Science.gov

Sample records for passive gene-environment correlation

  1. Disentangling Gene-Environment Correlations and Interactions on Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Genetic risks for depression may be expressed through greater exposure towards environmental stressors (gene-environment correlation, rGE) and increased susceptibility to these stressors (gene-environment interaction, G x E). While these effects are often studied independently, evidence supports their co-occurrence on depression.…

  2. Gene-Environment Correlation Underlying the Association between Parental Negativity and Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Horwitz, Briana N.; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody M.; Spotts, Erica L.; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of adolescent or parent-based twins suggest that gene-environment correlation (rGE) is an important mechanism underlying parent-adolescent relationships. However, information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent "and" child behaviors is needed to distinguish types of rGE. The…

  3. Effects of the Family Environment: Gene-Environment Interaction and Passive Gene-Environment Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Thomas S.; Jaffee, Sara R.

    2008-01-01

    The classical twin study provides a useful resource for testing hypotheses about how the family environment influences children's development, including how genes can influence sensitivity to environmental effects. However, existing statistical models do not account for the possibility that children can inherit exposure to family environments…

  4. The genetics of music accomplishment: evidence for gene-environment correlation and interaction.

    PubMed

    Hambrick, David Z; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2015-02-01

    Theories of skilled performance that emphasize training history, such as K. Anders Ericsson and colleagues' deliberate-practice theory, have received a great deal of recent attention in both the scientific literature and the popular press. Twin studies, however, have demonstrated evidence for moderate-to-strong genetic influences on skilled performance. Focusing on musical accomplishment in a sample of over 800 pairs of twins, we found evidence for gene-environment correlation, in the form of a genetic effect on music practice. However, only about one quarter of the genetic effect on music accomplishment was explained by this genetic effect on music practice, suggesting that genetically influenced factors other than practice contribute to individual differences in music accomplishment. We also found evidence for gene-environment interaction, such that genetic effects on music accomplishment were most pronounced among those engaging in music practice, suggesting that genetic potentials for skilled performance are most fully expressed and fostered by practice. PMID:24957535

  5. Why does parental language input style predict child language development? A twin study of gene–environment correlation

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Philip S.; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Plomin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    There are well-established correlations between parental input style and child language development, which have typically been interpreted as evidence that the input style causes, or influences the rate of, changes in child language. We present evidence from a large twin study (TEDS; 8395 pairs for this report) that there are also likely to be both child-to-parent effects and shared genetic effects on parent and child. Self-reported parental language style at child age 3 and age 4 was aggregated into an ‘informal language stimulation’ factor and a ‘corrective feedback’ factor at each age; the former was positively correlated with child language concurrently and longitudinally at 3, 4, and 4.5 years, whereas the latter was weakly and negatively correlated. Both parental input factors were moderately heritable, as was child language. Longitudinal bivariate analysis showed that the correlation between the language stimulation factor and child language was significantly and moderately due to shared genes. There is some suggestive evidence from longitudinal phenotypic analysis that the prediction from parental language stimulation to child language includes both evocative and passive gene–environment correlation, with the latter playing a larger role. Learning outcomes: The reader will understand why correlations between parental language and rate of child language are by themselves ambiguous, and how twin studies can clarify the relationship. The reader will also understand that, based on the present study, at least two aspects of parental language style – informal language stimulation and corrective feedback – have substantial genetic influence, and that for informal language stimulation, a substantial portion of the prediction to child language represents the effect of shared genes on both parent and child. It will also be appreciated that these basic research findings do not imply that parental language input style is unimportant or that interventions cannot be effective. PMID:26277213

  6. Local area disadvantage and gambling involvement and disorder: Evidence for gene-environment correlation and interaction.

    PubMed

    Slutske, Wendy S; Deutsch, Arielle R; Statham, Dixie J; Martin, Nicholas G

    2015-08-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that local area characteristics (such as disadvantage and gambling outlet density) and genetic risk factors are associated with gambling involvement and disordered gambling. These 2 lines of research were brought together in the present study by examining the extent to which genetic contributions to individual differences in gambling involvement and disorder contributed to being exposed to, and were also accentuated by, local area disadvantage. Participants were members of the national community-based Australian Twin Registry who completed a telephone interview in which the past-year frequency of gambling and symptoms of disordered gambling were assessed. Indicators of local area disadvantage were based on census data matched to the participants' postal codes. Univariate biometric model-fitting revealed that exposure to area disadvantage was partially explained by genetic factors. Bivariate biometric model-fitting was conducted to examine the evidence for gene-environment interaction while accounting for gene-environment correlation. These analyses demonstrated that: (a) a small portion of the genetic propensity to gamble was explained by moving to or remaining in a disadvantaged area, and (b) the remaining genetic and unique environmental variation in the frequency of participating in electronic machine gambling (among men and women) and symptoms of disordered gambling (among women) was greater in more disadvantaged localities. As the gambling industry continues to grow, it will be important to take into account the multiple contexts in which problematic gambling behavior can emerge-from genes to geography-as well as the ways in which such contexts may interact with each other. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26147321

  7. Local Area Disadvantage and Gambling Involvement and Disorder: Evidence for Gene-Environment Correlation and Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Deutsch, Arielle R.; Statham, Dixie B.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that local area characteristics (such as disadvantage and gambling outlet density) and genetic risk factors are associated with gambling involvement and disordered gambling. These two lines of research were brought together in the present study by examining the extent to which genetic contributions to individual differences in gambling involvement and disorder contributed to being exposed to, and were also accentuated by, local area disadvantage. Participants were members of the national community-based Australian Twin Registry who completed a telephone interview in which the past-year frequency of gambling and symptoms of disordered gambling were assessed. Indicators of local area disadvantage were based on census data matched to the participants' postal codes. Univariate biometric model-fitting revealed that exposure to area disadvantage was partially explained by genetic factors. Bivariate biometric model-fitting was conducted to examine the evidence for gene-environment interaction while accounting for gene-environment correlation. These analyses demonstrated that: (a) a small portion of the genetic propensity to gamble was explained by moving to or remaining in a disadvantaged area, and (b) the remaining genetic and unique environmental variation in the frequency of participating in electronic machine gambling (among men and women) and symptoms of disordered gambling (among women) was greater in more disadvantaged localities. As the gambling industry continues to grow, it will be important to take into account the multiple contexts in which problematic gambling behavior can emerge -- from genes to geography -- as well as the ways in which such contexts may interact with each other. PMID:26147321

  8. Evocative gene–environment correlation in the mother–child relationship: A twin study of interpersonal processes

    PubMed Central

    KLAHR, ASHLEA M.; THOMAS, KATHERINE M.; HOPWOOD, CHRISTOPHER J.; KLUMP, KELLY L.; BURT, S. ALEXANDRA

    2014-01-01

    The behavior genetic literature suggests that genetically influenced characteristics of the child elicit specific behaviors from the parent. However, little is known about the processes by which genetically influenced child characteristics evoke parental responses. Interpersonal theory provides a useful framework for identifying reciprocal behavioral processes between children and mothers. The theory posits that, at any given moment, interpersonal behavior varies along the orthogonal dimensions of warmth and control and that the interpersonal behavior of one individual tends to elicit corresponding or contrasting behavior from the other (i.e., warmth elicits warmth, whereas control elicits submission). The current study thus examined these dimensions of interpersonal behavior as they relate to the parent–child relationship in 546 twin families. A computer joystick was used to rate videos of mother–child interactions in real time, yielding information on mother and child levels of warmth and control throughout the interaction. Analyses indicated that maternal control, but not maternal warmth, was influenced by evocative gene–environment correlational processes, such that genetic influences on maternal control and child control were largely overlapping. Moreover, these common genetic influences were present both cross-sectionally and over the course of the interaction. Such findings not only confirm the presence of evocative gene–environment correlational processes in the mother–child relationship but also illuminate at least one of the specific interpersonal behaviors that underlie this evocative process. PMID:23398756

  9. Temperament and peer problems from early to middle childhood: Gene-environment correlations with negative emotionality and sociability.

    PubMed

    Hasenfratz, Liat; Benish-Weisman, Maya; Steinberg, Tami; Knafo-Noam, Ariel

    2015-11-01

    Based in a transactional framework in which children's own characteristics and the social environment influence each other to produce individual differences in social adjustment, we investigated relationships between children's peer problems and their temperamental characteristics, using a longitudinal and genetically informed study of 939 pairs of Israeli twins followed from early to middle childhood (ages 3, 5, and 6.5). Peer problems were moderately stable within children over time, such that children who appeared to have more peer problems at age 3 tended to have also more peer problems at age 6.5. Children's temperament accounted for 10%-22% of the variance in their peer problems measured at the same age and for 2%-7% of the variance longitudinally. It is important that genetic factors accounted for the association between temperament and peer problems and were in line with a gene-environment correlation process, providing support for the proposal that biologically predisposed characteristics, particularly negative emotionality and sociability, have an influence on children's early experiences of peer problems. The results highlight the need for early and continuous interventions that are specifically tailored to address the interpersonal difficulties of children with particular temperamental profiles. PMID:26439064

  10. The Interacting Effect of the BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism and Stressful Life Events on Adolescent Depression Is Not an Artifact of Gene-Environment Correlation: Evidence from a Longitudinal Twin Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Li, Xinying; McGue, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Background: Confounding introduced by gene-environment correlation (rGE) may prevent one from observing a true gene-environment interaction (G × E) effect on psychopathology. The present study investigated the interacting effect of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and stressful life events (SLEs) on adolescent depression while controlling for the…

  11. Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months: evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress

    PubMed Central

    Fearon, R.M. Pasco; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the lifespan and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. 561 infants adopted at birth were studied between 9 and 27 months with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth parent psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity, and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors linked to birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but primarily when the adoptive family environment was characterized by marital problems. The observed maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underline the importance of genetically-influenced evocative processes in early development. PMID:25216383

  12. Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months: Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress.

    PubMed

    Fearon, R M Pasco; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D; Shaw, Daniel S; Scaramella, Laura V; Ganiban, Jody M; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2015-11-01

    Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development. PMID:25216383

  13. Gene-Environment Interdependence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Behavioural genetics was initially concerned with partitioning population variance into that due to genetics and that due to environmental influences. The implication was that the two were separate and it was assumed that gene-environment interactions were usually of so little importance that they could safely be ignored. Theoretical…

  14. Genes, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Mark V.; Cutter, Mary Ann; Davidson, Ronald; Dougherty, Michael J.; Drexler, Edward; Gelernter, Joel; McCullough, Laurence B.; McInerney, Joseph D.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Vogler, George P.; Zola, John

    This curriculum module explores genes, environment, and human behavior. This book provides materials to teach about the nature and methods of studying human behavior, raise some of the ethical and public policy dilemmas emerging from the Human Genome Project, and provide professional development for teachers. An extensive Teacher Background…

  15. PASSIVE SENSOR IMAGING USING CROSS CORRELATIONS OF NOISY SIGNALS IN A SCATTERING MEDIUM

    E-print Network

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    PASSIVE SENSOR IMAGING USING CROSS CORRELATIONS OF NOISY SIGNALS IN A SCATTERING MEDIUM JOSSELIN's function between two passive sensors can be estimated from the cross correlation of recorded signal that the travel time can be effectively estimated when the ray joining the two sensors continues into the noise

  16. Gene-Environment Interplay, Family Relationships, and Child Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Briana N.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral genetic research from the past decade that has moved beyond simply studying the independent influences of genes and environments. The studies considered in this review have instead focused on understanding gene-environment interplay, including genotype-environment correlation (rGE) and genotype x environment…

  17. Gene-Environment Interplay between Number of Friends and Prosocial Leadership Behavior in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivizzigno, Alessandra S.; Brendgen, Mara; Feng, Bei; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Enriched environments may moderate the effect of genetic factors on prosocial leadership (gene-environment interaction, G × E). However, positive environmental experiences may also themselves be influenced by a genetic disposition for prosocial leadership (gene-environment correlation, rGE). Relating these processes to friendships, the present…

  18. Gene-Environment Interplay between Peer Rejection and Depressive Behavior in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Boivin, Michel; Girard, Alain; Bukowski, William M.; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Genetic risk for depressive behavior may increase the likelihood of exposure to environmental stressors (gene-environment correlation, rGE). By the same token, exposure to environmental stressors may moderate the effect of genes on depressive behavior (gene-environment interaction, GxE). Relating these processes to a peer-related…

  19. Gene-Environment Processes Linking Aggression, Peer Victimization, and the Teacher-Child Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendgen, Mara; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Barker, Edward D.; Vitaro, Frank; Girard, Alain; Tremblay, Richard; Perusse, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive behavior in middle childhood is at least partly explained by genetic factors. Nevertheless, estimations of simple effects ignore possible gene-environment interactions (G x E) or gene-environment correlations (rGE) in the etiology of aggression. The present study aimed to simultaneously test for G x E and rGE processes between…

  20. Benefits of Time Correlation Measurements for Passive Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murer, David; Blackie, Douglas; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    The “FLASH Portals Project” is a collaboration between Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd (CH), the Atomic Weapons Establishment (UK), and the Joint Research Centre (European Commission), supported by the Technical Support Working Group (TSWG). The program's goal was to develop and demonstrate a technology to detect shielded special nuclear materials (SNM) more efficiently and less ambiguously by exploiting time correlation. This study presents experimental results of a two-sided portal monitor equipped with in total 16 4He fast neutron detectors as well as four polyvinyltoluene (PVT) plastic scintillators. All detectors have been synchronized to nanosecond precision, thereby allowing the resolution of time correlations from timescales of tens of microseconds (such as (n, ?) reactions) down to prompt fission correlations directly. Our results demonstrate that such correlations can be detected in a typical radiation portal monitor (RPM) geometry and within operationally acceptable time scales, and that exploiting these signatures significantly improves the performance of the RPM compared to neutron counting. Furthermore, the results show that some time structure remains even in the presence of heavy shielding, thus significantly improving the sensitivity of the detection system to shielded SNM.

  1. Simulation of GPR Passive Interferometry using Cross-correlation for LNAPL Model Monitoring Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Zeng, Z.; Liu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Passive interferometry is based on the relation between the reflection and the transmission responses of the subsurface. The transmission response can be received at surface in the presence of the non-artificial source in the subsurface. The reflection response can be obtained by the cross-correlation or Multi-dimensional deconvolution (MDD) of the transmission response. In this paper, we investigate the basic principles of synthesizing the virtual shot gathers record from the transmission response and design a finite-difference algorithm for the simulation of long-duration GPR measurements in the presence of passive source randomly spaced in the subsurface. The random noise sources have the characteristic including random duration time, random waveform and random position distribution. Here we apply the GPR passive interferometry in light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) model monitoring and use the cross-correlation method to retrieve the target signal. With the simulation result, we can accurately obtain the dielectric constant, EM velocity, dynamic monitoring change characteristics and other information of LNAPL model by common midpoint (CMP) velocity analysis and normal moveout correction (NMO) method. The result demonstrates that the passive GPR interferometry is feasible in subsurface LNAPL and other target monitoring. It provides an idea and foundation for real passive interferometry GPR application.

  2. Simulation of GPR Passive Interferometry using Cross-correlation for LNAPL Model Monitoring Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Zeng, Z.; Liu, F.

    2011-12-01

    Passive interferometry is based on the relation between the reflection and the transmission responses of the subsurface. The transmission response can be received at surface in the presence of the non-artificial source in the subsurface. The reflection response can be obtained by the cross-correlation or Multi-dimensional deconvolution (MDD) of the transmission response. In this paper, we investigate the basic principles of synthesizing the virtual shot gathers record from the transmission response and design a finite-difference algorithm for the simulation of long-duration GPR measurements in the presence of passive source randomly spaced in the subsurface. The random noise sources have the characteristic including random duration time, random waveform and random position distribution. Here we apply the GPR passive interferometry in light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) model monitoring and use the cross-correlation method to retrieve the target signal. With the simulation result, we can accurately obtain the dielectric constant, EM velocity, dynamic monitoring change characteristics and other information of LNAPL model by common midpoint (CMP) velocity analysis and normal moveout correction (NMO) method. The result demonstrates that the passive GPR interferometry is feasible in subsurface LNAPL and other target monitoring. It provides an idea and foundation for real passive interferometry GPR application.

  3. NCI Gene-Environment Think-Tank

    Cancer.gov

    Risk of cancer is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of genetic variants associated with cancer. However, it remains unclear how to best incorporate gene-environment interplay into study design and analysis in order to better understand cancer etiology, or to identify public health interventions.

  4. Why study gene-environment interactions?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We examine the reasons for investigating gene-environment interactions and address recent reports evaluating interactions between genes and environmental modulators in relation to cardiovascular disease and its common risk factors. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies focusing on smoking, phy...

  5. Active-passive correlation spectroscopy - A new technique for identifying ocean color algorithm spectral regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    A new active-passive airborne data correlation technique has been developed which allows the validation of existing in-water oceoan color algorithms and the rapid search, identification, and evaluation of new sensor band locations and algorithm wavelength intervals. Thus far, applied only in conjunction with the spectral curvature algorithm (SCA), the active-passive correlation spectroscopy (APCS) technique shows that (1) the usual 490-nm (center-band) chlorophyll SCA could satisfactorily be placed anywhere within the nominal 460-510-nm interval, and (2) two other spectral regions, 645-660 and 680-695 nm, show considerable promise for chlorophyll pigment measurement. Additionally, the APCS method reveals potentially useful wavelength regions (at 600 and about 670 nm) of very low chlorophyll-in-water spectral curvature into which accessory pigment algorithms for phycoerythrin might be carefully positioned. In combination, the APCS and SCA methods strongly suggest that significant information content resides within the seemingly featureless ocean color spectrum.

  6. Millimeter-wave passive components of correlation radiometers for polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peverini, Oscar A.; Tascone, Riccardo; Virone, Giuseppe; Baralis, Massimo; Olivieri, Augusto; Orta, Renato

    2004-10-01

    In this paper the millimeter-wave passive components developed for the Ka-band Bar-SPOrt (Balloon-borne Radiometer for Sky Polarization Observatory) correlation radiometer are described. Comparison between numerical and experimental results are reported for all the building blocks of the radiometer: marker injector, polarizer, ortho-mode transducer, filtering sections and correlation unit. Due to the very low level of the polarized sky emission to be measured, all the components were designed and manufactured in order to achieve a very high level of sensitivity.

  7. Gene-environment interactions in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Daniel A.; Newman, Lee S.; Kavuru, Mani S.

    2007-01-01

    Susceptibility to most human diseases is polygenic, with complex interactions between functional polymorphisms of single genes governing disease incidence, phenotype, or both. In this context, the contribution of any discrete gene is generally modest for a single individual, but may confer substantial attributable risk on a population level. Environmental exposure can modify the effects of a polymorphism, either by providing a necessary substrate for development of human disease or because the effects of a given exposure modulate the effects of the gene. In several diseases, genetic polymorphisms have been shown to be context-dependent, i.e. the effects of a genetic variant are realized only in the setting of a relevant exposure. Since sarcoidosis susceptibility is dependent on both genetic and environmental modifiers, the study of gene-environment interactions may yield important pathogenetic information and will likely be crucial for uncovering the range of genetic susceptibility loci. However, the complexity of these relationships implies that investigations of gene-environment interactions will require the study of large cohorts with carefully-defined exposures and similar clinical phenotypes. A general principle is that the study of gene-environment interactions requires a sample size at least several-fold greater than for either factor alone. To date, the presence of environmental modifiers has been demonstrated for one sarcoidosis susceptibility locus, HLA-DQB1, in African-American families. This article reviews general considerations obtaining for the study of gene-environment interactions in sarcoidosis. It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of environmental influences on sarcoidosis susceptibility genes. PMID:17560304

  8. The neural correlates of ego-disturbances (passivity phenomena) and formal thought disorder in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leube, Dirk; Whitney, Carin; Kircher, Tilo

    2008-11-01

    Ego-disturbances (passivity phenomena) and formal thought disorder are two hallmark symptoms of schizophrenia. Formal thought disorder has been highlighted already very early by Eugen Bleuler in his concept of basic symptoms (Grundsymptome). In contrast ego-disturbances (Ich-Störungen) or passivity phenomena have been declared as core symptoms of schizophrenia by Kurt Schneider in his concept of first-rank symptoms (Erstrangsymptome) that influenced the whole concept of schizophrenia until today (ICD10; DSM IV). We present new neuroimaging and cognitive neuropsychological results that help to explain what brain and cognitive functions may be involved in the emergence of these symptoms. Questions on cognitive and neural correlates of notions such as self-awareness, self-consciousness, introspective perspective or subjective experiences have re-emerged as topics of great interest in the scientific community. Employing new neuroscientific methods such as functional brain imaging, advances into thus far unexplored territory of mind-brain relationships have been made. These findings give new impulses for the search on the neural basis of psychopathological symptoms. We will review neuroscientific data and models on the pathogenesis of two of the core symptoms of schizophrenia, i.e. passivity phenomena and formal thought disorder. PMID:18985290

  9. The neural correlates of subjectively perceived and passively matched loudness perception in auditory phantom perception

    PubMed Central

    De Ridder, Dirk; Congedo, Marco; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A fundamental question in phantom perception is determining whether the brain creates a network that represents the sound intensity of the auditory phantom as measured by tinnitus matching (in dB), or whether the phantom perception is actually only a representation of the subjectively perceived loudness. Methods In tinnitus patients, tinnitus loudness was tested in two ways, by a numeric rating scale for subjectively perceived loudness and a more objective tinnitus-matching test, albeit it is still a subjective measure. Results Passively matched tinnitus does not correlate with subjective numeric rating scale, and has no electrophysiological correlates. Subjective loudness, in a whole-brain analysis, is correlated with activity in the left anterior insula (alpha), the rostral/dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (beta), and the left parahippocampus (gamma). A ROI analysis finds correlations with the auditory cortex (high beta and gamma) as well. The theta band links gamma band activity in the auditory cortex and parahippocampus via theta–gamma nesting. Conclusions Apparently the brain generates a network that represents subjectively perceived tinnitus loudness only, which is context dependent. The subjective loudness network consists of the anterior cingulate/insula, the parahippocampus, and the auditory cortex. The gamma band activity in the parahippocampus and the auditory cortex is functionally linked via theta–gamma nested lagged phase synchronization. PMID:25874164

  10. Gene-Environment Interplay in the Link of Friends' and Nonfriends' Behaviors with Children's Social Reticence in a Competitive Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Fanny-Alexandra; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Forget-Dubois, Nadine; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study used a genetically informed design to assess the effects of friends' and nonfriends' reticent and dominant behaviors on children's observed social reticence in a competitive situation. Potential gene-environment correlations (rGE) and gene-environment interactions (GxE) in the link between (a) friends' and…

  11. The Role of Individual Correlates and Class Norms in Defending and Passive Bystanding Behavior in Bullying: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pozzoli, Tiziana; Gini, Gianluca; Vieno, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates possible individual and class correlates of defending and passive bystanding behavior in bullying, in a sample of 1,825 Italian primary school (mean age = 10 years 1 month) and middle school (mean age = 13 years 2 months) students. The findings of a series of multilevel regression models show that both individual (e.g.,…

  12. An automated cross-correlation based event detection technique and its application to surface passive data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Behura, Jyoti; Haines, Seth S.; Batzle, Mike

    2013-01-01

    In studies on heavy oil, shale reservoirs, tight gas and enhanced geothermal systems, the use of surface passive seismic data to monitor induced microseismicity due to the fluid flow in the subsurface is becoming more common. However, in most studies passive seismic records contain days and months of data and manually analysing the data can be expensive and inaccurate. Moreover, in the presence of noise, detecting the arrival of weak microseismic events becomes challenging. Hence, the use of an automated, accurate and computationally fast technique for event detection in passive seismic data is essential. The conventional automatic event identification algorithm computes a running-window energy ratio of the short-term average to the long-term average of the passive seismic data for each trace. We show that for the common case of a low signal-to-noise ratio in surface passive records, the conventional method is not sufficiently effective at event identification. Here, we extend the conventional algorithm by introducing a technique that is based on the cross-correlation of the energy ratios computed by the conventional method. With our technique we can measure the similarities amongst the computed energy ratios at different traces. Our approach is successful at improving the detectability of events with a low signal-to-noise ratio that are not detectable with the conventional algorithm. Also, our algorithm has the advantage to identify if an event is common to all stations (a regional event) or to a limited number of stations (a local event). We provide examples of applying our technique to synthetic data and a field surface passive data set recorded at a geothermal site.

  13. Passive Leg Raising Correlates with Future Exercise Capacity after Coronary Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Chun; Wong, May-Kuen; Lin, Pyng-Jing; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Wen, Ming-Shien; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamic properties affected by the passive leg raise test (PLRT) reflect cardiac pumping efficiency. In the present study, we aimed to further explore whether PLRT predicts exercise intolerance/capacity following coronary revascularization. Following coronary bypass/percutaneous coronary intervention, 120 inpatients underwent a PLRT and a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) 2-12 days during post-surgery hospitalization and 3-5 weeks after hospital discharge. The PLRT included head-up, leg raise, and supine rest postures. The end point of the first CPET during admission was the supra-ventilatory anaerobic threshold, whereas that during the second CPET in the outpatient stage was maximal performance. Bio-reactance-based non-invasive cardiac output monitoring was employed during PLRT to measure real-time stroke volume and cardiac output. A correlation matrix showed that stroke volume during leg raise (SVLR) during the first PLRT was positively correlated (R = 0.653) with the anaerobic threshold during the first CPET. When exercise intolerance was defined as an anaerobic threshold < 3 metabolic equivalents, SVLR / body weight had an area under curve value of 0.822, with sensitivity of 0.954, specificity of 0.593, and cut-off value of 1504·10-3mL/kg (positive predictive value 0.72; negative predictive value 0.92). Additionally, cardiac output during leg raise (COLR) during the first PLRT was related to peak oxygen consumption during the second CPET (R = 0.678). When poor aerobic fitness was defined as peak oxygen consumption < 5 metabolic equivalents, COLR / body weight had an area under curve value of 0.814, with sensitivity of 0.781, specificity of 0.773, and a cut-off value of 68.3 mL/min/kg (positive predictive value 0.83; negative predictive value 0.71). Therefore, we conclude that PLRT during hospitalization has a good screening and predictive power for exercise intolerance/capacity in inpatients and early outpatients following coronary revascularization, which has clinical significance. PMID:26360736

  14. Passive Leg Raising Correlates with Future Exercise Capacity after Coronary Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Chun; Wong, May-Kuen; Lin, Pyng-Jing; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Wen, Ming-Shien; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2015-01-01

    Hemodynamic properties affected by the passive leg raise test (PLRT) reflect cardiac pumping efficiency. In the present study, we aimed to further explore whether PLRT predicts exercise intolerance/capacity following coronary revascularization. Following coronary bypass/percutaneous coronary intervention, 120 inpatients underwent a PLRT and a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) 2–12 days during post-surgery hospitalization and 3–5 weeks after hospital discharge. The PLRT included head-up, leg raise, and supine rest postures. The end point of the first CPET during admission was the supra-ventilatory anaerobic threshold, whereas that during the second CPET in the outpatient stage was maximal performance. Bio-reactance-based non-invasive cardiac output monitoring was employed during PLRT to measure real-time stroke volume and cardiac output. A correlation matrix showed that stroke volume during leg raise (SVLR) during the first PLRT was positively correlated (R = 0.653) with the anaerobic threshold during the first CPET. When exercise intolerance was defined as an anaerobic threshold < 3 metabolic equivalents, SVLR / body weight had an area under curve value of 0.822, with sensitivity of 0.954, specificity of 0.593, and cut-off value of 1504·10-3mL/kg (positive predictive value 0.72; negative predictive value 0.92). Additionally, cardiac output during leg raise (COLR) during the first PLRT was related to peak oxygen consumption during the second CPET (R = 0.678). When poor aerobic fitness was defined as peak oxygen consumption < 5 metabolic equivalents, COLR / body weight had an area under curve value of 0.814, with sensitivity of 0.781, specificity of 0.773, and a cut-off value of 68.3 mL/min/kg (positive predictive value 0.83; negative predictive value 0.71). Therefore, we conclude that PLRT during hospitalization has a good screening and predictive power for exercise intolerance/capacity in inpatients and early outpatients following coronary revascularization, which has clinical significance. PMID:26360736

  15. Information-theoretic metrics for visualizing gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Pritam; Zhang, Aidong; Brazeau, Daniel; Sucheston, Lara; Freudenheim, Jo L; Ambrosone, Christine; Ramanathan, Murali

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of our work was to develop heuristics for visualizing and interpreting gene-environment interactions (GEIs) and to assess the dependence of candidate visualization metrics on biological and study-design factors. Two information-theoretic metrics, the k-way interaction information (KWII) and the total correlation information (TCI), were investigated. The effectiveness of the KWII and TCI to detect GEIs in a diverse range of simulated data sets and a Crohn disease data set was assessed. The sensitivity of the KWII and TCI spectra to biological and study-design variables was determined. Head-to-head comparisons with the relevance-chain, multifactor dimensionality reduction, and the pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT) methods were obtained. The KWII and TCI spectra, which are graphical summaries of the KWII and TCI for each subset of environmental and genotype variables, were found to detect each known GEI in the simulated data sets. The patterns in the KWII and TCI spectra were informative for factors such as case-control misassignment, locus heterogeneity, allele frequencies, and linkage disequilibrium. The KWII and TCI spectra were found to have excellent sensitivity for identifying the key disease-associated genetic variations in the Crohn disease data set. In head-to-head comparisons with the relevance-chain, multifactor dimensionality reduction, and PDT methods, the results from visual interpretation of the KWII and TCI spectra performed satisfactorily. The KWII and TCI are promising metrics for visualizing GEIs. They are capable of detecting interactions among numerous single-nucleotide polymorphisms and environmental variables for a diverse range of GEI models. PMID:17924337

  16. PASSIVE SENSOR IMAGING USING CROSS CORRELATIONS OF NOISY SIGNALS IN A SCATTERING MEDIUM

    E-print Network

    Garnier, Josselin

    in seismology where the sensors were seismic stations recording velocity fields, the noise sources came from amplitudes generated by ambient noise sources. It is also known that the direction of the energy flux from source region. We extend this analysis to passive sensor imaging of reflectors with different ambient

  17. Can clouds dance? Neural correlates of passive conceptual expansion using a metaphor processing task: Implications for creative cognition.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Barbara; Kröger, Sören; Stark, Rudolf; Schweckendiek, Jan; Windmann, Sabine; Hermann, Christiane; Abraham, Anna

    2012-03-01

    Creativity has emerged in the focus of neurocognitive research in the past decade. However, a heterogeneous pattern of brain areas has been implicated as underpinning the neural correlates of creativity. One explanation for these divergent findings lies in the fact that creativity is not usually investigated in terms of its many underlying cognitive processes. The present fMRI study focuses on the neural correlates of conceptual expansion, a central component of all creative processes. The study aims to avoid pitfalls of previous fMRI studies on creativity by employing a novel paradigm. Participants were presented with phrases and made judgments regarding both the unusualness and the appropriateness of the stimuli, corresponding to the two defining criteria of creativity. According to their respective evaluation, three subject-determined experimental conditions were obtained. Phrases judged as both unusual and appropriate were classified as indicating conceptual expansion in participants. The findings reveal the involvement of frontal and temporal regions when engaging in passive conceptual expansion as opposed to the information processing of mere unusualness (novelty) or appropriateness (relevance). Taking this new experimental approach to uncover specific processes involved in creative cognition revealed that frontal and temporal regions known to be involved in semantic cognition and relational reasoning play a role in passive conceptual expansion. Adopting a different vantage point on the investigation of creativity would allow for critical advances in future research on this topic. PMID:22204876

  18. Passive advection of a vector field: Anisotropy, finite correlation time, exact solution, and logarithmic corrections to ordinary scaling.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M

    2015-10-01

    In this work we study the generalization of the problem considered in [Phys. Rev. E 91, 013002 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.013002] to the case of finite correlation time of the environment (velocity) field. The model describes a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and preassigned pair correlation function. Due to the presence of distinguished direction n, all the multiloop diagrams in this model vanish, so that the results obtained are exact. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to the two nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations. Their stability depends on the relation between the exponents in the energy spectrum E?k_{?}^{1-?} and the dispersion law ??k_{?}^{2-?}. In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the corrections to ordinary scaling are polynomials of logarithms of the integral turbulence scale L. PMID:26565343

  19. Passive advection of a vector field: Anisotropy, finite correlation time, exact solution, and logarithmic corrections to ordinary scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we study the generalization of the problem considered in [Phys. Rev. E 91, 013002 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.013002] to the case of finite correlation time of the environment (velocity) field. The model describes a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and preassigned pair correlation function. Due to the presence of distinguished direction n , all the multiloop diagrams in this model vanish, so that the results obtained are exact. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to the two nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations. Their stability depends on the relation between the exponents in the energy spectrum E ?k?1 -? and the dispersion law ? ?k?2 -? . In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the corrections to ordinary scaling are polynomials of logarithms of the integral turbulence scale L .

