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Sample records for passionfruit woodiness disease

  1. Characterization and distribution of a Potyvirus associated with passion fruit woodiness disease in Uganda

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes the incidence and etiology of viral infection on passion fruit in Uganda. Viral disease symptoms, including those characteristic of Passion fruit woodiness disease (PWD), were observed in producing areas with an overall mean infection level of 27%. Electron microscopic observati...

  2. Indoor winter fumigation with formic acid for control of Acarapis woodi (Acari: Tarsonemidae) and nosema disease, Nosema sp.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Robyn M; Currie, Robert W

    2009-10-01

    Indoor fumigation of honey bees, Apis mellifera L., with formic acid to control varroa mites, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, allows simultaneous fumigation of multiple colonies with little labor input and good efficacy. Several experiments were designed to test the efficacy of formic acid as a treatment for honey bee mites, Acarapis woodi (Rennie) (Acari: Tarsonemidae), and nosema disease, Nosema sp., indoors in winter. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the efficacy of formic acid fumigation for honey bee mite control by using both the thoracic slice and live dissection methods and (2) to determine whether indoor fumigation can reliably prevent the buildup of nosema disease in overwintering honey bee colonies. Indoor winter fumigation of honey bee colonies with formic acid was effective in killing a high percentage of honey bee mites but did not significantly reduce the proportion of bees with infested tracheae over the duration of the experiments. Thus, the method used to determine the efficacy of the treatment affected the results. Under conditions of relatively low or decreasing levels of nosema, fumigation tended to suppress the mean abundance of nosema spores relative to the controls. In three separate fumigation experiments using a range of formic acid concentrations, there was no statistical difference between the buildup or maintenance of nosema spore mean abundance over the winter in bees from formic acid fumigated colonies compared with untreated controls. However, fumigation with formic acid during winter at a low concentration for extended periods significantly suppressed spore buildup of mixed populations of nosema (Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae) in 1 yr. PMID:19886435

  3. Effect of Simulated Dasiops inedulis (Diptera: Lonchaeidae) Injury on Yield and Fruit Quality Parameters in Yellow Passionfruit.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, Leidy; Manzano, Maria R; Baena, Diosdado; Tovar, Diego; Wyckhuys, Kris A G

    2015-02-01

    Yellow passionfruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa O. Deg.) is a tropical fruit crop that is meeting increasing demand both in local and international markets in South America. The lance fly, Dasiops inedulis (Diptera: Lonchaeidae), affects P. edulis floral buds and flowers, and is thought to cause important yield losses in this crop. In Colombia, D. inedulis are commonly controlled through calendar-based applications of chemically synthesized insecticides, and no scientific criteria exist to guide pest management. In the present study, we simulated D. inedulis injury to passionfruit plants, over the course of three production cycles. We assessed the effect of seven different categories of flower bud removal (from 0% to 79.9%) on passionfruit yield and fruit quality parameters. Removal rates above 20% caused a significant reduction in the number of flowers, while yield levels were lowest at 50-79.9% bud removal. With increasing rates of flower bud removal, we observed higher initial production of buds and lower levels of natural abortion of floral and fruiting structures. For the three consecutive harvests, maximum yield levels were 7.57±5.51 kg (mean±SD; with 0-9.9% damage), and minimum yield was 2.37±2.15 kg (60-69.9% damage) per plant. For fruit quality parameters, D. inedulis injury did not affect fruit pulp weight or the content of soluble solids (Brix). Our work provides insights into the impact of D. inedulis on yellow passionfruit production, and constitutes a basis for future integrated pest management programs for this pest. PMID:26470121

  4. Can vessel dimension explain tolerance toward fungal vascular wilt diseases in woody plants? Lessons from Dutch elm disease and esca disease in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Pivovaroff, Alexandria L.; Santiago, Louis S.; Rolshausen, Philippe E.

    2014-01-01

    This review illuminates key findings in our understanding of grapevine xylem resistance to fungal vascular wilt diseases. Grapevine (Vitis spp.) vascular diseases such as esca, botryosphaeria dieback, and eutypa dieback, are caused by a set of taxonomically unrelated ascomycete fungi. Fungal colonization of the vascular system leads to a decline of the plant host because of a loss of the xylem function and subsequent decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Fungal vascular pathogens use different colonization strategies to invade and kill their host. Vitis vinifera cultivars display different levels of tolerance toward vascular diseases caused by fungi, but the plant defense mechanisms underlying those observations have not been completely elucidated. In this review, we establish a parallel between two vascular diseases, grapevine esca disease and Dutch elm disease, and argue that the former should be viewed as a vascular wilt disease. Plant genotypes exhibit differences in xylem morphology and resistance to fungal pathogens causing vascular wilt diseases. We provide evidence that the susceptibility of three commercial V. vinifera cultivars to esca disease is correlated to large vessel diameter. Additionally, we explore how xylem morphological traits related to water transport are influenced by abiotic factors, and how these might impact host tolerance of vascular wilt fungi. Finally, we explore the utility of this concept for predicting which V. vinifera cultivars are most vulnerable of fungal vascular wilt diseases and propose new strategies for disease management. PMID:24971084

  5. Gasification of Woody Biomass.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jianjun; Saayman, Jean; Grace, John R; Ellis, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Interest in biomass to produce heat, power, liquid fuels, hydrogen, and value-added chemicals with reduced greenhouse gas emissions is increasing worldwide. Gasification is becoming a promising technology for biomass utilization with a positive environmental impact. This review focuses specifically on woody biomass gasification and recent advances in the field. The physical properties, chemical structure, and composition of biomass greatly affect gasification performance, pretreatment, and handling. Primary and secondary catalysts are of key importance to improve the conversion and cracking of tars, and lime-enhanced gasification advantageously combines CO2 capture with gasification. These topics are covered here, including the reaction mechanisms and biomass characterization. Experimental research and industrial experience are investigated to elucidate concepts, processes, and characteristics of woody biomass gasification and to identify challenges. PMID:26247289

  6. A sustainable woody biomass biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shijie; Lu, Houfang; Hu, Ruofei; Shupe, Alan; Lin, Lu; Liang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Woody biomass is renewable only if sustainable production is imposed. An optimum and sustainable biomass stand production rate is found to be one with the incremental growth rate at harvest equal to the average overall growth rate. Utilization of woody biomass leads to a sustainable economy. Woody biomass is comprised of at least four components: extractives, hemicellulose, lignin and cellulose. While extractives and hemicellulose are least resistant to chemical and thermal degradation, cellulose is most resistant to chemical, thermal, and biological attack. The difference or heterogeneity in reactivity leads to the recalcitrance of woody biomass at conversion. A selection of processes is presented together as a biorefinery based on incremental sequential deconstruction, fractionation/conversion of woody biomass to achieve efficient separation of major components. A preference is given to a biorefinery absent of pretreatment and detoxification process that produce waste byproducts. While numerous biorefinery approaches are known, a focused review on the integrated studies of water-based biorefinery processes is presented. Hot-water extraction is the first process step to extract value from woody biomass while improving the quality of the remaining solid material. This first step removes extractives and hemicellulose fractions from woody biomass. While extractives and hemicellulose are largely removed in the extraction liquor, cellulose and lignin largely remain in the residual woody structure. Xylo-oligomers, aromatics and acetic acid in the hardwood extract are the major components having the greatest potential value for development. Higher temperature and longer residence time lead to higher mass removal. While high temperature (>200°C) can lead to nearly total dissolution, the amount of sugars present in the extraction liquor decreases rapidly with temperature. Dilute acid hydrolysis of concentrated wood extracts renders the wood extract with monomeric sugars

  7. Application of Somatic Embryogenesis in Woody Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yuan; Li, Shui-Gen; Fan, Xiao-Fen; Su, Zhen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is a developmental process where a plant somatic cell can dedifferentiate to a totipotent embryonic stem cell that has the ability to give rise to an embryo under appropriate conditions. This new embryo can further develop into a whole plant. In woody plants, somatic embryogenesis plays a critical role in clonal propagation and is a powerful tool for synthetic seed production, germplasm conservation, and cryopreservation. A key step in somatic embryogenesis is the transition of cell fate from a somatic cell to embryo cell. Although somatic embryogenesis has already been widely used in a number of woody species, propagating adult woody plants remains difficult. In this review, we focus on molecular mechanisms of somatic embryogenesis and its practical applications in economic woody plants. Furthermore, we propose a strategy to improve the process of somatic embryogenesis using molecular means. PMID:27446166

  8. New market potential: Torrefaction of Woody Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J. Richard Hess

    2015-07-01

    According to researchers in Idaho National Laboratory’s Bioenergy Program, torrefaction of woody biomass could reduce variability in biomass feedstock and enable development of a commodity-type product for green energy generation and usage.

  9. Determinants of woody cover in African savannas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankaran, M.; Hanan, N.P.; Scholes, R.J.; Ratnam, J.; Augustine, D.J.; Cade, B.S.; Gignoux, J.; Higgins, S.I.; Le, Roux X.; Ludwig, F.; Ardo, J.; Banyikwa, F.; Bronn, A.; Bucini, G.; Caylor, K.K.; Coughenour, M.B.; Diouf, A.; Ekaya, W.; Feral, C.J.; February, E.C.; Frost, P.G.H.; Hiernaux, P.; Hrabar, H.; Metzger, K.L.; Prins, H.H.T.; Ringrose, S.; Sea, W.; Tews, J.; Worden, J.; Zambatis, N.

    2005-01-01

    Savannas are globally important ecosystems of great significance to human economies. In these biomes, which are characterized by the co-dominance of trees and grasses, woody cover is a chief determinant of ecosystem properties 1-3. The availability of resources (water, nutrients) and disturbance regimes (fire, herbivory) are thought to be important in regulating woody cover1,2,4,5, but perceptions differ on which of these are the primary drivers of savanna structure. Here we show, using data from 854 sites across Africa, that maximum woody cover in savannas receiving a mean annual precipitation (MAP) of less than ???650 mm is constrained by, and increases linearly with, MAP. These arid and semi-arid savannas may be considered 'stable' systems in which water constrains woody cover and permits grasses to coexist, while fire, herbivory and soil properties interact to reduce woody cover below the MAP-controlled upper bound. Above a MAP of ???650 mm, savannas are 'unstable' systems in which MAP is sufficient for woody canopy closure, and disturbances (fire, herbivory) are required for the coexistence of trees and grass. These results provide insights into the nature of African savannas and suggest that future changes in precipitation 6 may considerably affect their distribution and dynamics. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Frost resistance in alpine woody plants.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research. Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover. Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate. In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers, and fruits) and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone. PMID:25520725

  11. Frost resistance in alpine woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research. Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover. Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate. In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers, and fruits) and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone. PMID:25520725

  12. 77 FR 5755 - Request for Proposals: 2012 Hazardous Fuels Woody Biomass Utilization Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ...The Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, State and Private Forestry (S&PF), Technology Marketing Unit, located at the Forest Products Laboratory, request proposals for wood energy projects that require engineering services. These projects will use woody biomass, such as material removed from forest restoration activities, wildfire hazardous fuel treatments, insect and disease......

  13. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work...

  14. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work...

  15. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work...

  16. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work...

  17. 48 CFR 1452.237-71 - Utilization of Woody Biomass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Biomass. 1452.237-71 Section 1452.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Utilization of Woody Biomass. As prescribed in § 1437.7202, insert the following clause: Utilization of Woody Biomass (MAY 2005) (a) The contractor may remove and utilize woody biomass, if: (1) Project work...

  18. MECHANICS OF STREAM-BORNE WOODY DEBRIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large woody debris is increasingly regarded as an integral component of stream stabilization and restoration programs. Unravelling the dynamics of complex interaction of multiple logs among themselves and with the stream environs must start with a correct specification of all the forces acting on i...

  19. THE INTAKE OF FIBER MESOCARP PASSIONFRUIT (PASSIFLORA EDULIS) LOWERS LEVELS OF TRIGLYCERIDE AND CHOLESTEROL DECREASING PRINCIPALLY INSULIN AND LEPTIN

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, E.M.; Medina, L.; Barros-Monteiro, J.; Valle, N.O.; Sales, R.; Magalães, A.; Souza, F.C.A.; Carvalho, T.B.; Lemos, J.R.; Lira, E.F.; Lima, E.S.; Galeno, D.M.L.; Morales, L.; Ortiz, C.; Carvalho, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Over the last years, there has been an increasing demand in folk medicine for natural sources that could help in the treatment of chronic diseases, including diabetes. The rind of passion fruit (Passiflora edulis f. Flavicarpa) is traditionally used as a functional food due to its high concentration of soluble and insoluble fiber. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high-fiber diet albedo of passion fruit on the metabolic and biochemical profile in diabetic rats induced by alloxan (2%). Design The passion fruit mesocarp fiber was dried in an oven with circulating air at 60°C and pulverized. We used 32 adult male rats, divided into 4 groups: Wistar group 1 control (GC), Wistar group 2, 15% fiber (GF15), Wistar group 3, 30% fiber (GF30), Wistar group 4, fiber disolved in water (GFH2O). The ratio of passion fruit was prepared according to the AIN 93M guidelines, varying only the source of dietary fiber. The corresponding diet for each group was offered to the animals for 60 days. Results There was a statically significant decrease in plasma glucose for GFH2O, GF15%, and GF30% groups with 27.0%, 37.4%, and 40.2%, respectively. Conclusion The use of mesocarp fiber of passion fruit at concentrations of 15% and 30% are an important dietary supplement for the treatment of DM due to its potential hypoglycemic effect, and its ability to reduce triglycerides and VLDL-cholesterol levels with a principal reduction of insulin and leptin. PMID:25346913

  20. Woodiness within the Spermacoceae–Knoxieae alliance (Rubiaceae): retention of the basal woody condition in Rubiaceae or recent innovation?

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Frederic; Groeninckx, Inge; Smets, Erik; Dessein, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The tribe Spermacoceae is essentially a herbaceous Rubiaceae lineage, except for some species that can be described as ‘woody’ herbs, small shrubs to treelets, or lianas. Its sister tribe Knoxieae contains a large number of herbaceous taxa, but the number of woody taxa is higher compared to Spermacoceae. The occurrence of herbaceous and woody species within the same group raises the question whether the woody taxa are derived from herbaceous taxa (i.e. secondary woodiness), or whether woodiness represents the ancestral state (i.e. primary woodiness). Microscopic observations of wood anatomy are combined with an independent molecular phylogeny to answer this question. Methods Observations of wood anatomy of 21 woody Spermacoceae and eight woody Knoxieae species, most of them included in a multi-gene molecular phylogeny, are carried out using light microscopy. Key Results Observations of wood anatomy in Spermacoceae support the molecular hypothesis that all the woody species examined are secondary derived. Well-known wood anatomical characters that demonstrate this shift from the herbaceous to the woody habit are the typically flat or decreasing length vs. age curves for vessel elements, the abundance of square and upright ray cells, or even the (near-) absence of rays. These so-called paedomorphic wood features are also present in the Knoxieae genera Otiophora, Otomeria, Pentas, Pentanisia and Phyllopentas. However, the wood structure of the other Knoxieae genera observed (Carphalea, Dirichletia and Triainolepis) is typical of primarily woody taxa. Conclusions In Spermacoceae, secondary woodiness has evolved numerous times in strikingly different habitats. In Knoxieae, there is a general trend from primary woodiness towards herbaceousness and back to (secondary) woodiness. PMID:19279041

  1. Woody debris flow behavior from experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Allen; Medina, Vicente; Morloti, Emanuele; Renaud, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    A consequence of debris flow in streams are well known, the collapse of the stream flooding all over the land. The high momentum flux of those flows can devastate houses, drag and crushes cars, etc. The presence of woody debris into the flow rise the flow depth and increment the collapse of the streams, bridges and structures. The present preliminary study offer a qualitative comparison between a debris flow and a woody debris flow with similar flow characteristics. To obtain this a series of experiments were performed in the Morph-dynamic Laboratory of the Hydraulic, Marine and Environmental Department. A high slope flume of 9 meters length, 40 cm width and 60 cm high was used. Up to 5 experiments were running in the flume. Initially the material was placed dry in the bed conforming a 20 cm depth of granular material changing the way of water wave entrance. Always water wave was introduced as a step function with different step size and different flow duration in order to introduce the same volume of water, just enough to saturate all the material in the channel. The flow was filmed with a handycam in order to see the general flow characteristics and with a high speed camera, just in a section, to visualize the flow velocities. Several woody pieces were placed along the channel to simulate the presence of wood and tress in the stream. Each tree was constructed in such a way that each one have a root made by rocks simulating a real root and different mass distribution. The comparison with experiments without wood was clever to understand the influence of woods in the debris flow. The woody debris flow alone creates natural dams along the stream without presence of inciters obstacles along the reach.

  2. Short Rotation Woody Crops Program: Project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    This document is a compilation of summaries describing research efforts in the US Department of Energy's Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP). The SRWCP is sponsored by DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division and is field-managed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SRWCP is an integrated basic research program with 18 field research projects throughout the United States. The overall objective of the program is to improve the productivity and increase the cost efficiency of growing and harvesting woody trees and shrubs. In a competitive technical review, 25 projects were chosen to form a new research program. Although some of the original projects have ended and new ones have begun, many of the long-term research projects still form the core of the SRWCP. This document contains individual summaries of each of the 18 research projects in the SRWCP from October 1985 to October 1986. Each summary provides the following information: name and address of the contracting institution, principal investigator, project title, current subcontract or grant number, period of performance, and annual funding through fiscal year 1986. In addition, each summary contains a brief description of the project rationale, objective, approach, status, and future efforts. A list of publications that have resulted from DOE-sponsored research follows many of the summaries.

  3. Woody biomass phytoremediation of contaminated brownfield land.

    PubMed

    French, Christopher J; Dickinson, Nicholas M; Putwain, Philip D

    2006-06-01

    Economic and environmental regeneration of post-industrial landscapes frequently involves some element of re-afforestation or tree planting. We report field trials that evaluate whether woody biomass production is compatible with managing residual trace element contamination in brownfield soils. Large-scale mapping of contamination showed a heterogenous dispersion of metals and arsenic, and highly localised within-site hotspots. Yields of Salix, Populus and Alnus were economically viable, showing that short-rotation coppice has a potentially valuable role in community forestry. Mass balance modelling demonstrated that phytoextraction potentially could reduce contamination hotspots of more mobile elements (Cd and Zn) within a 25-30-year life cycle of the crops. Cd and Zn in stems and foliage of Salix were 4-13 times higher than EDTA-extractable soil concentrations. Lability of other trace elements (As, Pb, Cu, Ni) was not increased 3 years after planting the coppice; woody biomass may provide an effective reduction of exposure (phyto-stabilization) to these less mobile contaminants. PMID:16271426

  4. Woody biomass production in waste recycling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwood, D.L.; Snyder, G.H.; Sprinkle, R.R.

    1994-12-31

    Combining woody biomass production with waste recycling offers many mutual advantages, including increased tree growth and nutrient and water reclamation. Three biomass/recycling studies collectively involving Eucalyptus amplifolia, E. camaldulensis, and E. grandis, rapidly growing species potentially tolerant of high water and nutrient levels, are (1) evaluating general potential for water/nutrient recycling systems to enhance woody biomass production and to recycle water and nutrients, (2) documenting Eucalyptus growth, water use, and nutrient uptake patterns, and (3) identifying Eucalyptus superior for water and nutrient uptake in central and southern Florida. In a 1992-93 study assessing the three Eucalyptus species planted on the outside berms of sewage effluent holding ponds, position on the berms (top to bottom) and genotypes influenced tree size. The potential of the trees to reduce effluent levels in the ponds was assessed. In a stormwater holding pond planted in 1993, these Eucalyptus genotypes varied significantly for tree size but not for survival. E. camaldulensis appears generally superior when flooded with industrial stormwater. Potential sizes of ponds needed for different stormwater applications were estimated. Prolonged flooding of 4- and 5-year-old E. camaldulensis with agricultural irrigation runoff has had no observable effects on tree growth or survival. Younger E. camaldulensis, E. amplifolia, and E. grandis were assessed for water use and nutrient uptake during a Summer 1994 flooding.

  5. Magnetic Wood Achieving a Harmony between Magnetic and Woody Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hideo

    Magnetic wood, which was first introduced and developed by the Oka group in 1991, achieves a good balance of both woody and magnetic functions through the active addition of magnetic characteristics to the wood itself. In addition to showing magnetic characteristics, this magnetic wood also offers a woody texture, low specific gravity, humidity control, acoustic absorption and is very easy to process.

  6. Woody Vegetation on Levees? - Research Experiences and Design Suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, Walter

    2013-04-01

    Recent flood events in Austria have reawakened practical and scientific interest in the stability of levees. One focus amongst others has been taken on the relationship between vegetation and levee stability with special reference to the role of woody plants. The effects of woody plants are undoubtedly manifold: On the one hand they can potentially have a negative influence and endanger levees, which is why many guidelines ban woody vegetation to preserve stability, visual inspection and unhindered flood-fight access. On the other hand woody vegetation can have several positive impacts on soil stability and which effects prevail depends largely on types and characteristics of plants. This shows how controversially woody plants on levees can be discussed and the strong need for further research in this field. In order to obtain new insights and widen horizons for this controversial issue, a research project carried out by the Institute of Soil Bioengineering and Landscape Construction - at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna - was launched. This project deals with several aspects of effects of woody plants have on levees and focuses particularly on shrubby woody plants. The examined vegetation type is a dense stand of willows - Purple-Willows (Salix purpurea L.) - commonly used for stabilization of river embankments. The proposed contribution discusses the gained results with reference to levee stability and existing levee vegetation guidelines and gives design suggestions for compatible woody vegetation on levees.

  7. Biofuel production from catalytic cracking of woody oils.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junming; Jiang, Jianchun; Chen, Jie; Sun, Yunjuan

    2010-07-01

    The catalytic cracking reactions of several kinds of woody oils have been studied. The products were analyzed by GC-MS and FTIR and show the formation of olefins, paraffins and carboxylic acids. Several kinds of catalysts were compared. It was found that the fraction distribution of product was modified by using base catalysts such as CaO. The products from woody oils showed good cold flow properties compared with diesel used in China. The results presented in this work have shown that the catalytic cracking of woody oils generates fuels that have physical and chemical properties comparable to those specified for petroleum based fuels. PMID:20206508

  8. Pyrolysis of Woody Residues: Impact of Mineral Content

    SciTech Connect

    Iisa, Kristiina; Zacher, Alan; Sykes, Robert; Preto, Fernando; Bronson, Benjamin

    2014-11-21

    Woody residues represent a lower cost option for feedstocks for the production of biofuels. In this study, the pyrolysis of woody residues was investigated as part of Clean Energy Dialogue between the U.S. and Canada. Three pine-based hog fuels from saw mills and wood from pine beetle killed trees were chosen as the woody residue feedstocks and pine and birch as the reference clean feedstocks. The yields and quality of the oil were evaluated in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor and a laboratory-scale pyrolyzer connected to a molecular beam mass spectrometer.

  9. Is Acarapis woodi a single species? A new PCR protocol to evaluate its prevalence.

    PubMed

    Cepero, A; Martín-Hernández, R; Prieto, L; Gómez-Moracho, T; Martínez-Salvador, A; Bartolomé, C; Maside, X; Meana, A; Higes, M

    2015-02-01

    Acarapisosis is a disease of the adult honey bee Apis mellifera L., caused by the tracheal mite Acarapis woodi (Rennie), that affects the prothoracic tracheas of worker honey bees. Although it is not usually considered a real problem for honey bee colonies in southern Europe (mainly Spain and Greece), where the majority of professional beekeepers are located in Europe, recent works have reported the constant presence of this mite in this area, making it a potential cofactor for colony losses. In this study, we developed a specific PCR diagnostic tool that improves the techniques used so far and allowed us to confirm the presence of this parasite in Spain, urging the need to monitor its prevalence and implications in the health of the colonies. Indeed, in a total of 635 apiaries analysed, the prevalence of A. woodi in 2010 was 8.3 and 4 % in 2011. The mite is present in bee colonies over time and should not be underestimated as a possible cofactor in the collapse of bee colonies. Additionally, some positive samples were cloned so a genetic analysis on the diversity within A. woodi isolates was also approached. This allowed us to identify different genetic variants within an isolate, even when they were present at low frequencies. And this genetic analysis revealed the existence of a different clade of Acarapis sequences that could represent a new species or subspecies, although more research is required to verify the identity of this novel lineage at genetic and morphological level. PMID:25399817

  10. Introduction of the anti-apoptotic baculovirus p35 gene in passion fruit induces herbicide tolerance, reduced bacterial lesions, but does not inhibits passion fruit woodiness disease progress induced by cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV).

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Daniele Scandiucci; Coelho, Marly C Felipe; Souza, Manoel T; Marques, Abi; Ribeiro, E Bergmann Morais

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of anti-apoptotic genes into plants leads to resistance to environmental stress and broad-spectrum disease resistance. The anti-apoptotic gene (p35) from a baculovirus was introduced into the genome of passion fruit plants by biobalistics. Eleven regenerated plants showed the presence of the p35 gene by PCR and/or dot blot hybridization. Transcriptional analysis of regenerated plants showed the presence of specific p35 transcripts in 9 of them. Regenerated plants containing the p35 gene were inoculated with the cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), the bacterium Xanthomonas axonopodis pv passiflorae, and the herbicide, glufosinate, (Syngenta). None of the plants showed resistance to CABMV. Regenerated plants (p35+) showed less than half of local lesions showed by non-transgenic plants when inoculated with X. axonopodis and some p35+ plants showed increased tolerance to the glufosinate herbicide when compared to non-transgenic plants. PMID:17016672

  11. Biogeochemistry of desertification and woody encroachment in grazing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Martin, Roberta E.

    Grazing systems occupy more of the terrestrial biosphere than any other form of land use, with arid and semi-arid regions supporting disproportionately larger grazing area than other biomes. Two common responses of dryland ecosystems to grazing practices are desertification and woody encroachment, with the former occurring in more arid zones and the latter becoming prevalent in mesic areas. Desertification and woody encroachment are linked to ecosystem impoverishment and land-use abandonment. Desertification leads to fragmented ecosystem structure and decreased carbon storage. Woody encroachment results in increased structural heterogeneity of the landscape, elevated carbon stores aboveground, and variable belowground carbon responses. Nitrogen accumulates under woody plants in both desertification and woody encroachment scenarios, but large-scale changes in nitrogen stocks and trace gas fluxes differ substantially between these types of land degradation. New remote sensing approaches based on imaging spectroscopy allow regional-scale estimates of carbon and nitrogen dynamics that will increase our understanding of desertification and woody encroachment in global grazing systems.

  12. Aluminum exclusion and aluminum tolerance in woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ivano; Sperisen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The aluminum (Al) cation Al3+ is highly rhizotoxic and is a major stress factor to plants on acid soils, which cover large areas of tropical and boreal regions. Many woody plant species are native to acid soils and are well adapted to high Al3+ conditions. In tropical regions, both woody Al accumulator and non-Al accumulator plants occur, whereas in boreal regions woody plants are non-Al accumulators. The mechanisms of these adaptations can be divided into those that facilitate the exclusion of Al3+ from root cells (exclusion mechanisms) and those that enable plants to tolerate Al3+ once it has entered the root and shoot symplast (internal tolerance mechanisms). The biochemical and molecular basis of these mechanisms have been intensively studied in several crop plants and the model plant Arabidopsis. In this review, we examine the current understanding of Al3+ exclusion and tolerance mechanisms from woody plants. In addition, we discuss the ecology of woody non-Al accumulator and Al accumulator plants, and present examples of Al3+ adaptations in woody plant populations. This paper complements previous reviews focusing on crop plants and provides insights into evolutionary processes operating in plant communities that are widespread on acid soils. PMID:23781222

  13. Extreme low temperature tolerance in woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Strimbeck, G. Richard; Schaberg, Paul G.; Fossdal, Carl G.; Schröder, Wolfgang P.; Kjellsen, Trygve D.

    2015-01-01

    Woody plants in boreal to arctic environments and high mountains survive prolonged exposure to temperatures below -40°C and minimum temperatures below -60°C, and laboratory tests show that many of these species can also survive immersion in liquid nitrogen at -196°C. Studies of biochemical changes that occur during acclimation, including recent proteomic and metabolomic studies, have identified changes in carbohydrate and compatible solute concentrations, membrane lipid composition, and proteins, notably dehydrins, that may have important roles in survival at extreme low temperature (ELT). Consideration of the biophysical mechanisms of membrane stress and strain lead to the following hypotheses for cellular and molecular mechanisms of survival at ELT: (1) Changes in lipid composition stabilize membranes at temperatures above the lipid phase transition temperature (-20 to -30°C), preventing phase changes that result in irreversible injury. (2) High concentrations of oligosaccharides promote vitrification or high viscosity in the cytoplasm in freeze-dehydrated cells, which would prevent deleterious interactions between membranes. (3) Dehydrins bind membranes and further promote vitrification or act stearically to prevent membrane–membrane interactions. PMID:26539202

  14. Can lemmings control the expansion of woody plants on tundra?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksanen, Lauri; Oksanen, Tarja; Olofsson, Johan; Virtanen, Risto; Hoset, Katrine; Tuomi, Maria; Kyrö, Kukka

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing expansion of woody vegetation in the arctic, due to global warming, creates a positive feed back loop. Increasing abundance of woody plants reduces surface albedo both directly and via speeding up snow melt. Thus a successively greater fraction of incoming solar radiation is absorbed and converted to heat. Browsing mammals - both big and small - can prevent this by consuming woody plants. However, the grazer/browser community of many tundra areas is dominated by brown/Norwegian lemmings (Lemmus spp.) which eat graminoids and mosses and cannot use woody plants as forage. It would seem a priori likely that in such areas, mammalian herbivores speed up the expansion of woody plants by improving the chances of their seedlings to get established. We studied the impact of lemmings on woody plants by constructing lemming proof exclosures within piece high-altitude tundra at Joatkanjávri, northernmost Norway. The exclosures were constructed in 1998, during a period of low lemming densities, in snow-beds, where Norwegian lemmings (L. lemmus) were the only ecologically significant herbivorous mammals. (Reindeer migrate through the area in May, when snow-beds are inaccessible for them; during the fall migration, the area represents a dead end and is therefore avoided.) We chose pairs of maximally similar vegetation patches of 0.5 by 0.5 m and randomly assigned one of each pair to become an exclosure while the other plot was left open. The initial state of the vegetation was documented by the point frequency method. In 2008, after the 2007 lemming outbreak, the same documentation was repeated; thereafter the plots were harvested, the vegetation was sorted to species, oven dried and weighed. Exclusion of lemmings resulted to pronounced increase in community level plant biomass. Evergreen woody plants were especially favored by the exclusion of lemming: their above-ground biomass in exclosures was 14 times as great as their biomass on open reference plots. The

  15. Evaluating Ecohydrological Theories of Woody Root Distribution in the Kalahari

    PubMed Central

    Bhattachan, Abinash; Tatlhego, Mokganedi; Dintwe, Kebonye; O'Donnell, Frances; Caylor, Kelly K.; Okin, Gregory S.; Perrot, Danielle O.; Ringrose, Susan; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of savannas to global carbon storage is poorly understood, in part due to lack of knowledge of the amount of belowground biomass. In these ecosystems, the coexistence of woody and herbaceous life forms is often explained on the basis of belowground interactions among roots. However, the distribution of root biomass in savannas has seldom been investigated, and the dependence of root biomass on rainfall regime remains unclear, particularly for woody plants. Here we investigate patterns of belowground woody biomass along a rainfall gradient in the Kalahari of southern Africa, a region with consistent sandy soils. We test the hypotheses that (1) the root depth increases with mean annual precipitation (root optimality and plant hydrotropism hypothesis), and (2) the root-to-shoot ratio increases with decreasing mean annual rainfall (functional equilibrium hypothesis). Both hypotheses have been previously assessed for herbaceous vegetation using global root data sets. Our data do not support these hypotheses for the case of woody plants in savannas. We find that in the Kalahari, the root profiles of woody plants do not become deeper with increasing mean annual precipitation, whereas the root-to-shoot ratios decrease along a gradient of increasing aridity. PMID:22470506

  16. Measuring biomass and carbon stock in resprouting woody plants.

    PubMed

    Matula, Radim; Damborská, Lenka; Nečasová, Monika; Geršl, Milan; Šrámek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Resprouting multi-stemmed woody plants form an important component of the woody vegetation in many ecosystems, but a clear methodology for reliable measurement of their size and quick, non-destructive estimation of their woody biomass and carbon stock is lacking. Our goal was to find a minimum number of sprouts, i.e., the most easily obtainable, and sprout parameters that should be measured for accurate sprout biomass and carbon stock estimates. Using data for 5 common temperate woody species, we modelled carbon stock and sprout biomass as a function of an increasing number of sprouts in an interaction with different sprout parameters. The mean basal diameter of only two to five of the thickest sprouts and the basal diameter and DBH of the thickest sprouts per stump proved to be accurate estimators for the total sprout biomass of the individual resprouters and the populations of resprouters, respectively. Carbon stock estimates were strongly correlated with biomass estimates, but relative carbon content varied among species. Our study demonstrated that the size of the resprouters can be easily measured, and their biomass and carbon stock estimated; therefore, resprouters can be simply incorporated into studies of woody vegetation. PMID:25719601

  17. CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Woody

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

    2012-02-01

    A conventional woody feedstock design has been developed that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying woody biomass as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints and consideration of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move woody biomass from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the use of the slash stream since it is a more conservative analysis and represents the material actually used in the experimental part of the project.

  18. Estimating woody biomass in Sub-Saharan Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Millington, A.C.; Critchley, R.W.; Douglas, T.D.; Ryan, P.

    1994-03-01

    Woody biomass constitutes the main domestic fuel in many parts of Africa. The need for more definitive data on this resource was perceived at a Household Energy Seminar held by the World Bank Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP) in Harare, Zimbabwe, in February 1988. The present project was conceived as a result. It is a first attempt to produce an analysis by type of land cover of the woody biomass present in Sub-Saharan. On examining the energy balance for most Sub-Saharan countries, one is struck by the dominance of woodfuel, including fuelwood and charcoal. (Copyright (c) 1994 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank.)

  19. 75 FR 76695 - Request for Proposals for 2011 Woody Biomass Utilization Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... nationwide challenge of using low-value woody biomass material to create renewable energy. Goals of the grant... biomass for renewable energy. Assist projects that produce renewable energy from woody biomass. Reduce... business risk to increase use of woody biomass from our nation's forestlands for renewable energy...

  20. Postscript: Problems With the Security Motivation Model Remain Largely Unresolved: Response to Woody and Szechtman (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven; McKay, Dean; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper comments on the response offered by Szechtman and Woody to Taylor et al's initial comments on Szechtman and Woody's original article. Taylor et al highlight one problem with their model that Woody and Szechtman seem to think is unimportant: the treatment relevance of their model. The analogy of aspirin and colds was used, suggesting…

  1. Assessing the Effects of Woody Plant Traits on Understory Herbaceous Cover in a Semiarid Rangeland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belay, Tamrat A.; Moe, Stein R.

    2015-07-01

    The ecological impact of woody plant encroachment in rangeland ecosystems has traditionally been evaluated based on correlation studies between densities of dissimilar woody plants and various ecosystem properties. However, ecosystem properties respond differently to woody plant encroachment because of variations in adaptation of co-occurring woody plants. The objective of this study is to predict the impact of woody plant encroachment on understory herbaceous cover based on analysis of key traits of woody plants. We conducted a vegetation survey in 4 savanna sites in southwestern Ethiopia and compared 9 different key traits of 19 co-occurring woody plants with understory herbaceous cover. Our results show that low understory herbaceous cover is associated with evergreen leaf phenology, shrubby growth form, smaller relative crown-base height and larger relative crown diameter. However, the N2-fixing ability and density of woody plants did not influence the understory herbaceous cover. This shows that traits of individual woody plants can predict the impact of woody plant encroachment on understory herbaceous cover better than density does. The finding improves our ability to accurately predict the impact of woody plant encroachment on various ecosystem properties in highly diverse savanna systems. This plant trait-based approach could be also used as an important management exercise to assess and predict the impact of encroaching woody species in several rangeland ecosystems.

  2. Does livestock grazing influence spatial patterns of woody plant proliferation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patterns of woody plant proliferation in grasslands and savannas influence rates of erosion, spread of disturbance, and nutrient pools.  Spatial pattern is the outcome of plant dispersal, recruitment, competition/facilitation, and disturbance. We quantified effects of livestock grazing, a widely cit...

  3. Patterns, determinants and models of woody plant diversity in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiheng; Fang, Jingyun; Tang, Zhiyao; Lin, Xin

    2011-01-01

    What determines large-scale patterns of species richness remains one of the most controversial issues in ecology. Using the distribution maps of 11 405 woody species in China, we compared the effects of habitat heterogeneity, human activities and different aspects of climate, particularly environmental energy, water–energy dynamics and winter frost, and explored how biogeographic affinities (tropical versus temperate) influence richness–climate relationships. We found that the species richness of trees, shrubs, lianas and all woody plants strongly correlated with each other, and more strongly correlated with the species richness of tropical affinity than with that of temperate affinity. The mean temperature of the coldest quarter was the strongest predictor of species richness, and its explanatory power for species richness was significantly higher for tropical affinity than for temperate affinity. These results suggest that the patterns of woody species richness mainly result from the increasing intensity of frost filtering for tropical species from the equator/lowlands towards the poles/highlands, and hence support the freezing-tolerance hypothesis. A model based on these results was developed, which explained 76–85% of species richness variation in China, and reasonably predicted the species richness of woody plants in North America and the Northern Hemisphere. PMID:21147804

  4. Growth of Woody Plants in Clean Chip Residual Substrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clean chip residual (CCR) is a potential replacement for pine bark (PB) in nursery crop substrates. It is a by-product of in-field forestry harvesting practices and has been shown to produce annual plants and perennials similar in size to plants grown in PB. This study evaluated growth of woody orna...

  5. EVALUATION, CHARACTERIZATION, AND IDENTIFICATION OF WOODY LANDSCAPE PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the Woody Landscape Plants Germplasm Repository (WLPGR) program at the US National Arboretum (USNA) are composed of two parts: repository activities and a research component. Repository activities are to introduce, maintain, and distribute diverse and wild-origin genetic resources...

  6. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF WOODY PLANTS TO SULFUR DIOXIDE AND PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the result of a detailed review of European and United States literature regarding the sensitivity of woody vegetation to sulfur dioxide, ozone, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), or nitrogen oxides. Reference is made to Russian, Japanese and Austrian literature onl...

  7. An ecohydrological framework for grass displacement by woody plants in savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    During the past several decades, woody plants have been encroaching into grasslands around the world. This transition in plant dominance is often explained as a state shift in bistable ecosystem dynamics induced by fire-vegetation feedbacks. These feedbacks occur when woody plants are able to displace grasses because of their better access to soil water and light. On the other hand, grasses can displace woody plants because of their ability to increase fire frequency and of the higher susceptibility of woody plants to fire-induced mortality. In this study, we present an ecohydrological framework to investigate the displacement of grasses by woody plants. Considering the effect of lateral root spread and of soil water and light limitations, we found that woody plant encroachment can substantially suppress grass production even without the presence of grazers. Bistable dynamics emerge as a result of the grass-fire feedback for a wide range of rainfall conditions, fire susceptibility, and woody plant growth rates.

  8. Genome sequence of Valsa canker pathogens uncovers a potential adaptation of colonization of woody bark.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhiyuan; Liu, Huiquan; Li, Zhengpeng; Ke, Xiwang; Dou, Daolong; Gao, Xiaoning; Song, Na; Dai, Qingqing; Wu, Yuxing; Xu, Jin-Rong; Kang, Zhensheng; Huang, Lili

    2015-12-01

    Canker caused by ascomycetous Valsa species are among the most destructive diseases of woody plants worldwide. These pathogens are distinct from other pathogens because they only effectively attack tree bark in the field. To unravel the potential adaptation mechanism of bark colonization, we examined the genomes of Valsa mali and Valsa pyri that preferentially infect apple and pear, respectively. We reported the 44.7 and 35.7 Mb genomes of V. mali and V. pyri, respectively. We also identified the potential genomic determinants of wood colonization by comparing them with related cereal pathogens. Both genomes encode a plethora of pathogenicity-related genes involved in plant cell wall degradation and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In order to adapt to the nutrient limitation and low pH environment in bark, they seem to employ membrane transporters associated with nitrogen uptake and secrete proteases predominantly with acidic pH optima. Remarkably, both Valsa genomes are especially suited for pectin decomposition, but are limited in lignocellulose and cutin degradation. Besides many similarities, the two genomes show distinct variations in many secondary metabolism gene clusters. Our results show a potential adaptation of Valsa canker pathogens to colonize woody bark. Secondary metabolism gene clusters are probably responsible for this host specificity. PMID:26137988

  9. Suitable utilization of woody plants for hibitation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke; Katayama, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    We have been investigating the usefulness of woody plants for habitation on Mars. During our research, we have found that woody plants have several properties which can be utilized for therapy and materials for enrage and construction even on Mars. Japanese people traditionally believe that "Bonsai" have therapeudic properties. Trees can become carbon fuel which can be used as energy on Mars. Tree materials could be used as a tool in closed bio-ecosystems such as for the purification and/or separation of solutions in an environment in space. Here, we will show some results of their abilities, the water leakage and vacuum seal test, separation of solutions using carbon materials made from trees. At the initiation of this research, we named the trees used as material for the experiment related to space environments "CosmoBon", small bonsai tree. To establish our research, as the first step, we will try to do the experiment using "CosmoBon".

  10. Biomass Estimation of Dry Tropical Woody Species at Juvenile Stage

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, R. K.; Raghubanshi, A. S.; Singh, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate characterization of biomass in different forest components is important to estimate their contribution to total carbon stock. Due to lack of allometric equations for biomass estimation of woody species at juvenile stage, the carbon stored in this forest component is ignored. We harvested 47 woody species at juvenile stage in a dry tropical forest and developed regression models for the estimation of above-ground biomass (AGB). The models including wood-specific gravity (ρ) exhibited higher R2 than those without ρ. The model consisting of ρ, stem diameter (D), and height (H) not only exhibited the highest R2 value but also had the lowest standard error of estimate. We suggest that ρ-based regression model is a viable option for nondestructive estimation of biomass of forest trees at juvenile stage. PMID:22448139

  11. Briquettability of lignite and woody wastes composite fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Beker, U.G.

    2000-03-01

    Woody wastes have favorable burning characteristics compared to lignite, as well as low ash content and reduced smoke emission. The aim of this study was to blend lignite with woody wastes to obtain a solid fuel that retains the advantageous characteristics of woody materials. Blends with lignite were made up with 7, 9, 12, 15, and 20% of waste and then briquetted under pressures of 400, 550, 700, and 800 MPa. Sunflower shell, sawdust, and paper mill wastes were used in different amounts with molasses as binder. Studies were carried out on a laboratory scale to determine optimum parameters for briquetting, such as moisture content of lignite and pressure. Briquetting of lignite without waste materials produces products of low strength. The strongest briquettes were obtained with waste contents of 12--20% and lignite moisture contents of 10--12% at briquetting pressures of 550, 700, and 800 MPa. Briquettes with adequate mechanical strength are obtained from lignite-waste blends with the addition of 8% molasses.

  12. Flowering cycles of woody bamboos native to southern South America.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Carolina

    2014-03-01

    Neotropical woody bamboos range from northern Mexico to southern Argentina and Chile. The most interesting aspect of bamboo biology is their flowering habit. The species that are the most intriguing are those that manifest a cyclic pattern of gregarious flowering after long vegetative periods. The flowering cycle has been described in very few species. The goal was to identify mass flowering events of woody bamboo species native to Argentina and neighboring areas, and to estimate the flowering cycle of each species. Sixteen species were surveyed: Chusquea culeou, C. deficiens, C. lorentziana, C. montana, C. quila, C. ramosissima, C. tenella, C. valdiviensis; Colanthelia rhizantha; Guadua chacoensis, G. paraguayana, G. trinii; Merostachys clausenii, M. multiramea, Rhipidocladum neumannii and R. racemiflorum. To reconstruct flowering dates, information from literature and herbarium collections was consulted and more than 990 records were gathered. Flowering cycles were estimated by recording the intervals between reported flowering events. Evidence of regular flowering cycles of ca. 30 years was found for most of the species considered. There is a remarkable concentration of flowering cycles about multiples of 15-16 years. Flowering synchrony among different species of woody bamboos was recorded for the first time in South America. PMID:24162620

  13. Woody plant encroachment paradox: Rivers rebound as degraded grasslands convert to woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Bradford P.; Huang, Yun

    2010-04-01

    The related phenomena of degradation and woody plant encroachment have transformed huge tracts of rangelands. Woody encroachment is assumed to reduce groundwater recharge and streamflow. We analyzed the long-term (85 years) trends of four major river basins in the Edwards Plateau region of Texas. This region, in which springs are abundant because of the karst geology, has undergone degradation and woody encroachment. We found that, contrary to widespread perceptions, streamflows have not been declining. The contribution of baseflow has doubled—even though woody cover has expanded and rainfall amounts have remained constant. We attribute this increase in springflow to a landscape recovery that has taken place concurrently with woody expansion—a recovery brought about by lower grazing pressure. Our results indicate that for drylands where the geology supports springs, it is degradation and not woody encroachment that leads to regional-scale declines in groundwater recharge and streamflows.

  14. Spatial patterns of streambed morphology around woody debris: flume experiments and field observations on the effects of woody debris on streambed morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, V.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    The interactions between woody debris, fluid flow and sediment transport in rivers play a fundamental role in ecogeomorphology, affecting channel roughness, streambed morphology, and sediment transport and storage. In particular, woody debris increases the hydraulic and topographic complexity in rivers, leading to a greater diversity of aquatic habitats and an increase in the number of large pools that are important fish habitat and breeding grounds. In the past decade, engineered logjams have become an increasingly used tool in river management for simultaneously decreasing the rate of riverbank migration and improving aquatic habitat. Sediment deposits around woody debris build up riverbanks and counteract bank migration caused by erosion. Previous experiments of flow visualization around model woody debris suggest the amount of sediment scour and deposition are primarily related to the presence of roots and the obstructional area of the woody debris. We present the results of field surveys and sediment transport experiments of streambed morphology around stationary woody debris on a mobile bed. These experiments test the effects of root presence, root geometry and log orientation of individual stationary trees on streambed morphology. The flume contains a deformable sediment bed of medium sand, and has subcritical and turbulent flow, corresponding to flow conditions found in nature. Field surveys on the Hoh River, WA, measure the local streambed morphology around woody debris (e.g. pool and gravel-bar length, width and depth), as well as woody debris characteristics (e.g. tree diameter, tree length, root diameter and root depth). We quantified the amount of local sediment scour and deposition around woody debris of varying sizes, geometries and orientations relative to flow. We find that: 1) the presence of roots on woody debris leads to greater areas of both sediment scour and deposition; and 2) the amount of sediment scour and deposition are related to the

  15. Relationship of Course Woody Debris to Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Prey Diversity and Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, G.S.

    1999-09-03

    The abundance of diversity of prey commonly used by the red-cockaded woodpecker were monitored in experimental plots in which course woody debris was manipulated. In one treatment, all the woody debris over four inches was removed. In the second treatment, the natural amount of mortality remained intact. The overall diversity of prey was unaffected; however, wood roaches were significantly reduced by removal of woody debris. The latter suggests that intensive utilizations or harvesting practices may reduce foraging.

  16. Importance of Coarse Woody Debris to Avian Communities in Loblolly Pine Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, S.M.; Gauthreaux, S.A.; Kilgo, J.C.

    2001-06-14

    Investigates the importance of standing and down coarse woody debris to bird communities in loblolly pine forests, researchers compared breeding and nonbreeding responses of birds among two coarse woody debris removal and control treatments. Quantification of vegetation layers to determine their effects on the experimental outcome coarse woody debris removal had no effect on the nonbreeding bird community. Most breeding and nonbreeding species used habitats with sparse midstory and well-developed understory, where as sparse canopy cover and dense midstory were important to some nonbreeding species. Snag and down coarse woody debris practices that maintain a dense understory, sparse midstory and canopy will create favorable breeding habitat.

  17. Woody encroachment over 70 years in South African savannahs: overgrazing, global change or extinction aftershock?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nicola; Erasmus, B F N; Archibald, S; Bond, W J

    2016-09-19

    Woody encroachment in 'open' biomes like grasslands and savannahs is occurring globally. Both local and global drivers, including elevated CO2, have been implicated in these increases. The relative importance of different processes is unresolved as there are few multi-site, multi-land-use evaluations of woody plant encroachment. We measured 70 years of woody cover changes over a 1020 km(2) area covering four land uses (commercial ranching, conservation with elephants, conservation without elephants and communal rangelands) across a rainfall gradient in South African savannahs. Different directions of woody cover change would be expected for each different land use, unless a global factor is causing the increases. Woody cover change was measured between 1940 and 2010 using the aerial photo record. Detection of woody cover from each aerial photograph was automated using eCognitions' Object-based image analysis (OBIA). Woody cover doubled in all land uses across the rainfall gradient, except in conservation areas with elephants in low-rainfall savannahs. Woody cover in 2010 in low-rainfall savannahs frequently exceeded the maximum woody cover threshold predicted for African savannahs. The results indicate that a global factor, of which elevated CO2 is the likely candidate, may be driving encroachment. Elephants in low-rainfall savannahs prevent encroachment and localized megafaunal extinction is a probable additional cause of encroachment.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. PMID:27502384

  18. Woody plant encroachment into grasslands: spatial patterns of functional group distribution and community development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Archer, Steven R; Gelwick, Frances; Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Wu, Xinyuan Ben

    2013-01-01

    Woody plant encroachment into grasslands has been globally widespread. The woody species invading grasslands represent a variety of contrasting plant functional groups and growth forms. Are some woody plant functional types (PFTs) better suited to invade grasslands than others? To what extent do local patterns of distribution and abundance of woody PFTs invading grasslands reflect intrinsic topoedaphic properties versus plant-induced changes in soil properties? We addressed these questions in the Southern Great Plains, United States at a subtropical grassland known to have been encroached upon by woody species over the past 50-100 years. A total of 20 woody species (9 tree-statured; 11 shrub-statured) were encountered along a transect extending from an upland into a playa basin. About half of the encroaching woody plants were potential N2-fixers (55% of species), but they contributed only 7% to 16 % of the total basal area. Most species and the PFTs they represent were ubiquitously distributed along the topoedaphic gradient, but with varying abundances. Overstory-understory comparisons suggest that while future species composition of these woody communities is likely to change, PFT composition is not. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) ordination and variance partitioning (Partial CCA) indicated that woody species and PFT composition in developing woody communities was primarily influenced by intrinsic landscape location variables (e.g., soil texture) and secondarily by plant-induced changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content. The ubiquitous distribution of species and PFTs suggests that woody plants are generally well-suited to a broad range of grassland topoedaphic settings. However, here we only examined categorical and non-quantitative functional traits. Although intrinsic soil properties exerted more control over the floristics of grassland-to-woodland succession did plant modifications of soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations, the latter

  19. Woody Plant Encroachment into Grasslands: Spatial Patterns of Functional Group Distribution and Community Development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Archer, Steven R.; Gelwick, Frances; Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W.; Wu, Xinyuan Ben

    2013-01-01

    Woody plant encroachment into grasslands has been globally widespread. The woody species invading grasslands represent a variety of contrasting plant functional groups and growth forms. Are some woody plant functional types (PFTs) better suited to invade grasslands than others? To what extent do local patterns of distribution and abundance of woody PFTs invading grasslands reflect intrinsic topoedaphic properties versus plant-induced changes in soil properties? We addressed these questions in the Southern Great Plains, United States at a subtropical grassland known to have been encroached upon by woody species over the past 50-100 years. A total of 20 woody species (9 tree-statured; 11 shrub-statured) were encountered along a transect extending from an upland into a playa basin. About half of the encroaching woody plants were potential N2-fixers (55% of species), but they contributed only 7% to 16 % of the total basal area. Most species and the PFTs they represent were ubiquitously distributed along the topoedaphic gradient, but with varying abundances. Overstory-understory comparisons suggest that while future species composition of these woody communities is likely to change, PFT composition is not. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) ordination and variance partitioning (Partial CCA) indicated that woody species and PFT composition in developing woody communities was primarily influenced by intrinsic landscape location variables (e.g., soil texture) and secondarily by plant-induced changes in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content. The ubiquitous distribution of species and PFTs suggests that woody plants are generally well-suited to a broad range of grassland topoedaphic settings. However, here we only examined categorical and non-quantitative functional traits. Although intrinsic soil properties exerted more control over the floristics of grassland-to-woodland succession did plant modifications of soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations, the latter

  20. Fire effects on tropical woody vegetation structure have been exaggerated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenendaal, Elmar; Torello-Raventos, Mireia; Miranda, Heloisa; Sato, Naomi; Oliveras-Menor, Imma; Van Langevelde, Frank; Lloyd, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century scientists, particularly those working in Africa, have proposed a major impact of fire frequency and intensity on woody vegetation leading to concepts such as "fire derived" savannas and "fire-mediated" feedbacks. Particularly in contact zones between forests and savannas the role of fire has been proposed as the driving agent of replacement of fire-sensitive forest-associated species with fire sensitive "fire resistant" savanna species and transition from closed forest vegetation to open savanna vegetation. In this presentation we will provide a global synthesis of the fire experiment literature with an aim to determine if general patterns can be established in terms of magnitude of fire effects on tropical vegetation structure in terms of (a) season and frequency of burning; (b) vegetation structure in the absence of fire and (c) climate. With this body of empirical data and a simple simulation model we examine if, the impact of fire on tropical woody cover as currently presented in the literature and the role of fire-mediated feedbacks in forest-savanna transitions can be justified by empirical data emanating from long term fire experiments

  1. Expected international demand for woody and herbaceous feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Lamers, Patrick; Jacobson, Jacob; Mohammad, Roni; Wright, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The development of a U.S. bioenergy market and ultimately ‘bioeconomy’ has primarily been investigated with a national focus. Limited attention has been given to the potential impacts of international market developments. The goal of this project is to advance the current State of Technology of a single biorefinery to the global level providing quantitative estimates on how international markets may influence the domestic feedstock supply costs. The scope of the project is limited to feedstock that is currently available and new crops being developed to be used in a future U.S. bioeconomy including herbaceous residues (e.g., corn stover), woody biomass (e.g., pulpwood), and energy crops (e.g., switchgrass). The timeframe is set to the periods of 2022, 2030, and 2040 to align with current policy targets (e.g., the RFS2) and future updates of the Billion Ton data. This particular milestone delivers demand volumes for generic woody and herbaceous feedstocks for the main (net) importing regions along the above timeframes. The regional focus of the study is the European Union (EU), currently the largest demand region for U.S. pellets made from pulpwood and forest residues. The pellets are predominantly used in large-scale power plants (>5MWel) in the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands (NL), Belgium (BE), and Denmark (DK).

  2. Experimental investigation of pyrolysis process of woody biomass mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosanić, Tijana R.; Ćeranić, Mirjana B.; Đurić, Slavko N.; Grković, Vojin R.; Milotić, Milan M.; Brankov, Saša D.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of pyrolysis of woody biomass mixture. The mixture consists of oak, beech, fir, cherry, walnut and linden wood chips with equal mass fractions. During the experiment, the sample mass inside the reactor was 10 g with a particle diameter of 5-10 mm. The sample in the reactor was heated in the temperature range of 24-650°C. Average sample heating rates in the reactor were 21, 30 and 54 °C/min. The sample mass before, during and after pyrolysis was determined using a digital scale. Experimental results of the sample mass change indicate that the highest yield of pyrolytic gas was achieved at the temperature slightly above 650°C and ranged from 77 to 85%, while char yield ranged from 15 to 23%. Heating rate has significant influence on the pyrolytic gas and char yields. It was determined that higher pyrolysis temperatures and heating rates induce higher yields of pyrolytic gas, while the char mass reduces. Condensation of pyrolytic gas at the end of the pyrolysis process at 650°C produced 2.4-2.72 g of liquid phase. The results obtained represent a starting basis for determining material and heat balance of pyrolysis process as well as woody biomass pyrolysis equipment.

  3. Interactions of woody biofuel feedstock production systems with water resources: Considerations for sustainability.

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, Carl,C.; Amatya, Devendra; Coleman, Mark.

    2008-07-01

    Abstract. Water resources are important for the production of woody biofuel feedstocks. It is necessary to ensure that production systems do not adversely affect the quantity or quality of surface and ground water. The effects of woody biomass plantations on water resources are largely dependent on the prior land use and the management regime. Experience from both irrigated and non-irrigated systems has demonstrated that woody biofuel production systems do not impair water quality. Water quality actually improves from conversion of idle or degraded agricultural lands to woody biomass plantations. Site water balance may be altered by cultivation of woody biomass plantations relative to agricultural use, due to increases in evapostranspiration (ET) and storage. Incorporation of woody biomass production plantations within the landscape provides an opportunity to improve the quality of runoff water and soil conservation. Given the centrality of water resources to the sustainability of ecosystem services and other values derived, the experience with woody biofuels feedstock production systems is positive. Keywords. Short rotation woody crop, forest hydrology, water quality, hardwood plantation.

  4. Late-Rotation Nitrogen Management in Deciduous Short Rotation Woody Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Idle agricultural land has the potential for producing woody crops as an energy or chemical feedstock. Short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) may improve soil health, water quality, and sequester soil carbon in these intensively farmed fields. Frequently, nitrogen is the limiting nutrient in these sys...

  5. Evaluating woody material transport and deposition in alpine rivers and deducing risk mitigation approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzorana, B.; Zischg, A.; Hübl, J.; Largiader, A.

    2009-04-01

    The impact levels of recent flashflood events in Switzerland and Western Austria in 2005 have significantly been accentuated by a considerable amount of transported woody material. As a consequence, either protection measures or bridges suffered considerable damage. Furthermore, cross-sectional obstructions due to woody material entrapment caused unexpected floodplain inundations resulting in severe damage to elements at risk. Until now, these woody material transport phenomena are neither sufficiently taken into account nor systematically considered, leading to a decrease in prediction accuracy during the procedure of hazard mapping. To close this gap, a procedure is proposed that (1) allows for the estimation of woody material recruitment from wood covered bankslopes and floodplains within the perimeter of the considered extreme flood event; and (2) permits the analysis of, the disposition for woody material entrainment and transport to selected critical configurations along the channel. The proposed procedure had been implemented into an ArcGIS-environment and provided indications for potential accentuation of flood hazards due to the transport of woody material. Results from a case study suggested the general applicability of the concept. The computational results can be used to devise effective risk mitigation strategies that comprise: (1) selective woody material volume reduction within the source areas, (2) thinning measures to increase the elasticity of the forest structure, (3) preventive interception of transported woody material and (4) redesign of the critical configurations.

  6. Diagnostic genetic test for the honey bee tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tracheal mite, Acarapis woodi, has become a worldwide pest of honey bees. Identification and description of A. woodi is hampered by the minute size of these mites, their cryptic lifestyle, and a general lack of strong morphological differences with relatives. Here we describe a diagnostic gene...

  7. USING PROTEOMICS TO STUDY THE COMPLEXITIES OF STRESS ADAPTATION IN WOODY PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter survival of woody plants in temperate climates depends on their ability to acclimate to freezing temperatures. The ability to cold acclimate in woody plants can be quite complex. Different organs (buds vs. leaves) and tissues (xylem vs. bark) can differ dramatically in the extent of their c...

  8. Non-Linear Dynamics Approach to Assessing Woody-Encroachment in Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, N. A.; Nippert, J. B.; Van Vleck, E.

    2015-12-01

    Woody species are encroaching on grasslands globally. Here, we investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of this encroachment in relation to climate and fire regimes in the central U.S. A low-dimensional model is used to assess stability of species composition. Sixe years of eddy covariance data at a paired grassland and woody encroachment site at the Konza Prairie LTER site are used to verify carbon and water dynamics. Historical aerial photography and remote sensing data are used to quantify the spatial diffusion of woody tree fraction into grasslands. Non-linear dynamics approaches are used to quantify the stability of vegetation and the presence of tipping points in relation to woody fraction, fire frequency and precipitation and temperature variability. Understanding the roles of multiple confounding forcing factors operating at disparate timescales is essential for predicting future woody encroachment and the water and climate implications of land cover transitions.

  9. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Audrey G; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Ryan, Michael G; Tissue, David T; Baggett, L Scott; Adams, Henry D; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R L; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W; Dickman, L Turin; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Saint Joanis, Brigitte; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R

    2015-11-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent literature could be quantitatively compared among studies. We also asked whether any differences among laboratories were related to the extraction and quantification methods used to determine starch and sugar concentrations. These questions were addressed by sending sub-samples collected from five woody plant tissues, which varied in NSC content and chemical composition, to 29 laboratories. Each laboratory analyzed the samples with their laboratory-specific protocols, based on recent publications, to determine concentrations of soluble sugars, starch and their sum, total NSC. Laboratory estimates differed substantially for all samples. For example, estimates for Eucalyptus globulus leaves (EGL) varied from 23 to 116 (mean = 56) mg g(-1) for soluble sugars, 6-533 (mean = 94) mg g(-1) for starch and 53-649 (mean = 153) mg g(-1) for total NSC. Mixed model analysis of variance showed that much of the variability among laboratories was unrelated to the categories we used for extraction and quantification methods (method category R(2) = 0.05-0.12 for soluble sugars, 0.10-0.33 for starch and 0.01-0.09 for total NSC). For EGL, the difference between the highest and lowest least squares means for categories in the mixed model analysis was 33 mg g(-1) for total NSC, compared with the range of laboratory estimates of 596 mg g(-1). Laboratories were reasonably consistent in their ranks of estimates among tissues for starch (r = 0.41-0.91), but less so for total NSC (r = 0.45-0.84) and soluble sugars (r = 0.11-0.83). Our results show that NSC estimates for woody plant tissues cannot be compared among laboratories. The relative changes in NSC between treatments measured within a laboratory

  10. Woody plants in grasslands: post-encroachment stand dynamics.

    PubMed

    Browning, Dawn M; Archer, Steven R; Asner, Gregory P; McClaran, Mitchel P; Wessman, Carol A

    2008-06-01

    Woody plant abundance is widely recognized to have increased in savannas and grasslands worldwide. The lack of information on the rates, dynamics, and extent of increases in shrub abundance is a major source of uncertainty in assessing how this vegetation change has influenced biogeochemical cycles. Projecting future consequences of woody cover change on ecosystem function will require knowledge of where shrub cover in present-day stands lies relative to the realizable maximum for a given soil type within a bioclimatic region. We used time-series aerial photography (1936, 1966, and 1996) and field studies to quantify cover and biomass of velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina Woot.) following its proliferation in a semidesert grassland of Arizona. Mapping of individual shrubs indicated an encroachment phase characterized by high rates of bare patch colonization. Upon entering a stabilization phase, shrub cover increases associated with recruitment and canopy expansion were largely offset by contractions in canopy area of other shrub patches. Instances of shrub disappearance coincided with a period of below-average rainfall (1936-1966). Overall, shrub cover (mean +/- SE) on sandy uplands with few and widely scattered shrubs in 1902 was dynamically stable over the 1936-1996 period averaging approximately 35% +/- 5%. Shrub cover on clayey uplands in 1936 was 17% +/- 2% but subsequently increased twofold to levels comparable to those on sandy uplands by 1966 (36% +/- 7%). Cover on both soils then decreased slightly between 1966 and 1996 to 28% +/- 3%. Thus, soil properties influenced the rate at which landscapes reached a dynamic equilibrium, but not the apparent endpoint. Although sandy and clayey landscapes appear to have stabilized at comparable levels of cover, shrub biomass was 1.4 times greater on clayey soils. Declines in shrub cover between 1966 and 1996 were accompanied by a shift to smaller patch sizes on both sandy and clayey landscapes. Dynamics observed during

  11. Mapping Woody Plant Encroachment in Grassland Using Multiple Source Remote Sensing images: Case Study in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xiao, X.; Qin, Y.; Dong, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.; Zou, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Wu, X.; Bajgain, R.

    2015-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment (mainly Juniperus virginiana, a coniferous evergreen tree) in the native grassland has been rapidly increasing in the U.S. Southern Great Plains, largely triggered by overgrazing domestic livestock, fire suppression, and changing rainfall regimes. Increasing dense woody plants have significant implications for local grassland ecosystem dynamics, such as carbon storage, soil nutrient availability, herbaceous forage production, livestock, watershed hydrology and wildlife habitats. However, very limited data are available about the spatio-temporal dynamics of woody plant encroachment to the native grassland at regional scale. Data from remotes sensing could potentially provide relevant information and improve the conversion of native grassland to woody plant encroachment. Previous studies on woody detection in grassland mainly conducted at rangeland scale using airborne or high resolution images, which is sufficient to monitor the dynamics of woody plant encroachment in local grassland. This study examined the potential of medium resolution images to detect the woody encroachment in tallgrass prairie. We selected Cleveland county, Oklahoma, US. as case study area, where eastern area has higher woody coverage than does the western area. A 25-m Phased Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR, N36W98) image was used to map the trees distributed in the grassland. Then, maximum enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in the winter calculated from time-series Landsat images was used to identify the invaded woody species (Juniperus virginiana) through phenology-based algorithm. The resulting woody plant encroachment map was compared with the results extracted from the high resolution images provided by the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP). Field photos were also used to validate the accuracy. These results showed that integrating PALSAR and Landsat had good performance to identify the

  12. Hydrothermal fractionation of woody biomass: Lignin effect on sugars recovery.

    PubMed

    Yedro, Florencia M; Cantero, Danilo A; Pascual, Marcos; García-Serna, Juan; Cocero, M José

    2015-09-01

    Subcritical water was employed to fractionate woody biomass into carbohydrates and lignin. Nine urban trees species (hardwood and softwood) from Spain were studied. The experiments were carried out in a semi-continuous reactor at 250 °C for 64 min. The hemicellulose and cellulose recovery yields were between 30%wt. and 80%wt. while the lignin content in the solid product ranged between 32%wt. and 92%wt. It was observed that an increment of solubilized lignin disfavored the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses. It was determined that the maximum extraction of hemicellulose was achieved at 20 min of solid reaction time while the extraction of celluloses not exhibited a maximum value. The hydrolysis of hemicellulose and cellulose would be governed by the hydrolysis kinetic and the polymers accessibility. In addition, the extraction of hemicellulose was negatively affected by the lignin content in the raw material while cellulose hydrolysis was not affected by this parameter. PMID:25985415

  13. Woody biomass resource of Louisiana, 1991. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1993-09-01

    Data from the 1991 Louisiana forest survey were used to derive fresh and dry biomass estimates for all trees, on timberland, greater than 1.0 inch in diameter at breast height (d.b.h.). There are 470.0 million fresh tons in softwood species and 757.5 million fresh tons in hardwood species. The woody biomass resource averages 45.9 and 61.9 tons per acre for softwoods and hardwoods where they occur, respectively. Most of this biomass is in the stem portion of the trees--85 percent for softwoods and 75 percent for hardwoods. Nonindustrial private landowners hold 58 and 69 percent of the total softwood and hardwood biomass resource, respectively.

