  11. Development of a Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator to evaluate the transport and dispersion of Asian carp eggs in rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Tatiana; Jackson, P. Ryan; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2013-01-01

    Asian carp are migrating towards the Great Lakes and are threatening to invade this ecosystem, hence there is an immediate need to control their population. The transport of Asian carp eggs in potential spawning rivers is an important factor in its life history and recruitment success. An understanding of the transport, development, and fate of Asian carp eggs has the potential to create prevention, management, and control strategies before the eggs hatch and develop the ability to swim. However, there is not a clear understanding of the hydrodynamic conditions at which the eggs are transported and kept in suspension. This knowledge is imperative because of the current assumption that suspension is required for the eggs to survive. Herein, FluEgg (Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator), a three-dimensional Lagrangian model capable of evaluating the influence of flow velocity, shear dispersion and turbulent diffusion on the transport and dispersal patterns of Asian carp eggs is presented. The model's variables include not only biological behavior (growth rate, density changes) but also the physical characteristics of the flow field, such as mean velocities and eddy diffusivities. The performance of the FluEgg model was evaluated using observed data from published flume experiments conducted in China with water-hardened Asian carp eggs as subjects. FluEgg simulations show a good agreement with the experimental data. The model was also run with observed data from the Sandusky River in Ohio to provide a real-world demonstration case. This research will support the identification of critical hydrodynamic conditions (e.g., flow velocity, depth, and shear velocity) to maintain eggs in suspension, assist in the evaluation of suitable spawning rivers for Asian carp populations and facilitate the development of prevention, control and management strategies for Asian carp species in rivers and water bodies.

  12. Evaluation of turfgrass species and cultivars for potential resistance to twolined spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae).

    PubMed

    Shortman, S L; Braman, S K; Duncan, R R; Hanna, W W; Engelke, M C

    2002-04-01

    Potential resistance to the twolined spittlebug, Prosapia bicincta (Say), was evaluated among 56 turfgrass genotypes. Greenhouse, laboratory, and field bioassays identified differences in spittlebug survival and development, host preference and damage levels, and turfgrass tolerance to and ability to recover from pest induced injury. All centipede grasses demonstrated high levels of susceptibility, followed by bermudagrasses, seashore paspalums, and zoysiagrasses. Average nymphal survival to the adult stage ranged from 1.5 to 78.1%. Development required 38.1-62.0 d under greenhouse conditions, depending on plant taxa. Among seashore paspalums, nymphal survival to the adult stage was lowest and duration of development was longest on HI-1, 'Sea Isle 2000', 561-79, and 'Mauna Kea'. Reduced spittlebug survival and increased developmental times were also observed on the bermudagrasses BERPC 91-15 and 'Tifway'. Although zoysiagrasses supported spittlebug development and survival to the adult stage, developmental times were extended on the zoysiagrass cultivars 'Emerald' and 'El Toro'. Spittlebug preference varied with generation evaluated. First-generation spittlebugs inflicted the greatest damage on TC201 (centipede grass), 'Primavera' (bermudagrass), and 'Emerald' (zoysiagrass) in choice tests. In the fall, second-generation spittlebugs damaged TC201 (centipedegrass) and 'Sea Isle 1' (paspalum) most severely, whereas 561-79 (paspalum) and 'Emerald'(zoysiagrass) were less severely affected. Among taxa included in field trials, HI-1, 'Mauna Kea', 'Sea Isle 2000',and AP-14 paspalums, 'Tifway' bermudagrass, and 'Emerald' zoysiagrass were most tolerant (demonstrated the best regrowth potential following twolined spittlebug feeding). PMID:12020030

  13. Soil-extractable phosphorus and phosphorus saturation threshold in beef cattle pastures as affected by grazing management and forage type.

    PubMed

    Sigua, Gilbert C; Chase, Chad C; Albano, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Grazing can accelerate and alter the timing of nutrient transfer, and could increase the amount of extractable phosphorus (P) cycle from soils to plants. The effects of grazing management and/or forage type that control P cycling and distribution in pasture's resources have not been sufficiently evaluated. Our ability to estimate the levels and changes of soil-extractable P and other crop nutrients in subtropical beef cattle pastures has the potential to improve our understanding of P dynamics and nutrient cycling at the landscape level. To date, very little attention has been paid to evaluating transfers of extractable P in pasture with varying grazing management and different forage type. Whether or not P losses from grazed pastures are significantly greater than background losses and how these losses are affected by soil, forage management, or stocking density are not well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of grazing management (rotational versus "zero" grazing) and forage types (FT; bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum, Flugge versus rhizoma peanuts, Arachis glabrata, Benth) on the levels of extractable soil P and degree of P saturation in beef cattle pastures. This study (2004-2007) was conducted at the Subtropical Agricultural Research Station, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service located 7 miles north of Brooksville, FL. Soil (Candler fine sand) at this location was described as well-drained hyperthermic uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments. A split plot arrangement in a completely randomized block design was used and each treatment was replicated four times. The main plot was represented by grazing management (grazing vs. no grazing) while forage types (bahiagrass vs. perennial peanut) as the sub-plot treatment. Eight steel exclosures (10 × 10 m) were used in the study. Four exclosures were placed and established in four pastures with bahiagrass and four exclosures were established in four pastures with rhizoma

  14. AGRONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF DALLISGRASS TISSUE CULTURE REGENERANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common dallisgrass, Paspalum dilatatum, is a pentaploid obligate apomict and efforts to improve this important forage grass have not been successful because of its asexual reproduction and irregular meiosis. An apomictic hexaploid biotype, known as Uruguayan dallisgrass, is a new source of genetic v...

  15. GRAZING TOLERANCE AND FORAGE PRODUCTION OF SELECTED DALLISGRASS ACCESSIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.), introduced into the USA from South America, is an important forage grass in many of the warmer regions of the world. The term dallisgrass is synonymous with the common biotype which is distributed throughout the southeastern USA and is widely used for ...

  16. Sabine, a new dallisgrass cultivar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common dallisgrass, Paspalum dilatatum, is an important forage grass in the southern United States because of its forage quality, palatability, and ability to grow in mixed species stands. However, the grass produces less forage than other perennial warm-season grasses which reduces its popularity ...

  17. Registration of 'Sabine' Dallisgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Sabine' dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.) (Reg. No. CV-2; PI 655527) was released by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and Texas AgriLife Research on 2 September 2008. This cultivar is phenotypically and cytologically different from common...

  18. Digestive utilization of ozone-exposed forage by rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mixture of common Southern Piedmont (USA) grassland species (Lolium arundinacea, Paspalum dilatatum, Cynodon dactylon and Trifolium repens) was exposed to ozone [ambient (non-filtered; NF) and twice-ambient (2X) concentrations] and fed to individually caged New Zealand white rabbits (Oryctolagus c...

  19. Screening and productivity of penicillin antibiotic from Penicillium sp.

    PubMed

    Sivakumari, V; Dhinakaran, J; Rajendran, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper highlights the antagonism effect of Penicillium isolates, which were screened against the test organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli and Penicillium sp. Penicillium notatum and Penicillium chrysogenum isolates were used for penicillin biosynthesis. The antibacterial activities of fermented crude penicillin extract were assayed by disc diffusion method. Maximum antibacterial activity was observed in Gram positive organisms (Staphylococcus aureus) when compared with Gram negative organisms. The isolated Penicillium chrysogenum can be used for large-scale penicillin antibiotic production. PMID:21117415

  20. Simplified design and evaluation of liquid storage tanks relative to earthquake loading

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, A.B.

    1994-06-01

    A summary of earthquake-induced damage in liquid storage tanks is provided. The general analysis steps for dynamic response of fluid-filled tanks subject to horizontal ground excitation are discussed. This work will provide major attention to the understanding of observed tank-failure modes. These modes are quite diverse in nature, but many of the commonly appearing patterns are believed to be shell buckling. A generalized and simple-to-apply shell loading will be developed using Fluegge shell theory. The input to this simplified analysis will be horizontal ground acceleration and tank shell form parameters. A dimensionless parameter will be developed and used in predictions of buckling resulting from earthquake-imposed loads. This prediction method will be applied to various tank designs that have failed during major earthquakes and during shaker table tests. Tanks that have not failed will also be reviewed. A simplified approach will be discussed for early design and evaluation of tank shell parameters and materials to provide a high confidence of low probability of failure during earthquakes.

  1. Aquatic plants for removal of mevinphos from the aquatic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    Fragrant waterlily (Nymphaea odorata, Ait.), joint-grass (Paspalum distichum L.), and rush (Juncus repens, Michx.) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of vascular aquatic plants in removing the insecticide mevinphos (dimethyl-1-carbomethoxy-1propen-2-yl phosphate) from waters contaminated with this chemical. The emersed aquatic plants fragrant waterlily and joint-grass removed 87 and 93 ppm of mevinphos from water test systems in less than 2 weeks without apparent damage to the plants; whereas rush, a submersed plant, removed less insecticide than the water-soil controls. Water-soil control still contained toxic levels of this insecticide, as demonstrated by fish bioassay studies, after 35 days.

  2. Production of fumigaclavine A by Aspergillus tamarii Kita.

    PubMed

    Janardhanan, K K; Sattar, A; Husain, A

    1984-02-01

    Aspergillus tamarii Kita. isolated from seeds of Paspalum scrobiculatum L. is found to produce ergot alkaloids in submerged culture. The culture filtrate and mycelium are observed to contain 0.125 mg/mL and 1.2 mg/g (dry weight) total alkaloids consisting of 86.5 and 91.3% fumigaclavine A, respectively. The identification of the compound was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography, ultraviolet, infrared, and mass spectrophotometry analyses. This is the first report of the production of ergot alkaloid by this fungus. The possible role of fumigaclavine A as a mycotoxin is discussed. PMID:6713307

  3. Anther and pollen development in some species of Poaceae (Poales).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A T; Longhi-Wagner, H M; Scatena, V L

    2010-05-01

    Anther and pollen development were studied in Olyra humilis Nees, Sucrea monophylla Soderstr, (Bambusoideae), Axonopus aureus P. Beauv., Paspalum polyphyllum Nees ex Trin. (Panicoideae), Eragrostis solida Nees, and Chloris elata Desv. (Chloridoideae). The objective of this study was to characterise, embryologically, these species of subfamilies which are considered basal, intermediate and derivate, respectively. The species are similar to each other and to other Poaceae. They present the following characters: tetrasporangiate anthers; monocotyledonous-type anther wall development, endothecium showing annular thickenings, secretory tapetum; successive microsporogenesis; isobilateral tetrads; spheroidal, tricellular, monoporate pollen grains with annulus and operculum. Nevertheless, the exine patterns of the species studied are distinct. Olyra humilis and Sucrea monophylla (Bambusoideae) show a granulose pattern, whereas in the other species, it is insular. In addition, Axonopus aureus and Paspalum polyphyllum (Panicoideae) have a compactly insular spinule pattern, while Chloris elata and Eragrostis solida (Chloridoideae) show a sparsely insular spinule pattern. The exine ornamentation may be considered an important feature at the infrafamiliar level. PMID:20552147

  4. Preventing Establishment: An Inventory of Introduced Plants in Puerto Villamil, Isabela Island, Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Guézou, Anne; Pozo, Paola; Buddenhagen, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    As part of an island-wide project to identify and eradicate potentially invasive plant species before they become established, a program of inventories is being carried out in the urban and agricultural zones of the four inhabited islands in Galapagos. This study reports the results of the inventory from Puerto Villamil, a coastal village representing the urban zone of Isabela Island. We visited all 1193 village properties to record the presence of the introduced plants. In addition, information was collected from half of the properties to determine evidence for potential invasiveness of the plant species. We recorded 261 vascular taxa, 13 of which were new records for Galapagos. Most of the species were intentionally grown (cultivated) (73.3%) and used principally as ornamentals. The most frequent taxa we encountered were Cocos nucifera (coconut tree) (22.1%) as a cultivated plant and Paspalum vaginatum (salt water couch) (13.2%) as a non cultivated plant. In addition 39 taxa were naturalized. On the basis of the invasiveness study, we recommend five species for eradication (Abutilon dianthum, Datura inoxia, Datura metel, Senna alata and Solanum capsicoides), one species for hybridization studies (Opuntia ficus-indica) and three species for control (Furcraea hexapetala, Leucaena leucocephala and Paspalum vaginatum). PMID:17940606

  5. True metabolizable energy of moist-soil seeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Checkett, J.M.; Drobney, R.D.; Petrie, M.J.; Graber, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Habitat objectives for migrating and wintering waterfowl are often established by converting population energy demands into an equivalent measure of foraging habitat. In some areas, seeds produced from moist-soil plants provide a significant proportion of the energy available to waterfowl. To accurately establish habitat objectives for migrating and wintering waterfowl, managers must estimate seed production from moist-soil plants and have information on metabolizable energy (ME) of moist-soil seeds. Although methods for estimating seed production have been developed, ME has been determined for few natural seeds. We determined true metabolizable energy (TME) of 10 moist-soil seeds commonly consumed by wintering and migrating ducks. TME estimates were similar (P>0.05) for hairy crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis; 3.09 kcal/g), little hairy crabgrass (D. ischaemum; 3.10 kcal/g), pigweed (Amaranthus spp.; 2.97 kcal/g), yellow foxtail (Setaria lutescens; 2.88 kcal/g), fall panicum (Panicum dichotomiflorum; 2.75 kcal/g), curly dock (Rumex crispus; 2.68 kcal/g), and wild millet (Echinochloa crusgalli; 2.61 kcal/g), but less (P<0.05) for beakrush (Rynchospora corniculata; 1.86 kcal/g), paspalum (Paspalum laeve; 1.57 kcal/g), and nodding or curltop ladysthumb smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium; 1.52 kcal/g). TME values determined for moist-soil seeds in this study will allow managers to accurately estimate carrying capacity of waterfowl habitats.