  20. Passive advection of a vector field: Anisotropy, finite correlation time, exact solution and logarithmic corrections to ordinary scaling

    E-print Network

    N. V. Antonov; N. M. Gulitskiy

    2015-09-27

    In this work we study the generalization of the problem, considered in [{\\it Phys. Rev. E} {\\bf 91}, 013002 (2015)], to the case of {\\it finite} correlation time of the environment (velocity) field. The model describes a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and preassigned pair correlation function. Due to the presence of distinguished direction ${\\bf n}$, all the multiloop diagrams in this model are vanish, so that the results obtained are exact. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to the two nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations. Their stability depends on the relation between the exponents in the energy spectrum ${\\cal E} \\propto k_{\\bot}^{1-\\xi}$ and the dispersion law $\\omega \\propto k_{\\bot}^{2-\\eta}$. In contrast to the well known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the corrections to ordinary scaling are polynomials of logarithms of the integral turbulence scale $L$.

  1. Correlation between central venous pressure and peripheral venous pressure with passive leg raise in patients on mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ali, Shahna; Ray, Utpal; Varshney, Ankur; Doley, Kashmiri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central venous pressure (CVP) assesses the volume status of patients. However, this technique is not without complications. We, therefore, measured peripheral venous pressure (PVP) to see whether it can replace CVP. Aims: To evaluate the correlation and agreement between CVP and PVP after passive leg raise (PLR) in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study in Intensive Care Unit. Methods: Fifty critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation were included in the study. CVP and PVP measurements were taken using a water column manometer. Measurements were taken in the supine position and subsequently after a PLR of 45°. Statistical Analysis: Pearson's correlation and Bland–Altman's analysis. Results: This study showed a fair correlation between CVP and PVP after a PLR of 45° (correlation coefficient, r = 0.479; P = 0.0004) when the CVP was <10 cmH2O. However, the correlation was good when the CVP was >10 cmH2O. Bland–Altman analysis showed 95% limits of agreement to be ?2.912–9.472. Conclusion: PVP can replace CVP for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients.

  2. Calibration of Passive Microwave Polarimeters that Use Hybrid Coupler-Based Correlators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Four calibration algorithms are studied for microwave polarimeters that use hybrid coupler-based correlators: 1) conventional two-look of hot and cold sources, 2) three looks of hot and cold source combinations, 3) two-look with correlated source, and 4) four-look combining methods 2 and 3. The systematic errors are found to depend on the polarimeter component parameters and accuracy of calibration noise temperatures. A case study radiometer in four different remote sensing scenarios was considered in light of these results. Applications for Ocean surface salinity, Ocean surface winds, and soil moisture were found to be sensitive to different systematic errors. Finally, a standard uncertainty analysis was performed on the four-look calibration algorithm, which was found to be most sensitive to the correlated calibration source.

  3. Green's function retrieval from noise correlation in multiple scattering media Passive detection in seismology, acoustics or even electromagnetism is an important issue that

    E-print Network

    Boschi, Lapo

    Green's function retrieval from noise correlation in multiple scattering media 1. Context Passive detection in seismology, acoustics or even electromagnetism is an important issue that exists since many, Mordet2013, Ekstrom2014], as well as underwater acoustics and non destructive control [Chemani2014

  4. Correlation between in vitro complement deposition and passive mouse protection of anti-pneumococcal surface protein A monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naeem; Qadri, Raies Ahmad; Sehgal, Devinder

    2015-01-01

    The shortcomings of the licensed polysaccharide-based pneumococcal vaccine are driving efforts toward development of a protein-based vaccine that is serotype independent and effective in all age groups. An opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPKA) is used to evaluate the antibody response against polysaccharide-based pneumococcal vaccines. However, the OPKA is not reliable for noncapsular antigens. Thus, there is a need to develop an in vitro surrogate for protection for protein vaccine candidates like pneumococcal surface antigen A (PspA). PspA is a serologically variable cell surface virulence factor. Based on its sequence, PspA has been classified into families 1 (clade 1 and 2), 2 (clades 3, 4 and 5), and 3 (clade 6). Here, we report the characterization of 18 IgG anti-PspA monoclonal antibodies (anti-PspA(hkR36A) MAbs) generated from mice immunized with heat-killed strain R36A (clade 2). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based analysis of the reactivity of the MAbs with recombinant PspAs from the 6 clades indicated that they were family 1 specific. This was confirmed by flow cytometry using a hyperimmune serum generated against PspA from R36A. Eight MAbs that bind at least one clade 1- and clade 2-expressing strain were evaluated for complement deposition, bactericidal activity, and passive protection. The anti-PspA(hkR36A) MAb-dependent deposition of complement on pneumococci showed a positive correlation with passive protection against strain WU2 (r = 0.8783, P = 0.0041). All of our protective MAbs showed bactericidal activity; however, not all MAbs that exhibited bactericidal activity conferred protection in vivo. The protective MAbs described here can be used to identify conserved protection eliciting B cell epitopes for engineering a superior PspA-based vaccine. PMID:25410204

  5. Determining 252Cf source strength by absolute passive neutron correlation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.

    2013-06-01

    Physically small, lightly encapsulated, radionuclide sources containing 252Cf are widely used for a vast variety of industrial, medical, educational and research applications requiring a convenient source of neutrons. For many quantitative applications, such as detector efficiency calibrations, the absolute strength of the neutron emission is needed. In this work we show how, by using a neutron multiplicity counter the neutron emission rate can be obtained with high accuracy. This provides an independent and alternative way to create reference sources in-house for laboratories such as ours engaged in international safeguards metrology. The method makes use of the unique and well known properties of the 252Cf spontaneous fission system and applies advanced neutron correlation counting methods. We lay out the foundation of the method and demonstrate it experimentally. We show that accuracy comparable to the best methods currently used by national bodies to certify neutron source strengths is possible.

  6. Gene-Environment Interactions in Asthma: Genetic and Epigenetic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Uk; Kim, Jeong Dong

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, a large number of genetic studies have been aimed at finding genetic variants associated with the risk of asthma, applying various genetic and genomic approaches including linkage analysis, candidate gene polymorphism studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, contrary to general expectation, even single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) discovered by GWAS failed to fully explain the heritability of asthma. Thus, application of rare allele polymorphisms in well defined phenotypes and clarification of environmental factors have been suggested to overcome the problem of 'missing' heritability. Such factors include allergens, cigarette smoke, air pollutants, and infectious agents during pre- and post-natal periods. The first and simplest interaction between a gene and the environment is a candidate interaction of both a well known gene and environmental factor in a direct physical or chemical interaction such as between CD14 and endotoxin or between HLA and allergens. Several GWAS have found environmental interactions with occupational asthma, aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease, tobacco smoke-related airway dysfunction, and farm-related atopic diseases. As one of the mechanisms behind gene-environment interaction is epigenetics, a few studies on DNA CpG methylation have been reported on subphenotypes of asthma, pitching the exciting idea that it may be possible to intervene at the junction between the genome and the environment. Epigenetic studies are starting to include data from clinical samples, which will make them another powerful tool for research on gene-environment interactions in asthma. PMID:26069107

  7. The impact of gate width setting and gate utilization factors on plutonium assay in passive correlated neutron counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Croft, S.; Favalli, A.; Santi, P.

    2015-10-01

    In the field of nuclear safeguards, passive neutron multiplicity counting (PNMC) is a method typically employed in non-destructive assay (NDA) of special nuclear material (SNM) for nonproliferation, verification and accountability purposes. PNMC is generally performed using a well-type thermal neutron counter and relies on the detection of correlated pairs or higher order multiplets of neutrons emitted by an assayed item. To assay SNM, a set of parameters for a given well-counter is required to link the measured multiplicity rates to the assayed item properties. Detection efficiency, die-away time, gate utilization factors (tightly connected to die-away time) as well as optimum gate width setting are among the key parameters. These parameters along with the underlying model assumptions directly affect the accuracy of the SNM assay. In this paper we examine the role of gate utilization factors and the single exponential die-away time assumption and their impact on the measurements for a range of plutonium materials. In addition, we examine the importance of item-optimized coincidence gate width setting as opposed to using a universal gate width value. Finally, the traditional PNMC based on multiplicity shift register electronics is extended to Feynman-type analysis and application of this approach to Pu mass assay is demonstrated.

  8. Music training and speech perception: a gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Claims of beneficial side effects of music training are made for many different abilities, including verbal and visuospatial abilities, executive functions, working memory, IQ, and speech perception in particular. Such claims assume that music training causes the associations even though children who take music lessons are likely to differ from other children in music aptitude, which is associated with many aspects of speech perception. Music training in childhood is also associated with cognitive, personality, and demographic variables, and it is well established that IQ and personality are determined largely by genetics. Recent evidence also indicates that the role of genetics in music aptitude and music achievement is much larger than previously thought. In short, music training is an ideal model for the study of gene-environment interactions but far less appropriate as a model for the study of plasticity. Children seek out environments, including those with music lessons, that are consistent with their predispositions; such environments exaggerate preexisting individual differences. PMID:25773632

  9. The epigenetic lorax: gene–environment interactions in human health

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Keith E; Sapienza, Carmen; Engel, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed an explosion of information on genetic factors underlying common human diseases and disorders. This ‘human genomics’ information revolution has occurred as a backdrop to a rapid increase in the rates of many human disorders and diseases. For example, obesity, Type 2 diabetes, asthma, autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have increased at rates that cannot be due to changes in the genetic structure of the population, and are difficult to ascribe to changes in diagnostic criteria or ascertainment. A likely cause of the increased incidence of these disorders is increased exposure to environmental factors that modify gene function. Many environmental factors that have epidemiological association with common human disorders are likely to exert their effects through epigenetic alterations. This general mechanism of gene–environment interaction poses special challenges for individuals, educators, scientists and public policy makers in defining, monitoring and mitigating exposures. PMID:22920179

  10. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampal CA1 region of aged rats correlates with better memory performance in passive avoidance test.

    PubMed

    Platano, Daniela; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Balietti, Marta; Giorgetti, Belinda; Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo; Aicardi, Giorgio

    2008-04-01

    Aging is associated with deficits in long-term declarative memory formation, and wide differences in performance can be observed among aged individuals. The cellular substrates of these deficits and the reasons for such marked individual differences are not yet fully understood. In the present study, morphologic parameters of synapses and synaptic mitochondria in stratum molecolare of CA1 hippocampal region were investigated in aged (26- to 27-month-old) female rats after a single trial inhibitory avoidance task. In this memory protocol animals learn to avoid a dark compartment in which they received a mild, inescapable foot shock. Rats were tested 3 and 6 or 9 hours after the training, divided into good and bad responders according to their performance (retention times above or below 100 seconds, respectively) and immediately sacrificed. The number of synapses and synaptic mitochondria per cubic micrometer of tissue (numeric density), the average area of synapses and volume of synaptic mitochondria, the total area of synapses per cubic micrometer of tissue, the percentage of perforated synapses and the overall volume of mitochondria per cubic micrometer of tissue were evaluated. In the good responder group, the numeric density of synapses and mitochondria was significantly higher and the average mitochondrial volume was significantly smaller 9 hours versus 6 hours after the training. No significant differences were observed among bad responders. Thus, better performances in passive avoidance memory task are correlated with more efficient plastic remodeling of synaptic contacts and mitochondria in hippocampal CA1. Present findings indicate that maintenance of synaptic plastic reactivity during aging is a critical requirement for preserving long-term memory consolidation. PMID:18442322

  11. Gene-Environment Interplay and Psychopathology: Multiple Varieties but Real Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Michael; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2006-01-01

    Gene-environment interplay is a general term that covers several divergent concepts with different meanings and different implications. In this review, we evaluate research evidence on four varieties of gene-environment interplay. First, we consider epigenetic mechanisms by which environmental influences alter the effects of genes. Second, we…

  12. Study of oral clefts: Indication of gene-environment interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.J.; Beaty, T.H.; Panny, S.

    1994-09-01

    In this study of infants with isolated birth defects, 69 cleft palate-only (CPO) cases, 114 cleft lip with or without palate (CL/P), and 284 controls with non-cleft birth defects (all born in Maryland during 1984-1992) were examined to test for associations among genetic markers and different oral clefts. Modest associations were found between transforming growth factor {alpha} (TGF{alpha}) marker and CPO, as well as that between D17S579 (Mfd188) and CL/P in this study. The association between TGF{alpha} marker and CPO reflects a statistical interaction between mother`s smoking and child`s TGF{alpha} genotype. A significantly higher risk of CPO was found among those reporting maternal smoking during pregnancy and carrying less common TGF{alpha} TaqI allele (odds ratio=7.02 with 95% confidence interval 1.8-27.6). This gene-environment interaction was also found among those who reported no family history of any type of birth defect (odds ratio=5.60 with 95% confidence interval 1.4-22.9). Similar associations were seen for CL/P, but these were not statistically significant.

  13. Gene-environment interaction and male reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Jonatan; Bonde, Jens Peter; Giwercman, Yvonne L.; Rylander, Lars; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    As genetic factors can hardly explain the changes taking place during short time spans, environmental and lifestyle-related factors have been suggested as the causes of time-related deterioration of male reproductive function. However, considering the strong heterogeneity of male fecundity between and within populations, genetic variants might be important determinants of the individual susceptibility to the adverse effects of environment or lifestyle. Although the possible mechanisms of such interplay in relation to the reproductive system are largely unknown, some recent studies have indicated that specific genotypes may confer a larger risk of male reproductive disorders following certain exposures. This paper presents a critical review of animal and human evidence on how genes may modify environmental effects on male reproductive function. Some examples have been found that support this mechanism, but the number of studies is still limited. This type of interaction studies may improve our understanding of normal physiology and help us to identify the risk factors to male reproductive malfunction. We also shortly discuss other aspects of gene-environment interaction specifically associated with the issue of reproduction, namely environmental and lifestyle factors as the cause of sperm DNA damage. It remains to be investigated to what extent such genetic changes, by natural conception or through the use of assisted reproductive techniques, are transmitted to the next generation, thereby causing increased morbidity in the offspring. PMID:20348940

  14. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P < 0.05). There was a significant gene × sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P < 0.05), with the interaction occurring on genetic influences that are common to both sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (< 7 h/night) or high (? 9 h/night) range, increased genetic influence on depressive symptoms was observed, particularly at sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  15. Gene-environment Interactions in the Etiology of Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, G; Ermis, R B; Calapoglu, N S; Celik, E U; Türel, G Y

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that can be conceptualized as an interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of AMELX, CA6, DEFB1, and TAS2R38 gene polymorphism and gene-environment interactions on caries etiology and susceptibility in adults. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal mucosa, and adults aged 20 to 60 y were placed into 1 of 2 groups: low caries risk (DMFT ? 5; n = 77) and high caries risk (DMFT ? 14; n = 77). The frequency of AMELX (+522), CA6 (T55M), DEFB1 (G-20A), and TAS2R38 (A49P) single-nucleotide polymorphisms was genotyped with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Environmental risk factors examined in the study included plaque amount, toothbrushing frequency, dietary intake between meals, saliva secretion rate, saliva buffer capacity, mutans streptococci counts, and lactobacilli counts. There was no difference between the caries risk groups in relation to AMELX (+522) polymorphism (?(2) test, P > 0.05). The distribution of CA6 genotype and allele frequencies in the low caries risk group did not differ from the high caries risk group (?(2) test, P > 0.05). Polymorphism of DEFB1 (G-20A) was positively associated, and TAS2R38 (A49P) negatively associated, with caries risk (?(2) test, P = 0.000). There were significant differences between caries susceptibility and each environmental risk factor, except for the saliva secretion rate (Mann-Whitney U test, P = 0.000). Based on stepwise multiple linear regression analyses, dental plaque amount, lactobacilli count, age, and saliva buffer capacity, as well as DEFB1 (G-20A), TAS2R38 (A49P), and CA6 (T55M) gene polymorphism, explained a total of 87.8% of the variations in DMFT scores. It can be concluded that variation in CA6 (T55M), DEFB1 (G-20A), and TAS2R38 (A49P) may be associated with caries experience in Turkish adults with a high level of dental plaque, lactobacilli count, and age and when saliva buffer capacity is low. PMID:26377569

  16. The Impact of Gene–Environment Interaction on Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Danielle M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes three types of gene–environment interactions and the challenges inherent in interpreting these interactions. It also reports on what is known about gene–environment interactions in the field of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Twin studies of the interaction of genetic and environmental influences on AUDs have resulted in relatively consistent findings and have suggested general mechanisms for interaction effects. These studies generally find that environments that exert more social control (e.g., higher parental monitoring, less migratory neighborhoods, etc.) tend to reduce genetic influences, whereas other environments allow greater opportunity to express genetic predispositions, such as those characterized by more deviant peers and greater alcohol availability. Conversely, the gene–environment literature that has been developed surrounding specific genes has focused largely on the role of stress as a moderator of genetic effects. PMID:23134047

  17. Immune correlates of protection against yellow fever determined by passive immunization and challenge in the hamster model.

    PubMed

    Julander, Justin G; Trent, Dennis W; Monath, Thomas P

    2011-08-11

    Live, attenuated yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is highly efficacious but causes rare, serious adverse events resulting from active replication in the host and direct viral injury to vital organs. We recently reported development of a potentially safer ?-propiolactone-inactivated whole virion YF vaccine (XRX-001), which was highly immunogenic in mice, hamsters, monkeys, and humans [10,11]. To characterize the protective efficacy of neutralizing antibodies stimulated by the inactivated vaccine, graded doses of serum from hamsters immunized with inactivated XRX-001 or live 17D vaccine were transferred to hamsters by the intraperitoneal (IP) route 24h prior to virulent, viscerotropic YF virus challenge. Neutralizing antibody (PRNT(50)) titers were determined in the sera of treated animals 4h before challenge and 4 and 21 days after challenge. Neutralizing antibodies were shown to mediate protection. Animals having 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT(50)) titers of ?40 4h before challenge were completely protected from disease as evidenced by viremia, liver enzyme elevation, and protection against illness (weight change) and death. Passive titers of 10-20 were partially protective. Immunization with the XRX-001 vaccine stimulated YF neutralizing antibodies that were equally effective (based on dose response) as antibodies stimulated by live 17D vaccine. The results will be useful in defining the level of seroprotection in clinical studies of new yellow fever vaccines. PMID:21718741

  18. Can Clouds Dance? Neural Correlates of Passive Conceptual Expansion Using a Metaphor Processing Task: Implications for Creative Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Barbara; Kroger, Soren; Stark, Rudolf; Schweckendiek, Jan; Windmann, Sabine; Hermann, Christiane; Abraham, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Creativity has emerged in the focus of neurocognitive research in the past decade. However, a heterogeneous pattern of brain areas has been implicated as underpinning the neural correlates of creativity. One explanation for these divergent findings lies in the fact that creativity is not usually investigated in terms of its many underlying…

  19. Exploiting Gene Expression Variation to Capture Gene-Environment Interactions for Disease

    PubMed Central

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions have long been recognized as a fundamental concept in evolutionary, quantitative, and medical genetics. In the genomics era, study of how environment and genome interact to shape gene expression variation is relevant to understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypes. While genetic analysis of gene expression variation focused on main effects, little is known about the extent of interaction effects implicating regulatory variants and their consequences on transcriptional variation. Here we survey the current state of the concept of transcriptional gene-environment interactions and discuss its utility for mapping disease phenotypes in light of the insights gained from genome-wide association studies of gene expression. PMID:23755064

  20. Evaluation of an inactivated Ross River virus vaccine in active and passive mouse immunization models and establishment of a correlate of protection.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Georg W; Coulibaly, Sogue; Aichinger, Gerald; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Mayrhofer, Josef; Brunner, Susanne; Schmid, Karl; Kistner, Otfried; Aaskov, John G; Falkner, Falko G; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Barrett, P Noel; Kreil, Thomas R

    2011-05-31

    Ross River Virus has caused reported outbreaks of epidemic polyarthritis, a chronic debilitating disease associated with significant long-term morbidity in Australia and the Pacific region since the 1920s. To address this public health concern, a formalin- and UV-inactivated whole virus vaccine grown in animal protein-free cell culture was developed and tested in preclinical studies to evaluate immunogenicity and efficacy in animal models. After active immunizations, the vaccine dose-dependently induced antibodies and protected adult mice from viremia and interferon ?/? receptor knock-out (IFN-?/?R(-/-)) mice from death and disease. In passive transfer studies, administration of human vaccinee sera followed by RRV challenge protected adult mice from viremia and young mice from development of arthritic signs similar to human RRV-induced disease. Based on the good correlation between antibody titers in human sera and protection of animals, a correlate of protection was defined. This is of particular importance for the evaluation of the vaccine because of the comparatively low annual incidence of RRV disease, which renders a classical efficacy trial impractical. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection, did not occur in mice even at low to undetectable concentrations of vaccine-induced antibodies. Also, RRV vaccine-induced antibodies were partially cross-protective against infection with a related alphavirus, Chikungunya virus, and did not enhance infection. Based on these findings, the inactivated RRV vaccine is expected to be efficacious and protect humans from RRV disease. PMID:21477673

  1. Evidence of Reactive Gene-Environment Correlation in Preschoolers' Prosocial Play with Unfamiliar Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLalla, Lisabeth Fisher; Bersted, Kyle; John, Sufna Gheyara

    2015-01-01

    The development of prosocial behaviors during the preschool years is essential for children's positive interactions with peers in school and other social situations. Although there is some evidence of genetic influences on prosocial behaviors, very little is known about how genes and environment, independently and in concert, affect prosocial…

  2. Gene-Environment Interactions in Genome-Wide Association Studies: Current Approaches and New Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winham, Stacey J.; Biernacka, Joanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Complex psychiatric traits have long been thought to be the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and gene-environment interactions are thought to play a crucial role in behavioral phenotypes and the susceptibility and progression of psychiatric disorders. Candidate gene studies to investigate hypothesized…

  3. How Gene-Environment Interaction Affects Children's Anxious and Fearful Behavior. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction in Predicting Behavioral Inhibition in Middle Childhood" (N. A. Fox, K E. Nichols, H. A. Henderson, K. Rubin, L. Schmidt, D. Hamer, M. Ernst, and D. S.…

  4. Commentary: Gene-Environment Interplay in the Context of Genetics, Epigenetics, and Gene Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comment on the article in this issue of the Journal by Professor Michael Rutter, "Environmentally Mediated Risks for Psychopathology: Research Strategies and Findings," in the context of current research findings on gene-environment interaction, epigenetics, and gene expression. Method: Animal and human studies are reviewed that…

  5. Gene Environment Interactions in Reading Disability and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    E-print Network

    Carlini, David

    Gene × Environment Interactions in Reading Disability and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder developmental disorders--reading disability (RD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD--reading disability (RD) and attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)--and to the favorable ends

  6. Genes in Context GeneEnvironment Interplay and the Origins of Individual

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    Genes in Context Gene­Environment Interplay and the Origins of Individual Differences in Behavior implications for our understanding of the origins of individual differences in behavior and may provide new these new findings illustrate the importance of putting genes in context. KEYWORDS--epigenetic; gene

  7. Gene-Environment Interplay in Internalizing Disorders: Consistent Findings across Six Environmental Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Brian M.; Dirago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavior genetic methods can help to elucidate gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of internalizing (INT) disorders (i.e., major depression and anxiety disorders). To date, however, no study has conducted a comprehensive analysis examining multiple environmental risk factors with the purpose of delineating general…

  8. Gene–Environment Interactions and Susceptibility to Metabolic Syndrome and Other Chronic Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an intrinsic complexity in the pathogenesis of common diseases. The concept of gene–environment interaction is receiving support from emerging evidence coming primarily from studies involving diet and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its various risk factors. The accumulating evidence shows...

  9. Gene-Environment Interactions and Epigenetic Basis of Human Diseases 25 Horizon Scientific Press. http://www.horizonpress.com

    E-print Network

    Gene-Environment Interactions and Epigenetic Basis of Human Diseases 25 © Horizon Scientific Press://www.cimb.org Gene-Environment Interactions and Epigenetic Basis of Human Diseases Liang Liu1,2*, Yuanyuan Li3. Regulation of gene expression is a complex process. In addition to genetic mechanisms, epigenetic causes

  10. 354 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, VOL. 12, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 Meta-Regression of Gene-Environment Interaction in

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    heightened interest in understanding the effects of gene-environment interaction on complex human diseases human diseases or traits are believed to result from the combined effect of genes, environ- mental354 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOBIOSCIENCE, VOL. 12, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2013 Meta-Regression of Gene

  11. Integrative Analysis of Gene-Environment Interactions under a Multi-response Partially Linear Varying Coefficient Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cen; Cui, Yuehua; Ma, Shuangge

    2014-01-01

    Consider the integrative analysis of genetic data with multiple correlated response variables. The goal is to identify important gene-environment (G×E) interactions along with main gene and environment effects that are associated with the responses. The homogeneity and heterogeneity models can be adopted to describe the genetic basis of multiple responses. To accommodate possible nonlinear effects of some environment effects, a multi-response partially linear varying coefficient (MPLVC) model is assumed. Penalization is adopted for marker selection. The proposed penalization method can select genetic variants with G×E interactions, no G×E interactions, and no main effects simultaneously. It adopts different penalties to accommodate the homogeneity and heterogeneity models. The proposed method can be effectively computed using a coordinate descent algorithm. Simulation study and the analysis of Health Professional’s Follow-up Study (HPFS), which has two correlated continuous traits, SNP measurements, and multiple environment effects, show superior performance of the proposed method over its competitors. PMID:25146388

  12. Improved Measures of Diet & Physical Activity for the Genes, Environment, & Health Initiative (GEI)

    Cancer.gov

    The Genes, Environment, and Health Initiative (GEI) is a NIH-wide project led by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The overarching goal of the GEI is to determine the etiology of common diseases by focusing on the interaction of genetic and environmental factors to better understand how these interactions contribute to health and disease.

  13. Gene?environment interactions in parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease: the Geoparkinson study

    PubMed Central

    Dick, F D; De Palma, G; Ahmadi, A; Osborne, A; Scott, N W; Prescott, G J; Bennett, J; Semple, S; Dick, S; Mozzoni, P; Haites, N; Wettinger, S Bezzina; Mutti, A; Otelea, M; Seaton, A; Soderkvist, P; Felice, A

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To investigate associations of Parkinson's disease (PD) and parkinsonian syndromes with polymorphic genes that influence metabolism of either foreign chemical substances or dopamine and to seek evidence of gene?environment interaction effects that modify risk. Methods A case?control study of 959 prevalent cases of parkinsonism (767 with PD) and 1989 controls across five European centres. Occupational hygienists estimated the average annual intensity of exposure to solvents, pesticides and metals, (iron, copper, manganese), blind to disease status. CYP2D6, PON1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTM3, GSTP1, NQO1, CYP1B1, MAO?A, MAO?B, SOD 2, EPHX,DAT1, DRD2 and NAT2 were genotyped. Results were analysed using multiple logistic regression adjusting for key confounders. Results There was a modest but significant association between MAO?A polymorphism in males and disease risk (G vs T, OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.66, adjusted). The majority of gene?environment analyses did not show significant interaction effects. There were possible interaction effects between GSTM1 null genotype and solvent exposure (which were stronger when limited to PD cases only). Conclusions Many small studies have reported associations between genetic polymorphisms and PD. Fewer have examined gene?environment interactions. This large study was sufficiently powered to examine these aspects. GSTM1 null subjects heavily exposed to solvents appear to be at increased risk of PD. There was insufficient evidence that the other gene?environment combinations investigated modified disease risk, suggesting they contribute little to the burden of PD. PMID:17449559

  14. Genetics, environment, and gene-environment interactions in the development of systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Jeffrey A.; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding disease susceptibility factors and gene-environment interactions may offer valuable insights into the biological mechanisms for the etiology of rheumatic diseases. Defining the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), may have important implications for understanding risk prediction, pathogenic mechanisms, cellular pathways, drug discovery, and prevention strategies. However, rheumatic diseases offer distinct challenges to researchers due to heterogeneity in disease phenotypes, low disease incidence, and geographic variation in both genetic and environmental factors. Emerging research areas, including epigenetics, metabolomics, and the microbiome, may provide additional links between genetic and environmental risk factors in rheumatic disease pathogenesis. This article reviews the methods used to establish genetic and environmental risk factors and to study gene-environment interactions in rheumatic diseases and provides specific examples of successes and challenges for identifying gene-environment interactions in RA, SLE, and AS. Finally, we describe how emerging research strategies may build upon previous discoveries as well as future challenges. PMID:25437282

  15. Passive Scalar Evolution in Peripheral Region

    E-print Network

    V. V. Lebedev; K. S. Turitsyn

    2003-09-05

    We consider evolution of a passive scalar (concentration of pollutants or temperature) in a chaotic (turbulent) flow. A universal asymptotic behavior of the passive scalar decay (homogenization) related to peripheral regions (near walls) is established. The passive scalar moments and its pair correlation function in the peripheral region are analyzed. A special case investigated in our paper is the passive scalar decay along a pipe.