  14. Differential physiological responses to environmental change promote woody shrub expansion.

    PubMed

    Heskel, Mary; Greaves, Heather; Kornfeld, Ari; Gough, Laura; Atkin, Owen K; Turnbull, Matthew H; Shaver, Gaius; Griffin, Kevin L

    2013-05-01

    Direct and indirect effects of warming are increasingly modifying the carbon-rich vegetation and soils of the Arctic tundra, with important implications for the terrestrial carbon cycle. Understanding the biological and environmental influences on the processes that regulate foliar carbon cycling in tundra species is essential for predicting the future terrestrial carbon balance in this region. To determine the effect of climate change impacts on gas exchange in tundra, we quantified foliar photosynthesis (A net), respiration in the dark and light (R D and R L, determined using the Kok method), photorespiration (PR), carbon gain efficiency (CGE, the ratio of photosynthetic CO2 uptake to total CO2 exchange of photosynthesis, PR, and respiration), and leaf traits of three dominant species - Betula nana, a woody shrub; Eriophorum vaginatum, a graminoid; and Rubus chamaemorus, a forb - grown under long-term warming and fertilization treatments since 1989 at Toolik Lake, Alaska. Under warming, B. nana exhibited the highest rates of A net and strongest light inhibition of respiration, increasing CGE nearly 50% compared with leaves grown in ambient conditions, which corresponded to a 52% increase in relative abundance. Gas exchange did not shift under fertilization in B. nana despite increases in leaf N and P and near-complete dominance at the community scale, suggesting a morphological rather than physiological response. Rubus chamaemorus, exhibited minimal shifts in foliar gas exchange, and responded similarly to B. nana under treatment conditions. By contrast, E. vaginatum, did not significantly alter its gas exchange physiology under treatments and exhibited dramatic decreases in relative cover (warming: -19.7%; fertilization: -79.7%; warming with fertilization: -91.1%). Our findings suggest a foliar physiological advantage in the woody shrub B. nana that is further mediated by warming and increased soil nutrient availability, which may facilitate shrub expansion and

  15. Differential physiological responses to environmental change promote woody shrub expansion

    PubMed Central

    Heskel, Mary; Greaves, Heather; Kornfeld, Ari; Gough, Laura; Atkin, Owen K; Turnbull, Matthew H; Shaver, Gaius; Griffin, Kevin L

    2013-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of warming are increasingly modifying the carbon-rich vegetation and soils of the Arctic tundra, with important implications for the terrestrial carbon cycle. Understanding the biological and environmental influences on the processes that regulate foliar carbon cycling in tundra species is essential for predicting the future terrestrial carbon balance in this region. To determine the effect of climate change impacts on gas exchange in tundra, we quantified foliar photosynthesis (Anet), respiration in the dark and light (RD and RL, determined using the Kok method), photorespiration (PR), carbon gain efficiency (CGE, the ratio of photosynthetic CO2 uptake to total CO2 exchange of photosynthesis, PR, and respiration), and leaf traits of three dominant species – Betula nana, a woody shrub; Eriophorum vaginatum, a graminoid; and Rubus chamaemorus, a forb – grown under long-term warming and fertilization treatments since 1989 at Toolik Lake, Alaska. Under warming, B. nana exhibited the highest rates of Anet and strongest light inhibition of respiration, increasing CGE nearly 50% compared with leaves grown in ambient conditions, which corresponded to a 52% increase in relative abundance. Gas exchange did not shift under fertilization in B. nana despite increases in leaf N and P and near-complete dominance at the community scale, suggesting a morphological rather than physiological response. Rubus chamaemorus, exhibited minimal shifts in foliar gas exchange, and responded similarly to B. nana under treatment conditions. By contrast, E. vaginatum, did not significantly alter its gas exchange physiology under treatments and exhibited dramatic decreases in relative cover (warming: −19.7%; fertilization: −79.7%; warming with fertilization: −91.1%). Our findings suggest a foliar physiological advantage in the woody shrub B. nana that is further mediated by warming and increased soil nutrient availability, which may facilitate shrub

  16. Does stream flow structure woody riparian vegetation in subtropical catchments?

    PubMed

    James, Cassandra S; Mackay, Stephen J; Arthington, Angela H; Capon, Samantha J; Barnes, Anna; Pearson, Ben

    2016-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test the relevance of hydrological classification and class differences to the characteristics of woody riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape in Queensland, Australia. We followed classification procedures of the environmental flow framework ELOHA - Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration. Riparian surveys at 44 sites distributed across five flow classes recorded 191 woody riparian species and 15, 500 individuals. There were differences among flow classes for riparian species richness, total abundance, and abundance of regenerating native trees and shrubs. There were also significant class differences in the occurrence of three common tree species, and 21 indicator species (mostly native taxa) further distinguished the vegetation characteristics of each flow class. We investigated the influence of key drivers of riparian vegetation structure (climate, depth to water table, stream-specific power, substrate type, degree of hydrologic alteration, and land use) on riparian vegetation. Patterns were explained largely by climate, particularly annual rainfall and temperature. Strong covarying drivers (hydrology and climate) prevented us from isolating the independent influences of these drivers on riparian assemblage structure. The prevalence of species considered typically rheophytic in some flow classes implies a more substantial role for flow in these classes but needs further testing. No relationships were found between land use and riparian vegetation composition and structure. This study demonstrates the relevance of flow classification to the structure of riparian vegetation in a subtropical landscape, and the influence of covarying drivers on riparian patterns. Management of environmental flows to influence riparian vegetation assemblages would likely have most potential in sites dominated by rheophytic species where hydrological influences override other controls. In contrast, where vegetation assemblages are

  17. BAAD: a Biomass And Allometry Database for woody plants

    SciTech Connect

    Falster, Daniel; Duursma, Remko; Ishihara, Masae; Barneche, Diego; Fitzjohn, Richard; Varhammar, Angelica; Aiba, Masahiro; Ando, M.; Anten, Niels; Aspinwall, Michael J.; Baltzer, Jennifer; Baraloto, Christopher; Battaglia, Michael; Battles, John; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; van Breugel, Michiel; Camac, James; Claveau, Yves; Coll Mir, Llus; Dannoura, Dannoura; Delagrange, Sylvain; Domec, Jean-Cristophe; Fatemi, Farrah; Feng, Wang; Gargaglione, Veronica; Goto, Yoshiaki; Hagihara, Akio; Hall, Jefferson S.; Hamilton, Steve; Harja, Degi; Hiura, Tsutom; Holdaway, Robert; Hutley, L. B.; Ichie, Tomoaki; Jokela, Eric; Kantola, Anu; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Kenzo, Tanaka; King, David A.; Kloeppel, Brian; Kohyama, Takashi; Komiyama, Akira; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Lusk, Christopher; Maguire, Doug; le Maire, Guerric; Makela, Annikki; Markesteijn, Lars; Marshall, John; McCulloh, Kate; Miyata, Itsuo; Mokany, Karen; Mori, Shigeta; Myster, Randall; Nagano, Masahiro; Naidu, Shawna; Nouvellon, Yann; O'Grady, Anthony; O'Hara, Kevin; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Osada, Noriyuki; Osunkoya, Olusegun O.; Luis Peri, Pablo; Petritan, Mary; Poorter, Lourens; Portsmuth, Angelika; Potvin, Catherine; Ransijn, Johannes; Reid, Douglas; Ribeiro, Sabina C.; Roberts, Scott; Rodriguez, Rolando; Saldana-Acosta, Angela; Santa-Regina, Ignacio; Sasa, Kaichiro; Gailia Selaya, Nadezhda; Sillett, Stephen; Sterck, Frank; Takagi, Kentaro; Tange, Takeshi; Tanouchi, Hiroyuki; Tissue, David; Umehara, Tohru; Utsugi, Hajime; Vadeboncoeur, Matthew; Valladares, Fernando; Vanninen, Petteri; Wang, Jian; Wenk, Elizabeth; Williams, Dick; Ximenes, Fabiano de Aquino; Yamaba, Atsushi; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yamakura, Takuo; Yanai, Ruth; York, Robert

    2015-05-07

    Quantifying the amount of mass or energy invested in plant tissues is of fundamental interest across a range of disciplines, including ecology, forestry, ecosystem science, and climate change science (Niklas, 1994; Chave et al. 2005; Falster et al. 2011). The allocation of net primary production into different plant components is an important process affecting the lifetime of carbon in ecosystems, and resource use and productivity by plants (Cannell & Dewar, 1994; Litton et al. 2007; Poorter et al. 2012). While many studies in have destructively harvested woody plants in the name of science, most of these data have only been made available in the form of summary tables or figures included in publications. Until now, the raw data has resided piecemeal on the hard drives of individual scientists spread around the world. Several studies have gathered together the fitted (allometric) equations for separate datasets (Ter-Mikaelian & Korzukhin, 1997; Jenkins et al. 2003; Zianis et al. 2005; Henry et al. 2013), but none have previously attempted to organize and share the raw individual plant data underpinning these equations on a large scale. Gathered together, such data would represent an important resource for the community, meeting a widely recognised need for rich, open data resources to solve ecological problems (Costello et al. 2013; Fady et al. 2014; Harfoot & Roberts, 2014; Costello et al. 2013). We (D.S. Falster and R.A. Duursma, with the help of D.R. Barneche, R.G. FitzJohn and A. Vårhammar) set out to create such a resource, by asking authors directly whether they would be willing to make their raw data files freely available. The response was overwhelming: nearly everyone we contacted was interested to contribute their raw data. Moreover, we were invited to incorporate another compilation led by M. Ishihara and focussing on Japanese literature. As a result, we present BAAD: a Biomass And Allometry Database for woody plants, comprising data collected in 174

  18. Phytoliths in woody plants from the Miombo woodlands of Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, Julio; Bennett, Tim; Esselmont, Chris; Simpson, Steven; Walde, Dale

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims There are no descriptions of phytoliths produced by plants from the ‘Zambezian’ zone, where Miombo woodlands are the dominant element of the largest single phytochorion in sub-Saharan Africa. The preservation of phytoliths in fossil records of Africa makes phytoliths a tool to study early plant communities. Paleo-ethnobotanical interpretation of phytoliths relies on the comparison of ancient types with morphotypes extracted from living reference collections. Methods Phytoliths were extracted from plant samples representing 41 families, 77 genera and 90 species through sonic cleaning, dry ashing and acid treatment; and phytoliths thus extracted were quantified. For each species, an average of 216 phytoliths were counted. The percentage of each morphotype identified per species was calculated, and types were described according to the descriptors from the International Code for Phytolith Nomenclature. Phytolith assemblages were subject to discriminant analysis, cluster analysis and principal component analysis. Key Results Phytoliths were grouped into 57 morphotypes (two were articulated forms and 55 were discrete shapes), and provide a reference collection of phytolith assemblages produced by Miombo woody species. Common and unique morphotypes are described and taxonomic and grouping variables are looked into from a statistical perspective. Conclusions The first quantitative taxonomy of phytoliths from Miombos is presented here, including new types and constituting the most extensive phytolith key for any African ecoregion. Evidence is presented that local woody species are hypervariable silica producers and their phytolith morphotypes are highly polymorphic. The taxonomic significance of these phytoliths is largely poor, but there are important exceptions that include the morphotypes produced by members from >10 families and orders. The typical phytolithic signal that would allow scientists to identify ancient woodlands of

  19. Patterns of woody plant invasion in an Argentinean coastal grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberio, Constanza; Comparatore, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    Coastal dune grasslands are fragile ecosystems that have historically been subjected to various types of uses and human activities. In Buenos Aires Province (Argentina), these areas are frequently afforested for urban and touristic development. The introduction and subsequent spread of exotic tree species is one of the main threats to conservation of natural grasslands as invasive trees strongly transform their structure and composition. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of woody plant invasion comparing plant communities and environmental variables between invaded and non-invaded areas surrounding the coastal village of Mar Azul, Argentina. Coastal grasslands in this area are being invaded by Populus alba (white poplar) and Acacia longifolia (coast wattle). The height of the saplings and the richness of the accompanying vegetation were evaluated in relation to the distance from the edge of the mature tree patches. Also, the cover, richness and diversity of all species in the invaded and non-invaded areas were measured, as well as soil pH, temperature and particle size. Negative correlations were found between the height of the saplings and distance to mature tree patches in all areas. The richness of the accompanying vegetation was negatively and positively correlated with the distance from the poplar and acacia area, respectively. The most abundant native species was Cortaderia selloana. Less cover, richness and diversity of native plant species and greater soil particle size were found in invaded areas, where the proportion of bare soil was higher. Also, a higher proportion of leaf litter in the invaded areas was registered. The results emphasize the invasive capacity of P. alba and A. longifolia advancing on the native communities and reducing their richness. Knowledge of the impact of invasive woody plants in coastal grasslands is important to design active management strategies for conservation purposes.

  20. Woody Plant Encroachment Paradox: Rivers Rebound as Degraded Grasslands Convert to Woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, B. P.; Huang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The related phenomena of degradation and woody plant encroachment have transformed huge tracts of semiarid and subhumid rangelands. This transformation may have enormous consequences for regional water supplies, but to date few assessments have been done at scales larger than that of small catchments. Woody plant encroachment in particular is assumed to reduce groundwater recharge and, hence, baseflow to streams. For the study reported on in this paper, we analyzed the long-term (85 years) streamflow trends of four major river basins in the Edwards Plateau region of Central Texas. This region, in which springs are abundant because of the karst geology, has undergone both degradation and woody plant encroachment. We found that, contrary to common and widespread perceptions, streamflows have not been declining. In fact, the contribution of baseflow (supplied by springs and groundwater) has doubled—even though woody plant cover has expanded and rainfall amounts have remained relatively constant. We attribute this increase in springflow to a general landscape recovery that has taken place concurrent with woody plant expansion—a recovery brought about by lower grazing pressure and improved land management. Our results indicate that for drylands where the geology supports springs, it is degradation and not woody plant encroachment that leads to regional-scale declines in groundwater recharge and baseflows. Further, our results indicate that when woody plant expansion follows on the heels of degradation, it may even help reverse these declines.

  1. Effect of downed woody debris on small mammal anti-predator behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkleman, Travis, M.; Orrock, John, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2011-10-01

    Anti-predator behavior can affect prey growth, reproduction, survival, and generate emergent effects in food webs. Small mammals often lower the cost of predation by altering their behavior in response to shrubs,but the importance of other microhabitat features, such as downed woody debris, for anti-predator behavior is unknown. We used givingup densities to quantify the degree to which downed woody debris alters perceived predation risk by small mammals in southeastern pineforests. We placed 14 foraging trays next to large downed woody debris,shrubs, and in open areas for 12 consecutive nights. Moon illumination, a common indicator of predation risk, led to a similar reduction in small mammal foraging in all three microhabitats (open, downed woody debris,and shrub). Small mammals perceived open microhabitats as riskier than shrub microhabitats, with downed woody debris habitats perceived as being of intermediate risk between shrub and open microhabitats. Despite the presumed benefits of the protective cover of downed woody debris, small mammals may perceive downed woody debris as a relatively risky foraging site in southeastern pine forests where the high diversity and abundance of rodent-eating snakes may provide a primary predatory threat.

  2. Relationship Between Woody Plant Colonization and Typha L. Encroachment in Stormwater Detention Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Priscilla Bocskor; Day, Susan D.; Wynn-Thompson, Theresa M.; Seiler, John R.

    2013-10-01

    We studied stormwater detention basins where woody vegetation removal was suspended for 2 years in Virginia, USA to determine if woody vegetation can control Typha populations and how early woody plant succession interacts with Typha, other herbaceous vegetation, and site factors. Distribution and composition of woody vegetation, Typha and non- Typha herbaceous vegetation biomass, and site factors were assessed at 100 plots in four basins ranging in age from 7 to 17 years. A greenhouse study examined the interaction of shade and soil moisture on Typha biomass and persistence. Principal component analysis identified an environmental gradient associated with greater water table depths and decreased elevation that favored Typha but negatively influenced woody vegetation. Elevation was correlated with litter layer distribution, suggesting that initial topography influences subsequent environmental characteristics and thus plant communities. Soil organic matter at 0-10 cm ranged from 5.4 to 12.7 %. Woody plants present were native species with the exception of Ailanthus altissima and Pyrus calleryana. In the greenhouse, shade and reduced soil moisture decreased Typha biomass and rhizome length. The shade effect was strongest in flooded plants and the soil moisture effect was strongest for plants in full sun. Typha in dry soil and heavy shade had 95 % less total biomass and 83 % smaller rhizomes than Typha in flooded soil and full sun, but even moderate soil moisture reductions decreased above- and below-ground biomass by 63 and 56 %, respectively. Suspending maintenance allows restoration of woody vegetation dominated by native species and may suppress Typha invasion.

  3. The affect of a clearcut environment on woody debris respiration rate dynamics, Harvard Forest, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoof, M. K.; Williams, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    At an ecosystem scale, the distribution of carbon is largely a function of stand development and disturbance processes. Clearcut logging remains a common practice both in the United States and globally and typically results in elevated storage of carbon in onsite woody debris and detritus. The residence time and decomposition rate of this woody debris and detritus will affect the rate of CO2 efflux to the atmosphere and thus affect the long term consequences of such disturbances on carbon flux and storage. The removal of a forest canopy also affects a site's microclimate including the albedo, air temperature, air humidity, as well as soil temperature and moisture, many of the same factors that affect the rate of woody debris decomposition. Thus it could be expected that differences in woody debris characteristics (e.g. size, abundance, state of decay), as well as differences in microclimate, between mature and recently clearcut forest sites, would result in differences in piece and site-level woody debris decomposition rates. Although woody debris stocks post-harvest have been well characterized, few studies have explored post-disturbance woody debris respiration rates, which directly measures carbon emissions from woody debris, distinguishing decomposition from mass loss due to fragmentation or leaching. This study addressed the question: does a clearcut environment in a temperate forest affect the rate of decomposition of coarse woody debris? The rate of respiration of downed spruce logs were repeatedly measured in-situ using an LI-6250 gas analyzer in Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts. Treatments included clear-cut, shaded clear-cut, mature spruce stand, and transfer (from clearcut to spruce stand). Gas analyzer measurements were accompanied by measurements of log temperature and percent water, soil temperature, moisture and pH, as well as light levels, air temperature and humidity to determine dominant drivers of respiration rates.

  4. Fire and Grazing Influences on Rates of Riparian Woody Plant Expansion along Grassland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Veach, Allison M.; Dodds, Walter K.; Skibbe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Grasslands are threatened globally due to the expansion of woody plants. The few remaining headwater streams within tallgrass prairies are becoming more like typical forested streams due to rapid conversion of riparian zones from grassy to wooded. Forestation can alter stream hydrology and biogeochemistry. We estimated the rate of riparian woody plant expansion within a 30 m buffer zone surrounding the stream bed across whole watersheds at Konza Prairie Biological Station over 25 years from aerial photographs. Watersheds varied with respect to experimentally-controlled fire and bison grazing. Fire frequency, presence or absence of grazing bison, and the historical presence of woody vegetation prior to the study time period (a proxy for proximity of propagule sources) were used as independent variables to predict the rate of riparian woody plant expansion between 1985 and 2010. Water yield was estimated across these years for a subset of watersheds. Riparian woody encroachment rates increased as burning became less frequent than every two years. However, a higher fire frequency (1–2 years) did not reverse riparian woody encroachment regardless of whether woody vegetation was present or not before burning regimes were initiated. Although riparian woody vegetation cover increased over time, annual total precipitation and average annual temperature were variable. So, water yield over 4 watersheds under differing burn frequencies was quite variable and with no statistically significant detected temporal trends. Overall, burning regimes with a frequency of every 1–2 years will slow the conversion of tallgrass prairie stream ecosystems to forested ones, yet over long time periods, riparian woody plant encroachment may not be prevented by fire alone, regardless of fire frequency. PMID:25192194

  5. Fire and grazing influences on rates of riparian woody plant expansion along grassland streams.

    PubMed

    Veach, Allison M; Dodds, Walter K; Skibbe, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Grasslands are threatened globally due to the expansion of woody plants. The few remaining headwater streams within tallgrass prairies are becoming more like typical forested streams due to rapid conversion of riparian zones from grassy to wooded. Forestation can alter stream hydrology and biogeochemistry. We estimated the rate of riparian woody plant expansion within a 30 m buffer zone surrounding the stream bed across whole watersheds at Konza Prairie Biological Station over 25 years from aerial photographs. Watersheds varied with respect to experimentally-controlled fire and bison grazing. Fire frequency, presence or absence of grazing bison, and the historical presence of woody vegetation prior to the study time period (a proxy for proximity of propagule sources) were used as independent variables to predict the rate of riparian woody plant expansion between 1985 and 2010. Water yield was estimated across these years for a subset of watersheds. Riparian woody encroachment rates increased as burning became less frequent than every two years. However, a higher fire frequency (1-2 years) did not reverse riparian woody encroachment regardless of whether woody vegetation was present or not before burning regimes were initiated. Although riparian woody vegetation cover increased over time, annual total precipitation and average annual temperature were variable. So, water yield over 4 watersheds under differing burn frequencies was quite variable and with no statistically significant detected temporal trends. Overall, burning regimes with a frequency of every 1-2 years will slow the conversion of tallgrass prairie stream ecosystems to forested ones, yet over long time periods, riparian woody plant encroachment may not be prevented by fire alone, regardless of fire frequency. PMID:25192194

  6. Boron deficiency in woody plants: various responses and tolerance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nannan; Yang, Chengquan; Pan, Zhiyong; Liu, Yongzhong; Peng, Shu’ang

    2015-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential microelement for higher plants, and its deficiency is widespread around the world and constrains the productivity of both agriculture and forestry. In the last two decades, numerous studies on model or herbaceous plants have contributed greatly to our understanding of the complex network of B-deficiency responses and mechanisms for tolerance. In woody plants, however, fewer studies have been conducted and they have not well been recently synthesized or related to the findings on model species on B transporters. Trees have a larger body size, longer lifespan and more B reserves than do herbaceous plants, indicating that woody species might undergo long-term or mild B deficiency more commonly and that regulation of B reserves helps trees cope with B deficiency. In addition, the highly heterozygous genetic background of tree species suggests that they may have more complex mechanisms of response and tolerance to B deficiency than do model plants. Boron-deficient trees usually exhibit two key visible symptoms: depression of growing points (root tip, bud, flower, and young leaf) and deformity of organs (root, shoot, leaf, and fruit). These symptoms may be ascribed to B functioning in the cell wall and membrane, and particularly to damage to vascular tissues and the suppression of both B and water transport. Boron deficiency also affects metabolic processes such as decreased leaf photosynthesis, and increased lignin and phenol content in trees. These negative effects will influence the quality and quantity of wood, fruit and other agricultural products. Boron efficiency probably originates from a combined effect of three processes: B uptake, B translocation and retranslocation, and B utilization. Root morphology and mycorrhiza can affect the B uptake efficiency of trees. During B translocation from the root to shoot, differences in B concentration between root cell sap and xylem exudate, as well as water use efficiency, may play key roles in

  7. Boron deficiency in woody plants: various responses and tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Yang, Chengquan; Pan, Zhiyong; Liu, Yongzhong; Peng, Shu'ang

    2015-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential microelement for higher plants, and its deficiency is widespread around the world and constrains the productivity of both agriculture and forestry. In the last two decades, numerous studies on model or herbaceous plants have contributed greatly to our understanding of the complex network of B-deficiency responses and mechanisms for tolerance. In woody plants, however, fewer studies have been conducted and they have not well been recently synthesized or related to the findings on model species on B transporters. Trees have a larger body size, longer lifespan and more B reserves than do herbaceous plants, indicating that woody species might undergo long-term or mild B deficiency more commonly and that regulation of B reserves helps trees cope with B deficiency. In addition, the highly heterozygous genetic background of tree species suggests that they may have more complex mechanisms of response and tolerance to B deficiency than do model plants. Boron-deficient trees usually exhibit two key visible symptoms: depression of growing points (root tip, bud, flower, and young leaf) and deformity of organs (root, shoot, leaf, and fruit). These symptoms may be ascribed to B functioning in the cell wall and membrane, and particularly to damage to vascular tissues and the suppression of both B and water transport. Boron deficiency also affects metabolic processes such as decreased leaf photosynthesis, and increased lignin and phenol content in trees. These negative effects will influence the quality and quantity of wood, fruit and other agricultural products. Boron efficiency probably originates from a combined effect of three processes: B uptake, B translocation and retranslocation, and B utilization. Root morphology and mycorrhiza can affect the B uptake efficiency of trees. During B translocation from the root to shoot, differences in B concentration between root cell sap and xylem exudate, as well as water use efficiency, may play key roles in

  8. Woody cover and hominin environments in the past 6million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Wynn, Jonathan G.; Andanje, Samuel A.; Bird, Michael I.; Korir, David Kimutai; Levin, Naomi E.; Mace, William; Macharia, Anthony N.; Quade, Jay; Remien, Christopher H.

    2011-08-01

    The role of African savannahs in the evolution of early hominins has been debated for nearly a century. Resolution of this issue has been hindered by difficulty in quantifying the fraction of woody cover in the fossil record. Here we show that the fraction of woody cover in tropical ecosystems can be quantified using stable carbon isotopes in soils. Furthermore, we use fossil soils from hominin sites in the Awash and Omo-Turkana basins in eastern Africa to reconstruct the fraction of woody cover since the Late Miocene epoch (about 7 million years ago). 13C/12C ratio data from 1,300 palaeosols at or adjacent to hominin sites dating to at least 6million years ago show that woody cover was predominantly less than ~40% at most sites. These data point to the prevalence of open environments at the majority of hominin fossil sites in eastern Africa over the past 6million years.

  9. Woody cover and hominin environments in the past 6 million years.

    PubMed

    Cerling, Thure E; Wynn, Jonathan G; Andanje, Samuel A; Bird, Michael I; Korir, David Kimutai; Levin, Naomi E; Mace, William; Macharia, Anthony N; Quade, Jay; Remien, Christopher H

    2011-08-01

    The role of African savannahs in the evolution of early hominins has been debated for nearly a century. Resolution of this issue has been hindered by difficulty in quantifying the fraction of woody cover in the fossil record. Here we show that the fraction of woody cover in tropical ecosystems can be quantified using stable carbon isotopes in soils. Furthermore, we use fossil soils from hominin sites in the Awash and Omo-Turkana basins in eastern Africa to reconstruct the fraction of woody cover since the Late Miocene epoch (about 7 million years ago). (13)C/(12)C ratio data from 1,300 palaeosols at or adjacent to hominin sites dating to at least 6 million years ago show that woody cover was predominantly less than ∼40% at most sites. These data point to the prevalence of open environments at the majority of hominin fossil sites in eastern Africa over the past 6 million years. PMID:21814275

  10. 78 FR 11622 - Request for Proposals: 2013 Hazardous Fuels Woody Biomass Utilization Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... due to catastrophic weather events, and/or thinning overstocked stands. The woody biomass shall be... = 25%; 2) electricity plus low pressure steam for dry kilns = 45%; and 3) boiler processes that...

  11. Genomic resources for valuable woody ornamental landscape plants such as hydrangea macrophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New and improved ornamental landscape plants are typically produced by conventional breeding. Unfortunately, long generation times for woody plants can significantly slow progress. Incorporating genomic and biotechnology resources provides more information when designing breeding strategies and ac...

  12. Woody encroachment reduces nutrient limitation and promotes soil carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Blaser, Wilma J; Shanungu, Griffin K; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, the biomass of woody species has increased in many grassland and savanna ecosystems. As many of these species fix nitrogen symbiotically, they may alter not only soil nitrogen (N) conditions but also those of phosphorus (P). We studied the N-fixing shrub Dichrostachys cinerea in a mesic savanna in Zambia, quantifying its effects upon pools of soil N, P, and carbon (C), and availabilities of N and P. We also evaluated whether these effects induced feedbacks upon the growth of understory vegetation and encroaching shrubs. Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs increased total N and P pools, as well as resin-adsorbed N and soil extractable P in the top 10-cm soil. Shrubs and understory grasses differed in their foliar N and P concentrations along gradients of increasing encroachment, suggesting that they obtained these nutrients in different ways. Thus, grasses probably obtained them mainly from the surface upper soil layers, whereas the shrubs may acquire N through symbiotic fixation and probably obtain some of their P from deeper soil layers. The storage of soil C increased significantly under D. cinerea and was apparently not limited by shortages of either N or P. We conclude that the shrub D. cinerea does not create a negative feedback loop by inducing P-limiting conditions, probably because it can obtain P from deeper soil layers. Furthermore, C sequestration is not limited by a shortage of N, so that mesic savanna encroached by this species could represent a C sink for several decades. We studied the effects of woody encroachment on soil N, P, and C pools, and availabilities of N and P to Dichrostachys cinerea shrubs and to the understory vegetation. Both N and P pools in the soil increased along gradients of shrub age and cover, suggesting that N fixation by D. cinerea did not reduce the P supply. This in turn suggests that continued growth and carbon sequestration in this mesic savanna ecosystems are unlikely to be constrained by nutrient

  13. Woody pretzels: spirocycles from vetiver to patchouli and Georgywood.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Philip

    2008-06-01

    This review, including new experimental results, is the summary of a talk at the RSC/SCI conference 'flavours & fragrances 2007' in London, Imperial College, 24-26 September, 2007. Though the third dimension of the receptor models of J. E. Amoore rarely was exceeding 4 A, the world of woody odorants such as (+)-cedrol (3; cedarwood), (-)-khusimone (4; vetiver), and (-)-patchoulol (5; patchouli) is anything but flat. Any tricyclic skeleton with a zero-bridge contains a spirocyclic ring system determining its 3D structure, so spirocycles (spira, Lat. pretzel) are the fastest access to the third dimension. In the vetiver family, a spirocyclic mimic 9 of (-)-khusimone (4) was first discovered by chance by Büchi in 1976, and also by chance, we obtained another system, 12, with a characteristic vetiver smell by tandem-Rupe-Nazarov reaction of alkyne diols. A 5-A distance between a quaternary C-atom and a carbonyl group (or alternative HB acceptor) with an alpha-methyl or methylene branching is proposed to be the key to their vetiver odor. Upon scale-up of one of these odorants, 24, we discovered a very powerful (0.067 ng/l) impurity with a most typical patchouli scent: the spirocyclic, sterically crowded hydroxy ketone 33--a most unusual structure for a patchouli odorant. Several spirocyclic hydroxy ketone analogs, also with inverted ring systems such as in 70 and 84, provided new insights into the structure-odor correlation of this family. A superposition analysis indicated the carbonyl function of the hydroxy ketone to overlay on the geminal dimethyl motive of (-)-patchoulol. And indeed, the corresponding hydroxy ketone of patchoulol, 59, synthesized in 13 steps from Cyclal C (63), also emanated a patchouli odor. Finally, the synthesis and olfactory properties of twelve rigid spirocyclic analogs, 95-97, 99-102, and 106-110, of Georgywood (91) are presented that highlight stereochemical requirements for woody odorants and raise doubts about an alpha-helical binding

  14. Woody Plant Cover Dynamics in Sahelian Drylands from Earth Observation Based Seasonal Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, M.; Hiernaux, P.; Fensholt, R.; Tagesson, T.; Rasmussen, K.; Mbow, C.

    2015-12-01

    Woody plants play an important role in drylands primary productivity and peoples' livelihood, however, due to their scattered appearance, quantifying and monitoring their abundance over a large area is challenging. From in situ measured woody cover we develop a phenology driven model to estimate the canopy cover of woody species in the Sahelian drylands. Annual maps are applied to monitor dynamics of woody populations in relation to climate and anthropogenic interference. The model estimates the total canopy cover of all woody phanerophytes and the concept is based on the significant difference in phenophases of dryland trees, shrubs and bushes as compared to that of the herbaceous plants. Whereas annual herbaceous are only green during the rainy season and senescence occurs shortly after flowering towards the last rains, most woody plants remain photosynthetically active over large parts of the year. We use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) seasonal metrics representing the dry season to reproduce in situ woody cover at 77 field sites (178 observations in 3x3 km plots between 2000 and 2014) in Niger, Mali and Senegal. The extrapolation to Sahel scale shows agreement between VGT and MODIS at an almost nine times higher woody cover than in the global tree cover product MOD44B which only captures trees of a certain minimum size. Trends over 15 years show that the pattern is closely related to population density and land cover/use. A negative woody cover change can be observed in densely populated areas, but a positive change is seen in sparsely populated regions. Whereas woody cover in cropland is generally stable, it is strongly positive in savannas and woodland. Discrepancies between the countries are huge and also deforestation can be observed at a more local scale. The method is applicable and derived woody cover maps of the Sahel are freely available. They represent an improvement of existing products and a

  15. The role of short-rotation woody crops in sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, J.P.; Tolbert, V.R.

    1996-12-31

    One answer to increase wood production is by increasing management intensity on existing timberland, especially in plantation forests. Another is to convert land currently in agriculture to timberland. Short-rotation woody crops can be used in both cases. But, what are the environmental consequences? Short-rotation woody crops can provide a net improvement in environmental quality at both local and global scales. Conversion of agricultural land to short-rotation woody crops can provide the most environmental quality enhancement by reducing erosion, improving soil quality, decreasing runoff, improving groundwater quality, and providing better wildlife habitat. Forest products companies can use increased production from intensively managed short-rotation woody crop systems to offset decreased yield from the portion of their timberland that is managed less intensively, e.g. streamside management zones and other ecologically sensitive or unique areas. At the global scale, use of short-rotation woody crops for bioenergy is part of the solution to reduce greenhouse gases produced by burning fossil fuels. Incorporating short-rotation woody crops into the agricultural landscape also increases storage of carbon in the soil, thus reducing atmospheric concentrations. In addition, use of wood instead of alternatives such as steel, concrete, and plastics generally consumes less energy and produces less greenhouse gases. Cooperative research can be used to achieve energy, fiber, and environmental goals. This paper will highlight several examples of ongoing cooperative research projects that seek to enhance the environmental aspects of short-rotation woody crop systems. Government, industry, and academia are conducting research to study soil quality, use of mill residuals, nutrients in runoff and groundwater, and wildlife use of short-rotation woody crop systems in order to assure the role of short-rotation crops as a sustainable way of meeting society`s needs.

  16. Trade-offs between savanna woody plant diversity and carbon storage in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Adam F A; Socolar, Jacob B; Elsen, Paul R; Giam, Xingli

    2016-10-01

    Incentivizing carbon storage can be a win-win pathway to conserving biodiversity and mitigating climate change. In savannas, however, the situation is more complex. Promoting carbon storage through woody encroachment may reduce plant diversity of savanna endemics, even as the diversity of encroaching forest species increases. This trade-off has important implications for the management of biodiversity and carbon in savanna habitats, but has rarely been evaluated empirically. We quantified the nature of carbon-diversity relationships in the Brazilian Cerrado by analyzing how woody plant species richness changed with carbon storage in 206 sites across the 2.2 million km(2) region at two spatial scales. We show that total woody plant species diversity increases with carbon storage, as expected, but that the richness of endemic savanna woody plant species declines with carbon storage both at the local scale, as woody biomass accumulates within plots, and at the landscape scale, as forest replaces savanna. The sharpest trade-offs between carbon storage and savanna diversity occurred at the early stages of carbon accumulation at the local scale but the final stages of forest encroachment at the landscape scale. Furthermore, the loss of savanna species quickens in the final stages of forest encroachment, and beyond a point, savanna species losses outpace forest species gains with increasing carbon accumulation. Our results suggest that although woody encroachment in savanna ecosystems may provide substantial carbon benefits, it comes at the rapidly accruing cost of woody plant species adapted to the open savanna environment. Moreover, the dependence of carbon-diversity trade-offs on the amount of savanna area remaining requires land managers to carefully consider local conditions. Widespread woody encroachment in both Australian and African savannas and grasslands may present similar threats to biodiversity. PMID:26919289

  17. Ecohydrological Impacts of Woody Phreatophyte Invasion Within a Semiarid Riparian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, R. L.; Huxman, T. E.; Williams, D. G.; Goodrich, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    Along the Upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona deep-rooted woody phreatophytes such as the non-native Tamarix ramosissima (salt cedar) and the native Prosopis velutina (velvet mesquite) are expanding their range, but we have little understanding about how this change in vegetation composition will change the cycling of water and nutrients in these riparian ecosystems. We compared water and carbon dioxide fluxes over a grassland, a grassland-shrubland mosaic, and a fully developed woodland to evaluate potential consequences of woody plant encroachment on important ecosystem processes. Using fluxes measured by eddy covariance in 2003 we found that ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET) and net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) increased with woody plant encroachment. The dominant grass or shrub at all sites accessed groundwater to some degree, but groundwater use increased with woody plant density. Greater access to groundwater for the deeper-rooted woody plants apparently decouples ecosystem evapotranspiration from gross ecosystem production (GEP) with respect to precipitation. The woody plants were better able to use the stable groundwater source, which increased net carbon dioxide gain during the dry periods by maintaining plant function. However, this enhanced plant activity leads to substantial accumulation of leaf litter on the soil surface that, during rainy periods, may lead to high microbial respiration rates that offset these photosynthetic fluxes. These initial data suggest that the ability of the woody plants to better exploit water resources in riparian areas results in enhanced carbon sequestration at the expense of increased groundwater use under current climate conditions, but the potential does not scale specifically as a function of woody plant density.

  18. Plant diversity and ecosystem multifunctionality peak at intermediate levels of woody cover in global drylands

    PubMed Central

    Soliveres, Santiago; Maestre, Fernando T.; Eldridge, David J.; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Quero, José Luis; Bowker, Matthew A.; Gallardo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Aim The global spread of woody plants into grasslands is predicted to increase over the coming century. While there is general agreement regarding the anthropogenic causes of this phenomenon, its ecological consequences are less certain. We analyzed how woody vegetation of differing cover affects plant diversity (richness and evenness) and multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) in global drylands, and how this changes with aridity. Location 224 dryland sites from all continents except Antarctica widely differing in their environmental conditions (from arid to dry-subhumid sites) and woody covers (from 0 to 100%). Methods Using a standardized field survey, we measured the cover, richness and evenness of perennial vegetation. At each site, we measured 14 ecosystem functions related to soil fertility and the build-up of nutrient pools. These functions are critical for maintaining ecosystem function in drylands. Results Species richness and ecosystem multifunctionality were strongly influenced by woody vegetation, with both variables peaking at relative woody covers (RWC) of 41-60%. This relationship shifted with aridity. We observed linear positive effects of RWC in dry-subhumid sites. These positive trends shifted to hump-shaped RWC-diversity and multifunctionality relationships under semiarid environments. Finally, hump-shaped (richness, evenness) or linear negative (multifunctionality) effects of RWC were found under the most arid conditions. Main conclusions Plant diversity and multifunctionality peaked at intermediate levels of woody cover, although this relationship became increasingly positive under wetter environments. This comprehensive study accounts for multiple ecosystem attributes across a range of woody covers and environmental conditions. Our results help us to reconcile contrasting views of woody encroachment found in current literature and can be used to improve predictions of the likely effects of encroachment on biodiversity and ecosystem

  19. Potential of Co-firing of Woody Biomass in Coal Fired Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yosuke; Kato, Takeyoshi; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    Taking the distributing woody biomass supply into account, this paper assesses the potential of a co-firing of woody biomass in utility's coal power plant from the both energy-saving and economical view points. Sawmill wastes, trimming wastes from fruit farms and streets, and thinning residues from forests in Aichi Prefecture are taken into account. Even though transportation energy is required, almost all of woody biomass can be more efficiently used in co-firing with coal than in a small-scale fuel cell system with gasification as a distributed utilization. When the capital cost of fuel cell system with 25% of total efficiency, including preprocess, gasification and power generation, is higher than 170× 103yen/kW, almost all of thinning residues can be more economically used in co-firing. The cost of woody biomass used in co-firing is also compared with the transaction cost of renewable power in the current RPS scheme. The result suggests the co-firing of woody biomass in coal fired power plant can be feasible measure for effective utilization of woody biomass.

  20. Woody plant encroachment of grasslands: a comparison of terrestrial and wetland settings.

    PubMed

    Saintilan, Neil; Rogers, Kerrylee

    2015-02-01

    A global trend of woody plant encroachment of terrestrial grasslands is co-incident with woody plant encroachment of wetland in freshwater and saline intertidal settings. There are several arguments for considering tree encroachment of wetlands in the context of woody shrub encroachment of grassland biomes. In both cases, delimitation of woody shrubs at regional scales is set by temperature thresholds for poleward extent, and by aridity within temperature limits. Latitudinal expansion has been observed for terrestrial woody shrubs and mangroves, following recent warming, but most expansion and thickening has been due to the occupation of previously water-limited grassland/saltmarsh environments. Increases in atmospheric CO₂, may facilitate the recruitment of trees in terrestrial and wetland settings. Improved water relations, a mechanism that would predict higher soil moisture in grasslands and saltmarshes, and also an enhanced capacity to survive arid conditions, reinforces local mechanisms of change. The expansion of woody shrubs and mangroves provides a negative feedback on elevated atmospheric CO₂ by increasing carbon sequestration in grassland and saltmarsh, and is a significant carbon sink globally. These broad-scale vegetation shifts may represent a new stable state, reinforced by positive feedbacks between global change drivers and endogenic mechanisms of persistence in the landscape. PMID:25729806

  1. The multiple fuzzy origins of woodiness within Balsaminaceae using an integrated approach. Where do we draw the line?

    PubMed Central

    Lens, Frederic; Eeckhout, Sharon; Zwartjes, Rosa; Smets, Erik; Janssens, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The family Balsaminaceae is essentially herbaceous, except for some woodier species that can be described as ‘woody’ herbs or small shrubs. The family is nested within the so-called balsaminoid clade of Ericales, including the exclusively woody families Tetrameristaceae and Marcgraviaceae, which is sister to the remaining families of the predominantly woody order. A molecular phylogeny of Balsaminaceae is compared with wood anatomical observations to find out whether the woodier species are derived from herbaceous taxa (i.e. secondary woodiness), or whether woodiness in the family represents the ancestral state for the order (i.e. primary woodiness). Methods Wood anatomical observations of 68 Impatiens species and Hydrocera triflora, of which 47 are included in a multigene phylogeny, are carried out using light and scanning electron microscopy and compared with the molecular phylogenetic insights. Key Results There is much continuous variation in wood development between the Impatiens species studied, making the distinction between herbaceousness and woodiness difficult. However, the most woody species, unambiguously considered as truly woody shrubs, all display paedomorphic wood features pointing to secondary woodiness. This hypothesis is further supported by the molecular phylogeny, demonstrating that these most woody species are derived from herbaceous (or less woody) species in at least five independent clades. Wood formation in H. triflora is mostly confined to the ribs of the stems and shows paedomorphic wood features as well, suggesting that the common ancestor of Balsaminaceae was probably herbaceous. Conclusions The terms ‘herbaceousness’ and ‘woodiness’ are notoriously difficult to use in Balsaminaceae. However, anatomical observations and molecular sequence data show that the woodier species are derived from less woody or clearly herbaceous species, demonstrating that secondary woodiness has evolved in parallel. PMID

  2. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  3. Soil Carbon Budget During Establishment of Short Rotation Woody Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M. D.

    2003-12-01

    Carbon budgets were monitored following forest harvest and during re-establishment of short rotation woody crops. Soil CO2 efflux was monitored using infared gas analyzer methods, fine root production was estimated with minirhizotrons, above ground litter inputs were trapped, coarse root inputs were estimated with developed allometric relationships, and soil carbon pools were measured in loblolly pine and cottonwood plantations. Our carbon budget allows evaluation of errors, as well as quantifying pools and fluxes in developing stands during non-steady-state conditions. Soil CO2 efflux was larger than the combined inputs from aboveground litter fall and root production. Fine-root production increased during stand development; however, mortality was not yet equivalent to production, showing the belowground carbon budget was not yet in equilibrium and root carbon standing crop was accruing. Belowground production was greater in cottonwood than pine, but the level of pine soil CO2 efflux was equal to or greater than that of cottonwood, indicating heterotrophic respiration was higher for pine. Comparison of unaccounted efflux with soil organic carbon changes provides verification of loss or accrual.

  4. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  5. Flow and scour constraints on uprooting of pioneer woody seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater-Reyes, Sharon; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Stella, John C.; Lightbody, Anne F.

    2015-11-01

    Scour and uprooting during flood events is a major disturbance agent that affects plant mortality rates and subsequent vegetation composition and density, setting the trajectory of physical-biological interactions in rivers. During flood events, riparian plants may be uprooted if they are subjected to hydraulic drag forces greater than their resisting force. We measured the resisting force of woody seedlings established on river bars with in situ lateral pull tests that simulated flood flows with and without substrate scour. We quantified the influence of seedling size, species (Populus and Tamarix), water-table depth, and scour depth on resisting force. Seedling size and resisting force were positively related with scour depth and water-table depth—a proxy for root length—exerting strong and opposing controls on resisting force. Populus required less force to uproot than Tamarix, but displayed a greater increase in uprooting force with seedling size. Further, we found that calculated mean velocities required to uproot seedlings were greater than modeled flood velocities under most conditions. Only when plants were either shallowly rooted or subjected to substrate scour (≥0.3 m) did the calculated velocities required for uprooting decrease to within the range of modeled flood velocities, indicating that drag forces alone are unlikely to uproot seedlings in the absence of extreme events or bar-scale sediment transport. Seedlings on river bars are most resilient to uprooting when they are large, deeply rooted, and unlikely to experience substrate scour, which has implications for ecogeomorphic evolution and river management.

  6. Environmental Control of Cold Hardiness in Woody Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Irving, R. M.; Lanphear, F. O.

    1967-01-01

    The development of cold hardiness in 2 woody plant species (Acer negundo and Viburnum plicatum tomentosum) was shown to be independent of the induction of bud dormancy. Substantial hardiness levels were obtained under controlled conditions with long days and certain low temperatures—without dormancy development as a prerequisite. Low temperatures given during the dark period with long days induced hardiness to a level not significantly different from that of short days. Giving plants continuous 10° temperatures under long days forced plants to harden as if they were under short days, even though they were not dormant. Development of hardiness was shown to be a photoperiodic response. Increasing weeks of short days, followed by a low temperature hardening period in darkness, brought about a progressive increase in hardiness. The short day stimulus could be reversed by long days. Following 6 weeks of short days, the rate of hardening in darkness at 5° was over twice that of plants previously exposed to long days. PMID:16656639

  7. Woody riparian vegetation of Great Basin National Park. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, C.L.; Smith, S.D.; Murray, K.J.; Landau, F.H.; Sala, A.

    1994-07-01

    The community composition and population structure of the woody riparian vegetation in Great Basin National Park are described. Community analyses were accomplished by sampling 229 plots placed in a systematic random fashion along elevational gradients of 8 major stream systems (Baker, Big Wash, Lehman, Pine, Pole, Shingle, Snake, and Strawberry Creeks) in the Park using the releve method. Stand demographics were determined for the four dominant tree species in the Park, based on absolute stem counts at 15 sites along 6 major watersheds. Elevational ranges of the dominant tree and shrub species along 8 major streams were determined via transect analysis and systematic reconnaissance efforts. TWINSPAN (two-way indicator analysis) indentified 4 primary species groups and 8 stand groups in the Park. Because of the homogeneity of riparian zones, both presence and abundance of species were important parameters in determining species groups. Although species such as Populus tremuloides (aspen), Abies concolor (white fir) and Rosa woodsii (Woods rose) are very common throughout the Park, they are particularly abundant at higher, upper intermediate, and lower intermediate elevations.

  8. Contributions of woody and herbaceous vegetation to tropical savanna ecosystem productivity: a quasi-global estimate.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Jon; Bird, Michael I; Vellen, Lins; Miranda, Antonio Carlos; Veenendaal, Elmar M; Djagbletey, Gloria; Miranda, Heloisa S; Cook, Garry; Farquhar, Graham D

    2008-03-01

    To estimate the relative contributions of woody and herbaceous vegetation to savanna productivity, we measured the 13C/12C isotopic ratios of leaves from trees, shrubs, grasses and the surface soil carbon pool for 22 savannas in Australia, Brazil and Ghana covering the full savanna spectrum ranging from almost pure grassland to closed woodlands on all three continents. All trees and shrubs sampled were of the C3 pathway and all grasses of the C4 pathway with the exception of Echinolaena inflexa (Poir.) Chase, a common C3 grass of the Brazilian cerrado. By comparing the carbon isotopic compositions of the plant and carbon pools, a simple model relating soil delta 13C to the relative abundances of trees + shrubs (woody plants) and grasses was developed. The model suggests that the relative proportions of a savanna ecosystem's total foliar projected cover attributable to grasses versus woody plants is a simple and reliable index of the relative contributions of grasses and woody plants to savanna net productivity. Model calibrations against woody tree canopy cover made it possible to estimate the proportion of savanna productivity in the major regions of the world attributable to trees + shrubs and grasses from ground-based observational maps of savanna woodiness. Overall, it was estimated that 59% of the net primary productivity (Np) of tropical savannas is attributable to C4 grasses, but that this proportion varies significantly within and between regions. The C4 grasses make their greatest relative contribution to savanna Np in the Neotropics, whereas in African regions, a greater proportion of savanna Np is attributable to woody plants. The relative contribution of C4 grasses in Australian savannas is intermediate between those in the Neotropics and Africa. These differences can be broadly ascribed to large scale differences in soil fertility and rainfall. PMID:18171668

  9. Dynamic aspects of large woody debris in river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Alexandra; Caporali, Enrica; Becchi, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    Large Woody Debris (LWD) are an integral component of the fluvial environment. They represent an environmental resource, but without doubt they represent also a risk factor for the amplification that could give to the destructive power of a flood event. While countless intervention in river channels have reintroduced wood in rivers with restoration and banks protection aims, during several flash flood events LWD have had a great part in catastrophic consequences, pointing out the urgency of an adequate risk assessment procedure. At present wood dynamics in rivers is not systematically considered within the procedures for the elaboration of hazard maps resulting in loss of prediction accuracy and underestimation of hazard impacts. The assessment inconsistency comes from the complexity of the question: several aspects in wood processes are not yet well known and the superposition of different physical phenomena results in great difficulty to predict critical scenarios. The presented research activity has been aimed to improve management skills for the assessment of the hydrologic risk associated to the presence of large woody debris in rivers, improving knowledge about LWD dynamic processes and proposing effective tools for monitoring and mapping river catchments vulnerability. Utilizing critical review of the published works, field surveys and experimental investigations LWD damaging potential has been analysed to support the identification of the exposed sites and the redaction of hazard maps, taking into account that a comprehensive procedure has to involve: a) Identification of the critical cross sections; b) Evaluation of wood availability in the river catchment; c) Prediction of hazard scenarios through the estimation of water discharge, wood recruitment and entrainment, wood transport and destination. Particularly, a survey sheets form for direct measurements has been implemented and tested in field to provide an investigation instruments for wood and river

  10. The Geomorphic Role of Large Woody Debris in River Avulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, J. C.; Grove, J. R.; Rutherfurd, I.; Marren, P.

    2014-12-01

    The avulsion or abandonment of a river channel in favor of a new course on the floodplain is integral to the development and maintenance of anabranching planforms. Avulsions tend to occur on rivers where the rate of vertical aggradation outpaces lateral migration. In fine cohesive floodplain sediments, avulsions evolve through five stages dependent on the amount of flow and sediment being captured by the new channel. There is limited data available to allow the prediction of autogenic and allogenic controls on: the time over which an avulsion is active; its likely location; the frequency of occurrence; and the length of the interavulsion period. The delivery of wood to the river channel is an autogenic process which has received much attention over the last three decades. Surprisingly it has not previously been considered in anabranch avulsions, apart from where log-jams entirely block channels. The presence of large woody debris in the channel acts as a roughness element, trapping, and impeding the movement of sediments and deflecting flow onto the floodplain. We hypothesize that the delivery rates of wood to the channel, and its subsequent configuration (i.e. dimension, amount, volume, spatial arrangement and blockage ratio), alters flow and sediment routing through the channel. These changes directly influence the stages of avulsion development. To test this conceptual model we have used eleven floodplain cores to reconstruct the timing of a Holocene avulsion. The morphology of the channel in each evolutionary stage was used to estimate the relative role of wood as a roughness element. This was done by coupling a mass balance wood delivery model, run in a Monte Carlo simulation, to the geomorphic processes of each evolutionary stage of the avulsion. Our results allow us to quantify the importance of in-channel wood during each stage of the avulsion. These data highlight that there are critical points in the evolution of anabranching channels when large wood

  11. Biomedical molecular of woody extractives of Cunninghamia Lanceolata biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Huang, Kai; Ye, Yong-Jun; Shi, Jun-You; Zhang, Zhong-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Extractives, important compounds from wood, provide abundant resources for woody medicine. In this study, the three extractives from Cunninghamia lanceolata wood were removed by method of three-stage extraction with alcohol, petroleum ether, and alcohol/petroleum ether and their chemical components were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirteen chemical components were discovered in the first-stage extractives, including: 4-((1e)-3-hydroxy-1-propenyl)-2-methoxyphenol (36.80%), α-(2-phenylethenyl)-1-piperidineacetonitrile (15.39%). One-hundred chemical components were discovered in the second-stage extractives, including: [1s-(1α,4aα,10aβ)]-1, 2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydro-1,4a- dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)-1- phenanthrenecar-boxylic acid (15.16%), 1,3-dimethoxy-5-[(1e)-2- phenylethenyl]-benzene (6.99%). Seven chemical components were discovered in the third-stage extractives, including: 1,3-dimethoxy -5-[(1E)-2-phenylethenyl]-benzene (32.88%), stigmasta-4,6,22-trien-3α-ol (17.83%). And both the main retention time of the first-stage and which of third-stage extractives are 20-30 minutes, and the main retention time of the second-stage extractives is <10 minutes. Besides, the three extractives contained many biomedical molecular, such as [1s-(1α,4aα,10aβ)]-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydro-1,4a-dimethyl-7-(1-methylethyl)-1-phenanthrenecar-boxylic acid, squalene, stigmast-4-en-3-one and γ-sitosterol and so on, which means that the three extractives from Cunninghamia lanceolata wood have huge potential in biomedicine. PMID:25796151

  12. Field and flume investigations of the effects of logjams and woody debris on streambed morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, V.; Montgomery, D. R.; McHenry, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Interactions among wood debris, fluid flow and sediment transport in rivers are first-order controls on channel morphodynamics, affecting streambed morphology, sediment transport, sediment storage and aquatic habitat. Woody debris increases the hydraulic and topographic complexity in rivers, leading to a greater diversity of aquatic habitats and an increase in the number of large pools that are important fish habitat and breeding grounds. In the past decade, engineered logjams have become an increasingly used tool in river management for simultaneously decreasing the rate of riverbank migration and improving aquatic habitat. Sediment deposits around woody debris build up riverbanks and counteract bank migration caused by erosion. Previous experiments on flow visualization around model woody debris suggest the amount of sediment scour and deposition are primarily related to the presence of roots and the obstructional area of the woody debris. We present the results of fieldwork and sediment transport experiments of streambed morphology around stationary woody debris. Field surveys on the Hoh River and the Elwha River, WA, measure the local streambed morphology around logjams and individual pieces of woody debris. We quantified the amount of local scour and dam-removal related fine sediment deposition around natural and engineered logjams of varying sizes and construction styles, located in different geomorphic settings. We also quantified the amount of local scour around individual pieces of woody debris of varying sizes, geometries and orientations relative to flow. The flume experiments tested the effects of root geometry and log orientation of individual stationary trees on streambed morphology. The flume contained a deformable sediment bed of medium sand. We find that: 1) the presence of roots on woody debris leads to greater areas of both sediment scour and deposition; and 2) the amount of sediment scour and deposition are related to the wood debris cross

  13. Drivers of belowground C accrual in response to woody plant encroachment of grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, C. A.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.; Kantola, I. B.; Stott, D.

    2011-12-01

    A combination of long-term fire suppression and livestock overgrazing has resulted in the progressive encroachment of C3 woodlands into native C4-dominanted grasslands in the Rio Grande Plains region of southern Texas. This common land-cover change alters the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in the sandy loam soils of southern Texas so that C and N accrue belowground with increasing woody stand age. C and N increases are predominantly in physically unprotected particulate soil organic matter fractions, where changes in the abundance and chemistry of lignin and aliphatic biopolymers suggest that selective accrual of purportedly more recalcitrant plant molecules may facilitate belowground C stabilization. To evaluate the importance of changing plant input chemistry and soil organic carbon (SOC) accessibility in belowground SOC stabilization, we measured the quantity and isotopic composition of respired CO2 during long term laboratory incubations of whole soil and size (>250 μm) and density (<1.0 g cm-3) separated soil fractions along a chronosequence of woody encroachment. During the two soil fraction incubations a greater proportion of total SOC was respired from younger woody stands (14-23 yrs) and grasslands than from older woody stands (34-86 yrs), suggesting that increases in biochemically recalcitrant polymers with woody encroachment decreased microbial respiration from physically unprotected soil fractions. However, in the whole soil proportional respiration was higher from older woody stands than from younger woody stands and grasslands. This was due to the greater overall allocation of SOC into physically unprotected soil fractions in older woody soils, revealing that microbial accessibility to SOC was more important than SOC chemistry during the whole soil incubation. The effects of changing plant chemistry and SOC accessibility with woody encroachment were also reflected in microbial community structure and function, as the ratio of fungal to bacterial

  14. Island colonization and evolution of the insular woody habit in Echium L. (Boraginaceae).

    PubMed

    Böhle, U R; Hilger, H H; Martin, W F

    1996-10-15

    Numerous island-inhabiting species of predominantly herbaceous angiosperm genera are woody shrubs or trees. Such "insular woodiness" is strongly manifested in the genus Echium, in which the continental species of circummediterranean distribution are herbaceous, whereas endemic species of islands along the Atlantic coast of north Africa are woody perennial shrubs. The history of 37 Echium species was traced with 70 kb of noncoding DNA determined from both chloroplast and nuclear genomes. In all, 239 polymorphic positions with 137 informative sites, in addition to 27 informative indels, were found. Island-dwelling Echium species are shown to descend from herbaceous continental ancestors via a single island colonization event that occurred < 20 million years ago. Founding colonization appears to have taken place on the Canary Islands, from which the Madeira and Cape Verde archipelagos were invaded. Colonization of island habitats correlates with a recent origin of perennial woodiness from herbaceous habit and was furthermore accompanied by intense speciation, which brought forth remarkable diversity of forms among contemporary island endemics. We argue that the origin of insular woodiness involved response to counter-selection of inbreeding depression in founding island colonies. PMID:8876207

  15. Reforestation of bottomland hardwoods and the issue of woody species diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Bottomland hardwood forests in the southcentral United States have been cleared extensively for agriculture, and many of the remaining forests are fragmented and degraded. During the last decade, however, approximately 75,000 ha of land-mainly agricultural fields-have been replanted or contracted for replanting, with many more acres likely to be reforested in the near future. The approach used in most reforestation projects to date has been to plant one to three overstory tree species, usually Quercus spp. (oaks), and to rely on natural dispersal for the establishment of other woody species. I critique this practice by two means. First, a brief literature review demonstrates that moderately high woody species diversity occurs in natural bottomland hardwood forests in the region. This review, which relates diversity to site characteristics, serves as a basis for comparison with stands established by means of current reforestation practices. Second, I reevaluate data on the invasion of woody species from an earlier study of 10 reforestation projects in Mississippi,with the goal of assessing the likelihood that stands with high woody species diversity will develop. I show that natural invasion cannot always be counted on to produce a diverse stand, particularly on sites more than about 60 m from an existing forest edge. I then make several recommendations for altering current reforestation pactices in order to establish stands with greater woody species diversity, a more natural appearance,and a more positive environmental impact at scales larger than individual sites.

  16. Intertidal coarse woody debris: A spatial subsidy as shelter or feeding habitat for gastropods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storry, Kristin A.; Weldrick, Christine K.; Mews, Malte; Zimmer, Martin; Jelinski, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) in the intertidal region of rocky shores serves as a potential source of nutrients as well as habitat or refugia from predation, ecologically linking the adjacent marine and terrestrial habitats. In a series of field and laboratory experiments, the affinity of slow-moving motile intertidal gastropods to CWD either as food source or as shelter that increases habitat complexity was tested. In intertidal pools, CWD did not increase colonization by Littorina spp., while it did so in supratidal pools. Habitat complexity, brought about by algal cover and barnacles, was apparently sufficient in intertidal pools without woody debris, while the increase in habitat complexity by CWD increased the attractiveness of supratidal pools with little natural complexity to Littorina spp. Overall, however, comparison of pools containing woody debris and those containing artificial shelter provided evidence for CWD, and/or its biofilm, serving as food source rather than refugium per se. Similarly, Tegula funebralis chose CWD as food source rather than as shelter as indicated by comparison of autoclaved and unmanipulated woody debris. Further, both unfed and fed snails from a site where CWD was present significantly preferred CWD over macroalgae. Among snails from a site without woody debris, fed individuals showed no preference, while unfed snails significantly preferred macroalgae. From this, experience appears to be a factor that mediates the role of CWD. Overall, however, CWD appears to provide supplementary food to snails in the inter- and supratidal zone.

  17. The contribution of woody plant materials on the several conditions in a space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Kimura, Shunta; Sato, Seigo; Katoh, Hiroshi; Abe, Yusuke; Katayama, Takeshi

    Woody plant materials have several utilization elements in our habitation environment on earth. The studies of woody plants under a space-environment in the vegetable kingdom have a high contribution to the study of various and exotic environmental responses, too. Woody plants can produce an excess oxygen, woody materials for the living cabin, and provide a biomass by cultivating crops and other species of creatures. Tree material would become to be a tool in closed bio-ecosystems such as an environment in a space. We named the trees used as material for the experiment related to space environments “CosmoBon”, small tree bonsai. Japanese cherry tree, “Sakura”, is famous and lovely tree in Japan. One species of “Sakura”, “Mamezakura, Prunus incisa”, is not only lovely tree species, but also suitable tree for the model tree of our purpose. The species of Prunus incisa is originally grown in volcano environment. That species of Sakura is originally grown on Mt. Fuji aria, oligotrophic place. We will try to build the best utilization usage of woody plant under the space environment by “Mamezakura” as a model tree. Here, we will show the importance of uniformity of materials when we will use the tree materials in a space environment. We will also discuss that tree has a high possibility of utilization under the space environments by using our several results related to this research.

  18. [Distribution and growing possibilities of the medicinal woody plants in Lithuania].

    PubMed

    Baroniene, Valerija; Liagiene, Danguole

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the work was to collect and to publicize data about distribution and growing possibilities of native, introduced and suitable for introduction woody plants, containing some established medicinal properties, as a resource of material for medicinal preparations. It was established that 748 species of medicinal woody plants could be grown under Lithuanian climatic conditions: there are 65 native species of medicinal trees and shrubs, 421 introduced species and in addition 262 species of woody plants can be introduced. Out of all these plants, 368 species (49%) can be easily propagated and grown and are winter-hardy. The growing of 285 species (38%) is more difficult to some degree because of their more complicated propagation or care or less hardiness. Ninety-five species (13%) can be grown only in specialized collections. Thus, there are 262 species of woody medicinal plants, which can be introduced into Lithuania. In total 368 species of woody plants are promising as the resources of medicinal preparations in a broad scale and 285 species have medium perspectives. PMID:15299986

  19. Woody biomass production lags stem-girth increase by over one month in coniferous forests.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick; Mäkinen, Harri; Prislan, Peter; Rossi, Sergio; Del Castillo, Edurne Martinez; Campelo, Filipe; Vavrčík, Hanuš; Camarero, Jesus Julio; Bryukhanova, Marina V; Jyske, Tuula; Gričar, Jožica; Gryc, Vladimír; De Luis, Martin; Vieira, Joana; Čufar, Katarina; Kirdyanov, Alexander V; Oberhuber, Walter; Treml, Vaclav; Huang, Jian-Guo; Li, Xiaoxia; Swidrak, Irene; Deslauriers, Annie; Liang, Eryuan; Nöjd, Pekka; Gruber, Andreas; Nabais, Cristina; Morin, Hubert; Krause, Cornelia; King, Gregory; Fournier, Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Wood is the main terrestrial biotic reservoir for long-term carbon sequestration(1), and its formation in trees consumes around 15% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions each year(2). However, the seasonal dynamics of woody biomass production cannot be quantified from eddy covariance or satellite observations. As such, our understanding of this key carbon cycle component, and its sensitivity to climate, remains limited. Here, we present high-resolution cellular based measurements of wood formation dynamics in three coniferous forest sites in northeastern France, performed over a period of 3 years. We show that stem woody biomass production lags behind stem-girth increase by over 1 month. We also analyse more general phenological observations of xylem tissue formation in Northern Hemisphere forests and find similar time lags in boreal, temperate, subalpine and Mediterranean forests. These time lags question the extension of the equivalence between stem size increase and woody biomass production to intra-annual time scales(3, 4, 5, 6). They also suggest that these two growth processes exhibit differential sensitivities to local environmental conditions. Indeed, in the well-watered French sites the seasonal dynamics of stem-girth increase matched the photoperiod cycle, whereas those of woody biomass production closely followed the seasonal course of temperature. We suggest that forecasted changes in the annual cycle of climatic factors(7) may shift the phase timing of stem size increase and woody biomass production in the future. PMID:27251531

  20. Bryophyte species associations with coarse woody debris and stand ages in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rambo, T.; Muir, Patricia S.

    1998-01-01

    We quantified the relationships of 93 forest floor bryophyte species, including epiphytes from incorporated litterfall, to substrate and stand age in Pseudotsuga menziesii-Tsuga heterophylla stands at two sites in western Oregon. We used the method of Dufr??ne and Legendre that combines a species' relative abundance and relative frequency, to calculate that species' importance in relation to environmental variables. The resulting 'indicator value' describes a species' reliability for indicating the given environmental parameter. Thirty-nine species were indicative of either humus, a decay class of coarse woody debris, or stand age. Bryophyte community composition changed along the continuum of coarse woody debris decomposition from recently fallen trees with intact bark to forest floor humus. Richness of forest floor bryophytes will be enhanced when a full range of coarse woody debris decay classes is present. A suite of bryophytes indicated old-growth forest. These were mainly either epiphytes associated with older conifers or liverworts associated with coarse woody debris. Hardwood-associated epiphytes mainly indicated young stands. Mature conifers, hardwoods, and coarse woody debris are biological legacies that can be protected when thinning managed stands to foster habitat complexity and biodiversity, consistent with an ecosystem approach to forest management.

  1. Woody encroachment and forest degradation in sub-Saharan Africa's woodlands and savannas 1982–2006

    PubMed Central

    Mitchard, Edward T. A.; Flintrop, Clara M.

    2013-01-01

    We review the literature and find 16 studies from across Africa's savannas and woodlands where woody encroachment dominates. These small-scale studies are supplemented by an analysis of long-term continent-wide satellite data, specifically the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series from the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) dataset. Using dry-season data to separate the tree and grass signals, we find 4.0% of non-rainforest woody vegetation in sub-Saharan Africa (excluding West Africa) significantly increased in NDVI from 1982 to 2006, whereas 3.52% decreased. The increases in NDVI were found predominantly to the north of the Congo Basin, with decreases concentrated in the Miombo woodland belt. We hypothesize that areas of increasing dry-season NDVI are undergoing woody encroachment, but the coarse resolution of the study and uncertain relationship between NDVI and woody cover mean that the results should be interpreted with caution; certainly, these results do not contradict studies finding widespread deforestation throughout the continent. However, woody encroachment could be widespread, and warrants further investigation as it has important consequences for the global carbon cycle and land–climate interactions. PMID:23878342

  2. Predicting the Effects of Woody Encroachment on Mammal Communities, Grazing Biomass and Fire Frequency in African Savannas

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Izak P. J.; Prins, Herbert H. T.

    2015-01-01

    With grasslands and savannas covering 20% of the world’s land surface, accounting for 30–35% of worldwide Net Primary Productivity and supporting hundreds of millions of people, predicting changes in tree/grass systems is priority. Inappropriate land management and rising atmospheric CO2 levels result in increased woody cover in savannas. Although woody encroachment occurs world-wide, Africa’s tourism and livestock grazing industries may be particularly vulnerable. Forecasts of responses of African wildlife and available grazing biomass to increases in woody cover are thus urgently needed. These predictions are hard to make due to non-linear responses and poorly understood feedback mechanisms between woody cover and other ecological responders, problems further amplified by the lack of long-term and large-scale datasets. We propose that a space-for-time analysis along an existing woody cover gradient overcomes some of these forecasting problems. Here we show, using an existing woody cover gradient (0–65%) across the Kruger National Park, South Africa, that increased woody cover is associated with (i) changed herbivore assemblage composition, (ii) reduced grass biomass, and (iii) reduced fire frequency. Furthermore, although increased woody cover is associated with reduced livestock production, we found indigenous herbivore biomass (excluding elephants) remains unchanged between 20–65% woody cover. This is due to a significant reorganization in the herbivore assemblage composition, mostly as a result of meso-grazers being substituted by browsers at increasing woody cover. Our results suggest that woody encroachment will have cascading consequences for Africa’s grazing systems, fire regimes and iconic wildlife. These effects will pose challenges and require adaptation of livelihoods and industries dependent on conditions currently prevailing. PMID:26379249

  3. Predicting the Effects of Woody Encroachment on Mammal Communities, Grazing Biomass and Fire Frequency in African Savannas.

    PubMed

    Smit, Izak P J; Prins, Herbert H T

    2015-01-01

    With grasslands and savannas covering 20% of the world's land surface, accounting for 30-35% of worldwide Net Primary Productivity and supporting hundreds of millions of people, predicting changes in tree/grass systems is priority. Inappropriate land management and rising atmospheric CO2 levels result in increased woody cover in savannas. Although woody encroachment occurs world-wide, Africa's tourism and livestock grazing industries may be particularly vulnerable. Forecasts of responses of African wildlife and available grazing biomass to increases in woody cover are thus urgently needed. These predictions are hard to make due to non-linear responses and poorly understood feedback mechanisms between woody cover and other ecological responders, problems further amplified by the lack of long-term and large-scale datasets. We propose that a space-for-time analysis along an existing woody cover gradient overcomes some of these forecasting problems. Here we show, using an existing woody cover gradient (0-65%) across the Kruger National Park, South Africa, that increased woody cover is associated with (i) changed herbivore assemblage composition, (ii) reduced grass biomass, and (iii) reduced fire frequency. Furthermore, although increased woody cover is associated with reduced livestock production, we found indigenous herbivore biomass (excluding elephants) remains unchanged between 20-65% woody cover. This is due to a significant reorganization in the herbivore assemblage composition, mostly as a result of meso-grazers being substituted by browsers at increasing woody cover. Our results suggest that woody encroachment will have cascading consequences for Africa's grazing systems, fire regimes and iconic wildlife. These effects will pose challenges and require adaptation of livelihoods and industries dependent on conditions currently prevailing. PMID:26379249

  4. Thermochemical pretreatment of underutilized woody biomass for manufacturing wood composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaez Samaniego, Manuel Raul

    Prescribed fires, one method for reducing hazardous fuel loads from forest lands in the US, are limited by geographical, environmental, and social impacts. Mechanical operations are an alternative type of fuel treatment but these processes are constrained by the difficulty of economically harvesting and/or using large amounts of low-value woody biomass. Adoption and integration of new technologies into existing wood composite facilities offer better utilization of this material. A pretreatment that enables integration of technologies in a typical composite facility will aid with diversification of product portfolio (e.g. wood composites, fuel pellets, liquid fuels, chemicals). Hot water extraction (HWE) is an option for wood pretreatment. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical changes to wood resulting from HWE, and how these changes impact processing and performance of composites. Specific objectives were to: 1) review literature on studies related to the manufacture of composites produced with thermally pretreated wood, 2) manufacture wood plastic composites (WPC) and particleboard using HWE wood and evaluate the impacts of pretreatment on product properties, 3) develop an understanding of the effect of HWE on lignin properties, specifically lignin at the cells surface level after migration from cell walls and middle lamella, 4) discern the influence of lignin on the fiber surface on processing WPCs, and, 5) investigate the effect of changing the pretreatment environment (inert gas instead of water) on lignin behavior. Results show that HWE enhances the resistance of both WPCs and particleboard to water with positive or no effect on mechanical properties. Reduction of hemicelluloses and lignin property changes are suggested as the main reasons for enhancing interaction between wood fiber and resins during composite processing. Lignin on the surface of particles after HWE interacts with thermoplastics during WPCs compounding, thus

  5. Changes in flowering phenology of woody plants in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Junhu

    2016-04-01

    Over the past several decades, abundant evidences proved that the first flowering date of plants in northern hemisphere became earlier in response to climate warming. However, the existing results about impact of climate change on flowering duration are controversial. In this study, we studied temporal trends in first flowering date (FFD), end of flowering date (EFD) and flowering duration (FD) of 94 woody plants from 1963 to 2014 at three stations (Harbin, Beijing and Xi'an) in North China. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relationship between length of flowering periods and temperature using two phenological models (including regression model and growing degree day model). At all stations, more than 90% of observed species showed earlier flowering over time from 1963 to 2014. The average trends in FFD were 1.33, 1.77 and 3.01 days decade-1 at Harbin, Beijing and Xi'an, respectively. During the same period, EFD also became earlier by a mean rate of 2.19, 1.39 and 2.00 days decade-1, respectively. Regarding FD, a significant shortening of FD was observed at Harbin (-0.86 days decade-1), but FD extended by 0.37 and 1.01 days decade-1 at Beijing and Xi'an, respectively. At interspecific level, the plant species with longer FD tend to have stronger trends of FD extension. Through regression analyses, we found more than 85% of time series revealed a significant negative relationship between FFD (or EFD) and preseason temperature. The regression model could simulate the interannual changes in FFD and EFD with the mean goodness of fit (R2) ranging from 0.38 to 0.67, but failed to simulate the FD accurately, as R2 ranging from 0.09 to 0.18. Regarding to FFD and EFD, the growing degree day model could improved R2 of simuation, but also could not simulate FD accurately. Therefore, we concluded that the FFD and EFD advanced notably in recent six decades as a result of climate warming, but the direction of FD changes depended on locations and the species involved. In addition, the

  6. The toughness of secondary cell wall and woody tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, P. W.; Tan, H. T. W.; Cheng, P. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The 'across grain' toughness of 51 woods has been determined on thin wet sections using scissors. The moisture content of sections and the varying sharpness of the scissor blades had little effect on the results. In thin sections (less than 0.6mm), toughness rose linearly with section thickness. The intercept toughness at zero thickness, estimated from regression analysis, was proportional to relative density, consistent with values reported for non-woody plant tissues. Extrapolation of the intercept toughness of these woods and other plant tissues/materials to a relative density of 1.0 predicted a toughness of 3.45kJ m-2 , which we identify with the intrinsic toughness of the cell wall. This quantity appears to predict published results from KIC tests on woods and is related to the propensity for crack deflection. The slope of the relationship between section thickness and toughness, describing the work of plastic buckling of cells, was not proportional to relative density, the lightest (balsa) and heaviest (lignum vitae) woods fracturing with less plastic work than predicted. The size of the plastic zone around the crack tip was estimated to be 0.5mm in size. From this, the hypothetical overall toughness of a thick (greater than 1 mm) block of solid cell wall material was calculated as 39.35 kJ m-2, due to both cell wall resistance (10 per cent) and the plastic buckling of cells (90 per cent). This value successfully predicts the toughness of most commercial woods (of relative densities between 0.2 and 0.8) from 'work area' tests in tension and bending. Though density was the most important factor, both fibre width/fibre length (in hardwoods) and lignin/cellulose ratios were negatively correlated with the work of plastic buckling, after correcting for density. At low densities the work of plastic buckling in the longitudinal radial (LR) direction exceeded that in longitudinal tangential (LT), but the reverse was true for relative densities above 0.25. This could

  7. Environmental Determinants of Woody Plant Diversity at a Regional Scale in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Understanding what drives the geographic variation of species richness across the globe is a fundamental goal of ecology and biogeography. Environmental variables have been considered as drivers of global diversity patterns but there is no consensus among ecologists on what environmental variables are primary drivers of the geographic variation of species richness. Here, I examine the relationship of woody plant species richness at a regional scale in China with sixteen environmental variables representing energy availability, water availability, energy-water balance, seasonality, and habitat heterogeneity. I found that temperature seasonality is the best predictor of woody species richness in China. Other important environmental variables include annual precipitation, mean temperature of the coldest month, and potential evapotranspiration. The best model explains 85% of the variation in woody plant species richness at the regional scale in China. PMID:24086642

  8. Landsat-Based Woody Vegetation Cover Monitoring in Southern African Savannahs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonakis, E.; Petroulaki, K.; Higginbottom, T.