  6. Synthesis, Spectral investigation (¹H, ¹³C) and Anti-microbial Screening of benzophenone imines.

    PubMed

    Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Jamal, Muhammad Asghar; Saif, Muhammad Jawad; Muneer, Majid; Rehman, Fazalur; Farman, Muhammad; Shoaib, Hafiz Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hameed, Shabnam

    2015-11-01

    New series of benzophenone imines with general formula Ph2-C=NR; R = Benzyl, 4-Fluorobenzyl, Naphthyl, Phenyl, 4-Nitrophenyl were synthesized by condensation of dichlorodiphenylmethane and different aromatic primary amines (1:1) Those imines were characterized by different physiochemical and spectroscopic techniques like melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, multinuclear NMR (¹H, ¹³C). After characterization, imines were subjected to anti-microbial activities. All compounds showed promising activity against different bacterial strains like Escherichia coli, Bacillussubtilis, Pasturellam ultocida and Staphylococcus aureus as well as fungal strains like Alternata alternaria, Ganoderma lucidium, Penicillium notatum and Trichoderma harzianum using Amoxicillin and Flucanazole as a standard drugs respectively. PMID:26639485

  7. Upper boundary of the biosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Imshenetsky, A A; Lysenko, S V; Kazakov, G A

    1978-01-01

    By using meterological rockets fitted with specially designed analyzers, samples for microbiological investigation have been taken. The analyzer design prevented extraneous microorganisms from penetrating into the analyzer. Before being used, the analyzers were sterilized with high gamma-ray doses. For the first time microorganisms have been detected in the mesosphere at an altitude of 48 to 77 km. The microorganisms are microscopic fungi having black conidia or spores (Circinella muscae, Aspergillus niger, Papulaspora anomala) and one species forming green conidia (Penicillium notatum). Colonies of Mycobacterium luteum and Micrococcus albus have also grown. Five of the six species have synthesized pigments. The presence of pigmented microbial forms leads us to believe that natural selection is occurring in the mesosphere because cells possessing chromogenous pigments (carotenoids, melanins) are more resistant to ultraviolet-ray action. A greater number of microorganisms have been registered in the mesosphere during dust storms than in the absence of strong winds. Images PMID:623455

  8. Brine organisms and the question of habitat-specific adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.; Speitel, T.; Waber, J.; Stoecker, R.

    1984-01-01

    The question of adaptivity to extremely saline water environments is discussed, with attention given to the evolutionary performance of four common organisms including Cladonia skottsbergii, Penicillium notatum, Nostoc, and Dunaliella salina. Samples of each organism were collected and subjected to experimental conditions similar to extreme marine and limnetic environments in the Dead Sea and Don Juan Pond in the upper Wright valley of Antarctica. Measurements were made of isotope uptake and carbon dioxide production, and photoautotrophs were taken. It is found that all of the organisms responded quickly to the need to adapt to the extreme environments. It is concluded that a degree of uncertainty exists in the perception that the abundance of bulk water on the earth is in itself essential for life.

  9. Tremorgenic mycotoxins produced by strains of Penicillium spp. isolated from toxic Poa huecu parodi.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, M; Sala de Miguel, M A; Blanco Viera, J; Planes de Banchero, E

    1992-12-01

    Seventeen strains of Penicillium spp. have been isolated from Poa huecu Parodi from the Zapala zone, exhibiting toxicity to sheet. The following strains have been identified: P. crustosum, cyclopium, notatum, palitans, puberulum, verrucosum, viridicatum and Penicillium spp. The toxigenic capacity of the strains was studied after growing them under suitable conditions. Toxins produced were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Penitrem A (PA) and Penitrem B (PB) neurotoxins were identified and quantitated in twelve strains; verruculogen (VERR) and fumitremorgen B (FTB) being present in one of them. The effect of these mycotoxins was studied in mice. Neurological symptoms characteristic of the intoxication by tremorgenic toxins and similar to those observed in sheep suffering from 'huecu's disease' were observed. The possible role of these toxins as causative agents of 'huecu's disease' is discussed. PMID:1494361

  10. Molecular tools to understand the bioremediation effect of plants and earthworms on contaminated marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Beatriz; Cañizares, Rosa; Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Masciandaro, Grazia; Benitez, Emilio

    2015-12-30

    A meso-scale pilot plant was set up to test the efficiency of a bioremediation scheme applied to marine sediments contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The experiment was implemented for three years in two stages using two remediation agents: plants (Paspalum vaginatum and Tamarix gallica) and earthworms (Eisenia fetida). DNA and RNA-based methodologies were applied to elucidate the dynamics of the bacterial population and were related to improving biological and chemical conditions of the sediments. Bioremediation strategies were successful in removing pollutants from the contaminated sediments and specialization within the bacterial community related to the type of contamination present was detected in the different stages of the process. The highest response of Gram-positive PAH-degraders to the contamination was detected at the beginning and after the first stage of the experiment, corresponding to the uppermost values of degradation. PMID:26223013

  11. Cloning plants by seeds: Inheritance models and candidate genes to increase fundamental knowledge for engineering apomixis in sexual crops.

    PubMed

    Pupilli, Fulvio; Barcaccia, Gianni

    2012-06-30

    Apomixis is desirable in agriculture as a reproductive strategy for cloning plants by seeds. Because embryos derive from the parthenogenic development of apomeiotic egg cells, apomixis excludes fertilization in addition to meiotic segregation and recombination, resulting in offspring that are exact replicas of the parent. Introgression of apomixis from wild relatives to crop species and transformation of sexual genotypes into apomictically reproducing ones are long-held goals of plant breeding. In fact, it is generally accepted that the introduction of apomixis into agronomically important crops will have revolutionary implications for agriculture. This review deals with the current genetic and molecular findings that have been collected from model species to elucidate the mechanisms of apomeiosis, parthenogenesis and apomixis as a whole. Our goal is to critically determine whether biotechnology can combine key genes known to control the expression of the processes miming the main components of apomixis in plants. Two natural apomicts, as the eudicot Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John's wort) and the monocot Paspalum spp. (crowngrass), and the sexual model species Arabidopsis thaliana are ideally suited for such investigations at the genomic and biotechnological levels. Some novel views and original concepts have been faced on this review, including (i) the parallel between Y-chromosome and apomixis-bearing chromosome (e.g., comparative genomic analyses revealed common features as repression of recombination events, accumulation of transposable elements and degeneration of genes) from the most primitive (Hypericum-type) to the most advanced (Paspalum-type) in evolutionary terms, and (ii) the link between apomixis and gene-specific silencing mechanisms (i.e., likely based on chromatin remodelling factors), with merging lines of evidence regarding the role of auxin in cell fate specification of embryo sac and egg cell development in Arabidopsis. The production of

  12. Antimicrobial activity of glycosidase inhibitory protein isolated from Cyphomandra betacea Sendt. fruit.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Roxana M; Ordóñez, Adriana A L; Sayago, Jorge E; Nieva Moreno, María I; Isla, María I

    2006-06-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of an invertase inhibitory protein (IIP) isolated from Cyphomandra betacea ripe fruits is documented. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by agar macrodilution and broth microdilution assays. This IIP inhibited the growth of xylophagous and phytopatogenic fungi (Ganoderma applanatum, Schizophyllum commune, Lenzites elegans, Pycnoporus sanguineous, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus niger, Phomopsis sojae and Fusarium mango) and phytopathogenic bacteria (Xanthomonas campestris pvar vesicatoria CECT 792, Pseudomonas solanacearum CECT 125, Pseudomonas corrugata CECT 124, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and Erwinia carotovora var carotovora). The IIP concentration required to completely inhibit the growth of all studied fungi ranged from 7.8 to 62.5 microg/ml. Phytopatogenic bacteria were the most sensitive, with MIC values between 7.8 and 31.25 microg/ml. Antifungal and antibacterial activities can be associated with their ability to inhibit hydrolytic enzymes. Our results indicate the possible participation of IIP in the plant defense mechanism and its potential application as a biocontrol agent against phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria. PMID:16406143

  13. Taxonomic and nomenclatural aspects of Hypoxylon taxa from southern South America proposed by Spegazzini.

    PubMed

    Hladki, Adriana I; Romero, Andrea I

    2009-01-01

    The holotypes and isotypes of 20 Hypoxylon taxa described by Spegazzini have been examined and their taxonomic positions and nomenclatural problems are discussed. Two new combinations, Annulohypoxylon apiahynum comb. nov. and A. subeffusum comb. nov., are proposed. H. goliath is considered a synonym of Rosellinia bunodes. H. albostigmatosum and H. guarapiense are synonyms of H. anthochroum, H. anthracoderma of H. monticulosum, H. mbaiense of H. notatum, H. paulistanum of H. diatrypeoides, H. plumbeum and H. rubiginosum var. microcarpum of H. perforatum. H. porteri and H. intermedium belong in Biscogniauxia capnodes, H. puiggarii in Annulophypoxylon subeffusum, H. subvinosum. in H. lenormandii, H. turbinatum var. guaraniticum in Phylacia turbinata and H. valsarioides in Creosphaeria sassafras. H. leptascum is transferred to A. leptascum, H. circostomum to Nemania circostoma and H. latissimum to N. latissima. The holotype of H. albostigmatosum has been recovered, thus the lectotypification by Shear no longer is needed. H. subnigricans and H. umbilicatum are confirmed as good taxa. H. anthochroum and H. lenormandii are reported as first records from Argentina (Tucumán). PMID:19750953

  14. Sensitization Rates for Various Allergens in Children with Allergic Rhinitis in Qingdao, China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hang; Lin, Rongjun; Li, Na

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sensitization to common allergens in children with allergic rhinitis (AR) living in Qingdao, China. We conducted a retrospective analysis for AR cases, who underwent skin prick tests (SPT) in Qingdao. A total of 2841 children with AR qualified for the inclusion criteria (Age 3–5 years: 1500 children; Age 6–12 years: 1341 children). The most common inhaled allergens to which the AR children were sensitive were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (69.3%), Dermatophagoides farinae (66.2%) and mould 1 (Penicillium notatum 38.9%); while the corresponding ingested allergens were mussel (39.2%), shrimp (36.3%) and carp (36.5%). The prevalence of sensitization to inhaled allergens and food allergens was higher in children >6 years of age as compared to that in children 3–5 years of age (all p < 0.05). Children >6 years old were more sensitive to dust mite as compared to children 3–5 years old (p < 0.05). Sensitization to dust mite was more common in males than in females (p = 0.05). In this study, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae were the most common allergens causing AR in children in Qingdao, China. Older children with AR, particularly males, were found to be more sensitive to dust mite. PMID:26371014