  16. Gene-environment Interaction Models to Unmask Susceptibility Mechanisms in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Vivian P.; Ko, Novie; Holman, Theodore R.; Manning-Bo?, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) activity has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis are less understood. Gene-environment interaction models have utility in unmasking the impact of specific cellular pathways in toxicity that may not be observed using a solely genetic or toxicant disease model alone. To evaluate if distinct LOX isozymes selectively contribute to PD-related neurodegeneration, transgenic (i.e. 5-LOX and 12/15-LOX deficient) mice can be challenged with a toxin that mimics cell injury and death in the disorder. Here we describe the use of a neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which produces a nigrostriatal lesion to elucidate the distinct contributions of LOX isozymes to neurodegeneration related to PD. The use of MPTP in mouse, and nonhuman primate, is well-established to recapitulate the nigrostriatal damage in PD. The extent of MPTP-induced lesioning is measured by HPLC analysis of dopamine and its metabolites and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis of striatum for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of dopamine. To assess inflammatory markers, which may demonstrate LOX isozyme-selective sensitivity, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1 immunohistochemistry are performed on brain sections containing substantia nigra, and GFAP Western blot analysis is performed on striatal homogenates. This experimental approach can provide novel insights into gene-environment interactions underlying nigrostriatal degeneration and PD. PMID:24430802

  17. Bisphenol-A and Female Infertility: A Possible Role of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xiaona; Chen, Dan; He, Yonghua; Zhu, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA) is widely used and ubiquitous in the environment. Animal studies indicate that BPA affects reproduction, however, the gene-environment interaction mechanism(s) involved in this association remains unclear. We performed a literature review to summarize the evidence on this topic. Methods: A comprehensive search was conducted in PubMed using as keywords BPA, gene, infertility and female reproduction. Full-text articles in both human and animals published in English prior to December 2014 were selected. Results: Evidence shows that BPA can interfere with endocrine function of hypothalamic-pituitary axis, such as by changing gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) secretion in hypothalamus and promoting pituitary proliferation. Such actions affect puberty, ovulation and may even result in infertility. Ovary, uterus and other reproductive organs are also targets of BPA. BPA exposure impairs the structure and functions of female reproductive system in different times of life cycle and may contribute to infertility. Both epidemiological and experimental evidences demonstrate that BPA affects reproduction-related gene expression and epigenetic modification that are closely associated with infertility. The detrimental effects on reproduction may be lifelong and transgenerational. Conclusions: Evidence on gene-environment interactions, especially from human studies, is still limited. Further research on this topic is warranted. PMID:26371021

  18. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  19. Passive smoking.

    PubMed

    Lee, P N

    1982-04-01

    Before 1980 the argument that passive smoking was a serious health hazard was rather tenuous. It was claimed that it produced allergic reactions, impaired driving ability, reduced exercise tolerance in patients with cardiorespiratory disease and increased the risk of bronchitis and pneumonia in first-year children. However, none of these claims provided convincing evidence relevant to the normal healthy adult nonsmoker. Many studies indicate that nonsmokers are unlikely to inhale more than a very small amount of those components of tobacco smoke traditionally considered harmful. It was surprising, therefore, when a study carried out in the USA showed reduced airways function and studies from Japan and Greece showed an increased lung cancer incidence, in nonsmokers passively exposed to tobacco smoke in comparison with nonsmokers not so exposed. A review of the detail of these studies suggests that none provides conclusive evidence that passive smoking is seriously harmful, a view supported by a recent large study that was carried out in the USA and in which no significant relationship was found between passive smoking and lung cancer. More research is urgently needed, particularly to explore the influence of potentially confounding factors. PMID:7200942

  20. Externalizing Disorders and Environmental Risk: Mechanisms of Gene-Environment Interplay and Strategies for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Diana R.; Hicks, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Though heritable, externalizing disorders have a number of robust associations with several environmental risk factors, including family, school, and peer contexts. To account for these associations, we integrate a behavioral genetic perspective with principles of a developmental cascade theory of antisocial behavior. The major environmental contexts associated with child externalizing problems are reviewed, as are the processes of gene-environment interplay underlying these associations. Throughout, we discuss implications for prevention and intervention. Three major approaches designed to reduce child externalizing behavior are reviewed. Prevention and intervention programs appear to be most successful when they target individuals or communities most at risk for developing externalizing disorders, rather than applied universally. We end by commenting on areas in need of additional research concerning environmental influences on persistent externalizing behaviors. PMID:25485087

  1. Environmental and gene-environment interactions and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Deane, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors including hormones, dietary factors, infections and exposure to tobacco smoke as well as gene-environment interactions have been associated with increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Importantly, the growing understanding of the prolonged period prior to the first onset of symptoms of RA suggests that these environmental and genetic factors are likely acting to drive the development of RA-related autoimmunity long before the appearance of the first joint symptoms and clinical findings that are characteristic of RA. Herein we will review these factors and interactions, especially those that have been investigated in a prospective fashion prior to the symptomatic onset of RA. We will also discuss how these factors may be explored in future study to further the understanding of the pathogenesis of RA, and ultimately perhaps develop preventive measures for this disease. PMID:22819092

  2. Defining the Environment in Gene–Environment Research: Lessons From Social Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Jonathan; Freese, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we make the case that social epidemiology provides a useful framework to define the environment within gene–environment (G×E) research. We describe the environment in a multilevel, multidomain, longitudinal framework that accounts for upstream processes influencing health outcomes. We then illustrate the utility of this approach by describing how intermediate levels of social organization, such as neighborhoods or schools, are key environmental components of G×E research. We discuss different models of G×E research and encourage public health researchers to consider the value of including genetic information from their study participants. We also encourage researchers interested in G×E interplay to consider the merits of the social epidemiology model when defining the environment. PMID:23927514

  3. Gene-environment interaction in the etiology of mathematical ability using SNP sets.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Sophia J; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Mathematics ability and disability is as heritable as other cognitive abilities and disabilities, however its genetic etiology has received relatively little attention. In our recent genome-wide association study of mathematical ability in 10-year-old children, 10 SNP associations were nominated from scans of pooled DNA and validated in an individually genotyped sample. In this paper, we use a 'SNP set' composite of these 10 SNPs to investigate gene-environment (GE) interaction, examining whether the association between the 10-SNP set and mathematical ability differs as a function of ten environmental measures in the home and school in a sample of 1888 children with complete data. We found two significant GE interactions for environmental measures in the home and the school both in the direction of the diathesis-stress type of GE interaction: The 10-SNP set was more strongly associated with mathematical ability in chaotic homes and when parents are negative. PMID:20978832

  4. Two-stage testing procedures with independent filtering for genome-wide gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Kooperberg, Charles; Leblanc, Michael; Prentice, Ross L

    2012-12-01

    Several two-stage multiple testing procedures have been proposed to detect gene-environment interaction in genome-wide association studies. In this article, we elucidate general conditions that are required for validity and power of these procedures, and we propose extensions of two-stage procedures using the case-only estimator of gene-treatment interaction in randomized clinical trials. We develop a unified estimating equation approach to proving asymptotic independence between a filtering statistic and an interaction test statistic in a range of situations, including marginal association and interaction in a generalized linear model with a canonical link. We assess the performance of various two-stage procedures in simulations and in genetic studies from Women's Health Initiative clinical trials. PMID:23843674

  5. Testing Gene-Environment Interaction in Large-Scale Case-Control Association Studies: Possible Choices and Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; Ahn, Jaeil; Gruber, Stephen B.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2012-01-01

    Several methods for screening gene-environment interaction have recently been proposed that address the issue of using gene-environment independence in a data-adaptive way. In this report, the authors present a comparative simulation study of power and type I error properties of 3 classes of procedures: 1) the standard 1-step case-control method; 2) the case-only method that requires an assumption of gene-environment independence for the underlying population; and 3) a variety of hybrid methods, including empirical-Bayes, 2-step, and model averaging, that aim at gaining power by exploiting the assumption of gene-environment independence and yet can protect against false positives when the independence assumption is violated. These studies suggest that, although the case-only method generally has maximum power, it has the potential to create substantial false positives in large-scale studies even when a small fraction of markers are associated with the exposure under study in the underlying population. All the hybrid methods perform well in protecting against such false positives and yet can retain substantial power advantages over standard case-control tests. The authors conclude that, for future genome-wide scans for gene-environment interactions, major power gain is possible by using alternatives to standard case-control analysis. Whether a case-only type scan or one of the hybrid methods should be used depends on the strength and direction of gene-environment interaction and association, the level of tolerance for false positives, and the nature of replication strategies. PMID:22199027

  6. MAOA, childhood maltreatment and antisocial behavior: Meta-analysis of a gene-environment interaction

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Amy L.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Background In a seminal study of gene-environment interaction, childhood maltreatment predicted antisocial behavior more strongly in males carrying an MAOA promoter variant of lesser, compared to higher, transcriptional efficiency. Many further investigations have been reported, including studies of other early environmental exposures and females. Here we report a meta-analysis of studies testing the interaction of MAOA genotype and childhood adversities on antisocial outcomes in predominantly non-clinical samples. Method Included were 27 peer-reviewed, English-language studies published through August, 2012, that contained indicators of maltreatment or “other” family (e.g., parenting, sociodemographic) hardships; MAOA genotype; indices of aggressive and antisocial behavior; and statistical test of genotype-environment interaction. Studies of forensic and exclusively clinical samples, clinical cohorts lacking proportionally matched controls, or outcomes non-specific for antisocial behavior were excluded. The Liptak-Stouffer weighted Z-test for meta-analysis was implemented to maximize study inclusion and calculated separately for male and female cohorts. Results Across 20 male cohorts, early adversity presaged antisocial outcomes more strongly for low, relative to high, activity MAOA genotype (P=.0044). Stratified analyses showed the interaction specific to maltreatment (P=.0000008) and robust to several sensitivity analyses. Across 11 female cohorts, MAOA did not interact with combined early life adversities, whereas maltreatment alone predicted antisocial behaviors preferentially, but weakly, in females of high activity MAOA genotype (P=.02). Conclusions We found common regulatory variation in MAOA to moderate effects of childhood maltreatment on male antisocial behaviors, confirming a sentinel finding in research on gene-environment interaction. An analogous, but less consistent, finding in females warrants further investigation. PMID:23786983

  7. A Fast Multiple-Kernel Method With Applications to Detect Gene-Environment Interaction.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Rachel; Lu, Wenbin; Holloway, Shannon; Sale, Michèle M; Worrall, Bradford B; Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-09-01

    Kernel machine (KM) models are a powerful tool for exploring associations between sets of genetic variants and complex traits. Although most KM methods use a single kernel function to assess the marginal effect of a variable set, KM analyses involving multiple kernels have become increasingly popular. Multikernel analysis allows researchers to study more complex problems, such as assessing gene-gene or gene-environment interactions, incorporating variance-component based methods for population substructure into rare-variant association testing, and assessing the conditional effects of a variable set adjusting for other variable sets. The KM framework is robust, powerful, and provides efficient dimension reduction for multifactor analyses, but requires the estimation of high dimensional nuisance parameters. Traditional estimation techniques, including regularization and the "expectation-maximization (EM)" algorithm, have a large computational cost and are not scalable to large sample sizes needed for rare variant analysis. Therefore, under the context of gene-environment interaction, we propose a computationally efficient and statistically rigorous "fastKM" algorithm for multikernel analysis that is based on a low-rank approximation to the nuisance effect kernel matrices. Our algorithm is applicable to various trait types (e.g., continuous, binary, and survival traits) and can be implemented using any existing single-kernel analysis software. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that our algorithm has similar performance to an EM-based KM approach for quantitative traits while running much faster. We also apply our method to the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, examining gene-by-vitamin effects on recurrent stroke risk and gene-by-age effects on change in homocysteine level. PMID:26139508

  8. Imaging passive seismic data Brad Artman

    E-print Network

    Imaging passive seismic data Brad Artman brad@sep.stanford.edu Submitted to Geophysics March 2005, CA 94305-2215 ABSTRACT Passive seismic imaging is the process of synthesizing the wealth been developed for the manipulation of reflection seismic data. With a correlation-based imaging

  9. A database of gene-environment interactions pertaining to blood lipid traits, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the role of the environment – diet, exercise, alcohol and tobacco use and sleep among others – is accorded a more prominent role in modifying the relationship between genetic variants and clinical measures of disease, consideration of gene-environment (GxE) interactions is a must. To facilitate i...

  10. Research Review: Gene-Environment Interaction Research in Youth Depression--A Systematic Review with Recommendations for Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Erin C.; Uddin, Monica; Subramanian, S. V.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression is a major public health problem among youth, currently estimated to affect as many as 9% of US children and adolescents. The recognition that both genes (nature) and environments (nurture) are important for understanding the etiology of depression has led to a rapid growth in research exploring gene-environment interactions…

  11. Gene-Environment Interactions across Development: Exploring DRD2 Genotype and Prenatal Smoking Effects on Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Stopp, Christian; Respass, Jennifer; Stewart, Peter; Jameson, Travis R.; Gilbert, David G.; Huggenvik, Jodi I.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic factors dynamically interact with both pre- and postnatal environmental influences to shape development. Considerable attention has been devoted to gene-environment interactions (G x E) on important outcomes (A. Caspi & T. E. Moffitt, 2006). It is also important to consider the possibility that these G x E effects may vary across…

  12. Gene-Environment Interaction in Externalizing Problems among Adolescents: Evidence from the Pelotas 1993 Birth Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Christian; Hutz, Mara H.; Genro, Julia P.; Polanczyk, Guilherme V.; Anselmi, Luciana; Camey, Suzi; Hallal, Pedro C.; Barros, Fernando C.; Victora, Cesar G.; Menezes, Ana M. B.; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Background: The study of gene-environment interactions (G by E) is one of the most promising strategies to uncover the origins of mental disorders. Replication of initial findings, however, is essential because there is a strong possibility of publication bias in the literature. In addition, there is a scarcity of research on the topic originated…

  13. Lack of correlative enhancement of passive transfer of delayed-type hypersensitivity and antilisterial resistance when using concanavalin A-stimulated primed spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R A; Hinrichs, D J

    1983-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of resistance to Listeria monocytogenes can be significantly enhanced by in vitro incubation of primed murine spleen cells with concanavalin A (ConA) before transfer into syngeneic recipients. The level of transferred resistance, as measured by clearance of infectious organisms, can approach that observed in actively immunized mice. When delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses of passive transfer recipients were compared, there was no difference in the level of hypersensitivity exhibited by mice receiving either nonstimulated or ConA-stimulated, Listeria-immune spleen cells. In addition, the level of these adoptively transferred responses never approached the level of DTH observed in actively immunized mice. This inability of ConA-stimulated cells to enhance passive DTH in recipient mice was not dependent on the antigenic preparation of Listeria used to elicit the DTH response. Transfer of cultured, ConA-stimulated, Listeria-immune spleen cells did not lead either to specific or to nonspecific suppression of DTH responsiveness in actively immunized mice. These results indicate the possible existence of antigen-specific T-cells subpopulations which, after stimulation with ConA, exhibit differing efficiencies when responding in assays of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6404821

  14. CardioGxE, a catalog of gene-environment interactions for cardiometabolic traits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic understanding of complex traits has developed immensely over the past decade but remains hampered by incomplete descriptions of contribution to phenotypic variance. Gene-environment (GxE) interactions are one of these contributors and in the guise of diet and physical activity are important modulators of cardiometabolic phenotypes and ensuing diseases. Results We mined the scientific literature to collect GxE interactions from 386 publications for blood lipids, glycemic traits, obesity anthropometrics, vascular measures, inflammation and metabolic syndrome, and introduce CardioGxE, a gene-environment interaction resource. We then analyzed the genes and SNPs supporting cardiometabolic GxEs in order to demonstrate utility of GxE SNPs and to discern characteristics of these important genetic variants. We were able to draw many observations from our extensive analysis of GxEs. 1) The CardioGxE SNPs showed little overlap with variants identified by main effect GWAS, indicating the importance of environmental interactions with genetic factors on cardiometabolic traits. 2) These GxE SNPs were enriched in adaptation to climatic and geographical features, with implications on energy homeostasis and response to physical activity. 3) Comparison to gene networks responding to plasma cholesterol-lowering or regression of atherosclerotic plaques showed that GxE genes have a greater role in those responses, particularly through high-energy diets and fat intake, than do GWAS-identified genes for the same traits. Other aspects of the CardioGxE dataset were explored. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate that SNPs supporting cardiometabolic GxE interactions often exhibit transcriptional effects or are under positive selection. Still, not all such SNPs can be assigned potential functional or regulatory roles often because data are lacking in specific cell types or from treatments that approximate the environmental factor of the GxE. With research on metabolic related complex disease risk embarking on genome-wide GxE interaction tests, CardioGxE will be a useful resource. PMID:25368670

  15. Passive mm-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, R.; Lettington, A. H.

    This paper discusses the current status of Passive Millimeter Wave Radiometry as an imaging technique. The major problems are poor spatial resolution and lack of thermal sensitivity. Techniques for overcoming these difficulties are identified, including the use of aperture synthesis, multichannel receivers, correlation and inverse transform techniques.

  16. Passive millimetre-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Roger; Lettington, Alan H.

    1990-04-01

    This paper discusses the current status of Passive Millimetre Wave Radiometry as an imaging technique. The major problems are poor spatial resolution and lack of thermal sensitivity. Techniques for overcoming these difficulties are identified, including the use of aperture synthesis, multichannel receivers, correlation and inverse transform techniques.

  17. Pentachlorophenol in the indoor environment: evidence for a correlation between pentachlorophenol in passively deposited suspended particulate and in urine of exposed persons.

    PubMed

    Meissner, T; Schweinsberg, F

    1996-11-01

    Analysis of passively deposited suspended particulate (PDSP) proved to be a reliable and easily applicable method for the investigation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) exposure from indoor air. PDSP was analyzed after manual collection of samples in 78 rooms with wooden paneling, where earlier treatment with wood preservatives was suspected. Pentachlorophenol was quantitatively determined by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector following derivatization with acetic anhydride. For biological monitoring of PCP, morning urine specimens were collected from 135 persons living in the rooms investigated. After acidic hydrolysis, these samples were analyzed for PCP. The urine samples from 9% of the test-persons exceeded a PCP level of 10 micrograms/g creatinine. From this urine level, a corresponding PCP level of approximately 40 micrograms/g in PDSP could be calculated. These results show that there is still a considerable risk of exposure to PCP, even after a long period following treatment of wood with PCP-containing preservatives. PMID:8920743

  18. Gene?×?Environment Interactions in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Role of Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tordjman, Sylvie; Somogyi, Eszter; Coulon, Nathalie; Kermarrec, Solenn; Cohen, David; Bronsard, Guillaume; Bonnot, Olivier; Weismann-Arcache, Catherine; Botbol, Michel; Lauth, Bertrand; Ginchat, Vincent; Roubertoux, Pierre; Barburoth, Marianne; Kovess, Viviane; Geoffray, Marie-Maude; Xavier, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Several studies support currently the hypothesis that autism etiology is based on a polygenic and epistatic model. However, despite advances in epidemiological, molecular and clinical genetics, the genetic risk factors remain difficult to identify, with the exception of a few chromosomal disorders and several single gene disorders associated with an increased risk for autism. Furthermore, several studies suggest a role of environmental factors in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). First, arguments for a genetic contribution to autism, based on updated family and twin studies, are examined. Second, a review of possible prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal environmental risk factors for ASD are presented. Then, the hypotheses are discussed concerning the underlying mechanisms related to a role of environmental factors in the development of ASD in association with genetic factors. In particular, epigenetics as a candidate biological mechanism for gene?×?environment interactions is considered and the possible role of epigenetic mechanisms reported in genetic disorders associated with ASD is discussed. Furthermore, the example of in utero exposure to valproate provides a good illustration of epigenetic mechanisms involved in ASD and innovative therapeutic strategies. Epigenetic remodeling by environmental factors opens new perspectives for a better understanding, prevention, and early therapeutic intervention of ASD. PMID:25136320

  19. Gene–Environment Interaction in Major Depression: Focus on Experience-Dependent Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lopizzo, Nicola; Bocchio Chiavetto, Luisella; Cattane, Nadia; Plazzotta, Giona; Tarazi, Frank I.; Pariante, Carmine M.; Riva, Marco A.; Cattaneo, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a multifactorial and polygenic disorder, where multiple and partially overlapping sets of susceptibility genes interact each other and with the environment, predisposing individuals to the development of the illness. Thus, MDD results from a complex interplay of vulnerability genes and environmental factors that act cumulatively throughout individual’s lifetime. Among these environmental factors, stressful life experiences, especially those occurring early in life, have been suggested to exert a crucial impact on brain development, leading to permanent functional changes that may contribute to lifelong risk for mental health outcomes. In this review, we will discuss how genetic variants (polymorphisms, SNPs) within genes operating in neurobiological systems that mediate stress response and synaptic plasticity, can impact, by themselves, the vulnerability risk for MDD; we will also consider how this MDD risk can be further modulated when gene?×?environment interaction is taken into account. Finally, we will discuss the role of epigenetic mechanisms, and in particular of DNA methylation and miRNAs expression changes, in mediating the effect of the stress on the vulnerability risk to develop MDD. Taken together, we aim to underlie the role of genetic and epigenetic processes involved in stress- and neuroplasticity-related biological systems on the development of MDD after exposure to early life stress, thereby building the basis for future research and clinical interventions. PMID:26005424

  20. Mendelian Randomization for Strengthening Causal Inference in Observational Studies: Application to Gene × Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Smith, George Davey

    2010-09-01

    Identification of environmentally modifiable factors causally influencing disease risk is fundamental to public-health improvement strategies. Unfortunately, observational epidemiological studies are limited in their ability to reliably identify such causal associations, reflected in the many cases in which conventional epidemiological studies have apparently identified associations that randomized controlled trials have failed to verify. The use of genetic variants as proxy measures of exposure -an application of the Mendelian randomization principle-can contribute to strengthening causal inference. Genetic variants are not subject to bias due to reverse causation (disease processes influencing exposure, rather than vice versa) or recall bias, and if simple precautions are applied, they are not influenced by confounding or attenuation by errors. The principles of Mendelian randomization are illustrated with specific reference to studies of the effects of alcohol intake on various health-related outcomes through the utilization of genetic variants related to alcohol metabolism (in ALDH2 and ADH1B). Ways of incorporating Gene × Environment interactions into the Mendelian randomization framework are developed, and the strengths and limitations of the approach discussed. PMID:26162196

  1. Shame and Guilt-Proneness in Adolescents: Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Szentágotai-T?tar, Aurora; Chi?, Adina; Vulturar, Romana; Dobrean, Anca; Cândea, Diana Mirela; Miu, Andrei C.

    2015-01-01

    Rooted in people’s preoccupation with how they are perceived and evaluated, shame and guilt are self-conscious emotions that play adaptive roles in social behavior, but can also contribute to psychopathology when dysregulated. Shame and guilt-proneness develop during childhood and adolescence, and are influenced by genetic and environmental factors that are little known to date. This study investigated the effects of early traumatic events and functional polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the serotonin transporter gene promoter (5-HTTLPR) on shame and guilt in adolescents. A sample of N = 271 healthy adolescents between 14 and 17 years of age filled in measures of early traumatic events and proneness to shame and guilt, and were genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. Results of moderator analyses indicated that trauma intensity was positively associated with guilt-proneness only in carriers of the low-expressing Met allele of BDNF Val66Met. This is the first study that identifies a gene-environment interaction that significantly contributes to guilt proneness in adolescents, with potential implications for developmental psychopathology. PMID:26230319

  2. Environmental factors as modulators of neurodegeneration: insights from gene-environment interactions in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2015-05-01

    Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases with established gene-environment interactions, Huntington's disease (HD) is viewed as a disorder governed by genetics. The cause of the disease is a highly penetrant tandem repeat expansion encoding an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. In the year 2000, a pioneering study showed that the disease could be delayed in transgenic mice by enriched housing conditions. This review describes subsequent human and preclinical studies identifying environmental modulation of motor, cognitive, affective and other symptoms found in HD. Alongside the behavioral observations we also discuss potential mechanisms and the relevance to other neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In mouse models of HD, increased sensorimotor and cognitive stimulation can delay or ameliorate various endophenotypes. Potential mechanisms include increased trophic support, synaptic plasticity, adult neurogenesis, and other forms of experience-dependent cellular plasticity. Subsequent clinical investigations support a role for lifetime activity levels in modulating the onset and progression of HD. Stress can accelerate memory and olfactory deficits and exacerbate cellular dysfunctions in HD mice. In the absence of effective treatments to slow the course of HD, environmental interventions offer feasible approaches to delay the disease, however further preclinical and human studies are needed in order to generate clinical recommendations. Environmental interventions could be combined with future pharmacological therapies and stimulate the identification of enviromimetics, drugs which mimic or enhance the beneficial effects of cognitive stimulation and physical activity. PMID:25770041

  3. Gene × Environment Interactions in Reading Disability and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Bruce F.; McGrath, Lauren M.; Rosenberg, Jenni; Barnard, Holly; Smith, Shelley D.; Munroe, Hattie B.; Willcutt, Erik G.; Friend, Angela; DeFries, John C.; Olson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions in two comorbid developmental disorders—reading disability (RD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—as a window on broader issues on G × E interactions in developmental psychology. The authors first briefly review types of G × E interactions, methods for detecting them, and challenges researchers confront in interpreting such interactions. They then review previous evidence for G × E interactions in RD and ADHD, the directions of which are opposite to each other: bioecological for RD and diathesis stress for ADHD. Given these results, the authors formulate and test predictions about G × E interactions that would be expected at the favorable end of each symptom dimension (e.g., above-average reading or attention). Consistent with their prediction, the authors found initial evidence for a resilience interaction for above-average reading: higher heritability in the presence of lower parental education. However, they did not find a G × E interaction at the favorable end of the ADHD symptom dimension. The authors conclude with implications for future research. PMID:19209992

  4. Methods for investigating gene-environment interactions in candidate pathway and genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the considerable enthusiasm about the yield of novel and replicated discoveries of genetic associations from the new generation of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the proportion of the heritability of most complex diseases that have been studied to date remains small. Some of this "dark matter" could be due to gene-environment (G x E) interactions or more complex pathways involving multiple genes and exposures. We review the basic epidemiologic study design and statistical analysis approaches to studying G x E interactions individually and then consider more comprehensive approaches to studying entire pathways or GWAS data. In addition to the usual issues in genetic association studies, particular care is needed in exposure assessment, and very large sample sizes are required. Although hypothesis-driven, pathway-based and agnostic GWA study approaches are generally viewed as opposite poles, we suggest that the two can be usefully married using hierarchical modeling strategies that exploit external pathway knowledge in mining genome-wide data. PMID:20070199

  5. Gene × environment interaction on intergroup bias: the role of 5-HTTLPR and perceived outgroup threat.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Bobby K; Livingston, Robert W; Hong, Ying-Yi; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-09-01

    Perceived threat from outgroups is a consistent social-environmental antecedent of intergroup bias (i.e. prejudice, ingroup favoritism). The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) has been associated with individual variations in sensitivity to context, particularly stressful and threatening situations. Here, we examined how 5-HTTLPR and environmental factors signaling potential outgroup threat dynamically interact to shape intergroup bias. Across two studies, we provide novel evidence for a gene-environment interaction on the acquisition of intergroup bias and prejudice. Greater exposure to signals of outgroup threat, such as negative prior contact with outgroups and perceived danger from the social environment, were more predictive of intergroup bias among participants possessing at least one short allele (vs two long alleles) of 5-HTTLPR. Furthermore, this gene x environment interaction was observed for biases directed at diverse ethnic and arbitrarily-defined outgroups across measures reflecting intergroup biases in evaluation and discriminatory behavior. These findings reveal a candidate genetic mechanism for the acquisition of intergroup bias, and suggest that intergroup bias is dually inherited and transmitted through the interplay of social (i.e. contextual cues of outgroup threat) and biological mechanisms (i.e. genetic sensitivity toward threatening contexts) that regulate perceived intergroup threats. PMID:23887814

  6. Genome-wide analysis of gestational gene-environment interactions in the developing kidney

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Yao, Xiao; Bachvarov, Dimcho; Saifudeen, Zubaida

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled bradykinin B2 receptor (Bdkrb2) plays an important role in regulation of blood pressure under conditions of excess salt intake. Our previous work has shown that Bdkrb2 also plays a developmental role since Bdkrb2?/? embryos, but not their wild-type or heterozygous littermates, are prone to renal dysgenesis in response to gestational high salt intake. Although impaired terminal differentiation and apoptosis are consistent findings in the Bdkrb2?/? mutant kidneys, the developmental pathways downstream of gene-environment interactions leading to the renal phenotype remain unknown. Here, we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling on embryonic kidneys from salt-stressed Bdkrb2+/+ and Bdkrb2?/? embryos. The results reveal significant alterations in key pathways regulating Wnt signaling, apoptosis, embryonic development, and cell-matrix interactions. In silico analysis reveal that nearly 12% of differentially regulated genes harbor one or more Pax2 DNA-binding sites in their promoter region. Further analysis shows that metanephric kidneys of salt-stressed Bdkrb2?/? have a significant downregulation of Pax2 gene expression. This was corroborated in Bdkrb2?/?;Pax2GFP+/tg mice, demonstrating that Pax2 transcriptional activity is significantly repressed by gestational salt-Bdkrb2 interactions. We conclude that gestational gene (Bdkrb2) and environment (salt) interactions cooperate to impact gene expression programs in the developing kidney. Suppression of Pax2 likely contributes to the defects in epithelial survival, growth, and differentiation in salt-stressed BdkrB2?/? mice. PMID:25005792

  7. Characterization of gene-environment interactions for colorectal cancer susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Slattery, Martha L; Pflugeisen, Bethann M; Lin, Yi; Duggan, David; Nan, Hongmei; Lemire, Mathieu; Rangrej, Jagadish; Figueiredo, Jane C; Jiao, Shuo; Harrison, Tabitha A; Liu, Yan; Chen, Lin S; Stelling, Deanna L; Warnick, Greg S; Hoffmeister, Michael; Küry, Sébastien; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward; Hazra, Aditi; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gallinger, Steven; Zanke, Brent W; Brenner, Hermann; Frank, Bernd; Ma, Jing; Ulrich, Cornelia M; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A; Kooperberg, Charles; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Prentice, Ross L; Jackson, Rebecca D; Schoen, Robert E; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Hayes, Richard B; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Hsu, Li; Bézieau, Stéphane; Chan, Andrew T; Hudson, Thomas J; Peters, Ulrike

    2012-04-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than a dozen loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Here, we examined potential effect-modification between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at 10 of these loci and probable or established environmental risk factors for CRC in 7,016 CRC cases and 9,723 controls from nine cohort and case-control studies. We used meta-analysis of an efficient empirical-Bayes estimator to detect potential multiplicative interactions between each of the SNPs [rs16892766 at 8q23.3 (EIF3H/UTP23), rs6983267 at 8q24 (MYC), rs10795668 at 10p14 (FLJ3802842), rs3802842 at 11q23 (LOC120376), rs4444235 at 14q22.2 (BMP4), rs4779584 at 15q13 (GREM1), rs9929218 at 16q22.1 (CDH1), rs4939827 at 18q21 (SMAD7), rs10411210 at 19q13.1 (RHPN2), and rs961253 at 20p12.3 (BMP2)] and select major CRC risk factors (sex, body mass index, height, smoking status, aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, alcohol use, and dietary intake of calcium, folate, red meat, processed meat, vegetables, fruit, and fiber). The strongest statistical evidence for a gene-environment interaction across studies was for vegetable consumption and rs16892766, located on chromosome 8q23.3, near the EIF3H and UTP23 genes (nominal P(interaction) = 1.3 × 10(-4); adjusted P = 0.02). The magnitude of the main effect of the SNP increased with increasing levels of vegetable consumption. No other interactions were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, the association of most CRC susceptibility loci identified in initial GWAS seems to be invariant to the other risk factors considered; however, our results suggest potential modification of the rs16892766 effect by vegetable consumption. PMID:22367214