    2016-06-01

    Mapping woody cover over large areas can only be effectively achieved using remote sensing data and techniques. The longest continuously operating Earth-observation program, the Landsat series, is now freely-available as an atmospherically corrected, cloud masked surface reflectance product. The availability and length of the Landsat archive is thus an unparalleled Earth-observation resource, particularly for long-term change detection and monitoring. Here, we map and monitor woody vegetation cover in the Northwest Province of South Africa, an area of more than 100,000 km2 covered by 11 Landsat scenes. We employ a multi-temporal approach with dry-season data from 7 epochs between 1990 to 2015. We use 0.5 m-pixel colour aerial photography to collect > 15,000 point samples for training and validating Random Forest classifications of (i) woody vegetation cover, (ii) other vegetation types (including grasses and agricultural land), and (iii) non-vegetated areas (i.e. urban areas and bare land). Overall accuracies for all years are around 80 % and overall kappa between 0.45 and 0.66. Woody vegetation covers a quarter of the Province and is the most accurately mapped class (balanced accuracies between 0.74-0.84 for the 7 epochs). There is a steady increase in woody vegetation cover over the 25-year-long period of study in the expense of the other vegetation types. We identify potential woody vegetation encroachment 'hot-spots' where mitigation measures might be required and thus provide a management tool for the prioritisation of such measures in degraded and food-insecure areas.

  9. Structure Measurements of Leaf and Woody Components of Forests with Dual-Wavelength Lidar Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahler, A. H.; Li, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Howe, G.; Martel, J.; Hewawasam, K.; Douglas, E. S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E. J.; Wang, Z.; Woodcock, C. E.; Jupp, D. L. B.; Schaefer, M.; Newnham, G.

    2014-12-01

    Forest structure plays a critical role in the exchange of energy, carbon and water between land and atmosphere and nutrient cycle. We can provide detailed forest structure measurements of leaf and woody components with the Dual Wavelength Echidna® Lidar (DWEL), which acquires full-waveform scans at both near-infrared (NIR, 1064 nm) and shortwave infrared (SWIR, 1548 nm) wavelengths from simultaneous laser pulses. We collected DWEL scans at a broadleaf forest stand and a conifer forest stand at Harvard Forest in June 2014. Power returned from leaves is much lower than from woody materials such as trunks and branches at the SWIR wavelength due to the liquid water absorption by leaves, whereas returned power at the NIR wavelength is similar from both leaves and woody materials. We threshold a normalized difference index (NDI), defined as the difference between returned power at the two wavelengths divided by their sum, to classify each return pulse as a leaf or trunk/branch hit. We obtain leaf area index (LAI), woody area index (WAI) and vertical profiles of leaf and woody components directly from classified lidar hits without empirical wood-to-total ratios as are commonly used in optical methods of LAI estimation. Tree heights, diameter at breast height (DBH), and stem count density are the other forest structure parameters estimated from our DWEL scans. The separation of leaf and woody components in tandem with fine-scale forest structure measurements will benefit studies on carbon allocation of forest ecosystems and improve our understanding of the effects of forest structure on ecosystem functions. This research is supported by NSF grant, MRI-0923389

  10. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Temuulen; Shrestha, Rupesh; Sankey, Joel B.; Hardgree, Stuart; Strand, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Woody encroachment is a globally occurring phenomenon that contributes to the global carbon sink. The magnitude of this contribution needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to address uncertainties present in the global- and continental-scale estimates, and guide regional policy and management in balancing restoration activities, including removal of woody plants, with greenhouse gas mitigation goals. The objective of this study was to estimate carbon stored in various successional phases of woody encroachment. Using lidar measurements of individual trees, we present high-resolution estimates of aboveground carbon storage in juniper woodlands. Segmentation analysis of lidar point cloud data identified a total of 60,628 juniper tree crowns across four watersheds. Tree heights, canopy cover, and density derived from lidar were strongly correlated with field measurements of 2613 juniper stems measured in 85 plots (30 × 30 m). Aboveground total biomass of individual trees was estimated using a regression model with lidar-derived height and crown area as predictors (Adj. R2 = 0.76, p 2. Uncertainty in carbon storage estimates was examined with a Monte Carlo approach that addressed major error sources. Ranges predicted with uncertainty analysis in the mean, individual tree, aboveground woody C, and associated standard deviation were 0.35 – 143.6 kg and 0.5 – 1.25 kg, respectively. Later successional phases of woody encroachment had, on average, twice the aboveground carbon relative to earlier phases. Woody encroachment might be more successfully managed and balanced with carbon storage goals by identifying priority areas in earlier phases of encroachment where intensive treatments are most effective.

  11. Modeling wave effects on limits of woody vegetation in Catahoula Lake, LA, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. L.; Curcic, M.; Keim, R.

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to water waves in lakes is an important control on the structure and distribution of both submerged and shoreline vegetative communities. Wave exposure incident on the shoreline limits the distribution of shrubs on both lake and coastal margins by preventing establishment of seedlings via bed disturbance and uprooting. The goal of this study is to investigate the relationship between bed stress due to wave action and the spatial distribution of woody seedling establishment in Catahoula Lake, Louisiana, USA. The lake bed consists of a broad, seasonally inundated flat bordered by a band of woody shrubs. Annual summer de-watering of the lake allows the lake bed to support a moist-soil herbaceous vegetation community, but recent encroachment by woody shrubs over the past ~70 years threatens ecosystem conversion. We use the University of Miami Wave Model (UMWM) to simulate surface wave evolution and bed shear stress for a range of dominant wind conditions and water levels. UMWM is a 3rdgeneration ocean wave model that solves the wave energy balance equation given wind forcing input. While the model has been previously validated in deep water and coastal ocean applications, this study validates the model in very shallow water where bed-induced wave dissipation is a significant process. Model results show that waves of sufficient energy to prevent establishment or to uproot seedlings are common in areas of the lake that are experiencing the least woody encroachment. Areas of the lake bed that are experiencing encroachment are often sheltered from the strongest waves due to the lakes orientation with respect to dominant winds and prior establishment of woody growth, which dissipates wave energy significantly. Results are consistent with some otherwise-unexplained conditions at the lake such as spatially inconsistent relationships between elevation and vegetation communities. We use model results to investigate feedbacks between woody encoachment (both new and

  12. Assessing Extension's Ability to Promote Family Forests as a Woody Biomass Feedstock in the Northeast United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Rene' H.; Ghosh, Chandrani

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here surveyed Extension educators' awareness and knowledge of woody biomass energy and assessed their desire and ability to reach out to family forest owners-a critical feedstock source. The results indicate Extension educators are aware of the potential of woody biomass to serve as a renewable source of energy. Respondents…

  13. Toward a woody plant list for Antigua and Barbuda: Past and present. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, J.; Rivera, C.; Figureroa, J.

    1994-06-01

    Beginning in the 17th century, the forest lands of Antigua and Barbuda were cleared for agriculture, burned, cut over, and grazed severely. A survey by personnel of the USDA Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry and previous surveys were used to assemble lists of native and exotic woody plants. A large majority of the original woody flora still grows on both islands.

  14. Woody Debris: Denitrification Hotspots and N2O Production in Fluvial Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maintenance and restoration of forested riparian cover is important for watershed nitrogen (N) cycling. Forested riparian zones provide woody debris to streams that may stimulate in-stream denitrification and control nitrous oxide (N2O) production. We examined the effects of ...

  15. EFFECTS OF WOODY DEBRIS EROSION CONTROL STRUCTURES ON FISH COMMUNITIES OF LITTLE TOPASHAW CREEK, MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish were sampled by backpack electroshocker from Little Topashaw Creek, MS to evaluate the effectiveness of bank stabilization structures constructed of large woody debris in reducing erosion and improving aquatic habitat. Specific details of project design and of physical habitat and morphology o...

  16. Changes to soil organic N dynamics with leguminous woody plant encroachment into grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The encroachment of nitrogen-fixing trees and shrubs into grasslands and savannas occurs worldwide. In the Rio Grande Plains region of southern Texas, previous studies have shown that woody encroachment by leguminous Prosopis glandulosa (mesquite) trees increases soil and microbial biomass nitrogen ...

  17. Grazing effect on woody plant recruitment in a Sonoran Desert grassland across space and time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing is a commonly cited factor contributing to shrub encroachment in savannas and grasslands. Patterns of woody plant proliferation are known to influence rates of erosion and spread of disturbance and are of practical importance to livestock management with regard to forage distribut...

  18. RESPONSE OF FISHES AND AQUATIC HABITATS TO SAND-BED STREAM RESTORATION USING LARGE WOODY DEBRIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large woody debris structures hold promise as cost-effective stream corridor rehabilitation measures. Pre- and post construction data are presented that describe effects of habitat rehabilitation of Little Topashaw Creek, a sinuous, fourth-order sand-bed stream draining 37 km2 in northwest Mississip...

  19. A Computer-Based Simulation for Teaching Heat Transfer across a Woody Stem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maixner, Michael R.; Noyd, Robert K.; Krueger, Jerome A.

    2010-01-01

    To assist student understanding of heat transfer through woody stems, we developed an instructional package that included an Excel-based, one-dimensional simulation model and a companion instructional worksheet. Guiding undergraduate botany students to applying principles of thermodynamics to plants in nature is fraught with two main obstacles:…

  20. A Plumber's-Eye View of Xylem Water Transport in Woody Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Pinol, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We present a practical for university-level students aimed at measuring and comparing xylem hydraulic properties of co-existing plant species. After sampling branches of several woody species in the field, their main hydraulic properties were measured using a simple set-up. Hydraulic conductivity ("K[subscript h]") was calculated as the ratio…

  1. Landowners' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Aspirations towards Woody Biomass Markets in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jasmine; Hazel, Dennis; Bardon, Robert; Jayaratne, K. S. U.

    2012-01-01

    Non-industrial private forest (NIPF) landowners are often not included in discussions of emerging woody biomass markets for energy, yet they will likely be principal suppliers of the resource. Surveys administered to 475 forest landowners before and after an Extension Forestry education program in 10 counties across North Carolina indicated that…

  2. The Role of the CBF-dependent Signalling Pathway in Woody Perennials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low temperatures are a major limiting factor in the production of nearly all crops. While a great deal of research has focused on annual crops, there has been a need for a greater understanding of cold hardiness in woody perennial plants. Many fruit crops, nursery crops and all trees used for timb...

  3. Functional network analysis of genes differentially expressed during xylogenesis in soc1ful woody Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Davin, Nicolas; Edger, Patrick P; Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Schuetz, Mathias; Smets, Erik; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Schranz, Michael E; Lens, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Many plant genes are known to be involved in the development of cambium and wood, but how the expression and functional interaction of these genes determine the unique biology of wood remains largely unknown. We used the soc1ful loss of function mutant - the woodiest genotype known in the otherwise herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis - to investigate the expression and interactions of genes involved in secondary growth (wood formation). Detailed anatomical observations of the stem in combination with mRNA sequencing were used to assess transcriptome remodeling during xylogenesis in wild-type and woody soc1ful plants. To interpret the transcriptome changes, we constructed functional gene association networks of differentially expressed genes using the STRING database. This analysis revealed functionally enriched gene association hubs that are differentially expressed in herbaceous and woody tissues. In particular, we observed the differential expression of genes related to mechanical stress and jasmonate biosynthesis/signaling during wood formation in soc1ful plants that may be an effect of greater tension within woody tissues. Our results suggest that habit shifts from herbaceous to woody life forms observed in many angiosperm lineages could have evolved convergently by genetic changes that modulate the gene expression and interaction network, and thereby redeploy the conserved wood developmental program. PMID:26952251

  4. Cheatgrass invasion and woody species encroachment in the Great Basin: benefits of conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Great Basin is the largest North American desert covering more than 122.5 million acres. Two of the biggest threats to ecosystem stability and integrity in the Great Basin are invasive annual grasses and expansion of native woody plants. The alteration of native plant communities by these invas...

  5. Changes in Microbial Community Structure and Carbon Utilization Patterns in Response to Woody Encroachment into Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, C. A.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    Land cover changes occurring in dryland ecosystems, such as woody encroachment, can moderate microbial activity and alter the flow of C and N between litter and soil, ultimately impacting soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics. We analyzed the quantity and isotopic composition of microbial phospholipids along a grassland-to-woodland successional chronosequence in southern Texas to determine how microbial community structure and SOC utilization patterns responded to the extent of woody encroachment across two sampling seasons (Spring and Fall). Woody encroachment resulted in significant increases in total microbial biomass and fungal:bacterial ratios along with significant decreases in the ratio of gram-positive:gram-negative bacteria. Compound-specific 13C analysis of microbial phospholipids revealed that gram-negative bacteria and fungi were preferentially utilizing newer, C3-derived inputs, while other microbial groups generally showed no preferential incorporation of newer or older C. This preferential use of newer C in gram-negative bacteria and fungi, combined with their increasing relative abundance, reveals that these microbial groups are most responsive to biogeochemical changes elicited by woody encroachment, potentially to enhanced rhizosphere development or changes in the chemical stability of C inputs. This research provides important information regarding the links between changing plant cover, SOC accrual, and microbial activity in response to a globally relevant environmental perturbation.

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN WOODY DEBRIS AND FISH HABITAT IN A SMALL WARMWATER STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abundance of woody debris was manipulated in a small Illinois stream to determine the importance of this material to fish. When a stream reach was divided along midchannel, and debris was added to one side, but removed from the other, fish and benthic invertebrates were usually m...

  7. Is Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder a Disturbance of Security Motivation? Comment on Szechtman and Woody (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven; McKay, Dean; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    H. Szechtman and E. Woody proposed that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is caused by a malfunctioning brain security motivation system. In the current article, the authors' review of the model suggests that it is limited in the following ways: (a) It is built on a selective review of the empirical literature, (b) it offers no explanation for…

  8. [Frost-resistance of subtropical evergreen woody plants: an evaluation based on plant functional traits].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Lu; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Yue; Xie, Yi-Ming; Wang, Liang-Yan; Yan, En-Rong

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the frost-resistance of evergreen woody plants is of significance in guiding the species selection in forest management in subtropical region. In this paper, an investigation was made on the functional traits (including specific leaf area, stem wood density, leaf area, leaf dry matter content, leaf relative electrical conductance, and twig wood density) of 64 common evergreen broad-leaved and coniferous woody plant species in the Ningbo region of Zhejiang Province, East China, after a severe snowstorm in early 2008, aimed to select the evergreen woody plants with high ability of freeze-tolerance, and to establish a related evaluation system. By using a hierarchy analysis approach, the weight values of the functional traits of each species were determined, and an index system for evaluating the plants tolerance ability against freeze and mechanical damage was established. Based on this system, 23 evergreen plant species with high tolerance ability against freeze and mechanical damage, such as Cyclobalanopsis gilva, Cyclobalanopsis nubium, Neolitsea aurata, and Vacciniuim mandarinorum, were selected. In the meantime, on the basis of the ordering with each of the functional traits, the ordering of the tolerance ability of the 64 plant species against freeze and mechanical damage was made, and a list for the frost-resistance ability of the subtropical evergreen woody plant species in Ningbo region was constituted. PMID:23479868

  9. A Computer-Based Multimedia Instruction Program for Woody Plant Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiler, J. R.; Peterson, J. A.; Taylor, C. D.; Feret, P. P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a multimedia-based program designed to provide students with a self-paced study of woody plants using color images of twigs, leaves, bark, fruit, and flowers. The program uses Authorware, software that can be used on both Macintosh- and Windows-compatible platforms. This program is intended for use as a supplement to field-study…

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF LARGE WOODY DEBRIS IN STREAM REHABILITATION PROJECTS IN URBAN BASINS. (R825284)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban stream rehabilitation projects commonly include log placement to establish the types of habitat features associated with large woody debris (LWD) in undisturbed streams. Six urban in-stream rehabilitation projects were examined in the Puget Sound Lowland of western Washi...

  11. Ecohydrological Consequences of Shifts in Grass-to-Woody Plant Dominance in Water Limited Ecosystems 1916

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in the representation of woody plants in historic grasslands has been a wide-spread recent phenomena in the drylands of North America. The consequences of this vegetation change for ecosystem services are uncertain and likely related to how soil-plant interactions are influenced by preci...

  12. Simulating impacts of Woody Biomass Harvesting on North Temperate Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, D.; Desai, A. R.; Bolstad, P.; Cook, B. D.; Scheller, R.

    2012-12-01

    Woody biomass harvesting is a common feature of forest management given its importance to society for acquisition of pulp and paper, lumber, and wood-based biofuel. Harvest affects many aspects of the forest environment such as biodiversity, soil nutrient quality, physical properties of soil, water quality, wildlife habitat, and climate feedbacks. In this study, we applied a modified CENTURY model to the Willow Creek, Wisconsin Ameriflux site for simulation of the impacts of woody biomass removal on forest carbon and nitrogen storage. Woody biomass harvesting scenarios with different harvesting types, interval, tree species, and soil properties were designed and tested in the model to explore the impact of harvesting on forest productivity, soil and biomass carbon and nitrogen storage, and net carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere. Comparisons of the impacts among harvesting scenarios indicate that woody biomass harvesting significantly alters long-term net soil carbon and nitrogen storage as well as carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere. The simulation results also provide a framework for incorporating carbon management into sustainable forest management practices.

  13. Resistance to root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne spp. in woody plants.

    PubMed

    Saucet, Simon Bernard; Van Ghelder, Cyril; Abad, Pierre; Duval, Henri; Esmenjaud, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    I. 42 II. 43 III. 44 IV. 47 V. 49 VI. 50 VII. 50 VIII. 50 IX. 52 52 References 52 SUMMARY: Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) Meloidogyne spp. cause major damage to cultivated woody plants. Among them, Prunus, grapevine and coffee are the crops most infested by worldwide polyphagous species and species with a more limited distribution and/or narrower host range. The identification and characterization of natural sources of resistance are important steps to develop RKN control strategies. In woody crops, resistant rootstocks genetically different from the scion of agronomical interest may be engineered. We describe herein the interactions between RKNs and different woody crops, and highlight the plant species in which resistance and corresponding resistance (R) genes have been discovered. Even though grapevine and, to a lesser extent, coffee have a history of rootstock selection for RKN resistance, few cases of resistance have been documented. By contrast, in Prunus, R genes with different spectra have been mapped in plums, peach and almond and can be pyramided for durable resistance in interspecific rootstocks. We particularly discuss here the Ma Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-like-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat gene from Myrobalan plum, one of the longest plant R genes cloned to date, due to its unique biological and structural properties. RKN R genes in Prunus will enable us to carry out molecular studies aimed at improving our knowledge of plant immunity in woody plants. PMID:27128375

  14. PRODUCTION OF QUALITY WOODY AND FLORAL CROPS USING INNOVATIVE PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For woody plants, accelerating seed germination by breaking seed dormancy and controlling flowering to bypass the juvenile period is a key to producing a quality plant in the shortest possible time. Germination of mature seeds of Styrax japonicus, as investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, was ...

  15. Soil carbon and nitrogen across a chronosequence of woody plant expansion in North Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Woody plant expansion has been documented on grasslands worldwide as a result of overgrazing and fire suppression, but the changes in ecosystem structure and function accompanying this phenomenon have yet to be extensively studied in the temperate semi-arid grasslands of North America. The primary o...

  16. HYDROLOGICAL IMPACTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT IN ARID AND SEMIARID GRASSLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Woody plants may be able to access deeper groundwater for year-round transpiration and thus consume more water than grasses, affecting recharge, soil moisture and runoff. Amount of water available to plants from precipitation is determined in part by nfiltration rates into...

  17. Performance of five models to predict the naturalization of non-native woody plants in Iowa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of risk-assessment models that can predict the naturalization and invasion of non-native woody plants is a potentially beneficial approach for protecting human and natural environments. This study validates the power and accuracy of four risk-assessment models previously tested in Iowa, and exa...

  18. MAPPING WOODY PLANT COVER IN DESERT GRASSLANDS USING CANOPY REFLECTANCE MODELING AND MISR DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simplified geometric-optical model (SGM) was inverted using red band reflectance data acquired at 275 m in nine viewing angles from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) flown on NASA’s Terra satellite, to provide estimates of fractional woody plant cover for large areas (over 3519 km2) ...

  19. Status of exotic woody species in big cypress national preserve. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.H.

    1983-12-01

    The current status of exotic woody plants in Big Cypress National Preserve is documented. A map of the distribution of principal pest species, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Schinus terebinthifolius, and Casuarina sp., is presented. Prognoses of population increases of these problem species are determined utilizing the current distributions and assessing environmental conditions. Some potential problem species are also identified.

  20. Lidar-derived estimate and uncertainty of carbon sink in successional phases of woody encroachment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Woody encroachment is a globally occurring phenomenon that is thought to contribute significantly to the global carbon (C) sink. The C contribution needs to be estimated at regional and local scales to address large uncertainties present in the global- and continental-scale estimates and guide regio...

  1. Woody plant establishment in grassed reclamation areas of the Athabasca oil sands

    SciTech Connect

    Fedkenheuer, A.W.

    1980-12-01

    The primary end land use for areas disturbed by the Syncrude Canada Ltd. oil sands surface mining venture is forest cover. Short term erosion control is of concern, however, and this results in the early establishment of a grass and legume cover. Problems have subsequently been encountered in attempts to establish woody plants in the grass and legume cover. Vegetation competition for soil moisture and nutrients and rodent damage to woody seedlings have been the major problem areas. A study was initiated in 1978 to evaluate methods of manipulating the grass and legume cover sufficiently to improve success rates in establishing a variety of shrubs and trees. Five replicated treatments using the chemical herbicide glyphosate, soil scarification and fire alone plus soil scarification were established on an area seeded to grass and legumes in spring 1976. Woody plant survival and rodent damage, populations and distribution are being assessed annually in spring and fall. Rodent damage to woody seedlings was heavy in fall 1978 with 80 percent of the deciduous seedlings on non-scarified plots being damaged. In June 1979, 98 percent of the deciduous plants on the control and herbicide treatment areas were damaged. Damage to conifers was approximately 30 percent less during this time. Prescribed burning and mechanical scarification substantially reduced rodent damage. Seedling survival was variable with Amelanchier alnifolia, Pinus contorta and Populus tremuloides consistently exhibiting the highest survival rates.

  2. Impacts of grazing, fire, and precipitation variability on woody plant cover expansion in semi-arid grasslands of southeastern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'neal, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Northern Chihuahuan semi-arid grasslands are highly managed systems supporting rich biodiversity and many endemic species as well as providing a valuable economic resource for cattle-ranching livelihoods, with 90% of grasslands open to grazing. Chihuahuan grasslands share many characteristics with other managed grazing systems, which occupy 25% of the global land surface and are the most extensive form of land use. These grasslands are experiencing land-cover modification from woody plant cover expansion, leading to diminished biodiversity and grazing capacity. Ongoing research indicates that grazing, fire suppression, and precipitation variability are the primary drivers causing increased woody plant cover in Chihuahuan grasslands; however, there is debate concerning the dominant driver. While it is understood that historical land use and climate variation have facilitated initial woody encroachment in the region, the current relative influence of the three drivers remains unclear. This research explores how grazing, fire/suppression, and seasonal precipitation variability influence woody plant cover in the semi-arid grasslands of southeastern Arizona and identifies the dominant driver behind observed changes. This research used the Landsat Thematic Mapper record from 1984 to 2008 to map changes in woody plant cover and identify spatial patterns and temporal trends of woody plant cover expansion. Spectral mixture analysis (SMA) was used to quantify the percent of woody plant cover in each pixel; trend analysis was used to track per-pixel changes over the time-series. Trend analysis was further refined by segmenting trends around fire events to accommodate abrupt and non-monotonic effects of fire on woody plant cover. The overall trend in the region shows increasing woody plant cover with most values ranging between 5-20% over the 25-year period and significant spatial variability in expansion amounts across the region. The Random Forests decision tree approach was

  3. Changes in soil phosphorus fractions following woody plant invasion of grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, I. B.; Boutton, T. W.; Filley, T. R.; Hallmark, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    Many grass-dominated ecosystems around the world have experienced woody plant encroachment over the last century due to livestock grazing, fire suppression, and/or changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry. In the Rio Grande Plains of Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by N-fixing tree legumes have largely replaced grasslands and altered the biogeochemistry of this region. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of this grassland-to-woodland transition on the size, distribution, and availability of soil P pools. A modified Hedley method was employed to fractionate soil P into pools based on organic and inorganic forms and relative plant-availability. Soil samples (0-10 cm) were collected in remnant grasslands and near the centers of woody plant clusters ranging in age from 14 to 86 years in a subtropical savanna parkland in southern Texas. Soil P was fractionated into resin-extractable inorganic P, bicarbonate-extractable organic and inorganic P, hydroxide-extractable organic and inorganic P, acid-extractable inorganic P, and residual inorganic P forms. P concentrations in these fractions were determined by colorimetry, and soil total P was determined by lithium fusion. Organic P was calculated from the difference between total and inorganic P. Total P in whole soils increased dramatically from 102 mg P/kg soil in remnant grasslands to 166 mg P/kg soil in the oldest woody plant stands (70-85 years). P concentrations in all pools increased linearly with increasing woody plant stand age except acid-extractable phosphorus. The most dramatic increases were observed in the resin-extractable fraction (plant-available P), which increased from 3 to 13 mg P/kg soil, and in hydroxide-extractable P (the majority of the organic P in the system), which increased from 15 mg P/kg soil in grasslands to 26 mg P/kg soil in the wooded clusters. Although the exact mechanisms by which soil P increases following woody invasion remain unknown, we suggest that the

  4. Changes in Soil Phosphorus Fractions Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutton, T. W.; Kantola, I. B.; Filley, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Many grass-dominated ecosystems around the world have experienced woody plant encroachment over the last century due to livestock grazing, fire suppression, and/or changes in climate and atmospheric chemistry. In the Rio Grande Plains of Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by N-fixing tree legumes have largely replaced grasslands and altered the biogeochemistry of this region. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of this grassland-to-woodland transition on the size, distribution, and availability of soil P pools. A modified Hedley method was employed to fractionate soil P into pools based on organic and inorganic forms and relative plant-availability. Soil samples (0-10 cm) were collected in remnant grasslands and near the centers of woody plant clusters ranging in age from 14 to 86 yrs in a subtropical savanna parkland in southern Texas. Soil P was fractionated into resin-extractable inorganic P, bicarbonate-extractable organic and inorganic P, hydroxide-extractable organic and inorganic P, acid-extractable inorganic P, and residual inorganic P forms. P concentrations in these fractions were determined by colorimetry, and soil total P was determined by lithium fusion. Organic P was calculated from the difference between total and inorganic P. Total P in whole soils increased dramatically from 98 mg P kg-1 soil in remnant grasslands to 168 mg P kg-1 soil in the oldest woody plant stands (70-85 yrs). P concentrations in all pools increased linearly with increasing woody plant stand age except acid-extractable phosphorus. The most dramatic increases were observed in the resin-extractable fraction (plant-available P), which increased from 3 to 13 mg P kg-1 soil, and in hydroxide-extractable P (the majority of the organic P in the system), which increased from 15 mg P kg-1 soil in grasslands to 26 mg P kg-1 soil in the wooded clusters. Although the exact mechanisms by which soil P increases following woody invasion remain unknown, we suggest that

  5. Carbon Exchange and Water Use in Karst Landscapes: Impact of Woody Encroachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Litvak, M. E.

    2008-05-01

    Woody plant invasion into grasslands and savannas, and its impact on water use are critical issues in karst landscapes because 25% of the world's population obtains its water from karst aquifers. It is well documented that woody encroachment increases carbon sequestration, but its impact on water use is less clear. It is widely presumed that woody plants increase evapotranspiration (ET), in part because deep root systems provide access to a more stable supply of water than what is available to grasses. If this is true, woody encroachment should reduce the sensitivity of carbon exchange and ET to rainfall pulses and water deficits, and vulnerability to drought. Since 2004, we have been investigating, via eddy covariance, carbon exchange and water use on a grassland, a savanna with approximately 35% woody cover, and a dense live oak-Ashe juniper forest on the karst Edwards Plateau in south and west central Texas. The Plateau is a 93,000 km2 karst ecoregion that is dominated by live oak-Ashe juniper savannas underlain by mixed C3/C4 grasses, and soils are generally shallow. The Plateau contains the Edwards Aquifer which supplies drinking water to over 2 million people, and is home to a number of threatened and endangered species, many of them aquatic. Populations of juniper are expanding due to suppression of wildfires, and public funds are being spent to remove juniper in an attempt to increase water availability. Our measurements show large differences in carbon sequestration among the ecosystems (highest in savanna and lowest in grassland), and small differences in ET (~0.2 mm day-1 higher in the forest than in the grassland). We attribute increased ET to increases in net radiation, and proportionally greater partitioning of available energy into sensible heat flux at the expense of latent heat flux. We found little differences in response of carbon exchange and ET to rainfall and water deficits, regardless of the amount of woody cover, intensity of rainfall, or

  6. Meat quality of broiler breast fillets with white striping and woody breast muscle myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tijare, V V; Yang, F L; Kuttappan, V A; Alvarado, C Z; Coon, C N; Owens, C M

    2016-09-01

    The global poultry industry has been faced with emerging broiler breast meat quality issues including conditions known as white striping (WS, white striations parallel to muscle fibers) and woody breast (WB, hardness of raw fillet). Experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of WS and WB hardness on meat quality traits in broiler breast fillets. In Exp. 1, birds were processed at approximately 9 wk of age and deboned at 4 h postmortem (PM); in Exp. 2, birds were processed at approximately 6 and 9 wk of age and deboned at 2 h PM. Fillets were categorized as: normal for both white striping and woody breast (NORM); moderate for white striping and mild for woody breast (MILD); severe for white striping and mild for woody breast (WS); severe for woody breast and moderate for white striping (WB); or severe for both white striping and woody breast (BOTH). Sarcomere length, gravimetric fragmentation index, marination uptake, cook loss, and Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy (MORSE) values on non-marinated and marinated fillets were assessed. Sarcomeres tended to be longer (P = 0.07) with increasing severity of WS and WB in both experiments and gravimetric fragmentation index did not differ (P > 0.05) among categories. Marinade uptake decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing severity of WS and WB. Cook losses of non-marinated and marinated fillets were greatest (P < 0.05) in the BOTH category. Even though MORSE values did not differ (P > 0.05) in non-marinated fillets, the marinated BOTH fillets had greater MORSE values (P < 0.05) than other categories of fillets in Exp. 1. Non-marinated NORM fillets had greater (P < 0.05) MORSE values than the other categories at 6 wk age; however, MORSE values did not differ (P > 0.05) among categories of marinated breasts. At 9 wk, WS and BOTH were higher (P < 0.05) in MORSE compared to NORM for non-marinated fillets, but similar to NORM marinated fillets. Results suggest that severe degrees of white striping and woody breast

  7. Long-term livestock exclusion facilitates native woody plant encroachment in a sandy semiarid rangeland

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Liu, Wei; Xu, Hong; Wang, Zongshuai; Zhang, Huifang; Hu, Haixiao; Li, Yonggeng

    2015-01-01

    The role of livestock grazing in regulating woody cover and biomass in grass-dominant systems is well recognized. However, the way in which woody plant populations in respond when livestock are removed from grazing in the absence of other disturbances, such as fire, remains unclear. We conducted a 10-year, replicated fencing experiment in a sandy semiarid rangeland in northern China (which has a mean annual rainfall of 365 mm), where fires have been actively suppressed for decades. Fencing dramatically influenced the growth and age structure of the native tree species, Ulmus pumila, which is the sole dominant tree in the area. After a decade, the density of the U. pumila tree population in the fencing plots increased doubly and canopy cover increased triply. The proportion of both saplings (U2) and young trees (U3) increased in fencing plots but decreased in grazing plots after the 10-year treatment period. The effects of fencing on U. pumila trees varied by age class, with potential implications for the future structure of the U. pumila tree community. Decadal fencing led to approximately 80-fold increase in recruitment and a nearly 2.5-fold decrease in the mortality of both U2 and U3. Further, livestock grazing generated a “browsing trap” to the recruitment of both U2 and U3, and had a small impact on the mortality of old trees. A long-term, fencing-driven shift in woody species composition was mediated via its effects on both recruitment and mortality rates. Synthesis and applications. Our results demonstrate that in the long-term absence of both fire and livestock, native woody plant encroachment tends to occur in sandy rangelands, transforming the woody plant demography in the process. The feasibility of full livestock exclusion in sandy rangelands requires further discussion. A balanced amount of livestock grazing may provide critical ecosystem services by regulating woody cover and mediating woody plant encroachment. PMID:26120433

  8. Effects of topoclimatic complexity on the composition of woody plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Oldfather, Meagan F.; Britton, Matthew N.; Papper, Prahlad D.; Koontz, Michael J.; Halbur, Michelle M.; Dodge, Celeste; Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorriane E.; Ackerly, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Topography can create substantial environmental variation at fine spatial scales. Shaped by slope, aspect, hill-position and elevation, topoclimate heterogeneity may increase ecological diversity, and act as a spatial buffer for vegetation responding to climate change. Strong links have been observed between climate heterogeneity and species diversity at broader scales, but the importance of topoclimate for woody vegetation across small spatial extents merits closer examination. We established woody vegetation monitoring plots in mixed evergreen-deciduous woodlands that spanned topoclimate gradients of a topographically heterogeneous landscape in northern California. We investigated the association between the structure of adult and regenerating size classes of woody vegetation and multidimensional topoclimate at a fine scale. We found a significant effect of topoclimate on both single-species distributions and community composition. Effects of topoclimate were evident in the regenerating size class for all dominant species (four Quercus spp., Umbellularia californica and Pseudotsuga menziesii) but only in two dominant species (Quercus agrifolia and Quercus garryana) for the adult size class. Adult abundance was correlated with water balance parameters (e.g. climatic water deficit) and recruit abundance was correlated with an interaction between the topoclimate parameters and conspecific adult abundance (likely reflecting local seed dispersal). However, in all cases, the topoclimate signal was weak. The magnitude of environmental variation across our study site may be small relative to the tolerance of long-lived woody species. Dispersal limitations, management practices and patchy disturbance regimes also may interact with topoclimate, weakening its influence on woody vegetation distributions. Our study supports the biological relevance of multidimensional topoclimate for mixed woodland communities, but highlights that this relationship might be mediated by

  9. Evaluating nurse plants for restoring native woody species to degraded subtropical woodlands

    PubMed Central

    Yelenik, Stephanie G; DiManno, Nicole; D'Antonio, Carla M

    2015-01-01

    Harsh habitats dominated by invasive species are difficult to restore. Invasive grasses in arid environments slow succession toward more desired composition, yet grass removal exacerbates high light and temperature, making the use of “nurse plants” an appealing strategy. In this study of degraded subtropical woodlands dominated by alien grasses in Hawai'i, we evaluated whether individuals of two native (Dodonaea viscosa, Leptocophylla tameiameia) and one non-native (Morella faya) woody species (1) act as natural nodes of recruitment for native woody species and (2) can be used to enhance survivorship of outplanted native woody species. To address these questions, we quantified the presence and persistence of seedlings naturally recruiting beneath adult nurse shrubs and compared survival and growth of experimentally outplanted seedlings of seven native woody species under the nurse species compared to intact and cleared alien-grass plots. We found that the two native nurse shrubs recruit their own offspring, but do not act as establishment nodes for other species. Morella faya recruited even fewer seedlings than native shrubs. Thus, outplanting will be necessary to increase abundance and diversity of native woody species. Outplant survival was the highest under shrubs compared to away from them with few differences between nurse species. The worst habitat for native seedling survival and growth was within the unmanaged invasive grass matrix. Although the two native nurse species did not differentially affect outplant survival, D. viscosa is the most widespread and easily propagated and is thus more likely to be useful as an initial nurse species. The outplanted species showed variable responses to nurse habitats that we attribute to resource requirements resulting from their typical successional stage and nitrogen fixation capability. PMID:25709807

  10. Net changes in aboveground woody carbon stock in western juniper woodlands, 1946-1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Eva K.; Vierling, Lee A.; Smith, Alistair M. S.; Bunting, Stephen C.

    2008-03-01

    Although regional increases in woody plant cover in semiarid ecosystems have been identified as a worldwide phenomenon affecting the global carbon budget, quantifying the impact of these vegetation shifts on C pools and fluxes is challenging. Challenges arise because woody encroachment is governed by ecological processes that occur at fine spatial resolutions (1-10 m) and, in many cases, at slow (decadal-scale) temporal rates over large areas. We therefore analyzed time series aerial photography, which exhibits both the necessary spatial precision and temporal extent, to quantify the expansion of western juniper into sagebrush steppe landscapes in southwestern Idaho. We established upper and lower bounds of aboveground woody carbon change across the landscape via two-dimensional spatial wavelet analysis, image texture analysis, and field data collection. Forty-eight 100-ha blocks across a 330,000-ha region were stratified by topography, soil characteristics, and land stewardship for analyses. Across the area we estimate aboveground woody carbon accumulation rates of 3.3 gCm-2yr-1 and 10.0 gCm-2yr-1 using the wavelet and texture method, respectively, during the time period 1946-1998. Carbon accumulation rates were significantly affected by soil properties and were highly dependent on the spatial and temporal scales of analysis. For example, at a 100-ha scale the aboveground carbon accumulation varied from -1.7 to 9.9 gCm-2yr-1, while at the 1-ha scale the range of variability increased to -11 to 22 gCm-2yr-1. These values are an order of magnitude lower than those previously suggested due to woody encroachment, highlighting the need for examining multiple spatial scales when accounting for changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  11. Evaluating nurse plants for restoring native woody species to degraded subtropical woodlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yelenik, Stephanie G.; DiManno, Nicole; D’Antonio, Carla M.

    2015-01-01

    Harsh habitats dominated by invasive species are difficult to restore. Invasive grasses in arid environments slow succession toward more desired composition, yet grass removal exacerbates high light and temperature, making the use of “nurse plants” an appealing strategy. In this study of degraded subtropical woodlands dominated by alien grasses in Hawai'i, we evaluated whether individuals of two native (Dodonaea viscosa, Leptocophylla tameiameia) and one non-native (Morella faya) woody species (1) act as natural nodes of recruitment for native woody species and (2) can be used to enhance survivorship of outplanted native woody species. To address these questions, we quantified the presence and persistence of seedlings naturally recruiting beneath adult nurse shrubs and compared survival and growth of experimentally outplanted seedlings of seven native woody species under the nurse species compared to intact and cleared alien-grass plots. We found that the two native nurse shrubs recruit their own offspring, but do not act as establishment nodes for other species. Morella faya recruited even fewer seedlings than native shrubs. Thus, outplanting will be necessary to increase abundance and diversity of native woody species. Outplant survival was the highest under shrubs compared to away from them with few differences between nurse species. The worst habitat for native seedling survival and growth was within the unmanaged invasive grass matrix. Although the two native nurse species did not differentially affect outplant survival, D. viscosa is the most widespread and easily propagated and is thus more likely to be useful as an initial nurse species. The outplanted species showed variable responses to nurse habitats that we attribute to resource requirements resulting from their typical successional stage and nitrogen fixation capability.

  12. Effects of topoclimatic complexity on the composition of woody plant communities.

    PubMed

    Oldfather, Meagan F; Britton, Matthew N; Papper, Prahlad D; Koontz, Michael J; Halbur, Michelle M; Dodge, Celeste; Flint, Alan L; Flint, Lorriane E; Ackerly, David D

    2016-01-01

    Topography can create substantial environmental variation at fine spatial scales. Shaped by slope, aspect, hill-position and elevation, topoclimate heterogeneity may increase ecological diversity, and act as a spatial buffer for vegetation responding to climate change. Strong links have been observed between climate heterogeneity and species diversity at broader scales, but the importance of topoclimate for woody vegetation across small spatial extents merits closer examination. We established woody vegetation monitoring plots in mixed evergreen-deciduous woodlands that spanned topoclimate gradients of a topographically heterogeneous landscape in northern California. We investigated the association between the structure of adult and regenerating size classes of woody vegetation and multidimensional topoclimate at a fine scale. We found a significant effect of topoclimate on both single-species distributions and community composition. Effects of topoclimate were evident in the regenerating size class for all dominant species (four Quercus spp., Umbellularia californica and Pseudotsuga menziesii) but only in two dominant species (Quercus agrifolia and Quercus garryana) for the adult size class. Adult abundance was correlated with water balance parameters (e.g. climatic water deficit) and recruit abundance was correlated with an interaction between the topoclimate parameters and conspecific adult abundance (likely reflecting local seed dispersal). However, in all cases, the topoclimate signal was weak. The magnitude of environmental variation across our study site may be small relative to the tolerance of long-lived woody species. Dispersal limitations, management practices and patchy disturbance regimes also may interact with topoclimate, weakening its influence on woody vegetation distributions. Our study supports the biological relevance of multidimensional topoclimate for mixed woodland communities, but highlights that this relationship might be mediated by

  13. Perspectives on screening winter-flood-tolerant woody species in the riparian protection forests of the three gorges reservoir.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yong; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of riparian protection forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) is an ideal measure to cope with the eco-environmental problems of the water-level fluctuation zone (WLFZ). Thus, the information for screening winter-flood-tolerant woody plant species is useful for the recovery and re-establishment of the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ. Therefore, we discussed the possibilities of constructing and popularizing riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ from several aspects, including the woody plant species distribution in the WLFZ, the survival rate analyses of suitable candidate woody species under controlled flooding conditions, the survival rate investigation of some woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, and the physiological responses of some woody plant species during the recovery stage after winter floods. The results of woody species investigation showed that most woody plant species that existed as annual seedlings in the TGR WLFZ are not suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests. However, arbor species (e.g., Salix matsudana, Populus×canadensis, Morus alba, Pterocarya stenoptera, Taxodium ascendens, and Metasequoia glyptostroboides) and shrub species (e.g., Salix variegata, Distylium chinensis, Lycium chinense, Myricaria laxiflora, and Rosa multiflora) might be considered suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ by survival rate analyses under controlled winter flooding conditions, and survival rate investigations of woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, respectively. Physiological analyses showed that P.×canadensis, M. alba, L. chinense, and S. variegata could develop specific self-repairing mechanisms to stimulate biomass accumulation and carbohydrate synthesis via the increases in chlorophyll pigments and photosynthesis during recovery after winter floods. Our results suggested these woody plant species could endure the winter flooding stress and recover well

  14. Perspectives on Screening Winter-Flood-Tolerant Woody Species in the Riparian Protection Forests of the Three Gorges Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yong; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-01-01

    The establishment of riparian protection forests in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) is an ideal measure to cope with the eco-environmental problems of the water-level fluctuation zone (WLFZ). Thus, the information for screening winter-flood-tolerant woody plant species is useful for the recovery and re-establishment of the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ. Therefore, we discussed the possibilities of constructing and popularizing riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ from several aspects, including the woody plant species distribution in the WLFZ, the survival rate analyses of suitable candidate woody species under controlled flooding conditions, the survival rate investigation of some woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, and the physiological responses of some woody plant species during the recovery stage after winter floods. The results of woody species investigation showed that most woody plant species that existed as annual seedlings in the TGR WLFZ are not suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests. However, arbor species (e.g., Salix matsudana, Populus×canadensis, Morus alba, Pterocarya stenoptera, Taxodium ascendens, and Metasequoia glyptostroboides) and shrub species (e.g., Salix variegata, Distylium chinensis, Lycium chinense, Myricaria laxiflora, and Rosa multiflora) might be considered suitable candidates for the riparian protection forests in the TGR WLFZ by survival rate analyses under controlled winter flooding conditions, and survival rate investigations of woody plant species planted in the TGR WLFZ, respectively. Physiological analyses showed that P.×canadensis, M. alba, L. chinense, and S. variegata could develop specific self-repairing mechanisms to stimulate biomass accumulation and carbohydrate synthesis via the increases in chlorophyll pigments and photosynthesis during recovery after winter floods. Our results suggested these woody plant species could endure the winter flooding stress and recover well

  15. Woody fuels reduction in Wyoming big sagebrush communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) ecosystems historically have been subject to disturbances that reduce or remove shrubs primarily by fire, although insect outbreaks and disease have also been important. Depending on site productivity, fire return in...

  16. Woody plant encroachment effect on soil organic carbon dynamics: results from a latitudinal gradient in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellis, Guido; Chiti, Tommaso; Moscatelli, Maria Cristina; Marinari, Sara; Papale, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Woody plant encroachment into pastures and grasslands represents a significant land cover change phenomenon, with a considerable impact on carbon dynamics at an ecosystem level. It was estimated that 7.64% of the Southern Europe land was subject to that process between 1950 to 2010. As a result of woody encroachment, changes in vegetation composition can produce substantial changes to the soil organic carbon (SOC) cycle. Despite the numerous papers published on land-use change, an evaluation of the IPCC terrestrial carbon pools changes occurring during woody encroachment on abandoned pastures and grasslands is still lacking, particularly for the Italian territory. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of woody encroachment on carbon sequestration over abandoned pastures and grasslands in Alpine and Apennine ecosystems, with a particular focus on the SOC. We applied a chronosequence approach to seven selected sites located along a latitudinal gradient in Italy. Each chronosequence consisted of a pasture currently managed, three sites abandoned at different times in the past and, finally, a mature forest stand representing the last phase of the succession. The European Commission sampling protocols to certify SOC changes was adopted to estimate the variations following woody encroachment. Soil samples were collected at different depths in the topsoil (0-30 cm) and subsoil (30-70 cm), despite the original protocol formulation being limited to the topsoil only. In addition, aboveground living biomass (AGB), dead wood and litter were also measured following international protocols. Considering all C pools together, woody plant encroachment leads to a progressive C stock accumulation in all the chronosequences. The total C stock of mature forest stands ranges from 1.78±0.11 times (Eastern Alps) to 2.48±0.31 times (central Apennine) the initial value on pastures. Unsurprisingly, the C stocks of AGB, dead wood and litter all increase during the

  17. Controls on microbial accessibility to soil organic carbon following woody plant encroachment into grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, Courtney; Boutton, Thomas; Olk, Dan; Filley, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Woody plant encroachment (WPE) into savannas and grasslands is a global phenomenon that alters soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics through changes in litter quality and quantity, soil structure, microbial ecology, and hydrology. To elucidate the controls on microbial accessibility to SOC, bulk soils from a chronosequence of progressive WPE into native grasslands at the Texas Agrilife La Copita Research Area were incubated for one year. The quantity and stable carbon isotope composition of respired CO2, and plant biopolymer chemistry in SOC were tracked. Respiration rates declined exponentially over the course of the experiment with 15-25% of the total CO2 respired released in the first month of incubation. Between 8 and 18% of the total SOC was mineralized to CO2 throughout the incubation. After day 84 a significantly (p<0.05) greater portion of SOC was mineralized from soils of older woody clusters (34-86 years) than from soils of younger woody clusters (14-23 years) and the native grassland. Invading woody stands of ≃≥35 years of age represent a transition point in WPE where respiration dynamics become distinct in wooded elements compared to grasslands; this distinction has been previously observed through changes in belowground SOC accrual, C input chemistry, and mycorrhizal productivity. Despite documented SOC accrual following WPE at La Copita, we observed no evidence of enhanced SOC stabilization in these respiration experiments. In fact, a greater proportion of total SOC was lost from the soil of mature woody stands than from young stands, suggesting SOC accumulation observed with WPE may be due to greater input rates or microbial dynamics not captured in the laboratory incubation. Compound-specific analyses indicated there was a significant (p<0.05) loss of C from carbohydrates, amino acids, and amino sugars during the incubation. Amino nitrogen tended to become more concentrated during the incubation, although the trend was not significant. Relatively

  18. Activities of Extracellular Enzymes in Soils Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Stott, D. E.; Dooling, V.; Sorg, L.; Boutton, T.

    2008-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes produced by microbes and immobilize in the soil environment are the principle means by which complex plant and microbial compounds are degraded. The concentration of these enzymes and their ability to interact with litter and soil organic matter contributes both to the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon. We quantified the activities of three extracellular enzymes, B-glucosidase, B- glucosaminidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and a general marker for hydrolytic activity through fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity, in a subtropical savanna parkland in southern Texas where woody plants have invaded a once open grassland. Previous research has demonstrated that areas which have shifted to woody vegetation are accruing soil carbon, undergoing a dramatic shift in the chemistry of plant input, and increasing in hyphal biomass. Soils were obtained along a successional chronosequence from grassland dominated by C4 grasses to woody patches dominated by C3 trees/shrubs in Oct 2006 and stored immediately frozen until thawing for enzyme assay. Most enzymes, with the exception of PPO, show distinct behavior when comparing grassland and clusters in that grasslands exhibit far lower mass normalized activity than clusters and no activity trend with respect to age of the adjacent cluster. Both FDA and B- glucosaminidase activities are positively correlated with the age of the woody clusters and increase their activity by as much as 10-fold across the age gradient from 14 yr to 86 yr old clusters. The cellulose degrading enzyme, B-glucosidase, always exhibited greater activity (1.5 -4 fold) in woody clusters than in grasslands, but did not exhibit a trend with increasing cluster age. The PPO activity is anomalous in that there is no quantitative difference in mass normalized activity between grassland and cluster and no trend with cluster age. The results for the FDA and B-glucosaminidase assays are consistent with concurrent studies

  19. Woody Plant Research of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Wright, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    This article describes some of the research of the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program at ORNL. The focus of the research is to produce wood crops that are highly productive under short rotations with minimal inputs. The research combines the disciplines of forestry and traditional genetics, with the new techniques of molecular biology and plant physiology to develop high yield, stress, insect and disease resistant tree crops adaptable to large scale field trials. 4 figs.

  20. Size of coarse woody debris 5 years after girdling and removal treatments in 50-year-old Loblolly PIne Plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. Boyd

    2004-01-01

    PP 108 -113 in: Connor, Kristina F., ed. 2004. Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 594 p. Abstract: In 1996, a study began at Savannah River Site to investigate large-scale replicated forest areas to control coarse woody debris for integrated biodiversity objectives. Research design was a randomized complete block with four treatments replicated in four blocks, resulting in 16 plots. The treatments applied to 50-year-old loblolly pine stands were (1) control, (2) girdling of 25 percent of trees to create catastrophic simulation, (3) annual removal of down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter, and (4) annual removal of both standing and down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter. The study tracks coarse woody debris recruitment and loading, rates of decomposition, and effects on the forest ecosystem.

  1. Cross-stratified Wood: Enigmatic Woody Debris Deposits in Warm-Polar Fluvial Sediments (Pliocene Beaufort Formation, Nunavut)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N. S.; Gosse, J. C.; Rybczynski, N.

    2012-04-01

    Woody debris has been an important sediment component and a significant geomorphic agent in pristine fluvial systems since the Devonian. In recent years a large volume of research has focussed on various aspects of the importance of woody debris within the fluvial realm; from the evolutionary significance of fossil wood accumulations in the rock record to studies of the biogeomorphological and ecological importance of woody debris in modern rivers. In this presentation we describe cross-stratified woody debris deposits comprising organic detritus from a boreal-type treeline forest that included species of pine, birch, poplar, alder, spruce, eastern cedar, and larch, in both shrub and tree form. The cross-stratified wood is an enigmatic subset of fine woody debris which, to our knowledge, has never before been described from either the global stratigraphic record or modern fluvial environments. The deposits we describe are located within the Pliocene Beaufort Formation on Meighen Island, Nunavut, Canada, at a latitude of 80°N, and are compared with other cross-stratified woody debris deposits that have been noted elsewhere in the Pliocene of the Canadian Arctic. We make the robust observation that these deposits appear to be geographically and stratigraphically restricted to polar latitudes from a period of warm climatic conditions during the Pliocene (15-20 °C warmer mean annual temperature than the present day). In this regard it is possible to speculate that the transport of large amounts of woody debris as bedload is potentially a unique feature of forested high latitude rivers. Such bedload deposition requires a large amount of woody debris with a greater density than the fluid transporting it. The softwood composition of the debris suggests that this was most likely attained by saturation and subsequent entrainment of extensive accumulations of deadwood, promoted by unusually high rates of tree mortality and low rates of bacterial decomposition arising from

  2. Effect of long-term understory prescribed burning on standing and down dead woody material in dry upland oak forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polo, John A.; Hallgren, S.W.; Leslie,, David M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Dead woody material, long ignored or viewed as a nuisance for forest management, has gained appreciation for its many roles in the forest including wildlife habitat, nutrient storage and cycling, energy for trophic webs, protection of soil, fuel for fire and carbon storage. The growing interest in managing dead woody material has created strong demand for greater understanding of factors controlling amounts and turnover. Prescribed burning, an important management tool, may have strong effects of dead woody material given fire’s capacity to create and consume dead woody material. We determined effects of long-term understory prescribed burning on standing and down woody material in upland oak forests in south-central North America. We hypothesized that as frequency of fire increased in these stands the amount of deadwood would decrease and the fine woody material would decrease more rapidly than coarse woody material. The study was conducted in forests dominated by post oak (Quercus stellata) and blackjack oak (Quercus marilandica) in wildlife management areas where understory prescribed burning had been practiced for over 20 years and the range of burn frequencies was 0 (unburned) fires per decade (FPD) to 4.6 FPD. The amount of deadwood was low compared with more productive forests in southeastern North America. The biomass (24.7 Mg ha-1) and carbon stocks (11.7 Mg ha-1) were distributed among standing dead (22%), coarse woody debris (CWD, dia. > 7.5 cm., 12%), fine woody debris (FWD, dia. < 7.5 cm., 23%), and forest floor (43%). There was no evidence that understory prescribed burning influenced the amount and size distribution of standing and down dead woody material. There were two explanations for the lack of a detectable effect. First, a high incidence of severe weather including ice storms and strong winds that produce large amounts of deadwood intermittently in an irregular pattern across the landscape may preclude detecting a strong effect of understory

  3. Demonstration of the BioBaler harvesting system for collection of small-diameter woody biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Langholtz, Matthew H; Caffrey, Kevin R; Barnett, Elliott J; Webb, Erin; Brummette, Mark W; Downing, Mark

    2011-12-01

    As part of a project to investigate sustainable forest management practices for producing wood chips on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the ORNL steam plant, the BioBaler was tested in various Oak Ridge locations in August of 2011. The purpose of these tests and the subsequent economic analysis was to determine the potential of this novel woody biomass harvesting method for collection of small-diameter, low value woody biomass. Results suggest that opportunities may exist for economical harvest of low-value and liability or negative-cost biomass. (e.g., invasives). This could provide the ORR and area land managers with a tool to produce feedstock while improving forest health, controlling problem vegetation, and generating local employment.

  4. Application of Buckmaster Electrolyte Ion Leakage Test to Woody Biofuel Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Thomas F; Dooley, James H

    2014-08-28

    In an earlier ASABE paper, Buckmaster reported that ion conductivity of biomass leachate in aqueous solution was directly correlated with activity access to plant nutrients within the biomass materials for subsequent biological or chemical processing. The Buckmaster test involves placing a sample of the particles in a beaker of constant-temperature deionized water and monitoring the change in electrical conductivity over time. We adapted the Buckmaster method to a range of woody biomass and other cellulosic bioenergy feedstocks. Our experimental results suggest differences of electrolyte leakage between differently processed woody biomass particles may be an indicator of their utility for conversion in bioenergy processes. This simple assay appears to be particularly useful to compare different biomass comminution techniques and particle sizes for biochemical preprocessing.

  5. Microsite abundance and distribution of woody seedlings in a South Carolina cypress-tupelo swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Huenneke, L.F.; Sharitz, R.R.

    1986-05-01

    At least 16 types of microsites or substrates for vascular plant seedlings can be distinguished in bald cypress-water tupelo (Taxodium distichum-Nyssa aquatica) swamps. We measured the relative abundances of these microsite types, and the distribution of woody seedlings on them, in two riverine swamp forests on the Savannah River floodplain, South Carolina. Microsite abundances in a little disturbed forest differed significantly from those in a more open stand which had experienced much recent sediment deposition from upstream erosion, as well as higher water temperatures. Woody seedlings were distributed nonrandomly among microsite types (i.e., not in proportion to the abundance of a given microsite type). There were significant differences in microsite distribution patterns among growth forms (tree spp. vs. shrubs vs. vines) and among species within growth form. Many human activities may alter substrate nature and abundance in a wetland, thus indirectly altering the abundance and species composition of seedling recruitment.

  6. Effects of Experimental Manipulations of Course Woody Debris on Sorcids and Other Fauna

    SciTech Connect

    McCay, T.S.; Komoroski, M.J.; Ford, W.M.; Laerm, J.; Reitz, E.J.

    2001-06-10

    The authors studied the relationship between the level of course woody debris in experimental plots of mature loblolly pine and the richness and abundance of shrews, reptiles and amphibians. Comparisons were made between plots in which all down and standing debris were removed and plots that were not treated. Removal of woody debris resulted in a week treatment effect. The capture of southeastern shrews declined through the period perhaps due to drought. The least common shrew demonstrated the strongest effects from removal.In sampling 37 species of amphibians were observed. The Carolina anole and the red salamander were captured more frequently on removal plots. No difference were found between removal and controls with regard to reptiles.

  7. On the relative importance of pool morphology and woody debris to distributions of shrimp in a Puerto Rican headwater stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyron, M.; Covich, A.P.; Black, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we report the sizes and distributional orientation of woody debris in a headwater rainforest stream in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF), Puerto Rico. We also provide results of a 4-month study of a wood addition experiment designed to increase cover for benthic macroinvertebrates (freshwater shrimp). We added branch-sized woody debris to 20 pools in three streams. We trapped four species of freshwater shrimp (two species of benthic detritivores and two predatory shrimp species) during each of the 4 months following wood additions. An analysis of pool morphology (maximum depth, surface area and volume) provided a useful predictor of shrimp abundances. In general, numbers of shrimps increased with sizes of stream pools. A repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated no effect of woody debris additions on total numbers of shrimp per pool area. Two detritivore species (Atya lanipes, a filter feeder and Xiphocaris elongata, a shredder) decreased in abundance with increased woody debris and there was no statistical relationship between woody debris additions and predators (Macrobrachium carcinus and M. crenulatum). Small woody debris additions may have altered flow velocities that were important to filter-feeding Atya at the microhabitat scale, although the overall velocities within pools were not altered by wood additions. Lower numbers of Atya and Xiphocaris in two of the three streams may result from the occurrence of two predaceous fishes (American eel and mountain mullet) and more predatory Macrobrachium in these streams. One likely interpretation of the results of this study is that the stream pools in these study reaches had sufficient habitat structure provided by numerous rock crevices (among large rocks and boulders) to provide refuge from predators. Addition of woody debris did not add significantly to the existing structure. These results may not apply to stream channels with sand and gravel substrata where crevices and undercut banks are lacking

  8. Do Wildfires Promote Woody Species Invasion in a Fire-Adapted Ecosystem? Post-fire Resprouting of Native and Non-native Woody Plants in Central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, M. Lucrecia; Torres, Romina C.; Renison, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We asked whether prescribed fire could be a useful management tool to reduce invasion by non-native plants in an ecosystem where native plants are supposed to be adapted to fires. Specifically, we compare the post-fire resprouting response of native and non-native woody species in Chaco Serrano forest of central Argentina. The measurements were carried out in five burnt areas where we selected ten native and seven non-native species. Our response variables were (1) post-fire survival, (2) types of resprouts, and (3) the growth of the resprouts. Our main results show that one year after the fire, survivals of native and non-native species were 0.84 and 0.89, respectively, with variances in survival seven times smaller in the native species group. Type of resprout was also less variable in native species, while growth of the resprouts was similar in native and non-native groups. We interpret that in most cases, the burning a forest with mixed native and non-native plants through prescribed fires will not differentially stop the invasion by non-native woody species even in ecosystems which are presumed to be relatively resistant to fires such as our study area.

  9. Do Wildfires Promote Woody Species Invasion in a Fire-Adapted Ecosystem? Post-fire Resprouting of Native and Non-native Woody Plants in Central Argentina.

    PubMed

    Herrero, M Lucrecia; Torres, Romina C; Renison, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We asked whether prescribed fire could be a useful management tool to reduce invasion by non-native plants in an ecosystem where native plants are supposed to be adapted to fires. Specifically, we compare the post-fire resprouting response of native and non-native woody species in Chaco Serrano forest of central Argentina. The measurements were carried out in five burnt areas where we selected ten native and seven non-native species. Our response variables were (1) post-fire survival, (2) types of resprouts, and (3) the growth of the resprouts. Our main results show that one year after the fire, survivals of native and non-native species were 0.84 and 0.89, respectively, with variances in survival seven times smaller in the native species group. Type of resprout was also less variable in native species, while growth of the resprouts was similar in native and non-native groups. We interpret that in most cases, the burning a forest with mixed native and non-native plants through prescribed fires will not differentially stop the invasion by non-native woody species even in ecosystems which are presumed to be relatively resistant to fires such as our study area. PMID:26423569

  10. Assessment of carbon in woody plants and soil across a vineyard-woodland landscape

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantification of ecosystem services, such as carbon (C) storage, can demonstrate the benefits of managing for both production and habitat conservation in agricultural landscapes. In this study, we evaluated C stocks and woody plant diversity across vineyard blocks and adjoining woodland ecosystems (wildlands) for an organic vineyard in northern California. Carbon was measured in soil from 44 one m deep pits, and in aboveground woody biomass from 93 vegetation plots. These data were combined with physical landscape variables to model C stocks using a geographic information system and multivariate linear regression. Results Field data showed wildlands to be heterogeneous in both C stocks and woody tree diversity, reflecting the mosaic of several different vegetation types, and storing on average 36.8 Mg C/ha in aboveground woody biomass and 89.3 Mg C/ha in soil. Not surprisingly, vineyard blocks showed less variation in above- and belowground C, with an average of 3.0 and 84.1 Mg C/ha, respectively. Conclusions This research demonstrates that vineyards managed with practices that conserve some fraction of adjoining wildlands yield benefits for increasing overall C stocks and species and habitat diversity in integrated agricultural landscapes. For such complex landscapes, high resolution spatial modeling is challenging and requires accurate characterization of the landscape by vegetation type, physical structure, sufficient sampling, and allometric equations that relate tree species to each landscape. Geographic information systems and remote sensing techniques are useful for integrating the above variables into an analysis platform to estimate C stocks in these working landscapes, thereby helping land managers qualify for greenhouse gas mitigation credits. Carbon policy in California, however, shows a lack of focus on C stocks compared to emissions, and on agriculture compared to other sectors. Correcting these policy shortcomings could create incentives

  11. Biological and Physical Drivers of Coarse Woody Debris Respiration Following Moderate Forest Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, A. V.; Franklin, R. B.; Vogel, C. S.; Liebman, E.; Curtis, P.; Gough, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest disturbances that cause plant mortality alter the net carbon (C) balance by increasing heterotrophic respiration associated with coarse woody debris (CWD) decomposition. Whether a forest transitions from a C sink to source following disturbance is largely a function of the quantity of additional CWD produced and the rate of woody debris decomposition. Coarse woody debris temperature, moisture, and microbial community composition are known to drive rates of heterotrophic respiration, but rarely have these factors been studied together across a gradient of wood decay and over time following disturbance. We used a large-scale experimental disturbance, in which early successional aspen (Populus spp.) and birch (Betula papyrifera) were killed via stem girdling within a 39 ha area, to study the effects of moderate disturbance on the forest C cycle. We quantified changes over time in CWD mass for a decade, before and after disturbance. We then conducted point measurements of CWD respiration, temperature and moisture, and quantified extracellular enzyme activity of enzymes associated with wood decomposition for five classes varying in extent of decay and standing woody debris. Process and inventory data are being used to estimate ecosystem CO2 efflux from CWD, which we will contrast with net ecosystem production (NEP) determined from long-term eddy covariance measurements of net CO2 exchange between the forest and atmosphere at the University of Michigan Biological Station (US-UMd) Ameriflux site. Our results will improve ecosystem model predictions of CWD respiration by incorporating both physical factors, such as temperature and wood moisture content, and biological factors, such as extracellular enzymatic activity of different functional types of decomposers.

  12. Soil and water quality implications of production of herbaceous and woody energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Lindberg, J.E.; Green, T.H.

    1997-10-01

    Field-scale studies in three physiographic regions of the Tennessee Valley in the Southeastern US are being used to address the environmental effects of producing biomass energy crops on former agricultural lands. Comparison of erosion, surface water quality and quantity, and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops began with crop establishment in 1994. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes, and productivity of the different crops are also being monitored at the three sites.

  13. Modeling respiration from snags and coarse woody debris before and after an invasive gypsy moth disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renninger, Heidi J.; Carlo, Nicholas; Clark, Kenneth L.; Schäfer, Karina V. R.

    2014-04-01

    Although snags and coarse woody debris are a small component of ecosystem respiration, disturbances can significantly increase the mass and respiration from these carbon (C) pools. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure respiration rates of snags and coarse woody debris throughout the year in a forest previously defoliated by gypsy moths, (2) develop models for dead stem respiration rates, (3) model stand-level respiration rates of dead stems using forest inventory and analysis data sets and environmental variables predisturbance and postdisturbance, and (4) compare total dead stem respiration rates with total ecosystem respiration and net ecosystem exchange. Respiration rates were measured on selected Pinus and Quercus snags and coarse woody debris each month for 1 year in a northeastern U.S. temperate forest. Multiple linear regression using environmental and biometric variables including wood temperature, diameter, density, species, and decay class was used to model respiration rates of dead stems. The mass of snags and coarse woody debris increased more than fivefold after disturbance and respiration rates increased more than threefold. The contribution of dead stems to total ecosystem respiration more than tripled from 0.85% to almost 3% and respiration from dead stems alone was approximately equal to the net ecosystem exchange of the forest in 2011 (fourth year postdisturbance). This study highlights the importance of dead stem C pools and fluxes particularly during disturbance and recovery cycles. With climate change increasing the ranges of many forest pests and pathogens, these data become particularly important for accurately modeling future C cycling.

  14. Woody riparian vegetation near selected streamgages in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, Gregor T.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Merigliano, Michael F.; Scott, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Areal cover and occupancy of woody riparian species near 456 streamgages in the western United States were obtained from site visits during the growing seasons of 1996-2002. We made concomitant estimates of grazing intensity, channel stabilization and incision, gradient, sediment particle size, and nearby planting of Russian olive. The purpose of this publication is to describe the data set and make it available to other investigators in an electronic format.