  15. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of Araucaria araucana (Mol.) K. Koch heartwood lignans.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Avila, J Guillermo; García, Ana M; Becerra, José; Flores, Cristian; Aqueveque, Pedro; Bittner, Magalis; Hoeneisen, Maritza; Martinez, Miguel; Silva, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Five lignans (secoisolariciresinol, pinoresinol, eudesmin, lariciresinol, and lariciresinol-4-methyl ether) were isolated from an MeOH extract from Araucaria araucana (Mol.) K. Koch wood for the first time in this species and their structures determined with spectroscopic methods. The antimicrobial activities of these compounds were determined for the bacteria Citrobacter sp., Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and for the white rooting and staining fungi Mucor miehei, Paecilomyces variotii, Ceratocystis pilifera, Trametes versicolor, and Penicillium notatum, and in addition, the MeOH extract was evaluated against Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium moniliforme, F. sporotrichum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The most sensitive bacteria against pinoresinol were the Gram-positive. However, secoisolariciresinol exhibited a significant antifungal activity on fungi of white rooting and wood staining and this compound completely inhibited the mycelial growth of T. versicolor and C. pilifera at 300 and 400 microg per disc, respectively, whereas pinoresinol showed a moderate inhibitory activity. On the other hand, the MeOH extract had the highest activity against rooting and staining and pathogenic fungi as well as T. versicolor, Fusarium spp. and Trichophyton mentagrophytes, inhibiting completely the growth at 400 microg per disc. PMID:16610214

  16. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Janaki, A Chinnammal; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity. PMID:25748589

  17. Regulation of Sulfate Transport in Filamentous Fungi 1

    PubMed Central

    Bradfield, Gretchen; Somerfield, Paula; Meyn, Tina; Holby, Marilyn; Babcock, Donald; Bradley, Dorothy; Segel, Irwin H.

    1970-01-01

    Inorganic sulfate enters the mycelia of Aspergillus nidulans, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium notatum by a temperature-, energy-, pH-, ionic strength-, and concentration-dependent transport system (“permease”). Transport is unidirectional. In the presence of excess external sulfate, ATP sulfurylase-negative mutants will accumulate inorganic sulfate intracellularly to a level of about 0.04 m. The intracellular sulfate can be retained against a concentration gradient. Retention is not energy-dependent, nor is there any exchange between intracellular (accumulated) and extracellular sulfate. The sulfate permease is under metabolic control. Sulfur starvation of high methionine-grown mycelia results in about a 1000-fold increase in the specific sulfate transport activity at low external sulfate concentrations. l-Methionine is a metabolic repressor of the sulfate permease, while intracellular sulfate and possibly l-cysteine (or a derivative of l-cysteine) are feedback inhibitors. Sulfate transport follows hyperbolic saturation kinetics with a Michaelis constant (Km) value of 6 × 10−5 to 10−4m and a Vmax (for maximally sulfurstarved mycelia) of about 5 micromoles per gram per minute. Refeeding sulfur-starved mycelia with sulfate or cysteine results in about a 10-fold decrease in the Vmax value with no marked change in the Km. Azide and dinitrophenol also reduce the Vmax. PMID:16657536

  18. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  19. Proteomics Shows New Faces for the Old Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Carlos; Martín, Juan F.; García-Estrada, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Fungi comprise a vast group of microorganisms including the Ascomycota (majority of all described fungi), the Basidiomycota (mushrooms or higher fungi), and the Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota (basal or lower fungi) that produce industrially interesting secondary metabolites, such as β-lactam antibiotics. These compounds are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs world-wide. Since Fleming's initial discovery of Penicillium notatum 80 years ago, the role of Penicillium as an antimicrobial source became patent. After the isolation of Penicillium chrysogenum NRRL 1951 six decades ago, classical mutagenesis and screening programs led to the development of industrial strains with increased productivity (at least three orders of magnitude). The new “omics” era has provided the key to understand the underlying mechanisms of the industrial strain improvement process. The review of different proteomics methods applied to P. chrysogenum has revealed that industrial modification of this microorganism was a consequence of a careful rebalancing of several metabolic pathways. In addition, the secretome analysis of P. chrysogenum has opened the door to new industrial applications for this versatile filamentous fungus. PMID:22318718

  20. Synthesis of Mannich bases: 2-(3-Phenylaminopropionyloxy)-benzoic acid and 3-Phenylamino-1-(2,4,6-trimethoxy-phenyl)-propan-1-one, their toxicity, ionization constant, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Oloyede, Ganiyat K; Willie, Itoro E; Adeeko, Oluwakemi O

    2014-12-15

    Mannich bases 2-(3-Phenylaminopropionyloxy)-benzoic acid (A) and 3-Phenylamino-1-(2,4,6-trimethoxy-phenyl)-propan-1-one (B) were synthesized. Structures were confirmed by ultraviolet/visible and infra-red spectroscopies. The ionization constant (pKa) values at 8.3 and 8.0 reported for compounds A and B, respectively, indicated that protonation might occur at physiological pH. The LC50 values of 145,595 μg/ml (A) and 82,526 μg/ml (B) obtained from Brine shrimp lethality testing showed that both compounds were non-toxic. The two compounds possessed significant antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal strains; Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aereus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonellae typhi, Candida albicans, Rhizopus stolonifer, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium notatum when compared with standards, gentamicin and tioconazole for bacteria and fungi, respectively. In vitro antioxidant screening by the DPPH free radical scavenging method and the scavenging effect on hydrogen peroxide showed that the compounds possessed significant antioxidant activity when compared with antioxidant standards ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxylanisole and α-tocopherol. PMID:25038706

  1. Screening of indigenously isolated fungi for lovastatin production and its in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Javed, Sadia; Bukhari, Shazia A; Zovia, Iram; Meraj, Munazzah

    2014-01-01

    Seven indigenously isolated fungal strains (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus terreus, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium notatum, Pleurotus ostreatus and Trichoderma viradae) were tested for their potential to produce cholesterol lowering drug lovastatin by using different agro-industrial wastes (Corn cobs, corn stover, banana stalk, wheat straw, wheat bran, bagasse) in submerged as well as solid state fermentation. Aspergillus terreus showed maximum production of 18.74 mg/100 mL by wheat bran in solid state fermentation. The fermentation parameters (pH, temperature, Inoculum size, moisture contents and fermentation time) were also optimized for optimum production of lovastatin. It was found that Aspergillus terreus could produce 27.14 mg/100 mL lovastatin under optimum condition of pH (6), temperature (30°C), Inoculum size (2 mL), moisture contents (60%) and fermentation time (120 hrs) in solid state fermentation. The optimized lovastatin was extracted from fermented broth and orally administered to rats. The hypocholesterolemic effect of fermented lovastatin was evaluated on serum ALT, AST, HDL-C, LDL-C, TG and TC level of rats. It was concluded from the study, fermented lovastatin effectively lower the cholesterol level of rats. PMID:24894549

  2. Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor from leaves of Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Satheesh, L Shilpa; Murugan, K

    2011-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor isolated from Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt. has been reported. A 14.3 kDa protease inhibitor (PI) was isolated and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation (20-85% saturation), sephadex G-75, DEAE sepharose column and trypsin-sepharose affinity chromatography from the leaves of C. grandis. The purity was checked by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. PI exhibited marked growth inhibitory effects on colon cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PI was thermostable and showed antimicrobial activity without hemolytic activity. PI strongly inhibited pathogenic microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Eschershia coli, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, Mucor indicus, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus flavus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Examination by bright field microscopy showed inhibition of mycelial growth and sporulation. Morphologically, PI treated fungus showed a significant shrinkage of hyphal tips. Reduced PI completely lost its activity indicating that disulfide bridge is essential for its protease inhibitory and antifungal activity. Results reported in this study suggested that PI may be an excellent candidate for development of novel oral or other anti-infective agents. PMID:21615062

  3. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki, A. Chinnammal; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity.

  4. Elimination of microorganisms from dental operatory compressed air.

    PubMed

    De Ciccio, A; Chan, E C

    1998-01-01

    Compressed air is used to power high-speed handpieces, as well as to dry and clean surfaces in the oral cavity during patient treatment, in all dental operatories. The compressed air used in the dental operatories located in large institutions such as universities or hospitals is generally obtained from a central source, and is produced by continually running compressors. In operatories located in private practice settings, compressed air is obtained from small on-site air compressors, which may be run less frequently. A survey was made of operatories in the Montreal area to determine the microbial load of the compressed air produced by air compressors. An air sampler was used to collect compressed air and impinge it on a rotating agar medium surface. Compared to the air produced from compressors in constant use, the air collected from compressors that ran intermittently had a very high microbial load. The efficacy of an apparatus designed to sterilize the contaminated air produced by small, on-site compressors was tested. Called a Purilair, this device heats every particle of inflowing compressed air to 250 degrees C and then forces it through a fine-pore ceramic filter. In three private practice operatories, an in-line Purilair effectively sterilized the air being delivered by small compressors. The same result was obtained in the laboratory when lyophilized spores and cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus and conidia of Penicillium notatum and Aspergillus niger were sprayed into the intake line of the apparatus. PMID:9473876

  5. Mercury speciation, distribution, and bioaccumulation in a river catchment impacted by compact fluorescent lamp manufactures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Peng; Feng, Xinbin; You, Qiongzhi; Zhang, Jin; Cao, Yucheng; Leung, Anna Oi Wah; Wu, Shengchun

    2016-06-01

    The influence from the manufacturing of compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) on mercury (Hg) speciation and distribution in river catchments nearby a typical CFL manufacturing area in China was investigated. Water, sediment, river snail (Procambarus clarkii), and macrophyte (Paspalum distichum L.) samples were collected. Total Hg (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in water ranged from 1.06 to 268 ng · L(-1) and N.D. -2.14 ng · L(-1), respectively. MeHg was significantly positively correlated with THg in water. THg and MeHg in sediment ranged from 15.0 to 2480 and 0.06 to 1.85 ng · g(-1), respectively. River snail samples exhibited high concentrations of THg (206-1437 ng · g(-1)) and MeHg (31.4-404 ng · g(-1)). THg and MeHg concentrations in root of P. distichum L. were significantly higher than those in shoot, indicating that THg and MeHg in the plant were mainly attributed to root assimilation. A very high bioaccumulation factor (20.9 ± 22.1) for MeHg in P. distichum L was noted, suggesting that P. distichum L. might have a potential role in phytoremediating MeHg contaminated soil due to its abnormal uptake capacity to MeHg. PMID:26898928

  6. Phytoremediation of dredged marine sediment: monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes contributing to sediment reclamation.

    PubMed

    Masciandaro, G; Di Biase, A; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Iannelli, R; Doni, S

    2014-02-15

    In this study, a pilot phytoremediation experiment was performed to treat about 80 m(3) of silty saline sediments contaminated by heavy metals and organic compounds. After preliminary mixing with a sandy soil and green compost application, three different plant treatments [Paspalum vaginatum (P); P. vaginatum + Spartium junceum (P + S); P. vaginatum + Tamarix gallica (P + T)] were compared to each other and to an unplanted control (C) in order to evaluate the plant efficiency in remediating and ameliorating agronomical and functional sediment properties. The experiment was monitored for one year after planting by taking sediment samples at two depths and performing several chemical and biochemical analyses. After one year, the increase in hydrolytic enzyme and dehydrogenase activities indicated the stimulation of sediment functionality. Additionally, the availability of energy sources derived from organic matter application and plant-root activity promoted the formation of a stable organic matter fraction. Finally, P + S and P + T were also effective in decontaminating polluted marine sediments from both organic (total petroleum hydrocarbons, TPH) and inorganic (heavy metal) pollutants. PMID:24486533

  7. Metal concentrations and mycorrhizal status of plants colonizing copper mine tailings: potential for revegetation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baodong; Tang, Xiangyu; Zhu, Yongguan; Christie, Peter

    2005-05-01

    A field survey of metal concentrations and mycorrhizal status of plants growing on copper mine tailings was conducted in Anhui Province, China. Available phosphorus and organic matter in the tailings were very low. High concentrations of Pb, Zn, As and Cd as well as Cu were observed on some sites. The dominant plants growing on mine tailings belonged to the families Gramineae and Compositae, and the most widely distributed plant species were Imperata cylindrica, Cynodon dactylon and Paspalum distichum. Coreopsis drummondii also grew well on the arid sites but not on wet sites. Very low or zero arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal colonization was observed in most of the plants, but extensive mycorrhizal colonization was recorded in the roots of C. drummondii and C. dactylon. Metal concentrations in plant tissues indicated that I. cylindrica and P. distichum utilized avoidance mechanisms to survive at high metal concentrations. The investigation suggests that remediation and revegetation of heavy metal contaminated sites might be facilitated by selection of tolerant plant species. Isolation of tolerant AM fungi may also be warranted. PMID:16089342

  8. Monitoring and assessment of mercury pollution in the vicinity of a chloralkali plant. IV. Bioconcentration of mercury in in situ aquatic and terrestrial plants at Ganjam, India.