  8. Sleep Duration and Body Mass Index in Twins: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Weigle, David S.; Goldberg, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on body mass index (BMI). Design: Genotype-environment interaction twin study. Setting: University of Washington Twin Registry. Patients or Participants: A population-based sample of US twins (1,088 pairs, 604 monozygotic, 484 dizygotic; 66% female; mean age = 36.6 yr, standard deviation (SD) = 15.9 yr). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants self-reported information on height, weight, and sleep. Mean BMI was calculated as 25.3 kg/m2 (SD = 5.4) and mean habitual sleep duration was 7.2 hr/night (SD = 1.2). Data were analyzed using biometric genetic interaction models. Overall the heritability of sleep duration was 34%. Longer sleep duration was associated with decreased BMI (P < 0.05). The heritability of BMI when sleep duration was < 7 hr (h2 = 70%) was more than twice as large as the heritability of BMI when sleep duration was ? 9 hr (h2 = 32%); this interaction was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Shorter sleep duration is associated with increased BMI and increased genetic influences on BMI, suggesting that shorter sleep duration increases expression of genetic risks for high body weight. At the same time, longer sleep duration may suppress genetic influences on body weight. Future research aiming to identify specific genotypes for BMI may benefit by considering the moderating role of sleep duration. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Weigle DS; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and body mass index in twins: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2012;35(5):597-603. PMID:22547885

  9. G x E: a NIAAA workshop on gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Gunzerath, Lorraine; Goldman, David

    2003-03-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) sponsored a May 2002 workshop on gene-environment interaction (G x E) research to identify potential roadblocks to further research and to propose solutions to those roadblocks, to optimize investigative opportunities and multidisciplinary or multi-institution collaborations, and to explore ways that NIAAA can facilitate G x E studies. Sessions included panels on animal models; phenotypes; genetic findings in humans; study designs and analytical methods; and assessment of environmental risk. Key among the identified challenges to progress in G x E research were issues of study design and sampling strategies; logistic and methodological costs and constraints; availability and understanding of data analysis techniques; potential stigmatization of study populations; and organizational/bureaucratic structures that are inadequate to address the unique needs of large-scale, multicenter, longitudinal projects. Participants proposed a series of recommendations to address these issues. Session coordinators included: Gayle Boyd, Kendall Bryant, Page Chiapella, Vivian Faden, David Goldman, and Antonio Noronha. Session participants included: Laura Almasy, Henri Begleiter, Raul Caetano, Bruce Dudek, Mary Dufour, Cindy Ehlers, Mary-Anne Enoch, Joel Gelernter, David Goldman, Bridget Grant, Lorraine Gunzerath, Deborah Hasin, Andrew Heath, Victor Hesselbrock, J. Dee Higley, Shirley Hill, Kerry Jang, Raynard S. Kington, Rick Kittles, George Koob, Kenneth Leonard, Ting-Kai Li, Jeffrey Long, William McBride, Matthew McGue, Kathleen Merikangas, Tamara Phillips, Bernice Porjesz, Carol Prescott, Theodore Reich, John Rice, Richard Rose, Charmaine Royal, Arnold Sameroff, Marc Schuckit, Kenneth Sher, Renee Sieving, Robert Taylor, Michael Windle, and Robert Zucker. PMID:12658122

  10. Study design: Evaluating gene–environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer – the WECARE study

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Langholz, Bryan; Haile, Robert W; Bernstein, Leslie; Thomas, Duncan C; Stovall, Marilyn; Malone, Kathleen E; Lynch, Charles F; Olsen, Jørgen H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Shore, Roy E; Boice, John D; Berkowitz, Gertrud S; Gatti, Richard A; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Smith, Susan A; Rosenstein, Barry S; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Concannon, Patrick; Thompson, W Douglas

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Deficiencies in cellular responses to DNA damage can predispose to cancer. Ionizing radiation can cause cluster damage and double-strand breaks (DSBs) that pose problems for cellular repair processes. Three genes (ATM, BRCA1, and BRCA2) encode products that are essential for the normal cellular response to DSBs, but predispose to breast cancer when mutated. Design To examine the joint roles of radiation exposure and genetic susceptibility in the etiology of breast cancer, we designed a case-control study nested within five population-based cancer registries. We hypothesized that a woman carrying a mutant allele in one of these genes is more susceptible to radiation-induced breast cancer than is a non-carrier. In our study, 700 women with asynchronous bilateral breast cancer were individually matched to 1400 controls with unilateral breast cancer on date and age at diagnosis of the first breast cancer, race, and registry region, and counter-matched on radiation therapy. Each triplet comprised two women who received radiation therapy and one woman who did not. Radiation absorbed dose to the contralateral breast after initial treatment was estimated with a comprehensive dose reconstruction approach that included experimental measurements in anthropomorphic and water phantoms applying patient treatment parameters. Blood samples were collected from all participants for genetic analyses. Conclusions Our study design improves the potential for detecting gene–environment interactions for diseases when both gene mutations and the environmental exposures of interest are rare in the general population. This is particularly applicable to the study of bilateral breast cancer because both radiation dose and genetic susceptibility have important etiologic roles, possibly by interactive mechanisms. By using counter-matching, we optimized the informativeness of the collected dosimetry data by increasing the variability of radiation dose within the case–control sets and enhanced our ability to detect radiation–genotype interactions. PMID:15084244

  11. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10?07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10?05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  12. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: influence of gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of "environmental cardiology". Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of "personalized intervention program". PMID:19028510

  13. The developmental origins of externalizing behavioral problems: parental disengagement and the role of gene-environment interplay.

    PubMed

    Boutwell, Brian B; Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, James C; Vaske, Jamie

    2012-05-30

    A line of research has revealed that the influence of genes on behavioral development is closely tied to environmental experiences. Known as gene-environment interaction, research in this area is beginning to reveal that variation in parenting behaviors may moderate genetic influences on antisocial behaviors in children. Despite growing interest in gene-environment interaction research, little evidence exists concerning the role of maternal disengagement in the conditioning of genetic influences on childhood behavioral problems. The current study is intended to address this gap in the literature by analyzing a sample of twin pairs drawn from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). Analysis of the ECLS-B provided evidence that maternal disengagement moderates genetic influences on the development of externalizing problems. PMID:22421070

  14. The Challenge of Causal Inference in Gene–Environment Interaction Research: Leveraging Research Designs From the Social Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Dalton

    2013-01-01

    The integration of genetics and the social sciences will lead to a more complex understanding of the articulation between social and biological processes, although the empirical difficulties inherent in this integration are large. One key challenge is the implications of moving “outside the lab” and away from the experimental tools available for research with model organisms. Social science research methods used to examine human behavior in nonexperimental, real-world settings to date have not been fully taken advantage of during this disciplinary integration, especially in the form of gene–environment interaction research. This article outlines and provides examples of several prominent research designs that should be used in gene–environment research and highlights a key benefit to geneticists of working with social scientists. PMID:23927518

  15. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  16. Power and sample size calculations for case-control studies of gene-environment interactions with a polytomous exposure variable.

    PubMed

    Foppa, I; Spiegelman, D

    1997-10-01

    Genetic polymorphisms may appear to the epidemiologist most commonly as different levels of susceptibility to exposure. Epidemiologic studies of heterogeneity in exposure susceptibility aim at estimating the parameter quantifying the gene-environment interaction. In this paper, the authors use a general approach to power and sample size calculations for case-control studies, which is applicable to settings where the exposure variable is polytomous and where the assumption of independence between the distribution of the genotype and the environmental factor may not be met. It was found through exploration of different scenarios that in the cases explored, power calculations were relatively insensitive to assumptions about the odds ratio for the exposure in the referent genotype category and to assumptions about the odds ratio for the genetic factor in the lowest exposure category, yet they were relatively sensitive to assumptions about gene frequency, particularly when gene frequency was low. In general, to detect a small to moderate gene-environment interaction effect, large sample sizes are needed. Because the examples studied represent only a small subset of possible scenarios that could occur in practice, the authors encourage the use of their user-friendly Fortran program for calculating power and sample size for gene-environment interactions with exposures grouped by quantiles that are explicitly tailored to the study at hand. PMID:9326439

  17. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  18. Estimating primaries from passive seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hao; Wang, De-Li; Feng, Fei; Zhu, Heng

    2015-12-01

    Passive seismic sources can generally be divided into transient sources and noise sources. Noise sources are particularly the continuous, random small bursts, like background noise. The virtual-shot gathers obtained by the traditional cross-correlation algorithm from passive seismic data not only contain primaries, but also include surface-related multiples. Through estimating primaries by sparse inversion, we can directly obtain primaries from passive seismic data activated by transient sources, which are free of surface-related multiples. The problem of estimating primaries from passive seismic data activated by noise sources has not been discussed to date. First, by introducing the optimisation problem via the L1-norm constraint, this paper makes the traditional method of estimating primaries by sparse inversion from passive seismic data activated by transient sources improved, which overcomes the time-window problem. During the sparse inversion, the sparsifying transform, S = C2?W, is introduced. In the sparsifying-transform domain, the transformed data is more sparse, so the solution becomes more accurate. Second, this paper proposes estimating primaries from passive seismic data activated by noise sources. In the case of the sparse assumption not holding, we use the least-squares method based on the principle of minimum energy to estimate primaries from passive seismic data using the noise sources. Finally, we compare the primaries estimated from passive seismic data using transient sources and noise sources and analyse the characteristics of the estimated primaries obtained from two passive seismic data.

  19. Toward a 3D model of human brain development for studying gene/environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This project aims to establish and characterize an in vitro model of the developing human brain for the purpose of testing drugs and chemicals. To accurately assess risk, a model needs to recapitulate the complex interactions between different types of glial cells and neurons in a three-dimensional platform. Moreover, human cells are preferred over cells from rodents to eliminate cross-species differences in sensitivity to chemicals. Previously, we established conditions to culture rat primary cells as three-dimensional aggregates, which will be humanized and evaluated here with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The use of iPSCs allows us to address gene/environment interactions as well as the potential of chemicals to interfere with epigenetic mechanisms. Additionally, iPSCs afford us the opportunity to study the effect of chemicals during very early stages of brain development. It is well recognized that assays for testing toxicity in the developing brain must consider differences in sensitivity and susceptibility that arise depending on the time of exposure. This model will reflect critical developmental processes such as proliferation, differentiation, lineage specification, migration, axonal growth, dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis, which will probably display differences in sensitivity to different types of chemicals. Functional endpoints will evaluate the complex cell-to-cell interactions that are affected in neurodevelopment through chemical perturbation, and the efficacy of drug intervention to prevent or reverse phenotypes. The model described is designed to assess developmental neurotoxicity effects on unique processes occurring during human brain development by leveraging human iPSCs from diverse genetic backgrounds, which can be differentiated into different cell types of the central nervous system. Our goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of the personalized model using iPSCs derived from individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders caused by known mutations and chromosomal aberrations. Notably, such a human brain model will be a versatile tool for more complex testing platforms and strategies as well as research into central nervous system physiology and pathology. PMID:24564953

  20. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  1. Dynamics of Passive Scalars and Probe Particles in Driven

    E-print Network

    Dynamics of Passive Scalars and Probe Particles in Driven Diffusive Systems Sakuntala Chatterjee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Probe Particles in a Driven Diffusive Medium . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2 Dynamics of Passive-correlation Function in Steady State . . . . . . . . . 23 2.3.2 Space-time Correlation Function in Steady State

  2. The passive imaging of the Philippine Sea slab underneath Tokai region in Japan inferred from cross-correlation analysis of teleseismic S coda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, T.; Nishida, K.; Watanabe, T.; Shiomi, K.

    2008-12-01

    The seismic interferometry has recently been developed practically and theoretically for monitoring subsurface structure. The spatial correlation of wave fields, such as noise and coda, at two receivers describes a wave field that is recorded at a receiver if there was a source at the other, the Green"fs function. If such a wave field between the two receivers can be retrieved, it would be possible to detect scattered or reflected phases from subsurface structure by taking migration with the cross correlated functions. In this study we applied the this technique to teleseismic S-coda observed at Hi-net tiltmeters, deployed by NIED, to investigate crustal and uppermost mantle structure, especially the Philippine Sea slab, underneath Tokai region in Japan. We used 246 teleseismic events with magnitudes 5.5 or larger for a period from April 2003 to Dec 2007, and applied bandpass filter of 0.05-0.5 Hz to S-coda on radial component. The time-window used in this study is 20 sec before and 500 sec after the S arrival. The specific features for calculating cross correlation functions used in this study is the followings that effectively enhance the effect of S-coda portion: we subtracted the effect of microseisms, depressed the portion of source-time function by applying taper, and removed the effects of later phases, such as ScS and SS. After these processing, we stacked the cross- correlated waveforms with good S/N ratios among all teleseismic events, and made cross-sections by taking migration technique. In the Tokai region, the Philippine Sea slab subducts west-northwestwards from the Nankai trough. A resultant migrated image for Tokai region clearly shows a dipping feature corresponding to the Philippine Sea slab, and this feature is good agreement with the hypocenter distribution. The dipping feature just below the hypocenters presumably corresponds to the oceanic Moho inside the slab, implying that this technique can be used to detect body waves. However, the continental Moho seems to be unclear in northern part of the cross-section, presumably due to a lack of station density. Moreover, another migrated image also shows a clear features corresponding to the Philippine Sea slab underneath central Japan.

  3. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  4. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  5. Conceptual Shifts Needed to Understand the Dynamic Interactions of Genes, Environment, Epigenetics, Social Processes, and Behavioral Choices

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Mihai D.; Jackson, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Social and behavioral research in public health is often intimately tied to profound, but frequently neglected, biological influences from underlying genetic, environmental, and epigenetic events. The dynamic interplay between the life, social, and behavioral sciences often remains underappreciated and underutilized in addressing complex diseases and disorders and in developing effective remediation strategies. Using a case-study format, we present examples as to how the inclusion of genetic, environmental, and epigenetic data can augment social and behavioral health research by expanding the parameters of such studies, adding specificity to phenotypic assessments, and providing additional internal control in comparative studies. We highlight the important roles of gene–environment interactions and epigenetics as sources of phenotypic change and as a bridge between the life and social and behavioral sciences in the development of robust interdisciplinary analyses. PMID:23927503

  6. Conceptual shifts needed to understand the dynamic interactions of genes, environment, epigenetics, social processes, and behavioral choices.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Fatimah L C; Niculescu, Mihai D; Jackson, Robert T

    2013-10-01

    Social and behavioral research in public health is often intimately tied to profound, but frequently neglected, biological influences from underlying genetic, environmental, and epigenetic events. The dynamic interplay between the life, social, and behavioral sciences often remains underappreciated and underutilized in addressing complex diseases and disorders and in developing effective remediation strategies. Using a case-study format, we present examples as to how the inclusion of genetic, environmental, and epigenetic data can augment social and behavioral health research by expanding the parameters of such studies, adding specificity to phenotypic assessments, and providing additional internal control in comparative studies. We highlight the important roles of gene-environment interactions and epigenetics as sources of phenotypic change and as a bridge between the life and social and behavioral sciences in the development of robust interdisciplinary analyses. PMID:23927503

  7. A Twin and Adoption Study of Reading Achievement: Exploration of Shared-Environmental and Gene-Environment-Interaction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; Legrand, Lisa N.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Existing behavior-genetic research implicates substantial influence of heredity and modest influence of shared environment on reading achievement and reading disability. Applying DeFries-Fulker analysis to a combined sample of twins and adoptees (N = 4,886, including 266 reading-disabled probands), the present study replicates prior findings of considerable heritability for both reading achievement and reading disability. A simple biometric model adequately described parent and offspring data (combined N = 9,430 parents and offspring) across differing types of families present in the sample Analyses yielded a high heritability estimate (around 0.70) and a negligible shared-environmentality estimate for both reading achievement and reading disability. No evidence of gene × environment interaction was found for parental reading ability and parental educational attainment, the two moderators analyzed. PMID:21743785

  8. Gene-environment interaction effects on lung function- a genome-wide association study within the Framingham heart study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies in occupational exposure and lung function have focused only on the main effect of occupational exposure or genetics on lung function. Some disease-susceptible genes may be missed due to their low marginal effects, despite potential involvement in the disease process through interactions with the environment. Through comprehensive genome-wide gene-environment interaction studies, we can uncover these susceptibility genes. Our objective in this study was to explore gene by occupational exposure interaction effects on lung function using both the individual SNPs approach and the genetic network approach. Methods The study population comprised the Offspring Cohort and the Third Generation from the Framingham Heart Study. We used forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) as outcomes. Occupational exposures were classified using a population-specific job exposure matrix. We performed genome-wide gene-environment interaction analysis, using the Affymetrix 550 K mapping array for genotyping. A linear regression-based generalized estimating equation was applied to account for within-family relatedness. Network analysis was conducted using results from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-level analyses and from gene expression study results. Results There were 4,785 participants in total. SNP-level analysis and network analysis identified SNP rs9931086 (Pinteraction =1.16 × 10-7) in gene SLC38A8, which may significantly modify the effects of occupational exposure on FEV1. Genes identified from the network analysis included CTLA-4, HDAC, and PPAR-alpha. Conclusions Our study implies that SNP rs9931086 in SLC38A8 and genes CTLA-4, HDAC, and PPAR-alpha, which are related to inflammatory processes, may modify the effect of occupational exposure on lung function. PMID:24289273

  9. Gene-environment and protein-degradation signatures characterize genomic and phenotypic diversity in wild Caenorhabditis elegans populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analyzing and understanding the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes is at the heart of genetics. Research on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been instrumental for unraveling genotype-phenotype relations, and has important implications for understanding the biology of mammals, but almost all studies, including forward and reverse genetic screens, are limited by investigations in only one canonical genotype. This hampers the detection and functional analysis of allelic variants, which play a key role in controlling many complex traits. It is therefore essential to explore the full potential of the natural genetic variation and evolutionary context of the genotype-phenotype map in wild C. elegans populations. Results We used multiple wild C. elegans populations freshly isolated from local sites to investigate gene sequence polymorphisms and a multitude of phenotypes including the transcriptome, fitness, and behavioral traits. The genotype, transcriptome, and a number of fitness traits showed a direct link with the original site of the strains. The separation between the isolation sites was prevalent on all chromosomes, but chromosome V was the largest contributor to this variation. These results were supported by a differential food preference of the wild isolates for naturally co-existing bacterial species. Comparing polymorphic genes between the populations with a set of genes extracted from 19 different studies on gene expression in C. elegans exposed to biotic and abiotic factors, such as bacteria, osmotic pressure, and temperature, revealed a significant enrichment for genes involved in gene-environment interactions and protein degradation. Conclusions We found that wild C. elegans populations are characterized by gene-environment signatures, and we have unlocked a wealth of genotype-phenotype relations for the first time. Studying natural isolates provides a treasure trove of evidence compared with that unearthed by the current research in C. elegans, which covers only a diminutive part of the myriad of genotype-phenotype relations that are present in the wild. PMID:23957880

  10. Characterization of 9p24 risk locus and colorectal adenoma and cancer: gene-environment interaction and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kocarnik, Jonathan D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Slattery, Martha L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Hsu, Li; Duggan, David J.; Muehling, Jill; Caan, Bette J.; Beresford, Shirley A.A.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Sarto, Gloria E.; Marshall, James R.; Hammad, Nazik; Wallace, Robert B.; Makar, Karen W.; Prentice, Ross L.; Potter, John D.; Hayes, Richard B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Background A potential susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer on chromosome 9p24 (rs719725) was initially identified through a genome-wide association study, though replication attempts have been inconclusive. Methods We genotyped this locus and explored interactions with known risk factors as potential sources of heterogeneity, which may explain the previously inconsistent replication. We included Caucasians with colorectal adenoma or colorectal cancer and controls from four studies (total 3891 cases, 4490 controls): the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI); the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle Study (DALS); a Minnesota population-based case-control study (MinnCCS); and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO). We used logistic regression to evaluate the association and test for gene-environment interactions. Results SNP rs719725 was statistically significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer in WHI (OR per A allele 1.19; 95% CI 1.01–1.40; p-trend 0.04), marginally associated with adenoma risk in PLCO (OR per A allele 1.11; 95% CI 0.99–1.25; p-trend 0.07), and not associated in DALS and MinnCCS. Evaluating for gene-environment interactions yielded no consistent results across the studies. A meta-analysis of seventeen studies (including these four) gave an OR per A allele of 1.07 (95% CI 1.03–1.12; p-trend 0.001). Conclusions Our results suggest the A allele for SNP rs719725 at locus 9p24 is positively associated with a small increase in risk for colorectal tumors. Environmental risk factors for colorectal cancer do not appear to explain heterogeneity across studies. Impact If this finding is supported by further replication and functional studies, it may highlight new pathways underlying colorectal neoplasia. PMID:20978172

  11. Passive Identification and Analysis of TCP Anomalies

    E-print Network

    environments and to protocol engineering as well. We apply the proposed heuristic to traffic traces collected- switched data networks, like the Erlang teletraffic theory in telephone networks. By focusing on passive for a number of reasons. First, traffic analysis is made very difficult by the correlations both in space

  12. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  13. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  14. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area. PMID:26545598

  15. Most energetic passive states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Hovhannisyan, Karen V.; Huber, Marcus; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Tura, Jordi; Acín, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Passive states are defined as those states that do not allow for work extraction in a cyclic (unitary) process. Within the set of passive states, thermal states are the most stable ones: they maximize the entropy for a given energy, and similarly they minimize the energy for a given entropy. Here we find the passive states lying in the other extreme, i.e., those that maximize the energy for a given entropy, which we show also minimize the entropy when the energy is fixed. These extremal properties make these states useful to obtain fundamental bounds for the thermodynamics of finite-dimensional quantum systems, which we show in several scenarios.

  16. Evidence of Gene–Environment Interactions between Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Loci and Established Environmental Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John L.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; The GENICA Network; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; kConFab; Group, AOCS Management; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine M.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Doody, Michele M.; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene–environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction?=?2.4×10?6) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction?=?3.1×10?4). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01–1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96–1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16–1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85–0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14–1.85) in those who drank ?20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction?=?5.3×10?5), with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11–1.17) in parous women and 0.98 (0.92–1.05) in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors. PMID:23544014

  17. Passive microfluidic interconnects

    E-print Network

    Jonnalagadda, Aparna S

    2005-01-01

    Equipment and procedures were developed to test two passive microfluidic interconnect rings held together by the friction forces on the contact surfaces. The second design forms fluid seals by means of thin flared rings ...

  18. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  19. Linking the serotonin transporter gene, family environments, hippocampal volume and depression onset: A prospective imaging gene × environment analysis.

    PubMed

    Little, Keriann; Olsson, Craig A; Youssef, George J; Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Yücel, Murat; Sheeber, Lisa B; Foley, Debra L; Allen, Nicholas B

    2015-11-01

    A single imaging gene-environment (IGxE) framework that is able to simultaneously model genetic, neurobiological, and environmental influences on psychopathology outcomes is needed to improve understanding of how complex interrelationships between allelic variation, differences in neuroanatomy or neuroactivity, and environmental experience affect risk for psychiatric disorder. In a longitudinal study of adolescent development we demonstrate the utility of such an IGxE framework by testing whether variation in parental behavior at age 12 altered the strength of an imaging genetics pathway, involving an indirect association between allelic variation in the serotonin transporter gene to variation in hippocampal volume and consequent onset of major depressive disorder by age 18. Results were consistent with the presence of an indirect effect of the serotonin transporter S-allele on depression onset via smaller left and right hippocampal volumes that was significant only in family environments involving either higher levels of parental aggression or lower levels of positive parenting. The previously reported finding of S-allele carriers' increased risk of depression in adverse environments may, therefore, be partly because of the effects of these environments on a neurobiological pathway from the serotonin transporter gene to depression onset that proceeds through variation in hippocampal volume. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26595471

  20. Muscle Quality and Myosteatosis: Novel Associations With Mortality Risk: The Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Ilse; Murphy, Rachel A; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Visser, Marjolein; Launer, Lenore; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jonsson, Palmi V; Lang, Thomas F; Harris, Tamara B

    2016-01-01

    Muscle composition may affect mortality risk, but prior studies have been limited to specific samples or less precise determination of muscle composition. We evaluated associations of thigh muscle composition, determined using computed tomography imaging, and knee extension strength with mortality risk among 4,824 participants aged 76.4 (standard deviation (SD), 5.5) years from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (2002-2006). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios. After 8.8 years of follow-up, there were 1,942 deaths. For men, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 11% and 22%. Each SD-increment increase in intermuscular adipose tissue and intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with higher mortality risk (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.22) and HR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.30), respectively). For women, each SD-increment increase in muscle lean area, muscle quality, and strength was associated with lower mortality risk, with decreases ranging between 12% and 19%. Greater intramuscular adipose tissue was associated with an 8% higher mortality risk (HR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.16). This study shows that muscle composition is associated with mortality risk. These results also show the importance of improving muscle strength and area and lowering muscle adipose tissue infiltration. PMID:26643983

  1. Gene-environment interaction between the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene and parenting behaviour on children's theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mark; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2015-12-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is the ability to interpret and understand human behaviour by representing the mental states of others. Like many human capacities, ToM is thought to develop through both complex biological and socialization mechanisms. However, no study has examined the joint effect of genetic and environmental influences on ToM. This study examined how variability in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and parenting behaviour-two widely studied factors in ToM development-interacted to predict ToM in pre-school-aged children. Participants were 301 children who were part of an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study. ToM was assessed at age 4.5 using a previously validated scale. Parenting was assessed through observations of mothers' cognitively sensitive behaviours. Using a family-based association design, it was suggestive that a particular variant (rs11131149) interacted with maternal cognitive sensitivity on children's ToM (P?=?0.019). More copies of the major allele were associated with higher ToM as a function of increasing cognitive sensitivity. A sizeable 26% of the variability in ToM was accounted for by this interaction. This study provides the first empirical evidence of gene-environment interactions on ToM, supporting the notion that genetic factors may be modulated by potent environmental influences early in development. PMID:25977357

  2. Gene-environment interactions in determining differences in genetic susceptibility to cancer in subsites of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Shailendra S; Katiyar, Tridiv; Dhawan, Ankur; Singh, Sudhir; Jain, Swatantra K; Pant, Mohan C; Parmar, Devendra

    2015-04-01

    Genetic differences in susceptibility to cancer in subsites of the head and neck were investigated in a case-control study involving 750 cases of cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, or pharynx, and an equal number of healthy controls. The prevalence of variant genotypes of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1B1, 2E1, or glutathione-S-transferase M1 (null) in cases suggests that polymorphisms in drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) modify cancer risk within subsites of the head and neck. Tobacco or alcohol use was found to increase the risk in cases of laryngeal, pharyngeal, or oral cavity cancers. Interaction between genetic variation in DMEs and tobacco smoke (or smoking) exposures conferred significant risk for laryngeal cancer. Likewise, strong associations of the polymorphic genotypes of DMEs with cases of pharyngeal and oral cavity cancer who were tobacco chewers or alcohol users demonstrate that gene-environment interactions may explain differences in genetic susceptibility for cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx. PMID:25399842

  3. The Influence of Major Life Events on Economic Attitudes in a World of Gene-Environment Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Hatemi, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    The role of “genes” on political attitudes has gained attention across disciplines. However, person-specific experiences have yet to be incorporated into models that consider genetic influences. Relying on a gene-environment interplay approach, this study explicates how life-events, such as losing one’s job or suffering a financial loss, influence economic policy attitudes. The results indicate genetic and environmental variance on support for unions, immigration, capitalism, socialism and property tax is moderated by financial risks. Changes in the magnitude of genetic influences, however, are temporary. After two years, the phenotypic effects of the life events remain on most attitudes, but changes in the sources of individual differences do not. Univariate twin models that estimate the independent contributions of genes and environment on the variation of attitudes appear to provide robust baseline indicators of sources of individual differences. These estimates, however, are not event or day specific. In this way, genetic influences add stability, while environment cues change, and this process is continually updated. PMID:24860199

  4. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all. PMID:26024343

  5. Estimating genetic effect sizes under joint disease-endophenotype models in presence of gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Alexandre; Croteau, Jordie; Couture, Christian; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Bouchard, Claude; Pérusse, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Effects of genetic variants on the risk of complex diseases estimated from association studies are typically small. Nonetheless, variants may have important effects in presence of specific levels of environmental exposures, and when a trait related to the disease (endophenotype) is either normal or impaired. We propose polytomous and transition models to represent the relationship between disease, endophenotype, genotype and environmental exposure in family studies. Model coefficients were estimated using generalized estimating equations and were used to derive gene-environment interaction effects and genotype effects at specific levels of exposure. In a simulation study, estimates of the effect of a genetic variant were substantially higher when both an endophenotype and an environmental exposure modifying the variant effect were taken into account, particularly under transition models, compared to the alternative of ignoring the endophenotype. Illustration of the proposed modeling with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, physical activity and polymorphisms in the NOX3 gene in the Quebec Family Study revealed that the positive association of the A allele of rs1375713 with the metabolic syndrome at high levels of physical activity was only detectable in subjects without abdominal obesity, illustrating the importance of taking into account the abdominal obesity endophenotype in this analysis. PMID:26284107

  6. Gene-environment interactions across development: Exploring DRD2 genotype and prenatal smoking effects on self-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Sandra A.; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Stopp, Christian; Respass, Jennifer; Stewart, Peter; Jameson, Travis R.; Gilbert, David G.; Huggenvik, Jodi I.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic factors dynamically interact with both pre- and postnatal environmental influences to shape development. Considerable attention has been devoted to gene-environment interactions (GxE) on important outcomes (Caspi & Moffitt, 2006). It is also important to consider the possibility that these GxE effects may vary across development, particularly for constructs like self-regulation that emerge slowly, depend on brain regions that change qualitatively in different developmental periods, and thus may be manifested differently. To illustrate one approach to explore such developmental patterns, the relation between variation in the TaqIA polymorphism, related to D2 dopamine receptor expression and availability, and prenatal exposure to tobacco, was examined in two exploratory studies. First, in 4-week-old neonates, genotype-exposure interactions were observed for attention and irritable reactivity, but not for stress dysregulation. Second, in preschool children, genotype was related to Trails-P task performance on conditions requiring executive control, and children with both the A1+ genotype and a history of prenatal tobacco exposure displayed disproportionately poor performance. Despite study limitations, these results illustrate the importance of examining the interplay between genetic and prenatal environmental factors across development. PMID:19209988