  15. Woody encroachment by nitrogen-fixing species: impacts on nitrogen biogeochemistry expressed through nitrogen trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, J. P.; West, J. B.; Boutton, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is a globally important vegetation change that continues to transform former grasslands or savannas into woodlands. This dramatic and geographically widespread phenomenon appears to be driven primarily by human land use changes, including reduced fire frequency and heavy livestock grazing. Observed effects of increased woody plant abundance in grasslands generally include alterations of above- and belowground productivity, changes in the chemistry of litter inputs, modifications to rooting depths and distributions, altered biogeochemical and hydrologic processes, and changes in microclimate and energy balance. These changes to fundamental ecosystem characteristics have strong, but relatively poorly understood, potential to modify biogeochemical processes that can themselves influence regional and global climate through biogeochemistry-climate feedbacks. In addition, in South Texas woody encroachment has occurred across a complex landscape differing in soil type and water retention. This work tests the hypothesis that woody encroachment, in addition to increasing total nitrogen stocks in the system, has increased nitrogen losses due to increased rates of nitrogen soil gas efflux. Under dry soil conditions and in contrast to this hypothesis, reactive nitrogen soil efflux (NO + NOy + NH3) was 21.53 ± 3.4 ng N m-2 s-1 in intact grasslands compared to 6.23 ± 1.6 ng N m-2 s-1 in woodlands on the same soil type. The non-reactive nitrogen gas, nitrous oxide, was similar in magnitude between the grassland and encroached sites (~ 7 ng N m-2 s-1). Under moist soil conditions, the magnitude of flux increased and order of magnitude, but did not change the relative ranking. Measurements of soil respiration rate and microbial biomass suggest higher microbial activity in the encroached environment and potentially higher rates of immobilization by plants and microbes. Landscape position had a large overall effect on soil nitrogen trace gas efflux with

  16. Different spatial organisation strategies of woody plant species in a montane cloud forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Alicia; Montes, Fernando; Condés, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The coexistence of a high number of species in the forest is a central issue in tropical ecology. In this paper, we aim to characterise the spatial pattern of woody species in an Andean montane cloud forest to determine whether differences exist among the species in terms of spatial organization and if so, whether these differences are related to the life-form, primary dispersal mode, shade tolerance or the diameter distribution of the species. For this purpose, we analysed the spatial pattern of each species as well as the spatial relationships between young and adult individuals. Almost all the analysed species showed a cluster pattern, followed by a random pattern at larger distances. The cluster size is more evident for the young trees whereas adult trees tended to be more randomly distributed. The shade-tolerant species showed greater distances of aggregation than gap or medium-shade-tolerant species. Species primarily dispersed by wind and small birds showed larger distances of aggregation than species dispersed by mammals or big birds. All the under-story woody plants showed a notable cluster pattern, whereas canopy trees showed a variety of spatial patterns, with clustering at small scales being the most frequent. In the case of emergent trees, association was found between young and adult individuals on a large scale. Positive associations between young and adult individuals predominate at small scales for medium and shade tolerant species and at larger scales for bird-dispersed species whereas negative spatial associations at smaller scales were found for shade tolerant species and wind dispersed species. Our study confirms that conspecific organization varies among the woody plants in the analysed forest, and that the spatial pattern of woody plants is partially linked to shade tolerance, primary dispersal mode and life form of the species.

  17. Woody biomass resource of east Texas, 1992. Forest Service Resource Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Rosson, J.F.

    1993-09-01

    Data from the most recent east Texas forest survey were used to derive estimates of wood and bark biomass by counties. The information is important to resource managers, legislators, policymakers, and procurement specialists in regard to the extent, location, and potential availability of the woody biomass resource in the State. Wood and bark biomass estimates for all trees on timberland are summarized in the report. The resource is described by dimension (size), forest type, ownership, species, stand attributes, and tree merchantability class.

  18. Woody vegetation composition and structure in peri-urban Chongming Island, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Escobedo, Francisco J; Wang, Ruijing; Zhou, Qiaolan; Lin, Wenpeng; Gao, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Chongming, the world's largest alluvial island, is located within the municipality of Shanghai, China. Recent projects have now linked peri-urban Chongming to Shanghai's urban core and as a result will soon undergo substantial changes from urbanization. We quantitatively analyzed the structure and composition of woody vegetation across subtropical, peri-urban Chongming as a basis for sustainable management of these rapidly urbanizing subtropical ecosystems elsewhere. We used 178 permanent, random plots to statistically and spatially analyze woody plant composition and tree structure across the 1,041 km(2) of Chongming. A total of 2,251 woody plants were measured comprising 42 species in 37 genera. We statistically and geospatially analyzed field data according to land uses and modeled air pollution removal by trees. Average tree diameter at breast height, total height, and crown widths on transportation land uses were greater than other land uses. These same values were lowest on forest land use and greater tree cover was associated with areas of increased anthropogenic activity. Less than 20 % of the woody vegetation was exotic and a species richness index was significantly different between land uses due to legacy effects. Composition of agriculture and forest land uses were similar to residential and transportation. Tree cover across Chongming was also estimated to annually remove 1,400 tons of air pollutants. We propose that this integrated and quantitative method can be used in other subtropical, peri-urban areas in developing countries to establish baseline trends for future sustainability objectives and to monitor the effects of urbanization and climate change. PMID:23494057

  19. Woody Vegetation Composition and Structure in Peri-urban Chongming Island, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Min; Escobedo, Francisco J.; Wang, Ruijing; Zhou, Qiaolan; Lin, Wenpeng; Gao, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Chongming, the world's largest alluvial island, is located within the municipality of Shanghai, China. Recent projects have now linked peri-urban Chongming to Shanghai's urban core and as a result will soon undergo substantial changes from urbanization. We quantitatively analyzed the structure and composition of woody vegetation across subtropical, peri-urban Chongming as a basis for sustainable management of these rapidly urbanizing subtropical ecosystems elsewhere. We used 178 permanent, random plots to statistically and spatially analyze woody plant composition and tree structure across the 1,041 km2 of Chongming. A total of 2,251 woody plants were measured comprising 42 species in 37 genera. We statistically and geospatially analyzed field data according to land uses and modeled air pollution removal by trees. Average tree diameter at breast height, total height, and crown widths on transportation land uses were greater than other land uses. These same values were lowest on forest land use and greater tree cover was associated with areas of increased anthropogenic activity. Less than 20 % of the woody vegetation was exotic and a species richness index was significantly different between land uses due to legacy effects. Composition of agriculture and forest land uses were similar to residential and transportation. Tree cover across Chongming was also estimated to annually remove 1,400 tons of air pollutants. We propose that this integrated and quantitative method can be used in other subtropical, peri-urban areas in developing countries to establish baseline trends for future sustainability objectives and to monitor the effects of urbanization and climate change.

  20. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Progress of twenty projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period March 1 through May 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major project activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  1. Energy Product Options for Eucalyptus Species Grown as Short Rotation Woody Crops

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Donald L.; Rudie, Alan W.; Ralph, Sally A.; Zhu, J.Y.; Winandy, Jerrold E.

    2008-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are native to Australia but grown extensively worldwide as short rotation hardwoods for a variety of products and as ornamentals. We describe their general importance with specific emphasis on existing and emerging markets as energy products and the potential to maximize their productivity as short rotation woody crops. Using experience in Florida USA and similar locations, we document their current energy applications and assess their productivity as short-term and likely long-term energy and related products. PMID:19325808

  2. Spatial partitioning of water use by herbaceous and woody lifeforms in semiarid woodlands

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, D.D.

    1993-12-31

    Ecological studies of soil moisture, plant water uptake, and community composition in semiarid regions have focused on differences with depth in the soil profile, yet there are many reasons to expect that moisture also varies with the presence or absence of woody vegetation. Plant and soil moisture relationships for three dominant species in a semiarid woodland, Bouteloua gracilis, Juniperus monosperma, and Pinus edulis, were studied for 1.5 years. Soil moisture varied by type of plant cover as well as by depth. Plant water potential and conductance differed among species and was related to spatial variability in soil moisture. Water potential for blue grama was most correlated with soil moisture in the 0-15 cm layer of intercanopies; juniper water potential was highly correlated with soil moisture in the 0-15 cm layer beneath tree canopies of either species, and pinyon water potential was only weakly correlated with soil moisture in the 15-30 cm depth interval beneath pinyons. Pinyons had consistently greater maximum conductance rates than junipers, even though pinyon conductance was more sensitive to reductions in soil moisture. The results from this study indicate that horizontal differences in the soil moisture profile associated with type of plant cover may be as important as differences in depth for predicting plant-water relationships. A simple model was hypothesized for predicting community composition of three lifeforms: Herbaceous plants, shallow-rooted woody plants, and deeper-rooted woody plants. Distributions of roots of each lifeform and plant-available water were defined with respect to four soil compartments that distinguish upper vs. lower and canopy vs. intercanopy soil regions. The model predicts that multiple combinations of herbaceous and woody biomass can exist at a site and was qualitatively consistent with field data from a climatic gradient.

  3. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Progress of twenty-one projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period June 1 through August 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major program activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  4. Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

    2011-08-01

    This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

  5. An evaluation of the bioconversion of woody biomass to calcium acetate deicing salt

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.L.; Augenstein, D. )

    1988-01-01

    A competitive process is described using local woody biomass residues, which may also include associated pulp and paper wastes, or municipal solid waste, as potential feedstocks for bioconversion to calcium acetate, an alternative deicing salt. The process first involves suppressed methane fermentation of these woody biomass residues in a packed bed fermentor for the production of acetic acid. In earlier experimental work, operation of conventional anaerobic digestion systems in this suppressed methane mode has yielded a product of over 85% acetic acid, the remainder primarily being other organic acids such as propionic and butyric acids; operation at thermophilic conditions (60{degree}C) yielded essentially all acetic acid. In the process described, recovery of the dilute organic acids (=3.5% acetic acid) will be by liquid ion exchange extraction. Production calcium acetate is formed by back extraction of liquid ion exchange with calcium hydroxide. After spray drying, this calcium acetate is ready for use as an organic deicing salt. Pretreatment of woody biomass may be by steam explosion or by mild alkali treatment to breakdown the lignin fraction for fermentation to acetic acid; however, if cellulosic wastes are used, no pretreatment step will be needed. Essentially, only technology transfer is involved in commercialization of this process, rather than the development of new technology. Their cost analysis, the objective of this present work, projects calcium acetate costs of 0.258 $US/kg ($0.117/lb) for a full-scale plant of 454 metric tons/day (500 US tons/day).

  6. Biofuel Manufacturing from Woody Biomass: Effects of Sieve Size Used in Biomass Size Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T. W.; Pei, Z. J.; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes. PMID:22665985

  7. Modeling aboveground tree woody biomass using national-scale allometric methods and airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Estimating tree aboveground biomass (AGB) and carbon (C) stocks using remote sensing is a critical component for understanding the global C cycle and mitigating climate change. However, the importance of allometry for remote sensing of AGB has not been recognized until recently. The overarching goals of this study are to understand the differences and relationships among three national-scale allometric methods (CRM, Jenkins, and the regional models) of the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program in the U.S. and to examine the impacts of using alternative allometry on the fitting statistics of remote sensing-based woody AGB models. Airborne lidar data from three study sites in the Pacific Northwest, USA were used to predict woody AGB estimated from the different allometric methods. It was found that the CRM and Jenkins estimates of woody AGB are related via the CRM adjustment factor. In terms of lidar-biomass modeling, CRM had the smallest model errors, while the Jenkins method had the largest ones and the regional method was between. The best model fitting from CRM is attributed to its inclusion of tree height in calculating merchantable stem volume and the strong dependence of non-merchantable stem biomass on merchantable stem biomass. This study also argues that it is important to characterize the allometric model errors for gaining a complete understanding of the remotely-sensed AGB prediction errors.

  8. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed. PMID:26657837

  9. Field note: comparative efficacy of a woody evapotranspiration landfill cover following the removal of aboveground biomass.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, William; Munk, Jens; Byrd, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Woody vegetation cultivated for moisture management on evapotranspiration (ET) landfill covers could potentially serve a secondary function as a biomass crop. However, research is required to evaluate the extent to which trees could be harvested from ET covers without significantly impacting their moisture management function. This study investigated the drainage through a six-year-old, primarily poplar/cottonwood ET test cover for a period of one year following the harvest of all woody biomass exceeding a height of 30 cm above ground surface. Results were compared to previously reported drainage observed during the years leading up to the coppice event. In the first year following coppice, the ET cover was found to be 93% effective at redirecting moisture during the spring/summer season, and 95% effective during the subsequent fall/winter season. This was slightly lower than the 95% and 100% efficacy observed in the spring/summer and fall/winter seasons, respectively, during the final measured year prior to coppice. However, the post-coppice efficacy was higher than the efficacy observed during the first three years following establishment of the cover. While additional longer-term studies are recommended, this project demonstrated that woody ET covers could potentially produce harvestable biomass while still effectively managing aerial moisture. PMID:25254294

  10. Quantitative resistance traits and suitability of woody plant species for a polyphagous scarab, Popillia japonica Newman.

    PubMed

    Keathley, Craig P; Potter, Daniel A

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman, has an unusually broad host range among deciduous woody plants, yet it feeds only sparingly, or not at all, on certain species in the field. We evaluated beetles' preference, survival over time and fecundity on eight woody plant species historically rated as susceptible or resistant and, after verifying those ratings, tested whether resistance is correlated with so-called quantitative defense traits including leaf toughness, low nutrient content (water, nitrogen, and sugars), and relatively high amounts of tannins or saponins, traditionally associated with such plants. We further tested whether species unsuitable for Japanese beetles are also rejected by fall webworms, Hyphantria cunea (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae), the expected outcome if the aforementioned traits serve as broad-based defenses against generalists. Choice tests supported historical resistance ratings for the selected species: tuliptree, lilac, dogwood, and Bradford callery pear were rejected by Japanese beetles, whereas sassafras, cherry plum, Virginia creeper, and littleleaf linden were readily eaten. Rejected species also were unsuitable for survival over time, or egg-laying, indicating beetles' inability to overcome the resistance factors through habituation, compensatory feeding, or detoxification. None of the aforementioned leaf traits was consistently higher or lower in the resistant or susceptible plants, and plant species rejected by Japanese beetles often were not rejected by fall webworms. Specialized secondary chemistry, not quantitative defenses, likely determines the Japanese beetle's dietary range among deciduous woody plant species it may encounter. PMID:19161699

  11. Survival, reproduction, and recruitment of woody plants after 14 years on a reforested landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, George R.; Handel, Steven N.; Schmalhofer, Victoria R.

    1992-03-01

    With the advent of modern sanitary landfill closure techniques, the opportunity exists for transforming municipal landfills into urban woodlands. While costs of fullscale reforestation are generally prohibitive, a modest planting of clusters of trees and shrubs could initiate or accelerate population expansions and natural plant succession from open field to diverse forest. However, among woody species that have been screened for use on landfills, these ecological potentials have not yet been investigated. We examined a 14-yr-old landfill plantation in New Jersey, USA, established to test tolerance of 19 species of trees and shrubs to landfill environments. We measured survivorship, reproduction, and recruitment within and around the experimental installation. Half of the original 190 plants were present, although survival and growth rates varied widely among species. An additional 752 trees and shrubs had colonized the plantation and its perimeter, as well as 2955 stems of vines. However, the great majority (>95%) of woody plants that had colonized were not progeny of the planted cohort, but instead belonged to 18 invading species, mostly native, bird-dispersed, and associated with intermediate stages of secondary plant succession. Based on this evidence, we recommend that several ecological criteria be applied to choices of woody species for the restoration of municipal landfills and similar degraded sites, in order to maximize rapid and economical establishment of diverse, productive woodlands.

  12. Effect of Woody Debris abundance on daytime refuge use by cotton mice.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkelman, Travis, M.; Loeb, Susan, C.

    2007-07-01

    Abstract - Daytime refuges are important to nocturnal rodents for protection from predators and environmental extremes. Because refuges of forest-dwelling rodents are often associated with woody debris, we examined refuge use by 37 radio-collared Peromyscus gossypinus (cotton mice) in experimental plots with different levels of woody debris. Treatment plots had six times (≈ 60 m3/ha) the volume of woody debris as control plots (≈ 10 m3/ha). Of 247 refuges, 159 were in rotting stumps (64%), 32 were in root boles (13%), 19 were in brush piles (8%), and 16 were in logs (6%); 10 refuges could not be identified. Stumps were the most common refuge type in both treatments, but the distribution of refuge types was significantly different between treatment and control plots. Root boles and brush piles were used more on treatment plots than on control plots, and logs were used more on control plots than on treatment plots. Refuge type and vegetation cover were the best predictors of refuge use by cotton mice; root bole refuges and refuges with less vegetation cover received greater-than-expected use by mice. Abundant refuges, particularly root boles, may improve habitat quality for cotton mice in southeastern pine forests.

  13. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted and accumulated by herbaceous and woody California crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormeño, E.; Fares, S.; Park, J.; Gentner, D. R.; Karlik, J. F.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2009-12-01

    Emissions from vegetation may substantially influence regional air quality in California. However, the emission potentials of many important crop species have not been extensively studied, although they comprise extensive areas of landcover within this state. A better knowledge of the emission rate at the species-specific level is critical for reducing uncertainties in emission inventories and evaluating emission model performance. In the present study we identify and quantify BVOC produced (emitted and stored) by leaves of 22 dominant agricultural woody and herbaceous crops in California. Emissions were studied by means of a dynamic cuvette system where a whole plant (herbaceous species) or a branch (woody species) was enclosed. Emitted BVOC were collected by passing air from the cuvette enclosing the branch through a glass tube packed with carbon based adsorbents. The adsorbents were later liquid extracted and concentrated in the laboratory. BVOCs stored in the plant tissues were extracted with an organic solvent, after plant grinding. Both BVOC emitted and BVOC stored were identified and quantified using the same GC-MS equipment. Most identified leaf emissions and stored compounds were terpenoids, but BVOC from other biosynthetic classes (benzenoids and fatty acid derivates)were not negligible. The relationship between different BVOC classes and between emitted and stored terpenoids will be presented. Differences between herbaceous and woody crops, and a variety of foliar secretory structures (e.g. secretory cavities, secretory ducts, glandular trichomes, and glands), will be evaluated in terms of BVOC content and emissions to the atmosphere.

  14. Changes in spatial point patterns of pioneer woody plants across a large tropical landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, Eduardo; De la Cruz, Marcelino; Gómez-Sal, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    We assessed whether the relative importance of positive and negative interactions in early successional communities varied across a large landslide on Casita Volcano (Nicaragua). We tested several hypotheses concerning the signatures of these processes in the spatial patterns of woody pioneer plants, as well as those of mortality and recruitment events, in several zones of the landslide differing in substrate stability and fertility, over a period of two years (2001 and 2002). We identified all woody individuals with a diameter >1 cm and mapped them in 28 plots measuring 10 × 10-m. On these maps, we performed a spatial point pattern analysis using univariate and bivariate pair-correlation functions; g (r) and g12 (r), and pairwise differences of univariate and bivariate functions. Spatial signatures of positive and negative interactions among woody plants were more prevalent in the most and least stressful zones of the landslide, respectively. Natural and human-induced disturbances such as the occurrence of fire, removal of newly colonizing plants through erosion and clearcutting of pioneer trees were also identified as potentially important pattern-creating processes. These results are in agreement with the stress-gradient hypothesis, which states that the relative importance of facilitation and competition varies inversely across gradients of abiotic stress. Our findings also indicate that the assembly of early successional plant communities in large heterogeneous landslides might be driven by a much larger array of processes than previously thought.

  15. Overstory and understory relationships in longleaf pine plantations 14 years after thinning and woody control.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy, B.

    2011-09-09

    To develop silvicultural strategies for restoring longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savannas, mortality and growth of overstory pines and midstory hardwoods and abundance and species richness of herbs were studied for 14 years after pine thinning and nonpine woody control. Pine cover in thinned stands was about half of that in nonthinned stands through year 5, but it lagged by only 8% and 3% in years 9 and 14, respectively, because of vigorous crown responses. Despite a cumulative mortality of 64% of hardwood stems from prescribed fires in years 0, 4, and 9, hardwood basal area in thinned stands (2.1 m2/ha) was three times that in nonthinned stands (0.7 m2/ha) in year 14. Thinning was associated with 13%-22% more cover and six to eight more species of herbs in years 3-8 but only 6% more cover and two more species in year 14 because of accelerated growth of pine cover and hardwood basal area. However, similar increases in cover and richness of herb species in the woody control treatment were retained through year 14 because it had sustained reductions in hardwood and shrub abundance. Silvicultural strategies that substantially delay encroachment by pines, hardwoods, and shrubs will be those most effective at retaining herb species in longleaf pine savannas, including planting pines at wide spacing, periodic thinning and woody control, and frequent burning.

  16. Woody encroachment and its consequences on hydrological processes in the savannah.

    PubMed

    Honda, Eliane A; Durigan, Giselda

    2016-09-19

    Woody encroachment due to changes in climate or in the disturbance regimes (fire and herbivory) has been observed throughout the savannah biome over the last century with ecological, hydrological and socioeconomic consequences. We assessed changes in tree density and basal area and estimated changes in rain interception by the canopies across a 5-year period over a biomass gradient in Cerrado vegetation protected from fire. We modelled throughfall, stemflow and net rainfall on the basis of tree basal area (TBA). Tree density increased by an average annual rate of 6.7%, basal area at 5.7% and rain interception by the canopies at 0.6% of the gross rainfall. Independent of the vegetation structure, we found a robust relationship of 0.9% less rainfall reaching the ground as TBA increases by 1 m(2) ha(-1) Increases in tree biomass with woody encroachment may potentially result in less water available for uptake by plants and to recharge rivers and groundwater reserves. Given that water is a seasonally scarce resource in all savannahs, woody encroachment may threaten the ecosystem services related to water resources.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. PMID:27502378

  17. Changes in Regional Nitric Oxide Emissions from Savanna Soils Associated with Woody Encroachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. E.; Asner, G. P.

    2002-12-01

    Mesquite has been rapidly increasing over the past 100 years resulting in documented changes to the biophysical and biogeochemical structure of savanna ecosystems world-wide. Some of these changes include increases in plant and soil C and N stores and cycling rates as well as isotopic shifts in these pools (Archer et al. 2001, Boutton et al. 1998, Hibbard et al.2001). However, there is no information about the impacts of woody encroachment on soil N oxides emissions. The objective of this study is to determine that remotely sensed variables of vegetation, soil type, and climate alone can be used to estimate N oxide emissions. N oxide fluxes and related parameters were measured at nine study sites across a range of woody canopy cover on two soil types. Spatially, woody canopy cover was the best predictor of NO emissions while temporally temperature was the dominant control given adequate soil moisture. Through linking these biogeochemical relationships with spatially explicit data derived from remote sensing data it is possible to extend these plot-scale measurements to the landscape and regional scales. This method allows better determination of the spatial distribution of N oxide emissions and associated variability.

  18. Historical climates explain contrasting dormancy-breaking requirements in North American, Asian, and European woody species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohner, Constantin M.; Benito, Blas M.; Fridley, Jason D.; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Renner, Susanne S.

    2016-04-01

    Leaf-out times in temperate woody species are determined by winter chilling and spring warming, with day length playing a minor role. The species-specific relative importance of these phenological cues determines the sensitivity of leaf unfolding to climate warming in the globe's temperate forests. Using experimental and monitoring data on leaf-out cues in 495 woody species [about 1/3rd each from Asia, Europe, and North America (NA)], we show that NA species have higher winter chilling and spring warming requirements than do European and Asian species of similar genetic stock. The continent effect remained significant when controlling for the modern climates that species are adapted to, suggesting that contrasting historic climate conditions led to the differentiation of leaf-out strategies among NA, European, and Asian plants. The NA flora experienced more and longer periods of climatic instability and harshness (esp. since the Pliocene) than did southern Europe and East Asia, which may explain why NA species have higher dormancy requirements and leaf-out later than Asian species, which are characterized by a more shallow dormancy. That species from Asia require significantly less chilling than their NA relatives suggests contrasting responses of NA and Asian temperate forests to continued climate warming. Earlier leaf-out in NA trees and shrubs will be constrained by unmet chilling requirements as winters get warmer, whereas Asian woody species generally lack such temperature limitations.

  19. Tree mortality, canopy turnover, and woody detritus in old cove forests of the southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    A long-term study of tree mortality, canopy turnover, and coarse woody detritus inputs was conducted in cove forests of the Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee, USA. Seven old-growth stands were studied over a 10-yr period using 0.6-1.0 ha plots. Annual mortality of trees >10 cm dbh was 0.5-1.4% among stands (mean 0.7%), The highest mortality rate among canopy trees was exhibited by trees >80 cm dbh. An increase in mortality rate with canopy tree size was evident for two (Tsuga canadensis and Acer saccharum) of the three most abundant species in the forest. The increase in mortality with tree size had implications for canopy turnover and detritus input. Gap disturbance frequency was estimated at 0.008-0.019 forest area/yr, giving a return interval of ???130 yr or less. Standing death was the most common mode of mortality (59%). Annual rates of snag formation were 1.4 snags/ha for trees >10 cm dbh and 0.4 snags/ha for trees >50 cm dbh. The density of large snags (>50 cm dbh) was 5 snags/ha. Snags accounted for 8% of the total standing tree basal area and 23% of the coarse woody detritus mass (total of 48 Mg/ ha). The mean annual rate of coarse woody detritus input was 3.0 Mg/ha. A decay rate constant was estimated at 0.07, yielding a detritus half-life of 10 yr. Although mean mortality rates and canopy turnover in old cove forests were moderate in comparison with other old forests of eastern North America, input and accumulation of coarse woody detritus were high for the region. This resulted, in part, from the relatively large sizes attained by canopy trees and the fact that larger trees tended to suffer higher mortality. In comparison to forests worldwide, rates of mortality, canopy gap formation, and decay of coarse woody detritus were intermediate.

  20. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from Stems, Soils, and Coarse Woody Debris in a Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, D. L.; Villarreal, S.; McWilliams, K.; Inamdar, S. P.; Vargas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and variability of greenhouse gas fluxes from different terrestrial carbon pools is necessary for enhancing understanding of terrestrial carbon cycling. While much more is known about variability CO2 fluxes, we have little information on how CH4 fluxes vary across multiple carbon pools within terrestrial ecosystems. We measured fluxes of CH4 and CO2 from living tree stems, soils, and coarse woody debris within a temperate forested watershed during the growing season (May-November). Fluxes of both CH4 and CO2 were significantly different among carbon pools. Living tree stems were weak sources of both CH4 and CO2 with seasonal means (± 1 SD) of 0.08 ± 0.19 nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 1.16 ± 1.21 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Soils were sinks of CH4 and sources of CO2 with seasonal means (± 1 SD) of -2.00 ± 1.41 nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 3.07 ± 2.10 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Fluxes of CH4 and CO2 from coarse woody debris were largely variable relative to the other pools with seasonal means (± 1 SD) of -0.21 ± 0.76 nmol CH4 m-2 s-1 and 2.61 ± 2.50 μmol CO2m-2 s-1. Gas fluxes varied significantly (p < 0.05) between sampling sites for both living stems and coarse woody debris, but not for soils. For living stems, this variability was explained by differences in tree species, where N. sylvatica had largest seasonal mean flux of CH4 and L. tulipifera had the largest seasonal mean flux of CO2. For woody debris sites, the variability was explained wood density, with dense, fresh wood acting as CH4 sources, and less dense, decayed wood acting as CH4 sinks. Our results show homogeneity in soil CH4 and CO2 fluxes, but a large heterogeneity in fluxes from tree stems and coarse woody debris. These results provide insights on how forest management strategies could influence greenhouse gas emissions from forested watersheds.

  1. Determining effects of woody vegetation on flood flow and sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, E. R.; Smith, J. D.; Friedman, J. M.; Vincent, K. R.

    2008-12-01

    Predicting the outcome of flow and sediment transport events quantitatively has been difficult due to the complex nature of stream systems and the effects of woody vegetation on flow. Predictive, process-based models of flow and sediment transport developed by our group during the past decade compute flow from fluid mechanical theory without empirically adjusted coefficients. Our models generate local hydraulic roughness fields from known physical characteristics and distributions of woody vegetation and topography determined from field measurements. An opportunity has arisen to apply these models to reconstruct a recent flood that caused large-scale geomorphic change and to test model predictions using data from field observations and satellite imagery. In 2003 application of an herbicide by helicopter for control of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) killed almost all woody riparian vegetation along a 12-km reach of the Rio Puerco in north-central New Mexico. Subsequently, a large flood in August 2006 caused widespread erosion of the channel banks in the sprayed reach, where the channel widened by 84 percent on average. About 680,000 m3 of sediment eroded from the banks was deposited within 5 to 10 km downstream. Channel and floodplain widths remained virtually the same as prior to the flood upstream and downstream from the sprayed reach. Because of our previous work in the area, we were fortunate to have a large dataset of channel and floodplain geometry prior to the flood, including long-term channel cross sections, a detailed longitudinal profile, high-resolution imagery, and LIDAR topography. After the flood we resurveyed cross sections and the longitudinal profile and acquired post-flood imagery. Flood water-surface elevations determined from surveyed high-water marks provide constraints on the flood- flow depth with distance downstream and provide water-surface slopes. Satellite imagery and GPS survey data acquired after the flood are used to test the coupled

  2. Characterizing Woody Vegetation Spectral and Structural Parameters with a 3-D Scene Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W.; Yang, L.

    2004-05-01

    Quantification of structural and biophysical parameters of woody vegetation is of great significance in understanding vegetation condition, dynamics and functionality. Such information over a landscape scale is crucial for global and regional land cover characterization, global carbon-cycle research, forest resource inventories, and fire fuel estimation. While great efforts and progress have been made in mapping general land cover types over large area, at present, the ability to quantify regional woody vegetation structural and biophysical parameters is limited. One approach to address this research issue is through an integration of physically based 3-D scene model with multiangle and multispectral remote sensing data and in-situ measurements. The first step of this work is to model woody vegetation structure and its radiation regime using a physically based 3-D scene model and field data, before a robust operational algorithm can be developed for retrieval of important woody vegetation structural/biophysical parameters. In this study, we use an advanced 3-D scene model recently developed by Qin and Gerstl (2000), based on L-systems and radiosity theories. This 3-D scene model has been successfully applied to semi-arid shrubland to study structure and radiation regime at a regional scale. We apply this 3-D scene model to a more complicated and heterogeneous forest environment dominated by deciduous and coniferous trees. The data used in this study are from a field campaign conducted by NASA in a portion of the Superior National Forest (SNF) near Ely, Minnesota during the summers of 1983 and 1984, and supplement data collected during our revisit to the same area of SNF in summer of 2003. The model is first validated with reflectance measurements at different scales (ground observations, helicopter, aircraft, and satellite). Then its ability to characterize the structural and spectral parameters of the forest scene is evaluated. Based on the results from this study

  3. Behavioral responses of cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus) to large amounts of coarse woody debris.

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkleman, Travis M.

    2004-08-01

    Hinkleman, Travis M. 2004. MS Thesis. Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina. 62 pp. Coarse woody debris (CWD) is any log, snag, or downed branch >10 cm in diameter. As a major structural feature of forest ecosystems, CWD serves as an important habitat component for a variety of organisms. Rodents frequently use CWD for travel routes and daytime refugia. Although rodents are known to use CWD extensively and selectively, the use and selection of CWD by rodents may vary according to the abundance of CWD. The purpose of this project was to determine the effect of CWD abundance on the habitat use patterns of a common terrestrial rodent, the cotton mouse (Peromyscus gossypinus). I tracked cotton mice with fluorescent pigments and radiotelemetry in 6 plots, situated in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands, with manipulated levels of woody debris. Treatment plots had 6x the amount of woody debris as control plots. I determined log use and movement patterns from the paths produced by powder-tracking, and I identified daytime refugia by radio-tracking. Travel along logs was almost exclusively associated with the surface of logs (91%). The proportion of a movement path associated with logs was not the best predictor of path complexity; rather, the sex of the individual was the only significant indicator of relative displacement (i.e., males moved farther from the point of release than females) and vegetation cover was the only significant predictor of mean turning angle (i.e., increasing vegetation cover yielded more convoluted paths). Mice used logs to a greater extent on treatment plots (23.7%) than mice on control plots (4.8%). Mice on treatment plots used logs with less decay, less ground contact, and more bark than logs used by mice on control plots. Differences in log use patterns were largely a result of the attributes of available logs, but mice used logs selectively on treatment plots. Refuges were highly associated with woody debris, including refuges in rotting

  4. The influence of woody plants on the seepage of flood protection levees: Experiences from a test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, W.; Meixner, H.; Florineth, F.

    2009-04-01

    The past flood events have once more drawn the attention to the stability and maintenance of flood protection levees. The attention has also been focused on the relationship between vegetation and the structural integrity of dikes. Current standards regard dense turf to be safest vegetation cover for dikes. Many guidelines ban woody vegetation from dikes and levees to provide structural integrity, visual inspection and unhindered flood-fight access. The refusal of woody plants is mainly based on the argument that root penetration of woody plants facilitates water movement along their path. Within the frame of a research project carried out by the Institute of Soil Bioengineering and Landscape Construction (University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna), focusing on woody plants on levees, the effects of small to medium growing woody (shrubby) plants on the seepage are tested. Data are drawn from two natural-scaled research levees. The homogenous levees consist of a mineral silt-sand-gravel and have a fill height of 2.7 m and a slope inclination of 2:3. The tests investigate the impact of woody plants (living brush mattress - transversal) in comparison to compact turf (jute netting mulch seeding). Measured plant parameters, characterising the vegetation structures were shoot lengths, shoot diameters, and above ground biomass. Root growth is investigated in an extra plot area allowing excavation of the plants. Percolation is monitored using seepage monitoring pipes, soil moisture sensors and soil temperature probes, which were build into the embankment during construction. The proposed contribution discusses the effects of woody plants (shrubs) on seepage of flood protection levees. Methodology of research and results after three initial seepage tests are presented.

  5. Changes in soil nitrogen storage and δ15N with woody plant encroachment in a subtropical savanna parkland landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutton, T. W.; Liao, J. D.

    2010-09-01

    Subtropical woodlands dominated by N-fixing tree legumes have largely replaced grasslands in the Rio Grande Plains, southwestern United States, during the past century. To evaluate the impact of this vegetation change on the N cycle, we measured the mass and isotopic composition (δ15N) of N in the soil system of remnant grasslands and woody plant stands ranging in age from 10 to 130 years. Nitrogen accumulated at linear rates following woody encroachment in the litter (0.10-0.14 g N m-2 yr-1), roots (0.63-0.98 g N m-2 yr-1), and soils (0.75-3.50 g N m-2 yr-1), resulting in a 50%-150% increase in N storage in the soil system (0-30 cm) in woody stands older than 60 years. Simultaneous decreases in soil δ15N of up to 2‰ in the upper 30 cm of the profile are consistent with a scenario in which N inputs have exceeded losses following woody encroachment and suggest N accrual was derived from symbiotic N fixation by tree legumes and/or differential atmospheric N deposition to wooded areas. Vertical uplift and lateral transfer of N by the more deeply and intensively rooted woody plants may have contributed to N accumulation in wooded areas, but soil δ15N values are inconsistent with this explanation. N accumulation following woody encroachment may alter soil N availability, species interactions and successional dynamics, flux rates of key trace gases such as NOX and N2O and ecosystem C sequestration. Given the geographic dimensions of woody encroachment, these results may have implications for atmospheric composition and the climate system.

  6. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy

    2014-10-03

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  7. The spatial pattern and dominant drivers of woody cover change in Latin America and Caribbean from 2001 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.; Aide, T.; Riner, G.; Redo, D.; Grau, H.; Bonilla-Moheno, M.; Lopez-Carr, D.; Levy, M.

    2011-12-01

    Change in woody vegetation (i.e., forests, shrublands) is a major component of global environmental change: it directly affects biodiversity, the global carbon budget, and ecosystem function. For several decades, remote sensing technology has been used to document deforestation in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), although mostly at local to regional scales (e.g., moist forests of the Amazon basin). Most studies have focused on forest loss, some local-scale studies have mapped forest recovery, with contrasting forest dynamics attributed to shifting demographic and socio-economic factors. For example, local population change (rural-urban migration) can stimulate forest recovery on abandoned land, while increasing global food demand may drive regional expansion of mechanized agriculture. However, there are no studies in LAC that simultaneously map both loss and gain in woody vegetation at continental, national, and municipality scales with consistent data sources, methods and accuracy; and thus, we lack a comprehensive assessment of the spatial distribution of woody vegetation change and the relative importance of the multi-scale drivers of this change. We overcame this limitation by producing annual land-cover maps between 2001 and 2010 for each of the >16,000 municipalities in LAC. We focused on mapping municipality-scale trends in three broad classes: woody vegetation, mixed woody/plantations, and agriculture/herbaceous vegetation. Our area estimates show that woody vegetation change during the past decade was dominated by deforestation, or loss (-541,830 km2), particularly in the Amazon basin moist forest and the tropical-subtropical Cerrado and Chaco ecoregions, where large swaths of forest have been transformed to pastures and agricultural lands. Extensive areas (362,431 km2) in LAC also gained woody vegetation, particularly in regions too dry or too steep for modern agriculture, including the desert/xeric shrub biome in NE Brazil and northern Mexico, the

  8. Paleo-shade: woody cover, stable isotopes, soil temperature, and soil organic matter in tropical ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, T. E.; Andanje, S.; Kimutai, D.; Levin, N. E.; Mace, W. D.; Macharia, A. N.; Passey, B. H.; Remien, C.; Wynn, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    The δ13C value of soil carbon is directly related to the fraction of C4 biomass in soils because of the difference in isotope discrimination between plants using the C3 (trees, shrubs, and herbs) and C4 (primarily tropical grasses) photosynthetic pathways. Almost all woody plants use the C3 photosynthetic pathway, and therefore the fraction of woody cover in tropical ecosystems has an important influence on the fraction of C4 biomass in soils. Surveys of tropical ecosystems from East Africa and Australia show that little C4 biomass is evident until woody cover fraction falls below 0.5. This is due to several factors, including the shading effect of woody cover and retention of soil moisture; these decrease the daily maximum ground surface temperature and decrease water stress. Thus, C3 photosynthesis is favored relative to C4 photosynthesis in well-shaded environments compared to nearby open environments. Between 0.0 and 0.5 fraction woody cover, the δ13C of soil organic matter is strongly correlated with the fraction of woody cover. However, as the woody cover approaches 0, in some semi-arid ecosystems a significant fraction of C3 herbaceous plants are present. Thus some “grasslands” may have a significant fraction of C3 herbaceous cover. Paleosols are an indicator of the fraction of C4 biomass because of their preserved δ13C values in organic matter and in pedogenic carbonate. This δ13C signal can be used as an indicator of “paleo-shade” or fraction of woody-cover in the geological record. Δ47C values of paleosols for much of the past 4 Ma in the Turkana Basin in northern Kenya and the Awash Basin in Ethiopia indicate ecosystems similar to modern grasslands to woody grasslands (using the UNESCO classification for tropical ecosystems); these are commonly known as savannas. Thus some of the most important localities documenting hominin evolution show strong evidence for a savanna environment. This interpretation is supported by independent evidence

  9. Woody debris transport modelling by a coupled DE-SW approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persi, Elisabetta; Petaccia, Gabriella; Sibilla, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The presence of wood in rivers is gaining more and more attention: on one side, the inclusion of woody debris in streams is emphasized for its ecological benefits; on the other hand, particular attention must be paid to its management, not to affect hydraulic safety. Recent events have shown that wood can be mobilized during floodings (Comiti et al. 2008, Lange and Bezzola 2006), aggravating inundations, in particular near urban areas. For this reason, the inclusion of woody debris influence on the prediction of flooded areas is an important step toward the reduction of hydraulic risk. Numerical modelling plays an important role to this purpose. Ruiz-Villanueva et al. (2014) use a two-dimensional numerical model to calculate the kinetics of cylindrical woody debris transport, taking into account also the hydrodynamic effects of wood. The model here presented couples a Discrete Element approach (DE) for the calculation of motion of a cylindrical log with the solution of the Shallow Water Equations (SW), in order to simulate woody debris transport in a two-dimensional stream. In a first step, drag force, added mass force and side force are calculated from flow and log velocities, assuming a reference area and hydrodynamic coefficients taken from literature. Then, the equations of dynamics are solved to model the planar roto-translation of the wooden cylinder. Model results and its physical reliability are clearly affected by the values of the drag and side coefficients, which in turn depend upon log submergence and angle towards the flow direction. Experimental studies to evaluate drag and side coefficients can be found for a submerged cylinder, with various orientations (Gippel et al. 1996; Hoang et al. 2015). To extend such results to the case of a floating (non-totally submerged) cylinder, the authors performed a series of laboratory tests whose outcomes are implemented in the proposed DE-SW model, to assess the effects of these values on the dynamic of woody

  10. Biodiversity of Soil Microbial Communities Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland: An Assessment Using Molecular Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantola, I. B.; Gentry, T. J.; Filley, T. R.; Boutton, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plants have encroached into grasslands, savannas, and other grass-dominated ecosystems throughout the world during the last century. This dramatic vegetation change is likely driven by livestock grazing, altered fire frequencies, elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and/or changes in atmospheric deposition patterns. Woody invasion often results in significant changes in ecosystem function, including alterations in above- and belowground primary productivity, soil C, N, and P storage and turnover, and the size and activity of the soil microbial biomass pool. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships and interactions between plant communities and soil microbial communities in the Rio Grande Plains region of southern Texas where grasslands have been largely replaced by woodlands. Research was conducted along a successional chronosequence representing the stages of woody plant encroachment from open grassland to closed-canopy woodland. To characterize soil microbial community composition, soil samples (0-7.5 cm) were collected in remnant grasslands (representing time 0) and near the centers of woody plant clusters, groves, and drainage woodlands ranging in age from 10 to 130 yrs. Ages of woody plant stands were determined by dendrochronology. Community DNA was extracted from each soil sample with a MoBio PowerMax Soil DNA isolation kit. The DNA concentrations were quantified on a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and diluted to a standard concentration. Pyrosequencing was performed by the Research and Testing Laboratory (Lubbock, TX) according to Roche 454 Titanium chemistry protocols. Samples were amplified with primers 27F and 519R for bacteria, and primers ITS1F and ITS4 for fungi. Sequences were aligned using BioEdit and the RDP Pipeline and analyzed in MOTHUR. Non-metric multidimensional scaling of the operational taxonomic units identified by pyrosequencing revealed that both bacterial and fungal community composition were

  11. Ecosystem Impacts of Woody Encroachment In Texas: A Spatial Analysis Using AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roberta E.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2004-01-01

    Woody encroachment, the increase of woody plant density relative to herbaceous vegetation, has been documented in drylands of Texas as well as worldwide (Archer 1994, Harrington and Harman 1995, Moleele et al. 2002). Over-grazing, fire suppression and climate change are implicated in the shift from open grasslands to ecosystems now populated by trees and shrubs (Scholes and Archer 1997, Archer et al. 2001), such as Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa (honey mesquite) in north Texas (Teague et al. 1997, Ansley et al. 2001, Asner et al. 2003a). Several studies have examined changes in ecosystem properties accompanying woody vegetation encroachment in the Southwest U.S., with research focused on increases in plant and soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stores (Hoffman and Jackson 2000, Asner et al. 2003a), isotopic shifts in these pools (Boutton 1999, Archer et al. 2001), and increases in N cycling rates (Rundel et al. 1982, Hibbard et al. 2001). However, little is known regarding the impact of woody encroachment on N trace gas emissions from dryland regions such as Texas. NOx is produced in the soil during the processes of nitrification and denitrification (Firestone and Davidson 1989). The total N efflux from soils is most directly influenced by the internal cycling of N, which at a regionalscale, is controlled by the inputs and availability of N from vegetation via litterfall and subsequent decomposition (Robertson et al. 1989). Although plot-scale studies are critical to understanding controls over N oxide emissions, regionalization of the measurements is impeded by spatial variation in the factors contributing most to N cycling processes: soil properties (affecting soil moisture regimes and N stocks) and vegetation cover (affecting litter inputs and N uptake). While broad patterns in ecosystem structure and vegetation composition co-vary with general patterns of trace gas emissions (Matson 1997), there is no easily measured index of N availability that can be

  12. Topo-edaphic Controls over Woody Biomass in South African Savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, M.; Asner, G. P.; Levick, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    The influence of substrate type on woody plant growth is well documented in the granite and basalt savannas of Kruger National Park, South Africa. Over the past two decades field studies and airborne photography have shown the gradually undulating granitic landscapes support higher woody cover than the basaltic plains. Yet nested within these broader trends are significant variations in biomass at the hillslope scale (0.5-1km), and it is debated to what extent the gradual slopes and subtle relief exert a catena influence on woody biomass. These trends have been qualitatively observed in the field, especially on the granite substrates, but drawing clear correlations between vegetation and terrain is hampered in the field by limited visibility due to relatively gradual (1-2°) and long (hundreds of meters) hillslopes. Here airborne LiDAR reveals clear, quantifiable biomass trends at the hillslope spatial scale and at the resolution (~1m) necessary to resolve the heterogeneity inherent in an open-canopy system. Our aim is to investigate the importance of hillslope topographic and soil properties in controlling woody biomass relative to regional differences in parent material. Aboveground woody biomass (AGWB) was estimated using airborne LiDAR over seven sites in Kruger National Park (KNP) in April-May 2008. Sites were selected to encompass the park’s range of substrate types, as well as variation in precipitation, topography, and dominant vegetation types. Throughout these seven sites 202 field plots were collected during the same period to inform and validate airborne biomass estimates. Basal diameter, height, and species of 4,500+ trees spanning 50+ woody species were recorded, and existing field allometry was applied to estimate dry AGWB. When regressed individually, canopy height and canopy cover each explained approximately the same variation in biomass (R2=0.60). Using canopy cover from three height classes significantly improved goodness of fit (R2=0.80) and

  13. Assessment of using Imaging software Image J to determine percentage woody cover from half meter resolution satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, W. D.; Cerling, T. E.

    2010-12-01

    The percentage of woody cover over a landscape has been shown to be related to the d13C in soil organic matter because of the difference in carbon isotope discrimination between plants using C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Woody plants such as those found in dense forests predominantly use the C3 pathway; whereas plants that are found to grow in arid grasslands are predominantly using the C4 pathway. Therefore it has also been shown that it is possible to determine the vegetation of current and past ecosystems using d13C in soil organic matter. With the introduction of very high resolution remote sensing it is becoming possible to make detailed maps based on d13C and estimate percentage woody cover. Using these maps it may be possible to create large scale representations of prehistoric ecosystems. Here we asses the use of a widely available imaging software, Image J to survey the percentage of woody cover of tropical ecosystems in East Africa. These results are compared with canopy gap fraction that has been calculated from in-situ ground-up circular fisheye images. We find that in areas where the percentage woody cover is less than 0.5, Image J is an effective method of analysis; however as the percentage cover becomes greater than 0.5 it becomes difficult to distinguish between true canopy and shadows.

  14. Vegetation types, dominant compositions, woody plant diversity and stand structure in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary of Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Koushik; Datta, B K

    2015-03-01

    Present study was carried out to assess the vegetation types, diversity and phytosociological status of woody plants in Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary of Tripura, Northeast India. Vegetation data was derived by 25 line transects (10 m wide and 500 m length, each 0.5 ha size). All woody species at >10 cm gbh (Girth at Breast Height) within each plots were measured and counted. A total of six forest types were classified by cluster analysis using Importance Value Index (IVI) of 289 woody species. Species diversity, forest structure and woody community associations were evaluated and discussed. One way ANOVA revealed significant differences in all species diversity measures and stand structure along the forest types. Distribution of stem density at ten different gbh classes showed reverse J-shaped curves. Population status of woody plants was also examined through grouping of all individuals into four population age stages viz. sapling (<30 cm gbh), adult (> or = 30 - <120 cm gbh), mature (>120 - 210 cm gbh) and old (> or =210 cm). To observe dominant composition and species population trend, IVI of top ten dominant species from all forest types were tabulated. The present study suggested that Trishna Wildlife Sanctuary is an important habitat in Tripura from floristic point of view and it should be conserved on priority basis for remaining wildlife endurances and monitor for forest livelihoods products for sustainable biodiversity conservation in this region. PMID:25895264

  15. Combining paleo-data and modern exclosure experiments to assess the impact of megafauna extinctions on woody vegetation.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Elisabeth S; Gill, Jacquelyn L; Johnson, Christopher N; Vera, Frans W M; Sandom, Christopher J; Asner, Gregory P; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-26

    Until recently in Earth history, very large herbivores (mammoths, ground sloths, diprotodons, and many others) occurred in most of the World's terrestrial ecosystems, but the majority have gone extinct as part of the late-Quaternary extinctions. How has this large-scale removal of large herbivores affected landscape structure and ecosystem functioning? In this review, we combine paleo-data with information from modern exclosure experiments to assess the impact of large herbivores (and their disappearance) on woody species, landscape structure, and ecosystem functions. In modern landscapes characterized by intense herbivory, woody plants can persist by defending themselves or by association with defended species, can persist by growing in places that are physically inaccessible to herbivores, or can persist where high predator activity limits foraging by herbivores. At the landscape scale, different herbivore densities and assemblages may result in dynamic gradients in woody cover. The late-Quaternary extinctions were natural experiments in large-herbivore removal; the paleoecological record shows evidence of widespread changes in community composition and ecosystem structure and function, consistent with modern exclosure experiments. We propose a conceptual framework that describes the impact of large herbivores on woody plant abundance mediated by herbivore diversity and density, predicting that herbivore suppression of woody plants is strongest where herbivore diversity is high. We conclude that the decline of large herbivores induces major alterations in landscape structure and ecosystem functions. PMID:26504223

  16. Combining paleo-data and modern exclosure experiments to assess the impact of megafauna extinctions on woody vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Elisabeth S.; Gill, Jacquelyn L.; Johnson, Christopher N.; Vera, Frans W. M.; Sandom, Christopher J.; Asner, Gregory P.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Until recently in Earth history, very large herbivores (mammoths, ground sloths, diprotodons, and many others) occurred in most of the World’s terrestrial ecosystems, but the majority have gone extinct as part of the late-Quaternary extinctions. How has this large-scale removal of large herbivores affected landscape structure and ecosystem functioning? In this review, we combine paleo-data with information from modern exclosure experiments to assess the impact of large herbivores (and their disappearance) on woody species, landscape structure, and ecosystem functions. In modern landscapes characterized by intense herbivory, woody plants can persist by defending themselves or by association with defended species, can persist by growing in places that are physically inaccessible to herbivores, or can persist where high predator activity limits foraging by herbivores. At the landscape scale, different herbivore densities and assemblages may result in dynamic gradients in woody cover. The late-Quaternary extinctions were natural experiments in large-herbivore removal; the paleoecological record shows evidence of widespread changes in community composition and ecosystem structure and function, consistent with modern exclosure experiments. We propose a conceptual framework that describes the impact of large herbivores on woody plant abundance mediated by herbivore diversity and density, predicting that herbivore suppression of woody plants is strongest where herbivore diversity is high. We conclude that the decline of large herbivores induces major alterations in landscape structure and ecosystem functions. PMID:26504223

  17. Impacts of Extreme Events on Phenology: Drought-Induced Changes in Productivity of Mixed Woody-Herbaceous Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, P. M.; Breshears, D. D.; White, A. B.

    2006-12-01

    Ecosystem responses to key climate drivers are reflected in phenological dynamics such as the timing and degree of "greenup" that integrate responses over spatial scales from individual plants to ecosystems. This integration is clearest in ecosystems dominated by a single species or life form, such as seasonally dynamic grasslands or more temporally constant evergreen forests. Yet many ecosystems have substantial contribution of cover from both herbaceous and woody evergreen plants. Responses of mixed woody- herbaceous ecosystems to climate are of increasing concern due to their extensive nature, the potential for such systems to yield more complex responses than those dominated by a single life form, and projections that extreme climate and weather events will increase in frequency and intensity with global warming. We present responses of a mixed woody-herbaceous ecosystem type to an extreme event: regional scale piñon pine mortality following an extended drought and the subsequent herbaceous greenup following the first wet period after the drought. This example highlights how reductions in greenness of the slower, more stable evergreen woody component can rapidly be offset by increases associated with resources made available to the relatively more responsive herbaceous component. We hypothesize that such two-phase phenological responses to extreme events are characteristic of many mixed woody-herbaceous ecosystems.

  18. Establishment of woody riparian vegetation in relation to annual patterns of streamflow, Bill Williams River, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, P.B.; Auble, G.T.; Stromberg, J.C.; Patten, D.T.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the close coupling of components of annual streamflow hydrographs and the germination and establishment of Populus species. Key hydrograph components include the timing and magnitude of flood peaks, the rate of decline of the recession limb, and the magnitude of base flows. In this paper, we retrospectively examine establishment of four woody riparian species along the Bill Williams River, Arizona, USA, in the context of annual patterns of streamflow for the years 1993-1995. The four species examined were the native Populus fremontii, Salix gooddingii, and Baccharis salicifolia and the exotic Tamarix ramosissima. We modeled locations suitable for germination of each species along eight study transects by combining historic discharge data, calculated stage-discharge relationships, and seed-dispersal timing observations. This germination model was a highly significant predictor of seedling establishment. Where germination was predicted to occur, we compared values of several environmental variables in quadrats where we observed successful establishment with quadrats where establishment was unsuccessful. The basal area of mature woody vegetation, the maximum annual depth to ground water, and the maximum rate of water-table decline were the variables that best discriminated between quadrats with and without seedlings. The results of this study suggest that the basic components of models that relate establishment of Populus spp. to annual patterns of streamflow may also be applicable to other woody riparian species. Reach-to-reach variation in stage-discharge relationships can influence model parameters, however, and should be considered if results such as ours are to be used in efforts to prescribe reservoir releases to promote establishment of native riparian vegetation.

  19. Effects of woody vegetation on overbank sand transport during a large flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Perignon, Mariela C.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2014-02-01

    Distributions of woody vegetation on floodplain surfaces affect flood-flow erosion and deposition processes. A large flood along the lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, in August 2006 caused extensive erosion in a reach that had been sprayed with herbicide in September 2003 for the purpose of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control. Large volumes of sediment, including a substantial fraction of sand, were delivered to the reach downstream, which had not been treated with herbicide. We applied physically based, one-dimensional models of flow and suspended-sediment transport to compute volume concentrations of sand in suspension in floodplain flow at a site within the sprayed reach and at a site downstream from the sprayed reach. We computed the effects of drag on woody stems in reducing the skin friction shear stress, velocity of flow, and suspended-sand transport from open paths into patches of dense stems. Total flow and suspended-sand fluxes were computed for each site using well-constrained flood-flow depths, water-surface slopes, and measured shrub characteristics. Results show that flow in open paths carried high concentrations of sand in suspension with nearly uniform vertical distributions. Drag on woody floodplain stems reduced skin friction shear stresses by two orders of magnitude, yet sufficient velocities were maintained to transport sand more than 50 m into fields of dense, free-surface-penetrating stems. An increase in shrub canopy extent from 31% in the sprayed reach site to 49% in the downstream site was found to account for 69% of the computed decrease in discharge between the two sites. The results demonstrate the need to compute the spatial distribution of skin friction shear stress in order to effectively compute suspended-sand transport and to predict the fate of sediment and contaminants carried in suspension during large floods.

  20. Spatial and temporal patterns of beetles associated with coarse woody debris in managed bottomland hardwood forests.

    SciTech Connect

    Ulyshen, M., D.; Hanula, J., L.; Horn, S.; Kilgo, J., C.; Moorman, C., E.

    2004-05-13

    For. Ecol. and Mgt. 199:259-272. Malaise traps were used to sample beetles in artificial canopy gaps of different size (0.13 ha, 0.26 ha, and0.50 ha) and age in a South Carolina bottomland hardwood forest. Traps were placed at the center, edge, and in the surrounding forest of each gap. Young gaps (ý 1 year) had large amounts of coarse woody debris compared to the surrounding forest, while older gaps (ý 6 years) had virtually none. The total abundance and diversity of wood-dwelling beetles (Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, Brentidae, Bostrichidae, and Curculionidae (Scolytinae and Platypodinae)) was higher in the center of young gaps than in the center of old gaps. The abundance was higher in the center of young gaps than in the surrounding forest, while the forest surrounding old gaps and the edge of old gaps had a higher abundance and diversity of wood-dwelling beetles than did the center of old gaps. There was no difference in wood-dwelling beetle abundance between gaps of different size, but diversity was lower in 0.13 ha old gaps than in 0.26 ha or 0.50 ha old gaps. We suspect that gap size has more of an effect on woodborer abundance than indicated here because malaise traps sample a limited area. The predaceous beetle family Cleridae showed a very similar trend to that of the woodborers. Coarse woody debris is an important resource for many organisms, and our results lend further support to forest management practices that preserve coarse woody debris created during timber removal.

  1. Growing stock and woody biomass assessment in Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary, Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S P S; Nandy, S; Gupta, Mohini

    2014-09-01

    Biomass is an important entity to understand the capacity of an ecosystem to sequester and accumulate carbon over time. The present study, done in collaboration with the Delhi Forest Department, focused on the estimation of growing stock and the woody biomass in the so-called lungs of Delhi--the Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Aravalli hills. The satellite-derived vegetation strata were field-inventoried using stratified random sampling procedure. Growing stock was calculated for the individual sample plots using field data and species-specific volume equations. Biomass was estimated from the growing stock and the specific gravity of the wood. Among the four vegetation types, viz. Prosopis juliflora, Anogeissus pendula, forest plantation and the scrub, the P. juliflora was found to be the dominant vegetation in the area, covering 23.43 km(2) of the total area. The study revealed that P. juliflora forest with moderate density had the highest (10.7 m(3)/ha) while A. pendula forest with moderate density had the lowest (3.6 m(3)/ha) mean volume. The mean woody biomass was also found to be maximum in P. juliflora forest with moderate density (10.3 t/ha) and lowest in A. pendula forest with moderate density (3.48 t/ha). The total growing stock was estimated to be 20,772.95 m(3) while total biomass worked out to be 19,366.83 t. A strong correlation was noticed between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the growing stock (R(2) = 0.84)/biomass (R(2) = 0.88). The study demonstrated that growing stock and the biomass of the woody vegetation in Asola-Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary could be estimated with high accuracy using optical remote sensing data. PMID:24859859

  2. Industry/government collaborations on short-rotation woody crops for energy, fiber and wood products

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Berg, S.

    1996-12-31

    More than twenty-five organizations can be identified in the US and Canada that have research plantings of 20 ha in size or greater of short-rotation woody crops and most of those are well-established forest products companies. In 1990, only 9 forest products companies had commercial or substantial research plantings of short-rotation woody crops. The recent harvest and use of hybrid poplars for pulp and paper production in the Pacific Northwest has clearly stimulated interest in the use of genetically superior hybrid poplar clones across North America. Industry and government supported research cooperatives have been formed to develop sophisticated techniques for producing genetically superior hybrid poplars and willows suited for a variety of locations in the US. While the primary use of commercially planted short-rotation woody crops is for pulp and paper, energy is a co-product in most situations. A document defining a year 2020 technology vision for America`s forest, wood and paper industry affirms that {open_quotes}biomass will be used not only for building materials and paper and paperboard products, but also increasingly for steam, power, and liquid fuel production.{close_quotes} To accomplish the goals of {open_quotes}Agenda 2020{close_quotes} a new collaborative research effort on sustainable forestry has been initiated by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the American Forest and Paper Association (AF&PA). Both the new and old collaborative efforts are focusing on achieving substantial and sustainable gains in U.S. wood production for both energy and traditional wood products. AF&PA and DOE hope that industry and government partnerships addressing the competitiveness and energy efficiency of U.S. industries, can serve as a model for future research efforts.

  3. Biomass Increases Go under Cover: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in South African Rangelands.

    PubMed

    Mograbi, Penelope J; Erasmus, Barend F N; Witkowski, E T F; Asner, Gregory P; Wessels, Konrad J; Mathieu, Renaud; Knapp, David E; Martin, Roberta E; Main, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Woody biomass dynamics are an expression of ecosystem function, yet biomass estimates do not provide information on the spatial distribution of woody vegetation within the vertical vegetation subcanopy. We demonstrate the ability of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to measure aboveground biomass and subcanopy structure, as an explanatory tool to unravel vegetation dynamics in structurally heterogeneous landscapes. We sampled three communal rangelands in Bushbuckridge, South Africa, utilised by rural communities for fuelwood harvesting. Woody biomass estimates ranged between 9 Mg ha(-1) on gabbro geology sites to 27 Mg ha(-1) on granitic geology sites. Despite predictions of woodland depletion due to unsustainable fuelwood extraction in previous studies, biomass in all the communal rangelands increased between 2008 and 2012. Annual biomass productivity estimates (10-14% p.a.) were higher than previous estimates of 4% and likely a significant contributor to the previous underestimations of modelled biomass supply. We show that biomass increases are attributable to growth of vegetation <5 m in height, and that, in the high wood extraction rangeland, 79% of the changes in the vertical vegetation subcanopy are gains in the 1-3 m height class. The higher the wood extraction pressure on the rangelands, the greater the biomass increases in the low height classes within the subcanopy, likely a strong resprouting response to intensive harvesting. Yet, fuelwood shortages are still occurring, as evidenced by the losses in the tall tree height class in the high extraction rangeland. Loss of large trees and gain in subcanopy shrubs could result in a structurally simple landscape with reduced functional capacity. This research demonstrates that intensive harvesting can, paradoxically, increase biomass and this has implications for the sustainability of ecosystem service provision. The structural implications of biomass increases in communal rangelands could be

  4. Biomass Increases Go under Cover: Woody Vegetation Dynamics in South African Rangelands

    PubMed Central

    Mograbi, Penelope J.; Knapp, David E.; Martin, Roberta E.; Main, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Woody biomass dynamics are an expression of ecosystem function, yet biomass estimates do not provide information on the spatial distribution of woody vegetation within the vertical vegetation subcanopy. We demonstrate the ability of airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to measure aboveground biomass and subcanopy structure, as an explanatory tool to unravel vegetation dynamics in structurally heterogeneous landscapes. We sampled three communal rangelands in Bushbuckridge, South Africa, utilised by rural communities for fuelwood harvesting. Woody biomass estimates ranged between 9 Mg ha-1 on gabbro geology sites to 27 Mg ha-1 on granitic geology sites. Despite predictions of woodland depletion due to unsustainable fuelwood extraction in previous studies, biomass in all the communal rangelands increased between 2008 and 2012. Annual biomass productivity estimates (10–14% p.a.) were higher than previous estimates of 4% and likely a significant contributor to the previous underestimations of modelled biomass supply. We show that biomass increases are attributable to growth of vegetation <5 m in height, and that, in the high wood extraction rangeland, 79% of the changes in the vertical vegetation subcanopy are gains in the 1-3m height class. The higher the wood extraction pressure on the rangelands, the greater the biomass increases in the low height classes within the subcanopy, likely a strong resprouting response to intensive harvesting. Yet, fuelwood shortages are still occurring, as evidenced by the losses in the tall tree height class in the high extraction rangeland. Loss of large trees and gain in subcanopy shrubs could result in a structurally simple landscape with reduced functional capacity. This research demonstrates that intensive harvesting can, paradoxically, increase biomass and this has implications for the sustainability of ecosystem service provision. The structural implications of biomass increases in communal rangelands could be

  5. Quantifying the role of woody debris in providing bioenergetically favorable habitat for juvenile salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Hafs, A. W.; Utz, R.; Dunne, T.

    2013-12-01

    The habitat complexity of a riverine ecosystem substantially influences aquatic communities, and especially the bioenergetics of drift feeding fish. We coupled hydrodynamic and bioenergetic models to assess the influence of habitat complexity, generated via large woody debris (LWD) additions, on juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) growth potential in a river that lacked large wood. Model simulations indicated that LWD diversified the flow field, creating pronounced velocity gradients, which enhanced fish feeding and resting activities at the micro-habitat (sub-meter) scale. Fluid drag created by individual wood structures was increased under higher wood loading rates, leading to a 5-19% reduction in the reach-averaged velocity. We found that wood loading was asymptotically related to the reach-scale growth potential, suggesting that the river became saturated with LWD and additional loading would produce minimal benefit. In our study reach, LWD additions could potentially quadruple the potential growth area available before that limit was reached. Wood depletion in the world's rivers has been widely documented, leading to widespread attempts by river managers to reverse this trend by adding wood to simplified aquatic habitats, though systematic prediction of the effects of wood on fish growth has not been previously accomplished. We offer a quantitative, theory-based approach for assessing the role of wood on habitat potential as it affects fish growth at the micro-habitat and reach-scales. Fig. 1. Predicted flow field and salmon growth potential maps produced from model simulations with no woody debris (Graphs A and D), a low density (Graphs B and E), and a high density (Graphs C and E) of woody debris.

  6. Research to develop improved production methods for woody and herbaceous biomass crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.E.; Wright, L.L.; Tuskan, G.A.

    1995-09-01

    DOE`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) has led the nation in developing short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and herbaceous energy crops (HEC) as feedstocks for renewable energy. Over the past 15 years, the BFDP has examined the performance of 154 woody species and 35 herbaceous species in field trials across the US. One result of this effort to date has been the prescription of silvicultural systems for hybrid poplars and hybrid willows and agricultural systems for switchgrass. Selected clones of woody species are producing dry weight yields in research plots on agricultural land that are 3 to 7 times greater than those obtained from mixed species stands on forest land, and at least 2 times the yields of southern plantation pines. Selected switchgrass varieties are producing dry weight yields 2 to 7 times greater than average forage grass yields on similar sites. Crop development research is continuing efforts to translate this potential, in a sustainable manner, to larger, more geographically diverse acreage. Research on environmental aspects of biomass crop production are aimed at developing sustainable systems that will contribute to the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. Systems integration aims to understand all factors affecting bringing the crop to market. Factors affecting price and potential supplies of biomass crops are being evaluated at regional and national scales. Scale-up studies, feasibility analysis and demonstrations are establishing actual costs and facilitating the commercialization of integrated biomass systems. Information management and dissemination activities are facilitating the communication of results among a community of researchers, policymakers, and potential users and producers of energy crops.

  7. Effects of woody vegetation on overbank sand transport during a large flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Perignon, Mariela C.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions of woody vegetation on floodplain surfaces affect flood-flow erosion and deposition processes. A large flood along the lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, in August 2006 caused extensive erosion in a reach that had been sprayed with herbicide in September 2003 for the purpose of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control. Large volumes of sediment, including a substantial fraction of sand, were delivered to the reach downstream, which had not been treated with herbicide. We applied physically based, one-dimensional models of flow and suspended-sediment transport to compute volume concentrations of sand in suspension in floodplain flow at a site within the sprayed reach and at a site downstream from the sprayed reach. We computed the effects of drag on woody stems in reducing the skin friction shear stress, velocity of flow, and suspended-sand transport from open paths into patches of dense stems. Total flow and suspended-sand fluxes were computed for each site using well-constrained flood-flow depths, water-surface slopes, and measured shrub characteristics. Results show that flow in open paths carried high concentrations of sand in suspension with nearly uniform vertical distributions. Drag on woody floodplain stems reduced skin friction shear stresses by two orders of magnitude, yet sufficient velocities were maintained to transport sand more than 50 m into fields of dense, free-surface-penetrating stems. An increase in shrub canopy extent from 31% in the sprayed reach site to 49% in the downstream site was found to account for 69% of the computed decrease in discharge between the two sites. The results demonstrate the need to compute the spatial distribution of skin friction shear stress in order to effectively compute suspended-sand transport and to predict the fate of sediment and contaminants carried in suspension during large floods.

  8. Topo-edaphic controls over woody plant biomass in South African savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, M. S.; Asner, G. P.; Levick, S. R.; Martin, R. E.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2012-05-01

    The distribution of woody biomass in savannas reflects spatial patterns fundamental to ecosystem processes, such as water flow, competition, and herbivory, and is a key contributor to savanna ecosystem services, such as fuelwood supply. While total precipitation sets an upper bound on savanna woody biomass, the extent to which substrate and terrain constrain trees and shrubs below this maximum remains poorly understood, often occluded by local-scale disturbances such as fire and trampling. Here we investigate the role of hillslope topography and soil properties in controlling woody plant aboveground biomass (AGB) in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Large-area sampling with airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) provided a means to average across local-scale disturbances, revealing an unexpectedly linear relationship between AGB and hillslope-position on basalts, where biomass levels were lowest on crests, and linearly increased toward streams (R2 = 0.91). The observed pattern was different on granite substrates, where AGB exhibited a strongly non-linear relationship with hillslope position: AGB was high on crests, decreased midslope, and then increased near stream channels (R2 = 0.87). Overall, we observed 5-to-8-fold lower AGB on clayey, basalt-derived soil than on granites, and we suggest this is due to herbivore-fire interactions rather than lower hydraulic conductivity or clay shrinkage/swelling, as previously hypothesized. By mapping AGB within and outside fire and herbivore exclosures, we found that basalt-derived soils support tenfold higher AGB in the absence of fire and herbivory, suggesting high clay content alone is not a proximal limitation on AGB. Understanding how fire and herbivory contribute to AGB heterogeneity is critical to predicting future savanna carbon storage under a changing climate.

  9. Topo-edaphic controls over woody plant biomass in South African savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, M. S.; Asner, G. P.; Levick, S. R.; Martin, R. E.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of woody biomass in savannas reflects spatial patterns fundamental to ecosystem processes, such as water flow, competition, and herbivory, and is a key contributor to savanna ecosystem services, such as fuelwood supply. While total precipitation sets an upper bound on savanna woody biomass, the extent to which substrate and terrain constrain trees and shrubs below this maximum remains poorly understood, often occluded by local-scale disturbances such as fire and trampling. Here we investigate the role of hillslope topography and soil properties in controlling woody plant aboveground biomass (AGB) in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Large-area sampling with airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) provided a means to average across local-scale disturbances, revealing an unexpectedly linear relationship between AGB and hillslope-position on basalts, where biomass levels were lowest on crests, and linearly increased toward streams (R2 = 0.91). The observed pattern was different on granite substrates, where AGB exhibited a strongly non-linear relationship with hillslope position: AGB was high on crests, decreased midslope, and then increased near stream channels (R2 = 0.87). Overall, we observed 5-to-8-fold lower AGB on clayey, basalt-derived soil than on granites, and we suggest this is due to herbivore-fire interactions rather than lower hydraulic conductivity or clay shrinkage/swelling, as previously hypothesized. By mapping AGB within and outside fire and herbivore exclosures, we found that basalt-derived soils support tenfold higher AGB in the absence of fire and herbivory, suggesting high clay content alone is not a~proximal limitation on AGB. Understanding how fire and herbivory contribute to AGB heterogeneity is critical to predicting future savanna carbon storage under a changing climate.