    PubMed

    Lenka, M; Panda, K K; Panda, B B

    1992-02-01

    In situ aquatic and terrestrial plants including a few vegetable and crop plants growing in and around a chloralkali plant at Ganjam, India were analyzed for concentrations of root and shoot mercury. The aquatic plants found to bioconcentrate mercury to different degrees included Marsilea spp., Spirodela polyrhiza, Jussiea repens, Paspalum scrobiculatam, Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia crassipes, Hygrophila schulli, Monochoria hastata and Bacopa monniera. Among wild terrestrial plants Chloris barbata, Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotundus and Croton bonplandianum were found growing on heavily contaminated soil containing mercury as high as 557 mg/kg. Analysis of mercury in root and shoot of these plants in relation to the mercury levels in soil indicated a significant correlation between soil and plant mercury with the exception of C. bonplandianum. Furthermore, the tolerance to mercury toxicity was highest with C. barbata followed by C. dactylon and C. rotundus, in that order. The rice plants analyzed from the surrounding agricultural fields did not show any significant levels of bioconcentrated mercury. Of the different vegetables grown in a contaminated kitchen garden with mercury level at 8.91 mg/kg, the two leafy vegetables, namely cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and amaranthus (Amaranthus oleraceous), were found to bioconcentrate mercury at statistically significant levels. The overall study indicates that the mercury pollution is very much localized to the specific sites in the vicinity of the chloralkali plant. PMID:1536599

  9. Soil ecosystem function under native and exotic plant assemblages as alternative states of successional grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirito, Florencia; Yahdjian, Laura; Tognetti, Pedro M.; Chaneton, Enrique J.

    2014-01-01

    Old fields often become dominated by exotic plants establishing persistent community states. Ecosystem functioning may differ widely between such novel communities and the native-dominated counterparts. We evaluated soil ecosystem attributes in native and exotic (synthetic) grass assemblages established on a newly abandoned field, and in remnants of native grassland in the Inland Pampa, Argentina. We asked whether exotic species alter soil functioning through the quality of the litter they shed or by changing the decomposition environment. Litter decomposition of the exotic dominant Festuca arundinacea in exotic assemblages was faster than that of the native dominant Paspalum quadrifarium in native assemblages and remnant grasslands. Decomposition of a standard litter (Triticum aestivum) was also faster in exotic assemblages than in native assemblages and remnant grasslands. In a common garden, F. arundinacea showed higher decay rates than P. quadrifarium, which reflected the higher N content and lower C:N of the exotic grass litter. Soil respiration rates were higher in the exotic than in the native assemblages and remnant grasslands. Yet there were no significant differences in soil N availability or net N mineralization between exotic and native assemblages. Our results suggest that exotic grass dominance affected ecosystem function by producing a more decomposable leaf litter and by increasing soil decomposer activity. These changes might contribute to the extended dominance of fast-growing exotic grasses during old-field succession. Further, increased organic matter turnover under novel, exotic communities could reduce the carbon storage capacity of the system in the long term.

  10. [Effects of soil factors on vegetation community structure in an abandoned subtropical paddy wetland].

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi; Li, Yu-Yuan; Li, Zhong-Wu; Ye, Fang-Yi; Pan, Chun-Xiang; Xie, Xiao-Li

    2009-07-01

    Based on the investigation data from a subtropical wetland having been abandoned from paddy agriculture for one year, a redundancy analysis was conducted on the relationships between vegetation community and soil factors in the wetland. It was found that soil moisture regime, available K and P, and pH were the main factors affecting the distribution of plant species. The common plant species could be classified into three groups, i. e., Ludwigia prostrata - Murdannia triquetra group (G1), Hemarthria altissima - Rotala rotundifolia - Lapsana apogonoides group (G2), and Conyza canadensis - Polygonum hydropiper - Paspalum pasaloides group (G3). G1 mainly distributed on the soils with higher available K, G2 mainly distributed in periodically flooded area, while G3 mainly distributed in drainage area and was positively correlated to soil available P and pH. Species diversity and above-ground biomass had significant positive correlations with soil pH and total K, respectively, while evenness index was significantly negatively correlated with soil available N. No significant correlations were observed among other indices. PMID:19899449

  11. Removal of hydrogen sulphide BOD from brackish water using vertical flow wetlands in a Caribbean environment.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Zárate, E

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater from a 550-inhabitant community had been treated and discarded using an anaerobic filter. Due to seawater intrusion in the aquifer that supplies the water, high concentrations of hydrogen sulphide were detected in the effluent. A vertical flow wetland was designed in 1998 for treating this effluent. Four parallel reed beds with a total area of 556 m2 were constructed. During the first months of operation, a mean BOD5 removal efficiency of 91% was obtained, with loads to the wetland system up to 4 g/m2/d of grease and oils (G&O). In 1999, problems of soil clogging were found due to high G&O content in the wastewater, with loads up to 15 g/m2/d of G&O, which highly influenced the hydraulic conductivity of the beds, generating the clogging problems. The low hydraulic conductivity and the high effluent G&O content, caused low BOD5 and COD removal efficiencies. As G&O accumulated in the soil, the removal efficiencies decreased. Despite the clogging problems, there has been a high sulphide removal throughout the system operation. The wetlands removed sulphides successfully, under loads up to 20 g S=/m2/d. Four native species of macrophytes were planted: Paspalum penisetum, Typha sp, Conocarpres erectus and Scirpus lacustris. All of them but Typha sp. were established in the system. PMID:11804119

  12. Development of a conceptual model for vertical flow wetland metabolism.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Zárate, E

    2001-01-01

    Four parallel vertical constructed wetlands, with a total area of 556 m2, are used to treat domestic wastewater, coming from a community of 550 inhabitants. The system includes pre-treatment with an anaerobic filter and post-treatment with chlorine, before discharging the effluent to the ocean. Four native species of macrophytes were planted: Paspalum penisetum, Typha sp, Conocarpres erectus and Scirpus lacustris. In situ measurements of gas content were performed for each bed during an operation cycle. After a feeding discharge, an unaltered sample of sand from each bed was taken, and a respirometric test was implemented to measure the metabolic activity in terms of oxygen consumption kinetics, CO2 production and organic matter degradation. The results were used to develop a conceptual model of the microbiologic metabolism for the process of organic matter removal from wastewater. Sorption in the bed is the main mechanism for organic matter removal from the wastewater, with subsequent biological oxidation during the resting period. The degradation rate for dissolved organic matter is found to be dependent on its concentration and on oxygen content in the gaseous phase. During the days of major activity, the oxygen content was not fully recovered when a new discharge occurred, finding anaerobic activity within the bed. PMID:11804107

  13. Nitrogen management in reservoir catchments through constructed wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Tunçiper, B; Ayaz, S C; Akça, L; Samsunlu, A

    2005-01-01

    In this study, nitrogen removal was investigated in pilot-scale subsurface flow (SSF) and in free water surface flow (FWS) constructed wetlands installed in the campus of TUBITAK-Marmara Research Center, Gebze, near Istanbul, Turkey. The main purposes of this study are to apply constructed wetlands for the protection of water reservoirs and to reuse wastewater. Experiments were carried out at continuous flow reactors. The effects of the type of plants on the removal were investigated by using emergent (Canna, Cyperus, Typhia spp., Phragmites spp., Juncus, Poaceae, Paspalum and Iris.), submerged (Elodea, Egeria) and floating (Pistia, Salvina and Lemna) marsh plants at different conditions. During the study period HLRs were 30, 50, 70, 80 and 120 L m(2)d(-1) respectively. The average annual NH4-N, NO(3)-N, organic N and TN treatment efficiencies in SSF and FWS wetlands are 81% and 68%, 37% and 49%, 75% and 68%, 47% and 53%, respectively. Nitrification, denitrification and ammonification rate constant (k20) values in SSF and FNS systems have been found as 0.898 d(-1) and 0.541 d(-1), 0.488 d(-1) and 0.502 d(-1), 0.986 d(-1) and 0.908 respectively. Two types of the models (first-order plug flow and multiple regression) were tried to estimate the system performances. PMID:16114631

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizas in coastal sand dunes of the Paraguaná Peninsula, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, C; Cuenca, G

    2005-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization was measured in the most abundant plant species of the Paraguaná Peninsula, northwestern Venezuela. These plant species included: Acacia tortuosa, Argusia gnaphalodes, Croton punctatus, Croton rhamnifolius, Egletes prostrata, Melochia tomentosa, Panicum vaginatum, Scaevola plumieri, Sporobolus virginicus, Suriana maritima, Leptothrium rigidum, and Fimbristylis cymosa. Mycorrhizal colonization was assessed using the Trouvelot et al. (1986) method that allows for simultaneous evaluation of frequency of colonization (%F), intensity of colonization (%M), and the proportion of arbuscules (%A) and vesicles (%V) present in the roots. Average frequency of colonization was 69%. The highest frequency of colonization was around 92% in C. rhamnifolius and A. tortuosa; in the other species, it varied from 49 to 86%. L. rigidum and F. cymosa were considered nonmycorrhizal because its colonization was very scarce and at all times appeared without arbuscules. Average intensity of colonization was 7%. The highest intensity of colonization was 18% in C. rhamnifolius. In the other species, it varied from 3 to 15%. Paspalum vaginatum, A. gnaphalodes, M. tomentosa, and S. maritima had their fungal structures tightly packed in modified little ovoid roots. In general, frequency of AM colonization was high and similar to those reported for other tropical ecosystems, whereas the intensity of AM colonization was low and similar to values obtained in analogous studies in disturbed ecosystems. PMID:16007471

  15. Genetic diversity and genomic resources available for the small millet crops to accelerate a New Green Revolution

    PubMed Central

    Goron, Travis L.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    Small millets are nutrient-rich food sources traditionally grown and consumed by subsistence farmers in Asia and Africa. They include finger millet (Eleusine coracana), foxtail millet (Setaria italica), kodo millet (Paspalum scrobiculatum), proso millet (Panicum miliaceum), barnyard millet (Echinochloa spp.), and little millet (Panicum sumatrense). Local farmers value the small millets for their nutritional and health benefits, tolerance to extreme stress including drought, and ability to grow under low nutrient input conditions, ideal in an era of climate change and steadily depleting natural resources. Little scientific attention has been paid to these crops, hence they have been termed “orphan cereals.” Despite this challenge, an advantageous quality of the small millets is that they continue to be grown in remote regions of the world which has preserved their biodiversity, providing breeders with unique alleles for crop improvement. The purpose of this review, first, is to highlight the diverse traits of each small millet species that are valued by farmers and consumers which hold potential for selection, improvement or mechanistic study. For each species, the germplasm, genetic and genomic resources available will then be described as potential tools to exploit this biodiversity. The review will conclude with noting current trends and gaps in the literature and make recommendations on how to better preserve and utilize diversity within these species to accelerate a New Green Revolution for subsistence farmers in Asia and Africa. PMID:25852710

  16. The concentrations of five heavy metals in components of an economically important urban coastal wetland in Ghana: public health and phytoremediation implications.