  7. Gene-environment interactions between JAZF1 and occupational and household lead exposure in prostate cancer among African American men

    PubMed Central

    Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Levin, Albert M.; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Nock, Nora L.; Rundle, Andrew; Jankowski, Michelle; Krajenta, Richard; Dou, Q. Ping; Mitra, Bharati; Tang, Deliang; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A single nucleotide polymorphism, rs10486567, in JAZF1 has consistently been associated with increased risk of prostate cancer. The physical interaction of zinc finger proteins, such as JAZF1, with heavy metals may play a role in carcinogenesis. This study assessed potential gene-environment statistical interactions (GxE) between rs10486567 and heavy metals in prostate cancer. Methods In a case-only study of 228 African American prostate cancer cases, GxE between rs10486567 and sources of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were assessed. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate interaction odds ratios and GEE was used for models containing nested data. Case-control validation of IORs was performed, using 82 controls frequency matched to cases on age-race. Results Among cases, a potential GxE interaction was observed between rs10486567 CC genotype and living in a Census tract with a high proportion of housing built before 1950, a proxy for household Pb exposure, when compared to CT or TT carriers (OR 1.81; 95% CI 1.04-3.16; p=0.036). A stronger GxE interaction was observed when both housing and occupational Pb exposure were taken into account (OR 2.62; 95% CI 1.03-6.68; p=0.04). Case-control stratified analyses showed the odds of being a CC carrier was higher in cases compared to controls among men living in areas with older housing (OR 2.03; CI 0.99-4.19; p=0.05) or having high occupational Pb exposure (OR 2.50; CI 1.01-6.18; p=0.05). Conclusions In African American men, the association between JAZF1 rs10486567 and prostate cancer may be modified by exposure to heavy metals such as Pb. PMID:24801046

  8. Identifying novel interventional strategies for psychiatric disorders: integrating genomics, ‘enviromics’ and gene–environment interactions in valid preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    McOmish, Caitlin E; Burrows, Emma L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders affect a substantial proportion of the population worldwide. This high prevalence, combined with the chronicity of the disorders and the major social and economic impacts, creates a significant burden. As a result, an important priority is the development of novel and effective interventional strategies for reducing incidence rates and improving outcomes. This review explores the progress that has been made to date in establishing valid animal models of psychiatric disorders, while beginning to unravel the complex factors that may be contributing to the limitations of current methodological approaches. We propose some approaches for optimizing the validity of animal models and developing effective interventions. We use schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders as examples of disorders for which development of valid preclinical models, and fully effective therapeutics, have proven particularly challenging. However, the conclusions have relevance to various other psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety and bipolar disorders. We address the key aspects of construct, face and predictive validity in animal models, incorporating genetic and environmental factors. Our understanding of psychiatric disorders is accelerating exponentially, revealing extraordinary levels of genetic complexity, heterogeneity and pleiotropy. The environmental factors contributing to individual, and multiple, disorders also exhibit breathtaking complexity, requiring systematic analysis to experimentally explore the environmental mediators and modulators which constitute the ‘envirome’ of each psychiatric disorder. Ultimately, genetic and environmental factors need to be integrated via animal models incorporating the spatiotemporal complexity of gene–environment interactions and experience-dependent plasticity, thus better recapitulating the dynamic nature of brain development, function and dysfunction. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24846457

  9. I Just Ran a Thousand Analyses: Benefits of Multiple Testing in Understanding Equivocal Evidence on Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Heininga, Vera E.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Veenstra, René; Nederhof, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background In psychiatric genetics research, the volume of ambivalent findings on gene-environment interactions (G x E) is growing at an accelerating pace. In response to the surging suspicions of systematic distortion, we challenge the notion of chance capitalization as a possible contributor. Beyond qualifying multiple testing as a mere methodological issue that, if uncorrected, leads to chance capitalization, we advance towards illustrating the potential benefits of multiple tests in understanding equivocal evidence in genetics literature. Method We focused on the interaction between the serotonin-transporter-linked promotor region (5-HTTLPR) and childhood adversities with regard to depression. After testing 2160 interactions with all relevant measures available within the Dutch population study of adolescents TRAILS, we calculated percentages of significant (p < .05) effects for several subsets of regressions. Using chance capitalization (i.e. overall significance rate of 5% alpha and randomly distributed findings) as a competing hypothesis, we expected more significant effects in the subsets of regressions involving: 1) interview-based instead of questionnaire-based measures; 2) abuse instead of milder childhood adversities; and 3) early instead of later adversities. Furthermore, we expected equal significance percentages across 4) male and female subsamples, and 5) various genotypic models of 5-HTTLPR. Results We found differences in the percentages of significant interactions among the subsets of analyses, including those regarding sex-specific subsamples and genetic modeling, but often in unexpected directions. Overall, the percentage of significant interactions was 7.9% which is only slightly above the 5% that might be expected based on chance. Conclusion Taken together, multiple testing provides a novel approach to better understand equivocal evidence on G x E, showing that methodological differences across studies are a likely reason for heterogeneity in findings - but chance capitalization is at least equally plausible. PMID:26016887

  10. Powerful Tukey’s One Degree-of-Freedom Test for Detecting Gene–Gene and Gene–Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaping; Li, Donghui; Wei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) robustly associated with hundreds of complex human diseases including cancers. However, the large number of GWAS-identified genetic loci only explains a small proportion of the disease heritability. This “missing heritability” problem has been partly attributed to the yet-to-be-identified gene–gene (G × G) and gene–environment (G × E) interactions. In spite of the important roles of G × G and G × E interactions in understanding disease mechanisms and filling in the missing heritability, straightforward GWAS scanning for such interactions has very limited statistical power, leading to few successes. Here we propose a two-step statistical approach to test G × G/G × E interactions: the first step is to perform principal component analysis (PCA) on the multiple SNPs within a gene region, and the second step is to perform Tukey’s one degree-of-freedom (1-df) test on the leading PCs. We derive a score test that is computationally fast and numerically stable for the proposed Tukey’s 1-df interaction test. Using extensive simulations we show that the proposed approach, which combines the two parsimonious models, namely, the PCA and Tukey’s 1-df form of interaction, outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. We also demonstrate the utility and efficiency gains of the proposed method with applications to testing G × G interactions for Crohn’s disease using the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) GWAS data and testing G × E interaction using data from a case–control study of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26064040

  11. Galaxy Zoo: Passive Red Spirals

    E-print Network

    Masters, Karen L; Romer, A Kathy; Nichol, Robert C; Bamford, Steven P; Schawinski, Kevin; Lintott, Chris J; Andreescu, Dan; Campbell, Heather C; Crowcroft, Ben; Doyle, Isabelle; Edmondson, Edward M; Murray, Phil; Raddick, M Jordan; Slosar, Anze; Szalay, Alexander S; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    We study the spectroscopic properties and environments of red spiral galaxies found by the Galaxy Zoo project. By carefully selecting face-on, disk dominated spirals we construct a sample of truly passive disks (not dust reddened, nor dominated by old stellar populations in a bulge). As such, our red spirals represent an interesting set of possible transition objects between normal blue spirals and red early types. We use SDSS data to investigate the physical processes which could have turned these objects red without disturbing their morphology. Red spirals prefer intermediate density regimes, however there are no obvious correlations between red spiral properties and environment - environment alone is not sufficient to determine if a galaxy will become a red spiral. Red spirals are a small fraction of spirals at low masses, but dominate at large stellar masses - massive galaxies are red independent of morphology. We confirm that red spirals have older stellar populations and less recent star formation than ...

  12. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  13. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  14. Detection of Epistatic and Gene-Environment Interactions Underlying Three Quality Traits in Rice Using High-Throughput Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Jiang, Beibei; Cao, Yujie; Zhang, Yingxin; Zhan, Xiaodeng; Shen, Xihong; Cheng, Shihua; Lou, Xiangyang; Cao, Liyong

    2015-01-01

    With development of sequencing technology, dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been available, enabling uncovering genetic architecture of complex traits by genome-wide association study (GWAS). However, the current GWAS strategy usually ignores epistatic and gene-environment interactions due to absence of appropriate methodology and heavy computational burden. This study proposed a new GWAS strategy by combining the graphics processing unit- (GPU-) based generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) algorithm with mixed linear model approach. The reliability and efficiency of the analytical methods were verified through Monte Carlo simulations, suggesting that a population size of nearly 150 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) had a reasonable resolution for the scenarios considered. Further, a GWAS was conducted with the above two-step strategy to investigate the additive, epistatic, and gene-environment associations between 701,867 SNPs and three important quality traits, gelatinization temperature, amylose content, and gel consistency, in a RIL population with 138 individuals derived from super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308 in two environments. Four significant SNPs were identified with additive, epistatic, and gene-environment interaction effects. Our study showed that the mixed linear model approach combining with the GPU-based GMDR algorithm is a feasible strategy for implementing GWAS to uncover genetic architecture of crop complex traits. PMID:26345334

  15. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  16. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  17. Passive control Carles Batlle

    E-print Network

    Batlle, Carles

    and Damping Assignment Passivity Based Control (IDA-PBC) Magnetic levitation system How to solve quasilinear, we can try to select Ja and Ra to make its solution easier #12;Magnetic levitation system u i ym g + 1 2m x2 3 - mgx2 magnetic co-energy expresed in energy variables (coincides with energy due

  18. Allowing for population stratification in case-only studies of gene-environment interaction, using genomic control.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pankaj; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Lieb, Wolfgang; Dempfle, Astrid; Krawczak, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Gene-environment interactions (G × E) have attracted considerable research interest in the past owing to their scientific and public health implications, but powerful statistical methods are required to successfully track down G × E, particularly at a genome-wide level. Previously, a case-only (CO) design has been proposed as a means to identify G × E with greater efficiency than traditional case-control or cohort studies. However, as with genotype-phenotype association studies themselves, hidden population stratification (PS) can impact the validity of G × E studies using a CO design. Since this problem has been subject to little research to date, we used comprehensive simulation to systematically assess the type I error rate, power and effect size bias of CO studies of G × E in the presence of PS. Three types of PS were considered, namely genetic-only (PSG), environment-only (PSE), and joint genetic and environmental stratification (PSGE). Our results reveal that the type I error rate of an unadjusted Wald test, appropriate for the CO design, would be close to its nominal level (0.05 in our study) as long as PS involves only one interaction partner (i.e., either PSG or PSE). In contrast, if the study population is stratified with respect to both G and E (i.e., if there is PSGE), then the type I error rate is seriously inflated and estimates of the underlying G × E interaction are biased. Comparison of CO to a family-based case-parents design confirmed that the latter is more robust against PSGE, as expected. However, case-parent trios may be particularly unsuitable for G × E studies in view of the fact that they require genotype data from parents and that many diseases with an environmental component are likely to be of late onset. An alternative approach to adjusting for PS is principal component analysis (PCA), which has been widely used for this very purpose in past genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, resolving genetic PS properly by PCA requires genetic data at the population level, the availability of which would conflict with the basic idea of the CO design. Therefore, we explored three modified Wald test statistics, inspired by the genomic control (GC) approach to GWAS, as an alternative means to allow for PSGE. The modified statistics were benchmarked against a stratified Wald test assuming known population affiliation, which should provide maximum power under PS. Our results confirm that GC is capable of successfully and efficiently correcting the PS-induced inflation of the type I error rate in CO studies of G × E. PMID:26297539

  19. Industrialized passive: two case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, M.E.; Winter, S.; Marks, R.; Gardstein, C.

    1980-01-01

    Modular homes present unique constraints to the incorporation of passive solar concepts. A series of passive soalr modular designs were developed. Two of the designs developed and slated for construction are described here. In particular those characteristics unique to the interface of passive solar design with modular home technology are discussed.

  20. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-04-01

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover within a beat. PMID:25807583

  1. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA); Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin (Lagga Arby, SE); Ciovati, Gianluigi (Newport News, VA)

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  2. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (inventor); Hall, Earl T. (inventor); Baker, Donald A. (inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  3. Gene–gene and gene–environment interactions in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the population of Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Uma Jyothi, Kommoju; Reddy, Battini Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen SNPs from nine different genes were genotyped on 1379 individuals, 758 T2DM patients and 621 controls, from the city of Hyderabad, India, using Sequenom Massarray platform. These data were analyzed to examine the role of gene–gene and gene–environment interactions in the manifestation of T2DM. The multivariate analysis suggests that TCF7L2, CDKAL1, IGF2BP2, HHEX and PPARG genes are significantly associated with T2DM, albeit only the first two of the above 5 were associated in the univariate analysis. Significant gene–gene and gene–environment interactions were also observed with reference to TCF7L2, CAPN10 and CDKAL1 genes, highlighting their importance in the pathophysiology of T2DM. In the analysis for cumulative effect of risk alleles, SLC30A8 steps in as significant contributor to the disease by its presence in all combinations of risk alleles. A striking difference between risk allele categories, 1–4 and 5–6, was evident in showing protective and susceptible roles, respectively, while the latter was characterized by the presence of TCF7L2 and CDKAL1 variants. Overall, these two genes TCF7L2 and CDKAL1 showed strong association with T2DM, either individually or in interaction with the other genes. However, we need further studies on gene–gene and gene–environment interactions among heterogeneous Indian populations to obtain unequivocal conclusions that are applicable for the Indian population as a whole. PMID:26042206

  4. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the population of Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Uma Jyothi, Kommoju; Reddy, Battini Mohan

    2015-09-01

    Fifteen SNPs from nine different genes were genotyped on 1379 individuals, 758 T2DM patients and 621 controls, from the city of Hyderabad, India, using Sequenom Massarray platform. These data were analyzed to examine the role of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the manifestation of T2DM. The multivariate analysis suggests that TCF7L2, CDKAL1, IGF2BP2, HHEX and PPARG genes are significantly associated with T2DM, albeit only the first two of the above 5 were associated in the univariate analysis. Significant gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also observed with reference to TCF7L2, CAPN10 and CDKAL1 genes, highlighting their importance in the pathophysiology of T2DM. In the analysis for cumulative effect of risk alleles, SLC30A8 steps in as significant contributor to the disease by its presence in all combinations of risk alleles. A striking difference between risk allele categories, 1-4 and 5-6, was evident in showing protective and susceptible roles, respectively, while the latter was characterized by the presence of TCF7L2 and CDKAL1 variants. Overall, these two genes TCF7L2 and CDKAL1 showed strong association with T2DM, either individually or in interaction with the other genes. However, we need further studies on gene-gene and gene-environment interactions among heterogeneous Indian populations to obtain unequivocal conclusions that are applicable for the Indian population as a whole. PMID:26042206

  5. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  6. Passive Immunization Against Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has gone from being one of the worst scourges of the 20th century to nearing eradication in the 21st. This success is well known to be attributable to the Salk inactivated and Sabin attenuated poliovirus vaccines. However, before introduction of these vaccines, William McDowall Hammon of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health led the first major breakthrough in prevention of the disease by using passive immunization in one of the earliest double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. This study provided the first evidence that antibodies to poliovirus could prevent the disease in humans. PMID:15855454

  7. Passive-solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  8. Passive film-induced stress and mechanical properties of a-Ti in methanol solution

    E-print Network

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    in corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of titanium. Correlation between passive film-induced stress emission and motion during stress corrosion cracking of brass, 310 stainless steel, a-Ti and Ti3Al + Nb [11. Stress corrosion C. Effects of strain C. Interfaces a b s t r a c t Passive films play an important role

  9. Mechanical passive logic module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay; Caulfield, H. John

    2015-02-01

    Nothing from nothing gives simple simile, but something from nothing is an interesting and challenging task. Adolf Lohmann once proposed 'do nothing machine' in optics, which only copies input to output. Passive logic module (PALM) is a special type of 'do nothing machine' which can converts inputs into one of 16 possible binary outputs. This logic module is not like the conventional irreversible one. It is a simple type of reversible Turing machine. In this manuscript we discussed and demonstrated PALM using mechanical movement of plane mirrors. Also we discussed the theoretical model of micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) based PALM in this manuscript. It may have several valuable properties such as passive operation (no need for nonlinear elements as other logic device require) and modular logic (one device implementing any Boolean logic function with simple internal changes). The result is obtained from the demonstration by only looking up the output. No calculation is required to get the result. Not only that, PALM is a simple type of the famous 'billiard ball machine', which also discussed in this manuscript.

  10. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  11. MSL DAN Passive Data and Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, C. G.; Moersch, J.; Jun, I.; Ming, D. W.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Behar, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Drake, D.; Lisov, D.; Mischna, M. A.; Hardgrove, C. J.; Milliken, R.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R. D.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Harshman, K.; Kozyrev, A.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M.; Nikiforov, S.; Varenikov, A.

    2014-12-01

    In its passive mode of operation, The Mars Science Laboratory Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons experiment (DAN) detects low energy neutrons that are produced by two different sources on Mars. Neutrons are produced by the rover's Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and by interactions of high energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) within the atmosphere and regolith. As these neutrons propagate through the subsurface, their energies can be moderated by interactions with hydrogen nuclei. More hydrogen leads to greater moderation (thermalization) of the neutron population energies. The presence of high thermal neutron absorbing elements within the regolith also complicates the spectrum of the returning neutron population, as shown by Hardgrove et al. DAN measures the thermal and epithermal neutron populations leaking from the surface to infer the amount of water equivalent hydrogen (WEH) in the shallow regolith. Extensive modeling is performed using a Monte Carlo approach (MCNPX) to analyze DAN passive measurements at fixed locations and along rover traverse segments. DAN passive WEH estimates along Curiosity's traverse will be presented along with an analysis of trends in the data and a description of correlations between these results and the geologic characteristics of the surfaces traversed.

  12. Intrinsic surface passivation of CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, M. O.; Perkins, C. L.; Burst, J. M.; Farrell, S.; Barnes, T. M.; Johnston, S. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.

    2015-10-01

    Recombination is critically limiting in CdTe devices such as solar cells and detectors, with much of it occurring at or near the surface. In this work, we explore different routes to passivate p-type CdTe surfaces without any intentional extrinsic passivation layers. To provide deeper insight into the passivation routes, we uniquely correlate a set of characterization methods: surface analysis and time-resolved spectroscopy. We study two model systems: nominally undoped single crystals and large-grain polycrystalline films. We examine several strategies to reduce surface recombination velocity. First, we study the effects of removing surface contaminants while maintaining a near-stoichiometric surface. Then we examine stoichiometric thermally reconstructed surfaces. We also investigate the effects of shifting the surface stoichiometry by both "subtractive" (wet chemical etches) and "additive" (ampoule anneals and epitaxial growth) means. We consistently find for a variety of methods that a highly ordered stoichiometric to Cd-rich surface shows a significant reduction in surface recombination, whereas a Te-rich surface has high recombination and propose a mechanism to explain this. While as-received single crystals and as-deposited polycrystalline films have surface recombination velocities in the range of 105-106 cm/s, we find that several routes can reduce surface recombination velocities to <2.5 × 104 cm/s.

  13. High-performance passive millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Roger; Gleed, David G.; Anderton, Rupert N.; Lettington, Alan H.

    1993-06-01

    We discuss the current status of passive millimeter-wave radiometry as a thermal imaging technique. The major problems are poor spatial resolution and slow response time. Techniques for overcoming these difficulties are identified, including the use of aperture synthesis, multichannel receivers, correlation, and inverse transform techniques. A comparison is made with infrared imaging.

  14. Passive-Solar-Heating Analysis: a new ASHRAE manual

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The forthcoming ASHRAE book, Passive Solar Heating Analysis, is described. ASHRAE approval procedures are discussed. An overview of the contents is given. The development of the solar load ratio correlations is described, and the applicability of the analysis method is discussed.

  15. Passive retrofits for Navy housing

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbert, R.; Miles, C.; Jones, R.; Peck, C.; Anderson, J.; Jacobson, V.; Dale, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A project to assess and initiate passive solar energy retrofits to US Navy family housing is described. The current data base for Navy housing (ECOP), and its enhancement for passive solar purposes options proposed for Navy housing are explained. The analysis goals and methods to evaluate the retrofits are discussed. An educational package to explain the retrofits is described.

  16. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  17. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  18. Modularization of passive solar

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, T.

    1980-01-01

    Ways of modularizing component parts of passive soalr systems for the manufactured housing industry are discussed. Site-filled water mass modules installed in south-facing stud spaces, glazing systems, sun-rooms and roof apertures are being explored and constructed. Even though the houses are being designed without pre-selected sites, they are expected to perform well given the variable deployment of the south-facing wall system. Any facade of the house will be able to accept the sun's energy. While some of the solutions involve specific products and techniques, it is the general conclusion that low-cost, modular solar components can be worked into solar building designs without great regard for the final site. This makes marketing easier and costs lower with the result of more installations.

  19. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  20. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  1. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  2. Passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Ewing, M.; Press, F.; Sutton, G.; Dorman, J.; Nakamura, Y.; Toksoz, N.; Lammlein, D.; Duennebier, F.

    1972-01-01

    The design, deployment, and operation of the Apollo 16 passive seismic experiment (PSE) are discussed. Since activation, all elements of the PSE have operated as planned, with the exception of the sensor thermal control system. Significant progress in the measurement of meteoroid flux in near-earth space has been made, along with dilineation of active moonquake source regions. The data obtained indicate that moonquakes are concentrated at great depth (800 to 1000 km) and that the apparent disparity between meteoroid flux estimtes based on lunar crater counts and those from earth-based observations can be resolved by seismic measurements in favor of the lower flux indicated by the crater count method. The results obtained from the PSE are summarized and their significance is discussed in detail.

  3. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  4. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  5. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  6. Passive-solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Our project objective was to design, construct, and operate a commercialized (16' x 50') passive, solar greenhouse. The structure was originally intended as a vegetable forcing facility to produce vegetable crops in the off-season. Building and size constraints and economic considerations convinced us to use the greenhouse for producing bedding plants and vegetable starts in the spring, high value vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers) in the fall and forced bulbs in the winter. This crop sequence allows us to use the greenhouse all year without additional heat as the crops are adopted to the temperature regime of the greenhouse during each particular season. In our first season, the greenhouse performed beautifully. The lowest temperature recorded was 38/sup 0/F after 4 cold, cloudy days in February. The production of bedding plants has allowed us to diversify our products and the early transplants we produced were a great asset to our vegetable farming operation. Although construction cost (4.57 sq. ft.) is higher than that of a conventional polyethylene-covered, quonset-type greenhouse (approx. $1.92 sq. ft.), our annual operating cost is cheaper than that of a conventional greenhouse (0.49 cents sq. ft. versus 0.67 cents sq. ft.) due to a longer usable lifetime of the structure and the elimination of heating costs. Our structure has been toured by interested individuals, school and farm groups. We plan to publicize the structure and its advantages by promoting more visits to the site.

  7. Passive magnetic screening.

    PubMed

    Andrew, E R

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that a passive magnetic shield for a 1.5-T whole-body magnet requires about 20 tons of iron. Moreover, to first order, the amount of shielding material is independent of the radius of the shield. The choice between a thick shield fitting tightly round the magnet and a thinner shield of larger radius is determined by considerations of available space and the need for the highest uniformity of field in the bore. Very high permeability materials such as mu-metal are useful only in special circumstances. Multiple shields are valuable if a high degree of shielding is required, but the spacing between the shields needs careful attention. Although exact reciprocity of internal and external shielding is not found in the general case, the degree of shielding will be of the same order in both cases. The complete behavior of cylindrical shields around superconducting magnets can be determined by analytical solution of Maxwell's equations; for less regular shapes, solutions may be determined numerically by computer. PMID:2067396

  8. Orion Passive Thermal: Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hermandez, Angel; Miller, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Orion Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) is presented. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; and 3) Orion PTCS Overview.

  9. A system model for investigating passive electrical properties of neurons.

    PubMed Central

    D'Aguanno, A; Bardakjian, B L; Carlen, P L

    1989-01-01

    Passive membrane properties of neurons, characterized by a linear voltage response to constant current stimulation, were investigated by busing a system model approach. This approach utilizes the derived expression for the input impedance of a network, which simulates the passive properties of neurons, to correlate measured intracellular recordings with the response of network models. In this study, the input impedances of different network configurations and of dentate granule neurons, were derived as a function of the network elements and were validated with computer simulations. The parameters of the system model, which are the values of the network elements, were estimated using an optimization strategy. The system model provides for better estimation of the network elements than the previously described signal model, due to its explicit nature. In contrast, the signal model is an implicit function of the network elements which requires intermediate steps to estimate some of the passive properties. PMID:2765654

  10. Gene/environment interactions in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity: new insights on the role of Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Gianchecchi, Elena; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune disorders are increasing worldwide. Although their pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors is involved in their onset. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent a family of pattern recognition receptors involved in the recognition and in the defense of the host from invading microorganisms. They sense a wide range of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) deriving from metabolic pathways selective of bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan microorganisms. TLR activation plays a critical role in the activation of the downstream signaling pathway by interacting and recruiting several adaptor molecules. Although TLRs are involved in the protection of the host, several studies suggest that, in certain conditions, they play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We review the most recent advances showing a correlation between some single nucleotide polymorphisms or copy number variations in TLR genes or in adaptor molecules involved in TLR signaling and the onset of several autoimmune conditions, such as Type I diabetes, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. In light of the foregoing we finally propose that molecules involved in TLR pathway may represent the targets for novel therapeutic treatments in order to stop autoimmune processes. PMID:26184547

  11. Determining Subsurface Structure From Microtremors Using a Passive Circular Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, D. S.; Doser, D. I.; Velasco, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    The amount of damage to a structure during an earthquake is related to the ground motion at that site. Therefore, it is important to study seismic waves that propagate through specific soil types to understand site response. However, active seismic surveys are susceptible to noise interference and are limited due to spatial need while boreholes are costly. We develop a method using a passive array to study Rayleigh waves from microtremors, waves originating from building appliances, cars, pedestrians walking, etc. By using everyday noises as the source, site-specific analysis can be done in urban areas without worrying about noise interference or disturbing the public with explosions or other loud active sources. The array is comprised of short period Texans, self contained geophones, which record continuously for 24 hours. Our technique differs slightly from traditional SPAC (SPatial Auto-Correlation) methods used in passive arrays. We first cross correlate time windows between two receivers then stack the correlations to determine a phase delay. Performing the correlation at different frequencies will create a dispersion curve that can be inverted for shear velocity. This approach is similar to the two-station phase delay method used in regional tomography studies at much longer periods. Stacking removes off-azimuth energy, so we do not need to assume a source direction. Preliminary results from a previous passive array survey conducted near El Paso, Texas show 1-D velocity models can be created by cross-correlating noise at various frequencies. We will conduct another survey in alluvium sands at Rio Bosque Park east of El Paso. We will validate the results with active seismic refraction and surface wave survey results as well as other geophysical techniques to determine if a passive array using microtremors is an accurate method of determining subsurface structure.

  12. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept works by placing shape memory alloy (SMA) control surfaces on the submarine's diving planes and periodically oscillating them. The modulated control vortices generated by these surfaces interact with the tip vortices on the diving planes, causing an instability to rapidly occur. Though several numerical simulations have been presented, experimental verification does not appear to be available in the open literature. The authors address this problem through a concept called passive wake vortex control (PWVC), which has been demonstrated to rapidly break apart a trailing vortex wake and render it incoherent. PWVC functions by introducing unequal strength, counter-rotating control vortices next to the tip vortices. The presence of these control vortices destabilizes the vortex wake and produces a rapidly growing wake instability.

  13. Microgravity Passive Phase Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paragano, Matthew; Indoe, William; Darmetko, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A new invention disclosure discusses a structure and process for separating gas from liquids in microgravity. The Microgravity Passive Phase Separator consists of two concentric, pleated, woven stainless- steel screens (25-micrometer nominal pore) with an axial inlet, and an annular outlet between both screens (see figure). Water enters at one end of the center screen at high velocity, eventually passing through the inner screen and out through the annular exit. As gas is introduced into the flow stream, the drag force exerted on the bubble pushes it downstream until flow stagnation or until it reaches an equilibrium point between the surface tension holding bubble to the screen and the drag force. Gas bubbles of a given size will form a front that is moved further down the length of the inner screen with increasing velocity. As more bubbles are added, the front location will remain fixed, but additional bubbles will move to the end of the unit, eventually coming to rest in the large cavity between the unit housing and the outer screen (storage area). Owing to the small size of the pores and the hydrophilic nature of the screen material, gas does not pass through the screen and is retained within the unit for emptying during ground processing. If debris is picked up on the screen, the area closest to the inlet will become clogged, so high-velocity flow will persist farther down the length of the center screen, pushing the bubble front further from the inlet of the inner screen. It is desired to keep the velocity high enough so that, for any bubble size, an area of clean screen exists between the bubbles and the debris. The primary benefits of this innovation are the lack of any need for additional power, strip gas, or location for venting the separated gas. As the unit contains no membrane, the transport fluid will not be lost due to evaporation in the process of gas separation. Separation is performed with relatively low pressure drop based on the large surface area of the separating screen. Additionally, there are no moving parts, and there are no failure modes that involve fluid loss. A patent application has been filed.

  14. Early-life stress and antidepressant treatment involve synaptic signaling and Erk kinases in a gene-environment model of depression.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Mallei, Alessandra; Tardito, Daniela; Gruber, Susanne H M; El Khoury, Aram; Racagni, Giorgio; Mathé, Aleksander A; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-06-01

    Stress has been shown to interact with genetic vulnerability in pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Here we investigated the outcome of interaction between genetic vulnerability and early-life stress, by employing a rodent model that combines an inherited trait of vulnerability in Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, with early-life stress (maternal separation). Basal differences in synaptic signaling between FSL rats and their controls were studied, as well as the consequences of early-life stress in adulthood, and their response to chronic antidepressant treatment (escitalopram). FSL rats showed basal differences in the activation of synapsin I and Erk1/2, as well as in alpha CaM kinase II/syntaxin-1 and alpha CaM kinase II/NMDA-receptor interactions in purified hippocampal synaptosomes. In addition, FSL rats displayed a blunted response of Erk-MAP kinases and other differences in the outcome of early-life stress in adulthood. Escitalopram treatment restored some but not all alterations observed in FSL rats after early-life stress. The marked alterations found in key regulators of presynaptic release/neurotransmission in the basal FSL rats, and as a result of early-life stress, suggest synaptic dysfunction. These results show that early gene-environment interaction may cause life-long synaptic changes affecting the course of depressive-like behavior and response to drugs. PMID:20003989

  15. Functional variants in the catalase and myeloperoxidase genes, ambient air pollution, and respiratory-related school absences: an example of epistasis in gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Wenten, Madé; Gauderman, W James; Berhane, Kiros; Lin, Pi-Chu; Peters, John; Gilliland, Frank D

    2009-12-15

    The individual effect of functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the catalase and myeloperoxidase genes (CAT and MPO) has been studied in relation to asthma; however, their interrelationship with ambient air pollution exposures has yet to be determined. The authors investigated the interrelationships between variants in CAT and MPO, ambient air pollutants, and acute respiratory illness. Health information, air pollution, and incident respiratory-related school absences were ascertained in January-June 1996 for 1,136 Hispanic and non-Hispanic white US elementary schoolchildren as part of the prospective Children's Health Study. Functional and tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms for the CAT and MPO loci were genotyped. The authors found epistasis between functional polymorphisms in the CAT/MPO loci, which differed by levels of oxidant-stress-producing air pollutants. Risk of respiratory-related school absences was elevated for children with the CAT (G/G) and MPO (G/A or A/A) genes (relative risk = 1.35, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.77; P-interaction = 0.005). The epistatic effect of CAT and MPO variants was most evident in communities exhibiting high ambient ozone levels (P-interaction = 0.03). The association of respiratory-illness absences with functional variants in CAT and MPO that differ by air pollution levels illustrates the need to consider genetic epistasis in assessing gene-environment interactions. PMID:19897513

  16. Association of change in brain structure to objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behavior in older adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study.