  10. Effect of woody-plant encroachment on livestock production in North and South America

    PubMed Central

    Anadón, José D.; Sala, Osvaldo E.; Turner, B. L.; Bennett, Elena M.

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of the world grasslands and savannas are undergoing a rapid shift from herbaceous to woody-plant dominance. This land-cover change is expected to lead to a loss in livestock production (LP), but the impacts of woody-plant encroachment on this crucial ecosystem service have not been assessed. We evaluate how tree cover (TC) has affected LP at large spatial scales in rangelands of contrasting social–economic characteristics in the United States and Argentina. Our models indicate that in areas of high productivity, a 1% increase in TC results in a reduction in LP ranging from 0.6 to 1.6 reproductive cows (Rc) per km2. Mean LP in the United States is 27 Rc per km2, so a 1% increase in TC results in a 2.5% decrease in mean LP. This effect is large considering that woody-plant cover has been described as increasing at 0.5% to 2% per y. On the contrary, in areas of low productivity, increased TC had a positive effect on LP. Our results also show that ecological factors account for a larger fraction of LP variability in Argentinean than in US rangelands. Differences in the relative importance of ecological versus nonecological drivers of LP in Argentina and the United States suggest that the valuation of ecosystem services between these two rangelands might be different. Current management strategies in Argentina are likely designed to maximize LP for various reasons we are unable to explore in this effort, whereas land managers in the United States may be optimizing multiple ecosystem services, including conservation or recreation, alongside LP. PMID:25136084

  11. Landsat Based Woody Vegetation Loss Detection in Queensland, Australia Using the Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, K.; Phinn, S. R.; Taylor, M.

    2014-12-01

    Land clearing detection and woody Foliage Projective Cover (FPC) monitoring at the state and national level in Australia has mainly been undertaken by state governments and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) because of the considerable expense, expertise, sustained duration of activities and staffing levels needed. Only recently have services become available, providing low budget, generalized access to change detection tools suited to this task. The objective of this research was to examine if a globally available service, Google Earth Engine Beta, could be used to predict woody vegetation loss with accuracies approaching the methods used by TERN and the government of the state of Queensland, Australia. Two change detection approaches were investigated using Landsat Thematic Mapper time series and the Google Earth Engine Application Programming Interface: (1) CART and Random Forest classifiers; and (2) a normalized time series of Foliage Projective Cover (FPC) and NDVI combined with a spectral index. The CART and Random Forest classifiers produced high user's and producer's mapping accuracies of clearing (77-92% and 54-77%, respectively) when detecting change within epochs for which training data were available, but extrapolation to epochs without training data reduced the mapping accuracies. The use of FPC and NDVI time series provided a more robust approach for calculation of a clearing probability, as it did not rely on training data but instead on the difference of the normalized FPC / NDVI mean and standard deviation of a single year at the change point in relation to the remaining time series. However, the FPC and NDVI time series approach represented a trade-off between user's and producer's accuracies. Both change detection approaches explored in this research were sensitive to ephemeral greening and drying of the landscape. However, the developed normalized FPC and NDVI time series approach can be tuned to provide automated alerts for large

  12. Environmental effects of growing short-rotation woody crops on former agricultural lands

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Thornton, F.C.; Joslin, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    Field-scale studies in the Southeast have been addressing the environmental effects of converting agricultural lands to biomass crop production since 1994. Erosion, surface water quality and quantity and subsurface movement of water and nutrients from woody crops, switchgrass and agricultural crops are being compared. Nutrient cycling, soil physical changes and crop productivity are also being monitored at the three sites. Maximum sediment losses occurred in the spring and fall. Losses were greater from sweetgum planted without a cover crop than with a cover crop. Nutrient losses of N and P in runoff and subsurface water occurred primarily after spring fertilizer application.

  13. Spatial-structural analysis of leafless woody riparian vegetation for hydraulic considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissteiner, Clemens; Jalonen, Johanna; Järvelä, Juha; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2013-04-01

    Woody riparian vegetation is a vital element of riverine environments. On one hand woody riparian vegetation has to be taken into account from a civil engineering point of view due to boundary shear stress and vegetation drag. On the other hand it has to be considered from a river ecological point of view due to shadowing effects and as a source of organic material for aquatic habitats. In hydrodynamic and hydro-ecological studies the effects of woody riparian vegetation on flow patterns are usually investigated on a very detailed level. On the contrary vegetation elements and their spatial patterns are generally analysed and discussed on the basis of an integral approach measuring for example basal diameters, heights and projected plant areas. For a better understanding of the influence of woody riparian vegetation on turbulent flow and on river ecology, it is essential to record and analyse plant data sets on the same level of quality as for hydrodynamic or hydro-ecologic purposes. As a result of the same scale of the analysis it is possible to incorporate riparian vegetation as a sub-model in the hydraulic analysis. For plant structural components, such as branches on different topological levels it is crucial to record plant geometrical parameters describing the habitus of the plant on branch level. An exact 3D geometrical model of real plants allows for an extraction of various spatial-structural plant parameters. In addition, allometric relationships help to summarize and describe plant traits of riparian vegetation. This paper focuses on the spatial-structural composition of leafless riparia woddy vegetation. Structural and spatial analyses determine detailed geometric properties of the structural components of the plants. Geometrical and topological parameters were recorded with an electro-magnetic scanning device. In total, 23 plants (willows, alders and birches) were analysed in the study. Data were recorded on branch level, which allowed for the

  14. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  15. Use of Course Woody Debris by Cotton Mouse (Peromyscus gossypinus)in a Southeastern Pine Forest

    SciTech Connect

    T.S. McCay

    1999-03-22

    Course woody debris may be an important resource for many small mammals by providing protection and food sources. The author tracked cotton mice movements via radiotelemetry and powder in managed loblolly pine forests. Most day refuges for mice were associated with debris, including rotting stumps (69%), upturned root boles (14%) and under fallen logs (9%). Stumps used were more larger and more highly decomposed. Night time telemetry indicated that mice movements were more closely associated with the logs. Rooting stumps are an important resource for cotton mice.

  16. Mind the bubbles: achieving stable measurements of maximum hydraulic conductivity through woody plant samples

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Susana; Schenk, H. Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (kmax) of a plant sample is a measure of the ability of a plants’ vascular system to transport water and dissolved nutrients under optimum conditions. Precise measurements of kmax are needed in comparative studies of hydraulic conductivity, as well as for measuring the formation and repair of xylem embolisms. Unstable measurements of kmax are a common problem when measuring woody plant samples and it is commonly observed that kmax declines from initially high values, especially when positive water pressure is used to flush out embolisms. This study was designed to test five hypotheses that could potentially explain declines in kmax under positive pressure: (i) non-steady-state flow; (ii) swelling of pectin hydrogels in inter-vessel pit membranes; (iii) nucleation and coalescence of bubbles at constrictions in the xylem; (iv) physiological wounding responses; and (v) passive wounding responses, such as clogging of the xylem by debris. Prehydrated woody stems from Laurus nobilis (Lauraceae) and Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae) collected from plants grown in the Fullerton Arboretum in Southern California, were used to test these hypotheses using a xylem embolism meter (XYL'EM). Treatments included simultaneous measurements of stem inflow and outflow, enzyme inhibitors, stem-debarking, low water temperatures, different water degassing techniques, and varied concentrations of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and copper salts in aqueous measurement solutions. Stable measurements of kmax were observed at concentrations of calcium, potassium, and magnesium salts high enough to suppress bubble coalescence, as well as with deionized water that was degassed using a membrane contactor under strong vacuum. Bubble formation and coalescence under positive pressure in the xylem therefore appear to be the main cause for declining kmax values. Our findings suggest that degassing of water is essential for achieving stable and precise

  17. Hydrologic regime controls pattern and architecture of woody debris in mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, L. A.; Grant, G.; Lewis, S.

    2015-12-01

    One question that has received little attention in the literature on wood in rivers is the degree to which the pattern and architecture of woody debris accumulations reflect the hydrologic regime of those rivers. In this study we focus on how patterns of woody debris in mountain streams reflect the underlying flow regime by comparing wood loading, piece orientation, location, and jam architecture in spring- and runoff dominated streams with similar bioclimatic settings in the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest. A key aspect of spring-dominated streams is that flows are near constant and vary by less than a factor of 2 over the course of the year, rarely exceeding bankfull. In contrast, flow in highly variable runoff-dominated streams can vary by as much as two orders of magnitude. To compare wood accumulations in these two stream types, we took over 40 measurements for each piece of wood along four reaches in streams of similar size but different hydrologic regime. Differences in woody debris are so great that characteristics of woody debris can actually be a useful field indicator of overall flow regime. Wood in stable, spring-fed streams is largely immobile (83%), found as a single piece (67%) or as part of an open-fabric log jam (33%), and is near perpendicular to channel, indicating little movement since emplacement. In a real sense, wood becomes part of the channel and represents the dominant structural feature in these channels, accounting for a large fraction of total flow resistance and form drag. In contrast, the majority of wood in runoff-dominated streams is mobile (83%), has stripped bark (86%), occurs in densely-packed log jams (84%), and is found parallel or sub-parallel to the channel, all indicators of frequent fluvial transport. In these systems, wood moves through the channel quickly and is a much smaller component of total resistance. We conclude that wood patterning and mobility do reflect the degree of flow variability in a stream, and that

  18. Short rotation woody crops: Using agroforestry technology for energy in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L L; Ranney, J W

    1991-01-01

    Agroforestry in the United States is being primarily defined as the process of using trees in agricultural systems for conservation purposes and multiple products. The type of agroforestry most commonly practiced in many parts of the world, that is the planting of tree crops in combination with food crops or pasture, is the type least commonly practiced in the United States. One type of agroforestry technique, which is beginning now and anticipated to expand to several million acres in the United States, is the planting of short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) primarily to provide fiber and fuel. Research on SRWC's and environmental concerns are described.

  19. Short rotation woody crops: Using agroforestry technology for energy in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Ranney, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Agroforestry in the United States is being primarily defined as the process of using trees in agricultural systems for conservation purposes and multiple products. The type of agroforestry most commonly practiced in many parts of the world, that is the planting of tree crops in combination with food crops or pasture, is the type least commonly practiced in the United States. One type of agroforestry technique, which is beginning now and anticipated to expand to several million acres in the United States, is the planting of short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) primarily to provide fiber and fuel. Research on SRWC`s and environmental concerns are described.

  20. Biomass, production and woody detritus in an old coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, R.T.; Fujimori, T.

    2005-01-01

    We examined aboveground biomass dynamics, aboveground net primary production (ANPP), and woody detritus input in an old Sequoia sempervirens stand over a three-decade period. Our estimates of aboveground biomass ranged from 3300 to 5800 Mg ha-1. Stem biomass estimates ranged from 3000 to 5200 Mg ha-1. Stem biomass declined 7% over the study interval. Biomass dynamics were patchy, with marked declines in recent tree-fall patches <0.05 ha in size. Larger tree-fall patches approaching 0.2 ha in size were observed outside the study plot. Our estimates of ANPP ranged from 6 to 14 Mg ha -1yr-1. Estimates of 7 to 10 Mg ha-1yr -1 were considered to be relatively accurate. Thus, our estimates based on long-term data corroborated the findings of earlier short-term studies. ANPP of old, pure stands of Sequoia was not above average for temperate forests. Even though production was potentially high on a per stem basis, it was moderate at the stand level. We obtained values of 797 m3 ha -1 and 262 Mg ha-1 for coarse woody detritus volume and mass, respectively. Fine woody detritus volume and mass were estimated at 16 m3 ha-1 and 5 Mg ha-1, respectively. Standing dead trees (or snags) comprised 7% of the total coarse detritus volume and 8% of the total mass. Coarse detritus input averaged 5.7 to 6.9 Mg ha -1yr-1. Assuming steady-state input and pool of coarse detritus, we obtained a decay rate constant of 0.022 to 0.026. The old-growth stand of Sequoia studied had extremely high biomass, but ANPP was moderate and the amount of woody detritus was not exceptionally large. Biomass accretion and loss were not rapid in this stand partly because of the slow population dynamics and low canopy turnover rate of Sequoia at the old-growth stage. Nomenclature: Hickman (1993). ?? Springer 2005.

  1. Cheap and Cheerful Stream Restoration - An Example of System Wide Woody Addition Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, J. M.; Bennett, S. N.; Bouwes, N.; Camp, R.

    2012-12-01

    Stream restoration has been plagued with high price tags, limited spatial extents, and questionable effectiveness in light of largely absent monitoring efforts. One prominent example is the placement of large woody debris (LWD) structures and engineered log jams that are frequently employed to promote heterogeneity of instream habitat. Ironically, many of these treatments attempt to lock in place and over-engineer the woody structures as opposed to allowing them to adjust and rearrange themselves as natural LWD would have. We are in the midst of a large scale restoration experiment using LWD to recover ESA-listed steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Asotin Creek Watershed of Southeast Washington. The project is an Intensively Monitored Watershed (IMW) where the restoration treatment and monitoring use a hierarchal staircase design maximizing the power to detect a population level response in steelhead. We are treating over 12 km of stream with enough LWD input (> 200 pieces per km) to mimic the historic background wood loading and encourage the stream to reshape and regularly rework itself leaving. We are using hundreds of structures we call DWS (dynamic woody structures), which generally consist of a series of wooden fence posts driven into the stream bed and complex LWD anchored between them to invoke a specific hydrogeomorphic response. The real advantage of these DWS are their cost. They can be installed quickly (15-30 minutes each) and cheaply (< $100/DWS); even in remote settings with a 2-3 person crew, hydraulic post pounder, very cheap materials, and avoiding impacts associated with operating heavy equipment. This allows us to install lots of the structures at high density (every 5-15 channel widths) over an entire stream system. We call this overall approach System Wide Woody Addition Treatment (SWWAT). In the long term, we hypothesize that the SWWAT will provide an intial input LWD that will become a part of study creeks which are more

  2. Overcoming barriers to seedling regeneration during forest restoration on tropical pasture land and the potential value of woody weeds.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Amelia T; Freebody, Kylie; Pohlman, Catherine L; Shoo, Luke P; Catterall, Carla P

    2014-01-01

    Combating the legacy of deforestation on tropical biodiversity requires the conversion to forest of large areas of established pasture, where barriers to native plant regeneration include competition with pasture grasses and poor propagule supply (seed availability). In addition, initial woody plants that colonise pasture are often invasive, non-native species whose ecological roles and management in the context of forest regeneration are contested. In a restoration experiment at two 0.64 ha sites we quantified the response of native woody vegetation recruitment to (1) release from competition with introduced pasture grasses, and (2) local facilitation of frugivore-assisted seed dispersal provided by scattered woody plants and artificial bird perches. Herbicide pasture grass suppression during 20 months caused a significant but modest increase in density of native woody seedlings, together with abundant co-recruitment of the prominent non-native pioneer wild tobacco (Solanum mauritianum). Recruitment of native species was further enhanced by local structure in herbicide-treated areas, being consistently greater under live trees and dead non-native shrubs (herbicide-treated) than in open areas, and intermediate under bird perches. Native seedling recruitment comprised 28 species across 0.25 ha sampled but was dominated by two rainforest pioneers (Homalanthus novoguineensis, Polyscias murrayi). These early results are consistent with the expected increase in woody vegetation recruitment in response to release from competitive and dispersive barriers to rainforest regeneration. The findings highlight the need for a pragmatic consideration of the ecological roles of woody weeds and the potential roles of "new forests" more broadly in accelerating succession of humid tropical forest across large areas of retired agricultural land. PMID:24904602

  3. A meta-analysis of the responses of woody and herbaceous plants to elevated ultraviolet-B radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fu-Rong; Peng, Shao-Lin; Chen, Bao-Ming; Hou, Yu-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined plant responses to elevated ultraviolet-B radiation at the species level. More than 140 studies conducted within the past three decades were collected for meta-analysis to generalize and examine overall responses of two main life-forms, woody plants and herbaceous plants under two supplemental UV-B levels. The analysis suggested that both life-forms would suffer an overall negative effect in total biomass under the two UV-B levels, and the reduction was 7.0-14.6% of the value at ambient UV-B radiation. Comparing the overall responses under the high supplemental UV-B level with those under the low supplemental UV-B level, woody plants showed no significant changes in any variables. As opposed to this, decreases in herbaceous plant height and specific leaf area as well as increase in herbaceous UV-B-absorbing compounds under the higher UV-B level were significantly greater than those under the lower UV-B level. With continued increases in UV-B levels, the two life-forms would show different response strategies for their different intrinsic capabilities to resist UV-B damage. Woody plants would not invest in large additional amounts of UV-B-absorbing compounds, while herbaceous plants would need to induce stronger defense mechanisms to protect themselves from the associated detrimental effects of UV-B radiation. A higher number of response variables were significantly affected by UV-B radiation for herbaceous plants than for woody plants. Most of the studied variables were not affected significantly under elevated UV-B for woody plants and exhibited very large confidence intervals. Further studies should investigate if the response to elevated UV-B radiation varies between different functional groups of woody species. To sum up, we suggest that as UV-B radiation continues to increase, grassland ecosystems should receive more attention for future vegetation management.

  4. Patterns of Woody Growth for Brazilian Savanna (Cerrado) Trees in the Cuiaba Basin and Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappia, A. J.; Vourlitis, G. L.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Brazilian savanna, locally known as cerrado, is a major ecosystem that covers a vast majority of central Brazil. Little is known about how woody growth within the cerrado is affected by soil properties such as texture and/or nutrient availability. Thus, in this study we assessed the relationship between woody growth and soil properties in the Cuiaba Basin and Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. We sampled 4-5 vegetation stands in each site that varied in hydrology, soil type, and vegetation composition and structure, and measured diameter at breast height, wood density, and soil nutrient concentration and physical properties every 5-10 m along a 100 m long transect. We hypothesized that as tree diameter at breast height increases, annual tree growth rate will decrease and that woody carbon (C) storage will increase as a function of soil nutrient availability. Our preliminary data support our hypotheses. Tree growth rates declined with tree size in both the Cuiaba Basin and the Pantanal. Rates of woody C storage, both on a per tree basis (kgC tree-1 year-1) and on a per unit ground area basis (kgC m-2 year-1) were significantly positively correlated with soil extractable phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), and clay content, while only woody C storage on a per tree basis was positively correlated with potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). These data suggest that rates of woody C storage in cerrado are nutrient limited, while correspondence between C storage and soil physical properties could indicate both nutrient and water limitations to C storage.

  5. Overcoming barriers to seedling regeneration during forest restoration on tropical pasture land and the potential value of woody weeds

    PubMed Central

    Elgar, Amelia T.; Freebody, Kylie; Pohlman, Catherine L.; Shoo, Luke P.; Catterall, Carla P.

    2014-01-01

    Combating the legacy of deforestation on tropical biodiversity requires the conversion to forest of large areas of established pasture, where barriers to native plant regeneration include competition with pasture grasses and poor propagule supply (seed availability). In addition, initial woody plants that colonise pasture are often invasive, non-native species whose ecological roles and management in the context of forest regeneration are contested. In a restoration experiment at two 0.64 ha sites we quantified the response of native woody vegetation recruitment to (1) release from competition with introduced pasture grasses, and (2) local facilitation of frugivore-assisted seed dispersal provided by scattered woody plants and artificial bird perches. Herbicide pasture grass suppression during 20 months caused a significant but modest increase in density of native woody seedlings, together with abundant co-recruitment of the prominent non-native pioneer wild tobacco (Solanum mauritianum). Recruitment of native species was further enhanced by local structure in herbicide-treated areas, being consistently greater under live trees and dead non-native shrubs (herbicide-treated) than in open areas, and intermediate under bird perches. Native seedling recruitment comprised 28 species across 0.25 ha sampled but was dominated by two rainforest pioneers (Homalanthus novoguineensis, Polyscias murrayi). These early results are consistent with the expected increase in woody vegetation recruitment in response to release from competitive and dispersive barriers to rainforest regeneration. The findings highlight the need for a pragmatic consideration of the ecological roles of woody weeds and the potential roles of “new forests” more broadly in accelerating succession of humid tropical forest across large areas of retired agricultural land. PMID:24904602

  6. Multiple Scales of Control on the Structure and Spatial Distribution of Woody Vegetation in African Savanna Watersheds

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Smit, Izak P. J.; Riddel, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Factors controlling savanna woody vegetation structure vary at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and as a consequence, unraveling their combined effects has proven to be a classic challenge in savanna ecology. We used airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) to map three-dimensional woody vegetation structure throughout four savanna watersheds, each contrasting in geologic substrate and climate, in Kruger National Park, South Africa. By comparison of the four watersheds, we found that geologic substrate had a stronger effect than climate in determining watershed-scale differences in vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density. Generalized Linear Models were used to assess the spatial distribution of woody vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density, in relation to mapped hydrologic, topographic and fire history traits. For each substrate and climate combination, models incorporating topography, hydrology and fire history explained up to 30% of the remaining variation in woody canopy structure, but inclusion of a spatial autocovariate term further improved model performance. Both crown density and the cover of shorter woody canopies were determined more by unknown factors likely to be changing on smaller spatial scales, such as soil texture, herbivore abundance or fire behavior, than by our mapped regional-scale changes in topography and hydrology. We also detected patterns in spatial covariance at distances up to 50–450 m, depending on watershed and structural metric. Our results suggest that large-scale environmental factors play a smaller role than is often attributed to them in determining woody vegetation structure in southern African savannas. This highlights the need for more spatially-explicit, wide-area analyses using high resolution remote sensing techniques. PMID:26660502

  7. Managing Semi-Arid Rangelands for Carbon Storage: Grazing and Woody Encroachment Effects on Soil Carbon and Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Hasen M.; Treydte, Anna C.; Sauerborn, Jauchim

    2015-01-01

    High grazing intensity and wide-spread woody encroachment may strongly alter soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pools. However, the direction and quantity of these changes have rarely been quantified in East African savanna ecosystem. As shifts in soil C and N pools might further potentially influence climate change mitigation, we quantified and compared soil organic carbon (SOC) and total soil nitrogen (TSN) content in enclosures and communal grazing lands across varying woody cover i.e. woody encroachment levels. Estimated mean SOC and TSN stocks at 0–40 cm depth varied across grazing regimes and among woody encroachment levels. The open grazing land at the heavily encroached site on sandy loam soil contained the least SOC (30 ± 2.1 Mg ha-1) and TSN (5 ± 0.57 Mg ha-1) while the enclosure at the least encroached site on sandy clay soil had the greatest mean SOC (81.0 ± 10.6 Mg ha-1) and TSN (9.2 ± 1.48 Mg ha-1). Soil OC and TSN did not differ with grazing exclusion at heavily encroached sites, but were twice as high inside enclosure compared to open grazing soils at low encroached sites. Mean SOC and TSN in soils of 0–20 cm depth were up to 120% higher than that of the 21–40 cm soil layer. Soil OC was positively related to TSN, cation exchange capacity (CEC), but negatively related to sand content. Our results show that soil OC and TSN stocks are affected by grazing, but the magnitude is largely influenced by woody encroachment and soil texture. We suggest that improving the herbaceous layer cover through a reduction in grazing and woody encroachment restriction are the key strategies for reducing SOC and TSN losses and, hence, for climate change mitigation in semi-arid rangelands. PMID:26461478

  8. Multiple Scales of Control on the Structure and Spatial Distribution of Woody Vegetation in African Savanna Watersheds.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Nicholas R; Asner, Gregory P; Smit, Izak P J; Riddel, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    Factors controlling savanna woody vegetation structure vary at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and as a consequence, unraveling their combined effects has proven to be a classic challenge in savanna ecology. We used airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) to map three-dimensional woody vegetation structure throughout four savanna watersheds, each contrasting in geologic substrate and climate, in Kruger National Park, South Africa. By comparison of the four watersheds, we found that geologic substrate had a stronger effect than climate in determining watershed-scale differences in vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density. Generalized Linear Models were used to assess the spatial distribution of woody vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density, in relation to mapped hydrologic, topographic and fire history traits. For each substrate and climate combination, models incorporating topography, hydrology and fire history explained up to 30% of the remaining variation in woody canopy structure, but inclusion of a spatial autocovariate term further improved model performance. Both crown density and the cover of shorter woody canopies were determined more by unknown factors likely to be changing on smaller spatial scales, such as soil texture, herbivore abundance or fire behavior, than by our mapped regional-scale changes in topography and hydrology. We also detected patterns in spatial covariance at distances up to 50-450 m, depending on watershed and structural metric. Our results suggest that large-scale environmental factors play a smaller role than is often attributed to them in determining woody vegetation structure in southern African savannas. This highlights the need for more spatially-explicit, wide-area analyses using high resolution remote sensing techniques. PMID:26660502

  9. Woody biomass and RPF gasification using reforming catalyst and calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jun; Kawamoto, Katsuya; Fukushima, Ryutaro; Tanaka, Shingo

    2011-05-01

    This study focused on steam gasification and reforming of waste biomass using a reforming catalyst. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the durability of a commercial Ni reforming catalyst and the effect of CaO on the reforming behavior, and to clarify detailed factors of catalytic performance, as well as the effect of operating parameters on the characteristics of produced gas composition. Moreover, catalyst regeneration was carried out and the behavior of catalytic activity based on gas composition was investigated. Using a fluidized bed gasifier and a fixed bed reformer, gasification and reforming of waste biomass were carried out. Commercial Ni-based catalyst and calcined limestone (CaO) were applied to the reforming reaction. Temperature of the gasifier and reformer was almost 1023K. Ratio of steam to carbon in the feedstock [molmol(-1)] and equivalence ratio (i.e., ratio of actual to theoretical amount of oxygen) [-] were set at about 2 and 0.3, respectively. The feed rate of the feedstock into the bench-scale gasifier was almost 15kgh(-1). The results of waste biomass gasification confirmed the improvement in H(2) composition by the CO(2) absorption reaction using the reforming catalyst and CaO. In addition, CaO proved to be especially effective in decreasing the tar concentration in the case of woody biomass gasification. Catalytic activity was maintained by means of catalyst regeneration processing by hydrogen reduction after air oxidation when woody biomass was used as feedstock. PMID:21459406

  10. Morphological changes in woody stem of Prunus jamasakura under simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoneyama, Emi; Ishimoto-Negishi, Yoko; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Teruko

    2004-01-01

    When the four-week-old woody stem of Prunus jamasakura was grown under simulated microgravity condition on a three-dimensional clinostat, it bent at growth, and width of its secondary xylem decreased due to the reduction of fiber cell numbers and a smaller microfibril angle in the secondary cell wall, as reported in our previous paper. Gravity induces the development of the secondary xylem that supports the stem upward against the action of gravity. In this study, morphological changes of the tissues and cells were microscopically observed. Disorder was found in the concentric structure of tissues that organize the stem. The radial arrangement of the cells was also disturbed in the secondary xylem, and in the secondary phloem secondary cell walls of the bast fiber cells were undeveloped. These findings suggest that differentiation and development of the secondary xylem and the bast fiber cells are strongly controlled by terrestrial gravity. These tissue and cells functions to support the stem under the action of gravity. Furthermore, clinorotation induced disorder in the straight joint of vessel elements and the lattice-like structure of radial parenchyma cells, which is responsible for water transportation and storage, respectively. Gravity is an essential factor for keeping the division and differentiation normal in woody stem.

  11. Acoustic vibration analysis for utilization of woody plant in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Yukari; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Sato, Seigo; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Baba, Keiichi; Suzuki, Toshisada; Motohashi, Kyohei; Sakurai, Naoki; Nakagawa-izumi, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    We are proposing to raise woody plants for space agriculture in Mars. Space agriculture has the utilization of wood in their ecosystem. Nobody knows the real tree shape grown under space environment under the low or micro gravitational conditions such as outer environment. Angiosperm tree forms tension wood for keeping their shape. Tension wood formation is deeply related to gravity, but the details of the mechanism of its formation has not yet been clarified. For clarifying the mechanism, the space experiment in international space station, ISS is the best way to investigate about them as the first step. It is necessary to establish the easy method for crews who examine the experiments at ISS. Here, we are proposing to investigate the possibility of the acoustic vibration analysis for the experiment at ISS. Two types of Japanese cherry tree, weeping and upright types in Prunus sp., were analyzed by the acoustic vibration method. Coefficient-of-variation (CV) of sound speed was calculated by the acoustic vibration analysis. The amount of lignin and decomposed lignin were estimated by both Klason and Py-GC/MS method, respectively. The relationships of the results of acoustic vibration analysis and the inner components in tested woody materials were investigated. After the experiments, we confirm the correlation about them. Our results indicated that the acoustic vibration analysis would be useful for determining the inside composition as a nondestructive method in outer space environment.

  12. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated woody crops to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Spindler, D.D.; Wyman, C.E.; Grohmann, K.

    1991-12-31

    Four promising woody crops (Populus maximowiczii x nigra (NE388), P. trichocarpa x deltoides (N11), P. tremuloides, and Sweetgum Liquidambar styraciflua) were pretreated by dilute sulfuric acid and evaluated in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process for ethanol production. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in the fermentations alone, and in mixed cultures with {beta}-glucosidase producing Brettanomyces clausenii. Commercial Genencor 150L cellulose enyme was either employed alone or supplemented with {beta}-glucosidase. All SSFs were run at 37{degrees}C for 8 d and compared to saccharifications at 45{degrees}C under the same enzyme loadings. S. cerevisiae alone achieved the highest ethanol yields and rates of hydrolysis at the higher enzyme loadings, whereas the mixed culture performed better at the lower enzyme loadings without {beta}-glucosidase supplementation. The best overall rates of fermentation (3 d) and final theoretical ethanol yields (86-90%) were achieved with P. maximowiczii x nigra (NE388) and Sweetgum Liquidambar styraciflua, followed by P. tremuloides and P. trichocarpa x deltoides (N11) with slightly slower rates and lower yields. Although there were some differences in SSF performance, all these pretreated woody crops show promise as substrates for ethanol production.

  13. Modeling and Optimization of Woody Biomass Harvest and Logistics in the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Damon S.

    World energy consumption is at an all-time high and is projected to continue growing for the foreseeable future. Currently, much of the energy that is produced comes from non-renewable fossil energy sources, which includes the burden of increased greenhouse gas emissions and the fear of energy insecurity. Woody biomass is being considered as a material that can be utilized to reduce the burden caused by fossil energy. While the technical capability to convert woody biomass to energy has been known for a long period of time, the cost of the feedstock has been considered too costly to be implemented in a large commercial scale. Increasing the use of woody biomass as an energy source requires that the supply chains are setup in a way that minimizes cost, the locational factors that lead to development are understood, the facilities are located in the most favorable locations and local resource assessments can be made. A mixed integer linear programming model to efficiently configure woody biomass supply chain configurations and optimize the harvest, extraction, transport, storage and preprocessing of the woody biomass resources to provide the lowest possible delivered price. The characteristics of woody biomass, such as spatial distribution and low bulk density, tend to make collection and transport difficult as compared to traditional energy sources. These factors, as well as others, have an adverse effect on the cost of the feedstock. The average delivered cost was found to be between 64.69-98.31 dry Mg for an annual demand of 180,000 dry Mg. The effect of resource availability and required demand was examined to determine the impact that each would have on the total cost. The use of woody biomass for energy has been suggested as a way to improve rural economies through job creation, reduction of energy costs and regional development. This study examined existing wood using bio-energy facilities in the northeastern United States to define the drivers of

  14. Convergent production and tolerance among 107 woody species and divergent production between shrubs and trees.

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Ming; Sun, Zhen-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Green leaves face two fundamental challenges (i.e., carbon fixation and stress tolerance) during their lifespan. However, the relationships between leaf production potential and leaf tolerance potential have not been explicitly tested with a broad range of plant species in the same environment. To do so, we conducted a field investigation based on 107 woody plants grown in a common garden and complementary laboratory measurements. The values, as measured by a chlorophyll meter, were significantly related to the direct measurements of chlorophyll content on a leaf area basis. Area-based chlorophyll content was positively correlated with root surface area, whole-plant biomass, leaf mass per area (LMA), and force to punch. Additionally, LMA had a positive correlation with force to punch. Shrubs had a higher leaf chlorophyll content than trees; however, shrubs and trees exhibited a similar leaf lifespan, force to punch, and LMA. These findings suggest that the production potential of leaves and their tolerance to stresses may be convergent in woody species and that the leaf production potential may differ between shrubs and trees. This study highlights the possibility that functional convergence and divergence might be linked to long-term selection pressures and genetic constraints. PMID:26854019

  15. Raman microprobe investigation of molecular structure and organization in the native state of woody tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Although the primary emphasis of our program has remained with the application of Raman spectroscopy to the study of native tissue, the scope of the work has been expanded to include a number of complementary approaches. These have included Solid State 13C NMR, autoradiography of radiolabeled woody tissue sections, and the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have resulted in progress in the areas of interpretation of the spectral features, and confirmation of the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. We have assembled and made operational our new microprobe and spectrometer systems acquired under the DOE-URIP program. We have also demonstrated that, operating with gated detection and pulsed laser excitation, we can discriminate against the laser-excited fluorescence characteristic of most woody tissue. Our studies of celluloses, which combine Raman spectroscopy and 13C NMR have shown that all native celluloses are composites of two forms which have the same secondary structure but different tertiary structures.

  16. Gibberellin Promotes Shoot Branching in the Perennial Woody Plant Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Gao, Congcong; Chen, Mao-Sheng; Pan, Bang-Zhen; Ye, Kaiqin; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2015-08-01

    Strigolactone (SL), auxin and cytokinin (CK) interact to regulate shoot branching. CK has long been considered to be the only key phytohormone to promote lateral bud outgrowth. Here we report that gibberellin also acts as a positive regulator in the control of shoot branching in the woody plant Jatropha curcas. We show that gibberellin and CK synergistically promote lateral bud outgrowth, and that both hormones influence the expression of putative branching regulators, J. curcas BRANCHED1 and BRANCHED2, which are key transcription factors maintaining bud dormancy. Moreover, treatment with paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of de novo gibberellin biosynthesis, significantly reduced the promotion of bud outgrowth by CK, suggesting that gibberellin is required for CK-mediated axillary bud outgrowth. In addition, SL, a plant hormone involved in the repression of shoot branching, acted antagonistically to both gibberellin and CK in the control of lateral bud outgrowth. Consistent with this, the expression of JcMAX2, a J. curcas homolog of Arabidopsis MORE AXILLARY GROWTH 2 encoding an F-box protein in the SL signaling pathway, was repressed by gibberellin and CK treatment. We also provide physiological evidence that gibberellin also induces shoot branching in many other trees, such as papaya, indicating that a more complicated regulatory network occurs in the control of shoot branching in some perennial woody plants. PMID:26076970

  17. Can antibrowsing defense regulate the spread of woody vegetation in arctic tundra?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, John P.; Joly, Kyle; Chapin, F. Stuart, III; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Kielland, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially shrubs, in arctic tundra. Many factors may affect the extent of this increase, including browsing by mammals. We hypothesize that across the Arctic the effect of browsing will vary because of regional variation in antibrowsing chemical defense. Using birch (Betula) as a case study, we propose that browsing is unlikely to retard birch expansion in the region extending eastward from the Lena River in central Siberia across Beringia and the continental tundra of central and eastern Canada where the more effectively defended resin birches predominate. Browsing is more likely to retard birch expansion in tundra west of the Lena to Fennoscandia, Iceland, Greenland and South Baffin Island where the less effectively defended non-resin birches predominate. Evidence from the literature supports this hypothesis. We further suggest that the effect of warming on the supply of plant-available nitrogen will not significantly change either this pan-Arctic pattern of variation in antibrowsing defense or the resultant effect that browsing has on birch expansion in tundra. However, within central and east Beringia warming-caused increases in plant-available nitrogen combined with wildfire could initiate amplifying feedback loops that could accelerate shrubification of tundra by the more effectively defended resin birches. This accelerated shrubification of tundra by resin birch, if extensive, could reduce the food supply of caribou causing population declines. We conclude with a brief discussion of modeling methods that show promise in projecting invasion of tundra by woody plants.

  18. Allometric scaling relationship between above- and below-ground biomass within and across five woody seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dongliang; Ma, Yuzhu; Zhong, Quanling; Xu, Weifeng

    2014-01-01

    Allometric biomass allocation theory predicts that leaf biomass (ML) scaled isometrically with stem (MS) and root (MR) biomass, and thus above-ground biomass (leaf and stem) (MA) and root (MR) scaled nearly isometrically with below-ground biomass (root) for tree seedlings across a wide diversity of taxa. Furthermore, prior studies also imply that scaling constant should vary with species. However, litter is known about whether such invariant isometric scaling exponents hold for intraspecific biomass allocation, and how variation in scaling constants influences the interspecific scaling relationship between above- and below-ground biomass. Biomass data of seedlings from five evergreen species were examined to test scaling relationships among biomass components across and within species. Model Type II regression was used to compare the numerical values of scaling exponents and constants among leaf, stem, root, and above- to below-ground biomass. The results indicated that ML and MS scaled in an isometric or a nearly isometric manner with MR, as well as MA to MR for five woody species. Significant variation was observed in the Y-intercepts of the biomass scaling curves, resulting in the divergence for intraspecific scaling and interspecific scaling relationships for ML versus MS and ML versus MR, but not for MS versus MR and MA versus MR. We conclude, therefore, that a nearly isometric scaling relationship of MA versus MR holds true within each of the studied woody species and across them irrespective the negative scaling relationship between leaf and stem. PMID:25505524

  19. Characterization of water dissolved organic matter under woody vegetation patches in semi-arid Mediterranean soils.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, M; Sánchez-Sánchez, A; Jordá, J D; Amat, B; Cortina, J; Ruiz-Vicedo, N; El-Khattabi, M

    2016-05-15

    Woody patches in semiarid environments favor the establishment of other plants. Facilitation may be favored by an increase in soil fertility. Dissolved organic matter (DOM), is the most active fraction of soil organic matter and may contain compounds affecting plant establishment, as allelochemicals, hormone-like substances and metal carriers. However, information on DOM contents and composition in these environments is scarce. In this paper, we study the impact of woody patches on DOM in Stipa tenacissima L. steppes and discuss its implications for community dynamics. DOM under patch- and inter-patch areas, was analyzed for elemental composition, UV-Vis indices and organic acid content. Element concentration and composition in DOM, and organic acid concentration were similar in patch- and inter-patch areas. Yet, soils under patches were richer in DOC, aromatic species and organic acids (particularly fumaric acid) than soils in inter-patch areas. Dominant species affected organic matter concentration and quality in complex ways. Thus, patches dominated by Ephedra fragilis showed higher concentrations of TOC and aromatics than those dominated by other species. Rhamnus lycioides patches showed the highest accumulation of fumaric acid, which may contribute to its successful recruitment rate and expansion in the area. Our results show substantial differences in the amount and composition of DOM and specific compounds affecting soil functionality and plant dynamics. Further studies on the effects of such changes on seedling performance are needed to increase our understanding of plant-plant interactions in semiarid environments. PMID:26930307

  20. Inoculation of Woody Legumes with Selected Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Rhizobia To Recover Desertified Mediterranean Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, M. A.; Salamanca, C. P.; Barea, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Revegetation strategies, either for reclamation or for rehabilitation, are being used to recover desertified ecosystems. Woody legumes are recognized as species that are useful for revegetation of water-deficient, low-nutrient environments because of their ability to form symbiotic associations with rhizobial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi, which improve nutrient acquisition and help plants to become established and cope with stress situations. A range of woody legumes used in revegetation programs, particularly in Mediterranean regions, were assayed. These legumes included both exotic and native species and were used in a test of a desertified semiarid ecosystem in southeast Spain. Screening for the appropriate plant species-microsymbiont combinations was performed previously, and a simple procedure to produce plantlets with optimized mycorrhizal and nodulated status was developed. The results of a 4-year trial showed that (i) only the native shrub legumes were able to become established under the local environmental conditions (hence, a reclamation strategy is recommended) and (ii) biotechnological manipulation of the seedlings to be used for revegetation (by inoculation with selected rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi) improved outplanting performance, plant survival, and biomass development. PMID:16348838

  1. Transcriptional and Hormonal Regulation of Gravitropism of Woody Stems in Populus[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gerttula, Suzanne; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Lewis, Daniel R.; Brumer, Harry; Hart, Foster; Filkov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Angiosperm trees reorient their woody stems by asymmetrically producing a specialized xylem tissue, tension wood, which exerts a strong contractile force resulting in negative gravitropism of the stem. Here, we show, in Populus trees, that initial gravity perception and response occurs in specialized cells through sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplasts and relocalization of the auxin transport protein, PIN3. Gibberellic acid treatment stimulates the rate of tension wood formation and gravibending and enhances tissue-specific expression of an auxin-responsive reporter. Gravibending, maturation of contractile fibers, and gibberellic acid (GA) stimulation of tension wood formation are all sensitive to transcript levels of the Class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor-encoding gene ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2). We generated genome-wide transcriptomes for trees in which gene expression was perturbed by gravistimulation, GA treatment, and modulation of ARK2 expression. These data were employed in computational analyses to model the transcriptional networks underlying wood formation, including identification and dissection of gene coexpression modules associated with wood phenotypes, GA response, and ARK2 binding to genes within modules. We propose a model for gravitropism in the woody stem in which the peripheral location of PIN3-expressing cells relative to the cambium results in auxin transport toward the cambium in the top of the stem, triggering tension wood formation, while transport away from the cambium in the bottom of the stem triggers opposite wood formation. PMID:26410302

  2. Convergent production and tolerance among 107 woody species and divergent production between shrubs and trees

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Ming; Sun, Zhen-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Green leaves face two fundamental challenges (i.e., carbon fixation and stress tolerance) during their lifespan. However, the relationships between leaf production potential and leaf tolerance potential have not been explicitly tested with a broad range of plant species in the same environment. To do so, we conducted a field investigation based on 107 woody plants grown in a common garden and complementary laboratory measurements. The values, as measured by a chlorophyll meter, were significantly related to the direct measurements of chlorophyll content on a leaf area basis. Area-based chlorophyll content was positively correlated with root surface area, whole-plant biomass, leaf mass per area (LMA), and force to punch. Additionally, LMA had a positive correlation with force to punch. Shrubs had a higher leaf chlorophyll content than trees; however, shrubs and trees exhibited a similar leaf lifespan, force to punch, and LMA. These findings suggest that the production potential of leaves and their tolerance to stresses may be convergent in woody species and that the leaf production potential may differ between shrubs and trees. This study highlights the possibility that functional convergence and divergence might be linked to long-term selection pressures and genetic constraints. PMID:26854019

  3. Integration of Shiitake cultivation and solid-state anaerobic digestion for utilization of woody biomass.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yunqin; Ge, Xumeng; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-04-01

    Pretreatment technologies that can not only reduce the recalcitrance of woody biomass but also achieve a high benefit-cost ratio are desirable for bioenergy production from woody biomass. In this study, an integrated process was proposed and conducted by pretreating woodchips via Shiitake cultivation for improved methane yield during solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD), and simultaneously producing mushrooms as a high-value co-product. Shiitake cultivation using woodchips as the main substrate ingredient obtained mushroom yields comparable to those using a commercial substrate. Enzymatic digestibility and cumulative methane yields (133-160 L kg(-1)VS during 62 days of SS-AD) of pretreated substrates (spent mushroom substrate) were at least 1.5 times as high as those of untreated woodchips. Compared to a sole SS-AD process, the integrated Shiitake cultivation/SS-AD process increased methane production and solid waste reduction per kilogram of woodchips by about 1.5 and 8 times, respectively. PMID:25686546

  4. EFFECT OF SITE ON BACTERIAL POPULATIONS IN THE SAPWOOD OF COARSE WOODY DEBRIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Emma, G.,; Waldrop, Thomas, A.; McElreath, Susan, D.; Tainter, Frank, H.

    1998-01-01

    Porter, Emma G., T.A. Waldrop, Susan D. McElreath, and Frank H. Tainter. 1998. Effect of site on bacterial populations in the sapwood of coarse woody debris. Pp. 480-484. In: Proc. 9th Bienn. South. Silv. Res. Conf. T.A. Waldrop (ed). USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-20. Abstract: Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southeastern forest ecosystems, yet little is known about its dynamics in these systems. This project identified bacterial populations associated with CWD and their dynamics across landscape ecosystem classification (LEC) units. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three hydric, mesic, and xeric sites at the Savannah River Station. After the controls were processed, samples were taken at four intervals over a 16-week period. Samples were ground within an anaerobe chamber using nonselective media. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were identified using the Biolog system and the anaerobes were identified using the API 20A system. Major genera isolated were: Bacillus, Buttiauxella, Cedecea, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Serratia, and Xanthomonas. The mean total isolates were determined by LEC units and sample intervals. Differences occurred between the sample intervals with total isolates of 6.67, 13.33, 10.17, and 9.50 at 3, 6, 10, and 16 weeks, respectively. No significant differences in the numbers of bacteria isolated were found between LEC units.

  5. The Effects of Coarse Woody Debris and Vegetation Structure on Avian Communities of Southeastern Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda) Forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, S.M.

    1999-09-01

    Avian community richness and abundance were compared among several treatments in which coarse woody debris was manipulated. Treatments included a control, all dead wood removed less than four inches, and all down wood less than four inches removed. Avian communities were compared during the winter and spring nesting periods. In general, no differences in community parameters were detected during the winter months. However, during the spring nesting season several species of cavity nesting species like woodpeckers were significantly reduced where all snags were removed. Diversity was highest on the control. In addition, the woody debris appeared to benefit several ground nesting species such as the Carolina wren.

  6. Large woody debris mobility and accumulation by an extreme flood - an example from the Dyje River, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macka, Zdenek; Krejci, Lukas

    2010-05-01

    Large woody debris (LWD) in the form of logs, branches and their fragments play an important geomorphic and ecological role in forested watersheds. Especially when organized in accumulations and jams, LWD have been found to change hydraulic, morphological, sedimentary and biological characteristics of fluvial ecosystems. Our study focuses on LWD jams distribution and properties within the 44 km long forested reach of the Dyje River in south-eastern Czech Republic. The study reach is located between two large water reservoirs and the flow is regulated showing significant daily fluctuation of discharges due to water releases for power generation. River flows in the deeply incised meandering valley with the narrow and patchy floodplain. In 2002, and especially 2006 large volumes of LWD have been transported by river and the water reservoir downstream was congested with wood. Peak discharge of 2006 flood equalled 306 m3.s-1 which was estimated as 500 year flood. The flood caused significant mobility and redistribution of woody debris as in aquatic, so in riparian segment of the river corridor. The high rate of LWD transport is favoured by large bankfull channel width which exceeds the average tree height. LWD jams were defined as aggregations of three or more wood pieces with diameter ≥ 0.1 m and length ≥ 1 m. We surveyed LWD jams in 62 river reaches, which have been located at meander apexes, inflections and intermediate positions; the length of the reaches was 200 m. The overall number of registered LWD jams was 200. Majority of jams consist of solely allochthonous (transported) wood pieces (65 %), some jams are combination of large key trees and trapped transported pieces (29%), and only small proportion are jams formed by locally uprooted trees (12,6%). Number of wood pieces varies greatly from 3 to 98, the most common being the interval 5 - 10 pieces per jam. Spatial distribution of jams is longitudinally and transversally irregular within the river corridor

  7. Mapping global potential risk of mango sudden decline disease caused by fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mango Sudden Decline (MSD), sometimes referred to as mango wilt, is an important disease of mango caused by one of the most significant fungal species causing disease in woody plants, Ceratocystis fimbriata. This species is mainly disseminated by the mango bark beetle, Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Steb...

  8. Responses to shading of naturalized and non-naturalized exotic woody species

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yanhao; van Kleunen, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent studies have suggested that responses to shading gradients may play an important role in establishment success of exotic plants, but hitherto few studies have tested this. Therefore, a common-garden experiment was conducted using multiple Asian woody plant species that were introduced to Europe >100 years ago in order to test whether naturalized and non-naturalized species differ in their responses to shading. Specifically, a test was carried out to determine whether naturalized exotic woody species maintained better growth under shaded conditions, and whether they expressed greater (morphological and physiological) adaptive plasticity in response to shading, relative to non-naturalized species. Methods Nineteen naturalized and 19 non-naturalized exotic woody species were grown under five light levels ranging from 100 to 7 % of ambient light. For all plants, growth performance (i.e. biomass), morphological and CO2 assimilation characteristics were measured. For the CO2 assimilation characteristics, CO2 assimilation rate was measured at 1200 μmol m–2 s–1 (i.e. saturated light intensity, A1200), 50 μmol m–2 s–1 (i.e. low light intensity, A50) and 0 μmol m–2 s–1 (A0, i.e. dark respiration). Key Results Overall, the naturalized and non-naturalized species did not differ greatly in biomass production and measured morphological and CO2 assimilation characteristics across the light gradient. However, it was found that naturalized species grew taller and reduced total leaf area more than non-naturalized species in response to shading. It was also found that naturalized species were more capable of maintaining a high CO2 assimilation rate at low light intensity (A50) when grown under shading. Conclusions The results indicate that there is no clear evidence that the naturalized species possess a superior response to shading over non-naturalized species, at least not at the early stage of their growth. However, the higher CO2

  9. Controls upon microbial accessibility to soil organic matter following woody plant encroachment into grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, C. A.; Boutton, T. W.; Filley, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment (WPE) into savannas and grasslands is a global phenomenon that alters soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics through changes in litter quality and quantity, soil structure, microbial ecology, and soil hydrology. To elucidate the controls upon microbial accessibility to SOM, bulk soils from a chronosequence of progressive WPE into native grasslands at the Texas A&M Agricultural Experimental Station La Copita Research Area were incubated for one year. The quantity and stable carbon isotope composition of respired CO2, plant biopolymer chemistry in SOM, and microbial community structure were tracked. Respiration rates declined steadily over the course of the experiment with 15-25% of the total CO2 respired released in the first month of incubation. Between 8 and 18% of the total carbon was mineralized to CO2 throughout the incubation. After day 84 a significantly (p < 0.05) greater portion of carbon was mineralized from soils of older woody clusters (34-86 years) than from soils of younger clusters (14-23 years) and the native grassland. Approximately 80% of patterns seen in cumulative CO2 loss could be explained by the proportions of macro- and micro-aggregates within each soil, suggesting soil structure is a major controlling factor of respiration rates. Despite documented carbon accrual within La Copita soils due to WPE, we observed no evidence of enhanced carbon stabilization in these respiration experiments. In fact, a greater proportion of total carbon was lost from the soil of mature woody stands than from young stands, suggesting carbon accumulation observed with WPE may be due to greater input rates or microbial dynamics not captured in the laboratory incubation. A cluster approximately 34 years in age represents a transition point in WPE where respiration dynamics become distinct between grassland and wooded elements. By day 84 of the incubation CO2 respired from all soils was depleted with respect to bulk SOM (1.5 to 5‰) and this

  10. Distributed Modeling Reveals the Ecohydrological Dynamics Linked with Woody Plant Encroachment in the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, N. A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2012-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment is an important issue facing semiarid ecosystems in the southwestern United States that is associated with grazing pressures, fire suppression, and the invasion of shrub species into historical grasslands. In this study, we present observational and distributed modeling activities conducted in two small rangeland watersheds of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, Arizona. This Sonoran Desert landscape is representative of the vegetation shift from grasslands to a woody savanna due to the encroachment of velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina). The paired basins are similar in size and in close proximity, leading to equivalent meteorological and soil conditions. Nevertheless, they vary substantially in mesquite cover, with one basin having undergone a removal treatment several decades ago, while the other watershed represents the regional encroachment process. This distinction presents an excellent case study for analyzing the effects of mesquite encroachment on dryland ecohydrological dynamics. Observational datasets are obtained from a high-resolution environmental sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, twenty-one soil moisture and temperature profiles, five channel runoff flumes and an eddy covariance tower with a complete set of radiation, energy, carbon and water fluxes. In addition, high-resolution digital terrain models and image orthomosaics were obtained from a piloted aircraft with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements and an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera. These two remote sensing platforms allowed characterizing the topography, stream network and plant species distributions at a high resolution (<1 m) in both basins. Using the sensor network, we present comparative analyses of watershed rainfall-runoff transformation in the paired basins, illustrating the role that mesquite trees have in runoff generation at the two outlet flumes. We further explore the impact of mesquite trees on the soil

  11. Impacts of Woody Plant Encroachment and Cultivation on Soil Carbon and Soil Water Flux Across a Precipitation Gradient in Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Jobbágy, E. G.; Jackson, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    Land-use/cover changes affect flux and storages of water and carbon, which are becoming increasingly important in light of the projected climate change and water shortages around the world. Cultivation of food crops and woody-plant encroachment are two such changes that are prevalent in grassland ecosystems. We compared belowground water flux and carbon storage in adjacent stands of natural grasslands and woody- encroached or cultivated plots. Stands were located in 5 sites across a precipitation gradient in the Pampa grasslands of varying soil texture in Argentina. Soil cores were excavated to 9 meters or to groundwater level and analyzed for soil moisture and chloride to estimate groundwater recharge rates using the chloride mass balance and chloride displacement methods. Cores were also analyzed for soil organic and inorganic carbon. Comparison of soil chloride profiles under the land-use/cover change from the natural grasslands suggested reduced recharge and/or higher groundwater use under woody plants and enhanced recharge under cultivation compared to the grasslands. Chloride concentrations differed up to 3-fold between the grassland and the two land-use/cover changes. Soil organic carbon was similar or significantly higher under woody plants and lower under cultivation compared with grasslands. The changes in water yield are discussed in context of the estimated carbon sequestration measured at the sites. Valuation of such changes would help determine the optimum land-use/cover under global environmental changes.

  12. Woody plant encroachment into grasslands leads to accelerated erosion of previously stable organic carbon from dryland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttock, Alan; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.; Macleod, Christopher J. A.; Bol, Roland; Brazier, Richard E.

    2014-12-01

    Drylands worldwide are experiencing rapid and extensive environmental change, concomitant with the encroachment of woody vegetation into grasslands. Woody encroachment leads to changes in both the structure and function of dryland ecosystems and has been shown to result in accelerated soil erosion and loss of soil nutrients. Covering 40% of the terrestrial land surface, dryland environments are of global importance, both as a habitat and a soil carbon store. Relationships between environmental change, soil erosion, and the carbon cycle are uncertain. There is a clear need to further our understanding of dryland vegetation change and impacts on carbon dynamics. Here two grass-to-woody ecotones that occur across large areas of the southwestern United States are investigated. This study takes a multidisciplinary approach, combining ecohydrological monitoring of structure and function and a dual-proxy biogeochemical tracing approach using the unique natural biochemical signatures of the vegetation. Results show that following woody encroachment, not only do these drylands lose significantly more soil and organic carbon via erosion but that this includes significant amounts of legacy organic carbon which would previously have been stable under grass cover. Results suggest that these dryland soils may not act as a stable organic carbon pool, following encroachment and that accelerated erosion of carbon, driven by vegetation change, has important implications for carbon dynamics.

  13. Facilitation contributes to Mediterranean woody plant diversity but does not shape the diversity-productivity relationship along aridity gradients.

    PubMed

    Rey, Pedro J; Alcántara, Julio M; Manzaneda, Antonio J; Sánchez-Lafuente, Alfonso M

    2016-07-01

    The diversity-productivity relationship (humped-back model (HBM)) and the stress-gradient (SGH) hypotheses may be connected when productivity is limited primarily by aridity. We analytically connect both hypotheses and assess the contribution of facilitation to woody plant richness along the aridity gradient of the Western Mediterranean floristic region. We monitored regeneration niches of woody plants, obtaining rarefied species richness and plant relative interaction indices in 54 forests and scrublands in a 1750-km geographical range across Spain, Morocco and the Canary Islands. We verified the monotonic increase in facilitation with aridity postulated by SGH and the humped-shape pattern of species richness expected from HBM, which became manifest after expanding the aridity gradient or crossing vegetation types. Along the gradient, interaction balance turned into facilitation earlier in forest than in scrublands. The effects of aridity and interaction balance on species diversity were additive rather than interdependent. Facilitation is an important driver of woody species richness at macroecological scales because it added up to diversity in most sites, with enhanced contribution with increased stress. The HBM was not shaped by species interactions. Results suggest that facilitation may act in Mediterranean vegetation buffering against critical transitions between states allowing woody plant communities to cope with the rise in aridity expected with global warming. PMID:26959084

  14. A common origin for woody Sonchus and five related genera in the Macaronesian islands: molecular evidence for extensive radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S C; Crawford, D J; Francisco-Ortega, J; Santos-Guerra, A

    1996-01-01

    Woody Sonchus and five related genera (Babcockia, Taeckholmia, Sventenia, Lactucosonchus, and Prenanthes) of the Macaronesian islands have been regarded as an outstanding example of adaptive radiation in angiosperms. Internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA (ITS) sequences were used to demonstrate that, despite the extensive morphological and ecological diversity of the plants, the entire alliance in insular Macaronesia has a common origin. The sequence data place Lactucosonchus as sister group to the remainder of the alliance and also indicate that four related genera are in turn sister groups to subg. Dendrosonchus and Taeckholmia. This implies that the woody members of Sonchus were derived from an ancestor similar to allied genera now present on the Canary Islands. It is also evident that the alliance probably occurred in the Canary Islands during the late Miocene or early Pliocene. A rapid radiation of major lineages in the alliance is consistent with an unresolved polytomy near the base and low ITS sequence divergence. Increase of woodiness is concordant with other insular endemics and refutes the relictural nature of woody Sonchus in the Macaronesian islands. PMID:8755546

  15. REMOTE SENSING OF WOODY SHRUB COVER IN DESERT GRASSLANDS USING MISR WITH A GEOMETRIC-OPTICAL CANOPY REFLECTANCE MODEL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method is described for the retrieval of fractional cover of large woody plants (shrubs) at the landscape scale using moderate resolution multiangle remote sensing data from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and an hybrid geometric-optical (GO) canopy reflectance model. Remote se...

  16. Denisty fractionation and 13C reveal changes in soil carbon following woody encroachment in a desert ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Woody encroachment has dramatically changed land cover patterns in arid and semiarid systems (drylands) worldwide over the past 150 years. This change is known to influence bulk soil carbon (C) pools, but the implications for dynamics and stability of these pools are not well understood. Working in ...

  17. Effects of seasonal drought on net carbon dioxide exchange from a woody-plant-encroached semiarid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The encroachment of woody plants into historical semiarid grasslands has important ecohydrological and socioeconomic consequences. In this paper, we document the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of water and carbon dioxide that occurred from 2004 through 2007 over a semiarid, warm-season savanna in sou...

  18. Large woody debris and salmonid habitat in the Anchor River basin, Alaska, following an extensive spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A widespread and intense spruce beetle outbreak has killed most of the mature white spruce trees across many watersheds in south-central Alaska. To investigate the potential habitat impacts in a salmon stream, we characterized the current abundance and species composition of large woody debris (LWD...

  19. Effects of fireplace use on forest vegetation and amount of woody debris in suburban forests in northwestern Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hegetschweiler, K Tessa; van Loon, Nicole; Ryser, Annette; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter; Baur, Bruno

    2009-02-01

    Urban forests are popular recreation areas in Europe. Several of these temperate broad-leaved forests also have a high conservation value due to sustainable management over many centuries. Recreational activities, particularly the use of fireplaces, can cause extensive damage to soil, ground vegetation, shrubs, and trees. Firewood collection depletes woody debris, leading to a loss of habitat for specialized organisms. We examined the effects of fireplace use on forest vegetation and the amount of woody debris by comparing disturbed and control plots in suburban forests in northwestern Switzerland. At frequently used fireplaces, we found reduced species densities in the ground vegetation and shrub layer and changes in plant species composition due to human trampling within an area of 150-200 m(2). Picnicking and grilling also reduced the height and changed the age structure of shrubs and young trees. The amount of woody debris was lower in disturbed plots than in control plots. Pieces of wood with a diameter of 0.6-7.6 cm were preferentially collected by fireplace users. The reduction in woody debris volume extended up to a distance of 16 m from the fire ring, covering an area of 800 m(2) at each picnic site. In order to preserve the ecological integrity of urban forests and to maintain their attractiveness as important recreation areas, we suggest depositing logging residues to be used as firewood and to restrict visitor movements near picnic sites. PMID:18773236

  20. Woody biomass-based bioenergy development at the Atikokan Power Generating Station: Local perceptions and public opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baten, Cassia Sanzida

    To tackle climate change, reduce air pollution and promote development of renewable energy, the Ontario government is investing in the conversion of the coal-based Atikokan Power Generating Station (APGS) in Atikokan, Ontario, to woody biomass feedstock. This research offers one of the first looks at the perspectives of different individuals and groups on converting woody biomass to energy. Using a combination of study instruments which include literature review, surveys, interviews with key informants, semi-structured interviews, and focus group discussions, this dissertation uses qualitative research to provide a picture of the public's opinions and attitudes towards the APGS biomass energy development. Given Ontario's huge and sustainably managed forest resource, woody biomass is expected to be a major component of renewable energy production in Ontario. The move towards renewable energy that replaces fossil fuels with woody biomass will have considerable socio-economic implications for local and First Nation communities living in and around the bioenergy power generating station. Findings indicate that there is wide support for biomass utilization at the APGS by local people, especially since the project would create sustainable employment. The connection of woody biomass-based energy generation and rural community development provides opportunities and challenges for Atikokan's economic development. Respondents identified economic, environmental and social barriers to biomass utilization, and emphasized trust and transparency as key elements in the successful implementation of the APGS project. As demand for woody biomass-based energy increases, special attention will be needed to ensure and maintain the social, economic and environmental sustainability of biomass use at the APGS. In this research, respondents' views about biomass utilization for energy mainly focused on forest-related issues rather than energy. In Atikokan much of the project's social

  1. Energy input-output analysis of herbaceous energy and short-rotation woody crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    Energy input-output analyses, expressed in terms of energy-profit ratios, were derived for the production of a biocrude fuel oil from switchgrass and silver maple. Each energy analysis was concerned with determining the amount of direct and embodied energy associated with crop production, transport, processing, and conversion. Direct energy inputs include energy derived from gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and/or LP-gas. Embodied energy inputs are the amount of energy allocated to the machinery, chemicals, and equipment needed to perform the various operations associated with producing, transporting, processing, and converting bioenergy crops to a useful energy source. Energy-profit ratios varied from 1.96 to 2.48 for switchgrass and were 1.46 to 1.97 when short-rotation woody crops were the feedstock.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of a new isolate of passion fruit woodiness virus from Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Masayuki; Wylie, Stephen J; Chiaki, Yuya; Iwai, Hisashi

    2013-08-01

    We determined the complete genome sequence of the passion fruit woodiness virus Gld-1 isolate (PWV-Gld-1) from Australia and compared it with that of PWV-MU-2, another Australian isolate of PWV. The genomes shared high sequence identity in both the complete nucleotide sequence and the ORF amino acid sequence. All of the cleavage sites of each protein were identical to those of MU-2, and the sequence identity for the individual proteins ranged from 97.2 % to 100.0 %. However, the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the Gld-1 isolate shared only 46.8 % sequence identity with that of PWV-MU-2 and was 177 nucleotides shorter. Re-sequencing of the 5'UTR of MU-2 revealed that the 5' end of the original sequence includes an artifact generated by deep sequencing. PMID:23508550

  3. Use of wetlands for production of woody plants for fuels and petrochemical substitutes. [Alders, willows, poplars

    SciTech Connect

    Farnham, R.S.; Read, P.

    1981-03-01

    Work performed on this project in the past year has included the evaluations of natural stands productivity for wetland biomass species; propagation studies with alder, willow and poplar species; nursery establishment for production of cultivars and evaluation of wetland soils suitable for production of woody biomass species. Also a biomass research facility has been established in N. Minnesota suitable for long-term research and demonstration. Propagation research has included both micro and macro propagation techniques with native willows, selected willow clones from Sweden, alder seed selection from Finland and hybrid poplar clones from US Forest Service, Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Approximately 100,000 rooted plants will be available for field research by June 1, 1981.

  4. Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maria S.; Fridley, Jason D.; Yin, Jingjing; Bauerle, Taryn L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons. PMID:24348490

  5. Characterization of woody and herbaceous biomasses lignin composition with 1064 nm dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lupoi, Jason S; Smith, Emily A

    2012-08-01

    Biomass representing different classes of bioenergy feedstocks, including woody and herbaceous species, was measured with 1064 nm Raman spectroscopy. Pine, oak, poplar, kenaf, miscanthus, pampas grass, switchgrass, alfalfa, orchard grass, and red clover were included in this study. Spectral differences have been identified with an emphasis on lignin guaiacyl and syringyl monomer content and carotenoid compounds. The interpretation of the Raman spectra was correlated with (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning spectra of select biomass samples. Thioacidolysis quantification of guaiacyl and syringyl monomer composition and the library of Raman spectra were used as a training set to develop a principal component analysis model for classifying plant samples and a principal component regression model for quantifying lignin guaiacyl and syringyl composition. Raman spectroscopy with 1064 nm excitation offers advantages over alternative techniques for biomass characterization, including low spectral backgrounds, higher spectral resolution, short analysis times, and nondestructive analyses. PMID:22800567

  6. Characterisation of seven Inocybe ectomycorrhizal morphotypes from a semiarid woody steppe.

    PubMed

    Seress, Diána; Dima, Bálint; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-04-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) of Inocybe species (Inocybaceae, Basidiomycota) formed by three host plant species (Populus alba, Salix rosmarinifolia and Pinus nigra) in a semiarid woody steppe of Hungary were studied. To identify the fungal partners, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences for the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear DNA (nrDNA ITS) together with sequences gained from public databases. Seven Inocybe ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were morpho-anatomically characterised. Five morphotypes were identified (I. phaeoleuca, I. psammophila, I. semifulva, I. splendens and I. subporospora), whereas two morphotypes represented unidentified Inocybe species. Differences were discernible among the morphotypes, and they showed general anatomical characteristics of Inocybe ECM, such as the slightly organised plectenchymatic mantle (types A, B and E and the gelatinous C). The ECM of I. subporospora and I. phaeoleuca were detected from the introduced Pinus nigra. These two fungi are probably native to the area but capable of forming a novel ectomycorrhizal association with the invasive host. PMID:26403243

  7. CosmoBon, tree research team, for studying utilization of woody plant in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Sato, Seigo; Baba, Keiichi; Chida, Yukari

    2012-07-01

    We are proposing to raise woody plants in space for several applications and plant science, as Tree research team, TRT. Trees produce excess oxygen, wooden materials for living cabin, and provide biomass for cultivating mushroom and insect as for the space agriculture. Excellent tree shapes which would be deeply related to wood formation improve quality of life under stressful environment in outer space. We have the serious problem about their size. Bonsai is one of the Japanese traditional arts. We have been investigating the tension wood formation under exotic gravitational environment using Bonsai. CosmoBon is the small tree Bonsai for our space experiment. The tension wood formation in CosmoBon was confirmed as the same as that in the natural trees. Our goal is to examine feasibility to grow various species of trees in space as bioresource for space agriculture.

  8. Japanese flowering cherry tree as a woody plant candidate grown in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Yoshida, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Nyunoya, H.; Funada, R.; Katayama, T.; Suzuki, T.; Honma, T.; Nagatomo, M.; Nakamura, T.

    We are proposing to raise woody plant in space for several applications Japanese flowering cherry tree is a candidate to do wood science in space Mechanism of sensing gravity and controlling shape of tree has been studied quite extensively Cherry mutants associated with gravity are telling responsible plant hormones and molecular machinery for plant adaptation against action of gravity Space experiment using our wood model contribute to understand molecular and cellular process of gravitropism in plant Tree is considered to be an important member in space agriculture to produce excess oxygen wooden materials for constructing living environment and provide biomass for cultivating mushrooms and insects Furthermore trees and their flowers improve quality of life under stressful environment in outer space

  9. AIRSAR studies of woody shrub density in semiarid rangeland: Jornada del Muerto, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Musick, H.B.; Schaber, G.S.; Breed, C.S.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data to assess woody shrub density in a semiarid site where the vegetation consists primarily of varied mixtures of herbaceous vegetation and shrubs. AIRSAR data and field observations of vegetation cover and growth form-composition were obtained for 59 sites in the Jornada del Muerto plain in southern New Mexico. Radar signature measures examined were C-, L- and P-band backscattering coefficients (??0) for HH, HV and W polarizations, ratios of ??0HH and ??0HV to ??0VV, and the HH-VV polarization phase difference and correlation coefficient. The most effective measure for estimation of shrub density was L-band ??0HV, which distinguished among shrub density classes with no misclassification. Sensitivity of this measure to small amounts of shrub cover was indicated by successful separation of sites with <1% shrub cover from sites with 1-5% cover. Separability of shrub density classes was generally least for C-band signature measures. A distinctive radar signature was exhibited by dense stands of Yucca elata, a semitreelike plant with uniformly thick ???10 cm diameter) fibrous stems. Yucca sites were distinguished from others by their high P-band ??0HV relative to L-band ??0HV. The results are largely explained by the greater sensitivity of lounger wavelengths to larger canopy structural elements. L-band ??0HV and other measures responsive to canopy volume scattering were more strongly related to shrub than to herbaceous plant cover because woody shrub canopies have numerous stems of the intermediate size to which L-band is most sensitive, whereas stems of this size are mostly lacking in herbaceous canopies. The uniform-diameter stems of yucca have larger dimensions to which P-band is more sensitive than L-band.This study evaluates the use of polarimetric Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) data to assess woody shrub density in a semiarid site where the vegetation consists

  10. RESPONSE OF HERPETOFAUNA AND SORICIDS TO COARSE WOODY DEBRIS MANIPULATIONS IN UPLAND LOBLOLLY PINE STANDS.

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Kurtis, Rooks

    2004-06-01

    MS Thesis. University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 153 pp. Although use of coarse woody debris (CWD) by herpetofauna and shrew species has been well documented in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountain regions of the United States, little information exists regarding the importance of CWD to herpetofaunal and shrew assemblages in pine forests of the southeastern Coastal Plain. Furthermore, few manipulative studies have assessed response to increased CWD volume. The primary objective of my study was to assess the response of herpetofauna and shrews to CWD manipulations in upland loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands of the South Carolina Coastal Plain physiographic region as part of an interdisciplinary study undertaken to better understand the ecological role of CWD in southeastern pine forests.