    PubMed

    Gbogbo, Francis; Otoo, Samuel D

    2015-10-01

    Sakumo II is an urban wetland and a receptacle for domestic and industrial wastes from two cities in Ghana. It however supports viable populations of fish and crabs, is cultivated for food crops and grazed by farm animals. Components of the wetland can therefore accumulate pollutants, but the public health and phytoremediation implications of this are yet to be evaluated. We analysed Cd, As, Hg, Cu and Pb in the lagoon water, sediment, green algae, eight species of aquatic macrophytes, seven species of arthropods and one species of fish. The concentrations of Pb were generally below detection limit whilst Cu was detected only in the lagoon water and Pheropsophus vertialis. Cadmium ranged from 21 ± 4 ppb in algae to 69 ± 12 ppb in Typha domingensis and was generally higher than As and Hg. The highest concentration of As was 11.7 ± 2.1 ppb in Pistia stratiotes whilst Hg was highest in lagoon water (4 ± 2 ppb). The Cd concentrations generally, and Hg concentrations in macrophytes, were higher than US EPA guidelines indicating the wetland's resources were unsafe for regular consumption. Among the emergent aquatic macrophytes, T. domingensis, Ludwigia sp. and Paspalum vaginatum, respectively, had the highest accumulation capacity for Cd, As and Hg, but the floating aquatic plant P. stratiotes appeared to be a better accumulator of Cd and As. PMID:26423633

  17. Modelling and evaluation of nitrogen removal performance in subsurface flow and free water surface constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tunçsiper, B; Ayaz, S C; Akça, L

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of protecting drinking water sources in rural regions, pilot-scale subsurface water flow (SSF) and free water surface flow (FWS) constructed wetland systems were evaluated for removal efficiencies of nitrogenous pollutants in tertiary stage treated wastewaters (effluent from the Pasaköy biological nutrient removal plant). Five different hydraulic application rates and emergent (Canna, Cyperus, Typhia sp., Phragmites sp., Juncus, Poaceae, Paspalum and Iris) and floating (Pistia, Salvina and Lemna) plant species were assayed. The average annual NH4-N, NO3-N and organic-N treatment efficiencies were 81, 40 and 74% in SSFs and 76, 59 and 75% in FWSs, respectively. Two types of the models (first-order plug flow and multiple regression) were tried to estimate the system performances. Nitrification, denitrification and ammonification rate constants (k20) values in SSF and FWS systems were 0.898 d-1 and 0.541 d(-1), 0.486 d(-1) and 0.502 d(-1), 0.986 d(-1) and 0.908, respectively. Results show that the first-order plug flow model clearly estimates slightly higher or lower values than observed when compared with the other model. PMID:16889247

  18. A toxic metabolite of Nigrospora oryzae (Berk and Br.) petch.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Davis, N D; Diener, U L

    1986-09-01

    Nigrospora oryzae was isolated from dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.) collected in Auburn and from hay shipped under refrigeration to Florida. Some of these samples were eaten by cattle and horses that subsequently developed lameness. Metabolites of N. oryzae were separated by thin layer chromatography and tested for toxicity. Only one metabolite was toxic. Metabolite A showed toxicity to brine shrimp with an LD50 = 500 micrograms/ml in 8 h. It also had an antibiotic effect on Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 with a minimum inhibitory level of 10.1 micrograms/disc. As little as 435 micrograms of a crude methanolic extract of N. oryzae showed mild toxicity to chick embryos. The metabolite was not toxic to mice nor rats at the levels tested. Quantitative procedures developed for the determination of metabolite A showed that the maximum production occurred in yeast extract-sucrose liquid medium with an initial pH of 5-6, when incubated as a stationary culture for 28 days at 25 degrees C. It was concluded that metabolite A is a weak antibiotic rather than a mycotoxin, and was probably not associated with the symptoms of lameness observed in cattle and horses. The antibiotic is not one previously reported for N. oryzae. PMID:3095644

  19. Mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses.

    PubMed

    Riet-Correa, Franklin; Rivero, Rodolfo; Odriozola, Ernesto; Adrien, Maria de Lourdes; Medeiros, Rosane M T; Schild, Ana Lucia

    2013-11-01

    In the current study, mycotoxicoses of ruminants and horses are reviewed, with an emphasis on the occurrence of these diseases in South America. The main mycotoxicoses observed in grazing cattle include intoxications by indole-diterpenoid mycotoxins (Paspalum spp. contaminated by Claviceps paspali, Lolium perenne infected by Neotyphodium lolii, Cynodon dactylon infected by Claviceps cynodontis, and Poa huecu), gangrenous ergotism and dysthermic syndrome (hyperthermia) caused by Festuca arundinacea (syn. Festuca elatior) infected by Neotyphodium coenophialum (syn. Acremonium coenophialum), and photosensitization in pastures contaminated by toxigenic Pithomyces chartarum. Other mycotoxicoses in grazing cattle include slaframine toxicity in clover pastures infected by Rhizoctonia leguminicola and diplodiosis in cattle grazing in corn stubbles. The mycotoxicoses caused by contaminated concentrated food or byproducts in cattle include poisoning by toxins of Aspergillus clavatus, which contaminate barley or sugar beetroot by-products, gangrenous ergotism or dysthermic syndrome caused by wheat bran or wheat screenings contaminated with Claviceps purpurea, and acute respiratory distress caused by damaged sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas). The main mycotoxicosis of horses is leukoencephalomalacia caused by the fumonisins B1 and B2 produced by Fusarium spp. Poisoning by C. purpurea and F. elatior infected by N. coenophialum has also been reported as a cause of agalactia and neonatal mortality in mares. Slaframine toxicosis caused by the ingestion of alfalfa hay contaminated by R. leguminicola has also been reported in horses. PMID:24091682

  20. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors from plants: isolation, structure elucidation, and SAR studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Cong; Joshi, Alpana S; ElSohly, Hala N; Khan, Shabana I; Jacob, Melissa R; Zhang, Zhizheng; Khan, Ikhlas A; Ferreira, Daneel; Walker, Larry A; Broedel, Sheldon E; Raulli, Robert E; Cihlar, Ronald L

    2002-12-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been identified as a potential antifungal target. FAS prepared from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was employed for bioactivity-guided fractionation of Chlorophora tinctoria,Paspalum conjugatum, Symphonia globulifera, Buchenavia parviflora, and Miconia pilgeriana. Thirteen compounds (1-13), including three new natural products (1, 4, 12), were isolated and their structures identified by spectroscopic interpretation. They represented five chemotypes, namely, isoflavones, flavones, biflavonoids, hydrolyzable tannin-related derivatives, and triterpenoids. 3'-Formylgenistein (1) and ellagic acid 4-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranoside (9) were the most potent compounds against FAS, with IC(50) values of 2.3 and 7.5 microg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, 43 (14-56) analogues of the five chemotypes from our natural product repository and commercial sources were tested for their FAS inhibitory activity. Structure-activity relationships for some chemotypes were investigated. All these compounds were further evaluated for antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Although there were several antifungal compounds in the set, correlation between the FAS inhibitory activity and antifungal activity could not be defined. PMID:12502337

  1. Variations in the dorso-ventral organization of leaf structure and Kranz anatomy coordinate the control of photosynthesis and associated signalling at the whole leaf level in monocotyledonous species.

    PubMed

    Soares-Cordeiro, Ana Sofia; Driscoll, Simon P; Pellny, Till K; Olmos, Enrique; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-12-01

    Photosynthesis and associated signalling are influenced by the dorso-ventral properties of leaves. The degree of adaxial/abaxial symmetry in stomatal numbers, photosynthetic regulation with respect to light orientation and the total section areas of the bundle sheath (BS) cells and the surrounding mesophyll (M) cells on the adaxial and abaxial sides of the vascular bundles were compared in two C(4)[Zea mays (maize) and Paspalum dilatatum] and one C(3)[Triticum turgidum (Durum wheat)] monocotyledonous species. The C(3) leaves had a higher degree of dorso-ventral symmetry than the C(4) leaves. Photosynthetic regulation was the same on each side of the wheat leaves, as were stomatal numbers and the section area of the BS relative to that of the M cells (BS/M section area ratio). In contrast, photosynthetic regulation in maize and P. dilatatum leaves showed a marked surface-specific response to light orientation. Compared to the adaxial sides of the C(4) monocotyledonous leaves, the abaxial surfaces had more stomata and the BS/M section area ratio was significantly higher. Differences in dorso-ventral structure, particularly in Kranz anatomy, serve not only to maximize photosynthetic capacity with respect light orientation in C(4) monocotyledonous leaves but also allow adaxial and abaxial-specific signalling from the respective M cells. PMID:19712063

  2. Full Genome Sequence Analysis of Two Isolates Reveals a Novel Xanthomonas Species Close to the Sugarcane Pathogen Xanthomonas albilineans

    PubMed Central

    Pieretti, Isabelle; Cociancich, Stéphane; Bolot, Stéphanie; Carrère, Sébastien; Morisset, Alexandre; Rott, Philippe; Royer, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans is the bacterium responsible for leaf scald, a lethal disease of sugarcane. Within the Xanthomonas genus, X. albilineans exhibits distinctive genomic characteristics including the presence of significant genome erosion, a non-ribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS) locus involved in albicidin biosynthesis, and a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of the Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1) family. We sequenced two X. albilineans-like strains isolated from unusual environments, i.e., from dew droplets on sugarcane leaves and from the wild grass Paspalum dilatatum, and compared these genomes sequences with those of two strains of X. albilineans and three of Xanthomonas sacchari. Average nucleotide identity (ANI) and multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) showed that both X. albilineans-like strains belong to a new species close to X. albilineans that we have named “Xanthomonas pseudalbilineans”. X. albilineans and “X. pseudalbilineans” share many genomic features including (i) the lack of genes encoding a hypersensitive response and pathogenicity type 3 secretion system (Hrp-T3SS), and (ii) genome erosion that probably occurred in a common progenitor of both species. Our comparative analyses also revealed specific genomic features that may help X. albilineans interact with sugarcane, e.g., a PglA endoglucanase, three TonB-dependent transporters and a glycogen metabolism gene cluster. Other specific genomic features found in the “X. pseudalbilineans” genome may contribute to its fitness and specific ecological niche. PMID:26213974

  3. Competition between meiotic and apomictic pathways during ovule and seed development results in clonality.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, Diego H; Martínez, Eric J; Quarin, Camilo L

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic and apomictic reproductive pathways develop simultaneously in facultative aposporous species, and compete to form a seed as a final goal. This developmental competition was evaluated in tetraploid genotypes of Paspalum malacophyllum in order to understand the low level of sexuality in facultative apomictic populations. Cyto-embryology on ovules, flow cytometry on seeds and progeny tests by DNA fingerprinting were used to measure the relative incidence of each meiotic or apomictic pathway along four different stages of the plant's life cycle, namely the beginning and end of gametogenesis, seed formation and adult offspring. A high variation in the frequencies of sexual and apomictic pathways occurred at the first two stages. A trend of radical decline in realized sexuality was then observed. Sexual and apomictic seeds were produced, but the efficiency of the sexual pathway dropped drastically, and exclusively clonal offspring remained. Both reproductive pathways are unstable at the beginning of development, and only the apomictic one remains functional. Key factors reducing sexuality are the faster growth and parthenogenetic development in the aposporous pathway, and an (epi)genetically negative background related to the extensive gene de-regulation pattern responsible for apomixis. The effects of inbreeding depression during post-fertilization development may further decrease the frequency of effective sexuality. PMID:23127139

  4. The role of drought- and disturbance-mediated competition in shaping community responses to varied environments.

    PubMed

    Napier, Joseph D; Mordecai, Erin A; Heckman, Robert W

    2016-06-01

    By altering the strength of intra- and interspecific competition, droughts may reshape plant communities. Furthermore, species may respond differently to drought when other influences, such as herbivory, are considered. To explore this relationship, we conducted a greenhouse experiment measuring responses to inter- and intraspecific competition for two grasses, Schedonorus arundinaceus and Paspalum dilatatum, while varying water availability and simulating herbivory via clipping. We then parameterized population growth models to examine the long-term outcome of competition under these conditions. Under drought, S. arundinaceus was less water stressed than P. dilatatum, which exhibited severe water stress; clipping alleviated this stress, increasing the competitive ability of P. dilatatum relative to S. arundinaceus. Although P. dilatatum competed weakly under drought, clipping reduced water stress in P. dilatatum, thereby enhancing its ability to compete with S. arundinaceus under drought. Supporting these observations, population growth models predicted that P. dilatatum would exclude S. arundinaceus when clipped under drought, while S. arundinaceus would exclude P. dilatatum when unclipped under drought. When the modeled environment varied temporally, environmental variation promoted niche differences that, though insufficient to maintain stable coexistence, prevented unconditional competitive exclusion by promoting priority effects. Our results suggest that it is important to consider how species respond not just to stable, but also to variable, environments. When species differ in their responses to drought, competition, and simulated herbivory, stable environments may promote competitive exclusion, while fluctuating environments may promote coexistence. These interactions are critical to understanding how species will respond to global change. PMID:26893230