    PubMed

    Arnardottir, Nanna Yr; Koster, Annemarie; Domelen, Dane R Van; Brychta, Robert J; Caserotti, Paolo; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sverrisdottir, Johanna E; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Johannsson, Erlingur; Chen, Kong Y; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Sveinsson, Thorarinn

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the hypothesis that greater participation in physical activity (PA) is associated with less brain atrophy. Here we examine, in a sub-sample (n=352, mean age 79.1 years) of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study cohort, the association of the baseline and 5-year change in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) to active and sedentary behavior (SB) measured at the end of the 5-year period by a hip-worn accelerometer for seven consecutive days. More GM (?=0.11; p=0.044) and WM (?=0.11; p=0.030) at baseline was associated with more total physical activity (TPA). Also, when adjusting for baseline values, the 5-year change in GM (?=0.14; p=0.0037) and WM (?=0.11; p=0.030) was associated with TPA. The 5-year change in WM was associated with SB (?=-0.11; p=0.0007). These data suggest that objectively measured PA and SB late in life are associated with current and prior cross-sectional measures of brain atrophy, and that change over time is associated with PA and SB in expected directions. PMID:26363425

  17. A Comparison of Case-Control and Case-Only Designs to Investigate Gene-Environment Interactions Using Breast Cancer Data

    PubMed Central

    Hassanzadeh, Jafar; Moradzadeh, Rahmatollah; Rajaee fard, Abdolreza; Tahmasebi, Sedigheh; Golmohammadi, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The traditional methods of studying the gene-environment interactions need a control group. However, the selection of an appropriate control group has been associated with problems. Therefore, new methods, such as case-only design, have been created to study such interactions. The objective of this study was to compare the case-only and case-control designs using data from patients with breast cancer. Methods: The interaction of genetic and environmental factor as well as the ratio of control to population odds ratio was calculated for case-only (300 patients with breast cancer) and case-control (300 cases of breast cancer and 300 matched controls) designs. Results: The confidence intervals and -2log likelihood in all variables in case-only design was smaller than those in the matched case-control design. In case-only design, the standard errors of some variables such as age at menarche, the first delivery at the age of 35 yrs and more or no delivery, the history of having live birth, use of oral contraception pills, breastfeeding history were less than those in the matched case-control design. Conclusion: The findings indicate that the case-only design is an efficient method to investigate the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. PMID:23115440

  18. Evidence of a Gene × Environment Interaction Between Birth Weight and Genetic Risk in the Prediction of Criminogenic Outcomes Among Adolescent Males.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dylan B; Beaver, Kevin M

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have revealed that low birth weight children have a heightened risk of various maladaptive outcomes, including academic challenges and delinquent involvement. However, very little research to date has examined whether the relationship between low birth weight, poor academic performance, and delinquent peer affiliation is moderated by genetic risk. Using data from the National Longitudinal study of Adolescent Health, the present study examines whether male adolescents born at very low birth weights are significantly predisposed to poor academic performance and delinquent peer affiliation. Moreover, we test whether the effect of birth weight on these outcomes is conditioned by level of genetic risk. We find no evidence that very low birth weight males are more likely to affiliate with delinquent peers or perform poorly in school during adolescence. However, upon examining gene-environment interactions, we find that being born at a very low birth weight does significantly increase the odds of poor academic performance and delinquent peer affiliation among males who possess a higher level of genetic risk. Limitations are noted and the implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25145687

  19. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome with medulloblastoma in an African-American boy: A rare case illustrating gene-environment interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Korczak, J.F.; Goldstein, A.M.; Kase, R.G.

    1997-03-31

    We present an 8-year-old African-American boy with medulloblastoma and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) who exhibited the radiosensitive response of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) formation in the area irradiated for medulloblastoma. Such a response is well-documented in Caucasian NBCCS patients with medulloblastoma. The propositus was diagnosed with medulloblastoma at the age of 2 years and underwent surgery, chemotherapy, and craniospinal irradiation. At the age of 6 years, he was diagnosed with NBCCS following his presentation with a large odontogenic keratocyst of the mandible, pits of the palms and soles and numerous BCCs in the area of the back and neck that had been irradiated previously for medulloblastoma. Examination of other relatives showed that the propositus mother also had NBCCS but was more mildly affected; in particular, she had no BCCs. This case illustrates complex gene-environment interaction, in that increased skin pigmentation in African-Americans is presumably protective against ultraviolet, but not ionizing, radiation. This case and other similar cases in the literature show the importance of considering NBCCS in the differential diagnosis of any patient who presents with a medulloblastoma, especially before the age of 5 years, and of examining other close relatives for signs of NBCCS to determine the patient`s at-risk status. Finally, for individuals who are radiosensitive, protocols that utilize chemotherapy in lieu of radiotherapy should be considered. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Cross-cultural gene- environment interactions in depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and the cortisol awakening response: FKBP5 polymorphisms and childhood trauma in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Worthman, Carol M; Ressler, Kerry J; Mercer, Kristina B; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Koirala, Suraj; Nepal, Mahendra K; Sharma, Vidya Dev; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased attention to global mental health, psychiatric genetic research has been dominated by studies in high-income countries, especially with populations of European descent. The objective of this study was to assess single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FKBP5 gene in a population living in South Asia. Among adults in Nepal, depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C), and childhood maltreatment with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). FKBP5 SNPs were genotyped for 682 participants. Cortisol awakening response (CAR) was assessed in a subsample of 118 participants over 3 days. The FKBP5 tag-SNP rs9296158 showed a main effect on depressive symptoms (p = 0.03). Interaction of rs9296158 and childhood maltreatment predicted adult depressive symptoms (p = 0.02) but not PTSD. Childhood maltreatment associated with endocrine response in individuals homozygous for the A allele, demonstrated by a negative CAR and overall hypocortisolaemia in the rs9296158 AA genotype and childhood maltreatment group (p < 0.001). This study replicated findings related to FKBP5 and depression but not PTSD. Gene-environment studies should take differences in prevalence and cultural significance of phenotypes and exposures into account when interpreting cross-cultural findings. PMID:26100613

  1. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  2. Indoor localization using passive RFID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastianos, George E.; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Segou, Olga E.; Mitilineos, Stelios A.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems based on passive tags are used successfully in a wide range of object identification applications. However, the increasing needs to meet new demands on applications of localization and tracking create a new field for evolution of the RFID technology. This paper presents the design, implementation, and evaluation of a cost-effective localization system for in-building usage that is able to localize objects that carry passive RFID tags. The RFID reading is performed by a single Reader and an array of directional antennas through multiplexing. Evaluation and experimental results from three localization algorithms based on RSSI are presented.

  3. Community-Based Participatory Research and Gene-Environment Interaction Methodologies Addressing Environmental Justice among Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Women and Children in Texas: “From Mother to Child Project”

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Valero, María A.; Herrera, Angelica P.; Zahm, Sheila H.; Jones, Lovell A.

    2013-01-01

    The “From Mother to Child Project” is a molecular epidemiological study that employs a community- based participatory research (CBPR) approach and gene-environment interaction research to address environmental justice in migrant and seasonal farmworker (MSF) women and children of Mexican origin home-based in Baytown and La Joya, Texas. This paper presents the background and rationale for the study and describes the study design and methodology. Preliminary data showed that MSF women and children in Texas have measurable levels of pesticides in their blood and urine, some of which were banned in the United States decades ago and are possible human carcinogens. Polymorphisms in genes involved in chemical detoxification and DNA repair have been associated with susceptibility to genetic damage and cancer development in populations exposed to environmental toxins. The “From Mother to Child Project” is testing three hypotheses: (1) MSF women and children who are occupationally exposed to pesticides are at higher risk for DNA damage than are non-exposed women and children. (2) Both, the extent of pesticide exposure and type of polymorphisms in chemical detoxification and DNA repair genes contribute to the extent of DNA damage observed in study participants. (3) The mutagenic potency levels measured in the organic compounds extracted from the urine and serum of study participants will correlate with the total concentrations of pesticides and with the measured DNA damage in study participants. The study will enroll 800 participants: 200 MSF mother-child pairs; 200 children (one per family) whose parents have never worked in agriculture, matched with the MSF children by ethnicity, age ± 2 years, gender, and city of residence; and these children’s mothers. Personal interviews with the mothers are used to gather data for both mothers and children on sociodemographic characteristics; pesticide exposure at work and home; medical and reproductive history; dietary assessment, and lifestyle factors. Blood and urine samples are collected from each participant and analyzed for (1) organochlorine and organophosphate pesticide levels, (2) genetic polymorphisms of chemical detoxification and DNA repair genes, (3) DNA damage (chromosomal aberrations), and (4) the mutagenic potential of pesticides in the serum and urine. Recruitment and data collection in Baytown is near completion, and over one third of the target population for the La Joya study site. PMID:24391476

  4. Active and realistic passive marijuana exposure tested by three immunoassays and GC/MS in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Mule, S.J.; Lomax, P.; Gross, S.J.

    1988-05-01

    Human urine samples obtained before and after active and passive exposure to marijuana were analyzed by immune kits (Roche, Amersham, and Syva) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven of eight subjects were positive for the entire five-day test period with one immune kit. The latter correlated with GC/MS in 98% of the samples. Passive inhalation experiments under conditions likely to reflect realistic exposure resulted consistently in less than 10 ng/mL of cannabinoids. The 10-100-ng/mL cannabinoid concentration range essential for detection of occasional and moderate marijuana users is thus unaffected by realistic passive inhalation.

  5. Spatial dependence of passive scalar correlation functions in

    E-print Network

    Fominov, Yakov

    dimensions dll >> ...1 Smallest dimension reaches at timedr 11 Peln~ -- >> dt =+ )^( T t r #12;Two points of blob dimensions dll ,...,1 R R Averaging over rotating: R R R One-point moments: E. Balkovsky and A. Fouxon, Phys.Rev.E, 60, 4164 (1999) dll >> ...1Blob dimensions: #12;Statistics of blob dimensions

  6. HCI gesture tracking using wearable passive tags

    E-print Network

    Bainbridge, Rachel M

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis. a wearable system is developed to track hand gestures with passive RFID sensor tags. This system was composed of an ultra-high frequency reader and small, passive, finger-worn tags powered by scavenged RFID ...

  7. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  8. Gene-environment interaction: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The execution and completion of the Human Genome Project was surrounded by great expectations and many overstated promises, and for the first time in history, the information revolution has made of the general public a first row spectator of the scientific advances in real time. Therefore, the publi...

  9. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  10. Bond Graph Based Approach to Passive Teleoperation

    E-print Network

    Li, Perry Y.

    is a well utilized concept in electromechanical robotic systems, investiga- tion of electrohydraulic control stores and dissipates energy but cannot generate energy of its own. Passive systems are easier and safer,4 , Cobot 5 and Passive Trajectory Enhancing Ro- bot 6 . While passivity is widely used in electromechanical

  11. Molecular and genomic approach for understanding the gene-environment interaction between Nrf2 deficiency and carcinogenic nickel-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Lim; Seo, Young Rok

    2012-12-01

    Nickel (?) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal which induces a redox imbalance following oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox factor that regulates oxidation/reduction status and consequently mediates cytoprotective responses against exposure to environmental toxicants. In this study, we investigated the protective roles of the Nrf2 gene against oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by nickel at sub-lethal doses. Under nickel exposure conditions, we detected significantly increased intracellular ROS generation, in addition to higher amounts of DNA damage using comet assay and ?-H2AX immunofluorescence staining in Nrf2 lacking cells, as compared to Nrf2 wild-type cells. In addition, we attempted to identify potential nickel and Nrf2-responsive targets and the relevant pathway. The genomic expression data were analyzed using microarray for the selection of synergistic effect-related genes by Nrf2 knockdown under nickel treatment. In particular, altered expressions of 6 upregulated genes (CAV1, FOSL2, MICA, PIM2, RUNX1 and SLC7A6) and 4 downregulated genes (APLP1, CLSPN, PCAF and PRAME) were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Additionally, using bioinformatics tool, we found that these genes functioned principally in a variety of molecular processes, including oxidative stress response, necrosis, DNA repair and cell survival. Thus, we describe the potential biomarkers regarded as molecular candidates for Nrf2-related cellular protection against nickel exposure. In conclusion, these findings indicate that Nrf2 is an important factor with a protective role in the suppression of mutagenicity and carcinogenicity by environmental nickel exposure in terms of gene-environment interaction. PMID:23023193

  12. Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocyte Grade in Primary Melanomas Is Independently Associated With Melanoma-Specific Survival in the Population-Based Genes, Environment and Melanoma Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Nancy E.; Busam, Klaus J.; From, Lynn; Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B.; Gallagher, Richard P.; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Groben, Pamela A.; Hao, Honglin; Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S.; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Ollila, David W.; Wilcox, Homer; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although most hospital-based studies suggest more favorable survival with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) present in primary melanomas, it is uncertain whether TILs provide prognostic information beyond existing melanoma staging definitions. We addressed the issue in an international population-based study of patients with single and multiple primary melanomas. Patients and Methods On the basis of the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) study, we conducted follow-up of 2,845 patients diagnosed from 1998 to 2003 with 3,330 invasive primary melanomas centrally reviewed for TIL grade (absent, nonbrisk, or brisk). The odds of TIL grades associated with clinicopathologic features and survival by TIL grade were examined. Results Independent predictors (P < .05) for nonbrisk TIL grade were site, histologic subtype, and Breslow thickness, and for brisk TIL grade, they were age, site, Breslow thickness, and radial growth phase. Nonbrisk and brisk TIL grades were each associated with lower American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage compared with TIL absence (Ptrend < .001). Death as a result of melanoma was 30% less with nonbrisk TIL grade (hazard ratio [HR], 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 1.0) and 50% less with brisk TIL grade (HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.9) relative to TIL absence, adjusted for age, sex, site, and AJCC tumor stage. Conclusion At the population level, higher TIL grade of primary melanoma is associated with a lower risk of death as a result of melanoma independently of tumor characteristics currently used for AJCC tumor stage. We conclude that TIL grade deserves further prospective investigation to determine whether it should be included in future AJCC staging revisions. PMID:24127443

  13. The Effect of UGT1A and UGT2B Polymorphisms on Colorectal Cancer Risk: Haplotype Associations and Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Angstadt, Andrea Y.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Lesko, Samuel M.; Muscat, Joshua E.; Zhu, Junjia; Gallagher, Carla J.; Lazarus, Philip

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) play an important role in the phase II metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds. As colorectal cancer (CRC) etiology is thought to involve the biotransformation of dietary factors, UGT polymorphisms may affect CRC risk by altering levels of exposure. Genotyping of over 1800 Caucasian subjects was completed to identify the role of genetic variation in nine UGT1A and five UGT2B genes on CRC risk. Unconditional logistic regression and haplotype analyses were conducted to identify associations with CRC risk and potential gene-environment interactions. UGT1A haplotype analysis found that the T-G haplotype in UGT1A10 exon 1 (block 2: rs17864678, rs10929251) decreased colon cancer risk [proximal (OR = 0.28, 95% CI=0.11–0.69), distal (OR = 0.32, 95% CI=0.12–0.91)] and that the C-T-G haplotype in the 3? region flanking the UGT1A shared exons (block 11: rs7578153, rs10203853, rs6728940) increased CRC risk in males (OR = 2.56, 95% CI=1.10–5.95). A haplotype in UGT2B15 containing a functional variant (rs4148269, K523T) and an intronic SNP (rs6837575) was found to affect rectal cancer risk overall (OR = 2.57, 95% CI=1.21–5.04) and in females (OR = 3.08, 95% CI=1.08–8.74). An interaction was found between high NSAID use and the A-G-T haplotype (block 10: rs6717546, rs1500482, rs7586006) in the UGT1A shared exons that decreased CRC risk. This suggests that UGT genetic variation alters CRC risk differently by anatomical sub-site and gender and that polymorphisms in the UGT1A shared exons may have a regulatory effect on gene expression that allows for the protective effect of NSAIDs on CRC risk. PMID:24822274

  14. Glutamatergic GRIN2B and polyaminergic ODC1 genes in suicide attempts: associations and gene-environment interactions with childhood/adolescent physical assault.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, M; Ben-Efraim, Y J; Wasserman, J; Wasserman, D

    2013-09-01

    The complex etiology of suicidal behavior has frequently been investigated in relation to monoaminergic neurotransmission, but other neurosystems have shown alterations as well, involving excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) molecular components, together with the modulating polyamines. Sufficiently powered and family-based association studies of glutamatergic and GABAergic genes with suicidal behavior are nonexistent, but several studies have been reported for polyamines. We therefore conducted, for the first time ever, an extensive family-based study of 113 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in 24 glutamatergic and GABA genes, in addition to interrelated polyaminergic genes, on the outcome of severe suicide attempts (SAs). The family-based analysis (n=660 trios) was supplemented with gene-environment interaction (G × E), case-control (n=519 controls) and subgroup analyses. The main observations were the previously unreported association and linkage of SNPs rs2268115 and rs220557 in GRIN2B, as well as of SNPs rs1049500 and rs2302614 in ODC1 (P<10(-2)). Furthermore, GRIN2B haplotypic associations were observed, in particular with a four-SNP AGGC haplotype (rs1805247-rs1806201-rs1805482-rs2268115; P<10(-5)), and a third SNP rs7559979 in ODC1 showed G × E with serious childhood/adolescent physical assault (P<10(-4)). SA subjects were characterized by transdiagnostic trait anger and past year alcohol-drug use disorders, but not by alcohol-drug use at SA, depression, anxiety or psychosis diagnoses. We also discuss a first ever confirmatory observation of SNP rs6526342 (polyaminergic SAT1) in SA, originally identified in completed suicides. The results suggest that specific genetic variants in a subset of glutamatergic (GRIN2B) and polyaminergic (ODC1) neurosystem genes may be of importance in certain suicidal subjects. PMID:22850629

  15. Family-based study of HTR2A in suicide attempts: observed gene, gene × environment and parent-of-origin associations.

    PubMed

    Ben-Efraim, Y J; Wasserman, D; Wasserman, J; Sokolowski, M

    2013-07-01

    While suicidal behavior is frequently accompanied by serotonergic system alterations, specific associations with genetic variation in the serotonin 2A receptor (HTR2A) gene have been inconsistent. Using a family-based study design of 660 offspring who have made a suicide attempt (SA) and both parents, we conducted an association and linkage analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with extensive gene coverage, and included the study of parent-of-origin (POE) and gene-environment interaction (G × E), also using previously unstudied exposures. The main finding was a G × E between the exon 1 SNP rs6313 and exposure to cumulative types of lifetime stressful life events (SLEs), driven by overtransmission of CT and undertransmission of TT, both in relation to other genotypes. Further exploratory analysis revealed a significant POE in this G × E in female subjects, which followed a polar overdominant inheritance pattern. In addition, rs6310 and rs6305 were found to significantly associate with SA in the total sample. A G × E in female subjects (rs7322347 × physical assault in childhood/adolescence) confirmed features of a previously observed association with SA. Other potentially interesting nominally significant findings were observed, but like the G × E of rs7322347 did not pass a false-discovery rate cutoff. Taken together, this study found multiple associations of HTR2A SNPs on SA, with strongest statistical evidence for a G × E involving rs6313, and further suggested the importance of taking into account different inheritance patterns and G × Es with regard to HTR2A. PMID:22751492

  16. Relationship of Gingival Pigmentation with Passive Smoking in Women

    PubMed Central

    Moravej-Salehi, Elahe; Moravej-Salehi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral mucosal pigmentation is among the most common findings in smokers, affecting smile esthetics. Passive smoking significantly compromises the health of non-smoker individuals particularly women. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of passive smoking with oral pigmentation in non-smoker women. Materials and Methods: This historical-cohort study was conducted on a case group of 50 married women who were unemployed, not pregnant, non-smoker, had no systemic condition causing cutaneous or mucosal pigmentation, were not taking any medication causing cutaneous or mucosal pigmentation and had a heavy smoker husband. The control group comprised of 50 matched females with no smoker member in the family. Both groups were clinically examined for presence of gingival pigmentation and the results were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression tests. Results: Gingival pigmentation was found in 27 (54%) passive smokers and 14 (28%) controls (P=0.01). The odds ratio (OR) of gingival pigmentation in women exposed to secondhand smoke of their husbands (adjusted for education and having a smoker parent at childhood) was 3 (95% confidence interval; CI: 1.26 – 7.09). House floor area was correlated with gingival pigmentation in female passive smokers (P=0.025). Conclusion: This study was the first to describe the relationship between secondhand smoke and gingival pigmentation in women and this effect was magnified in smaller houses. PMID:26528364

  17. Interior design for passive solar homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  18. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  19. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  20. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Morais, Jorge E.; Forte, Pedro; Neiva, Henrique; Garrido, Nuno D.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively) were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001) and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001). On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475) for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247) for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one’s passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer’s status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures. PMID:26207364

  1. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Morais, Jorge E; Forte, Pedro; Neiva, Henrique; Garrido, Nuno D; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively) were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001) and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001). On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475) for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247) for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one's passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer's status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures. PMID:26207364

  2. Driven active and passive nematics

    E-print Network

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    We investigate similarities in the micro-structural dynamics between externally driven and actively driven nematics. Walls, lines of strong deformations in the director field, and topological defects are characteristic features of an active nematic. Similar structures form in driven passive nematics when there are inhomogeneities in imposed velocity gradients due to non-linear flow fields or geometrical constraints. Specifically, pressure driven flow of a tumbling passive nematic in an expanding-contracting channel produces walls and defects similar to those seen in active nematics. We also study the response of active nematics to external driving, confirming that imposed shear suppresses the hydrodynamic instabilities. We show that shear fields can lead to wall alignments and the localisation of active turbulence.

  3. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Davoyan, Arthur R; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave-matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices. PMID:26414528

  4. New England style passive solar

    SciTech Connect

    Kriescher, P.

    2000-06-01

    There are homeowners throughout New England who planned for and built homes that allow them to avoid the sting of winter's high heating bills. These climate-responsive homes rely on passive solar heating, cooling and lighting. An example of such a climate-responsive/passive solar house is the home that Arthur and Terry Becker build on 6 beautiful acres (2.4 hectares) of rolling farm and woodland southeast of Andover, Connecticut, in 1981. They worked very closely with their designer, Al Eggan of K.T. Lear and Associates, to ensure that they would never have to pay for home heating oil, and that they would enjoy a level of year-round comfort that they had not experienced in conventionally built homes.

  5. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave–matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices PMID:26414528

  6. Myths in passive solar design

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    For years passive solar design principles have been perpetuated without being reexamined or questioned regarding their relevance in the context of new materials and constructions. Rarely does an architect get quantitative feedback on system or concept performance after the building is built. The result has been the perpetuation of beliefs among conference papers, text books and popular articles, all too often based only on belief. In this paper examples of premises which likely deserve to be kept passive rather than acted on are challenged. Designers are encouraged to ask three questions when applying a commonly held rule or assumption: Does it address the right issue? Does it apply, given the properties of new components and materials? If the premise is violated, how badly is comfort or the energy balance affected? Examples taken from monitoring and sensitivity studies illustrate the importance of asking `stupid` questions. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-09-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave-matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices

  8. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  9. Passive Neutron Detection at Borders

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Keller, Paul E.; McConn, Ronald J.

    2008-03-01

    Radiation portal monitor systems have been deployed to screen for illicit trafficking of radioactive materials at international border crossings. This report reviews some of the neutron detection requirements and capabilities of passive detection systems used for such applications. Simulations show the effects of cargo materials on neutron spectra, different detector geometries, using a large-array of neutron detectors, and the effects of backgrounds including “ship effect” neutrons.

  10. Response frequency and Exner's active-passive ratio as Rorschach indicators of flexibility.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Lawrence

    2010-10-01

    Among 75 college students, response frequency from the Rorschach correlated significantly at .21 with Alternate Uses and at .20 with Match Problems (measures of divergent thinking), but not significantly (r = .07) with the Questionnaire (a self-report measure of flexibility) from the Test of Behavioral Rigidity. Contrary to hypothesis, the Active-Passive Movement Ratio from the Comprehensive System did not correlate significantly with any of these tests (r = .04-.11). Whereas Response Frequency can be seen as another reflection of ideational fluency or productivity, as long has been speculated, the conceptual and empirical links between flexibility and the ratio of active to passive movement are dubious. PMID:21162456

  11. Light-induced degradation of native silicon oxide-silicon nitride bilayer passivated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2015-10-01

    This article reports on the effects of aging and light induced degradation of the passivation quality of the interface formed by the crystalline silicon surface and facile grown oxide—SiNx bilayer. Stable passivation quality against aging and light soaking require thicker oxide layers grown at room temperature, suggesting that thicker oxide layers mitigate the migration of hydrogen from the interface and hence the defect density under light soaking. In addition, the stoichiometry of the PECVD SiNx influences the stability of the passivation quality. Specifically, the rate of degradation in passivation quality is observed to correlate with the optical absorption properties of SiNx; the higher the optical absorption the greater the degradation in passivation. This result is attributed to neutralization of the K+ centers in SiNx. Passivation layers with SiNx deposited with 5% silane in nitrogen to ammonia gas ratio of 7 and facile grown native oxide thickness of ˜1 nm resulted in the most stable passivation scheme within the scope of the reported experiments.

  12. Dispersion analysis of passive surface-wave noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Willis, Mark; Snieder, Roel; Haines, Seth S.; Behura, Jyoti; Batzle, Mike; Davidson, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Surface-wave dispersion analysis is useful for estimating near-surface shear-wave velocity models, designing receiver arrays, and suppressing surface waves. Here, we analyze whether passive seismic noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations can be used to extract surface-wave dispersion characteristics. Applying seismic interferometry to noise measurements, we extract surface waves by cross-correlating several minutes of passive records; this approach is distinct from previous studies that used hours or days of passive records for cross-correlation. For comparison, we also perform dispersion analysis for an active-source array that has some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive character of the fundamental-mode surface-waves. For the higher mode surface waves, however, active and passive data resolve the dispersive properties at different frequency ranges. To demonstrate an application of dispersion analysis, we invert the observed surface-wave dispersion characteristics to determine the near-surface, one-dimensional shear-wave velocity.

  13. The passive-aggressive organization.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2005-10-01

    Passive-aggressive organizations are friendly places to work: People are congenial, conflict is rare, and consensus is easy to reach. But, at the end of the day, even the best proposals fail to gain traction, and a company can go nowhere so imperturbably that it's easy to pretend everything is fine. Such companies are not necessarily saddled with mulishly passive-aggressive employees. Rather, they are filled with mostly well-intentioned people who are the victirms of flawed processes and policies. Commonly, a growing company's halfhearted or poorly thought-out attempts to decentralize give rise to multiple layers of managers, whose authority for making decisions becomes increasingly unclear. Some managers, as a result, hang back, while others won't own up to the calls they've made, inviting colleagues to second-guess or overturn the decisions. In such organizations, information does not circulate freely, and that makes it difficult for workers to understand the impact of their actions on company performance and for managers to correctly appraise employees' value to the organization. A failure to accurately match incentives to performance stifles initiative, and people do just enough to get by. Breaking free from this pattern is hard; a long history of seeing corporate initiatives ignored and then fade away tends to make people cynical. Often it's best to bring in an outsider to signal that this time things will be different. He or she will need to address every obstacle all at once: clarify decision rights; see to it that decisions stick; and reward people for sharing information and adding value, not for successfully negotiating corporate politics. If those steps are not taken, it's only a matter of time before the diseased elements of a passive-aggressive organization overwhelm the remaining healthy ones and drive the company into financial distress. PMID:16250627

  14. Passive solar in China: traditional and new

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.; Balcomb, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    The authors' observations of a tradition of passive solar architecture in northern China are described. Tendencies for modern buildings to depart from this tradition are noted. Major passive solar research programs are discussed and experimental buildings are illustrated. It is concluded that the Chinese could realize a major advantage by combining their strong tradition of passive solar architecture with modern insulation methods and improved glazing systems.

  15. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  16. Regulation of adult cardiocyte growth: effects of active and passive mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. L.; Janes, D. M.; Barclay, M. M.; Harger, L.; Decker, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in hemodynamic load have been documented to modulate contractile protein turnover and myofibrillar structure in the heart; however, the relative importance of active and passive loading in regulating adult cardiocyte growth remains unresolved. To address this issue at the cellular level, adult feline cardiocytes were cultured either on Silastic membranes or plastic surfaces. Cardiocyte-laden membranes were stretched 10% of their rest length to enhance passive loading, whereas heart cells cultured on plastic or Silastic were field stimulated at 1 Hz to mimic active loading. Turnover of contractile proteins and structural integrity of the contractile-cytoskeletal apparatus were monitored for periods ranging from 4 to 72 h. Active and passive loading elevated contractile protein synthesis nearly equally (approximately 50%) and promoted the attachment of remodeled myofibrils to vinculin-positive focal contacts and/or costameres during the first 24 h of loading. Thereafter, rates of contractile protein synthesis returned to control values in passively stretched heart cells but remained elevated in field-stimulated cultures. The fractional rate of growth was increased significantly (approximately 8%/day) in electrically paced cells, whereas in passively stretched cardiocytes the growth rate rose only modestly (approximately 2%/day). Changes in the rate of myocyte growth appeared more closely correlated with the development of focal contacts and myofibril remodeling than with changes in myofibrillar protein turnover per se. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime, nifedipine, and, to a lesser extent, ryanodine blocked field-stimulated contractile protein synthesis and myofibrillar remodeling but had no impact on protein turnover or myofibril reassembly in passively loaded cardiocytes. The results of these experiments imply that both active and passive loading stimulate contractile protein turnover and myofibril remodeling, but the generation of active tension accelerates cardiocyte growth to a greater extent than passive loading. Furthermore, pharmacological interventions suggest that unique pathways may mediate these cellular events in actively and passively loaded adult cardiocytes.

  17. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; da Silva, Sebastião William; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; de Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90-120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron-iron oxide were 145 emu g-1 and 131 emu g-1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  18. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  19. Passive component manufacturing in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The serious downturn of optical fiber communication industry in the past three years speeds up the consolidation of passive component manufacturing. Automation activity and investment stopped due to no driving force from the volume demand. A lot of skillful but low cost labors must be needed in the future for manufacturing when the demand comes back. Except MEMS based VOA, most of components based on advanced technology seem to get delayed in most applications. Furthermore, the highly integrated products are also delayed and become uncertain, especially AWG technology. Most of the manufacturing of passive components already moved or are moving to Asia especially China. Browave already built its manufacturing factory and is almost doing all the manufacturing in Zhong Shan. Browave tries to optimize the value of Taiwan plus China, i.e., Tawan provides superior management system, quality systems and manufacturing engineering support where China provides a lot of skillful but low cost labors. Browave is now not only providing the basic elements like Couplers, Isolators, TFF add/drop filter, Thin Film based GFF (Gain Flattened Filters), but also providing "Dedicated Lines" for the components/modules/subsystems for the players who need the value as mentioned above.