  11. Prescribed fire and cutting as tools for reducing woody plant succession in a created salt marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, A.B.; Proffitt, C.E.; Grace, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on efforts to reduce woody successional growth by the native shrub Iva frutescens L. in a created salt marsh by using prescribed fire and cutting. Experimental treatments included a winter burn, cutting plants at ground level, and a combination burn-and-cut treatment, with replicate plots of each. Iva frutescens proved to be extremely hardy, with zero mortality following the cutting, burning, or combination treatment; similar levels of regrowth were observed for all treatments. Individual shrub response, however, was found to be related to initial plant size, ground water level and salinity, and two fire characteristics (total heating >60??C and total heat index >60??C). Fire severity, sediment nutrient concentrations, and other abiotic factors had no observable effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Rapid and solvent-saving liquefaction of woody biomass using microwave-ultrasonic assisted technology.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zexiang; Wu, Zhengguo; Fan, Liwei; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Yiqiang; Zheng, Deyong; Wang, Siqun

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to rapidly liquefy sawdust using reduced quantities of solvent, was successfully carried out via microwave-ultrasonic assisted technology (MUAT) in a sulphuric acid/polyethylene glycol 400-glycerol catalytic system. The influences of some key parameters on the liquefaction yield were investigated. The results showed that compared with traditional liquefaction, the introduction of MUAT allowed the solvent dosage to be halved and shortened the liquefaction time from 60 to 20 min. The liquefaction yield reached 91% under the optimal conditions. However, the influence on the yield of some parameters such as catalyst concentration, was similar to that of traditional liquefaction, indicating that the application of MUAT possibly only intensified heat and mass transfer rather than altering either the degradation mechanism or pathway. The introduction of MUAT as a process intensification technology has good industrial application potential for woody biomass liquefaction. PMID:26419964

  13. The complete plastid genome of Piper kadsura (Piperaceae), an East Asian woody vine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Choi, In-Su; Choi, Byoung-Hee; Yang, Sungyu; Choi, Goya

    2016-09-01

    We sequenced the complete plastid genome (plastome) for Piper kadsura, a woody vine endemic to East Asia. This species is part of the largest genus within Piperaceae and its genome is almost identical to its congener P. cenocladum. The plastome for P. kadsura comprises 131 genes, including four unique rRNAs, 30 tRNAs, and 79 protein-coding genes. It retains ycf1 as an intact open reading frame. Our phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the monophyly of the Piper genus. The additional plastome sequence found in this evolutionarily and economically important genus will be a valuable, fundamental tool for future studies of phylogenetic relationships among basal angiosperms, and will provide a useful resource for molecular breeding programs. PMID:26260180

  14. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California forests.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, Thomas W.; Shook, Christine D.; Keeley, Jon E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  15. Estimating aboveground biomass for broadleaf woody plants and young conifers in Sierra Nevada, California, forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGinnis, T.W.; Shook, C.D.; Keeley, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of biomass is fundamental to a wide range of research and natural resource management goals. An accurate estimation of plant biomass is essential to predict potential fire behavior, calculate carbon sequestration for global climate change research, assess critical wildlife habitat, and so forth. Reliable allometric equations from simple field measurements are necessary for efficient evaluation of plant biomass. However, allometric equations are not available for many common woody plant taxa in the Sierra Nevada. In this report, we present more than 200 regression equations for the Sierra Nevada western slope that relate crown diameter, plant height, crown volume, stem diameter, and both crown diameter and height to the dry weight of foliage, branches, and entire aboveground biomass. Destructive sampling methods resulted in regression equations that accurately predict biomass from one or two simple, nondestructive field measurements. The tables presented here will allow researchers and natural resource managers to easily choose the best equations to fit their biomass assessment needs.

  16. Determinants of water circulation in a woody bamboo species: afternoon use and night-time recharge of culm water storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Goldstein, Guillermo; Sun, Mei; Ma, Ren-Yi; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2015-09-01

    To understand water-use strategies of woody bamboo species, sap flux density (Fd) in the culms of a woody bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris Schrader ex Wendland) was monitored using the thermal dissipation method. The daytime and night-time Fd were analyzed in the dry and rainy seasons. Additionally, diurnal changes in root pressure, culm circumference, and stomatal conductance (gs) were investigated to characterize the mechanisms used to maintain diurnal water balance of woody bamboos. Both in the dry and rainy seasons, daytime Fd responded to vapor pressure deficit (VPD) in an exponential fashion, with a fast initial increase in Fd when VPD increased from 0 to 1 kPa. The Fd and gs started to increase very fast as light intensity and VPD increased in the morning, but they decreased sharply once the maximum value was achieved. The Fd response of this woody bamboo to VPD was much faster than that of representative trees and palms growing in the same study site, suggesting its fast sap flow and stomatal responses to changes in ambient environmental factors. The Fd in the lower and higher culm positions started to increase at the same time in the morning, but the Fd in the higher culm position was higher than that of the lower culm in the afternoon. Consistently, distinct decreases in its culm circumference in the afternoon were detected. Therefore, unlike trees, water storage of bamboo culms was not used for its transpiration in the morning but in the afternoon. Nocturnal sap flow of this woody bamboo was also detected and related to root pressure. We conclude that this bamboo has fast sap flow/stomatal responses to irradiance and evaporative demands, and it uses substantial water storage for transpiration in the afternoon, while root pressure appears to be a mechanism resulting in culm water storage recharge during the night. PMID:26232783

  17. High-Throughput Sequencing of Six Bamboo Chloroplast Genomes: Phylogenetic Implications for Temperate Woody Bamboos (Poaceae: Bambusoideae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Background Bambusoideae is the only subfamily that contains woody members in the grass family, Poaceae. In phylogenetic analyses, Bambusoideae, Pooideae and Ehrhartoideae formed the BEP clade, yet the internal relationships of this clade are controversial. The distinctive life history (infrequent flowering and predominance of asexual reproduction) of woody bamboos makes them an interesting but taxonomically difficult group. Phylogenetic analyses based on large DNA fragments could only provide a moderate resolution of woody bamboo relationships, although a robust phylogenetic tree is needed to elucidate their evolutionary history. Phylogenomics is an alternative choice for resolving difficult phylogenies. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we present the complete nucleotide sequences of six woody bamboo chloroplast (cp) genomes using Illumina sequencing. These genomes are similar to those of other grasses and rather conservative in evolution. We constructed a phylogeny of Poaceae from 24 complete cp genomes including 21 grass species. Within the BEP clade, we found strong support for a sister relationship between Bambusoideae and Pooideae. In a substantial improvement over prior studies, all six nodes within Bambusoideae were supported with ≥0.95 posterior probability from Bayesian inference and 5/6 nodes resolved with 100% bootstrap support in maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analyses. We found that repeats in the cp genome could provide phylogenetic information, while caution is needed when using indels in phylogenetic analyses based on few selected genes. We also identified relatively rapidly evolving cp genome regions that have the potential to be used for further phylogenetic study in Bambusoideae. Conclusions/Significance The cp genome of Bambusoideae evolved slowly, and phylogenomics based on whole cp genome could be used to resolve major relationships within the subfamily. The difficulty in resolving the diversification among three clades of

  18. Experimental tree removal in tallgrass prairie: variable responses of flora and fauna along a woody cover gradient.

    PubMed

    Alford, Aaron L; Hellgren, Eric C; Limb, Ryan; Engle, David M

    2012-04-01

    Woody plant encroachment is a worldwide phenomenon in grassland and savanna systems whose consequence is often the development of an alternate woodland state. Theoretically, an alternate state may be associated with changes in system state variables (e.g., species composition) or abiotic parameter shifts (e.g., nutrient availability). When state-variable changes are cumulative, such as in woody plant encroachment, the probability of parameter shifts increases as system feedbacks intensify over time. Using a Before-After Control-Impact (BACI) design, we studied eight pairs of grassland sites undergoing various levels of eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana) encroachment to determine whether responses of flora and fauna to experimental redcedar removal differed according to the level of pretreatment redcedar cover. In the first year after removal, herbaceous plant species diversity and evenness, woody plant evenness, and invertebrate family richness increased linearly with pretreatment redcedar cover, whereas increases in small-mammal diversity and evenness were described by logarithmic trends. In contrast, increases in woody plant diversity and total biomass of terrestrial invertebrates were accentuated at levels of higher pretreatment cover. Tree removal also shifted small-mammal species composition toward a more grassland-associated assemblage. During the second year postremoval, increases in herbaceous plant diversity followed a polynomial trend, but increases in most other metrics did not vary along the pretreatment cover gradient. These changes were accompanied by extremely high growing-season precipitation, which may have homogenized floral and faunal responses to removal. Our results demonstrate that tree removal increases important community metrics among grassland flora and fauna within two years, with some responses to removal being strongly influenced by the stage of initial encroachment and modulated by climatic variability. Our results underscore the

  19. Demographic responses of shrews to removal of coarse woody debris in a managed pine forest.

    SciTech Connect

    McCay, Timothy, S.; Komoroski, Mark, J.

    2004-01-01

    McCay, T.S., and M.J. Komoroski. 2004. Demographic responses of shrews to removal of coarse woody debris in a managed pine forest. For. Ecol., and Mgt. 189:387-395. We trapped shrews at six 9.3 ha plots from which logs ý 10 cm diameter (coarse woody debris; CWD) had been manually removed and six control plots inmanaged loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests of the southeastern coastal plain, USA. Trapping was conducted seasonally between autumn 1997 and summer 2001. Capture rates of Cryptotis parva were lower at plots from which CWD was removed than at control plots (P ¡ 0ý011) and declined at all plots over the study period (P ¡ 0ý001). Capture rates of Blarina carolinensis (P ¡ 0ý129) and Sorex longirostris (P ¡ 0ý432) did not differ between removal and control plots, but declined over the study period (P ¡ 0ý001). Age distributions of B. carolinensis differed between removal and control plots (P ¡ 0ý048) with a smaller proportion of individuals in young age categories at removal plots. Sensitivity of Cryptotis to the removal of CWD may have been due to its sociality or low population density at the study area. A reduction in the abundance of young B. carolinensis after removal of CWD may reflect reduced reproduction and immigration of older individuals from outside the plot. Effect of removal of CWD on populations of these shrews was relatively weak compared to strong seasonal and multi-year variation in abundance. However, weak treatment effects may have been partly due to low ambient levels of CWD at control plots.

  20. Evidence of physiological decoupling from grassland ecosystem drivers by an encroaching woody shrub.

    PubMed

    Nippert, Jesse B; Ocheltree, Troy W; Orozco, Graciela L; Ratajczak, Zak; Ling, Bohua; Skibbe, Adam M

    2013-01-01

    Shrub encroachment of grasslands is a transformative ecological process by which native woody species increase in cover and frequency and replace the herbaceous community. Mechanisms of encroachment are typically assessed using temporal data or experimental manipulations, with few large spatial assessments of shrub physiology. In a mesic grassland in North America, we measured inter- and intra-annual variability in leaf δ(13)C in Cornus drummondii across a grassland landscape with varying fire frequency, presence of large grazers and topographic variability. This assessment of changes in individual shrub physiology is the largest spatial and temporal assessment recorded to date. Despite a doubling of annual rainfall (in 2008 versus 2011), leaf δ(13)C was statistically similar among and within years from 2008-11 (range of -28 to -27‰). A topography*grazing interaction was present, with higher leaf δ(13)C in locations that typically have more bare soil and higher sensible heat in the growing season (upland topographic positions and grazed grasslands). Leaf δ(13)C from slopes varied among grazing contrasts, with upland and slope leaf δ(13)C more similar in ungrazed locations, while slopes and lowlands were more similar in grazed locations. In 2011, canopy greenness (normalized difference vegetation index - NDVI) was assessed at the centroid of individual shrubs using high-resolution hyperspectral imagery. Canopy greenness was highest mid-summer, likely reflecting temporal periods when C assimilation rates were highest. Similar to patterns seen in leaf δ(13)C, NDVI was highest in locations that typically experience lowest sensible heat (lowlands and ungrazed). The ability of Cornus drummondii to decouple leaf physiological responses from climate variability and fire frequency is a likely contributor to the increase in cover and frequency of this shrub species in mesic grassland and may be generalizable to other grasslands undergoing woody encroachment. PMID

  1. Relationship between the Relative Limitation and Resorption Efficiency of Nitrogen vs Phosphorus in Woody Plants

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Luying; Chen, Yahan; Fang, Jingyun

    2013-01-01

    Most previous studies have ascribed variations in the resorption of a certain plant nutrient to its corresponding environmental availability or level in tissues, regardless of the other nutrients’ status. However, given that plant growth relies on both sufficient and balanced nutrient supply, the nutrient resorption process should not only be related to the absolute nutrient status, but also be regulated by the relative limitation of the nutrient. Here, based on a global woody-plants dataset from literature, we test the hypothesis that plants resorb proportionately more nitrogen (or phosphorus) when they are nitrogen (or phosphorus) limited, or similar proportions of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) when co-limited by both nutrients (the relative resorption hypothesis). Using the N:P ratio in green foliage as an indicator of nutrient limitation, we found an inverse relationship between the difference in the proportionate resorption of N vs P and this foliar N:P ratio, consistent across species, growth-forms, and vegetation-types globally. Moreover, according to the relative resorption hypothesis, communities with higher/lower foliar N:P (more likely P/N limited) tend to produce litter with disproportionately higher/lower N:P, causing a worsening status of P/N availability; this positive feedback may somehow be counteracted by several negative-feedback mechanisms. Compared to N, P generally shows higher variability in resorption efficiency (proportion resorbed), and higher resorption sensitivity to nutrient availability, implying that the resorption of P seems more important for plant nutrient conservation and N:P stoichiometry. Our findings elucidate the nutrient limitation effects on resorption efficiency in woody plants at the global scale, and thus can improve the understanding of nutrient resorption process in plants. This study also suggests the importance of the foliar N:P ratio as a key parameter for biogeochemical modeling, and the relative resorption

  2. The impacts of climate change on the winter hardiness zones of woody plants in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloning, Philipp; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we investigated how global climate change will affect winter minimum temperatures and if, as a consequence, potential species ranges will expand or contract. Thus, Heinze and Schreiber's 1984 winter hardiness zones (WHZ) for woody plants in Europe, which are based on mean annual minimum temperatures, were updated and analyzed for recent and future changes using the ENSEMBLES data set E-OBS for recent climate and CLM-model data based on two emission scenarios (A1B and B1) for future simulated climate. For the different data sets, maps of the WHZ were created and compared. This allowed the assessment of projected changes in the development of the WHZ until the end of the twenty-first century. Our results suggested that, depending on the emission scenario used, the main shifts in the WHZ will occur for zones 8 and 9 (increase), located in Mediterranean regions, and for zone 5 (decrease), a boreal zone. Moreover, up to 85 % of the area analyzed will experience a warmer winter climate during the twenty-first century, and some areas will experience increases in two WHZ, equal to an increase of 5.6-11 °C in the mean annual minimum temperature. The probabilities of absolute minimum winter temperatures for four 30-year time periods from 1971 to 2100 were calculated in order to reveal changes associated with a general increase in temperature as well as shifts in the distribution itself. It was predicted that colder temperatures than indicated by the WHZ will occur less frequently in the future, but, depending on the region, reoccur every 5-50 years. These findings are discussed in the context of woody plant species assigned to each of the WHZ by Roloff and Bärtels (1996), with respect to a possible expansion of their range limits and the altered risk of recurring cold spells.

  3. Coherence between woody carbon uptake and net ecosystem productivity at five eddy-covariance sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babst, F.; Bouriaud, O.; Papale, D.; Gielen, B.; Janssens, I.; Nikinmaa, E.; Ibrom, A.; Wu, J.; Bernhofer, C.; Koestner, B.; Gruenwald, T.; Seufert, G.; Ciais, P.; Frank, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forest growth ranks amongst the most important processes that determine the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Quantifications of forest carbon cycling can be made e.g. using biometric and eddy-covariance (EC) techniques. Both offer different perspectives on carbon uptake and attempts to combine them have been inconsistent and variably successful in the past. This contributes to persistent uncertainties regarding carbon allocation in forest ecosystems and complicates precise vegetation model parameterization. Aiming to reconcile assessments of carbon cycling from biometric and EC techniques, we measured radial tree growth and wood density at five long-term EC stations across Europe. The resulting records were used to calculate annual carbon uptake during above-ground wood formation and compared to monthly and seasonal CO2-flux measurements. Efforts were made to identify i) the time periods when EC and tree-ring data correspond best in different parts of Europe and ii) the fraction of eddy-fluxes which is associated with changes in above-ground woody carbon stocks. Biometric measurements and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) proved largely compatible at seasonal time scales while relationships with gross primary productivity (GPP) were often weaker. Results suggest a partitioning of sequestered carbon mainly used for volume increase (January-June) and a combination of cell-wall thickening and storage (July-September). The inter-annual variability in above-ground woody carbon uptake was significantly linked with absolute productivity ranging between 69-366 g C m-2 y-1 at boreal and temperate sites, thereby accounting for 10-25% of GPP, 15-32% of TER, and 25-80% of NEP. These findings from sites representing the major European climate zones and tree species contribute to improved quantification of above-ground carbon allocation in forests. Furthermore, they refine knowledge on processes driving ecosystem productivity important for e.g. vegetation models and

  4. Photosynthetic and physiological responses of native and exotic tidal woody seedlings to simulated tidal immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tonggui; Gu, Shenhua; Zhou, Hefeng; Wang, G. Geoff; Cheng, Xiangrong; Yu, Mukui

    2013-12-01

    Hibiscus hamabo, a native tidal woody species, and Myrica cerifera, an exotic tidal woody species, have been widely planted on coastal beaches in subtropical China. However, whether there are differences in physiological response and tolerance to immersion between the two tidal species is still unknown. Our objectives were to evaluate differences in the photosynthetic and physiological responses to tidal immersion for the two species in the context of sea level rise. With increasing immersion, net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and light saturation point declined progressively for both species, whereas dark respiration and light compensation point showed the reverse trend. Lower variation was observed in H. hamabo than in M. cerifera for each index in the same treatment. Photosynthetic ability and utilization of light, especially under high light intensity, decreased for both species. Leaf soluble sugar and protein contents, and glycolate oxidase activity first increased and then decreased with increasing of immersion degree, with the higher values observed in the W4 (4 h duration, 15 cm depth) and W6 (6 h duration, 25 cm depth) treatments for H. hamabo, and W2 (2 h duration, 5 cm depth) and W4 treatments for M. cerifera. These findings indicate that H. hamabo has a better ability to keep the reduction of photosynthesis at a minimum through soluble substance regulated osmotic potential and avoiding excess light damage to the photosynthetic system through increased photorespiration, heat dissipation, chlorophyll fluorescence. Our results suggest that H. hamabo is more tolerant to tidal immersion than M. cerifera, and therefore it is better adapted to the anticipated sea level rise in future.

  5. Watershed-Scale Ecohydrological Studies of Woody Plant Encroachment in Sonoran and Chihuahuan Desert Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivoni, E.; Pierini, N.; Anderson, C.; Schreiner-McGraw, A.; Robles-Morua, A.; Mendez-barroso, L. A.; Templeton, R. C.

    2013-05-01

    The causes and consequences of woody shrub and tree encroachment onto historical grasslands in arid and semiarid areas have been studied for over a century. Despite significant progress, the scientific community has not addressed the problem from a hydrologic perspective at a scale that integrates both vertical and lateral processes. The hydrologic budget of a small watershed can provide a strong constraint for other measured ecohydrological fluxes as well as help to link ecosystem transitions to changes in landscape properties. In this study, we present the measurement and modeling of ecohydrological processes in two watersheds in the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts at the Santa Rita Experimental Range (Green Valley, AZ) and the Jornada Experimental Range (Las Cruces, NM). In each watershed, a similar set of observations are obtained from a high-resolution sensor network consisting of six rain gauges, forty soil moisture and temperature profiles, four channel runoff flumes, a COSMOS sensor and an eddy covariance tower. In addition, high-resolution digital terrain models and image orthomosaics were obtained from an aircraft with Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements or an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera. Based on these datasets, a distributed hydrologic model has been applied and tested to reproduce spatiotemporal patterns in the watershed ecohydrological processes. We compare and contrast the observations and model simulations for two summer periods (2011 and 2012) when both watersheds responded to the precipitation availability during the North American monsoon. Activities at both sites will provide a foundation for synthesizing the role of woody plant encroachment on watershed hydrology with broad implications for the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts.

  6. Calibration of SWAT model for woody plant encroachment using paired experimental watershed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Lei; Zou, Chris B.; Will, Rodney E.; Stebler, Elaine

    2015-04-01

    Globally, rangeland has been undergoing a transition from herbaceous dominated grasslands into tree or shrub dominated woodlands with great uncertainty of associated changes in water budget. Previous modeling studies simulated the impact of woody plant encroachment on hydrological processes using models calibrated and constrained primarily by historic streamflow from intermediate sized watersheds. In this study, we calibrated the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model), a widely used model for cropping and grazing systems, for a prolifically encroaching juniper species, eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), in the south-central Great Plains using species-specific biophysical and hydrological parameters and in situ meteorological forcing from three pairs of experimental watersheds (grassland versus eastern redcedar woodland) for a period of 3-years covering a dry-to-wet cycle. The multiple paired watersheds eliminated the potentially confounding edaphic and topographic influences from changes in hydrological processes related to woody encroachment. The SWAT model was optimized with the Shuffled complexes with Principal component analysis (SP-UCI) algorithm developed from the Shuffled Complexes Evolution (SCE_UA). The mean Nash-Sutcliff coefficient (NSCE) values of the calibrated model for daily and monthly runoff from experimental watersheds reached 0.96 and 0.97 for grassland, respectively, and 0.90 and 0.84 for eastern redcedar woodland, respectively. We then validated the calibrated model with a nearby, larger watershed undergoing rapid eastern redcedar encroachment. The NSCE value for monthly streamflow over a period of 22 years was 0.79. We provide detailed biophysical and hydrological parameters for tallgrass prairie under moderate grazing and eastern redcedar, which can be used to calibrate any model for further validation and application by the hydrologic modeling community.

  7. Effects of high-frequency understorey fires on woody plant regeneration in southeastern Amazonian forests

    PubMed Central

    Balch, Jennifer K.; Massad, Tara J.; Brando, Paulo M.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Curran, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic understorey fires affect large areas of tropical forest, yet their effects on woody plant regeneration post-fire remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of repeated experimental fires on woody stem (less than 1 cm at base) mortality, recruitment, species diversity, community similarity and regeneration mode (seed versus sprout) in Mato Grosso, Brazil. From 2004 to 2010, forest plots (50 ha) were burned twice (B2) or five times (B5), and compared with an unburned control (B0). Stem density recovered within a year after the first burn (initial density: 12.4–13.2 stems m−2), but after 6 years, increased mortality and decreased regeneration—primarily of seedlings—led to a 63 per cent and 85 per cent reduction in stem density in B2 and B5, respectively. Seedlings and sprouts across plots in 2010 displayed remarkable community similarity owing to shared abundant species. Although the dominant surviving species were similar across plots, a major increase in sprouting occurred—almost three- and fourfold greater in B2 and B5 than in B0. In B5, 29 species disappeared and were replaced by 11 new species often present along fragmented forest edges. By 2010, the annual burn regime created substantial divergence between the seedling community and the initial adult tree community (greater than or equal to 20 cm dbh). Increased droughts and continued anthropogenic ignitions associated with frontier land uses may promote high-frequency fire regimes that may substantially alter regeneration and therefore successional processes. PMID:23610167

  8. Effects of high-frequency understorey fires on woody plant regeneration in southeastern Amazonian forests.

    PubMed

    Balch, Jennifer K; Massad, Tara J; Brando, Paulo M; Nepstad, Daniel C; Curran, Lisa M

    2013-06-01

    Anthropogenic understorey fires affect large areas of tropical forest, yet their effects on woody plant regeneration post-fire remain poorly understood. We examined the effects of repeated experimental fires on woody stem (less than 1 cm at base) mortality, recruitment, species diversity, community similarity and regeneration mode (seed versus sprout) in Mato Grosso, Brazil. From 2004 to 2010, forest plots (50 ha) were burned twice (B2) or five times (B5), and compared with an unburned control (B0). Stem density recovered within a year after the first burn (initial density: 12.4-13.2 stems m(-2)), but after 6 years, increased mortality and decreased regeneration--primarily of seedlings--led to a 63 per cent and 85 per cent reduction in stem density in B2 and B5, respectively. Seedlings and sprouts across plots in 2010 displayed remarkable community similarity owing to shared abundant species. Although the dominant surviving species were similar across plots, a major increase in sprouting occurred--almost three- and fourfold greater in B2 and B5 than in B0. In B5, 29 species disappeared and were replaced by 11 new species often present along fragmented forest edges. By 2010, the annual burn regime created substantial divergence between the seedling community and the initial adult tree community (greater than or equal to 20 cm dbh). Increased droughts and continued anthropogenic ignitions associated with frontier land uses may promote high-frequency fire regimes that may substantially alter regeneration and therefore successional processes. PMID:23610167

  9. Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Floodplain Stabilization by Woody Riparian Vegetation During an Extreme Flood Along Headwater Tributaries of East Plum Creek, Colorado.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, E. R.; Smith, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Dense woody riparian vegetation acts to reduce flow velocities and boundary shear stresses on floodplain surfaces during large overbank flow events. Throughout the semi-arid west, woody riparian vegetation has been progressively thinned as the result of land use practices, such as grazing, and extensive reduction in beaver populations. Where woody vegetation is sparse, the floodplain surface is vulnerable to high rates of erosion during overbank flows. Unraveling of a floodplain surface occurs when flow is sufficiently deep and fast enough to erode the surface. Once erosion begins, it proceeds rapidly, leading to transformation from a narrow, single-threaded stream to a much wider, braided stream, as occurred along most of the mainstem of East Plum Creek, Colorado, during an extreme flood on June 16, 1965. Effects of this flood along headwater tributaries of East Plum Creek were documented in large scale (about 1:2,500) aerial photographs taken two days after the flood. The photographs along with available map information and field examination clearly show overbank flows were deep (on the order of 3 meters), yet the floodplain remained intact at sites with dense shrubs (sandbar willow). Two days after the flood, the shrubs were still lying bent over by the flood flow, and their canopy sizes and densities could be measured from the photographs. Within a 1.5-km reach, the downstream sequence of sites examined included: 1) locations where the floodplain surface and vegetation remained intact; 2) a location with less dense woody vegetation where the floodplain surface had just begun to erode; 3) locations with minimal woody vegetation, where the entire floodplain surface had begun to erode but a new channel had not yet formed; and 4) locations where erosion had caused a new, much wider channel to form and almost all pre-flood woody vegetation was removed. Estimates of pre-flood vegetation types and densities were made at each of these four sites. Boundary shear

  11. Effects of termite activities on coarse woody debris decomposition in an intact lowland mixed dipterocarp forest of Brunei Darussalam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sohye; Kim, Seungjun; Roh, Yujin; Abu Salim, Kamariah; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Davies, Stuart; Son, Yowhan

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests have been considered important ecosystems in terms of carbon cycle and climate change, because they sequester carbon more than any other terrestrial ecosystems. In addition, coarse woody debris is one of the main carbon storages, accounting for 10 ‑ 40% of the tropical forest carbon. Carbon in coarse woody debris is released by various activities of organisms, and particularly termite's feeding activities are known to be main process in tropical forests. Therefore, investigating the effects of termite activities on coarse woody debris decomposition is important to understanding carbon cycles of tropical forests. This study was conducted in an intact lowland mixed dipterocarp forest (MDF) of Brunei Darussalam, and three main MDF tree species (Dillenia beccariana, Macaranga bancana, and Elateriospermum tapos) were selected. Coarse woody debris samples of both 10 cm diameter and length were prepared, and half of samples were covered twice with nylon net (mesh size 1.5 mm × 1.5 mm) to prevent termite's approach. Three 2 m × 11 m permanent plots were installed in January, 2015 and eighteen samples per plot (3 species × 2 treatments × 3 repetitions) were placed at the soil surface. Weights of each sample were recorded at initial time, and weighed again in August, 2015. On average, uncovered and covered samples lost 18.9 % and 3.3 % of their initial weights, respectively. Weight loss percentage was highest in uncovered samples of M. bancana (23.9 %), and lowest in covered samples of E. tapos (7.8 %). Two-way ANOVA showed that tree species and termite exclusion treatment had statistically significant effects on coarse woody debris decomposition (P = 0.0001). The effect of species and termite exclusion treatment interaction was also statistically significant (P = 0.0001). The result reveals that termite activities promote the coarse woody debris decomposition and they influence differently along the wood species. However, many samples of D. beccariana

  12. Evaluation of the Relative Merits of Herbaceous and Woody Crops for Use in Tunable Thermochemical Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon-Hyun; Martinalbo, Ilya

    2011-12-01

    This report summarizes the work and findings of the grant work conducted from January 2009 until September 2011 under the collaboration between Ceres, Inc. and Choren USA, LLC. This DOE-funded project involves a head-to-head comparison of two types of dedicated energy crops in the context of a commercial gasification conversion process. The main goal of the project was to gain a better understanding of the differences in feedstock composition between herbaceous and woody species, and how these differences may impact a commercial gasification process. In this work, switchgrass was employed as a model herbaceous energy crop, and willow as a model short-rotation woody crop. Both crops are species native to the U.S. with significant potential to contribute to U.S. goals for renewable liquid fuel production, as outlined in the DOE Billion Ton Update (http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/billion_ton_update.html, 2011). In some areas of the U.S., switching between woody and herbaceous feedstocks or blending of the two may be necessary to keep a large-scale gasifier operating near capacity year round. Based on laboratory tests and process simulations it has been successfully shown that suitable high yielding switchgrass and willow varieties exist that meet the feedstock specifications for large scale entrained flow biomass gasification. This data provides the foundation for better understanding how to use both materials in thermochemical processes. It has been shown that both switchgrass and willow varieties have comparable ranges of higher heating value, BTU content and indistinguishable hydrogen/carbon ratios. Benefits of switchgrass, and other herbaceous feedstocks, include its low moisture content, which reduce energy inputs and costs for drying feedstock. Compared to the typical feedstock currently being used in the Carbo-V® process, switchgrass has a higher ash content, combined with a lower ash melting temperature. Whether or not this may cause inefficiencies in the

  13. Molecular evidence for multiple origins of woodiness and a New World biogeographic connection of the Macaronesian Island endemic Pericallis (Asteraceae: Senecioneae)

    PubMed Central

    Panero, Jose L.; Francisco-Ortega, Javier; Jansen, Robert K.; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of woody species in oceanic islands has attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists for more than a century. We used a phylogeny based on sequences of the internal-transcribed spacer region of nuclear ribosomal DNA to trace the evolution of woodiness in Pericallis (Asteraceae: Senecioneae), a genus endemic to the Macaronesian archipelagos of the Azores, Madeira, and Canaries. Our results show that woodiness in Pericallis originated independently at least twice in these islands, further weakening some previous hypotheses concerning the value of this character for tracing the continental ancestry of island endemics. The same data suggest that the origin of woodiness is correlated with ecological shifts from open to species-rich habitats and that the ancestor of Pericallis was an herbaceous species adapted to marginal habitats of the laurel forest. Our results also support Pericallis as closely related to New World genera of the tribe Senecioneae. PMID:10570168

  14. A terrestrial biosphere model optimized to atmospheric CO2 concentration and above ground woody biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Ito, A.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    This study documents an optimization of a prognostic biosphere model (VISIT; Vegetation Integrative Similator for Trace gases) to observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration and above ground woody biomass by using a Bayesian inversion method combined with an atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM; National Institute for Environmental Studies / Frontier Research Center for Global Change (NIES/FRCGC) off-line global atmospheric tracer transport model). The assimilated observations include 74 station records of surface atmospheric CO2 concentration and aggregated grid data sets of above ground woody biomass (AGB) and net primary productivity (NPP) over the globe. Both the biosphere model and the atmospheric transport model are used at a horizontal resolution of 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid with temporal resolutions of a day and an hour, respectively. The atmospheric transport model simulates atmospheric CO2 concentration with nine vertical levels using daily net ecosystem CO2 exchange rate (NEE) from the biosphere model, oceanic CO2 flux, and fossil fuel emission inventory. The models are driven by meteorological data from JRA-25 (Japanese 25-year ReAnalysis) and JCDAS (JMA Climate Data Assimilation System). Statistically optimum physiological parameters in the biosphere model are found by iterative minimization of the corresponding Bayesian cost function. We select thirteen physiological parameter with high sensitivity to NEE, NPP, and AGB for the minimization. Given the optimized physiological parameters, the model shows error reductions in seasonal variation of the CO2 concentrations especially in the northern hemisphere due to abundant observation stations, while errors remain at a few stations that are located in coastal coastal area and stations in the southern hemisphere. The model also produces moderate estimates of the mean magnitudes and probability distributions in AGB and NPP for each biome. However, the model fails in the simulation of the terrestrial

  15. Soil respiration responses to variation in temperature and moisture availability under woody plants and grasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravalprukskul, P.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment into grasslands, such as in the southwestern US, is thought to have altered regional carbon fluxes due to the differences in structure and function between grasses and woody plants. It is unknown how climate change predictions for such areas, particularly warmer temperatures and fewer but larger precipitation events, might further acerbate our ability to estimate flux dynamics. Soil respiration, a key flux affecting ecosystem carbon balance, has been increasingly studied, but the exact effects of temperature and precipitation changes on flux rates have not been fully determined, particularly their interactive effects. The goal of this study was to compare soil respiration responses to different temperatures in soils under native southwestern mesquites and grasses undergoing a precipitation pulse, whilst removing other confounding factors, such as soil history, through the controlled environments within Biosphere 2. Mesquites and grasses were transplanted into ground basalt within two environments maintained at a 4°C temperature difference, the projected temperature increase from climate change. Post-transplant soil samples were incubated between 10 and 40°C to determine the temperature sensitivities of soils from each microhabitat within a month of this transplant. A single-peak, best-fit model for grass soils suggested a weak temperature sensitivity, while mesquite soils showed little to no sensitivity. Additionally, all plants underwent a drought treatment prior to the precipitation event, and soil respiration rates were tracked over several days using the collar technique. This portion of the study allowed for an estimation of the sensitivity of soil respiration to precipitation pulses under a variety of antecedent moisture conditions. Initial results illustrate that soils under mesquites tend to respire significantly more than soil under grasses or in bare soils over the course of a precipitation event. Together, these results suggest

  16. Eco-hydrological feedbacks between surface sealing and woody vegetation in dry climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sela, S.; Svoray, T.; Assouline, S.

    2013-12-01

    Physical sealing of the soil is a widespread natural process in the bare soil patches between shrubs, occurring frequently in dry environments. The seal layer has significantly lower hydraulic conductivity than the underlying undisturbed soil and thus, it affects significantly hydrological fluxes. Recent studies highlighted the significant role of the seal layer in controlling woody vegetation water availability through the allocation of overland flow. The seal layer however, induces another feedback by suppressing evaporation fluxes from the soil. This feedback is usually disregarded but it could have a broad impact on vegetation root water uptake (RWU). Up to date, no attempt has been made to quantify how the modulation of soil water content by the presence of a seal layer affects woody vegetation RWU. We approach this research gap using a model-based analysis of long term local climatic records (36y). The study site is a hillslope (0.075 KM2), located at the LTER Lehavim site in the Negev desert at the south of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E). Annual rainfall is 290 mm and the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess, prone to surface sealing. The vegetation is characterized by the dwarf shrub ( Sarcopoterium spinosum). The Feddes RWU parameters of the shrubs were acquired using a high resolution lysimeter experiment, enabling the simulation of vegetation RWU using The Hydrus2D model accounting explicitly for topographic and soil hydraulic parameters. Hydraulic properties of the seal layer at the soil surface were modeled following Mualem and Assouline (1989). The results indicate that the seal layer has a strong positive effect on vegetation RWU, with higher RWU in shrubs surrounded a sealed soil layer. This effect was found to be augmented during dry rainfall seasons, and is tightly coupled with within-season climatic variability (e.g. the timing and intensity of rainfall events). Assuming dry land vegetation go into a period of 'stress' when the soil

  17. Characterization of the NADP-malic enzymes in the woody plant Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiguo; Liu, Jinwen; Wang, Zhifeng; Nai, Jiefei; Lü, Mengyan; Zhou, Xiying; Cheng, Yuxiang

    2013-02-01

    Plant NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME, EC 1.1.1.40) participates in a large number of metabolic pathways, but little is known about the NADP-ME family in woody plants or trees. Here, we characterized the tree Populus trichocarpa NADP-ME (PtNADP-ME) family and the properties of the family members. Five NADP-ME genes (PtNADP-ME1-PtNADP-ME5) were found in the genome of Populus. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis show that the transcription levels of PtNADP-ME1 in lignified stems and roots are clearly higher than in other tissues, and PtNADP-ME2, PtNADP-ME3, PtNADP-ME4 and PtNADP-ME5 are broadly expressed in various tissues. PtNADP-ME gene expression was found to respond to salt and osmotic stresses, and NaCl salts upregulated the transcripts of putative plastidic ones (PtNADP-ME4 and PtNADP-ME5) significantly. Further, the NADP-ME activities of Populus seedlings increased at least two-fold under NaCl, mannitol and PEG treatments. Also, the expression of PtNADP-ME2 and PtNADP-ME3 increased during the course of leaf wounding. Each recombinant PtNADP-ME proteins were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, respectively. Coomassie brilliant blue and NADP-ME activity staining on native polyacrylamide gels showed different oligomeric states of the recombinant PtNADP-MEs in vitro. Noticeably, the cytosolic PtNADP-ME2 aggregates as octamers and hexadecamers while the plastidic PtNADP-ME4 resembles hexamers and octamers. The four PtNADP-ME proteins except for PtNADP-ME1 have high activities on native polyacrylamide gels including different forms for PtNADP-ME2 (octamers and hexadecamers) or for PtNADP-ME4 (hexamers and octamers). High concentrations of NADP substrate decreased the activities of all PtNADP-MEs slightly, while the malate had no effect on them. The kinetic parameters (V (max), K (m), K (cat), and K (cat)/K (m)) of each isoforms were summarized. Our data show the different effects of metabolites (influx into tricarboxylic acid cycle or Calvin cycle) on the

  18. Physically-based modeling of drag force caused by natural woody vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvelä, J.; Aberle, J.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian areas and floodplains are characterized by woody vegetation, which is an essential feature to be accounted for in many hydro-environmental models. For applications including flood protection, river restoration and modelling of sediment processes, there is a need to improve the reliability of flow resistance estimates. Conventional methods such as the use of lumped resistance coefficients or simplistic cylinder-based drag force equations can result in significant errors, as these methods do not adequately address the effect of foliage and reconfiguration of flexible plant parts under flow action. To tackle the problem, physically-based methods relying on objective and measurable vegetation properties are advantageous for describing complex vegetation. We have conducted flume and towing tank investigations with living and artificial plants, both in arrays and with isolated plants, providing new insight into advanced parameterization of natural vegetation. The stem, leaf and total areas of the trees confirmed to be suitable characteristic dimensions for estimating flow resistance. Consequently, we propose the use of leaf area index and leaf-to-stem-area ratio to achieve better drag force estimates. Novel remote sensing techniques including laser scanning have become available for effective collection of the required data. The benefits of the proposed parameterization have been clearly demonstrated in our newest experimental studies, but it remains to be investigated to what extent the parameter values are species-specific and how they depend on local habitat conditions. The purpose of this contribution is to summarize developments in the estimation of vegetative drag force based on physically-based approaches as the latest research results are somewhat dispersed. In particular, concerning woody vegetation we seek to discuss three issues: 1) parameterization of reconfiguration with the Vogel exponent; 2) advantage of parameterizing plants with the leaf area

  19. Transport, retention, and ecological significance of woody debris within a large ephemeral river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The spatiotemporal patterns and ecological significance of the retention of coarse particulate organic matter and large woody debris have been intensively studied in perennial rivers and streams but are virtually unknown in ephemeral systems. We examined the influence of 2 features characteristic of ephemeral systems, downstream hydrologic decay and in-channel tree growth, on the distribution, transport, and retention of woody debris following a flood having a ~2.6-y recurrence interval in the ephemeral Kuiseb River in southwestern Africa. A total of 2105 pieces of wood were painted at 8 sites along the river channel to measure retention patterns. The flood had a peak discharge of 159 m3/s at the upper end of the study area, decaying to <1 m3/s by 200 km downstream. Downstream export of wood from marking sites totaled 59.5% (n = 1253). Transport distances ranged from 1 to 124 km, and 34.8% (n = 436) of the exported wood was recovered. Marked wood retained within marking sites was significantly longer than exported wood (p < 0.001, t-test). Once in transport, there was little correlation between wood length and distance traveled (r = 0.11, correlation analysis, n = 369). Length influenced the site of retention; material retained on debris piles was significantly longer than that stranded on channel sediments (p < 0.001, t-test). In-channel growth of Faidherbia trees significantly influenced wood retention; 83.7% of marked wood not moved by the flood was associated with debris piles on Faidherbia trees. Similarly, 65% of the exported wood retained within downstream debris piles was associated with Faidherbia trees. In contrast to many perennial systems, we observed a general increase in wood retention downstream, peaking in the river's lower reaches in response to hydrologic decay. Debris piles induced sediment deposition and the formation of in-channel islands. Following flood recession, debris piles and their associated sediments provided moist, organic

  20. Coarse Woody Debris and Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics in a North Temperate Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, C. M.; Vogel, C. S.; Nagal, L.; Kazanski, C.; Flower, C.; Curtis, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    Many aspen-dominated forests in the upper Great Lakes region of North America are past maturity and beginning to decline. As trees senesce in these aging forests, coarse woody debris (CWD) is expected to be increasingly important to the ecosystem carbon (C) balance. We used a biometric approach to quantify C mass and the annual respiratory C loss from CWD and other major ecosystem components for a typical mature deciduous forest in northern lower Michigan, USA. Coarse woody debris mass (2.2 Mg C ha-1) was less than that of soils (104.1 Mg C ha-1) and boles (71.7 Mg C ha-1), but similar to that of leaves (1.8 Mg C ha-1). CWD respiration (RCWD) increased with increasing temperature and water content. Higher RCWD in more decayed wood was due to greater water absorption and, consequently, higher water content rather than to a greater temperature sensitivity of respiration ( Q10). The Q10 of RCWD ranged from 2.20 to 2.57 and varied inconsistently with decay status. Daily RCWD varied seasonally in response to temperature and water content, increasing rapidly following snow melt in early April and peaking at 0.17 g C m-2 d-1 in early June. Daily RCWD in the early growing season (day 130-200) was 13 % greater than during the late growing season (day 201-279) since CWD water content was 69 % higher even though temperature was 1.5°C cooler. Annual CWD respiration (FCWD, 0.21 Mg C ha-1 yr-1) was 12 % of bole respiration, 8 % of leaf respiration, and 2 % of soil respiration. Compared to the 1.53 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 average annual C storage by our forest, FCWD is a small, but substantial flux that is expected to increase over the next several decades. We show how concurrent increases in CWD production and temperature in the near future may temporarily reduce regional forest C storage.

  1. Changes in ecosystem structure related to the type and extent of woody cover alter carbon dynamics and surface energy exchange in central Texas ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Heilman, J.; McInnes, K.; Owens, K.; Kjelgaard, J.; Thijs, A.

    2006-12-01

    Rangeland ecosystems account for almost two thirds the total land area in Texas. Over the past century, heavy livestock grazing and fire suppression coupled with changes in climate have facilitated the expansion of woody species into rangelands throughout the state. Based in part on the assumption that woody species use more water than their herbaceous counterparts, land managers have used a variety of techniques to reduce tree and shrub abundance to combat the loss of forage for cattle. As a result, the structure of rangelands in Texas is complex, characterized by woody vegetation that is patchy in distribution, and continually changing between grassland, savanna and woodland. Despite the large areal extent of Texas rangelands, very little is known about how the observed changes in ecosystem structure impact carbon cycle dynamics and surface energy exchange. To reduce these uncertainties, we explored explicit relationships between structure and function in these ecosystems by comparing tower-based measurements of carbon and water vapor exchange made simultaneously from July 2004-Dec 2005 across three representative land covers in central Texas: open grassland, savanna with 30% Ashe juniper and honey mesquite cover, and closed canopy woodland. Here we report our findings on what impact the type and pattern of woody plant cover has on biological controls and patterns of carbon sequestration, evapotranspiration, and sensitivity to precipitation pulses. Monthly measurements of leaf level gas exchange, soil respiration rates, herbaceous net ecosystem exchange, and sap flow measurements on dominant woody species were used to augment eddy covariance estimates of ecosystem-atmosphere exchange. The addition of woody species significantly increased carbon sequestration in these ecosystems. Net ecosystem production from July 05-Jun 05 in the grassland, savanna and forest ecosystems was -14 g C m-2, -413 g C m-2, -450 g C m-2, respectively. Evapotranspiration was less

  2. Response of a depleted sagebrush steppe riparian system to grazing control and woody plantings. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, W.P.; Shaw, N.L.; Dudley, J.G.; Saab, V.A.; Kinney, J.W.

    1996-12-01

    To find out if a depleted riparian system in the sagebrush steppe of eastern Oregon would respond quickly to improved management, five management treatments were applied for 7 years, ranging from ungrazed to heavily grazed treatments, including, in some cases, planting of woody species. While the results varied, all treatments were too limited to significantly restore the damaged areas within the 7-year span. Although some improvements were made in woody plant densities, little meaningful change occurred in the frequencies of herbaceous wetland plants, densities of small wildlife, or stream channel morphology. We concluded the restoration would take many years, possibly decades, without increased revegetation efforts and continued reductions in grazing in this riparian system damaged over 150 years.

  3. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: A methods assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lazarus, Brynne E.; Germino, Matthew; Vander Veen, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant–soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics.

  4. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: a methods assessment.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Brynne E; Germino, Matthew J; Vander Veen, Jessica L

    2016-06-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant-soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics. PMID:26963293

  5. Heavy metal accumulation and signal transduction in herbaceous and woody plants: Paving the way for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Bin; He, Jiali; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metal (HM)-accumulating herbaceous and woody plants are employed for phytoremediation. To develop improved strategies for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency, knowledge of the microstructural, physiological and molecular responses underlying HM-accumulation is required. Here we review the progress in understanding the structural, physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification, as well as the regulation of these processes by signal transduction in response to HM exposure. The significance of genetic engineering for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency is also discussed. In herbaceous plants, HMs are taken up by roots and transported into the root cells via transmembrane carriers for nutritional ions. The HMs absorbed by root cells can be further translocated to the xylem vessels and unloaded into the xylem sap, thereby reaching the aerial parts of plants. HMs can be sequestered in the cell walls, vacuoles and the Golgi apparatuses. Plant roots initially perceive HM stress and trigger the signal transduction, thereby mediating changes at the molecular, physiological, and microstructural level. Signaling molecules such as phytohormones, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), modulate plant responses to HMs via differentially expressed genes, activation of the antioxidative system and coordinated cross talk among different signaling molecules. A number of genes participated in HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification have been functionally characterized and transformed to target plants for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Fast growing woody plants hold an advantage over herbaceous plants for phytoremediation in terms of accumulation of high HM-amounts in their large biomass. Presumably, woody plants accumulate HMs using similar mechanisms as herbaceous counterparts, but the processes of HM accumulation and signal transduction can be more complex in woody plants. PMID

  6. A STELLA Model to Estimate Water and Nitrogen Dynamics in a Short-Rotation Woody Crop Plantation.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ying; Zhang, Jiaen; Leininger, Theodor D; Frey, Brent R

    2015-01-01

    Although short-rotation woody crop biomass production technology has demonstrated a promising potential to supply feedstocks for bioenergy production, the water and nutrient processes in the woody crop planation ecosystem are poorly understood. In this study, a computer model was developed to estimate the dynamics of water and nitrogen (N) species (e.g., NH-N, NO-N, particulate organic N, and soluble organic N [SON]) in a woody crop plantation using STELLA (tructural hinking and xperiential earning aboratory with nimation) software. A scenario was performed to estimate diurnal and monthly water and N variations of a 1-ha mature cottonwood plantation over a 1-yr simulation period. A typical monthly variation pattern was found for soil water evaporation, leaf water transpiration, and root water uptake, with an increase from winter to summer and a decrease from summer to the following winter. Simulations further revealed that the rate of soil water evaporation was one order of magnitude lower than that of leaf water transpiration. In most cases, the relative monthly water loss rates could be expressed as evapotranspiration > root uptake > percolation > runoff. Leaching of NO-N and SON depended not only on soil N content but also on rainfall rate and duration. Leaching of NO-N from the cottonwood plantation was about two times higher than that of SON. The relative monthly rate of N leaching was NO-N > SON > NH-N. This study suggests that the STELLA model developed is a useful tool for estimating water and N dynamics from a woody crop plantation. PMID:25602335

  7. Potential for Woody Bioenergy Crops Grown on Marginal Lands in the US Midwest to Reduce Carbon Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahajpal, R.; Hurtt, G. C.; Fisk, J. P.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Zhang, X.

    2012-12-01

    While cellulosic biofuels are widely considered to be a low carbon energy source for the future, a comprehensive assessment of the environmental sustainability of existing and future biofuel systems is needed to assess their utility in meeting US energy and food needs without exacerbating environmental harm. To assess the carbon emission reduction potential of cellulosic biofuels, we need to identify lands that are initially not storing large quantities of carbon in soil and vegetation but are capable of producing abundant biomass with limited management inputs, and accurately model forest production rates and associated input requirements. Here we present modeled results for carbon emission reduction potential and cellulosic ethanol production of woody bioenergy crops replacing existing native prairie vegetation grown on marginal lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands are selected based on soil properties describing use limitation, and are extracted from the SSURGO (Soil Survey Geographic) database. Yield estimates for existing native prairie vegetation on marginal lands modeled using the process-based field-scale model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) amount to ~ 6.7±2.0 Mg ha-1. To model woody bioenergy crops, the individual-based terrestrial ecosystem model ED (Ecosystem Demography) is initialized with the soil organic carbon stocks estimated at the end of the EPIC simulation. Four woody bioenergy crops: willow, southern pine, eucalyptus and poplar are parameterized in ED. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters and drivers is conducted to explore the range of carbon emission reduction possible with variation in woody bioenergy crop types, spatial and temporal resolution. We hypothesize that growing cellulosic crops on these marginal lands can provide significant water quality, biodiversity and GHG emissions mitigation benefits, without accruing additional carbon costs from the displacement of food and feed production.

  8. Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-09-15

    A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

  9. Woody species diversity in forest plantations in a mountainous region of Beijing, China: effects of sampling scale and species selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Shuang; Ma, Keming; Fu, Bojie; Anand, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    The role of forest plantations in biodiversity conservation has gained more attention in recent years. However, most work on evaluating the diversity of forest plantations focuses only on one spatial scale; thus, we examined the effects of sampling scale on diversity in forest plantations. We designed a hierarchical sampling strategy to collect data on woody species diversity in planted pine (Pinus tabuliformis Carr.), planted larch (Larix principis-rupprechtii Mayr.), and natural secondary deciduous broadleaf forests in a mountainous region of Beijing, China. Additive diversity partition analysis showed that, compared to natural forests, the planted pine forests had a different woody species diversity partitioning pattern at multi-scales (except the Simpson diversity in the regeneration layer), while the larch plantations did not show multi-scale diversity partitioning patterns that were obviously different from those in the natural secondary broadleaf forest. Compare to the natural secondary broadleaf forests, the effects of planted pine forests on woody species diversity are dependent on the sampling scale and layers selected for analysis. Diversity in the planted larch forest, however, was not significantly different from that in the natural forest for all diversity components at all sampling levels. Our work demonstrated that the species selected for afforestation and the sampling scales selected for data analysis alter the conclusions on the levels of diversity supported by plantations. We suggest that a wide range of scales should be considered in the evaluation of the role of forest plantations on biodiversity conservation. PMID:25545860

  10. Woody invasions of urban trails and the changing face of urban forests in the great plains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemec, K.T.; Allen, C.R.; Alai, A.; Clements, G.; Kessler, A.C.; Kinsell, T.; Major, A.; Stephen, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    Corridors such as roads and trails can facilitate invasions by non-native plant species. The open, disturbed habitat associated with corridors provides favorable growing conditions for many non-native plant species. Bike trails are a corridor system common to many urban areas that have not been studied for their potential role in plant invasions. We sampled five linear segments of urban forest along bike trails in Lincoln, Nebraska to assess the invasion of woody non-native species relative to corridors and to assess the composition of these urban forests. The most abundant plant species were generally native species, but five non-native species were also present: white mulberry (Morus alba), common buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.) and elm (Ulmus spp.). The distribution of two of the woody species sampled, common buckthorn and honeysuckle, significantly decreased with increasing distance from a source patch of vegetation (P = 0.031 and 0.030). These linear habitats are being invaded by non-native tree and shrub species, which may change the structure of these urban forest corridors. If non-native woody plant species become abundant in the future, they may homogenize the plant community and reduce native biodiversity in these areas. ?? 2011 American Midland Naturalist.

  11. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants. PMID:27515999

  12. Abundance of Woody Riparian Species in the Western USA in Relation to Phenology, Climate, and Flow Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auble, G. T.; Friedman, J. M.; Scott, M. L.; Shafroth, P. B.; Merigliano, M. M.; Freehling, M. D.; Evans, R. E.; Griffin, E. R.

    2004-12-01

    We randomly selected 475 long-term U.S. Geological Survey stream gaging stations in 17 western states to relate the presence and abundance of woody species to environmental factors. Along a 1.3-km reach near each station we measured the cover of all species on a list of the 44 most abundant large woody riparian species in the region. We used logistic regression to fit the response of four abundant species to growing degree days and mean precipitation. Then we related relative abundance of these 4 species to timing of the flood peak in sites where the likelihood of occurrence was greater than 0.5. The exotics Tamarix ramosissima (saltcedar) and Elaeagnus angustifolia (Russian-olive) are now the third and fourth most frequently occurring large woody riparian species in the western U.S. and the second and fifth most abundant. In climatically suitable areas, species differences in reproductive phenology produce different relations of abundance to flow regime. Because of its limited period of seed release and viability in early summer, cottonwood (Populus deltoides) is disadvantaged where floods occur in the spring or fall. Abundances of saltcedar, because of its long period of seed release; Russian-olive, because of seed dormancy; and Salix exigua, because of the importance of vegetative spread, are much less sensitive to flood timing.

  13. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants. PMID:26600686

  14. Predictive modelling of savannah woody cover: A multi-temporal and multi-sensor machine learning investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbottom, Thomas; Symeonakis, Elias

    2016-04-01

    Effective monitoring of the Earth's ecosystems requires the availability of methods for quantifying the structural composition and cover of vegetation. This is especially important in heterogeneous environments, such as semi-arid savannahs which are naturally comprised of a dynamic mix of tree, shrub, and grass components. The fractional coverage of woody vegetation is a key ecosystem attribute in savannahs, particularly given current concerns over the invasion of grasslands by shrub species (shrub encroachment), or the over-exploitation of woody biomass for fuelwood. Remote sensing has a clear role to play in monitoring semi-arid environments, and in recent years the number of both spacebourne sensors and collected scenes has increased dramatically allowing for multi-temporal and multi-sensor investigations. Here we employ a statistical learning framework to assess the potential of optical and radar imagery for predicting fractional woody cover. We test a number of different model combinations in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Our results show that combining Landsat and PALSAR data produces the most accurate predictions (R2 =0.65, P < 0.001, RMSE =0.094). However, this was only marginally more effective than a model using multitemporal Landsat data from the wet and dry seasons (R2 = 0.64 < 0.001,RMSE = 0.094). When a single temporal epoch is employed, dry season data consistently and significantly outperforms imagery from the wet period. These results are an important addition to the growing literature on fractional cover prediction.

  15. [Selection and purification potential evaluation of woody plant in vertical flow constructed wetlands in the subtropical area].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Fu; Hao, Jun; Chen, Ming-Li; Zhu, Guang-Yu

    2014-02-01

    In order to solve the problem that wetland herbaceous plants tend to die during winter in subtropics areas, selection and purification potential evaluation experiments were carried out by introducing into the constructed wetlands 16 species of woody wetland plants. Cluster analysis was performed by including the morphological characteristics, physiological characteristics, as well as nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation of the woody wetland plants. The results indicated that there were significant differences among the tested woody plants in their survival rate, height increase, root length increase and vigor, Chlorophyll content, Superoxide dismutase, Malonaldehyde, Proline, Peroxidase, biomass, average concentration and accumulation of nitrogen and phosphorus. Based on the established evaluation system, the tested plants were clustered into 3 groups. The plants in the 1st group possessing high purification potentials are Nerium oleander and Hibiscus syriacus. Those in the 2nd group possessing moderate purification potentials are Trachycarpus fortune, Llex latifolia Thunb., Gardenia jasminoides, Serissa foetida and Ilex crenatacv Convexa. And those in the 3rd group with low purification potentials are Jasminum udiflorum, Hedera helix, Ligustrum vicaryi, Ligustrum lucidum, Buxus sempervives, Murraya paniculata, Osmanthus fragrans, Mahoniafortune and Photinia serrulata. PMID:24812951

  16. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants. PMID:27515999

  17. Using a botanical garden to assess factors influencing the colonization of exotic woody plants by phyllophagous insects.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, Natalia; Kenis, M

    2016-09-01

    The adoption of exotic plants by indigenous herbivores in the region of introduction can be influenced by numerous factors. A botanical garden in Western Siberia was used to test various hypotheses on the adaptation of indigenous phyllophagous insects to exotic plants invasions, focusing on two feeding guilds, external leaf chewers and leaf miners. A total of 150 indigenous and exotic woody plant species were surveyed for insect damage, abundance and species richness. First, exotic woody plants were much less damaged by chewers and leaf miners than native plants, and the leaf miners' species richness was much lower on exotic than native plants. Second, exotic woody plants having a congeneric species in the region of introduction were more damaged by chewers and hosted a more abundant and species-rich community of leaf miners than plants without native congeneric species. Third, damage by chewers significantly increased with the frequency of planting of exotic host plants outside the botanical garden, and leaf miners' abundance and species richness significantly increased with residence time in the garden. Finally, no significant relationship was found between insect damage or abundance and the origin of the exotic plants. Besides the ecological implications of the results, this study also illustrates the potential of botanical gardens to test ecological hypotheses on biological invasions and insect-plant interactions on a large set of plant species. PMID:27167225

  18. Estimation of aboveground woody biomass using HJ-1 and Radarsat-2 data for deciduous forests in Daxing'anling, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Yang, Le; Liu, Qinhuo; Li, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Accurate estimation of forest aboveground biomass is important for global carbon budgets and ecosystem change studies. Most algorithms for regional or global aboveground biomass estimation using optical and microwave remote sensing data are based on empirical regression and non-parametric training methods, which require large amount of ground measurements for training and are lacking of explicit interaction mechanisms between electromagnetic wave and vegetation. In this study, we proposed an optical/microwave synergy method based on a coherent polarimetric SAR model to estimate woody biomass. The study area is sparse deciduous forest dominated by birch with understory of shrubs and herbs in Daxing'anling, China. HJ-1, Radarsat-2 images, and field LAI were collected during May to August in 2013, tree biophysical parameters were measured at the field campaign during August to September in 2012. The effects of understory and wet ground were evaluated by introducing the NDVI derived from HJ-1 image and rain rate. Field measured LAI was used as an input to the SAR model to define the scattering and attenuation of the green canopy to the total backscatter. Finally, an logarithmic equation between the backscatter coefficient of direct forest scattering mechanism and woody biomass was generated (R2=0.582). The retrieval results were validated with the ground biomass measurements (RMSE=29.01ton/ha). The results indicated the synergy of optical and microwave remote sensing data based on SAR model has the potential to improve the accuracy of woody biomass estimation.

  19. High temperature air-blown woody biomass gasification model for the estimation of an entrained down-flow gasifier.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nobusuke; Tanaka, Miku; Piao, Guilin; Kobayashi, Jun; Hatano, Shigenobu; Itaya, Yoshinori; Mori, Shigekatsu

    2009-01-01

    A high temperature air-blown gasification model for woody biomass is developed based on an air-blown gasification experiment. A high temperature air-blown gasification experiment on woody biomass in an entrained down-flow gasifier is carried out, and then the simple gasification model is developed based on the experimental results. In the experiment, air-blown gasification is conducted to demonstrate the behavior of this process. Pulverized wood is used as the gasification fuel, which is injected directly into the entrained down-flow gasifier by the pulverized wood banner. The pulverized wood is sieved through 60 mesh and supplied at rates of 19 and 27kg/h. The oxygen-carbon molar ratio (O/C) is employed as the operational condition instead of the air ratio. The maximum temperature achievable is over 1400K when the O/C is from 1.26 to 1.84. The results show that the gas composition is followed by the CO-shift reaction equilibrium. Therefore, the air-blown gasification model is developed based on the CO-shift reaction equilibrium. The simple gasification model agrees well with the experimental results. From calculations in large-scale units, the cold gas is able to achieve 80% efficiency in the air-blown gasification, when the woody biomass feedrate is over 1000kg/h and input air temperature is 700K. PMID:18653324

  20. Technical Note: Linking climate change and downed woody debris decomposition across forests of the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Matthew B.; Woodall, Christopher W.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Fraver, Shawn; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play a critical role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Forest carbon (C) is stored through photosynthesis and released via decomposition and combustion. Relative to C fixation in biomass, much less is known about C depletion through decomposition of woody debris, particularly under a changing climate. It is assumed that the increased temperatures and longer growing seasons associated with projected climate change will increase the decomposition rates (i.e., more rapid C cycling) of downed woody debris (DWD); however, the magnitude of this increase has not been previously addressed. Using DWD measurements collected from a national forest inventory of the eastern United States, we show that the residence time of DWD may decrease (i.e., more rapid decomposition) by as much as 13% over the next 200 years, depending on various future climate change scenarios and forest types. Although existing dynamic global vegetation models account for the decomposition process, they typically do not include the effect of a changing climate on DWD decomposition rates. We expect that an increased understanding of decomposition rates, as presented in this current work, will be needed to adequately quantify the fate of woody detritus in future forests. Furthermore, we hope these results will lead to improved models that incorporate climate change scenarios for depicting future dead wood dynamics in addition to a traditional emphasis on live-tree demographics.

  1. Woody Species Diversity in Forest Plantations in a Mountainous Region of Beijing, China: Effects of Sampling Scale and Species Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Shuang; Ma, Keming; Fu, Bojie; Anand, Madhur

    2014-01-01

    The role of forest plantations in biodiversity conservation has gained more attention in recent years. However, most work on evaluating the diversity of forest plantations focuses only on one spatial scale; thus, we examined the effects of sampling scale on diversity in forest plantations. We designed a hierarchical sampling strategy to collect data on woody species diversity in planted pine (Pinus tabuliformis Carr.), planted larch (Larix principis-rupprechtii Mayr.), and natural secondary deciduous broadleaf forests in a mountainous region of Beijing, China. Additive diversity partition analysis showed that, compared to natural forests, the planted pine forests had a different woody species diversity partitioning pattern at multi-scales (except the Simpson diversity in the regeneration layer), while the larch plantations did not show multi-scale diversity partitioning patterns that were obviously different from those in the natural secondary broadleaf forest. Compare to the natural secondary broadleaf forests, the effects of planted pine forests on woody species diversity are dependent on the sampling scale and layers selected for analysis. Diversity in the planted larch forest, however, was not significantly different from that in the natural forest for all diversity components at all sampling levels. Our work demonstrated that the species selected for afforestation and the sampling scales selected for data analysis alter the conclusions on the levels of diversity supported by plantations. We suggest that a wide range of scales should be considered in the evaluation of the role of forest plantations on biodiversity conservation. PMID:25545860

  2. Technical Note: Linking climate change and downed woody debris decomposition across forests of the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. B.; Woodall, C. W.; D'Amato, A. W.; Fraver, S.; Bradford, J. B.

    2014-11-01

    Forest ecosystems play a critical role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Forest carbon (C) is stored through photosynthesis and released via decomposition and combustion. Relative to C fixation in biomass, much less is known about C depletion through decomposition of woody debris, particularly under a changing climate. It is assumed that the increased temperatures and longer growing seasons associated with projected climate change will increase the decomposition rates (i.e., more rapid C cycling) of downed woody debris (DWD); however, the magnitude of this increase has not been previously addressed. Using DWD measurements collected from a national forest inventory of the eastern United States, we show that the residence time of DWD may decrease (i.e., more rapid decomposition) by as much as 13% over the next 200 years, depending on various future climate change scenarios and forest types. Although existing dynamic global vegetation models account for the decomposition process, they typically do not include the effect of a changing climate on DWD decomposition rates. We expect that an increased understanding of decomposition rates, as presented in this current work, will be needed to adequately quantify the fate of woody detritus in future forests. Furthermore, we hope these results will lead to improved models that incorporate climate change scenarios for depicting future dead wood dynamics in addition to a traditional emphasis on live-tree demographics.

  3. Technical Note: Linking climate change and downed woody debris decomposition across forests of the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, M. B.; Woodall, C. W.; D'Amato, A. W.; Fraver, S.; Bradford, J. B.

    2014-06-01

    Forest ecosystems play a critical role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Long-term forest carbon (C) storage is determined by the balance between C fixation into biomass through photosynthesis and C release via decomposition and combustion. Relative to C fixation in biomass, much less is known about C depletion through decomposition of woody debris, particularly under a changing climate. It is assumed that the increased temperatures and longer growing seasons associated with projected climate change will increase the decomposition rates (i.e., more rapid C cycling) of downed woody debris (DWD); however, the magnitude of this increase has not been previously addressed. Using DWD measurements collected from a national forest inventory of the eastern United States, we show that the residence time of DWD may decrease (i.e., more rapid decomposition) by as much as 13% over the next 200 years depending on various future climate change scenarios and forest types. Although existing dynamic global vegetation models account for the decomposition process, they typically do not include the effect of a changing climate on DWD decomposition rates. We expect that an increased understanding of decomposition rates, as presented in this current work, will be needed to adequately quantify the fate of woody detritus in future forests. Furthermore, we hope these results will lead to improved models that incorporate climate change scenarios for depicting future dead wood dynamics, in addition to a traditional emphasis on live tree demographics.

  4. Water-use patterns of woody species in pineland and hammock communities of South Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewe, S.M.L.; da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel; Sternberg, L.; Busch, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Rockland pine forests of south Florida dominated by Pinus elliottii var. densa characteristically have poor soil development in relation to neighboring hardwood hammocks. This has led to the hypothesis that Everglades hammock trees are more reliant on soil moisture derived from local precipitation whereas pineland plants must depend more on groundwater linked to broader regional hydrologic patterns. Because soil moisture sources are likely to vary more than groundwater sources, we hypothesized that hammock plants would exhibit correspondingly higher levels of dry season water stress. This was examined by measuring predawn water potentials, and by analyzing water uptake in representative hammock and pineland woody species using stable isotopes of plant water and that of potential sources during wet and dry seasons. Two species typical of each of the two communities were selected; a fifth species which was found in both communities, Lysiloma latisiliqua Benth., was also analyzed. Water content of soils in both communities decreased from wet to dry season. Consistent with our hypothesis, the change in predawn water potentials between the wet and dry season was less in pineland species than that of hammock species. Water potential changes in L. latisiliqua in both communities resembled that of hammock species more than pineland plants. Isotopic data showed that pineland species rely proportionately more on groundwater than hammock species. Nevertheless, unlike hammock species in the Florida Keys, mainland hammock species utilized a substantial amount of groundwater during the dry season.

  5. Emission reductions from woody biomass waste for energy as an alternative to open burning.

    PubMed

    Springsteen, Bruce; Christofk, Tom; Eubanks, Steve; Mason, Tad; Clavin, Chris; Storey, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Woody biomass waste is generated throughout California from forest management, hazardous fuel reduction, and agricultural operations. Open pile burning in the vicinity of generation is frequently the only economic disposal option. A framework is developed to quantify air emissions reductions for projects that alternatively utilize biomass waste as fuel for energy production. A demonstration project was conducted involving the grinding and 97-km one-way transport of 6096 bone-dry metric tons (BDT) of mixed conifer forest slash in the Sierra Nevada foothills for use as fuel in a biomass power cogeneration facility. Compared with the traditional open pile burning method of disposal for the forest harvest slash, utilization of the slash for fuel reduced particulate matter (PM) emissions by 98% (6 kg PM/BDT biomass), nitrogen oxides (NOx) by 54% (1.6 kg NOx/BDT), nonmethane volatile organics (NMOCs) by 99% (4.7 kg NMOCs/BDT), carbon monoxide (CO) by 97% (58 kg CO/BDT), and carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) by 17% (0.38 t CO2e/BDT). Emission contributions from biomass processing and transport operations are negligible. CO2e benefits are dependent on the emission characteristics of the displaced marginal electricity supply. Monetization of emissions reductions will assist with fuel sourcing activities and the conduct of biomass energy projects. PMID:21305889

  6. Incorporating Dryland Ecohydrology into a Social-Ecological Framework: The Problem of Woody Plant Encroachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Grasslands and savannas across the globe have been transformed into woodlands, through a process often described as woody plant encroachment (WPE). This transformation has important implications for water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles—a topic that has been explored extensively, as reflected in the ecohydrological literature. The changes related to WPE have important societal implications as well. It is clear that human actions are strongly linked with both the causes and the consequences of WPE. At the same time, WPE has proved intractable in the face of attempts to slow or abate the phenomenon. Increasingly, it is being recognized that such complex environmental problems must be treated as social-ecological systems, that is, coupled human and natural systems. In this presentation, I will discuss recent progress in understanding WPE as a social-ecohydrological system and explore potentially promising approaches that merge insights from multiple disciplines—including hydrology, ecology, remote sensing, economics, and social sciences—as a basis for agent-based models that can improve our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  7. Cultural treatment of selected species for woody biomass production in the Pacific northwest. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Progress was made toward establishing two sites to study the effect of cultural treatment on two selected species, black cottonwood and red alder, for woody biomass production. The first study area (the dry site), located on the City of Seattle's Cedar River Watershed, at North Bend, Washington, was established and put into production during late winter 1978 and spring of 1979. Cottonwood cuttings obtained from US Forest Service land near Skykomish, Washington, were cut into 18 to 20 inch lengths and outplanted in March and April. Alder was obtained from logging roads near the plantation site as wildlings and transplanted immediately after pulling. Both species were planted in pure plots, mixes of 1:1, and mixes of 2:1 with spacings of 2x4, 4x6 and 6x8 feet. Row cultivation was performed three times during the growing season. Fertilizer and irrigation were not applied due to logistical problems. Survival for both species exceeded 98%. Growth was moderate to poor because of an extremely dry summer. The second area (the wet site) is being established on the University of Washington's Lee Experimental Forest north of Woodinville, Washington. The area was clearcut logged in September and October of 1979. Stumps were removed shortly thereafter.