  5. [Decomposition of herbaceous species in reservoir riparian region of Three Gorges Reservoir under flooding condition].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Ye; Xie, Zong-Qiang; Yang, Lin-Sen; Xiong, Gao-Ming; Li, Zhao-Jia; Fan, Da-Yong

    2014-08-01

    A total of 10 annuals and perennials of herbaceous species were investigated in reservoir riparian region of Three Gorges Reservoir. The correlations between the plants' nutrient release rate and the substrate composition and structural matter were studied under flooding condition. The decomposition rates of different species differed substantially, with the maximum of Alternanthera philoxeroides (decomposition rate constant k = 0.0228 d(-1)) and the minimum of Microstegium vimineum (k = 0.0029 d(-1)). There was no significant difference in k between annuals and perennials. There was no significant difference in nitrogen and phosphorus contents between annuals and perennials. Paspalum paspaloides and Bidens pilosa released more nutrients into the water than the other species. A. philoxeroides had a higher potential to release nitrogen while it had little effect on water phosphorus compared with the other species. Total N, P contents in the water were negatively correlated with the plants' decomposition rate, initial C content, C:N ratio, lignin:N ratio, and positively correlated with initial contents of K, Ca and N in plants. PMID:25509072

  6. Genetic diversity and genomic resources available for the small millet crops to accelerate a New Green Revolution.

    PubMed

    Goron, Travis L; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Small millets are nutrient-rich food sources traditionally grown and consumed by subsistence farmers in Asia and Africa. They include finger millet (Eleusine coracana), foxtail millet (Setaria italica), kodo millet (Paspalum scrobiculatum), proso millet (Panicum miliaceum), barnyard millet (Echinochloa spp.), and little millet (Panicum sumatrense). Local farmers value the small millets for their nutritional and health benefits, tolerance to extreme stress including drought, and ability to grow under low nutrient input conditions, ideal in an era of climate change and steadily depleting natural resources. Little scientific attention has been paid to these crops, hence they have been termed "orphan cereals." Despite this challenge, an advantageous quality of the small millets is that they continue to be grown in remote regions of the world which has preserved their biodiversity, providing breeders with unique alleles for crop improvement. The purpose of this review, first, is to highlight the diverse traits of each small millet species that are valued by farmers and consumers which hold potential for selection, improvement or mechanistic study. For each species, the germplasm, genetic and genomic resources available will then be described as potential tools to exploit this biodiversity. The review will conclude with noting current trends and gaps in the literature and make recommendations on how to better preserve and utilize diversity within these species to accelerate a New Green Revolution for subsistence farmers in Asia and Africa. PMID:25852710

  7. Allergens of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Greg S; Huang, Shih-Wen; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2005-01-01

    Background Beauveria bassiana is an important entomopathogenic fungus currently under development as a bio-control agent for a variety of insect pests. Although reported to be non-toxic to vertebrates, the potential allergenicity of Beauveria species has not been widely studied. Methods IgE-reactivity studies were performed using sera from patients displaying mould hypersensitivity by immunoblot and immunoblot inhibition. Skin reactivity to B. bassiana extracts was measured using intradermal skin testing. Results Immunoblots of fungal extracts with pooled as well as individual sera showed a distribution of IgE reactive proteins present in B. bassiana crude extracts. Proteinase K digestion of extracts resulted in loss of IgE reactive epitopes, whereas EndoH and PNGaseF (glycosidase) treatments resulted in minor changes in IgE reactive banding patterns as determined by Western blots. Immunoblot inhibitions experiments showed complete loss of IgE-binding using self protein, and partial inhibition using extracts from common allergenic fungi including; Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium herbarum, Candida albicans, Epicoccum purpurascens, and Penicillium notatum. Several proteins including a strongly reactive band with an approximate molecular mass of 35 kDa was uninhibited by any of the tested extracts, and may represent B. bassiana specific allergens. Intradermal skin testing confirmed the in vitro results, demonstrating allergenic reactions in a number of individuals, including those who have had occupational exposure to B. bassiana. Conclusions Beauveria bassiana possesses numerous IgE reactive proteins, some of which are cross-reactive among allergens from other fungi. A strongly reactive potential B. bassiana specific allergen (35 kDa) was identified. Intradermal skin testing confirmed the allergenic potential of B. bassiana. PMID:15644142

  8. In vitro screening of mucus and solvent extracts of Eisenia foetida against human bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Andleeb, Saiqa; Ejaz, Mubashir; Awan, Uzma Azeem; Ali, Shaukat; Kiyani, Ayesha; Shafique, Irsa; Zafar, Atiya

    2016-05-01

    Earthworms are macro invertebrate and have been widely used as therapeutic drugs for thousands of years. In the current research, experiments viz., the antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity of mucus and solvent extracts of Eisenia foetida were conducted to investigate for the first time in Pakistan against human infectious pathogens. Antimicrobial activity of E. foetida against human pathogens underwent investigation through an agar disc diffusion method while an ABTS(•+) free radical scavenging method assessed the antioxidant activity. The percentage of bacterial and fungal growth was analyzed statistically with One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results showed that the mucus IV of E. foetida produced a strong potent antibacterial and antifungal activity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibited the highest inhibition zone (33.67±1.53 mm), followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (30.33±1.53mm), Penicillium notatum (30±0.051), Escherichia coli (29±1 mm), Candida albicans (28.33±0.54 mm), Staphylococcus aureus (27±1mm), Serratia marcescens (25.33±0.58 mm), Aspergillus flavus (25.33±0.58 mm), Staphylococcus epidermidis (24.33±0.58 mm), Streptococcus pyogenes (21.67±1.53 mm), and Aspergillus niger (20.67±0.53 mm). Mucus IV of E. foetida also showed the highest antioxidant activity (99%). The results clearly indicate that the mucus and solvent extracts contain effective antimicrobial properties and bioactive compounds to inhibit the growth of infectious pathogens. We conclude that mucus extracts of earthworm have significant level of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and in future could be potentially used against various infectious pathogens. PMID:27166541

  9. Screening for new accumulator plants in Andes Range mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2016-04-01

    Toxic metal pollution of waters and soils is a major environmental problem, and most conventional remediation approaches do not provide acceptable solutions. The use of plants or plant products to restore or stabilize contaminated sites, collectively known as phytoremediation, takes advantage of the natural abilities of plants to take up, accumulate, store, or degrade organic and inorganic substances. Although not a new concept, phytoremediation is currently being re-examined as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective means of reducing metal contaminated soil. Plants growing on naturally metal-enriched soils are of particular interest in this regard, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations and have an excellent adaptation to this multi-stress environment. Processes include using plants that tolerate and accumulate metals at high levels (phytoextraction) and using plants that can grow under conditions that are toxic to other plants while preventing, for example, soil erosion (phytostabilization). Soil and plant samples were taken at polymetallic mines in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. It is suggested that Plantago orbignyana Steinheil is a Pb hyperaccumulator. Moreover, unusually elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg‑1) and Translocation Factor (TF) greater than one were also detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens) of a Caroline mine in Perú. Among the grass species (Poaceae), the highest shoot As concentration were found in Paspalum sp. (>1000 μg g-1) and Eriochola ramose (460 μg g-1) from the Cu mine in Peru and in Holcus lanatus and Pennisetum clandestinum (>200 μg g-1) from the silver mine in Ecuador. The shoot accumulation of Zn was highest in Baccharis amdatensis (>1900 μg g-1) and in Rumex crispus (1300 μg g-1) from the Ag mine in Ecuador (Bech et al., 2002). Paspalum racemosum also

  10. [Terrestrial flora of Malpelo Island, Colombia, Eastern Tropical Pacific].

    PubMed

    González-Román, Rubén D; López-Victoria, Mateo; Silverstone-Sopkin, Philip A

    2014-03-01

    Malpelo Island is located 380km off the mainland continental coast of Colombia, in the Pacific Ocean. Several geological, ecological, and zoological studies, both marine and terrestrial, have been conducted in this island. Despite some marginal comments on some publications, no single specific survey has been devoted to botany so far. In order to make a floristic inventory of the terrestrial flora of this island, three field trips were made in 2010 to collect vascular plants, mosses, and lichens, as well as data on their distribution within the island. We collected and identified 25 species of lichens, two species of vascular plants and one moss. Lichens were the most diverse group found, including records of four new genera (Endocarpon, Fuscidea, Lecanographa and Verrucaria) and 13 new species for Colombia. The high lichen richness on Malpelo might be explained by their efficient form of asexual reproduction (soredia and isidia), that may have facilitated their transport to the island by migrating birds or wind. Once on the island, it is possible that lichens persist by being chemically protected against herbivores. The great number of new generic and species records for Colombia is explained by the low number of studies in saxicolous lichens conducted so far in the country, particularly on coastal areas and remote islands. Only two species of vascular plants were collected, a grass, Paspalum sp., and a fern, Pityrogramma calomelanos, and both of them correspond to new determinations for Malpelo. A moss species previously reported but with no positive identification was collected and identified as Octoblepharum albidum. Other species previously reported, for example, some species of shrubs, were not observed. The low number of vascular plants is probably due to a combination of soil conditions and herbivory by land crabs. This study is the first complete inventory of the flora of Malpelo and is a starting and reference point for future comparisons among islands in

  11. Restoring biodiversity in the Gwydir Wetlands through environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, W A

    2003-01-01

    As part of the Water Reforms process, environmental flow rules have been progressively implemented in New South Wales rivers. The Integrated Monitoring of Environmental Flows (IMEF) is a major project established to better understand how rivers and associated wetlands respond to environmental water allocations. The results presented here represent the vegetation data collected for the testing of the hypothesis that "protecting or restoring a portion of freshes and high flows and otherwise maintaining natural flow variability will replenish anabranches and riverine wetlands, restoring their biodiversity". The study site is the Ramsar listed Gwydir Wetlands, located on the Gingham and Gwydir (Big Leather) Watercourses in the Lower Gwydir Valley, 100 km west of Moree. The expansion of irrigated agriculture in the lower Gwydir valley has severely altered flow regimes in the wetlands. The spread of the weed Phyla canescens (Lippia) is of major concern to landholders in the Gwydir Wetlands. Results indicate that Paspalum distichum (Water couch) and Eleocharis plana (Ribbed spike-rush) can maintain dominance over Phyla canescens if flooding occurs on a semi-regular basis. Conversely, Eichhornia crassipes (Water hyacinth) is a rampant noxious weed of open water in the Gwydir Wetlands, and has quickly spread in areas that are inundated for long periods. Management of this weed requires periodic drying of the wetlands to cause desiccation and death of the plants. The flooding requirement of individual species and plant associations in the Gwydir Wetlands are currently not fully understood. By providing better information on the consequence of different flows, the IMEF project will help to develop better management strategies to shift the dominance from introduced species such as P. canescens and E. crassipes to more desirable native plant species. PMID:14653636

  12. Evaluation of local energy sources in milk production in a tropical silvopastoral system with Erythrina poeppigiana.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ferrer, Guillermo; Mendoza-Martínez, Germán; Soto-Pinto, Lorena; Alayón-Gamboa, Armando