  20. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

  1. Passive tracking with sensors of opportunity using passive coherent location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Mahes; Tharmarasa, R.; McDonald, Mike; Kirubarajan, T.

    2008-04-01

    Passive coherent location (PCL), which uses the commercial signals as illuminators of opportunity, is an emerging technology in air defense systems. The advantages of PCL are low cost, low vulnerability to electronic counter measures, early detection of stealthy targets and low-altitude detection. However, limitations of PCL include lack of control over illuminators, poor bearing accuracy, time-varying sensor parameters and limited observability. In this paper, multiple target tracking using PCL with high bearing error is considered. In this case, the challenge is to handle high nonlinearity due to high measurement error. In this paper, we implement the converted measurement Kalman filter, unscented Kalman filter and particle filter based PHD filter for PCL radar measurements and compare their performances.

  2. Passive flow control by membrane wings for aerodynamic benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpe, Amory; Zhang, Zheng; Hubner, James; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The coupling of passive structural response of flexible membranes with the flow over them can significantly alter the aerodynamic characteristic of simple flat-plate wings. The use of flexible wings is common throughout biological flying systems inspiring many engineers to incorporate them into small engineering flying systems. In many of these systems, the motion of the membrane serves to passively alter the flow over the wing potentially resulting in an aerodynamic benefit. In this study, the aerodynamic loads and the flow field for a rigid flat-plate wing are compared to free trailing-edge membrane wings with two different pre-tensions at a chord-based Reynolds number of approximately 50,000. The membrane was silicon rubber with a scalloped free trailing edge. The analysis presented includes load measurements from a sting balance along with velocity fields and membrane deflections from synchronized, time-resolved particle image velocimetry and digital image correlation. The load measurements demonstrate increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift, while the synchronized flow and membrane measurements show how the membrane motion serves to force the flow. This passive flow control introduced by the membranes motion alters the flows development over the wing and into the wake region demonstrating how, at least for lower angles of attack, the membranes motion drives the flow as opposed to the flow driving the membrane motion.

  3. Ambient stability of chemically passivated germanium interfaces

    E-print Network

    Borguet, Eric

    Ambient stability of chemically passivated germanium interfaces D. Bodlaki, H. Yamamoto, D sulfidation or alkylation of Ge surfaces, SHG appears far less sensitive to H and Cl passivation of germanium surfaces than to silicon surfaces. Investigation of the stability of chemically modified germanium surfaces

  4. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  5. Passive Microwave Systems (Rees Chapter 7)

    E-print Network

    Sandwell, David T.

    Passive Microwave Systems (Rees Chapter 7) At wavelengths greater than about 2 cm and less than 10 radiation from the Earth dominates". Microwaves penetrate clouds and since the signal is from thermal emissions, passive microwave measurements can be made in all weather and in daytime or nighttime

  6. EVALUATION OF PASSIVE SAMPLING DEVICES (PSDS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basic objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of the EPA passive sampling device (PSD) for sampling of ambient level volatile organic compounds (VOC's); to develop an understanding of the mechanics of passive sampling using reversible adsorption; and to appl...

  7. Low cost passive solar adobe house

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-21

    A brief description, photographs, and cost breakdown of a hybrid direct-gain passive solar adobe house constructed in the City of El Paso, Texas. The 3-panel active solar domestic hot water system acts as a back-up to the direct gain passive system.

  8. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  9. Germanium surface cleaning, passivation, and initial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shiyu

    Germanium (Ge) is an attractive material to be incorporated into Si-based electronic devices because of its higher intrinsic low field carrier mobility. In order to fabricate devices using Ge, it is essential to understand the Ge surface chemistry and find an effective way to clean and passivate its surface. Systematic studies of these processes had not been performed prior to this work. In this work, synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy are used to investigate the Ge surface cleaning, passivation, morphology and initial oxidation. In addition, other materials closely related to Ge are characterized. The wet chemical cleaning and passivation of Ge surfaces are first studied. The etching mechanism determines the surface passivation. HF etching leads to rougher, hydrophobic, hydrogen passivated surfaces, and the hydrogen coverage is a function of the HF concentration. In contrast, HCl (HBr) etching results in smoother, hydrophilic, chlorine (bromine) passivated surfaces. Results from substrates with different orientations are compared, and the similarity and difference between Ge and Si are discussed. The thermal stability of passivated Ge surfaces is probed by vacuum annealing. As the annealing temperature increases, the passivation layers desorb gradually from the surfaces, and surface states are formed. The thermal stability of different passivation layers is compared, and the influence of substrate orientations is stressed. The passivated Ge surfaces are not stable in air at room temperature. Therefore, controlled experiments are performed to derive the initial oxidation mechanism. The stability of passivated surfaces relies on the coverage of the passivation layers, the size of the passivating atoms, the amount of hydroxide left on the surface after etching, and the difficulty of replacing the passivation layers. Finally, other materials closely related to Ge are characterized. Results on strained Si and Si1-xGex surfaces show that the introduced strain does not alter the Si surface chemistry significantly, while the addition of Ge changes the Si surface chemistry dramatically. Both strained Si and Si1-xGex surfaces have enhanced oxidation rates. In addition, Ge nanowires have similar surface chemistry to Ge planar wafers, and a very nonstoichiometric GeO, layer exists at the HfO2/Ge(100) interface.

  10. Passive ventricular mechanics modelling using MRI of structure and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, V Y; Lam, H I; Ennis, D B; Young, A A; Nash, M P

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy or myocardial infarction can develop left ventricular (LV) diastolic impairment. The LV remodels its structure and function to adapt to pathophysiological changes in geometry and loading conditions and this remodeling process can alter the passive ventricular mechanics. In order to better understand passive ventricular mechanics, a LV finite element model was developed to incorporate physiological and mechanical information derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue tagging, in vivo LV cavity pressure recording and ex vivo diffusion tensor MRI (DTMRI) of a canine heart. MRI tissue tagging enables quantitative evaluation of cardiac mechanical function with high spatial and temporal resolution, whilst the direction of maximum water diffusion (the primary eigenvector) in each voxel of a DTMRI directly correlates with the myocardial fibre orientation. This model was customized to the geometry of the canine LV during diastasis by fitting the segmented epicardial and endocardial surface data from tagged MRI using nonlinear finite element fitting techniques. Myofibre orientations, extracted from DTMRI of the same heart, were incorporated into this geometric model using a free form deformation methodology. Pressure recordings, temporally synchronized to the tissue tagging MRI data, were used to simulate the LV deformation during diastole. Simulation of the diastolic LV mechanics allowed us to estimate the stiffness of the passive LV myocardium based on kinematic data obtained from tagged MRI. This integrated physiological model will allow more insight into the regional passive diastolic mechanics of the LV on an individualized basis, thereby improving our understanding of the underlying structural basis of mechanical dysfunction in pathological conditions. PMID:18982680

  11. Passive Tracking System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Chen, Henry A. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Bourgeois, Brian A. (Inventor); Dusl, Jon (Inventor); Hill, Brent W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are disclosed for passively determining the location of a moveable transmitter utilizing a pair of phase shifts at a receiver for extracting a direction vector from a receiver to the transmitter. In a preferred embodiment, a phase difference between the transmitter and receiver is extracted utilizing a noncoherent demodulator in the receiver. The receiver includes an antenna array with three antenna elements, which preferably are patch antenna elements spaced apart by one-half wavelength. Three receiver channels are preferably utilized for simultaneously processing the received signal from each of the three antenna elements. Multipath transmission paths for each of the three receiver channels are indexed so that comparisons of the same multipath component are made for each of the three receiver channels. The phase difference for each received signal is determined by comparing only the magnitudes of received and stored modulation signals to determine a winning modulation symbol.

  12. Passive Tracking System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Chen, Henry A. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Bourgeois, Brian A. (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor); Hill, Brent W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for passively determining the location of a moveable transmitter utilizing a pair of phase shifts at a receiver for extracting a direction vector from a receiver to the transmitter. In a preferred embodiment, a phase difference between the transmitter and receiver is extracted utilizing a noncoherent demodulator in the receiver. The receiver includes antenna array with three antenna elements, which preferably are patch antenna elements placed apart by one-half wavelength. Three receiver channels are preferably utilized for simultaneously processing the received signal from each of the three antenna elements. Multipath transmission paths for each of the three receiver channels are indexed so that comparisons of the same multipath component are made for each of the three receiver channels. The phase difference for each received signal is determined by comparing only the magnitudes of received and stored modulation signals to determine a winning modulation symbol.

  13. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  14. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  15. Passive Auditory Stimulation Improves Vision in Hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Lewald, Jörg; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Techniques employed in rehabilitation of visual field disorders such as hemianopia are usually based on either visual or audio-visual stimulation and patients have to perform a training task. Here we present results from a completely different, novel approach that was based on passive unimodal auditory stimulation. Ten patients with either left or right-sided pure hemianopia (without neglect) received one hour of unilateral passive auditory stimulation on either their anopic or their intact side by application of repetitive trains of sound pulses emitted simultaneously via two loudspeakers. Immediately before and after passive auditory stimulation as well as after a period of recovery, patients completed a simple visual task requiring detection of light flashes presented along the horizontal plane in total darkness. The results showed that one-time passive auditory stimulation on the side of the blind, but not of the intact, hemifield of patients with hemianopia induced an improvement in visual detections by almost 100% within 30 min after passive auditory stimulation. This enhancement in performance was reversible and was reduced to baseline 1.5 h later. A non-significant trend of a shift of the visual field border toward the blind hemifield was obtained after passive auditory stimulation. These results are compatible with the view that passive auditory stimulation elicited some activation of the residual visual pathways, which are known to be multisensory and may also be sensitive to unimodal auditory stimuli as were used here. Trial Registration DRKS00003577 PMID:22666311

  16. The Future of Passive Solar in Industry 

    E-print Network

    Wulfinghoff, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    OF PASSIVE SOLAR IN INDUSTRY Donald R. WUlfingh9ff, P.E. WUlfinghoff Energy Services, Inc. Wheaton, Maryland ABSTRACT Passive solar is a family of tech niques for the direct use of sunlight for illumination and heating. Industrial facilities have..., passive solar may provide over half of the heating require ment in most climates. 9S ESL-IE-85-05-17 Proceedings from the Seventh National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 12-15, 1985 :~- '-- Cl .... a: L\\J 1Il ~ ..J...

  17. [Passive euthanasia and living will].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the intentional distinction between murder of first degree and passive euthanasia. In Hungary, active euthanasia is considered to be a murder of first degree, whilst the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and Switzerland have legalized the active form of mercy killing in Europe. The palliative terminal care, when e.g. giving pain-killer morphine to the patient, might result in decreasing the patient's life-span, and thus causing indirect euthanasia. However, the legal institution of living will exists in several counter-euthanasia countries. The living will allows future patients to express their decision in advance to refuse a life-sustaining treatment, e.g. in case of irreversible coma. The institution of living will exists in Germany and in Hungary too. Nevertheless, the formal criteria of living will make it hardly applicable. The patient ought to express his/her will before a notary public in advance, and he/she should hand it over when being hospitalized. If the patient is not able to present his/her living will to his/her doctor in the hospital, then his/her only hope remains that he/she has given a copy of the living will to the family doctor previously, and the family doctor will notify the hospital. PMID:24974840

  18. Passive environmental temperature control system

    DOEpatents

    Corliss, John M. (Columbus, OH); Stickford, George H. (Columbus, OH)

    1981-01-01

    Passive environmental heating and cooling systems are described, which utilize heat pipes to transmit heat to or from a thermal reservoir. In a solar heating system, a heat pipe is utilized to carry heat from a solar heat absorber plate that receives sunlight, through a thermal insulation barrier, to a heat storage wall, with the outer end of the pipe which is in contact with the solar absorber being lower than the inner end. The inclining of the heat pipe assures that the portion of working fluid, such as Freon, which is in a liquid phase will fall by gravity to the outer end of the pipe, thereby assuring diode action that prevents the reverse transfer of heat from the reservoir to the outside on cool nights. In a cooling system, the outer end of the pipe which connects to a heat dissipator, is higher than the inner end that is coupled to a cold reservoir, to allow heat transfer only out of the reservoir to the heat dissipator, and not in the reverse direction.

  19. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  20. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J. (Wheeling, IL); Cha, Yung S. (Darien, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  1. PASSIVE DETECTION OF VEHICLE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.

    2012-01-03

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  2. [Health consequences of passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Haustein, K O

    2001-06-01

    Environmental tobacco smoking (ETS) represents a main risk factor for the generation of diseases of the respiratory tract and of the cardiovascular system in spite of statements to the contrary. ETS enhances the risk of lung cancer by a factor of 2-3. Newborn and small children (< 2 years of life) are at high risk if they live within this period of time in a household exposed to maternal more than fraternal smoking. Endothelial cells of the blood vessels are damaged as early as during the first month of life of passive smoking children, and these defects can be detected during the first decade of life. ETS over a period of more than ten years changes the intima/media ratio by enhancing the thickness of the vessel wall. Additionally, poor health behaviour is seen in households of smokers because the behaviour of the parents is transferred to that of their children, and this behaviour is the starting point of further health risks and damages. The presented data should cause a call for primary smoking prevention preferably among children and young persons on the one hand, and the organisation of programs against ETS at the workplace and in public buildings, as well as in the private house on the other hand. Non-smokers must be informed about the risks and dangers of ETS more than it is the case up to now. PMID:11486503

  3. Passive tick surveillance, dog seropositivity, and incidence of human Lyme disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.L.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Zhioua, E.; Whitworth, U.G., Jr.; Markowski, D.; Hyland, K.E.; Hu, R.

    2004-01-01

    Data on nymphal Ixodes scapularis ticks submitted by the public to the University of Rhode Island Tick Research Laboratory for testing from 1991 to 2000 were compared with human case data from the Rhode Island Department of Health to determine the efficacy of passive tick surveillance at assessing human risk of Lyme disease. Numbers of ticks submitted were highly correlated with human cases by county (r = 0.998, n = 5 counties) and by town (r = 0.916, n = 37 towns), as were the numbers of positive ticks submitted (r = 0.989 by county, r = 0.787 by town). Human cases were correlated with ticks submitted by town each year, and with positive ticks in all but 2 years. Thus, passive tick surveillance effectively assessed geographical risk of human Lyme disease. In contrast, tick submissions through time were not correlated with human cases from year to year. Dog seropositivity was significantly correlated with human cases by county in both years tested, but by town in only one of two years. Numbers of ticks submitted were correlated with dog seropositivity by county but not by town, apparently because of high variability among towns with small sample sizes. Our results suggest that passive tick surveillance, using ticks submitted by the public for Lyme spirochete testing, can be used to assess the geographical distribution of Lyme disease risk, but cannot reliably predict Lyme incidence from year to year.

  4. A Microfluidic Passive Pumping Coulter Counter

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Amy L.; Walker, Glenn M.

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device using on-chip passive pumping was characterized for use as a particle counter. Flow occurred due to a Young-Laplace pressure gradient between two 1.2 mm diameter inlets and a 4 mm diameter reservoir when 0.5? L fluid droplets were applied to the inlets using a micropipette. Polystyrene particles (10?m diameter) were enumerated using the resistive pulse technique. Particle counts using passive pumping were within 13% of counts from a device using syringe pumping. All pumping methods produced particle counts that were within 16% of those obtained with a hemocytometer. The effect of intermediate wash steps on particle counts within the passive pumping device was determined. Zero, one, or two wash droplets were loaded after the first of two sample droplets. No statistical difference was detected in the mean particle counts among the loading patterns (p > 0.05). Hydrodynamic focusing using passive pumping was also demonstrated. PMID:23930109

  5. "Computerized" Passive Transformations at Quinta Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kann, Hans-Joachim

    1974-01-01

    The transformation from active to passive voice is analyzed by the student according to a sequence of specific "rules", analagous to the steps one might use to program a computer to perform the same transformation. (DD)

  6. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    E-print Network

    Entekhabi, Dara

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of ...

  7. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-29

    In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the value of performance-based passive building standards when it joined with Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) to promote DOE’s Challenge Home program in tandem with the PHIUS+ Certification program. Since then, the number of passive building projects that have been certified under the partnership has grown exponentially because of some synergy. Passive building represents a well-developed approach to arrive at the envelope basis for zero energy and energy-positive projects by employing performance-based criteria and maximizing cost-effective savings from conservation before implementing renewable energy technologies. The Challenge Home program evolved into the Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program in a move toward 1) attaining zero energy and 2) including active renewable energy generation such as photovoltaics (PV)—toward the zero energy goal.

  8. Vertical diffusivities of active and passive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and R ? (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, R ?. In doubly stable regimes (DS, ? T/?z > 0, ?S/? z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of R ? < 0 and Ri > 0. In DC regimes (diffusive convection, ? T/? z < 0, ? S/? z < 0, R ? > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. In SF regimes (salt fingers, ? T/? z > 0, ? S/? z > 0, R ? < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO 2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  9. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  10. Semi-Passive Replication Xavier Defago Andre Schiper Nicole Sergent

    E-print Network

    Défago, Xavier

    Semi-Passive Replication Xavier D´efago Andr´e Schiper Nicole Sergent D´epartement d This paper presents the semi-passive replication tech- nique ­ a variant of passive replication ­ that can on a primary. Passive replication is a popular replication technique since it can tolerate non

  11. Tracking Passive Sentence Comprehension in Agrammatic Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aaron M; Mack, Jennifer E; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2012-01-01

    People with agrammatic aphasia often experience greater difficulty comprehending passive compared to active sentences. The Trace Deletion Hypothesis (TDH; Grodzinsky, 2000) proposes that aphasic individuals cannot generate accurate syntactic representations of passive sentences and, hence, use an agent-first processing strategy which leads to at-chance performance. We tested this claim using the eyetracking-while-listening paradigm in order to reveal online processing routines. Ten agrammatic aphasic participants and 10 age-matched controls listened to passive and active sentences and performed a sentence-picture matching task (i.e., selecting between two pictures with reversed thematic roles), while their eye movements were monitored. Control participants' performance was at ceiling, whereas accuracy for the aphasic participants was above chance for active sentences and at chance for passive sentences. Further, for the control participants, the eye movement data showed an initial agent-first processing bias, followed by fixation on the correct picture in the vicinity of the verb in both active and passive sentences. However, the aphasic participants showed no evidence of agent-first processing, counter the predictions of the TDH. In addition, in active sentences, they reliably fixated the correct picture only at sentence offset, reflecting slowed processing. During passive sentence processing, fixations were at chance throughout the sentence, but different patterns were noted for correct and incorrect trials. These results are consistent with the proposal that agrammatic sentence comprehension failure involves lexical processing and/or lexical integration deficits. PMID:22043134

  12. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert M; Lohmann, Rainer; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P; Reitsma, Pamela; Perron, Monique M; Lefkovitz, Lisa; Cantwell, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there is an effort under way to encourage remedial project managers at contaminated sites to use passive sampling to collect freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree ) of hydrophobic organic contaminants to improve site assessments. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of passive sampling for measuring water column Cfree for several hydrophobic organic contaminants at 3 US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites. Sites investigated included New Bedford Harbor (New Bedford, MA, USA), Palos Verdes Shelf (Los Angeles, CA, USA), and Naval Station Newport (Newport, RI, USA); and the passive samplers evaluated were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers, semipermeable membrane devices, and polyoxymethylene. In general, the different passive samplers demonstrated good agreement, with Cfree values varying by a factor of 2 to 3. Further, at New Bedford Harbor, where conventional water sample concentrations were also measured (i.e., grab samples), passive sampler-based Cfree values agreed within a factor of 2. These findings suggest that all of the samplers were experiencing and measuring similar Cfree during their respective deployments. Also, at New Bedford Harbor, a strong log-linear, correlative, and predictive relationship was found between polyethylene passive sampler accumulation and lipid-normalized blue mussel bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (r(2) ?=?0.92, p?passive sampling for generating scientifically accurate water column Cfree values, which is critical for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. PMID:26039657

  13. Passive Energy Building Design Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-11-01

    SOLAR5 is a computer aided design tool to help architects design better, more energy efficient buildings. It is intended for use at the beginning of the design process. To get started, only four pieces of information are necessary to compute the energy needed: the square footage, the number of stories, the kind of building (such as school, home, hotel, or any one of 20 types), and its location (the program stores the temperature ranges formore »fourty major cities). Additional information may be given later to fine tune the design. An expert system using heuristics from a wide range of sources, automatically creates a passive solar baseline building from the four facts specified for that project. By modifying and adapting prior designs the user can create and work upon as many as nine schemes simultaneously. SOLAR5 can analyze the buildings thermal performance for each hour of each month and plot its total heat gain or loss as a three-dimensional surface. After reading the plot, the user can immediately redesign the building and rerun the analysis. Separate heat gain/loss surfaces can be plotted for each of the different parts of the building or schemes that add together to make up the total, including walls, roof, windows, skylights, floor, slab on grade, people, lights, equipment, and infiltration. Two different schemes can be instantly compared by asking for a three-dimensional plot showing only the difference in their performances. The objective of SOLAR5 is to allow the designer to make changes easily and quickly with detailed instantaneous pictorial feedback of the implications of the change.« less

  14. Optimization of passive optical limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sidney S.

    2000-07-01

    In this dissertation, we investigate the phenomenon of passive optical limiting, which serves the purpose of protecting sensors and eyes from strong incident laser pulses. I introduce several different nonlinear mechanisms and evaluate their performance in terms of important criteria for optical limiting. The remaining chapters are devoted to the experimental optimization of different types of optical limiters. Many designs of optical limiters are based on nonlinear absorption (NLA). The best limiting result from NLA was previously obtained in a 3-cell tandem limiter based on strong excited-state absorption. A detailed description of the concept of tandem limiters is given and experimental results based on NLA are presented. Thermally induced nonlinear refraction due to the absorbed light energy reduces the efficiency of the tandem limiters. However, we propose and demonstrate a novel limiter design utilizing this thermal effect to enhance the limiting performance. Previously, the nonlinear scattering (NLS) properties of carbon black suspensions (CBS) were used to produce good limiting results. Another NLS limiter design with scattering elements mixed in an index-matching fluid is proposed and compared to the CBS limiter. We have also applied liquid crystals to the design of limiters. This new mechanism is based on the polarization change due to induced nonlinear birefringence. An attractive property of this design is its insensitivity to wavelength. Finally a dual-focus limiter system is presented. This design combines nonlinear absorption, nonlinear refraction and nonlinear scattering. Experimental results show that the output energy of nanosecond 532 nm pulses through a 1.5 mrad aperture placed after a final focusing lens is held below 1?J for inputs greater than 14.5 mJ without damage while the linear transmittance is 21%.

  15. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided wave guided fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Ross James; la Grone, Marcus; Fisher, Mark

    2012-10-16

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  16. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided waveguided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James (Stillwater, OK); la Grone, Marcus (Cushing, OK); Fisher, Mark (Stillwater, OK)

    2011-10-18

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  17. Mesoscopics of ultrasound and seismic waves: application to passive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, É.

    2006-05-01

    This manuscript deals with different aspects of the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in heterogeneous media, both simply and multiply scattering ones. After a short introduction on conventional imaging techniques, we describe two observations that demonstrate the presence of multiple scattering in seismic records: the equipartition principle, and the coherent backscattering effect (Chap. 2). Multiple scattering is related to the mesoscopic nature of seismic and acoustic waves, and is a strong limitation for conventional techniques like medical or seismic imaging. In the following part of the manuscript (Chaps. 3 5), we present an application of mesoscopic physics to acoustic and seismic waves: the principle of passive imaging. By correlating records of ambient noise or diffuse waves obtained at two passive sensors, it is possible to reconstruct the impulse response of the medium as if a source was placed at one sensor. This provides the opportunity of doing acoustics and seismology without a source. Several aspects of this technique are presented here, starting with theoretical considerations and numerical simulations (Chaps. 3, 4). Then we present experimental applications (Chap. 5) to ultrasound (passive tomography of a layered medium) and to seismic waves (passive imaging of California, and the Moon, with micro-seismic noise). Physique mésoscopique des ultrasons et des ondes sismiques : application à l'imagerie passive. Cet article de revue rassemble plusieurs aspects fondamentaux et appliqués de la propagation des ondes acoustiques et élastiques dans les milieux hétérogènes, en régime de diffusion simple ou multiple. Après une introduction sur les techniques conventionelles d'imagerie sismique et ultrasonore, nous présentons deux expériences qui mettent en évidence la présence de diffusion multiple dans les enregistrements sismologiques : l'équipartition des ondes, et la rétrodiffusion cohérente (Chap. 2). La diffusion multiple des ondes, qui démontre l'aspect mésoscopique de leur propagation, est une limitation majeure pour les techniques d'imagerie conventionelles (imagerie médicale, sismique réflexion ou réfraction, tomographie...). La deuxième partie du document (Chaps. 3 5) est consacrée à une application de cette physique mésoscopique : le principe de l'imagerie passive. En effectuant la corrélation temporelle d'enregistrement de bruit ambiant ou d'ondes diffuses, il est possible de reconstruire la réponse impulsionnelle du milieu entre deux capteurs passifs comme si l'on avait placé une source en lieu et place d'un des capteurs. Cela offre la possibilité de faire de l'acoustique ou de la sismologie sans source. Plusieurs aspects sont présentés dans ce manuscrit : des aspects théoriques et numériques (Chaps. 3, 4), ensuite des aspects expérimentaux avec des applications (Chap. 5) à l'échelle des ultrasons (tomographie passive d'un milieu stratifié), et des applications à l'échelle de la sismologie (imagerie du sous-sol de la Californie, et même de la Lune).

  18. Passive measurement and interpretation of polarized microwave brightness temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Kunkee, D. B.; Piepmeier, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop satellite-based observational techniques for measuring both oceanic and atmospheric variables using passive polarimetric radiometry. Polarimetric radiometry offers a potential alternative to radar scatterometry in observing global ocean surface wind direction from satellites. Polarimetric radiometry might also provide a means of detecting cell-top ice in convective storms by virtue of the polarizing properties of oriented ice particles, and thus facilitate estimation of the phase of the storm. The project focuses on the development of polarimetric microwave radiometers using digital cross-correlators for obtaining precise measurements of all four Stokes' parameters. As part of the project a unique four-band polarimetric imaging radiometer, the Polar Scanning Radiometer (PSR), is being designed for use on the NASA DC-8 aircraft. In addition to providing an aircraft-based demonstration of digital correlation technology the PSR will significantly enhance the microwave imaging capability of the existing suite of DC-8 instruments. During the first grant year excellent progress has been made in the following areas: (1) demonstrating digital correlation radiometry, (2) fabricating aircraft-qualified correlators for use in the PSR, and (3) modeling observed SSM/I brightness signatures of ocean wind direction.

  19. ChemCam Passive Spectroscopy of the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.; Bender, S. C.; Johnson, J. R.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Barraclough, B. L.; Blaney, D. L.; DeFlores, L.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The design priority of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) portion of the ChemCam instrument (Wiens et al. 2012, Space Sci, Rev. 170) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is its active mode, which acquires spectra of a laser induced plasma using three spectrometers. However these same spectrometers have excellent sensitivity to ambient light and so are also used independent of the laser in 'passive' mode to acquire spectra of the Martian surface (Johnson et al., 2013, LPSC #1372) and, as we will describe here, the Martian sky. Using ChemCam passive sky observations, we have successfully measured the column abundance of water vapor, molecular oxygen, and carbon dioxide gas, and with further analysis will likely be able to constrain the column abundance of ozone as well as aerosol and cloud particle properties. Although data analysis is ongoing, we currently estimate a 2 sigma precision of < +/- 1 precipitable microns for water vapor, < +/- 30 ppm for molecular oxygen, and < +/- 4 % for carbon dioxide. The three ChemCam spectrometers span 240-342 nm, 382-469 nm, and 474-906 nm, respectively, with a resolution of 0.6 nm FWHM or better. Passive sky observations were obtained on sols 131, 230, and then at regular ~7 sol intervals starting on sol 278. The observation consists of acquiring spectra of light scattered by the atmosphere at two elevation angles so that the ratio of the two resulting radiance spectra yields (after removing the continuum) an extremely precise absorption spectrum with both the solar spectrum and instrument response uncertainties removed. To yield column abundances, the spectra are modeled with a discrete ordinates multiple scattering radiative transfer code that incorporates gas absorption via the correlated-k method.

  20. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information, results of laboratory tests, thermodynamic calculations, process description, and operational parameters, and addresses safety concerns.

  1. Integrated Source of Spectrally Filtered Correlated Photons for Large-Scale Quantum Photonic Systems

    E-print Network

    Grassani, Davide

    We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs combined with the spectral filtering of the pump field by more than 95 dB on a single silicon chip using electrically tunable ring resonators and passive ...

  2. Passive terahertz imaging for security application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lan-tao; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    The passive detection is safe for passengers and operators as no radiation. Therefore, passive terahertz (THz) imaging can be applied to human body security check. Imaging in the THz band offers the unique property of being able to identify object through a range of materials. Therefore passive THz imaging is meaningful for security applications. This attribute has always been of interest to both the civil and military marks with applications. We took advantage of a single THz detector and a trihedral scanning mirror to propose another passive THz beam scanning imaging method. This method overcame the deficiencies of the serious decline in image quality due to the movement of the focused mirror. We exploited a THz scanning mirror with a trihedral scanning mirror and an ellipsoidal mirror to streamline the structure of the system and increase the scanning speed. Then the passive THz beam scanning imaging system was developed based on this method. The parameters were set as follows: the best imaging distance was 1.7m, the image height was 2m, the image width was 1m, the minimum imaging time of per frame was 8s, and the minimum resolution was 4cm. We imaged humans with different objects hidden under their clothes, such as fruit knife, belt buckle, mobile phone, screwdriver, bus cards, keys and other items. All the tested stuffs could be detected and recognized from the image.

  3. Passive cooling systems in residential buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, John G.; Givoni, Baruch

    1985-11-01

    The performance of four passive cooling systems, nocturnal convective cooling, nocturnal radiative cooling, direct evaporative cooling and conductive earth-coupled cooling, is evaluated for representative environmental conditions in the temperate, hot-humid and hot-arid climatic zones of the United States. The analysis indicates that substantial portion of the cooling load of a typical energy-efficient single family residential building can be eliminated with any of these passive systems. Depending on system type and climatic zone, the building cooling load can be reduced by 1/3 to over 4/5 of its original value. The corresponding energy savings would amount to a minimum of 25 TWh/yr and could potentially exceed 50 TWh/yr, if proper passive cooling systems were to be employed throughout the country. Incorporation of passive cooling models in building energy analysis codes will be necessary to determine more precisely the potential of each system. Field testing will also be required to further evaluate this potential. Moreover, the extension of analytical modeling to include additional passive cooling systems and the research of advanced building—natural environment coupling systems and materials constitute tasks requiring further effort.