  8. Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

    1995-12-31

    Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable feedstock resources. The Department of Energy is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soil conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row crops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different biomass crops for selected wildlife species is also under study. To date, these studies have shown that in comparison with row crops biomass plantings of both grass and tree crops increased biodiversity of birds; however, the habitat value of tree plantations is not equivalent to natural forests. The effects on native wildlife of establishing multiple plantations across a landscape are being studied. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing biomass feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the probable effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

  9. Remediation of heavy metal-contaminated forest soil using recycled organic matter and native woody plants.

    PubMed

    Helmisaari, H-S; Salemaa, M; Derome, J; Kiikkilä, O; Uhlig, C; Nieminen, T M

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine how the application of a mulch cover (a mixture of household biocompost and woodchips) onto heavy metal-polluted forest soil affects (i) long-term survival and growth of planted dwarf shrubs and tree seedlings and (ii) natural revegetation. Native woody plants (Pinus sylvestris, Betula pubescens, Empetrum nigrum, and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) were planted in mulch pockets on mulch-covered and uncovered plots in summer 1996 in a highly polluted Scots pine stand in southwest Finland. Spreading a mulch layer on the soil surface was essential for the recolonization of natural vegetation and increased dwarf shrub survival, partly through protection against drought. Despite initial mortality, transplant establishment was relatively successful during the following 10 yr. Tree species had higher survival rates, but the dwarf shrubs covered a larger area of the soil surface during the experiment. Especially E. nigrum and P. sylvestris proved to be suitable for revegetating heavy metal-polluted and degraded forests. Natural recolonization of pioneer species (e.g., Epilobium angustifolium, Taraxacum coll., and grasses) and tree seedlings (P. sylvestris, Betula sp., and Salix sp.) was strongly enhanced on the mulched plots, whereas there was no natural vegetation on the untreated plots. These results indicate that a heavy metal-polluted site can be ecologically remediated without having to remove the soil. Household compost and woodchips are low-cost mulching materials that are suitable for restoring heavy metal-polluted soil. PMID:17596623

  10. Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

    1996-10-01

    Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable resources. The DOE is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water, and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soils conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row drops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different crops for wildlife species is also considered. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

  11. Filtering the signature of submerged large woody debris from bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Laurent; Hodges, Ben R.

    2005-07-01

    Modeling water velocities and depth for riverine aquatic habitat analysis requires fine-scale surveys of river bathymetry. The presence of submerged large woody debris (LWD) distorts the results of acoustic bathymetry surveys and subsequent modeling if the LWD data is not separated from the background river bathymetry. Submerged LWD typically appears in digital acoustic data for a low-gradient sand-bed river as impulse spikes of a few data points with a substantially shallower depth than the surrounding data. This paper examines the performance of linear and nonlinear filtering algorithms for removing impulse spikes from a digital bathymetry signal. A synthesized data set is used for control tests that quantify the error associated with each method. The more successful nonlinear filtering techniques (median and erosion filters) are used to filter single-beam echosounder data, from the Sulphur River in northeastern Texas, USA. Median filtering proved to be the best technique for removing LWD impulse spikes while leaving the background bathymetry relatively unchanged. Efficient automation of spike removal from a data set requires a method for selecting the filter characteristics without recourse to engineering judgment or prior experience. A method of a priori selecting the minimum filter order based upon the physical scales of the LWD and the statistics of the data separation in the survey is proposed based on scaling analysis, and validated with the study results.

  12. Investigation of Prediction Method and Fundamental Thermo-decomposition Properties on Gasification of Woody Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Akihiro

    Recently, development of energy transfer technology based on woody biomass remarkably has been forwarding accompanied biomass boom for gasification and liquefaction. To elevate on yield of energy into biomass for transportation and exergy is extremely important for essential utilization and production of bio-fuels. Because, conversion to bio-fuel must be discussion in detail thermo-decomposition characteristics for biomass main composition formed on cellulose and hemicelluloses, lignin. In this research, we analyze thermo-decomposition characteristics of each biomass main composition on both active (air) and passive (N2) atmosphere. Especially, we suggest predict model of gasification based on change of atomic carbon ratio with thermo-decomposition. 1) Even if it heat-treats cedar chip by 473K, loss of energy hardly produces it. From this, it acquired that the substance contributed to weight reduction was a low ingredient of energy value. 2) If cedar chip is heated in the 473K around, it can be predicted that the substance with a low energy value like water or acetic acid has arisen by thermal decomposition. It suggested that the transportation performance of the biomass improved by choosing and eliminating these. 3) Each ingredient of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen which dissipated in the gasification process acquired that it was direct proportion to the carbonaceous dissipation rate. 4) The action at the time of thermo-decomposition of (the carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen which are) the main constituent factors of the biomass suggested a possibility of being predicted by a statistical method.

  13. Effects of flooding upon woody vegetation along parts of the Potomac River flood plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, T.M.

    1982-01-01

    A two-part study along the Potomac River flood plain near Washington, D.C., was undertaken to investigate the effects of flooding upon woody vegetation. Floods abrade bark, damage branches and canopies, and often uproot trees. The first study was of vegetation in five monumented flood-plain plots which differed in the frequency and severity of floodflow over a 10-year period. Basal area and survival of trees appears to be related to velocity of floodflow, which in turn is related to flood magnitude and channel shape. However, the effects of flooding also depend on the nature of the flood-plain surface and size and growth habit of vegetation. In the second study, a catastrophic flood after Hurricane Agnes in June 1972 was found to cause large-scale changes in the age, form, and species composition of flood-plain forest below Great Falls, Va. The impact of the flood depended primarily on the flow regime of the river; destruction was greatest in areas exposed to the maximum flood foce, and minimal at sheltered locations. Age determinations from dead trunks and surviving trees suggest that most trees in severely damaged areas started to grow since the last great flood, which occurred in 1952. Trees along sheltered reaches survived several previous catastrophic floods. In addition, species varied in ability to withstand damage from the Hurricane Agnes flood. Least likely to recover were species growing on infrequently flooded surfaces, which may explain, in part, their absence at lower flood-plain elevations. (USGS)

  14. Somatic deleterious mutation rate in a woody plant: estimation from phenotypic data

    PubMed Central

    Bobiwash, K; Schultz, S T; Schoen, D J

    2013-01-01

    We conducted controlled crosses in populations of the long-lived clonal shrub, Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) to estimate inbreeding depression and mutation parameters associated with somatic deleterious mutation. Inbreeding depression level was high, with many plants failing to set fruit after self-pollination. We also compared fruit set from autogamous pollinations (pollen collected from within the same inflorescence) with fruit set from geitonogamous pollinations (pollen collected from the same plant but from inflorescences separated by several meters of branch growth). The difference between geitonogamous versus autogamous fitness within single plants is referred to as ‘autogamy depression' (AD). AD can be caused by somatic deleterious mutation. AD was significantly different from zero for fruit set. We developed a maximum-likelihood procedure to estimate somatic mutation parameters from AD, and applied it to geitonogamous and autogamous fruit set data from this experiment. We infer that, on average, approximately three sublethal, partially dominant somatic mutations exist within the crowns of the plants studied. We conclude that somatic mutation in this woody plant results in an overall genomic deleterious mutation rate that exceeds the rate measured to date for annual plants. Some implications of this result for evolutionary biology and agriculture are discussed. PMID:23778990

  15. Influence of coarse woody debris on the soricid community in southeastern Coastal Plain pine stands.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Justin, C.; Castleberry, Steven, B.; Kilgo, John, C.

    2010-07-01

    Shrew abundance has been linked to the presence of coarse woody debris (CWD), especially downed logs, in many regions in the United States. We investigated the importance of CWD to shrew communities in managed upland pine stands in the southeastern United States Coastal Plain. Using a randomized complete block design, 1 of the following treatments was assigned to twelve 9.3-ha plots: removal (n 5 3; all downed CWD _10 cm in diameter and _60 cm long removed), downed (n 5 3; 5-fold increase in volume of downed CWD), snag (n 5 3; 10-fold increase in volume of standing dead CWD), and control (n 5 3; unmanipulated). Shrews (Blarina carolinensis, Sorex longirostris, and Cryptotis parva) were captured over 7 seasons from January 2007 to August 2008 using drift-fence pitfall trapping arrays within treatment plots. Topographic variables were measured and included as treatment covariates. More captures of B. carolinensis were made in the downed treatment compared to removal, and captures of S. longirostris were greater in downed and snag compared to removal. Captures of C. parva did not differ among treatments. Captures of S. longirostris were positively correlated with slope. Our results suggest that abundance of 2 of the 3 common shrew species of the southeastern Coastal Plain examined in our study is influenced by the presence of CWD.

  16. Predictors, spatial distribution, and occurrence of woody invasive plants in subtropical urban ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Staudhammer, Christina L; Escobedo, Francisco J; Holt, Nathan; Young, Linda J; Brandeis, Thomas J; Zipperer, Wayne

    2015-05-15

    We examined the spatial distribution, occurrence, and socioecological predictors of woody invasive plants (WIP) in two subtropical, coastal urban ecosystems: San Juan, Puerto Rico and Miami-Dade, United States. These two cities have similar climates and ecosystems typical of subtropical regions but differ in socioeconomics, topography, and urbanization processes. Using permanent plot data, available forest inventory protocols and statistical analyses of geographic and socioeconomic spatial predictors, we found that landscape level distribution and occurrence of WIPs was not clustered. We also characterized WIP composition and occurrence using logistic models, and found they were strongly related to the proportional area of residential land uses. However, the magnitude and trend of increase depended on median household income and grass cover. In San Juan, WIP occurrence was higher in areas of high residential cover when incomes were low or grass cover was low, whereas the opposite was true in Miami-Dade. Although Miami-Dade had greater invasive shrub cover and numbers of WIP species, San Juan had far greater invasive tree density, basal area and crown cover. This study provides an approach for incorporating field and available census data in geospatial distribution models of WIPs in cities throughout the globe. Findings indicate that identifying spatial predictors of WIPs depends on site-specific factors and the ecological scale of the predictor. Thus, mapping protocols and policies to eradicate urban WIPs should target indicators of a relevant scale specific to the area of interest for their improved and proactive management. PMID:25776798

  17. Microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants in lead contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Gattai, Graziella S; Pereira, Sônia V; Costa, Cynthia M C; Lima, Cláudia E P; Maia, Leonor C

    2011-07-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants (Caesalpinia ferrea, Mimosa tenuiflora and Erythrina velutina) in lead contaminated soil from the semi-arid region of northeastern of Brazil (Belo Jardim, Pernambuco). Dilutions were prepared by adding lead contaminated soil (270 mg Kg(-1)) to uncontaminated soil (37 mg Pb Kg soil(-1)) in the proportions of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% (v:v). The increase of lead contamination in the soil negatively influenced the amount of carbon in the microbial biomass of the samples from both the dry and rainy seasons and the metabolic quotient only differed between the collection seasons in the 30% contaminated soil. The average value of the acid phosphatase activity in the dry season was 2.3 times higher than observed during the rainy season. There was no significant difference in the number of glomerospores observed between soils and periods studied. The most probable number of infective propagules was reduced for both seasons due to the excess lead in soil. The mycorrhizal colonization rate was reduced for the three plant species assayed. The inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi benefited the growth of Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil. PMID:24031701

  18. Poplar-Root Knot Nematode Interaction: A Model for Perennial Woody Species.

    PubMed

    Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Sacré, Pierre-Yves; Twyffels, Laure; Mol, Adeline; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Ziemons, Eric; Hubert, Philippe; Pérez-Morga, David; El Jaziri, Mondher; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Baucher, Marie

    2016-07-01

    Plant root-knot nematode (RKN) interaction studies are performed on several host plant models. Though RKN interact with trees, no perennial woody model has been explored so far. Here, we show that poplar (Populus tremula × P. alba) grown in vitro is susceptible to Meloidogyne incognita, allowing this nematode to penetrate, to induce feeding sites, and to successfully complete its life cycle. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to study changes in poplar gene expression in galls compared with noninfected roots. Three genes (expansin A, histone 3.1, and asparagine synthase), selected as gall development marker genes, followed, during poplar-nematode interaction, a similar expression pattern to what was described for other plant hosts. Downregulation of four genes implicated in the monolignol biosynthesis pathway was evidenced in galls, suggesting a shift in the phenolic profile within galls developed on poplar roots. Raman microspectroscopy demonstrated that cell walls of giant cells were not lignified but mainly composed of pectin and cellulose. The data presented here suggest that RKN exercise conserved strategies to reproduce and to invade perennial plant species and that poplar is a suitable model host to study specific traits of tree-nematode interactions. PMID:27135257

  19. Microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants in lead contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Gattai, Graziella S.; Pereira, Sônia V.; Costa, Cynthia M. C.; Lima, Cláudia E. P.; Maia, Leonor C.

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants (Caesalpinia ferrea, Mimosa tenuiflora and Erythrina velutina) in lead contaminated soil from the semi-arid region of northeastern of Brazil (Belo Jardim, Pernambuco). Dilutions were prepared by adding lead contaminated soil (270 mg Kg-1) to uncontaminated soil (37 mg Pb Kg soil-1) in the proportions of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% (v:v). The increase of lead contamination in the soil negatively influenced the amount of carbon in the microbial biomass of the samples from both the dry and rainy seasons and the metabolic quotient only differed between the collection seasons in the 30% contaminated soil. The average value of the acid phosphatase activity in the dry season was 2.3 times higher than observed during the rainy season. There was no significant difference in the number of glomerospores observed between soils and periods studied. The most probable number of infective propagules was reduced for both seasons due to the excess lead in soil. The mycorrhizal colonization rate was reduced for the three plant species assayed. The inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi benefited the growth of Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil. PMID:24031701

  20. Species-level diversity of belowground structure in savanna woody plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, F. C.; Caylor, K. K.; Bhattachan, A.; Dintwe, K.; D'Odorico, P.; Okin, G. S.

    2013-05-01

    Using compressed air, we excavated individual trees and shrubs and mapped their coarse root systems on a three-dimensional grid system up to 1.5 m depth. We excavated four woody savanna species at three sites spanning a climate gradient on the Kalahari Transect in southern Africa. Overall, species was more important than site in determining both large-scale and small-scale root system structure. The species excavated fell into two groups that coexisted across the climate gradient. Acacia mellifera and Terminalia sericea had straight roots in a laterally-extensive and relatively shallow system. Boscia albitrunca and Ochna pulchra had sinuous roots that were mostly concentrated beneath the canopy and were more prevalent in deep than near-surface soil layers, departing from the conventional model of decreasing root abundance with depth. The shallow-rooted species had small taproots, though it is unlikely that they reached the water table. Deep- and shallow-rootedness appear to correlate with other characteristics such as growth form (tree or shrub) and drought deciduousness. Acacia mellifera Boscia albitrunca

  1. Foliar absorption of intercepted rainfall improves woody plant water status most during drought.

    PubMed

    Breshears, David D; McDowell, Nathan G; Goddard, Kelly L; Dayem, Katherine E; Martens, Scott N; Meyer, Clifton W; Brown, Karen M

    2008-01-01

    A large proportion of rainfall in dryland ecosystems is intercepted by plant foliage and is generally assumed to evaporate to the atmosphere or drip onto the soil surface without being absorbed. We demonstrate foliar absorption of intercepted rainfall in a widely distributed, continental dryland, woody-plant genus: Juniperus. We observed substantial improvement in plant water status, exceeding 1.0 MPa water potential for drought-stressed plants, following precipitation on an experimental plot that excluded soil water infiltration. Experiments that wetted shoots with unlabeled and with isotopically labeled water confirmed that water potential responded substantially to foliar wetting, that these responses were not attributable to re-equilibration with other portions of the xylem, and that magnitude of response increased with water stress. Foliar absorption is not included in most ecological, hydrological, and atmospheric models; has implications for interpreting plant isotopic signatures; and not only supplements water acquisition associated with increases in soil moisture that follow large or repeated precipitation events, but also enables plants to bypass soil water uptake and benefit from the majority of precipitation events, which wet foliage but do not increase soil moisture substantially. Foliar absorption of intercepted water could be more important than previously appreciated, especially during drought when water stress is greatest. PMID:18376545

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic mechanisms of woody biochar on aqueous glyphosate removal.

    PubMed

    Mayakaduwa, S S; Kumarathilaka, Prasanna; Herath, Indika; Ahmad, Mahtab; Al-Wabel, Mohammed; Ok, Yong Sik; Usman, Adel; Abduljabbar, Adel; Vithanage, Meththika

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the removal of aqueous glyphosate using woody (dendro) biochar obtained as a waste by product from bioenergy industry. Equilibrium isotherms and kinetics data were obtained by adsorption experiments. Glyphosate adsorption was strongly pH dependent occurring maximum in the pH range of 5-6. The protonated amino moiety of the glyphosate molecule at this pH may interact with π electron rich biochar surface via π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions. Isotherm data were best fitted to the Freundlich and Temkin models indicating multilayer sorption of glyphosate. The maximum adsorption capacity of dendro biochar for glyphosate was determined by the isotherm modeling to be as 44 mg/g. Adsorption seemed to be quite fast, reaching the equilibrium <1 h. Pseudo-second order model was found to be the most effective in describing kinetics whereas the rate limiting step possibly be chemical adsorption involving valence forces through sharing or exchanging electrons between the adsorbent and sorbate. The FTIR spectral analysis indicated the involvement of functional groups such as phenolic, amine, carboxylic and phosphate in adsorption. Hence, a heterogeneous chemisorption process between adsorbate molecules and functional groups on biochar surface can be suggested as the mechanisms involved in glyphosate removal. PMID:26340852

  3. Study on Woody Species Diversity in the Chestnut (Castanea sativa L.) Forests, Guilan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorbabaei, Hassan; Faghir, Marzia B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study diversity of woody species in the Sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa L.) forests, Guilan, north of Iran. These forests are located in the Shafaroud and Emamzadeh Ebrahim regions. The Emamzadeh Ebrahim region is consisted of Visroud, Kishkhaleh, Askeh Koh, Male Lab, Doroudkhan, Galeroudkhan, Siahmazgy and Mali Anbar sites. Sampling was done in a selective manner in each site with a plot area of 50 m×50 m for tree and shrub layers and a circle 1000 m2 for tree saplings. In each plot, all trees ⩾10 cm in diameter at breast height (DBH) were identified and the DBH was measured, and shrub and tree sapling species were identified and recorded. In total, 68 sampling plots were taken using GPS device in the two regions. The results revealed that the mean richness, Simpson's index, Hill's N2, Shannon Wiener's function and N1 were higher in the Shafaroud region than other sites in tree, shrub and tree sapling layers. The highest and lowest mean values of evenness were obtained in the Kishkhaleh and Askekoh sites, respectively in tree layer, and similarly were in the Askekoh and Visroud in the shrub layer. The highest and lowest mean values of evenness were obtained in the Male Lab and Askeh Koh, respectively in the tree sapling layer.

  4. [Characteristics of coarse woody debris in Huzhong area of Great Xing' an Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Chang, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Hong-Wei; Jing, Guo-Zhi; Zhang, Hong-Xin; Zhang, Chang-Meng

    2009-08-01

    An investigation was made on the coarse woody debris (CWD) in burned forestlands in Huzhong area of Great Xing' an Mountains. The loading capacity of CWD in the burned forestlands was 24.9-181.0 m3 x hm(-2), among which, snag and log occupied 24.3%-85.9% and 14.0%-75.7%, being 6.0-93.9 m3 x hm(-2) and 15.3-138.4 m3 x hm(-2), respectively. Significant differences were observed among burned forestlands and among years. The predominant DBH class of snag and log was 2.5-20 cm and 1.5-15 m, and the height of most snags and logs was 2.5-15 m and 5-20 cm, respectively. The loading capacity of CWD had no obvious change with the recovery of forest vegetation. The characteristics of CWD had a close relationship with pre-fire forest stand conditions and burn intensity. PMID:19947195

  5. Carbon mineralization and nutrient availability in calcareous sandy soils amended with woody waste biochar.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Ahmed H; Usman, Adel R A; Al-Omran, Abdulrasoul; Ok, Yong Sik; Ahmad, Mahtab; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I

    2015-11-01

    Many studies have reported the positive effect of biochar on soil carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement in acidic soils. However, biochar may have different impacts on calcareous sandy soils. A 90-day incubation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of woody waste biochar (10 g kg(-1)) on CO2-C emissions, K2SO4-extractable C and macro-(N, P and K) and micro-(Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu) nutrient availability in the presence or absence of poultry manure (5 g kg(-1) soil). The following six treatments were applied: (1) conocarpus (Conocarpus erectus L.) waste (CW), (2) conocarpus biochar (BC), (3) poultry manure (PM), (4) PM+CW, (5) PM+BC and (6) untreated soil (CK). Poultry manure increased CO2-C emissions and K2SO4-extractable C, and the highest increases in CO2-C emission rate and cumulative CO2-C and K2SO4-extractable C were observed for the PM+CW treatment. On the contrary, treatments with BC halted the CO2-C emission rate, indicating that the contribution of BC to CO2-C emissions is negligible compared with the soils amended with CW and PM. Furthermore, the combined addition of PM+BC increased available N, P and K compared with the PM or BC treatments. Overall, the incorporation of biochar into calcareous soils might have benefits in carbon sequestration and soil fertility improvement. PMID:26037818

  6. Promise of combined hydrothermal/chemical and mechanical refining for pretreatment of woody and herbaceous biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Min; Dien, Bruce S; Singh, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Production of advanced biofuels from woody and herbaceous feedstocks is moving into commercialization. Biomass needs to be pretreated to overcome the physicochemical properties of biomass that hinder enzyme accessibility, impeding the conversion of the plant cell walls to fermentable sugars. Pretreatment also remains one of the most costly unit operations in the process and among the most critical because it is the source of chemicals that inhibit enzymes and microorganisms and largely determines enzyme loading and sugar yields. Pretreatments are categorized into hydrothermal (aqueous)/chemical, physical, and biological pretreatments, and the mechanistic details of which are briefly outlined in this review. To leverage the synergistic effects of different pretreatment methods, conducting two or more pretreatments consecutively has gained attention. Especially, combining hydrothermal/chemical pretreatment and mechanical refining, a type of physical pretreatment, has the potential to be applied to an industrial plant. Here, the effects of the combined pretreatment (combined hydrothermal/chemical pretreatment and mechanical refining) on energy consumption, physical structure, sugar yields, and enzyme dosage are summarized. PMID:27141232

  7. Quantitative woody cover reconstructions from eastern continental Asia of the last 22 kyr reveal strong regional peculiarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang; Cao, Xianyong; Dallmeyer, Anne; Ni, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yongbo; Herzschuh, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    We present a calibration-set based on modern pollen and satellite-based Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of woody cover (including needleleaved, broadleaved and total tree cover) in eastern continental Asia, which shows good performance under cross-validation with the modern analogue technique (all the coefficients of determination between observed and predicted values are greater than 0.65). The calibration-set is used to reconstruct woody cover from a taxonomically harmonized and temporally standardized fossil pollen dataset (including 274 cores) with 500-year resolution over the last 22 kyr. The spatial range of forest has not noticeably changed in eastern continental Asia during the last 22 kyr, although woody cover has, especially at the margin of the eastern Tibetan Plateau and in the forest-steppe transition area of north-central China. Vegetation was sparse during the LGM in the present forested regions, but woody cover increased markedly at the beginning of the Bølling/Allerød period (B/A; ca. 14.5 ka BP) and again at the beginning of the Holocene (ca. 11.5 ka BP), and is related to the enhanced strength of the East Asian Summer Monsoon. Forest flourished in the mid-Holocene (ca. 8 ka BP) possibly due to favourable climatic conditions. In contrast, cover was stable in southern China (high cover) and arid central Asia (very low cover) throughout the investigated period. Forest cover increased in the north-eastern part of China during the Holocene. Comparisons of these regional pollen-based results with simulated forest cover from runs of a global climate model (for 9, 6 and 0 ka BP (ECHAM5/JSBACH ∼1.125° spatial resolution)) reveal many similarities in temporal change. The Holocene woody cover history of eastern continental Asia is different from that of other regions, likely controlled by different climatic variables, i.e. moisture in eastern continental Asia; temperature in northern Eurasia and North America.

  8. Loss of native herbaceous species due to woody plant encroachment facilitates the establishment of an invasive grass.

    PubMed

    Alofs, Karen M; Fowler, Norma L

    2013-03-01

    Although negative relationships between diversity (frequently measured as species richness) and invasibility at neighborhood or community scales have often been reported, realistic natural diversity gradients have rarely been studied at this scale. We recreated a naturally occurring gradient in species richness to test the effects of species richness on community invasibility. In central Texas savannas, as the proportion of woody plants increases (a process known as woody plant encroachment), herbaceous habitat is both lost and fragmented, and native herbaceous species richness declines. We examined the effects of these species losses on invasibility in situ by removing species that occur less frequently in herbaceous patches as woody plant encroachment advances. This realistic species removal was accompanied by a parallel and equivalent removal of biomass with no changes in species richness. Over two springs, the nonnative bunchgrass Bothriochloa ischaemum germinated significantly more often in the biomass-removal treatment than in unmanipulated control plots, suggesting an effect of native plant density independent of diversity. Additionally, significantly more germination occurred in the species-removal treatment than in the biomass-removal treatment. Changes in species richness had a stronger effect on B. ischaemum germination than changes in plant density, demonstrating that niche-related processes contributed more to biotic resistance in this system than did species-neutral competitive interactions. Similar treatment effects were found on transplant growth. Thus we show that woody plant encroachment indirectly facilitates the establishment of an invasive grass by reducing native diversity. Although we found a negative relationship between species richness and invasibility at the scale of plots with similar composition and environmental conditions, we found a positive relationship between species richness and invasibility at larger scales. This apparent

  9. Abundance and Morphological Effects of Large Woody Debris in Forested Basins of Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoli, A.; Comiti, F.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Southern Andes mountain range represents an ideal location for studying large woody debris (LWD) in streams draining forested basins thanks to the presence of both pristine and managed woodland, and to the general low level of human alteration of stream corridors. However, no published investigations have been performed so far in such a large region. The investigated sites of this research are three basins (9-13 km2 drainage area, third-order channels) covered by Nothofagus forests: two of them are located in the Southern Chilean Andes (the Tres Arroyos in the Malalcahuello National Reserve and the Rio Toro within the Malleco Natural Reserve) and one basin lies in the Argentinean Tierra del Fuego (the Buena Esperanza basin, near the city of Ushuaia). Measured LWD were all wood pieces larger than 10 cm in diameter and 1 m in length, both in the active channel and in the adjacent active floodplain. Pieces forming log jams were all measured and the geometrical dimensions of jams were taken. Jam type was defined based on Abbe and Montgomery (2003) classification. Sediment stored behind log-steps and valley jams was evaluated approximating the sediment accumulated to a solid wedge whose geometrical dimensions were measured. Additional information relative to each LWD piece were recorded during the field survey: type (log, rootwad, log with rootwads attached), orientation to flow, origin (floated, bank erosion, landslide, natural mortality, harvest residuals) and position (log-step, in-channel, channel-bridging, channel margins, bankfull edge). In the Tres Arroyos, the average LWD volume stored within the bankfull channel is 710 m3 ha-1. The average number of pieces is 1,004 per hectare of bankfull channel area. Log-steps represent about 22% of all steps, whereas the elevation loss due to LWD (log-steps and valley jams) results in 27% loss of the total stream potential energy. About 1,600 m3 of sediment (assuming a porosity of 20%) is stored in the main channel

  10. A method for routine measurements of total sugar and starch content in woody plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Chow, Pak S; Landhäusser, Simon M

    2004-10-01

    Several extraction and measurement methods currently employed in the determination of total sugar and starch contents in plant tissues were investigated with the view to streamline the process of total sugar and starch determination. Depending on the type and source of tissue, total sugar and starch contents estimated from samples extracted with 80% hot ethanol were significantly greater than from samples extracted with a methanol:chloroform:water solution. The residual ethanol did not interfere with the sugar and starch determination, rendering the removal of ethanol from samples unnecessary. The use of phenol-sulfuric acid with a phenol concentration of 2% provided a relatively simple and reliable colorimetric method to quantify the total soluble-sugar concentration. Performing parallel sugar assays with and without phenol was more useful for accounting for the interfering effects of other substances present in plant tissue than using chloroform. For starch determination, an enzyme mixture of 1000 U alpha-amylase and 5 U amyloglucosidase digested starch in plant tissue samples more rapidly and completely than previously recommended enzyme doses. Dilute sulfuric acid (0.005 N) was less suitable for starch digestion than enzymatic hydrolysis because the acid also broke down structural carbohydrates, resulting in overestimates of starch content. After the enzymatic digestion of starch, the glucose hydrolyzate obtained was measured with a peroxidase-glucose oxidase/o-dianisidine reagent; absorbance being read at 525 nm after the addition of sulfuric acid. With the help of this series of studies, we developed a refined and shortened method suitable for the rapid measurement of total sugar and starch contents in woody plant tissues. PMID:15294759

  11. Soil nitrogen gas fluxes during woody legume encroachment: Does encroachment increase gaseous losses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Groffman, P. M.; Sparks, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Expansion of nitrogen (N2)-fixing trees is a major driver of ecosystem N enrichment in semi-arid grasslands. During this process, fluxes of N trace gases from soils are likely mediated by interactions between changing soil N availability and primary abiotic biogeochemical drivers in arid systems, namely temperature and wetting/re-wetting dynamics. We investigated the effects of encroachment, season and rainfall dynamics on total reactive N flux (NO, NOy, NH3, N2O) in a sub-tropical, semi-arid Texan savanna encroached by N-fixing Prosopis glandulosa over two years. We compared unencroached upland grasslands and non-fixing woody clusters with continuous Prosopis cover over uplands, intermediate drainages, and playa lowlands. We also quantified denitrification potential of intact soil cores to determine whether N2 could contribute significantly to soil N flux. Substantial soil N enrichment in upland Prosopis groves did not elevate N fluxes above those in remnant grasslands, though lower (moister) landscape positions did exhibit higher total emissions. Along with temperature, soil-wetting dynamics explained the greatest portion of variation in emissions and interacted with vegetation type. Timing and quantity of most recent soil wetting and interval to previous wetting were significant predictors, highlighting the importance of dynamics not captured by soil moisture measurements alone. As with other arid systems, rainfall events after dry periods can stimulate pulse emissions of >400 ug NO-N m-2 h-1. At realistic soil O2 concentrations, N2 fluxes fell below the detection limit of the Nitrogen-Free Atmospheric Recirculation Method system (~11 ug N m-2 h-1). However, applying plausible N2O:N2 flux ratios likely constrains the flux to much lower levels under field conditions. We conclude that encroachment does not increase N fluxes from upland savannas, but that interactions with rainfall and landscape position are important determinants of total emissions.

  12. Nitrogen trace gas fluxes from a semiarid subtropical savanna under woody legume encroachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, Fiona M.; Boutton, Thomas W.; Groffman, Peter M.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2016-05-01

    Savanna ecosystems are a major source of nitrogen (N) trace gases that influence air quality and climate. These systems are experiencing widespread encroachment by woody plants, frequently associated with large increases in soil N, with no consensus on implications for trace gas emissions. We investigated the impact of encroachment by N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa on total reactive N gas flux (Nt = NO + N2O + NOy + NH3) from south Texas savanna soils over 2 years. Contrary to expectations, upland Prosopis groves did not have greater Nt fluxes than adjacent unencroached grasslands. However, abiotic conditions (temperature, rainfall, and topography) were strong drivers. Emissions from moist, low-lying Prosopis playas were up to 3 times higher than from Prosopis uplands. Though NO dominated emissions, NH3 and NOy (non-NO oxidized N) comprised 12-16% of the total summer N flux (up to 7.9 µg N m-2 h-1). Flux responses to soil wetting were temperature dependent for NO, NH3, and NOy: a 15 mm rainfall event increased flux 3-fold to 22-fold after 24 h in summer but had no effect in winter. Repeated soil wetting reduced N flux responses, indicating substrate depletion as a likely control. Rapid (<1 min) increases in NO emissions following wetting of dry soils suggested that abiotic chemodenitrification contributes to pulse emissions. We conclude that temperature and wetting dynamics, rather than encroachment, are primary drivers of N flux from these upland savannas, with implications for future emission patterns under altered precipitation regimes.

  13. Accumulation and Connectivity of Coarse Woody Debris in Partial Harvest and Unmanaged Relict Forests

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Robert C.; Jenkins, Michael A.; Saunders, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    When a tree dies, it continues to play an important ecological role within forests. Coarse woody debris (CWD), including standing deadwood (SDW) and downed deadwood (DDW), is an important functional component of forest ecosystems, particularly for many dispersal-limited saproxylic taxa and for metapopulation dynamics across landscapes. Processes, such as natural disturbance or management, modify forest composition and structure, thereby influencing CWD abundance and distribution. Many studies have compared older forests to forests managed with even-aged silvicultural systems and observed a prolonged period of low CWD occurrence after harvesting. With fine-scale spatial data, our study compares the long-term impacts of light partial harvesting on the CWD structure of eastern deciduous hardwood forests. We mapped and inventoried DDW and SDW using variable radius plots based on a 10 m×10 m grid throughout an unmanaged, structurally-complex relict forest and two nearby forests that were partially harvested over 46 years ago. The relict stand had significantly larger individual pieces and higher accumulations of DDW and SDW than both of the partially harvested stands. Connectivity of CWD was much higher in the relict stand, which had fewer, larger patches. Larger pieces and higher proportion of decay-resistant species (e.g. Quercus spp.) in the relict forest resulted in slower decomposition, greater accumulation and increased connectivity of CWD. Partial harvests, such that occur with selection forestry, are generally considered less disruptive of ecosystem services, but this study highlights the long-term impacts of even light partial harvests on CWD stocks and distribution. When planning harvesting events, forest managers should also consider alternative methods to ensure the sustainability of deadwood resources and function. PMID:25409459

  14. Individual species-area relationship of woody plant communities in a heterogeneous subtropical monsoon rainforest.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Yi-Ching; Wiegand, Thorsten; Nakazawa, Takefumi; Su, Sheng-Hsin; Hsieh, Chih-Hao; Ding, Tzung-Su

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of species richness is often characterized by the species-area relationship (SAR). However, the SAR approach rarely considers the spatial variability of individual plants that arises from species interactions and species' habitat associations. Here, we explored how the interactions of individual plants of target species influence SAR patterns at a range of neighborhood distances. We analyzed the data of 113,988 woody plants of 110 species from the Fushan Forest Dynamics Plot (25 ha), northern Taiwan, which is a subtropical rainforest heavily influenced by typhoons. We classified 34 dominant species into 3 species types (i.e., accumulator, repeller, or no effect) by testing how the individual species-area relationship (i.e., statistics describing how neighborhood species richness changes around individuals) of target species departs (i.e., positively, negatively, or with no obvious trend) from a null model that accounts for habitat association. Deviation from the null model suggests that the net effect of species' interactions increases (accumulate) or decreases (repel) neighborhood species richness. We found that (i) accumulators were dominant at small interaction distances (<10-30 m); (ii) the detection of accumulator species was lower at large interaction distances (>30 m); (iii) repellers were rarely detected; and (iv) large-sized and abundant species tended to be accumulators. The findings suggest that positive species interactions have the potential to accumulate neighborhood species richness, particularly through size- and density-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that the frequently disturbed environment of this subtropical rainforest (e.g., typhoon-driven natural disturbances such as landslides, soil erosion, flooding, and windthrow) might create the spatial heterogeneity of species richness and promote positive species interactions. PMID:25884405

  15. Constraining the timescales of sediment sequestration associated with large woody debris using cosmogenic 7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, G. B.; Magilligan, F. J.; Kaste, J. M.; Nislow, K. H.

    2010-03-01

    The beneficial ecogeomorphic functions associated with large woody debris (LWD) in fluvial environments are well documented and include positive sediment impacts such as channel margin sequestration, increased substrate heterogeneity, and decreased channel embeddedness, as well as numerous secondary benefits such as nutrient retention and increased habitat heterogeneity. Despite an extensive literature documenting such positive sediment attributes of LWD in forested channels, a quantitative analysis of in-channel sediment storage times associated with channel obstructions has traditionally been difficult to assess. In this study along a 9 km stretch of the Ducktrap River in coastal Maine we present a novel application of fallout cosmogenic 7Be (t1/2 = 53 days) coupled with a constant initial activity (CIA) sediment aging model to quantitatively assess transitional bed load storage times in bars associated with in-channel obstructions (LWD and boulders). We find that reach-scale variability in unit stream power and LWD frequency affect sediment storage times, with transport-limited reaches providing longer-term sediment sequestration (generally > 100 days) associated with in-channel obstructions than supply limited ones (<100 days). Estimates of sediment baraccumulation rates also varied between reaches from 0.2 g cm-2 d-1 in the supply limited reach to 0.7 g cm-2 d-1 in the transport-limited reach. Last, greater frequency of sites, increased sediment volumes and storage times, and naturally viable recruitment mechanisms for LWD in forested channels document its superior ecogeomorphic function when compared to boulders in this study, even in the Ducktrap river, where twentieth century logging has greatly reduced the size, frequency, and geomorphic efficacy of in-channel wood. This study has implications for channel restoration efforts and documents a novel application of 7Be and CIA methodology to constraining transitional bed load storage times in the fluvial

  16. Fluvial islands: First stage of development from nonmigrating (forced) bars and woody-vegetation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintenberger, Coraline L.; Rodrigues, Stéphane; Bréhéret, Jean-Gabriel; Villar, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Fluvial islands can develop from the channel bed by interactions between pioneer trees and bars. Although vegetation recruitment and survival is possible on all bar types, it is easier for trees to survive on nonmigrating bars developed from a change in channel geometry or to the presence of a steady perturbation. This field study details the first stages of development of a vegetated mid-channel, nonmigrating (or forced) bar and its evolution toward an island form. Over six years, analysis of bed topographical changes, vegetation density and roughness, scour and fill depths, sediment grain size and architecture, and excess bed shear stress highlighted a specific signature of trees on topography and grain size segregation. Two depositional processes combining the formation of obstacle marks and upstream-shifting deposition of sediments led to the vertical accretion of the vegetated bar. During the first stage of the bar accretion, bedload sediment supply coming from surrounding channels during floods was identified as a key process modulated by the presence of woody vegetation and a deflection effect induced by the preexisting topography. Grain size segregation between vegetated and bare areas was also highlighted and interpreted as an important process affecting the development of surrounding channels and the degree of disconnection (and hence the speed of development) of a growing island. The heterogeneity of bedload supply can explain why sediment deposition and density of trees are not strictly related. A general conceptual model detailing the first stages of evolution from a bar to an established island is proposed for relatively large lowland rivers.

  17. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  18. Species-Specific Effects of Woody Litter on Seedling Emergence and Growth of Herbaceous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Koorem, Kadri; Price, Jodi N.; Moora, Mari

    2011-01-01

    The effect of litter on seedling establishment can influence species richness in plant communities. The effect of litter depends on amount, and also on litter type, but relatively little is known about the species-specific effects of litter. We conducted a factorial greenhouse experiment to examine the effect of litter type, using two woody species that commonly co-occur in boreonemoral forest—evergreen spruce (Picea abies), deciduous hazel (Corylus avellana), and a mixture of the two species—and litter amount—shallow (4 mm), deep (12 mm) and leachate—on seedling emergence and biomass of three understorey species. The effect of litter amount on seedling emergence was highly dependent on litter type; while spruce needle litter had a significant negative effect that increased with depth, seedling emergence in the presence of hazel broadleaf litter did not differ from control pots containing no litter. Mixed litter of both species also had a negative effect on seedling emergence that was intermediate compared to the single-species treatments. Spruce litter had a marginally positive (shallow) or neutral effect (deep) on seedling biomass, while hazel and mixed litter treatments had significant positive effects on biomass that increased with depth. We found non-additive effects of litter mixtures on seedling biomass indicating that high quality hazel litter can reduce the negative effects of spruce. Hazel litter does not inhibit seedling emergence; it increases seedling growth, and creates better conditions for seedling growth in mixtures by reducing the suppressive effect of spruce litter, having a positive effect on understorey species richness. PMID:22028890

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the relict woody plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Xu, Haibin; Yang, Liming; Liu, Guangxin; Sheng, Yu; Zheng, Chen; Zheng, Weiwei; Cheng, Tielong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng is the only species in the genus Metasequoia Miki ex Hu et Cheng, which belongs to the Cupressaceae family. There were around 10 species in the Metasequoia genus, which were widely spread across the Northern Hemisphere during the Cretaceous of the Mesozoic and in the Cenozoic. M. glyptostroboides is the only remaining representative of this genus. Here, we report the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence and the cp genomic features of M. glyptostroboides. The M. glyptostroboides cp genome is 131,887 bp in length, with a total of 117 genes comprised of 82 protein-coding genes, 31 tRNA genes and four rRNA genes. In this genome, 11 forward repeats, nine palindromic repeats, and 15 tandem repeats were detected. A total of 188 perfect microsatellites were detected through simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis and these were distributed unevenly within the cp genome. Comparison of the cp genome structure and gene order to those of several other land plants indicated that a copy of the inverted repeat (IR) region, which was found to be IR region A (IRA), was lost in the M. glyptostroboides cp genome. The five most divergent and five most conserved genes were determined and further phylogenetic analysis was performed among plant species, especially for related species in conifers. Finally, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that M. glyptostroboides is a sister species to Cryptomeria japonica (L. F.) D. Don and to Taiwania cryptomerioides Hayata. The complete cp genome sequence information of M. glyptostroboides will be great helpful for further investigations of this endemic relict woody plant and for in-depth understanding of the evolutionary history of the coniferous cp genomes, especially for the position of M. glyptostroboides in plant systematics and evolution. PMID:26136762

  20. A synthesis of postfire recovery traits of woody plants in Australian ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Peter J; Lawes, Michael J; Murphy, Brett P; Russell-Smith, Jeremy; Nano, Catherine E M; Bradstock, Ross; Enright, Neal J; Fontaine, Joseph B; Gosper, Carl R; Radford, Ian; Midgley, Jeremy J; Gunton, Richard M

    2015-11-15

    Postfire resprouting and recruitment from seed are key plant life-history traits that influence population dynamics, community composition and ecosystem function. Species can have one or both of these mechanisms. They confer resilience, which may determine community composition through differential species persistence after fire. To predict ecosystem level responses to changes in climate and fire conditions, we examined the proportions of these plant fire-adaptive traits among woody growth forms of 2880 taxa, in eight fire-prone ecosystems comprising ~87% of Australia's land area. Shrubs comprised 64% of the taxa. More tree (>84%) than shrub (~50%) taxa resprouted. Basal, epicormic and apical resprouting occurred in 71%, 22% and 3% of the taxa, respectively. Most rainforest taxa (91%) were basal resprouters. Many trees (59%) in frequently-burnt eucalypt forest and savanna resprouted epicormically. Although crown fire killed many mallee (62%) and heathland (48%) taxa, fire-cued seeding was common in these systems. Postfire seeding was uncommon in rainforest and in arid Acacia communities that burnt infrequently at low intensity. Resprouting was positively associated with ecosystem productivity, but resprouting type (e.g. basal or epicormic) was associated with local scale fire activity, especially fire frequency. Although rainforest trees can resprout they cannot recruit after intense fires and may decline under future fires. Semi-arid Acacia communities would be susceptible to increasing fire frequencies because they contain few postfire seeders. Ecosystems dominated by obligate seeders (mallee, heath) are also susceptible because predicted shorter inter-fire intervals will prevent seed bank accumulation. Savanna may be resilient to future fires because of the adaptive advantage of epicormic resprouting among the eucalypts. The substantial non-resprouting shrub component of shrublands may decline, but resilient Eucalyptus spp. will continue to dominate under future

  1. Synergism between ozone and light stress: structural responses of polyphenols in a woody Brazilian species.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Francine Faia; Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Alves, Edenise Segala

    2016-07-01

    Microscopic studies on isolated ozone (O3) effects or on those in synergy with light stress commonly report the induction of polyphenols that exhibit different aspects within the vacuole of photosynthesizing cells. It has been assumed that these different aspects are randomly spread in the symptomatic (injured) regions of the leaf blade. Interestingly, secretory ducts that constitutively produce polyphenols also exhibit these same variations in their vacuolar aspect, in a spatial sequence related to the destiny of these cells (e.g., programmed cell death (PCD) in lytic secretion processes). Here, we demonstrate that the deposition pattern of polyphenols prior to the establishment of the hypersensitive-like response, a type of PCD caused by O3, follows the same one observed in the epithelial cells of the constitutive lysigenous secretory ducts. Astronium graveolens, an early secondary Brazilian woody species, was selected based on its susceptibility to high light and presence of secretory ducts. The synergism effects were assessed by exposing plants to the high O3 concentrations at an urban site in São Paulo City. Confocal, widefield and light microscopies were used to examine polyphenols' occurrence and aspects. The spatial pattern of polyphenols distribution along the leaflets of plants submitted to the synergism condition, in which a dense vacuolar aspect is the target of a cell destined to death, was also observed in the constitutive secretory cells prior to lysis. This similar structural pattern may be a case of homology of process involving both the constitutive (secretory ducts) and the induced (photosynthesizing cells) defenses. PMID:27155473

  2. β-Diversity of Functional Groups of Woody Plants in a Tropical Dry Forest in Yucatan

    PubMed Central

    López-Martínez, Jorge Omar; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis; Meave, Jorge Arturo; Gallardo-Cruz, José Alberto

    2013-01-01

    correlates that are not apparent when focusing on overall woody plant diversity, and that have important implications for ecological theory and biodiversity conservation. PMID:24040014

  3. Establishment of woody riparian species from natural seedfall at a former gravel pit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelle, J.E.; Gladwin, D.N.

    1999-01-01

    Establishment of native riparian communities through natural seedfall may be a viable reclamation alternative at some alluvial sand and gravel mines where water level can be controlled in the abandoned pit. We experimented with this approach at a pit in Fort Collins, Colorado, where a drain culvert equipped with a screw gate allows water levels to be manipulated. From 1994 to 1996 we conducted a series of annual drawdowns during the period of natural seedfall of Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera (plains cottonwood), Salix amygdaloides (peachleaf willow), and S. exigua (sand-bar willow), thus providing the bare, moist substrate conducive to establishment of these species. Establishment was highly variable from year to year; in the fall following establishment, frequency of occurrence on 0.5-m2 sample plots ranged from 8.6% to 50.6% for cottonwood, 15.9% to 22.0% for peachleaf willow, and 21.7% to 50.0% for sandbar willow. Mean densities, however, were comparable to those reported for other locations. Concurrent establishment of the undesirable exotic Tamarix ramosissima (saltcedar) was a problem, but we were able to eradicate most saltcedar seedlings by reflooding the lower elevations of the annual drawdown zones each fall. At the end of the 3-year period, at least one of the three native woody species survived on 41.1% of the plots, while saltcedar was present on only 6.1%. In addition to the potential for establishing valuable native habitats, adaptations of the techniques described may require less earth moving than other reclamation approaches.

  4. Leaf structural traits of tropical woody species resistant to cement dust.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-08-01

    Cement industries located nearby limestone outcrops in Brazil have contributed to the coating of cement dust over native plant species. However, little is known about the extent of the response of tropical woody plants to such environmental pollutant particularly during the first stages of plant development and establishment. This work focused on the investigation of possible alterations in leaf structural and ultrastructural traits of 5-month-old Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae), 6-month-old Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão (Anacardiaceae), and 9-month-old Trichilia hirta L. (Meliaceae) challenged superficially with cement dust during new leaf development. Leaf surface of plants, the soil or both (leaf plus soil), were treated (or not) for 60 days, under controlled conditions, with cement dust at 2.5 or 5.0 mg cm(-2). After exposure, no significant structural changes were observed in plant leaves. Also, no plant death was recorded by the end of the experiment. There was also some evidence of localized leaf necrosis in G. ulmifolia and T. hirta, leaf curling in M. urundeuva and T. hirta, and bulges formation on epidermal surface of T. hirta, after cement dust contact with plant shoots. All species studied exhibited stomata obliteration while T. hirta, in particular, presented early leaf abscission, changes in cellular relief, and organization and content of midrib cells. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected under the experimental conditions studied. Indeed, mesophyll cells presented plastids with intact membrane systems. The high plant survival rates, together with mild morphoanatomic traits alterations in leaves, indicate that G. ulmifolia is more resistant to cement dust pollutant, followed by M. urundeuva and T. hirta. Thus, the three plant species are promising for being used to revegetate areas impacted by cement industries activities. PMID:27146683

  5. CO2 Flux from Coarse Woody Debris from a Tropical Forest at the FLONA Tapajos, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Crill, P.; Keller, M.

    2004-12-01

    The release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from tropical forests has a strong effect on the global carbon cycle due to fast turnover rates of organic matter than for other biomes. Despite its importance coarse woody debris (CWD) pools have been overlooked for estimates of carbon balance and especially in tropical forests where few studies have been conducted. Measurements were made on CWD in areas of undisturbed tropical forests and areas under selective logging. CO2 emissions from CWD averaged 1.95 \\pm 1.95 \\mu mol CO2 m2 Wood surf^{-1}$ s^{-1} for undisturbed forests and 2.61 ± 1.44 μmol CO_{2} m^{2} Wood _{surf}-1 s^{-1} for selective logging areas. For selective logging areas, a chronosequence study was established to follow up the five years of logging. Three wood species were sorted due differences in density to be studied and observe differences in CO_{2} efflux. Andiroba (Carapa guianensis) showed a average flux of 3.15 ± 3.2 μmol CO_{2} m^{2} Wood _{surf}-1 s^{-1}, tauari (Couratari stellata) with 2.88 ± 2.03 μmol CO_{2} m^{2} Wood _{surf}-1 s^{-1} and macaranduba (Manilkara huberi) with an average flux of 1.69 ± 1.6 μmol CO_{2} m^{2} Wood _{surf}-1 s^{-1}. An area of undisturbed forest was studied to quantify the efflux of CO_{2} in natural conditions. CO_{2} emissions from CWD were of 3.76 Mg C ha^{-1} y{-1} in logged areas and 1.43 Mg C ha^{-1} y{-1} for undisturbed forests. Wood water content and wood decay classes (year of logging) were some of the factors studied on controlling of CO_{2}$ efflux from CWD.

  6. Individual Species-Area Relationship of Woody Plant Communities in a Heterogeneous Subtropical Monsoon Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Yi-Ching; Wiegand, Thorsten; Nakazawa, Takefumi; Su, Sheng-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    The spatial structure of species richness is often characterized by the species-area relationship (SAR). However, the SAR approach rarely considers the spatial variability of individual plants that arises from species interactions and species’ habitat associations. Here, we explored how the interactions of individual plants of target species influence SAR patterns at a range of neighborhood distances. We analyzed the data of 113,988 woody plants of 110 species from the Fushan Forest Dynamics Plot (25 ha), northern Taiwan, which is a subtropical rainforest heavily influenced by typhoons. We classified 34 dominant species into 3 species types (i.e., accumulator, repeller, or no effect) by testing how the individual species-area relationship (i.e., statistics describing how neighborhood species richness changes around individuals) of target species departs (i.e., positively, negatively, or with no obvious trend) from a null model that accounts for habitat association. Deviation from the null model suggests that the net effect of species’ interactions increases (accumulate) or decreases (repel) neighborhood species richness. We found that (i) accumulators were dominant at small interaction distances (<10–30 m); (ii) the detection of accumulator species was lower at large interaction distances (>30 m); (iii) repellers were rarely detected; and (iv) large-sized and abundant species tended to be accumulators. The findings suggest that positive species interactions have the potential to accumulate neighborhood species richness, particularly through size- and density-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that the frequently disturbed environment of this subtropical rainforest (e.g., typhoon-driven natural disturbances such as landslides, soil erosion, flooding, and windthrow) might create the spatial heterogeneity of species richness and promote positive species interactions. PMID:25884405

  7. Woody debris volume depletion through decay: implications for biomass and carbon accounting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraver, Shawn; Milo, Amy M.; Bradford, John B.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Kenefic, Laura; Palik, Brian J.; Woodall, Christopher W.; Brissette, John

    2013-01-01

    Woody debris decay rates have recently received much attention because of the need to quantify temporal changes in forest carbon stocks. Published decay rates, available for many species, are commonly used to characterize deadwood biomass and carbon depletion. However, decay rates are often derived from reductions in wood density through time, which when used to model biomass and carbon depletion are known to underestimate rate loss because they fail to account for volume reduction (changes in log shape) as decay progresses. We present a method for estimating changes in log volume through time and illustrate the method using a chronosequence approach. The method is based on the observation, confirmed herein, that decaying logs have a collapse ratio (cross-sectional height/width) that can serve as a surrogate for the volume remaining. Combining the resulting volume loss with concurrent changes in wood density from the same logs then allowed us to quantify biomass and carbon depletion for three study species. Results show that volume, density, and biomass follow distinct depletion curves during decomposition. Volume showed an initial lag period (log dimensions remained unchanged), even while wood density was being reduced. However, once volume depletion began, biomass loss (the product of density and volume depletion) occurred much more rapidly than density alone. At the temporal limit of our data, the proportion of the biomass remaining was roughly half that of the density remaining. Accounting for log volume depletion, as demonstrated in this study, provides a comprehensive characterization of deadwood decomposition, thereby improving biomass-loss and carbon-accounting models.

  8. Functional traits predict drought performance and distribution of Mediterranean woody species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Iglesias, Bárbara; Villar, Rafael; Poorter, Lourens

    2014-04-01

    Water availability is one of the key environmental factors that affect plant establishment and distribution. In many regions water availability will decline with climate change, exposing small seedlings to a greater likelihood of drought. In this study, 17 leaves, stem, root, and whole-plant traits of ten woody Mediterranean species were measured under favourable growing conditions and seedling drought survival was evaluated during a simulated dry-down episode. The aims of this study were: i) to assess drought survival of different species, ii) to analyse which functional traits predict drought survival time, and iii) to explain species distribution in the field, based on species drought survival and drought strategies. Drought survival time varied ten-fold across species, from 19 to 192 days. Across species, drought survival was positively related to the rooting depth per leaf area, i.e., the ability to acquire water from deeper soil layers while reducing transpiring leaf area. Drought survival time was negatively related to species ability to grow quickly, as indicated by high relative growth and net assimilation rates. Drought survival also explained species distribution in the field. It was found that species were sorted along a continuum, ranging between two contrasting species functional extremes based on functional traits and drought performance. One extreme consisted of acquisitive fast-growing deciduous species, with thin, soft metabolically active leaves, with high resource use and vulnerability to drought. The opposite extreme consisted of conservative slow-growing evergreen species with sclerophyllous leaves, deep roots, a low transpiring area, and low water use, resulting in high drought survival and drought tolerance. The results show that these drought strategies shape species distribution in this Mediterranean area.

  9. Thermochemical Conversion of Woody Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2015-09-30

    Maine and its industries identified more efficient utilization of biomass as a critical economic development issue. In Phase I of this implementation project, a research team was assembled, research equipment was implemented and expertise was demonstrated in pyrolysis, hydrodeoxygenation of pyrolysis oils, catalyst synthesis and characterization, and reaction engineering. Phase II built upon the infrastructure to innovate reaction pathways and process engineering, and integrate new approaches for fuels and chemical production within pulp and paper and other industries within the state. This research cluster brought together chemists, engineers, physicists and students from the University of Maine, Bates College, and Bowdoin College. The project developed collaborations with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The specific research projects within this proposal were of critical interest to the DoE - in particular the biomass program within EERE and the catalysis/chemical transformations program within BES. Scientific and Technical Merit highlights of this project included: (1) synthesis and physical characterization of novel size-selective catalyst/supports using engineered mesoporous (1-10 nm diameter pores) materials, (2) advances in fundamental knowledge of novel support/ metal catalyst systems tailored for pyrolysis oil upgrading, (3) a microcalorimetric sensing technique, (4) improved methods for pyrolysis oil characterization, (5) production and characterization of woody biomass-derived pyrolysis oils, (6) development of two new patented bio oil pathways: thermal deoxygenation (TDO) and formate assisted pyrolysis (FASP), and (7) technoeconomics of pyrolysis of Maine forest biomass. This research cluster has provided fundamental knowledge to enable and assess pathways to thermally convert biomass to hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals.

  10. Wildfire Induced Degradation of Woody Vegetation in Dry Zone of Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, A.

    2011-08-01

    Small bushy tree species dominate the semi-arid areas of Kazakhstan. In the course of their life cycle, they form a layer of litter that is resistant to wind transport. This small shrub species with its own litter play a significant role in the spectral characteristics of the Earth surface. Changes in the density of shrub canopy forms or replacing them with herbaceous species is accompanied by significant changes in the spectral characteristics in the visible and near infrared spectral bands in the autumn. These changes can be recorded from satellite data. LANDSAT-TM images during 1985-2007 years and MODIS data (USGS: MOD09Q1, 2000-2010) used to diagnose changes in relation between woodyherbaceous vegetation species in the dry zone of Kazakhstan. It was found that over the past 10 years, spreading small shrub forms of semi-arid vegetation significantly decreased. There is a persistent expansion of herbal forms, leading to the semi-steppe formation areas. The mechanism of repression of wood forms constructed through the accumulation of dry plant mass during wet years, with its subsequent burnout during wildfires. In the case of a strong fire, a complete destruction of species is observed. The restoration of small shrub cover demands more than 20 years. Comparative analysis of LANDSAT-TM images showed a 10 times increasing of the fire scar areas in the test area in the central part of Kazakhstan between 1985 and 2007. According MOD09Q1 was conducted mapping small shrub forms of degradation in Kazakhstan. Reducing the area occupied by woody vegetation, semi-desert was about 30 million hectares or over 30% of their total range in Kazakhstan.

  11. The geomorphic function and characteristics of large woody debris in low gradient rivers, coastal Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilligan, F. J.; Nislow, K. H.; Fisher, G. B.; Wright, J.; Mackey, G.; Laser, M.

    2008-05-01

    The role, function, and importance of large woody debris (LWD) in rivers depend strongly on environmental context and land use history. The coastal watersheds of central and northern Maine, northeastern U.S., are characterized by low gradients, moderate topography, and minimal influence of mass wasting processes, along with a history of intensive commercial timber harvest. In spite of the ecological importance of these rivers, which contain the last wild populations of Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar) in the U.S., we know little about LWD distribution, dynamics, and function in these systems. We conducted a cross-basin analysis in seven coastal Maine watersheds, documenting the size, frequency, volume, position, and orientation of LWD, as well as the association between LWD, pool formation, and sediment storage. In conjunction with these LWD surveys, we conducted extensive riparian vegetation surveys. We observed very low LWD frequencies and volumes across the 60 km of rivers surveyed. Frequency of LWD ≥ 20 cm diameter ranged from 15-50 pieces km - 1 and wood volumes were commonly < 10-20 m 3 km - 1 . Moreover, most of this wood was located in the immediate low-flow channel zone, was oriented parallel to flow, and failed to span the stream channel. As a result, pool formation associated with LWD is generally lacking and < 20% of the wood was associated with sediment storage. Low LWD volumes are consistent with the relatively young riparian stands we observed, with the large majority of trees < 20 cm DBH. These results strongly reflect the legacy of intensive timber harvest and land clearing and suggest that the frequency and distribution of LWD may be considerably less than presettlement and/or future desired conditions.

  12. Flowering, die-back and recovery of a semelparous woody bamboo in the Atlantic Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montti, Lía; Campanello, Paula I.; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    Chusquea ramosissima is a semelparous woody bamboo growing in the understory of the semideciduous Atlantic Forest that increases in abundance after disturbance and consequently has profound effects on vegetation dynamics. Flowering and death of C. ramosissima may open a window of opportunity leaving space vacant for the recruitment of tree seedlings. We describe the flowering pattern and seedling demography of this species at different spatio-temporal scales between the years 2001 and 2009, and evaluate if tree seedling abundance of canopy species increased after the flowering event. At a landscape scale, flowering sites were interspersed with sites that did not flower. At a local scale, the flowering extended over 5 years, with flowering and non-flowering culms intermingled, also in small patches (i.e., 4 m 2). Seeds germinated soon after flowering and die-back. Four successive seedling cohorts were studied. Mortality rate was high during the first 4 months after seedling emergence but several fast-growing seedlings were able to become established successfully. At the end of the study, 10%-20% of the initial number of bamboo seedlings in each cohort survived. Seedling abundance of tree canopy species was similar in flowering and non-flowering sites. C. ramosissima was able to re-colonize and perpetuate in sites it previously occupied. The coexistence of flowering and non-flowering culms at different spatio-temporal scales and clonal growth by rhizomes, together with the successful bamboo seedlings establishment, enhanced bamboo persistence in gaps and disturbed sites. Flowering and death of C. ramosissima did not facilitate seedling growth of canopy tree species.

  13. Woody vegetation and succession on the Fonde surface mine demonstration area, Bell County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, G.L.; Thompson, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    The long term impact of surface mining on vegetation and plant succession has always been of concern to environmentalists and residents of Appalachia. The Fonde Surface Mine Demonstration Area is a 7.3-ha, NE-NW-aspect contour coal mine at an elevation of 562 m. It was reclaimed in 1965 to show state-of-the-art surface mine reclamation techniques consistent with then-current law and regulations after coal mining in 1959 and 1963. The mine spoils were lightly graded to control erosion and crates a bench with water control and two sediment ponds. Soil pH ranged from 2.8 to 5.9. About 80 percent of the mine was planted with 18 tree and shrub species including plantations of mixed pine, mixed hardwoods, black locust, and shrubs for wildlife. In a complete floristic inventory conducted 25 years later, the authors found the woody flora consisted of 34 families, 53 genera, and 70 species including 7 exotics. This inventory of the Fonde mine shows that a diverse forest vegetation can be reestablished after extreme disturbances in Appalachia. Black locust, yellow poplar, and Virginia pine reproduction varied significantly among plantation types. Canopy tree species significantly affected ground layer cover, total species richness, number of tree seedling species, and total number of tree seedlings present. Mine soil type affected ground layer percent cover and total species richness. Pre-SMCRA (Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977) reclaimed and inventoried mines can be used to evaluate biodiversity on post-SMCRA mines.

  14. The influence of woody thickening on SOM dynamics along a precipitation gradient in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Gustavo; Bird, Michael; Wurster, Christopher; Ascough, Philippa; Veenendaal, Elmar; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Schrodt, Franziska; Domingues, Tomas; Feldpausch, Ted; Braojos, Victor; Lloyd, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    We made use of the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter (SOM) in bulk and fractionated samples to assess the influence of C3/C4 vegetation on SOM dynamics in semi-natural tropical ecosystems sampled along a precipitation gradient in West Africa. The non-linear nature of the relationship between δ13C and SOC content observed across the latitudinal gradient strongly suggests that in addition to the inherent differences in the input rates and turnover times of tree and grass-derived carbon, the broad range of edaphic characteristics may have a major effect in both the physical protection of particulate organic carbon and the chemical stabilization of 13C enriched microbial metabolites. The stable carbon isotopic composition of SOM with depth indicated that there was a larger proliferation in woody vegetation with increasing precipitation, with such trend being also heavily dependent on the characteristics of the soils. An unbiased assessment of the potential impact of tropical vegetation thickening on SOM dynamics is characteristically difficult given the confounding effects posed by the interaction of varying climatic and edaphic factors. Therefore, in order to minimize the impact of those factors, we selected two neighboring transitional ecosystems (a closed savanna woodland and a semideciduous dry forest) occurring in soils of comparable characteristics. Both sites showed varying degrees of δ13C enrichment with depth in bulk and fractionated SOM. Moreover, radiocarbon analyses of sand-size aggregates (>53 μm HF) yielded relatively short MRT, which shows highly dynamic SOM processes even in fairly deep locations. Interestingly, the most stable SOM fraction associated to silt and clay (

  15. Electrophysiological assessment of water stress in fruit-bearing woody plants.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Rojas, Liliana; Tapia, Franco; Gurovich, Luis A

    2014-06-15

    Development and evaluation of a real-time plant water stress sensor, based on the electrophysiological behavior of fruit-bearing woody plants is presented. Continuous electric potentials are measured in tree trunks for different irrigation schedules, inducing variable water stress conditions; results are discussed in relation to soil water content and micro-atmospheric evaporative demand, determined continuously by conventional sensors, correlating this information with tree electric potential measurements. Systematic and differentiable patterns of electric potentials for water-stressed and no-stressed trees in 2 fruit species are presented. Early detection and recovery dynamics of water stress conditions can also be monitored with these electrophysiology sensors, which enable continuous and non-destructive measurements for efficient irrigation scheduling throughout the year. The experiment is developed under controlled conditions, in Faraday cages located at a greenhouse area, both in Persea americana and Prunus domestica plants. Soil moisture evolution is controlled using capacitance sensors and solar radiation, temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity and direction are continuously registered with accurate weather sensors, in a micro-agrometeorological automatic station located at the experimental site. The electrophysiological sensor has two stainless steel electrodes (measuring/reference), inserted on the stem; a high precision Keithley 2701 digital multimeter is used to measure plant electrical signals; an algorithm written in MatLab(®), allows correlating the signal to environmental variables. An electric cyclic behavior is observed (circadian cycle) in the experimental plants. For non-irrigated plants, the electrical signal shows a time positive slope and then, a negative slope after restarting irrigation throughout a rather extended recovery process, before reaching a stable electrical signal with zero slope. Well-watered plants presented a

  16. Accumulation and connectivity of coarse woody debris in partial harvest and unmanaged relict forests.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Robert C; Jenkins, Michael A; Saunders, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    When a tree dies, it continues to play an important ecological role within forests. Coarse woody debris (CWD), including standing deadwood (SDW) and downed deadwood (DDW), is an important functional component of forest ecosystems, particularly for many dispersal-limited saproxylic taxa and for metapopulation dynamics across landscapes. Processes, such as natural disturbance or management, modify forest composition and structure, thereby influencing CWD abundance and distribution. Many studies have compared older forests to forests managed with even-aged silvicultural systems and observed a prolonged period of low CWD occurrence after harvesting. With fine-scale spatial data, our study compares the long-term impacts of light partial harvesting on the CWD structure of eastern deciduous hardwood forests. We mapped and inventoried DDW and SDW using variable radius plots based on a 10 m × 10 m grid throughout an unmanaged, structurally-complex relict forest and two nearby forests that were partially harvested over 46 years ago. The relict stand had significantly larger individual pieces and higher accumulations of DDW and SDW than both of the partially harvested stands. Connectivity of CWD was much higher in the relict stand, which had fewer, larger patches. Larger pieces and higher proportion of decay-resistant species (e.g. Quercus spp.) in the relict forest resulted in slower decomposition, greater accumulation and increased connectivity of CWD. Partial harvests, such that occur with selection forestry, are generally considered less disruptive of ecosystem services, but this study highlights the long-term impacts of even light partial harvests on CWD stocks and distribution. When planning harvesting events, forest managers should also consider alternative methods to ensure the sustainability of deadwood resources and function. PMID:25409459

  17. Climate change and shifts in spring phenology of three horticultural woody perennials in northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, David W.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Lakso, Alan N.; Otsuki, Yuka; Pool, Robert M.; Shaulis, Nelson J.

    2005-05-01

    We evaluated spring phenology changes from 1965 to 2001 in northeastern USA utilizing a unique data set from 72 locations with genetically identical lilac plants (Syringa chinensis, clone “Red Rothomagensis”). We also utilized a previously validated lilac-honeysuckle “spring index” model to reconstruct a more complete record of first leaf date (FLD) and first flower date (FFD) for the region from historical weather data. In addition, we examined mid-bloom dates for apple (Malus domestica) and grape (Vitis vinifera) collected at several sites in the region during approximately the same time period. Almost all lilac sites with significant linear trends for FLD or FFD versus year had negative slopes (advanced development). Regression analysis of pooled data for the 72 sites indicated an advance of -0.092 day/year for FFD (P=0.003). The slope for FLD was also negative (-0.048 day/year), but not significant (P=0.234). The simulated data from the “spring index” model, which relies on local daily temperature records, indicated highly significant (P<0.001) negative slopes of -0.210 and -0.123 day/year for FLD and FFD, respectively. Data collected for apple and grape also indicated advance spring development, with slopes for mid-bloom date versus year of -0.20 day/year (P=0.01) and -0.146 (P=0.14), respectively. Collectively, these results indicate an advance in spring phenology ranging from 2 to 8 days for these woody perennials in northeastern USA for the period 1965 to 2001, qualitatively consistent with a warming trend, and consistent with phenology shifts reported for other mid- and high-latitude regions.

  18. Methane Emissions from Woody Stems of Tropical and Temperate Wetland Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangala, S. R.; Hornibrook, E. R.; Gowing, D. J.; Bastviken, D.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Gauci, V.