    2015-06-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of four local energy sources (sorghum grain, green banana, polished rice, and sugarcane molasses) fed to dairy cows on intake, milk production and composition, and economic viability in a silvopastoral system in Costa Rica (Turrialba). Twelve grazing cows (Jersey × Central American Milking Creole), with a mean live weight of 332 kg (SD 34), were supplemented with 0.5 kg of dry matter (DM)/100 kg/LW of Erythrina porppigiana fresh foliage daily. Experimental design was a replicated change-over 4 × 4 Latin Square. The pasture composition was 11 and 17 % of star grass (Cynodon niemfuensis), 32 and 28 % of ruzzi grass (Brachiaria rusisiensis), and 45 and 42 % of natural grasses (Axonopus compresus and Paspalum conjugatum) at initial and final times of the essay, respectively. The grass allowance was 30.14 DM/cow/day. Significant differences were found among treatments for variable milk fat content (P < 0.05). Sorghum presented the highest (41.2 g/kg milk) content of milk fat, followed by green banana (39.2 g/kg milk), polished rice (38.3 g/kg milk) and molasses (38.1 g/kg milk). Non-significant differences (P > 0.05) resulted for total milk production (sorghum 9.0 kg/cow/day; green banana 8.9 kg/cow/day; polished rice 8.8 kg/cow/day; molasses 8.6 kg/cow/day) and fat-corrected milk (FCM). The financial analysis showed that all treatments were economically viable; however, supplementation with green bananas and molasses were the most favorable due to the low costs incurred. PMID:25863954

  13. Prevalence and risk factors associated with gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats raised in Baybay city, Leyte, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Rupa, Ariel Paul M.; Portugaliza, Harvie P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Gastrointestinal parasitism is a serious constraint affecting goat production in the Philippines. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode infection in goat-populated barangays of Baybay City, Leyte. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 households or farms were interviewed, and 450 goats were sampled for fecalysis. Fecal egg count along with egg morphological identification and coproculture for third stage larvae identification were conducted. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine the farm- and animal-level prevalence and risk factors. Results: Fecalysis revealed the presence of strongyle and Trichuris spp. with a farm-level prevalence of 100% and 4.94%, respectively; and animal-level prevalence of 96.22% and 4.44%, respectively. The identified strongyle genera per barangay were Haemonchus spp. (34.79%), Trichostrongylus spp. (33.29%), Oesophagostomum spp. (24.21%), Cooperia spp. (6.93%), and Chabertia spp. (0.79%). Goats older than 12 months were four times more likely to present high strongyle burden when compared to goats <6 months. With each month increase in goat’s age, the odds of acquiring strongyle infection also increased by 1.07 times. Animals kept in goat house with cemented flooring have lower odds of acquiring strongyle (odds ratio=0.12). Goats raised for leisure purposes and fed with carabao grass (Paspalum conjugatum) were 8.12 and 5.52 times more likely to acquire Trichuris, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the backyard goat raisers in Baybay City, Leyte, do not practice sound helminth control measures as shown by the high prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes. The most relevant risk factors for gastrointestinal nematode infection were the age of the goat, type of goat house’s flooring, purpose of raising goats, and feeding practices. PMID:27536034

  14. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Estimate Nitrogen Status of Turfgrasses

    PubMed Central

    Corniglia, Matteo; Gaetani, Monica; Grossi, Nicola; Magni, Simone; Migliazzi, Mauro; Angelini, Luciana; Mazzoncini, Marco; Silvestri, Nicola; Fontanelli, Marco; Raffaelli, Michele; Peruzzi, Andrea; Volterrani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data originating from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) imagery is a valuable tool to monitor plant nutrition, reduce nitrogen (N) application to real needs, thus producing both economic and environmental benefits. The objectives of the trial were i) to compare the spectral reflectance of 3 turfgrasses acquired via UAV and by a ground-based instrument; ii) to test the sensitivity of the 2 data acquisition sources in detecting induced variation in N levels. N application gradients from 0 to 250 kg ha-1 were created on 3 different turfgrass species: Cynodon dactylon x transvaalensis (Cdxt) ‘Patriot’, Zoysia matrella (Zm) ‘Zeon’ and Paspalum vaginatum (Pv) ‘Salam’. Proximity and remote-sensed reflectance measurements were acquired using a GreenSeeker handheld crop sensor and a UAV with onboard a multispectral sensor, to determine Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Proximity-sensed NDVI is highly correlated with data acquired from UAV with r values ranging from 0.83 (Zm) to 0.97 (Cdxt). Relating NDVI-UAV with clippings N, the highest r is for Cdxt (0.95). The most reactive species to N fertilization is Cdxt with a clippings N% ranging from 1.2% to 4.1%. UAV imagery can adequately assess the N status of turfgrasses and its spatial variability within a species, so for large areas, such as golf courses, sod farms or race courses, UAV acquired data can optimize turf management. For relatively small green areas, a hand-held crop sensor can be a less expensive and more practical option. PMID:27341674

  15. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Estimate Nitrogen Status of Turfgrasses.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Lisa; Corniglia, Matteo; Gaetani, Monica; Grossi, Nicola; Magni, Simone; Migliazzi, Mauro; Angelini, Luciana; Mazzoncini, Marco; Silvestri, Nicola; Fontanelli, Marco; Raffaelli, Michele; Peruzzi, Andrea; Volterrani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data originating from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) imagery is a valuable tool to monitor plant nutrition, reduce nitrogen (N) application to real needs, thus producing both economic and environmental benefits. The objectives of the trial were i) to compare the spectral reflectance of 3 turfgrasses acquired via UAV and by a ground-based instrument; ii) to test the sensitivity of the 2 data acquisition sources in detecting induced variation in N levels. N application gradients from 0 to 250 kg ha-1 were created on 3 different turfgrass species: Cynodon dactylon x transvaalensis (Cdxt) 'Patriot', Zoysia matrella (Zm) 'Zeon' and Paspalum vaginatum (Pv) 'Salam'. Proximity and remote-sensed reflectance measurements were acquired using a GreenSeeker handheld crop sensor and a UAV with onboard a multispectral sensor, to determine Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Proximity-sensed NDVI is highly correlated with data acquired from UAV with r values ranging from 0.83 (Zm) to 0.97 (Cdxt). Relating NDVI-UAV with clippings N, the highest r is for Cdxt (0.95). The most reactive species to N fertilization is Cdxt with a clippings N% ranging from 1.2% to 4.1%. UAV imagery can adequately assess the N status of turfgrasses and its spatial variability within a species, so for large areas, such as golf courses, sod farms or race courses, UAV acquired data can optimize turf management. For relatively small green areas, a hand-held crop sensor can be a less expensive and more practical option. PMID:27341674

  16. Changes in southern Piedmont grassland community structure and nutritive quality with future climate scenarios of elevated tropospheric ozone and altered rainfall patterns.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, N J; Chappelka, A H; Muntifering, R B; Ditchkoff, S S

    2016-01-01

    Forage species common to the southern USA Piedmont region, Lolium arundinacea, Paspalum dilatatum, Cynodon dactylon and Trifolium repens, were established in a model pasture system to test the future climate change scenario of increasing ozone exposure in combination with varying rainfall amounts on community structure and nutritive quality. Forages were exposed to two levels of ozone [ambient (non-filtered; NF) and twice ambient (2×) concentrations] with three levels of precipitation (average or ±20% of average) in modified open-top chambers (OTCs) from June to September 2009. Dry matter (DM) yield did not differ over the growing season between forage types, except in primary growth grasses where DM yield was higher in 2× than NF treatment. Primary growth clover decreased in nutritive quality in 2× ozone because of increased concentrations of neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF) and acid detergent lignin (ADL). Re-growth clover exhibited the largest decrease in nutritive quality, whereas grasses were not adversely affected in 2× ozone. Re-growth grasses responded positively to 2× ozone exposure, as indicated in increased relative food value (RFV) and percentage crude protein (CP) than NF-exposed re-growth grasses. Effects of precipitation were not significant over the growing season for primary or re-growth forage, except in primary growth grasses where DM yield was higher in chambers with above average (+20%) precipitation. Total canopy cover was significantly higher over the growing season in chambers receiving above average precipitation, but no significant effects were observed with ozone. Results indicate shifts in plant community structure and functioning related to mammalian herbivore herbivory in future climate change scenarios. PMID:25727344

  17. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of Mexican tarragon (Tagetes lucida).

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Avila, J Guillermo; Martínez, Andrés; Serrato, Blanca; Calderón-Mugica, José C; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael

    2006-05-17

    Mexican tarragon (Tagetes lucida Cv. Asteraceae: Campanulatae) is an important, nutritious plant and an effective herbal medicine. Seven coumarins, 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin (4), umbelliferone (7-hydroxycoumarin) (5), scoparone (6,7-dimethoxycoumarin) (7), esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin) (11), 6-hydroxy-7-methoxycoumarin (12), herniarin (7-methoxycoumarin) (13), and scopoletin (6-methoxy-7-hydroxycoumarin) (14), and three flavonoids, patuletin (18), quercetin (19), and quercetagetin (20), were isolated from CH2Cl2 and MeOH extracts from aerial parts of T. lucida. In addition, 6,7-diacetoxy coumarin (15), 6-methoxy-7-acetylcoumarin (16), and 6-acetoxy-7-methoxycoumarin (17) derivatives were synthesized. 8-Methoxypsoralen (1), 8-acetyl-7-hydroxycoumarin (2), 7,8-dihydroxy-6-meth-oxycoumarin (3), 6,7-dimethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (6), 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin (8), 4-hydroxycoumarin (9), 4-hydroxy-6,7-dimethylcoumarin (10), naringenin (21), glycoside-7-rhamnonaringin (22), and rutin (23) were commercially obtained (Sigma-Aldrich). All of these compounds and extracts (M1 and M2) were assayed against bacteria and fungi. The antibacterial activity was determined on Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella sp., Shigella boydii, Shigella sp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter agglomerans, Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterolitica, Vibrio cholerae (three El Tor strains, CDC-V12, clinic case, and INDRE-206, were obtained from contaminated water), and V. cholerae (NO-O1). The evaluated fungi were Aspergillus niger, Penicillium notatum, Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium sporotrichum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The most active compounds against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria were the dihydroxylated coumarins 3 and 4. In addition, 2-4, 6, 7, and 11 showed an interesting activity against V. cholerae, a key bacterium in the contaminated

  18. Decontamination and functional reclamation of dredged brackish sediments.

    PubMed

    Doni, S; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Iannelli, R; Ceccanti, B; Masciandaro, G

    2013-07-01

    The continuous stream of sediments, dredged from harbors and waterways for keeping shipping traffic efficiency, is a considerable ongoing problem recognized worldwide. This problem gets worse as most of the sediments dredged from commercial ports and waterways turn out to be polluted by a wide range of organic and inorganic contaminants. In this study, phytoremediation was explored as a sustainable reclamation technology for turning slightly-polluted brackish dredged sediments into a matrix feasible for productive use. To test this possibility, a phytoremediation experimentation was carried out in containers of about 0.7 m(3) each, filled with brackish dredged sediments contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The sediments were pre-conditioned by adding an agronomic soil (30 % v/v) to improve their clayey granulometric composition, and by topping the mixture with high quality compost (4 kg m(-2)) to favour the initial adaptation of the selected vegetal species. The following plant treatments were tested: (1) Paspalum vaginatum, (2) Phragmites australis, (3) Spartium junceum + P. vaginatum, (4) Nerium oleander + P. vaginatum, (5) Tamarix gallica + P. vaginatum, and (6) unplanted control. Eighteen months after the beginning of the experimentation, all the plant species were found in healthy condition and well developed. Throughout the whole experiment, the monitored biological parameters (total microbial population and dehydrogenase activity) were generally observed as constantly increasing in all the planted sediments more than in the control, pointing out an improvement of the chemico-physical conditions of both microorganisms and plants. The concentration decrease of organic and inorganic contaminants (>35 and 20 %, respectively) in the treatments with plants, particularly in the T. gallica + P. vaginatum, confirmed the importance of the root-microorganism interaction in activating the decontamination processes. Finally, the healthy state of

  19. Performance and economic analyses of year-round forage systems for forage-fed beef production in the Gulf Coast.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, G; Rodriguez, J; Gillespie, J; Bhandari, B; Wang, J J; McMillin, K W