    2013-12-01

    Wetland-adapted trees are known to transport and release soil-produced methane to the atmosphere through woody stem surfaces, yet the magnitude and controls of tree-mediated methane emissions remain unknown for mature forests. Although 60% of global wetlands are forested, and many tropical forests are either permanently or seasonally flooded, the ecosystem level contribution of tree-mediated methane flux relative to other gas transport pathways (e.g., ebullition, pore-water diffusion and via aerenchyma of herbaceous plants) has received limited attention. The role of trees as a conduit for methane export from soil to the atmosphere was assessed in situ in a temperate forested wetland (Flitwick Moor, UK) and tropical forested wetlands in Borneo, Indonesia and Amazonia, Brazil. Mesocosm experiments also were conducted in the temperate region to characterise emission characteristics of Alnus glutinosa saplings subjected to different water-table treatments. Methane emissions from trees were compared to fluxes from the soil surface in both the in situ and mesocosm studies. Temperate and tropical tree species both released significant quantities of methane from stem surfaces. Emission rates for young trees exceeded that of mature trees by several orders of magnitude on a stem surface area basis. Key factors controlling rates of tree-mediated flux were tree physiology (e.g., wood specific density, stem lenticel density), abiotic conditions (e.g., soil temperature) and methane gas transport mechanisms (e.g., passive diffusion, convective transport). Tree-mediated methane emissions contributed 6 to 87% of total ecosystem methane flux with the largest relative contribution from trees occurring in tropical wetlands. Recent data from Amazonian wetlands demonstrate very high rates of tree-mediated methane emission relative to other types of forested wetlands. These results indicate that exclusion of tree-mediated methane fluxes from measurement campaigns conducted in forested

  19. A conceptual framework for dryland aeolian sediment transport along the grassland-forest continuum: Effects of woody plant canopy cover and disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, J.J.; Zou, C.B.; Field, J.P.; Allen, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    Aeolian processes are of particular importance in dryland ecosystems where ground cover is inherently sparse because of limited precipitation. Dryland ecosystems include grassland, shrubland, savanna, woodland, and forest, and can be viewed collectively as a continuum of woody plant cover spanning from grasslands with no woody plant cover up to forests with nearly complete woody plant cover. Along this continuum, the spacing and shape of woody plants determine the spatial density of roughness elements, which directly affects aeolian sediment transport. Despite the extensiveness of dryland ecosystems, studies of aeolian sediment transport have generally focused on agricultural fields, deserts, or highly disturbed sites where rates of transport are likely to be greatest. Until recently, few measurements have been made of aeolian sediment transport over multiple wind events and across a variety of types of dryland ecosystems. To evaluate potential trends in aeolian sediment transport as a function of woody plant cover, estimates of aeolian sediment transport from recently published studies, in concert with rates from four additional locations (two grassland and two woodland sites), are reported here. The synthesis of these reports leads to the development of a new conceptual framework for aeolian sediment transport in dryland ecosystems along the grassland-forest continuum. The findings suggest that: (1) for relatively undisturbed ecosystems, shrublands have inherently greater aeolian sediment transport because of wake interference flow associated with intermediate levels of density and spacing of woody plants; and (2) for disturbed ecosystems, the upper bound for aeolian sediment transport decreases as a function of increasing amounts of woody plant cover because of the effects of the height and density of the canopy on airflow patterns and ground cover associated with woody plant cover. Consequently, aeolian sediment transport following disturbance spans the largest

  20. Altering recharge dynamics through woody vegetation removal: a study on the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer of south Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Grasslands in many semi-arid regions of the world have seen an expansion of woody vegetation over the past century and many now exist largely as woodlands or shrublands. This "woody encroachment" results in numerous changes to ecosystem function, including alteration of element and water cycles. As in many parts of the world, these shrublands in south Texas have been subjected to a variety of management practices intended to reduce woody vegetation and increase the dominance of herbaceous vegetation. In addition to the intended change in vegetation structure, this activity has the potential to affect hydrologic fluxes and potentially increase deep drainage through reduced transpiration and rooting depths. However, there is significant uncertainty about the hydrologic response of vegetation to woody vegetation removal. We report here the results of a large manipulative experiment designed to assess the effects of woody vegetation removal on soil moisture movement in the vadose zone in an area that serves as a recharge zone for an unconsolidated sediment aquifer (Carrizo-Wilcox). In this study woody vegetation has been removed using a mechanical method (roller chopping) as well as a mechanical and chemical method (chainsaw removal + stump herbicide). The treated plots are located on three different soil types that represent the range of soils typical in this area. A water balance approach is used to assess soil moisture fluxes and potential deep drainage. In this first year of the study we quantified ecological and edaphic components that have the greatest effect on deep drainage, namely rooting depth, soil texture and antecedent soil water conditions. Exceptionally dry conditions this year have provided a unique opportunity to understand plant soil water interactions in the critical zone given the strong soil moisture limitations observed in the surface soil horizons. Understanding these interactions across different plant communities and soil textures are the

  1. Savannah woody structure modelling and mapping using multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Laven; Mathieu, Renaud; Main, Russell; Kleynhans, Waldo; Wessels, Konrad; Asner, Gregory; Leblon, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    Structural parameters of the woody component in African savannahs provide estimates of carbon stocks that are vital to the understanding of fuelwood reserves, which is the primary source of energy for 90% of households in South Africa (80% in Sub-Saharan Africa) and are at risk of over utilisation. The woody component can be characterised by various quantifiable woody structural parameters, such as tree cover, tree height, above ground biomass (AGB) or canopy volume, each been useful for different purposes. In contrast to the limited spatial coverage of ground-based approaches, remote sensing has the ability to sense the high spatio-temporal variability of e.g. woody canopy height, cover and biomass, as well as species diversity and phenological status - a defining but challenging set of characteristics typical of African savannahs. Active remote sensing systems (e.g. Light Detection and Ranging - LiDAR; Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR), on the other hand, may be more effective in quantifying the savannah woody component because of their ability to sense within-canopy properties of the vegetation and its insensitivity to atmosphere and clouds and shadows. Additionally, the various components of a particular target's structure can be sensed differently with SAR depending on the frequency or wavelength of the sensor being utilised. This study sought to test and compare the accuracy of modelling, in a Random Forest machine learning environment, woody above ground biomass (AGB), canopy cover (CC) and total canopy volume (TCV) in South African savannahs using a combination of X-band (TerraSAR-X), C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (ALOS PALSAR) radar datasets. Training and validation data were derived from airborne LiDAR data to evaluate the SAR modelling accuracies. It was concluded that the L-band SAR frequency was more effective in the modelling of the CC (coefficient of determination or R2 of 0.77), TCV (R2 of 0.79) and AGB (R2 of 0.78) metrics in Southern African

  2. A mixed-methods approach to understanding farmer and rancher interest in supplying woody biomass in the U.S. Northern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Ashley M.

    Bioenergy produced from cellulosic feedstocks could serve as an opportunity to strengthen local and regional economies, reduce fossil fuel energy consumption for transportation or electricity production, and also jointly produce various environmental services. In the U.S. Northern Great Plains, woody bioenergy crops can provide multifunctional benefits while building biomass supply capacity when established within existing farm and ranch systems. Understanding what facilitates or constraints potential biomass suppliers' level of interest in biomass production is essential to fully assess the regional potential of biomass-based bioenergy in the Northern Great Plains. Qualitative data from a regional focus group series illustrates the complexities associated with farmer definitions of marginality, attitudes towards trees and bioenergy production, while also characterizing influences on farmer/rancher interest in woody biomass production. Quantitatively, a region-wide representative survey of farmers and ranchers managing marginal land captures a snapshot of operator interest in woody biomass production. Results indicate that 61% of farmers and ranchers have some degree of interest in woody biomass production, while results from an ordered probit regression further illustrate how farm/ranch system attributes, individual farmer/rancher characteristics, relevant attitudes and knowledge significantly affect interest. Data from both methods allow us to highlight attributes of operators who are most likely to be early adopters of a woody biomass crop, can serve as an input to local or regional assessments of potential for renewable energy production, and have implications for the development of relevant policy initiatives and management practices.

  3. Structural reinterpretation of Ruedi and Woody Creek quadrangles, Pitkin and Eagle Counties, Colorado: a central Colorado overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Zoerner, F.P.

    1986-08-01

    The mountains northwest of Aspen, Colorado, are composed of Pennsylvanian through Triassic evaporites and molasse of the Eagle Valley, Belden, Minturn, Maroon, and State Bridge formations. Southwest of the Roaring Fork River and its tributary, Woody Creek, are Jurassic through Cretaceous sediments that unconformably overlie these older rocks. This entire sequence is located in the Elk Range thrust sheet. Along Woody Creek and the Roaring Fork River, Bryant and Freeman have mapped the continuation of the Castle Creek fault zone. These writers interpreted the fault zone as a southeast-dipping normal fault with a horst of Eagle Valley formation continuously present between the Pennsylvanian-Triassic and Cretaceous beds within the fault zone. Southwestward thrusting on a decollement within the Eagle Valley evaporite sequence would explain (1) its presence in the fault zone, (2) the 17,000 + ft of stratigraphic throw, and (3) the structural discordance across the fault zone. The author interprets the fault zone to be a northeast-dipping gravity slide that has been thrust off and possibly pushed by the Laramide Sawatch uplift. Cross sections through the area have similar geometry to those for the Elk Range and Hunters Hill thrusts to the south-southwest. The upturned heel is exposed along the Sawatch structural front between Hunter Creek (north of Aspen) and Lenado. These relationships suggest that another thrust paralleling the Fryingpan River is possible to the north. The author proposes the name Roaring fork thrust for the fault zone in the Woody Creek and Roaring Fork River valleys. The Castle Creek fault zone should be reserved for the fault zone in the drainage south of Aspen and the southwest projection of the Homestake shear zone, against which is appears to terminate.

  4. Simulation results of aboveground woody biomass and leaf litterfall for African tropical forest with a global terrestrial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Weirdt, Marjolein; Maignan, Fabienne; Peylin, Philippe; Poulter, Benjamin; Moreau, Inès; Ciais, Philippe; Defourny, Pierre; Steppe, Kathy; Verbeeck, Hans

    2014-05-01

    The response of tropical forest vegetation to global climate change could be central to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Tropical forests are believed to annually process approximately six times as much carbon via photosynthesis and respiration as humans emit from fossil fuel use. Of all tropical forests worldwide, the role of African tropical forest is not very well known and both the quantity as well as the dynamics of tropical forest carbon stocks and fluxes are very poorly quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Furthermore, African tropical forest spatial carbon stocks patterns as measured in the field are not as well represented by the global biogeochemical models as they are for temperate forests. In this study, a first simulation for the African tropical forest with the process based global terrestrial ecosystem model ORCHIDEE was done. In this work, ORCHIDEE included deep soils, seasonal leaf litterfall and phosphorus availability mechanisms for tropical evergreen forests included. The ORCHIDEE model run outputs are evaluated against reported field inventories, investigating seasonal variations in leaf litterfall and spatial variation in aboveground woody biomass. A comparison between modeled and measured leaf litterfall was made at a semi-deciduous Equatorial rainforest site in the Republic of Congo at the Biosphere reserve Dimonika south of Gabon. Also, simulated woody aboveground biomass was compared against site-level field inventories and satellite-based estimates based on a combination of MODIS imagery with field inventory data from Uganda, DRC and Cameroon. First comparison results seem promising and show that the radiation driven leaf litterfall model results correspond well with the field inventories and that the mean of the modelled aboveground woody biomass matches the available field inventory observations but there is still a need for more ground data to evaluate the model outcome over a large region like

  5. Adventitious Root Production and Plastic Resource Allocation to Biomass Determine Burial Tolerance in Woody Plants from Central Canadian Coastal Dunes

    PubMed Central

    DECH, JEFFERY P.; MAUN, M. ANWAR

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Burial is a recurrent stress imposed upon plants of coastal dunes. Woody plants are buried on open coastal dunes and in forested areas behind active blowouts; however, little is known about the burial responses and adaptive traits of these species. The objectives of this study were: (a) to determine the growth and morphological responses to burial in sand of seven woody plant species native to central Canadian coastal dunes; and (b) to identify traits that determine burial tolerance in these species. • Methods Field experiments were conducted to determine the responses of each species to burial. Saplings were exposed to burial treatments of 0, 10, 25, 50 and 75 % of their height. Burial responses were evaluated based on regressions of total biomass, height, adventitious root production and percentage allocation to shoot, root and adventitious root biomass on percentage burial. • Key Results Pinus strobus and Picea glauca lacked burial tolerance. In response to the burial gradient, these species showed a strong linear decline in total biomass, minimal adventitious root production that peaked at moderate levels (25–50 % burial) and no change in allocation to shoots vs. roots. The tolerant species Juniperus virginiana, Thuja occidentalis and Picea mariana showed a quadratic response to burial, with little change in biomass up to 50 % burial, but a large decline at 75 %. These species produced abundant adventitious roots up to 50 % burial, but did not alter allocation patterns over the range of burial levels. Populus balsamifera and Salix cordata were stimulated by burial. These species showed linear increases in biomass with increasing burial, produced copious adventitious roots across the gradient and showed a clear shift in allocation to vertical shoot growth and adventitious root production at the expense of the original roots under high burial conditions. • Conclusions Adventitious root production and plastic resource

  6. On the potential of long wavelength imaging radars for mapping vegetation types and woody biomass in tropical rain forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Zimmermann, Reiner; Oren, Ram

    1995-01-01

    In the tropical rain forests of Manu, in Peru, where forest biomass ranges from 4 kg/sq m in young forest succession up to 100 kg/sq m in old, undisturbed floodplain stands, the P-band polarimetric radar data gathered in June of 1993 by the AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar) instrument separate most major vegetation formations and also perform better than expected in estimating woody biomass. The worldwide need for large scale, updated biomass estimates, achieved with a uniformly applied method, as well as reliable maps of land cover, justifies a more in-depth exploration of long wavelength imaging radar applications for tropical forests inventories.

  7. On the measure of large woody debris in an alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, V.; Bertoldi, G.; Rigon, E.

    2012-04-01

    The management of large woody debris (LWD) in Alpine torrents is a complex and ambiguous task. On one side the presence of LWD contributes to in-channel and floodplain morphological processes and plays an important role in landscape ecology and biodiversity. On the other side LWD increases considerably flood hazards when some river cross-sections result critical for the human interface (e.g. culverts, bridges, artificial channels). Only few studies provide quantitative data of LWD volumes in Alpine torrents. Research is needed both at basin scale processes (LWD recruiting from hillslopes) and at channel scale processes (feeding from river bank, storage/transport/deposition of LWD along the river bed). Our study proposes an integrate field survey methodology to assess the overall LWD amount which can be entrained by a flood. This knowledge is mandatory for the scientific research, for the implementation of LWD transport models, and for a complete hazard management in mountain basins. The study site is the high-relief basin of the Cordevole torrent (Belluno Province, Central Alps, Italy) whose outlet is located at the Saviner village (basin area of 109 square kilometers). In the November 1966 an extreme flood event occurred and some torrent reaches were heavily congested by LWD enhancing the overall damages due to long-duration overflows. Currently, the LWD recruitment seems to be strictly correlated with bank erosion and hillslope instability and the conditions of forest stand suggest LWD hazard is still high. Previous studies on sub-catchments of the Cordevole torrent have also shown an inverse relation between the drainage area and the LWD storage in the river-bed. Present contribution analyzes and quantifies the presence of LWD in the main valley channel of the Cordevole basin. A new sampling methodology was applied to integrate surveys of riparian vegetation and LWD storage. Data inventory confirms the previous relationship between LWD volumes and drainage area

  8. Large Woody Debris Input and Its Influence on Channel Structure in Agricultural Lands of Southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, Felipe Rossetti De; Ferraz, Silvio Frosini De Barros; Gerhard, Pedro; Vettorazzi, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira, Anderson

    2011-10-01

    Riparian forests are important for the structure and functioning of stream ecosystems, providing structural components such as large woody debris (LWD). Changes in these forests will cause modifications in the LWD input to streams, affecting their structure. In order to assess the influence of riparian forests changes in LWD supply, 15 catchments (third and fourth order) with riparian forests at different conservation levels were selected for sampling. In each catchment we quantified the abundance, volume and diameter of LWD in stream channels; the number, area and volume of pools formed by LWD and basal area and tree diameter of riparian forest. We found that riparian forests were at a secondary successional stage with predominantly young trees (diameter at breast height <10 cm) in all studied streams. Results showed that basal area and diameter of riparian forest differed between the stream groups (forested and non-forested), but tree density did not differ between groups. Differences were also observed in LWD abundance, volume, frequency of LWD pools with subunits and area and volume of LWD pools. LWD diameter, LWD that form pools diameter and frequency of LWD pools without subunits did not differ between stream groups. Regression analyses showed that LWD abundance and volume, and frequency of LWD pools (with and without subunits) were positively related with the proportion of riparian forest. LWD diameter was not correlated to riparian tree diameter. The frequency of LWD pools was correlated to the abundance and volume of LWD, but characteristics of these pools (area and volume) were not correlated to the diameter of LWD that formed the pools. These results show that alterations in riparian forest cause modifications in the LWD abundance and volume in the stream channel, affecting mainly the structural complexity of these ecosystems (reduction in the number and structural characteristics of LWD pools). Our results also demonstrate that riparian forest

  9. Variation in woody plant delta(13)C along a topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna parkland.

    PubMed

    Bai, Edith; Boutton, Thomas W; Liu, Feng; Wu, X Ben; Archer, Steven R

    2008-06-01

    delta(13)C values of C(3) plants are indicators of plant carbon-water relations that integrate plant responses to environmental conditions. However, few studies have quantified spatial variation in plant delta(13)C at the landscape scale. We determined variation in leaf delta(13)C, leaf nitrogen per leaf area (N(area)), and specific leaf area (SLA) in April and August 2005 for all individuals of three common woody species within a 308 x 12-m belt transect spanning an upland-lowland topoedaphic gradient in a subtropical savanna in southern Texas. Clay content, available soil moisture, and soil total N were all negatively correlated with elevation. The delta(13)C values of Prosopis glandulosa (deciduous N(2)-fixing tree legume), Condalia hookeri (evergreen shrub), and Zanthoxylum fagara (evergreen shrub) leaves increased 1-4 per thousand with decreasing elevation, with the delta(13)C value of P. glandulosa leaves being 1-3 per thousand higher than those of the two shrub species. Contrary to theory and results from previous studies, delta(13)C values were highest where soil water was most available, suggesting that some other variable was overriding or interacting with water availability. Leaf N(area) was positively correlated with leaf delta(13)C of all species (p < 0.01) and appeared to exert the strongest control over delta(13)C along this topoedaphic gradient. Since leaf N(area) is positively related to photosynthetic capacity, plants with high leaf N(area) are likely to have low p (I)/p (a) ratios and therefore higher delta(13)C values, assuming stomatal conductance is constant. Specific leaf area was not correlated significantly with leaf delta(13)C. Following a progressive growing season drought in July/August, leaf delta(13)C decreased. The lower delta(13)C in August may reflect the accumulation of (13)C-depleted epicuticular leaf wax. We suggest control of leaf delta(13)C along this topoedaphic gradient is mediated by leaf N(area) rather than by stomatal

  10. Disentangling the drivers of coarse woody debris behavior and carbon gas emissions during fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiwei; van der Werf, Guido R.; van Logtestijn, Richard S. P.; van Hal, Jurgen R.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.

    2016-04-01

    The turnover of coarse woody debris, a key terrestrial carbon pool, plays fundamental roles in global carbon cycling. Biological decomposition and fire are two main fates for dead wood turnover. Compared to slow decomposition, fire rapidly transfers organic carbon from the earth surface to the atmosphere. Both a-biotic environmental factors and biotic wood properties determine coarse wood combustion and thereby its carbon gas emissions during fire. Moisture is a key inhibitory environmental factor for fire. The properties of dead wood strongly affect how it burns either directly or indirectly through interacting with moisture. Coarse wood properties vary between plant species and between various decay stages. Moreover, if we put a piece of dead wood in the context of a forest fuel bed, the soil and wood contact might also greatly affect their fire behavior. Using controlled laboratory burns, we disentangled the effects of all these driving factors: tree species (one gymnosperms needle-leaf species, three angiosperms broad-leaf species), wood decay stages (freshly dead, middle decayed, very strongly decayed), moisture content (air-dried, 30% moisture content in mass), and soil-wood contact (on versus 3cm above the ground surface) on dead wood flammability and carbon gas efflux (CO2 and CO released in grams) during fire. Wood density was measured for all coarse wood samples used in our experiment. We found that compared to other drivers, wood decay stages have predominant positive effects on coarse wood combustion (for wood mass burned, R2=0.72 when air-dried and R2=0.52 at 30% moisture content) and associated carbon gas emissions (for CO2andCO (g) released, R2=0.55 when air-dried and R2=0.42 at 30% moisture content) during fire. Thus, wood decay accelerates wood combustion and its CO2 and CO emissions during fire, which can be mainly attributed to the decreasing wood density (for wood mass burned, R2=0.91 when air-dried and R2=0.63 at 30% moisture content) as wood

  11. Precipitation pulse use by an invasive woody legume: the role of soil texture and pulse size.

    PubMed

    Fravolini, Alessandra; Hultine, Kevin R; Brugnoli, Enrico; Gazal, Rico; English, Nathan B; Williams, David G

    2005-08-01

    Plant metabolic activity in arid and semi-arid environments is largely tied to episodic precipitation events or "pulses". The ability of plants to take up and utilize rain pulses during the growing season in these water-limited ecosystems is determined in part by pulse timing, intensity and amount, and by hydrological properties of the soil that translate precipitation into plant-available soil moisture. We assessed the sensitivity of an invasive woody plant, velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina Woot.), to large (35 mm) and small (10 mm) isotopically labeled irrigation pulses on two contrasting soil textures (sandy-loam vs. loamy-clay) in semi-desert grassland in southeastern Arizona, USA. Predawn leaf water potential (psi(pd)), the isotopic abundance of deuterium in stem water (deltaD), the abundance of 13C in soluble leaf sugar (delta13C), and percent volumetric soil water content (theta(v)) were measured prior to irrigation and repeatedly for 2 weeks following irrigation. Plant water potential and the percent of pulse water present in the stem xylem indicated that although mesquite trees on both coarse- and fine-textured soils quickly responded to the large irrigation pulse, the magnitude and duration of this response substantially differed between soil textures. After reaching a maximum 4 days after the irrigation, the fraction of pulse water in stem xylem decreased more rapidly on the loamy-clay soil than the sandy-loam soil. Similarly, on both soil textures mesquite significantly responded to the 10-mm pulse. However, the magnitude of this response was substantially greater for mesquite on the sandy-loam soil compared to loamy-clay soil. The relationship between psi(pd) and delta13C of leaf-soluble carbohydrates over the pulse period did not differ between plants at the two sites, indicating that differences in photosynthetic response of mesquite trees to the moisture pulses was a function of soil water availability within the rooting zone rather than

  12. Hydraulic and Geomorphic Effects of Large Woody Debris Additions in the Narraguagus Watershed, Coastal Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E.; Snyder, N. P.

    2009-12-01

    Maine coastal rivers host the last remaining runs of endangered anadromous Atlantic salmon in the United States, whose populations have declined from ~500,000 returning adults in the 1880s to only ~1000 in 2000. Restoration projects focus on these rivers, and recent efforts involve adding large woody debris (LWD) to small tributaries to improve salmon rearing habitat. LWD changes the hydraulics and geomorphology of small streams by acting as a barrier to flow and resulting in decreased velocity zones, scour pools, and sediment storage and sorting. We quantify the effects of LWD additions in early August 2008 on hydraulics and substrate in Baker Brook, a west-flowing tributary of the Narraguagus River. Hydraulically, we focus on the treatment reach nearest the confluence with the Narraguagus River (Baker1). We study substrate in this and the upstream treatment location (Baker3). Both study locations are divided into two reaches, treatment (received cut wood) and control (did not receive cut wood). The reaches are further divided into 50 m sub-reaches based on gradient (1-2%). We seek to answer two research questions: (1) how much does mean velocity through the study sub-reaches change as a result of additions; and (2) does sediment storage and sorting result from the LWD additions? We measured reach-average velocities (Ureach) in Baker1 using the salt dilution method in May, July, August and October 2008 and May 2009. We use rating curves to compare the post-treatment to the pre-treatment Ureach-stage relationship. No reach-average change was quantified during the low-to-moderate flows we observed. We found a localized change in cross-sectionally averaged velocity (U⊥) measured with a flow meter in one sub-reach, but this is because an added tree intersected the cross-section where measurements were recorded. We quantified pre- and post-treatment sub-reach substrate median grain size (D50) with intensive clast counts in July 2008 and May 2009. Two of the three

  13. Woody plant richness and NDVI response to drought events in Catalonian (northeastern Spain) forests.

    PubMed

    Lloret, F; Lobo, A; Estevan, H; Maisongrande, P; Vayreda, J; Terradas, J

    2007-09-01

    The role of species diversity on ecosystem resistance in the face of strong environmental fluctuations has been addressed from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints to reveal a variety of positive and negative relationships. Here we explore empirically the relationship between the richness of forest woody species and canopy resistance to extreme drought episodes. We compare richness data from an extensive forest inventory to a temporal series of satellite imagery that estimated drought impact on forest canopy as NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) anomalies of the dry summer in 2003 in relation to records of previous years. We considered five different types of forests that are representative of the main climatic and altitudinal gradients of the region, ranging from lowland Mediterranean to mountain boreal-temperate climates. The observed relationship differed among forest types and interacted with the climate, summarised by the Thorntwaite index. In Mediterranean Pinus halepensis forests, NDVI decreased during the drought. This decrease was stronger in forests with lower richness. In Mediterranean evergreen forests of Quercus ilex, drought did not result in an overall NDVI loss, but lower NDVI values were observed in drier localities with lower richness, and in more moist localities with higher number of species. In mountain Pinus sylvestris forests NDVI decreased, mostly due to the drought impact on drier localities, while no relation to species richness was observed. In moist Fagus sylvatica forests, NDVI only decreased in plots with high richness. No effect of drought was observed in the high mountain Pinus uncinata forests. Our results show that a shift on the diversity-stability relationship appears across the regional, climatic gradient. A positive relationship appears in drier localities, supporting a null model where the probability of finding a species able to cope with drier conditions increases with the number of species. However, in

  14. Relationships of the Woody Medicago Species (Section Dendrotelis) Assessed by Molecular Cytogenetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rosato, Marcela; Castro, Mercedes; Rosselló, Josep A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The organization of rDNA genes in the woody medic species from the agronomically important Medicago section Dendrotelis was analysed to gain insight into their taxonomic relationships, to assess the levels of infraspecific variation concerning ribosomal loci in a restricted and fragmented insular species (M. citrina) and to assess the nature of its polyploidy. Methods Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used for physical mapping of 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA genes in the three species of section Dendrotelis (M. arborea, M. citrina, M. strasseri) and the related M. marina from section Medicago. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to assess the genomic relationships of the polyploid M. citrina with the putatively related species from section Dendrotelis. Key Results The diploid (2n = 16) M. marina has a single 45S and two 5S rDNA loci, a pattern usually detected in previous studies of Medicago diploid species. However, polyploid species from section Dendrotelis depart from expectations. The tetraploid species (2n = 32) M. arborea and M. strasseri have one 45S rDNA locus and two 5S rDNA loci, whereas in the hexaploid (2n = 48) M. citrina four 45S rDNA and five 5S rDNA loci have been detected. No single chromosome of M. citrina was uniformly labelled after using genomic probes from M. arborea and M. strasseri. Instead, cross-hybridization signals in M. citrina were restricted to terminal chromosome arms and NOR regions. Conclusions FISH results support the close taxonomic interrelationship between M. arborea and M. strasseri. In these tetraploid species, NOR loci have experienced a diploidization event through physical loss of sequences, a cytogenetic feature so far not reported in other species of the genus. The high number of rDNA loci and GISH results support the specific status for the hexaploid M. citrina, and it is suggested that this species is not an autopolyploid derivative of M. arborea or M. strasseri. Further, molecular

  15. Mapping aboveground woody biomass using forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bechu K V; Nandy, S

    2015-05-01

    Mapping forest biomass is fundamental for estimating CO₂ emissions, and planning and monitoring of forests and ecosystem productivity. The present study attempted to map aboveground woody biomass (AGWB) integrating forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques, viz., direct radiometric relationships (DRR), k-nearest neighbours (k-NN) and cokriging (CoK) and to evaluate their accuracy. A part of the Timli Forest Range of Kalsi Soil and Water Conservation Division, Uttarakhand, India was selected for the present study. Stratified random sampling was used to collect biophysical data from 36 sample plots of 0.1 ha (31.62 m × 31.62 m) size. Species-specific volumetric equations were used for calculating volume and multiplied by specific gravity to get biomass. Three forest-type density classes, viz. 10-40, 40-70 and >70% of Shorea robusta forest and four non-forest classes were delineated using on-screen visual interpretation of IRS P6 LISS-III data of December 2012. The volume in different strata of forest-type density ranged from 189.84 to 484.36 m(3) ha(-1). The total growing stock of the forest was found to be 2,024,652.88 m(3). The AGWB ranged from 143 to 421 Mgha(-1). Spectral bands and vegetation indices were used as independent variables and biomass as dependent variable for DRR, k-NN and CoK. After validation and comparison, k-NN method of Mahalanobis distance (root mean square error (RMSE) = 42.25 Mgha(-1)) was found to be the best method followed by fuzzy distance and Euclidean distance with RMSE of 44.23 and 45.13 Mgha(-1) respectively. DRR was found to be the least accurate method with RMSE of 67.17 Mgha(-1). The study highlighted the potential of integrating of forest inventory, remote sensing and geostatistical techniques for forest biomass mapping. PMID:25930205

  16. Reclamation of coppice forests in order to increase the potential of woody biomass in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelanovic, I.; Krstic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Biomass makes 63% of the total renewable energy potential of Serbia. Here, the biomass from forests together with wood processing industry waste represent the second most important renewable source for energy production. The Action Plan for Biomass of Serbia (2010) shows that the technically exploitable biomass in the Republic of Serbia amounts annually 2.7 Mtoe. Here, the woody biomass (fuelwood, forest residue, wood processing industry residue, wood from trees outside the forest) accounts for 1.0 Mtoe while the rest originates from agricultural sources. According to the national forest inventory (2008), forest cover in Serbia accounts for 29% of the country area, having standing volume of 362.5 mil. m3 and annual increment of 9.1 mil. m3. More than half is state-owned and the rest 47% is in the private ownership. Coppice forests dominate in the forest stock (65%). According to Glavonjić (2010), northeastern and southwestern Serbia are the regions with greatest spatial forest distribution. The general forest condition is characterised by insufficient production volume, unsatisfactory stock density and forest cover, high percentage of degraded forests, unfavorable age structure, unfavorable health condition and weeded areas. Herewith, the basic measures for the improvement of forest fund (Forestry Development Strategy for Serbia, 2006) represent conversion of coppice forests, increase of forest cover and productivity of forest ecosystems by the ecologically, economically and socially acceptable methods. The actions include reclamation of degraded forests, re- and afforestation activities on abandoned agricultural, degraded and other treeless lands. The average standing volume of high forests is 254 m3·ha-1 with an annual increment of 5.5 m3·ha-1. On the contrary, coppice forests dispose 124 m3·ha-1 of standing volume, having an annual increment of 3.1 m3·ha-1. Here, estimated losses from coppice forests amount up to 3.5 mil. m3 wood annually. These data

  17. Effect of woody and herbaceous plants on chemical weathering of basalt material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, N.; Dontsova, K.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, semi-arid landscapes are transitioning from shallow-rooted grasslands to mixed vegetation savannas composed of deeper-rooted shrubs. These contrasting growth forms differentially drive below-ground processes because they occupy different soil horizons, are differentially stressed by periods of drought, and unequally stimulate soil weathering. Our study aims to determine the effect of woody and herbaceous plants on weathering of granular basalt serving as a model for soil. We established pots with velvet mesquite (Prosopis veluntina), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), and bare-soil pots within two temperature treatments in University of Arizona Biosphere 2. The Desert biome served as the ambient temperature treatment, while the Savanna biome was maintained 4°C warmer to simulate projected air temperatures if climate change continues unabated. Rhizon water samplers were installed at a depth of one inch from the soil surface to monitor root zone exudates (total dissolved carbon and nitrogen), dissolved inorganic carbon, and lithogenic elements resulting from basalt weathering. Soil leachates were collected through the course of the experiment. The anion content of the leachates was determined using the ICS-5000 Reagent-Free ion chromatography system. Dissolved carbon and nitrogen were analyzed by combustion using the Shimadzu TOC-VCSH with TN module. Metals and metalloids were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Irrigation of the pots was varied in time to simulate periods of drought and determine the effect of stress on root exudation. Leachates from all treatments displayed higher pH and electrical conductivity than water used for irrigation indicating weathering. On average, leachates from the potted grasses displayed higher pH and electrical conductivity than mesquites. This agreed with higher concentrations of organic carbon, a measure of root exudation, and inorganic carbon, measure of soil respiration. Both organic

  18. Mapping invasive species and spectral mixture relationships with neotropical woody formations in southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Cibele H.; Roberts, Dar A.; Almeida, Teodoro I. R.; Souza Filho, Carlos R.

    2015-10-01

    Biological invasion substantially contributes to the increasing extinction rates of native vegetative species. The remote detection and mapping of invasive species is critical for environmental monitoring. This study aims to assess the performance of a Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) applied to imaging spectroscopy data for mapping Dendrocalamus sp. (bamboo) and Pinus elliottii L. (slash pine), which are invasive plant species, in a Brazilian neotropical landscape within the tropical Brazilian savanna biome. The work also investigates the spectral mixture between these exotic species and the native woody formations, including woodland savanna, submontane and alluvial seasonal semideciduous forests (SSF). Visible to Shortwave Infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectroscopy data at one-meter spatial resolution were atmospherically corrected and subset into the different spectral ranges (VIS-NIR1: 530-919 nm; and NIR2-SWIR: 1141-2352 nm). The data were further normalized via continuum removal (CR). Multiple endmember selection methods, including Interactive Endmember Selection (IES), Endmember average root mean square error (EAR), Minimum average spectral angle (MASA) and Count-based (CoB) (collectively called EMC), were employed to create endmember libraries for the targeted vegetation classes. The performance of the MESMA was assessed at the pixel and crown scales. Statistically significant differences (α = 0.05) were observed between overall accuracies that were obtained at various spectral ranges. The infrared region (IR) was critical for detecting the vegetation classes using spectral data. The invasive species endmembers exhibited spectral patterns in the IR that were not observed in the native formations. Bamboo was characterized as having a high green vegetation (GV) fraction, lower non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) and a low shade fraction, while pine exhibited higher NPV and shade fractions. The invasive species showed a statistically

  19. Host colonization and substrate utilization by wood-colonizing Ascomycete fungi in the grapevine trunk disease complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapevine trunk diseases cause chronic wood infections (cankers) in mixed infections within the same vine. To determine the synergistic interactions of trunk-pathogen communities and their impact on the host we are characterizing, on a pathogen-by-pathogen basis, fungal damage to woody cells and tis...

  20. Relationship of coarse woody debris to arthropod Availability for Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers and other bark-foraging birds on loblolly pine boles.

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Scott; Hanula, James, L.

    2008-04-01

    Abstract This study determined if short-term removal of coarse woody debris would reduce prey available to red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis Vieillot) and other bark-foraging birds at the Savannah River Site in Aiken and Barnwell counties, SC. All coarse woody debris was removed from four 9-ha plots of mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in 1997 and again in 1998. We sampled arthropods in coarse woody debris removal and control stands using crawl traps that captured arthropods crawling up tree boles, burlap bands wrapped around trees, and cardboard panels placed on the ground. We captured 27 orders and 172 families of arthropods in crawl traps whereas 20 arthropod orders were observed under burlap bands and cardboard panels. The most abundant insects collected from crawl traps were aphids (Homoptera: Aphididae) and ants (Hymenoptera: Forrnicidae). The greatest biomass was in the wood cockroaches (Blattaria: Blattellidae), caterpillars (Lepidoptera) in the Family Noctuidae, and adult weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). The most common group observed underneath cardboard panels was lsoptera (termites), and the most common taxon under burlap bands was wood cockroaches. Overall, arthropod abundance and biomass captured in crawl traps was similar in control and removal plots. In contrast, we observed more arthropods under burlap bands (mean & SE; 3,021.5 k 348.6, P= 0.03) and cardboard panels (3,537.25 k 432.4, P= 0.04) in plots with coarse woody debris compared with burlap bands (2325 + 171.3) and cardboard panels (2439.75 + 288.9) in plots where coarse woody debris was removed. Regression analyses showed that abundance beneath cardboard panels was positively correlated with abundance beneath burlap bands demonstrating the link between abundance on the ground with that on trees. Our results demonstrate that short-term removal of coarse woody debris from pine forests reduced overall arthropod availability to bark-foraging birds.

  1. On the global relationships between photosynthetic water-use efficiency, leaf mass per unit area and atmospheric demand in woody and herbaceous plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letts, M. G.; Fox, T. A.; Gulias, J.; Galmes, J.; Hikosaka, K.; Wright, I.; Flexas, J.; Awada, T.; Rodriguez-Calcerrada, J.; Tobita, H.

    2013-12-01

    A global dataset was compiled including woody and herbaceous C3 species from forest, Mediterranean and grassland-shrubland ecosystems, to elucidate the dependency of photosynthetic water-use efficiency on vapour pressure deficit (D) and leaf traits. Mean leaf mass per unit area (LMA) was lower and mass-based leaf nitrogen content (Nmass) was higher in herbaceous species. Higher mean stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration rate (E) and net CO2 assimilation rate under light saturating conditions (Amax) were observed in herbs, but photosynthetic and intrinsic water-use efficiencies (WUE = Amax/E and WUEi = Amax/gs) were lower than in woody plants. Woody species maintained stricter stomatal regulation of water loss at low D, resulting in a steeper positive and linear relationship between log D and log E. Herbaceous species possessed very high gs at low D, resulting in higher ratio of substomatal to atmospheric CO2 concentrations (ci/ca) and E, but lower WUE and WUEi than woody plants, despite higher Amax. The lower WUE and higher rates of gas exchange were most pronounced in herbs with low LMA and high Nmass. Photosynthetic water use also differed between species from grassland-shrubland and Mediterranean or forest environments. Water-use efficiency showed no relationship with either D or LMA in grassland-shrubland species, but showed a negative relationship with D in forest and chaparral. The distinct photosynthetic water-use of woody and herbaceous plants is consistent with the opportunistic growth strategy of herbs and the more conservative growth strategy of woody species. Further research is recommended to examine the implications of these functional group and ecosystem differences in the contexts of climate and atmospheric change.

  2. Relationships between woody vegetation and geomorphological patterns in three gravel-bed rivers with different intensities of anthropogenic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitzia, T.; Picco, L.; Ravazzolo, D.; Comiti, F.; Mao, L.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We compared three gravel-bed rivers in north-eastern Italy (Brenta, Piave, Tagliamento) having similar bioclimate, geology and fluvial morphology, but affected by different intensities of anthropogenic disturbance related particularly to hydropower dams, training works and instream gravel mining. Our aim was to test whether a corresponding difference in the interactions between vegetation and geomorphological patterns existed among the three rivers. In equally spaced and sized plots (n = 710) we collected descriptors of geomorphic conditions, and presence-absence of woody species. In the less disturbed river (Tagliamento), spatial succession of woody communities from the floodplain to the channel followed a profile where higher elevation floodplains featured more developed tree communities, and lower elevation islands and bars were covered by pioneer communities. In the intermediate-disturbed river (Piave), islands and floodplains lay at similar elevation and both showed species indicators of mature developed communities. In the most disturbed river (Brenta), all these patterns were simplified, all geomorphic units lay at similar elevations, were not well characterized by species composition, and presented similar persistence age. This indicates that in human-disturbed rivers, channel and vegetation adjustments are closely linked in the long term, and suggests that intermediate levels of anthropogenic disturbance, such as those encountered in the Piave River, could counteract the natural, more dynamic conditions that may periodically fragment vegetated landscapes in natural rivers.

  3. A Rickettsiella Bacterium from the Hard Tick, Ixodes woodi: Molecular Taxonomy Combining Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) with Significance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Leclerque, Andreas; Kleespies, Regina G.

    2012-01-01

    Hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) are known to harbour intracellular bacteria from several phylogenetic groups that can develop both mutualistic and pathogenic relationships to the host. This is of particular importance for public health as tick derived bacteria can potentially be transmitted to mammals, including humans, where e.g. Rickettsia or Coxiella act as severe pathogens. Exact molecular taxonomic identification of tick associated prokaryotes is a necessary prerequisite of the investigation of their relationship to both the tick and possible vertebrate hosts. Previously, an intracellular bacterium had been isolated from a monosexual, parthenogenetically reproducing laboratory colony of females of the hard tick, Ixodes woodi Bishopp, and had preliminarily been characterized as a “Rickettsiella-related bacterium”. In the present molecular taxonomic study that is based on phylogenetic reconstruction from both 16 S ribosomal RNA and protein-encoding marker sequences complemented with likelihood-based significance testing, the bacterium from I. woodi has been identified as a strain of the taxonomic species Rickettsiella grylli. It is the first time that a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach based on a four genes comprising MLST scheme has been implemented in order to classify a Rickettsiella-like bacterium to this species. The study demonstrated that MLST holds potential for a better resolution of phylogenetic relationships within the genus Rickettsiella, but requires sequence determination from further Rickettsiella-like bacteria in order to complete the current still fragmentary picture of Rickettsiella systematics. PMID:22675436

  4. F-box gene family is expanded in herbaceous annual plants Arabidopsis and rice relative to woody perennial plant Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Kalluri, Udaya C; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee E; Yin, Tongming; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Weston, David; Ranjan, Priya; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2008-01-01

    F-box proteins are generally responsible for substrate recognition in the Skp1-Cullin-F-box complexes that are involved in protein degradation via the ubiquitin-26S proteosome pathway. In plants, F-box genes influence a variety of biological processes such as leaf senescence, branching, self-incompatibility and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The number of F-box genes in Populus (~320) is less than half that found in Arabidopsis (~660) or rice (~680), even though the total number of genes in Populus is equivalent to that in rice and 1.5 times that in Arabidopsis. We performed comparative genomic analysis between the woody perennial plant Populus and the herbaceous annual plants Arabidopsis and rice in order to explicate the functional implications of this large gene family. Our analyses reveal interspecific differences in genomic distribution, orthologous relationship, intron evolution, protein domain structure and gene expression. The set of F-box genes shared by these three species appear to be involved in core biological processes essential for plant growth and development; lineage-specific differences primarily occurred because of an expansion of the F-box genes via tandem duplications in Arabidopsis and rice. The present study provides insights into the relationship between the structure and composition of the F-box gene family in herbaceous and woody species and their associated developmental and physiological features.

  5. Detection of two intermixed invasive woody species using color infrared aerial imagery and the support vector machine classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirik, Mustafa; Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Surber, Brady; Ale, Srinivasulu; James Ansley, R.

    2013-01-01

    Both the evergreen redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii Sudw.) and deciduous honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) are destructive and aggressive invaders that affect rangelands and grasslands of the southern Great Plains of the United States. However, their current spatial extent and future expansion trends are unknown. This study was aimed at: (1) exploring the utility of aerial imagery for detecting and mapping intermixed redberry juniper and honey mesquite while both are in full foliage using the support vector machine classifier at two sites in north central Texas and, (2) assessing and comparing the mapping accuracies between sites. Accuracy assessments revealed that the overall accuracies were 90% with the associated kappa coefficient of 0.86% and 89% with the associated kappa coefficient of 0.85 for sites 1 and 2, respectively. Z-statistics (0.102<1.96) used to compare the classification results for both sites indicated an insignificant difference between classifications at 95% probability level. In most instances, juniper and mesquite were identified correctly with <7% being mistaken for the other woody species. These results indicated that assessment of the current infestation extent and severity of these two woody species in a spatial context is possible using aerial remote sensing imagery.

  6. Measuring and monitoring linear woody features in agricultural landscapes through earth observation data as an indicator of habitat availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasher, J.; McGovern, M.; Putinski, V.

    2016-02-01

    The loss of natural habitats and the loss of biological diversity is a global problem affecting all ecosystems including agricultural landscapes. Indicators of biodiversity can provide standardized measures that make it easier to compare and communicate changes to an ecosystem. In agricultural landscapes the amount and variety of available habitat is directly correlated with biodiversity levels. Linear woody features (LWF), including hedgerows, windbreaks, shelterbelts as well as woody shrubs along fields, roads and watercourses, play a vital role in supporting biodiversity as well as serving a wide variety of other purposes in the ecosystem. Earth observation can be used to quantify and monitor LWF across the landscape. While individual features can be manually mapped, this research focused on the development of methods using line intersect sampling (LIS) for estimating LWF as an indicator of habitat availability in agricultural landscapes. The methods are accurate, efficient, repeatable and provide robust results. Methods were tested over 9.5 Mha of agricultural landscape in the Canadian Mixedwood Plains ecozone. Approximately 97,000 km of LWF were estimated across this landscape with results useable both at a regional reporting scale, as well as mapped across space for use in wildlife habitat modelling or other landscape management research. The LIS approach developed here could be employed at a variety of scales in particular for large regions and could be adapted for use as a national scale indicator of habitat availability in heavily disturbed agricultural landscape.

  7. Equations for estimating biomass of herbaceous and woody vegetation in early-successional southern Appalachian pine-hardwood forests. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, K.J.; Clinton, B.D.

    1993-03-31

    Allometric equations were developed to predict aboveground dry weight of herbaceous and woody species on prescribe-burned sites in the Southern Appalachians. Best-fit least-square regression models were developed using diameter, height, or both, as the independent variables and dry weight as the dependent variable. Coefficients of determination for the selected total biomass models ranged from 0.620 to 0.992 for herbaceous species and from 0.698 to 0.999 for the wood species. Equations for foliage biomass generally had lower coefficients of determination than did equations for either stem or total biomass of woody species.

  8. Salt marsh-mangrove ecotones: using structural gradients to investigate the effects of woody plant encroachment on plant-soil interactions and ecosystem carbon pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yando, Erik S.; Osland, Michael J.; Willis, Jonathan M; Day, Richard H.; Krauss, Ken W.; Hester, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis: Our results indicate that the ecological implications of woody plant encroachment in tidal saline wetlands are dependent upon precipitation controls of plant–soil interactions. Although the above-ground effects of mangrove expansion are consistently large, below-ground influences of mangrove expansion appear to be greatest along low-rainfall coasts where salinities are high and marshes being replaced are carbon poor and dominated by succulent plants. Collectively, these findings complement those from terrestrial ecosystems and reinforce the importance of considering rainfall and plant–soil interactions within predictions of the ecological effects of woody plant encroachment.

  9. Phaeoacremonium: from esca disease to phaeohyphomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gramaje, David; Mostert, Lizel; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Crous, Pedro W

    2015-09-01

    Phaeoacremonium spp. are commonly isolated from stems and branches of diseased woody hosts, and humans with phaeohyphomycosis. The genus Phaeoacremonium (Togniniaceae, Togniniales) has recently been monographed, and presently contains 46 species, while its sexual morph, Togninia, contains 26 epithets, of which 13 are insufficiently known. In this review we summarise information pertaining to the global distribution, pathology, ecology, and detection of these species, and present a case for retaining the genus Phaeoacremonium over that of Togninia. Furthermore, to obtain a single nomenclature, the following new combinations are also proposed: Phaeoacremonium africanum, P. aquaticum, P. fraxinopennsylvanicum, P. griseo-olivaceum, P. inconspicuum, P. leptorrhynchum, P. minimum, and P. vibratile. PMID:26321726

  10. Isotopic Tracer Study of Hydraulic Transfer Between Native Woody Shrubs and Associated Annual Crops Under Dry Conditions in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogie, Nathaniel; Bayala, Roger; Diedhiou, Ibrahima; Fogel, Marilyn; Dick, Richard; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2015-04-01

    Erratic precipitation at the beginning and end of the rainy season combined with short drought periods during the cropping season pose a major challenge for rain-fed agriculture and food security in the Sahel. Research has shown that intercropping annual crops with native evergreen woody shrubs in Senegal can greatly increase crop productivity. Hydraulic redistribution (HR), or the diurnal rewetting of dry soil by the pathway of the root system that extends into wetter soil has been found in many plants and climates worldwide. The HR pathway could be a factor in Senegal where water provided by shrubs aids crop growth during dry periods but this has not been confirmed. Therefore, the objective was to determine the ability of shrubs to provide water to millet plants using the deuterium tracer. Penisetum glaucum (Pearl Millet) was grown in association with the native woody shrub Guiera senegalensis under drip irrigation until 68 days after sowing, followed by a with holding of water during late flowering and early grain-filling stage. Within 10 days the soils in the stressed plots became extremely dry with water potentials ranging from -0.5 Mpa to -3.0 Mpa at 20cm depth. Twenty days after the initiation of water stress, vials of isotopically enriched deuterium tracer was sealed around cut roots of three separate shrubs at a depth of 1.0 m followed by sampling of aboveground tissue from injection shrubs and closely growing crop plants over a period of five days. Using cryogenic vacuum distillation, plant water samples were extracted from plant tissue. With lab work completed on two replications, a highly enriched deuterium signal was observed in the tissue water of the shrub beginning twelve hours after the injection. In the same replication thirty-six hours after the beginning of injection, a highly enriched pulse of deuterium in the crop growing directly adjacent to the injection shrub was observed. In a concurrent injection to a nearby shrub under much drier

  11. Evidence for linkages between ecoenzyme activity and soil organic matter chemistry following encroachment of leguminous woody plant into grasslands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, Timothy; Stott, Diane; Boutton, Thomas; Creamer, Courtney; Olk, Dan

    2010-05-01

    The encroachment of woody plants into grasslands is a worldwide phenomenon. In the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by the N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa have largely replaced native grasslands as a result of fire suppression and extensive cattle grazing. This land cover change has resulted in the increase of belowground stocks of C, N, and P, changes to the amount and chemical nature of soil-stabilized plant biopolymers, and the composition and activity of soil microbes. Given that extracellular enzymes produced by plants and microbes are the principal means by which complex compounds are degraded and that the production of such enzymes is triggered or suppressed by changes in substrate and nutrient availability we sought to relate how these fundamental changes in this ecosystem are reflected in the activity of soil stabilized ecoenzymes and soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry in this system. We investigated a chronosequence of woody encroachment (14-86 yrs) into a C4-dominant grassland. We related the potential activities of five extracellular enzymes (arylamidase, acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, polyphenoloxidase (PPO)) and a general marker for hydrolytic activity, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) to the molecular composition and concentration of total hydrolysable amino acids and amino sugars, sugars, as well as CuO extractable lignin and substituted fatty acid to. When normalized to dry weight soil all chemical components increase in concentration with cluster age and all clusters have greater concentrations than background grasslands. All enzymes activities exhibit higher potential activity in woody clusters than grasslands but only NAGase and FDA increase with cluster age when normalized to dry weight of soil. Conversely, when normalized to SOC only lignin phenols, hydroxyl proline, and glucose from cellulose are positively correlated with cluster age indicating a selective accrual with

  12. Integrating Measures of Soil Respiration Across Spatial and Temporal Scales Along a Woody Plant Encroachment Gradient Using Traditional and Innovative Techniques 2027

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the response of arid and semi-arid systems to changes in woody plant cover is an area of active research. Shifts in vegetation structure or function in these water-limited systems can have important and non-linear affects on ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. Most studies, ...

  13. BANK STABILIZATION, SHORELINE LAND-USE, AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF LARGE WOODY DEBRIS IN A REGULATED REACH OF THE UPPER MISSOURI RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large woody debris (LWD) is an important component of ecosystem function in floodplain rivers. We examined the effects on LWD distribution of shoreline land use, bank stabilization, local channel geomorphology, and distance from the dam in the Garrison Reach, a regulated reach of...

  14. Phytophthora ramorum: A Pathogen with a Remarkably Wide Host Range Causing Sudden Oak Death on Oaks and Ramorum Blight on Woody Ornamentals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is an oomycete plant pathogen classified in the kingdom Stramenopiles. P. ramorum is the causal agent of sudden oak death on coast live oak and tanoak as well as Ramorum blight on woody ornamental and forest understory plant hosts. It causes stem cankers on trees, and leaf bligh...

  15. Woody plant encroachment, and its removal, impact bacterial and fungal communities across stream and terrestrial habitats in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Veach, Allison M; Dodds, Walter K; Jumpponen, Ari

    2015-10-01

    Woody plant encroachment has become a global threat to grasslands and has caused declines in aboveground richness and changes in ecosystem function; yet we have a limited understanding on the effects of these phenomena on belowground microbial communities. We completed riparian woody plant removals at Konza Prairie Biological Station, Kansas and collected soils spanning land-water interfaces in removal and woody vegetation impacted areas. We measured stream sediments and soils for edaphic variables (C and N pools, soil water content, pH) and bacterial (16S rRNA genes) and fungal (ITS2 rRNA gene repeat) communities using Illumina MiSeq metabarcoding. Bacterial richness and diversity decreased with distance from streams. Fungal richness decreased with distance from the stream in wooded areas, but was similar across landscape position while Planctomycetes and Basidiomycota relative abundance was lower in removal areas. Cyanobacteria, Ascomycota, Chytridiomycota and Glomeromycota relative abundance was greater in removal areas. Ordination analyses indicated that bacterial community composition shifted more across land-water interfaces than fungi yet both were marginally influenced by treatment. This study highlights the impacts of woody encroachment restoration on grassland bacterial and fungal communities which likely subsequently affects belowground processes and plant health in this ecosystem. PMID:26347079

  16. A Test of Four Models to Predict the Risk of Naturalization of Non-native Woody Plants in the Chicago Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate methods to predict the naturalization of non-native woody plants are key components of risk-management programs being considered by nursery and landscape professionals. The objective of this study was to evaluate four decision-tree models to predict naturalization, first tested in Iowa, on...

  17. Overexpression of a peach CBF gene in apple: a model for understanding the integration of growth, dormancy, and cold hardiness in woody plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The timing of cold acclimation and de-acclimation, dormancy, and bud break play an integral role in the life cycle of woody plants. The molecular events that regulate these parameters have been the subject of much study, however, in most studies these events have been investigated independently of ...

  18. Carbon of Woody Debris in Plateau-type Karst Evergreen and Deciduous Broad-leaved Mixed Forest of Central Guizhou Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Ni, J.; Liu, L.; Guo, C.

    2014-12-01

    Woody debris (WD) is an essential structural and functional component of forest ecosystems, and plays very significant roles for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. Coarse woody debris (CWD) is considered to be the major part in forest WD and it is primarily composed of logs, snags, stumps and large branches, while fine woody debris (FWD) mainly consists of small twigs. Composition, spatial distribution and carbon storage of WD have been studied in plateau-type karst evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forest in Tianlong Mountain of central Guizhou Province. Results showed that the carbon storage of WD in karst forests was less than non-karst forests. The major components of WD were fallen trees and snags with 10-20 cm in diameter. Fallen trees and snags with diameter greater than 20 cm were the smallest part of WD. The situation of WD in this region reflects the structural characteristics of WD in mid-late stage of plateau-type karst evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forest succession. The potential contribution of WD to the regional carbon cycle, and its relationship with climate change were finally discussed. The WD (especially CWD) plays an important role in the carbon cycle of karst forest. Forest WD production and decay rates may partially depend on climatic conditions, the accumulation of CWD and FWD carbon stocks in forests may be correlated with climate. Key words: woody debris, karst forests, carbon storage, spatial distribution, CWD, FWD.

  19. Woody vegetation cover monitoring with multi-temporal Landsat data and Random Forests: the case of the Northwest Province (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symeonakis, Elias; Higginbottom, Thomas; Petroulaki, Kyriaki

    2016-04-01

    Land degradation and desertification (LDD) are serious global threats to humans and the environment. Globally, 10-20% of drylands and 24% of the world's productive lands are potentially degraded, which affects 1.5 billion people and reduces GDP by €3.4 billion. In Africa, LDD processes affect up to a third of savannahs, leading to a decline in the ecosystem services provided to some of the continent's poorest and most vulnerable communities. Indirectly, LDD can be monitored using relevant indicators. The encroachment of woody plants into grasslands, and the subsequent conversion of savannahs and open woodlands into shrublands, has attracted a lot of attention over the last decades and has been identified as an indicator of LDD. According to some assessments, bush encroachment has rendered 1.1 million ha of South African savanna unusable, threatens another 27 million ha (~17% of the country), and has reduced the grazing capacity throughout the region by up to 50%. Mapping woody cover encroachment over large areas can only be effectively achieved using remote sensing data and techniques. The longest continuously operating Earth-observation program, the Landsat series, is now freely-available as an atmospherically corrected, cloud masked surface reflectance product. The availability and length of the Landsat archive is thus an unparalleled Earth-observation resource, particularly for long-term change detection and monitoring. Here, we map and monitor woody vegetation cover in the Northwest Province of South Africa, a mosaic of 12 Landsat scenes that expands over more than 100,000km2. We employ a multi-temporal approach with dry-season TM, ETM+ and OLI data from 15 epochs between 1989 to 2015. We use 0.5m-pixel colour aerial photography to collect >15,000 samples for training and validating a Random Forest model to map woody cover, grasses, crops, urban and bare areas. High classification accuracies are achieved, especially so for the two cover types indirectly

  20. Changes in the background losses of woody plant foliage to insects during the past 60 years: are the predictions fulfilled?

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Mikhail V.; Zvereva, Elena L.

    2015-01-01

    The existing scenarios generally predict that herbivory will increase with climate warming. An analysis of the published data on the background foliar losses of woody plants to insects in natural ecosystems across the globe from 1952 to 2013 provided no support for this hypothesis. We detected no temporal trend in herbivory within the temperate climate zone and a significant decrease in herbivory in the tropics. From 1964 to 1990, herbivory in the tropics was 39% higher than in the temperate region, but these differences disappeared by the beginning of the 2000s. Thus, environmental changes have already disturbed one of the global ecological patterns—the decrease in herbivory with latitude—by affecting ecosystem processes differently in tropical and temperate climate zones. PMID:26179805

  1. Studies on cambial activity: advances and challenges in the knowledge of growth dynamics of Brazilian woody species.

    PubMed

    Callado, Cátia H; Vasconcellos, Thaís J de; Costa, Monique S; Barros, Claudia F; Roig, Fidel A; Tomazello-Filho, Mário

    2014-03-01

    The lack of specific research on the sequence of events that determine plant growth from meristem until wood formation represents a gap in the knowledge of growth dynamics in woody species. In this work, we surveyed published studies concerning cambial activity of Brazilian native species aiming at allowing the comparison of applied methods and obtained results. The annual cambial seasonality was observed in all the investigated species. Nevertheless, we found high heterogeneity in the used methodologies. As a result from this analysis, our opinion points to the need for standardizing sampling protocols and for discussing the suitability of experimental designs. This will help to define with greater precision the factors that determine the radial growth in the different tropical ecosystems. PMID:24519008

  2. Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Justin, Charles

    2009-04-01

    Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

  3. Changes in the background losses of woody plant foliage to insects during the past 60 years: are the predictions fulfilled?

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Mikhail V; Zvereva, Elena L

    2015-07-01

    The existing scenarios generally predict that herbivory will increase with climate warming. An analysis of the published data on the background foliar losses of woody plants to insects in natural ecosystems across the globe from 1952 to 2013 provided no support for this hypothesis. We detected no temporal trend in herbivory within the temperate climate zone and a significant decrease in herbivory in the tropics. From 1964 to 1990, herbivory in the tropics was 39% higher than in the temperate region, but these differences disappeared by the beginning of the 2000s. Thus, environmental changes have already disturbed one of the global ecological patterns--the decrease in herbivory with latitude--by affecting ecosystem processes differently in tropical and temperate climate zones. PMID:26179805

  4. Oxidation potential and state of some vanadium ores and the relation of woody material to their deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, Alfred Michael

    1956-01-01

    Oxidation potential studies with a multiple pH-potential recorder designed and constructed for this purpose demonstrated that some uranium-vanadium ores in the Colorado Plateau were in a reduced state when deposited. Any oxidation which took place occurred after deposition. Experimental and theoretical reducing studies on fresh wood, wood degraded by burial for 450 years, and lignite, indicate that such ores may have been deposited by reduction of oxidized vanadium solutions by woody material. A vanadium (III) mineral, V2O(OH)4, was prepared synthetically by reduction of a vanadium (V) solution with wood. This is the only reported synthesis of any reduced vanadium mineral by any method. It was shown that the origin of almost all vanadium deposits currently of commercial importance involves life processes and products.

  5. Coarse woody debris manipulations and the response of soricid and herpetofaunal communities in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) stands.

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, Audrey, K.

    2006-04-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) may increase abundance of forest-floor dwelling fauna. Understanding the role of CWD in ecosystem function is necessary to manage species that rely on it, however, the extent to which soricids and herpetofauna use CWD is not understood. This research took a large- and small-scale approach to investigate the response of soricids and herpetofauna to CWD manipulations in the southeastern Coastal Plain. The results suggest that the addition of CWD can increase abundance and activity of the southeastern shrew. However, herpetofauna exhibited little response to CWD manipulations. Many Coastal Plain species may be adapted to burrowing in soil or under leaf litter because of naturally low levels of CWD, although these species may use and benefit from CWD. Overall the results suggest that CWD, at least of early to moderate decay, is not a critical habitat component for most soricids and herpetofauna in the southeastern Coastal Plain.

  6. Comparison of modeling approaches for carbon partitioning: Impact on estimates of global net primary production and equilibrium biomass of woody vegetation from MODIS GPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ise, Takeshi; Litton, Creighton M.; Giardina, Christian P.; Ito, Akihiko

    2010-12-01

    Partitioning of gross primary production (GPP) to aboveground versus belowground, to growth versus respiration, and to short versus long-lived tissues exerts a strong influence on ecosystem structure and function, with potentially large implications for the global carbon budget. A recent meta-analysis of forest ecosystems suggests that carbon partitioning to leaves, stems, and roots varies consistently with GPP and that the ratio of net primary production (NPP) to GPP is conservative across environmental gradients. To examine influences of carbon partitioning schemes employed by global ecosystem models, we used this meta-analysis-based model and a satellite-based (MODIS) terrestrial GPP data set to estimate global woody NPP and equilibrium biomass, and then compared it to two process-based ecosystem models (Biome-BGC and VISIT) using the same GPP data set. We hypothesized that different carbon partitioning schemes would result in large differences in global estimates of woody NPP and equilibrium biomass. Woody NPP estimated by Biome-BGC and VISIT was 25% and 29% higher than the meta-analysis-based model for boreal forests, with smaller differences in temperate and tropics. Global equilibrium woody biomass, calculated from model-specific NPP estimates and a single set of tissue turnover rates, was 48 and 226 Pg C higher for Biome-BGC and VISIT compared to the meta-analysis-based model, reflecting differences in carbon partitioning to structural versus metabolically active tissues. In summary, we found that different carbon partitioning schemes resulted in large variations in estimates of global woody carbon flux and storage, indicating that stand-level controls on carbon partitioning are not yet accurately represented in ecosystem models.

  7. Is the size of the Carbon Sink caused by "Woody Encroachment" of U.S. Grasslands overestimated? One DGVM calculates an answer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, D.; Drapek, R. J.; Team Mapss,.

    2002-12-01

    The DGVM MC1 includes a modified version of the biogeochemistry model CENTURY that simulates soil processes and also simulates wild fires occurrence and effects. MC1 simulated all the locations in the conterminous U.S. that had switched from a period of dominance by grasses (at least 30 years) to a period of dominance by woody vegetation during the historical period (1895-1993) using VEMAP transient climate as input. The model simulated the size of the carbon pools in live plant biomass and in the soil under the different vegetation types. Simulations show decreased soil organic carbon with increased vegetation biomass as woody vegetation replaces grass vegetation. At high precipitation sites, the decrease in soil carbon associated with the conversion to woody vegetation is greater than at low precipitation sites, agreeing with Jackson et al. (2002). The negative relationship between annual average precipitation and simulated changes in soil carbon mimics that found by Jackson et al. (2002). Biomass consumed by wildfires during the grassland phase was compared to that consumed during the shrubland phase. Even though there was an increase in aboveground carbon associated with the conversion to woody vegetation, total biomass consumed by wildfires was 35 percent lower during the shrubland phase. In conclusion, potential carbon storage in live plant biomass increases when shrublands invade the grasslands as trees can store more carbon and are less likely to be consumed by wildfires. However the soil carbon sequestration potential decreases in those sites. In our study, MC1 simulates a decrease in total system carbon storage as the decrease in soil carbon exceeds the increase in vegetation carbon when woody vegetation invade the grasslands.

  8. Creation of a Digital Surface Model and Extraction of Coarse Woody Debris from Terrestrial Laser Scans in an Open Eucalypt Woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, J.; Phinn, S. R.; Armston, J.; Scarth, P.; Eyre, T.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse woody debris (CWD) provides important habitat for many species and plays a vital role in nutrient cycling within an ecosystem. In addition, CWD makes an important contribution to forest biomass and fuel loads. Airborne or space based remote sensing instruments typically do not detect CWD beneath the forest canopy. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides a ground based method for three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of surface features and CWD. This research produced a 3-D reconstruction of the ground surface and automatically classified coarse woody debris from registered TLS scans. The outputs will be used to inform the development of a site-based index for the assessment of forest condition, and quantitative assessments of biomass and fuel loads. A survey grade terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl VZ400) was used to scan 13 positions, in an open eucalypt woodland site at Karawatha Forest Park, near Brisbane, Australia. Scans were registered, and a digital surface model (DSM) produced using an intensity threshold and an iterative morphological filter. The DSMs produced from single scans were compared to the registered multi-scan point cloud using standard error metrics including: Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE), Mean Squared Error (MSE), range, absolute error and signed error. In addition the DSM was compared to a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) produced from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS). Coarse woody debris was subsequently classified from the DSM using laser pulse properties, including: width and amplitude, as well as point spatial relationships (e.g. nearest neighbour slope vectors). Validation of the coarse woody debris classification was completed using true-colour photographs co-registered to the TLS point cloud. The volume and length of the coarse woody debris was calculated from the classified point cloud. A representative network of TLS sites will allow for up-scaling to large area assessment using airborne or space based sensors to monitor forest

  9. Soil characterization and differential patterns of heavy metal accumulation in woody plants grown in coal gangue wastelands in Shaanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Yakun, Shi; Xingmin, Mu; Kairong, Li; Hongbo, Shao

    2016-07-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals in coal mine wastelands is a significant environmental issue in most developing countries. The purpose of this study is to evaluate contamination characteristics in the coal mine wastelands of Sanlidong coal mine, Tongchuan, China. To achieve this goal, we conducted field sampling work, followed by further analysis of the properties of soil contamination and accumulation characteristics in woody plants. At this site, the pH value ranged from 4.41 to 7.88, and the nutrient content of the soil rose gradually with the time after deposition due to the weathering effect improving the soil quality. Meanwhile, the levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Zn gradually decreased with the passage time. Generally, heavy metal contamination was found to be more serious in the discharge refuse area, with Cd contamination at moderate or heavy levels; Ni, Zn, and Cu contamination at light levels; and with no Cr contamination. The geoaccumulation index (I geo) was highest for Cd (2.38-3.14), followed by Ni, Zn, Cu, and Cr. Heavy metals accumulated on the lower slopes and spread to the surrounding areas via hydrodynamic effects and wind. According to transfer and enrichment coefficient analyses, Robinia pseudoacacia, Ulmus pumila, and Hippophae rhamnoides with considerable biomass could be used as pollution-resistant tree species for vegetation restoration. This study provided a theoretical basis for the restoration of the ecological environment in the mining area. This report described a link between heavy metal contamination of soils and growth dynamics of woody plants in China. PMID:27025220

  10. Flow resistance dynamics in step-pool channels: 2. Partitioning between grain, spill, and woody debris resistance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, A.C.; Nelson, J.M.; Wohl, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    In step-pool stream channels, flow resistance is created primarily by bed sediments, spill over step-pool bed forms, and large woody debris (LWD). In order to measure resistance partitioning between grains, steps, and LWD in step-pool channels we completed laboratory flume runs in which total resistance was measured with and without grains and steps, with various LWD configurations, and at multiple slopes and discharges. Tests of additive approaches to resistance partitioning found that partitioning estimates are highly sensitive to the order in which components are calculated and that such approaches inflate the values of difficult-to-measure components that are calculated by subtraction from measured components. This effect is especially significant where interactions between roughness features create synergistic increases in resistance such that total resistance measured for combinations of resistance components greatly exceeds the sum of those components measured separately. LWD contributes large proportions of total resistance by creating form drag on individual pieces and by increasing the spill resistance effect of steps. The combined effect of LWD and spill over steps was found to dominate total resistance, whereas grain roughness on step treads was a small component of total resistance. The relative contributions of grain, spill, and woody debris resistance were strongly influenced by discharge and to a lesser extent by LWD density. Grain resistance values based on published formulas and debris resistance values calculated using a cylinder drag approach typically underestimated analogous flume-derived values, further illustrating sources of error in partitioning methods and the importance of accounting for interaction effects between resistance components. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. The role of coarse woody debris in southeastern pine forests; preliminary results from a large-scale experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    McCay Timothy, S.; Hanula, James, L.; Loeb, Susan, C.; Lohr, Steven, M.; McMinn, James, W.; Wright-Miley. Bret, D.

    2002-08-01

    McCay, Timothy S., James L. Hanula, Susan C. Loeb, Steven M. Lohr, James W. McMinn, and Bret D. Wright-Miley. 2002. The role of coarse woody debris in southeastern pine forests; preliminary results from a large-scale experiment. 135-144. In: Proceedings of the symposium on the ecology and management of dead wood in western forests. 1999 November 2-4; Reno, NV. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture 949 p. ABSTRACT: We initiated a long-term experiment involving manipulation of coarse woody debris (CWD) at the Savannah River National Environmental Research Park in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Each of four 9.3-ha plots in each of four blocks was subject to one of the following treatments: removal of all snags and fallen logs, removal of fallen logs only, felling and girdling to simulate a catastrophic pulse of CWD, and control. Removal treatments were applied in 1996, and the felling or snag-creation treatment will be applied in 2000-2001. Monitoring of invertebrate, herptile, avian, and mammalian assemblages and CWD dynamics began immediately after CWD removal and continues through the present. Removal treatments resulted in a fivefold to tenfold reduction in CWD abundance. To date, significant differences among treatments have only been detected for a few animal taxa. However, preliminary results underscore the benefits of large-scale experiments. This experiment allowed unambiguous tests of hypotheses regarding the effect of CWD abundance on fauna. Coupled with studies of habitat use and trophic interacti