    2014-12-01

    On a global scale, most beef is produced from grazing pastures or rangelands. Certain limitations exist, however, such as not having adequate animal rates of gain for marbling and availability of adequate forage nutritional value and quantity for constant animal weight gains. In the last 20 yr, there has been an increased interest in forage-fed beef for multiple reasons (health related, environmental concerns, and welfare issues). Starting on June 5, 13, 14, and 8 in 4 consecutive yr, 54 steers (initial BW=259±5.6 kg; average of 9 mo of age) were randomly allotted to 3 yr-round forage systems. Each system occupied 6 ha/replicate and had the same stocking rate. System 1 had annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) for winter grazing and bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) for summer grazing; while Systems 2 and 3 added rye and a clover mix to the ryegrass and diversified the use of pastures in the fall (dallisgrass [Paspalum dilatatum] and clovers [Trifolium spp.]). System 3 added the use of annual summer forages. During their respective growing season for each forage or forage mix, mass and height did not limit animal performance; however, there was a sampling date effect (P<0.05) for nutritive value variables since it decreased as forages became mature. The ADG observed (0.44 kg) for all systems (P=0.78) during summer was lower than expected and might have been limited by the observed temperature as well as forage nutritive value. Systems 1 and 2 had more grazing days (P=0.03) during summer (155 and 146 d, respectively) compared to System 3 (132 d) due to the greater pasture area of bermudagrass in those systems. Steers in System 3 were fed more hay for a longer period of time (P<0.05) than on the other 2 systems. System 1 and 2 produced more hay per hectare than System 3 (P<0.05). No differences (P>0.05) were detected between systems in ADG year round, during the winter season, or carcass characteristics. Return over total direct costs and total specified expenses were

  20. Mercury net methylation in five tropical flood plain regions of Brazil: high in the root zone of floating macrophyte mats but low in surface sediments and flooded soils.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, J R; Meili, M; Hylander, L D; de Castro e Silva, E; Roulet, M; Mauro, J B; de Lemos, R

    2000-10-16

    In aquatic systems, bottom sediments have often been considered as the main methylmercury (MeHg) production site. In tropical floodplain areas, however, floating meadows and flooded forests extend over large areas and can be important Hg methylating sites. We present here a cross-system comparison of the Hg net methylation capacity in surface sediments, flooded soils and roots of floating aquatic macrophytes, assayed by in situ incubation with 203Hg and extraction of formed Me203 Hg by acid leaching and toluene. The presence of mono-MeHg was confirmed by thin layer chromatography and other techniques. Study areas included floodplain lakes in the Amazon basin (Tapajós, Negro and Amazon rivers), the Pantanal floodplain (Paraguay river basin), freshwater coastal lagoons in Rio de Janeiro and oxbow lakes in the Mogi-Guaçú river, São Paulo state. Different Hg levels were added in assays performed in 1994-1998, but great care was taken to standardise all other test parameters, to allow data comparisons. Net MeHg production was one order of magnitude higher (mean 13.8%, range 0.28-35) in the living or decomposing roots of floating or rooted macrophyte mats (Eichhornia azurea, E. crassipes, Paspalum sp., Eleocharis sellowiana, Salvinia sp., S. rotundifolia and Scirpus cubensis) than in the surface layer of underlying lake sediments (mean 0.6%, range 0.022-2.5). Methylation in flooded soils presented a wide range and was in some cases similar to the one found in macrophyte roots but usually much lower. In a Tapajós floodplain lake, natural concentrations of MeHg in soil and sediment cores taken along a lake-forest transect agreed well with data on net methylation potentials in the same samples. E. azurea, E. crassipes and Salvinia presented the highest methylation potentials, up to 113 times higher than in sediments. Methylation in E. azurea from six lakes of the Paraguay and Cuiabá rivers, high Pantanal, was determined in the 1998 dry and wet seasons and ranged from

  1. The first report of Pb and Zn accumulation in some native plants from the Peruvian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Duran, Paola; Poma, Wilfredo; Sánchez, Isidoro; Barceló, Juan; Roca, Núria; Boluda, Rafael; Roca-Pérez, Luís.; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Until recent decades little has been known about the remediation of mining sites using metalophytes in Latin America. Metal mining has helped to create severe and diverse environmental problems. The present study proposed to identify and characterize spontaneously growing heavy metal tolerant plant species in the area around the polimetalic mine in Hualgayoc (Cajamarca, Peru). These species are potentially useful for phytorremediation. Plant and soils from their rhizosphere were sampled and analized for concentration of As, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn. Translocation Factor (TF) defined the metals concentrations ratio between shoots and root biomass and Shoot Accumulation Factor (SAF) the metal concentration ratio between shoot and soil concentration were determined and used to measure the effectiveness of a plant in concentrating metals into its biomass. The soils were neutral pH (7,4±0,5) with variable content of organic carbon (2,4±1,1) and loam texture: sand (42,9±10,8) and clay (16,7±4,6). According to the total metals, all samples exceeded toxicity thresholds, high Pb (20016 ± 32559 mg•kg-1) and Zn (22512 ± 13056 mg•kg-1) concentrations were detected. High shoot Pb and Zn concentrations were found in Plantaginaceae Plantago orbignyana (6998 and 9617 μg/g); Brassicaceae Lepidium bipinnatifidum (6886 and 5034 mg•kg-1) and Asteraceae Senecio sp (4253 and 3870 mg•kg-1) and Baccharis latifolia (2554 and 1284 mg•kg-1 respectively). The high values of TFs indicates that the plants effectively traslocated metales. Lepidium bipinnatifidum shows the highest TFs values (143 in Pb and 21,5 in Zn). The SAF values were much lower than those reported for other species such as Paspalum sp in the Peruvian copper mine, which may be due to a high top soil Pb and Zn concentrations. These species can surely be considered as interesting for phytoextraction, due not only to its accumulative capacity but also since they showed an elevated transfer factor and grew in the

  2. Influence of riparian vegetation on channel widening and subsequent contraction on a sand-bed stream since European settlement: Widden Brook, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, Wayne; Keene, Annabelle; Bush, Richard; Cheetham, Michael; Chalmers, Anita

    2012-04-01

    Widden Brook in the Hunter Valley, Australia, was first settled by Europeans in 1831 and had widened substantially by the 1870s due to frequent floods during a flood-dominated regime impacting on highly disturbed banks whose riparian trees had been either ringbarked or cleared, and whose understorey had been grazed. Catastrophic floods in 1950 (many), two in August 1952 and one in February 1955 effected the final phase of channel widening at the onset of a second flood-dominated regime more than half a century after the initial widening. Contraction has been active since 1963 by a combination of five biogeomorphic processes. Firstly, rapid channel widening, migration and cutoffs totally reworked the pre-European floodplain and were followed by active floodplain formation. Initial bar formation was replaced by sand splay and overbank deposition which constructed a new floodplain and narrower channel. Secondly, overwidened channel segments that were produced by the catastrophic 1955 flood have contracted since 1963 by the formation of up to four bank-attached, discontinuous benches below the floodplain. Each bench has a bar nucleus of pebbly coarse sand overlain by stratified fine-medium sand and mud. Colonisation by River Sheoaks (Casuarina cunninghamiana subsp. cunninghamiana) or grasses (Cynodon dactylon, Paspalum distichum, Pennisetum clandestinum) is important in converting bars to benches. Thirdly, narrower segments which developed since 1963 have contracted by small-scale accretion on both banks. These deposits are steeply dipping, interbedded sand and mud trapped by stoloniferous and rhizomatous grasses (C. dactylon, P. distichum, P. clandestinum) which also rapidly stabilise the deposits. Fourthly, rare laterally migrating, small radius bends have contracted by recent point bar formation greatly exceeding cutbank recession rates. Point bar formation is controlled by secondary currents producing inclined stratified coarse sands without the influence of

  3. [Investigation of mold fungi in air samples of elementary schools and evaluation of allergen-specific IgE levels in students' sera].

    PubMed

    Ovet, Habibe; Ergin, Cağrı; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2012-04-01

    , Penicillium camemberti, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium frequentans, Penicillium glaucum, Penicillium notatum, Penicillium roqueforti ve Penicillium viridicatum) (RIDASCREEN; R-Biopharm AG, Germany) levels were determined in those children. Total IgE levels above reference ranges were detected in 41% (9/22) of the screened sera samples. P.roqueforti, P.commune and P.camemberti antibodies were higher (Odds ratio as 5.50, 4.0 and 3.75, respectively) in sera with high total IgE levels. No independent variables were determined between individual and/or environmental factors and Penicillium-specific IgE antibodies. It was concluded that those three strains should be chosen as antigens for mold allergy screening tests which will be performed among atopic cases in our region. In conclusion it should be kept in mind that molds have a possible role in the development of allergic symptoms, however, they are not the sole determining factor in this process. In the investigation of the allergic diseases environmental factors should be considered and standardized methods should be applied. PMID:22639315

  4. Acritarchs in Cambrian and Lower Ordovician Rocks of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Canada: New Constraints on Correlations and Paleogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, T.; Jensen, S.; Barr, S. M.; White, C. E.; Miller, R. F.

    2009-05-01

    Most of 200 samples collected from Avalonian Cambrian and Lower Ordovician sequences in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, as well as age-equivalent units in the Meguma terrane of southern Nova Scotia, have yielded acritarchs. Preliminary results show that they include taxa not reported previously from western Avalonia (Newfoundland), and indicate revised stratigraphical ranges for several taxa, thus increasing potential for stratigraphic comparisons and regional and global correlations, in particular to Baltica and northern Gondwana. Well-preserved material was obtained from the upper part of the MacLean Brook Formation (early Furongian) in the Mira River area of southeastern Cape Breton Island, including Petaloferidium lacrimiferum, Stelliferidium albanii and S. magnum and the first record in western Avalonia of Pirea orbicularis, a species which permits precise correlation to Baltica and northern Gondwana. Acritarchs from the MacNeil Formation in the Mira River area include Cristallinium randomense and Stelliferidium cortinulum. These findings suggest that any stratigraphic gap between the MacLean Brook Formation and the overlying MacNeil Formation is smaller than previously interpreted. In New Brunswick, the classic Lower to Middle Cambrian Hanford Brook section yielded acritarchs throughout the sequence. The upper half of the Ratcliffe Brook Formation (Early Cambrian) contains Archaeodiscina umbonulata and abundant Skiagia ornata, S. orbiculare and S. scottica. This assemblage of acritarchs has a global first appearance generally thought to be close in time to the rise of trilobites, potentially in conflict with the established view that all of the Ratcliffe Brook Formation is pre-trilobitic. The upper part of the Hanford Brook Formation yielded well- preserved material of Comasphaeridium silesiense, Heliosphaeridium notatum, Eliasum llaniscum and Liepania plana, taxa with a first appearance close to the base of the Middle Cambrian. Further studies of the Hanford

  5. Hydrology and Soil Erosion in Tropical Rainforests and Pasture Lands on the Atherton Tablelands, North Queensland, Australia - a rainfall simulator study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanne, Joanne; Ciesiolka, Cyril

    2010-05-01

    The Barron and Johnstone Rivers rise in the basaltic Atherton Tableland, North Queensland, Australia, and flow into the Coral Sea and Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA). Natural rainforest in this region was cleared for settlement in the early 20th century. Rapid decline in soil fertility during the 1940's and 50's forced landholders to turn to pasture based industries from row crop agriculture. Since then, these pasture based industries have intensified. The intensified land use has been linked to increases in sediment and nutrient levels in terrestrial runoff and identified as a major environmental threat to the GBRWHA, which has raised alarm for the tourist industry and resource managers. Studies linking land-use to pollutant discharge are often based on measurements and modelling of end of catchment measurements of water quality. Whilst such measurements can be a reasonable indicator of the effects of land use on pollutant discharge to waterways, they are often a gross assessment. This project used rainfall simulations to investigate the relationship between land use and management with sources and sinks of runoff and soil erosion within the Barron and Johnstone Rivers catchments. Rainfall simulations were conducted and pollutant loads measured in natural rainforest, as well as dairy and beef farming systems. The dairy farming systems included an effluent fed pasture, a high mineral fertilizer and supplementary irrigation farm, and a rainfed organic pasture that relied on tropical legumes and introduced grasses and returned organic material to the soil. One of the beef farming systems used a 7-10 day rotation with a low fertilizer regime (kikuyu mostly), while the other, used a long period- two paddock-rotation with no fertiliser and paspalum pastures. The rainforests were generally small isolated enclaves with a well developed shrub layer (1-3 m), and a presence of scattered, deciduous trees. Simulations were carried out on sites which were