  4. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J. (Alamo, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  5. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-01-21

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile. 9 figs.

  6. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  7. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  8. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  9. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  10. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  11. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lobitz, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  12. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-07

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  13. Complete corrosion inhibition through graphene defect passivation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Hofmann, Mario; Chang, Kai-Wen; Jhu, Jian Gang; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chen, Kuang Yao; Yang, Chang Chung; Chang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Li-Chyong

    2014-01-28

    Graphene is expected to enable superior corrosion protection due to its impermeability and chemical inertness. Previous reports, however, demonstrate limited corrosion inhibition and even corrosion enhancement of graphene on metal surfaces. To enable the reliable and complete passivation, the origin of the low inhibition efficiency of graphene was investigated. Combining electrochemical and morphological characterization techniques, nanometer-sized structural defects in chemical vapor deposition grown graphene were found to be the cause for the limited passivation effect. Extremely fast mass transport on the order of meters per second both across and parallel to graphene layers results in an inhibition efficiency of only ?50% for Cu covered with up to three graphene layers. Through selective passivation of the defects by atomic layer deposition (ALD) an enhanced corrosion protection of more than 99% was achieved, which compares favorably with commercial corrosion protection methods. PMID:24359599

  14. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  15. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    Passive design principles (super insulation, airtight envelopes, elimination of thermal bridges, etc.) - pioneered in North America in the 70s and 80s and refined in Europe in the 90s have proven to be universally effective to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads. However, a single, rigid performance metric developed in Germany has led to limited uptake of passive building principles in many regions of the United States. It has also, in many cases, promoted some design decisions that had negative effects on economic feasibility and thermal comfort. This study's main objective is to validate (in a theoretical sense) verifiable, climate-specific passive standards and space conditioning criteria that retain ambitious, environmentally-necessary energy reduction targets and are economically feasible, such standards provide designers an ambitious but achievable performance target on the path to zero.

  16. Advances in Inner Magnetosphere Passive and Active Wave Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    This review identifies a number of the principal research advancements that have occurred over the last five years in the study of electromagnetic (EM) waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. The observations used in this study are from the plasma wave instruments and radio sounders on Cluster, IMAGE, Geotail, Wind, Polar, Interball, and others. The data from passive plasma wave instruments have led to a number of advances such as: determining the origin and importance of whistler mode waves in the plasmasphere, discovery of the source of kilometric continuum radiation, mapping AKR source regions with "pinpoint" accuracy, and correlating the AKR source location with dipole tilt angle. Active magnetospheric wave experiments have shown that long range ducted and direct echoes can be used to obtain the density distribution of electrons in the polar cap and along plasmaspheric field lines, providing key information on plasmaspheric filling rates and polar cap outflows.

  17. ULTOR passive pose and position engine for spacecraft relative navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, S. Joel

    2008-04-01

    The ULTOR® Passive Pose and Position Engine (P3E) technology, developed by Advanced Optical Systems, Inc (AOS), uses real-time image correlation to provide relative position and pose data for spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control. Potential data sources include a wide variety of sensors, including visible and infrared cameras. ULTOR® P3E has been demonstrated on a number of host processing platforms. NASA is integrating ULTOR® P3E into its Relative Navigation System (RNS), which is being developed for the upcoming Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4). During SM4 ULTOR® P3E will perform realtime pose and position measurements during both the approach and departure phases of the mission. This paper describes the RNS implementation of ULTOR® P3E, and presents results from NASA's hardware-in-the-loop simulation testing against the HST mockup.

  18. The Construct Validity of Passive-Aggressive Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Morey, Leslie C.; Markowitz, John C.; Pinto, Anthony; Skodol, Andrew E.; Gunderson, John G.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, M. Tracie; Yen, Shirley; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Ansell, Emily B.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Although Passive Aggressive personality disorder (PAPD) plays an important role in many theories of personality pathology, it was consigned to the appendix of the fourth edition of the DSM. The scientific basis of this decision has been questioned, but several controversies persist regarding PAPD, including its structure, content validity, overlap with other PDs, and relations to validating variables such as personality traits, childhood experiences, and clinically relevant correlates. This study examined these facets of PAPD’s construct validity in a large clinical sample. Results suggest that the construct is unidimensional, internally consistent, and reasonably stable. Furthermore, PAPD appears systematically related to borderline and narcissistic personality disorders, sets of personality traits, and childhood experiences consistent with several theoretical formulations, dysfunction, substance abuse disorders, and history of hospitalizations. Overall, results support the construct validity of PAPD. PMID:19821648

  19. Bacterial turbulence reduction by passive magnetic particle chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo-An; I, Lin

    2013-09-01

    We report the experimental observation of the bacterial turbulence reduction in dense E. coli suspensions by increasing the coupling of passive particle additives (paramagnetic particles). Applying an external magnetic field induces magnetic dipoles for particles and causes the formation of vertical chain bundles, which are hard for bacterial flows to tilt and break. The larger effective drag coefficient of chains causes slow horizontal motion of chains, which in turn form obstacles to suppress bacterial flows through the strong correlation in coherent bacterial clusters and intercluster interaction. The interruption of the upward energy flow from individual self-propelling bacteria to the larger scale in the bacterial turbulence with multiscaled coherent flow by the chain bundle leads to more severe suppression in the low frequency (wave number) regimes of the power spectra. PMID:24125341

  20. Reliability of torque measurements during passive isokinetic knee movements in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Nuyens, G; de Weerdt, W; Spaepen, A; Janssens, L; Ketelaer, P; Bogaerts, K

    2000-06-01

    In the literature, few data are available about the reliability of torque measured during passive isokinetic knee movements. This study investigated the consistency of torque measurements during passive knee movements at 60, 180 and 300 degrees/second in 30 healthy subjects. Intraclass correlation values ranged between 0.78 and 0.92 when the results of two consecutive tests were compared. When retests were performed after repositioning the subjects, intraclass correlation values ranged between 0.43 and 0.87. These findings indicate the necessity for meticulous standardization of the test situation. Series of 10 consecutive movements, specifically repetitions of knee flexion at 180 and 300 degrees/second, indicated that torque measurements during the first two movements were less stable than those following. A concurrent change in electromyographic activity in the rectus femoris muscle suggested that these torque variations resulted from habituation of the stretch reflex. PMID:10853719

  1. The passive diffusion of Leptospira interrogans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koens, Lyndon; Lauga, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent experimental measurements, the passive diffusion of the bacterium Leptospira interrogans is investigated theoretically. By approximating the cell shape as a straight helix and using the slender-body-theory approximation of Stokesian hydrodynamics, the resistance matrix of Leptospira is first determined numerically. The passive diffusion of the helical cell is then obtained computationally using a Langevin formulation which is sampled in time in a manner consistent with the experimental procedure. Our results are in excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental results with no adjustable parameters.

  2. Cleaning, pickling, and passivation of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, C.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steels (SS) are chosen for various services because of their appearance and corrosion resistance and for their freedom from contamination in storage and shipment. However, certain conditions in handling or fabrication may make these alloys susceptible to localized corrosion or unsatisfactory performance. A surface of cleanliness, uniformity, and corrosion resistance is desirable and, in some services, absolutely required. Definitions and procedures for cleaning, pickling, and passivating stainless steels are reviewed. Surface contamination and defects including grinding marks and smut are discussed, as are measures for preventing and correcting them. The cleaning and passivating sequence required for free-machining stainless grades is included.

  3. Technical Assessment: WRAP 1 HVAC Passive Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.E.; Nash, C.R.; Stroup, J.L.

    1993-08-12

    As the result of careful interpretation of DOE Order 6430.lA and other DOE Orders, the HVAC system for WRAP 1 has been greatly simplified. The HVAC system is now designed to safely shut down to Passive State if power fails for any reason. The fans cease functioning, allowing the Zone 1 and Zone 2 HVAC Confinement Systems to breathe with respect to atmospheric pressure changes. Simplifying the HVAC system avoided overdesign. Construction costs were reduced by eliminating unnecessary equipment. This report summarizes work that was done to define the criteria, physical concepts, and operational experiences that lead to the passive shutdown design for WRAP 1 confinement HVAC systems.

  4. Passive margin earthquakes: Reviewing knowledge and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-03-01

    Earthquakes like the August 2011 magnitude 5.8 Mineral, Va., temblor that occur on “passive” continental margins surprise people because they expect earthquakes to occur only on plate boundaries. But, in fact, large and damaging intraplate earthquakes occur fairly regularly on passive margins around the world. For instance, in North America the magnitude ˜7 Charleston earthquake shook South Carolina in 1886, causing severe damage and about 60 deaths, and the 1929 magnitude 7.2 earthquake on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland caused a tsunami, a large landslide, and 28 fatalities. Although they are fairly common, these earthquakes are not well studied, and their specific geologic settings and causes are unclear.

  5. An all-silicon passive optical diode.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Varghese, Leo T; Shen, Hao; Niu, Ben; Xuan, Yi; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2012-01-27

    A passive optical diode effect would be useful for on-chip optical information processing but has been difficult to achieve. Using a method based on optical nonlinearity, we demonstrate a forward-backward transmission ratio of up to 28 decibels within telecommunication wavelengths. Our device, which uses two silicon rings 5 micrometers in radius, is passive yet maintains optical nonreciprocity for a broad range of input power levels, and it performs equally well even if the backward input power is higher than the forward input. The silicon optical diode is ultracompact and is compatible with current complementary metal-oxide semiconductor processing. PMID:22194410

  6. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  7. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  8. The Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.; Horvath, P.; Ibrahim, A. K.; Koyama, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The completed data set obtained from the 4-station Apollo seismic network includes signals from approximately 11,800 events of various types. Four data sets for use by other investigators, through the NSSDC, are in preparation. Some refinement of the lunar model based on seismic data can be expected, but its gross features remain as presented two years ago. The existence of a small, molten core remains dependent upon the analysis of signals from a single, far-side impact. Analysis of secondary arrivals from other sources may eventually resolve this issue, as well as continued refinement of the magnetic field measurements. Evidence of considerable lateral heterogeneity within the moon continues to build. The mystery of the much meteoroid flux estimate derived from lunar seismic measurements, as compared with earth-based estimates, remains; although, significant correlations between terrestrial and lunar observations are beginning to emerge.

  9. Physical Factors Influencing Pleasant Touch during Passive Fingertip Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Klöcker, Anne; Oddo, Calogero Maria; Camboni, Domenico; Penta, Massimo; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tactile explorations with the fingertips provide information regarding the physical properties of surfaces and their relative pleasantness. Previously, we performed an investigation in the active touch domain and linked several surface properties (i.e. frictional force fluctuations and net friction) with their pleasantness levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate physical factors being important for pleasantness perception during passive fingertip stimulation. Specifically we were interested to see whether factors, such as surfaces' topographies or their frictional characteristics could influence pleasantness. Furthermore, we ascertained how the stimulus pleasantness level was impacted by (i) the normal force of stimulus application (FN) and (ii) the stimulus temperature (TS). Methods and Results The right index fingertips of 22 blindfolded participants were stimulated using 27 different stimuli, which varied in average roughness (Ra) and TS. A 4-axis robot moved the stimuli horizontally under participants' fingertips with three levels of FN. The robot was equipped with force sensors, which recorded the FN and friction force (FT) during stimulation. Participants rated each stimulus according to a three-level pleasantness scale, as very pleasant (scored 0), pleasant (scored 1), or unpleasant (scored 2). These ordinal pleasantness ratings were logarithmically transformed into linear and unidimensional pleasantness measures with the Rasch model. Statistical analyses were conducted to investigate a possible link between the stimulus properties (i.e. Ra, FN, FT, and TS) and their respective pleasantness levels. Only the mean Ra and FT values were negatively correlated with pleasantness. No significant correlation was detected between FN or TS and pleasantness. Conclusion Pleasantness perception, resulting from passive fingertip stimulation, seems to be influenced by the surfaces' average roughness levels and average FT occurring during fingertip stimulation. PMID:25000561

  10. Death Anxiety and Voluntary Passive Euthanasia: Influences of Proximity to Death and Experiences with Death in Important Other Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devins, Gerald M.

    1979-01-01

    Identified five sources of death anxiety. Significant relationships were observed between each source and experimental factors. The relationship between death anxiety and attitude toward voluntary passive euthanasia was explored, and a significant correlation was noted among elderly persons. Results were consistent with an idiographic orientation…

  11. A 13-WEEK COMPARISON OF PASSIVE AND CONTINUOUS OZONE MONITORS AT FORESTED SITES IN NORTH-CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ogawa passive 03 samplers were used in a 13-233k study (June 1-September 1, 1999) involving 11 forested and mountaintop sites in north-central Pennsylvania. Four of the sites were collocated with TECO model 49 O3 analyzers. A significant correlation (p<0.0001) was found for 2...

  12. A THIRTEEN-WEEK COMPARISON OF PASSIVE AND CONTINUOUS OZONE MONITORS AT FORESTED SITES IN NORTH-CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ogawa passive 03 samplers were used in a 13-233k study (June 1-September 1, 1999) involving 11 forested and mountaintop sites in north-central Pennsylvania. Four of the sites were collocated with TECO model 49 O3 analyzers. A significant correlation (p<0.0001) was found for 24-...

  13. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  14. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Cendrero-Mateo, M Pilar; Moran, M Susan; Papuga, Shirley A; Thorp, K R; Alonso, L; Moreno, J; Ponce-Campos, G; Rascher, U; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  15. Comparison of passive microwave and modeled estimates of total watershed SWE in the continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuyovich, Carrie M.; Jacobs, Jennifer M.; Daly, Steven F.

    2014-11-01

    In the U.S., a dedicated system of snow measurement stations and snowpack modeling products is available to estimate the snow water equivalent (SWE) throughout the winter season. In other regions of the world that depend on snowmelt for water resources, snow data can be scarce, and these regions are vulnerable to drought or flood conditions. Even in the U.S., water resource management is hampered by limited snow data in certain regions, as evident by the 2011 Missouri Basin flooding due in large part to the significant Plains snowpack. Satellite data could potentially provide important information in under-sampled areas. This study compared the daily AMSR-E and SSM/I SWE products over nine winter seasons to spatially distributed, modeled output SNODAS summed over 2100 watersheds in the conterminous U.S. Results show large areas where the passive microwave retrievals are highly correlated to the SNODAS data, particularly in the northern Great Plains and southern Rocky Mountain regions. However, the passive microwave SWE is significantly lower than SNODAS in heavily forested areas, and regions that typically receive a deep snowpack. The best correlations are associated with basins in which maximum annual SWE is less than 200 mm, and forest fraction is less than 20%. Even in many watersheds with poor correlations between the passive microwave data and SNODAS maximum annual SWE values, the overall pattern of accumulation and ablation did show good agreement and therefore may provide useful hydrologic information on melt timing and season length.

  16. Prediction techniques for passive systems' probability of failure

    E-print Network

    Cavalieri d'Oro, Edoardo

    2007-01-01

    This work fits into the wider framework of the on-going debate centered on Passive System reliability. Its aim is to provide insights into the design of a dependable method to evaluate the reliability of Passive Systems. ...

  17. Surface passivation process of compound semiconductor material using UV photosulfidation

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A method for passivating compound semiconductor surfaces by photolytically disrupting molecular sulfur vapor with ultraviolet radiation to form reactive sulfur which then reacts with and passivates the surface of compound semiconductors.

  18. Active and passive coping strategies in chronic pain patients 

    E-print Network

    Snow-Turek, Andrea Lynn

    1994-01-01

    This study assessed the validity of an active/passive conceptualization of coping in a sample of chronic pain patients (N = 84). The validity of active and passive coping dimensions was supported. The Coping Strategies ...

  19. Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection

    DOEpatents

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10

    A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

  20. NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica

    E-print Network

    Kitajima, Kaoru

    NOTE / NOTE Transpiration-dependent passive silica accumulation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) under transport Si, through transpiration, from soils to shoots, while others actively transport silica manipulated transpiration rates by changing humidity and air movements around pot-grown plants receiving

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF LAND SURFACE PASSIVE MICROWAVE POLARIMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The launch of WindSat and potential designs of future operational passive microwave sensors such as Conical Scanning Microwave Imager/Scanner (CMIS) have prompted an examination of what additional information about land surface features may be present in the 3rd and 4th Stokes parameters beyond the ...

  2. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  3. Efficient Object Identification with Passive RFID Tags

    E-print Network

    application is the "RFID Chef"2 , a kitchen assistant that recognizes food items, e.g. in a shopping bagEfficient Object Identification with Passive RFID Tags Harald Vogt Department of Computer Science identification (RFID) promises to be an unobtrusive, practical, cheap, yet flexible technology for identification

  4. Mennonite Nursing Home passive solar demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    A long-term nursing care facility and retirement center was designed for passive solar heating. The system comprises thermal mass, thermal insulation, Trombe walls, and direct gain clerestories. Included here is a topical report, analysis of building performance, owner's perspective, designer's perspective, and summary of information dissemination activities. (MHR)

  5. Photodetectors with passive thermal radiation control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Dodson, Brian W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-10-02

    A new class of photodetectors which include means for passive shielding against undesired thermal radiation is disclosed. Such devices can substitute in applications currently requiring cooled optical sensors, such as IR detection and imaging. This description is included for purposes of searching, and is not intended to limit or otherwise influence the interpretation of the present invention.

  6. USE OF PASSIVE SAMPLERS IN THE DEARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) employs a number of passive diffusion-based samplers for the collection of select gaseous air pollutants. These pollutants include criteria gases such as ozone, carbonyls such as acrolein, and volatile organics such as 1-3, ...

  7. Passive mechanics in jellyfish-like locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Megan; Eldredge, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this work is to identify possible benefits of passive flexibility in biologically-inspired locomotion. Substantial energy savings are likely achieved in natural locomotion by allowing a mix of actively controlled and passively responsive deformation. The jellyfish is a useful target of study, due to its relatively simple structure and the availability of recent kinematics and flow-field measurements. In this investigation, the jellyfish consists of a two-dimensional articulated system of rigid bodies linked by hinges. The kinematics -- expressed via the hinge angles -- are adapted from experimentally measured motion. The free swimming system is explored via high-fidelity numerical simulation with a viscous vortex particle method with coupled body dynamics. The computational tool allows the arbitrary designation of individual hinges as ``active'' or ``passive,'' to introduce a mix of flexibility into the system. In some cases, replacing an active hinge with a passive spring can enhance the mean swimming speed, thus reducing the power requirements of the system. Varying the stiffness and damping coefficients of the spring yield different locomotive results. The numerical solution is used to compute the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) throughout the field. The FTLE fields reveal manifolds in the flow that act as transport barriers, uncovering otherwise unseen geometric characteristics of the flow field that add new insight into the locomotion mechanics.

  8. Sunspot Time Series: Passive and Active Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi?ba, S.; Nieckarz, Z.

    2014-07-01

    Solar activity slowly and irregularly decreases from the first spotless day (FSD) in the declining phase of the old sunspot cycle and systematically, but also in an irregular way, increases to the new cycle maximum after the last spotless day (LSD). The time interval between the first and the last spotless day can be called the passive interval (PI), while the time interval from the last spotless day to the first one after the new cycle maximum is the related active interval (AI). Minima of solar cycles are inside PIs, while maxima are inside AIs. In this article, we study the properties of passive and active intervals to determine the relation between them. We have found that some properties of PIs, and related AIs, differ significantly between two group of solar cycles; this has allowed us to classify Cycles 8 - 15 as passive cycles, and Cycles 17 - 23 as active ones. We conclude that the solar activity in the PI declining phase (a descending phase of the previous cycle) determines the strength of the approaching maximum in the case of active cycles, while the activity of the PI rising phase (a phase of the ongoing cycle early growth) determines the strength of passive cycles. This can have implications for solar dynamo models. Our approach indicates the important role of solar activity during the declining and the rising phases of the solar-cycle minimum.

  9. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  10. South Philadelphia Passive Sampler and Sensor Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Starting in June 2013, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the City of Philadelphia Air Measurements Services began collaborative research on the use of passive samplers (PSs) and stand-alone air measurement (SAM) systems to improve information on the...

  11. Passive safety injection system using borated water

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E. (Allegheny, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Westmoreland, PA)

    1993-01-01

    A passive safety injection system relies on differences in water density to induce natural circulatory flow patterns which help maintain prescribed concentrations of boric acid in borated water, and prevents boron from accumulating in the reactor vessel and possibly preventing heat transfer.

  12. CAN CONTINGENT VALUATION MEASURE PASSIVE USE VALUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contingent valuation (CV) is the only method currently available for practically measuring passive-use values. Because proposed laws may require that environmental regulations pass a benefit-cost test, CV has become central to the policy debate on environmental protection. Crit...

  13. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  14. Passive Smoking in the Workplace: Selected Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report provides information about the health effects of passive smoking, the types of policies that are in force in the public and private sectors to control workplace smoking, and the costs and effects of those policies. The executive summary briefly highlights the three major areas of the report: (1) a review of the studies of health…

  15. Camp Sacajawea Passive Solar Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-31

    The intent of the Passive Solar Demonstration Project was to have: an actual demonstration of the effectiveness of a passive solar design and working automatic shading devices; accurate data of energy saved by the passive design and shading devices; a brochure distributed to architects, builders, and consumers, with the monitoring data and information about the project; and the continued monitoring of the building to help explain to those who are using the building the value of the system; this would not only include the 7000 members, bu visitors and other users of the facility. To accomplish these goals, a monitoring system was installed in the recently build Passive Solar Lodge at Camp Sacajawea on Casper Mountain south of Casper, Wyoming. The building was monitored continously for the remainder of the project. The installation of the automatic shading device, a curtain wall was accomplished but had some difficulty. The results indicate there is some effectiveness of the Curtain Wall, but a quantitative value would be impossible at this time.

  16. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  17. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-06

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  18. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  19. Passive ultrasonics using sub-Nyquist sampling of high-frequency thermal-mechanical noise.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Karim G; Romberg, Justin; Lani, Shane; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-06-01

    Monolithic integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays with low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics minimizes interconnect parasitics thus allowing the measurement of thermal-mechanical (TM) noise. This enables passive ultrasonics based on cross-correlations of diffuse TM noise to extract coherent ultrasonic waves propagating between receivers. However, synchronous recording of high-frequency TM noise puts stringent requirements on the analog to digital converter's sampling rate. To alleviate this restriction, high-frequency TM noise cross-correlations (12-25?MHz) were estimated instead using compressed measurements of TM noise which could be digitized at a sampling frequency lower than the Nyquist frequency. PMID:24907847

  20. Passive synthesis of the antenna aperture for satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumskii, P. O.; Meshcheryakov, A. A.; Sharygin, G. S.

    2012-08-01

    The possibility of passive synthesis of the antenna aperture for satellite systems of monitoring ground-based radio radiation sources is discussed. Experimental data on the inverse passive synthesis on the Space-Earth paths are presented for reception of GPS navigation satellite radiation. The data confirm the possibility of developing the passive synthesized aperture radar and interference phase signal processing.

  1. Passive Sensors for Food Quality Monitoring and Counterfeiting

    E-print Network

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Passive Sensors for Food Quality Monitoring and Counterfeiting Ricardo Gonçalves1,2 , Jimmy Hester4 and proposal for a passive sensor for food quality, monitoring and counterfeiting, based on alternative materials. Keywords-- RFID, Passive Sensors, Cork I. INTRODUCTION (Heading 1) Radio frequency identification

  2. Patientive Absolutive Verbal Morphology and Passive in Samoan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Kenneth William

    A study of the Samoan "-cia" suffix is presented. It argues that, contrary to prevailing theory, Samoan does have an active/passive contrast but that it is indicated by a difference in word order rather than by verbal morphology. It is shown, however, that "-cia" is similar to a passive suffix in that passive involves the choice of a patient as…

  3. Review of methods for estimating cetacean density from passive

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Len

    Review of methods for estimating cetacean density from passive acoustics Len Thomas and Tiago Marques SIO Symposium: Estimating cetacean density from Passive Acoustics 16th July 2009 www for estimating the density of cetaceans from fixed passive acoustic devices. Methods should be applicable

  4. Joint Passive Time Reversal and Multichannel Equalization for Underwater Communications

    E-print Network

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Joint Passive Time Reversal and Multichannel Equalization for Underwater Communications Jo~ao Gomes interference introduced by the channel at the receiver. This paper presents experimental results for a passive-complexity algorithms for tracking channel variations prior to generating a passively focused signal. I. INTRODUCTION

  5. Passive and Active Acoustics Using an Autonomous Wave Glider

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of a modified wave glider to detect marine mammals using passive acoustic monitoring techniques. We alsoPassive and Active Acoustics Using an Autonomous Wave Glider of the autonomous platform is evaluated using an integrated passive acoustic recorder during a set of field trials

  6. RECURSIVE TECHNIQUES FOR PASSIVE SOURCE LOCATION JOSE M. F. MOURA

    E-print Network

    Moura, José

    . 403 Many detection and tracking problems are based on passive receiving systems where the availableRECURSIVE TECHNIQUES FOR PASSIVE SOURCE LOCATION ABSTRACT JOSE M. F. MOURA CAPS, COMPLEXO is concerned with the loca- tion of passive sources. Conceptually, this is viewed as a time delay estimation

  7. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  12. Automated Target Recognition Using Passive Radar and Coordinated Flight Models

    E-print Network

    Lanterman, Aaron

    approach to ATR compares the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of targets detected by a passive radar system, Passive Radar, Coordinated Flight Model, Radar Cross Section 1. INTRODUCTION Passive radar systems which if the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of the targets vary "slowly" with small changes in these components

  13. The Passive in 3- and 4-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Barros Pereira Rubin, Maraci Coelho

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that analyzing the patterns of individual subject performance in tests of comprehension of passives might give insight into how little children interpret passives: 3 and 4 year-olds seem to go through a range of passive interpretation, that varies from actual comprehension to total non-comprehension. The fact that some small…

  14. Application of Passive UHF RFID in Intermodal Facilities

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    @ittc.ku.edu Abstract In this paper, we explore the use of passive UHF RFID for tracking containers within intermodalApplication of Passive UHF RFID in Intermodal Facilities Daniel D. Deavours ITTC-FY2010-TR-41420 #12;Page 1 Application of Passive UHF RFID in Intermodal Facilities Daniel D. Deavours Information

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Soil Moisture Active Passive

    E-print Network

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration SMAP Soil Moisture Active Passive Mapping Soil Moisture and Freeze/Thaw State from Space #12;Acknowledgments Soil Moisture Active Passive smap.jpl.nasa.gov Special thanks to all who have worked so hard on the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission

  16. Correlative Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

  17. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  18. Use of passive alpha detectors to screen for uranium contamination in a field at Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Meyer, K.E.; Gammage, R.B.; Wheeler, R.V.; Salasky, M.; Kotrappa, P.

    1995-06-01

    This paper reports the results from a field test of newly developed techniques for inexpensive, in situ screening of soil for alpha contamination. Passive alpha detectors that are commercially available for the detection indoor airborne alpha activity (i.e., {sup 222}Rn) have been modified so they can be applied to the detection of alpha contamination on surfaces or in soils. Results reported here are from an intercomparison involving several different techniques with all measurements being made at the same sites in a field near the formerly used uranium processing facility at Fernald, Ohio, during the summer of 1994. The results for two types of passive alpha detector show that the quality of calibration is improved if soils samples are milled to increase homogeneity within the soil matrices. The correlation between laboratory based radiochemical analyses and quick, field-based screening measurements is acceptable and can be improved if the passive devices are left for longer exposure times in the field. The total cost per measurement for either type of passive alpha detector is probably less than $25 and should provide a cost-effective means for site managers to develop the information needed to find areas with remaining alpha contamination so resources can be allocated efficiently.

  19. Further Evidence That Cannabis Moderates Familial Correlation of Psychosis-Related Experiences

    PubMed Central

    van Winkel, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    Background Familial correlations underlie heritability estimates of psychosis. If gene-environment interactions are important, familial correlation will vary as a function of environmental exposure. Methods Associations between sibling and parental schizotypy (n = 669 pairs, n = 1222 observations), and between sibling schizotypy and patient CAPE psychosis (n = 978 pairs, n = 1723 observations) were examined as a function of sibling cannabis use. This design is based on the prediction that in unaffected siblings who are not exposed, vulnerability for psychosis will remain latent, whereas in case of exposure, latent psychosis vulnerability may become expressed, at the level of schizotypal symptoms, causing the phenotypic correlation between relatives to become “visible” under the influence of cannabis. Results Siblings exposed to recent cannabis use resembled their patient-relative more closely in terms of positive schizotypy (urinalysis(+):B = 0.30, P<.001; urinalysis(-):B = 0.10, p<0.001; p-interaction = 0.0135). Similarly, the familial correlation in positive schizotypy between parent and sibling was significantly greater in siblings recently exposed to cannabis (urinalysis(+):B = 0.78, P<.001; urinalysis(-):B = 0.43, p<0.001; p interaction = 0.0017). Results were comparable when using lifetime cannabis frequency of use as exposure instead of recent use. Parental schizotypy did not predict cannabis use in the healthy sibling, nor in the patient. Similarly, parental cannabis use was not associated with level of schizotypy in the sibling, nor with psychotic symptoms in the patient, making gene-environment correlation unlikely. Conclusion Familial correlation of psychosis-related experiences varies considerably as a function of exposure to cannabis, confirming the importance of gene-cannabis interaction in shifts of expression of psychosis-related experiences. PMID:26384217

  20. Semiconductor nanowires: Synthesis, passivation, and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Hemanth

    Semiconductor nanowires have received much attention in recent years to further the scaling of electronic devices, and for their use in memory, sensors, photonics, and 3-D integrated devices. Germanium nanowires, in particular, are of great interest due to their low synthesis temperatures and high carrier mobility compared to silicon. However, there exists little work to date exploring the low-temperature controlled-synthesis of germanium nanowires. This work studies the heteroepitaxy of germanium nanowires on silicon substrates. Key parameters such as substrate orientation, growth temperature, partial pressure of reactive gas, thermal history, and exposure to ambient atmosphere are identified, and their effects on the resulting epitaxial nanowire synthesis are studied. Additionally, self-assembled highly oriented cylindrical mesopores are used as templates for controlling nanowire synthesis and serve as an attractive alternative to epitaxy. In this method, the orientations and dimensions of the pores control the growth of nanowires (direction, density, order, and size) irrespective of the starting substrate. Stable passivation techniques post-growth to prevent subsequent oxidation are also essential for realizing the large scale integration of nanowires. The well known HF treatments that have been used for decades in silicon processing are ineffective in passivating germanium surfaces, thus beckoning the need for new passivation solutions. This dissertation presents systematic studies performed to passivate germanium nanowires using aqueous halides (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI). Hydrogen bromide passivated germanium surfaces for well over 24 hours with negligible etching of germanium, and is consequently identified as the most promising candidate among the aqueous hydrogen halides. The final portion of this dissertation discusses the integration of nanowires into back-gate field-effect transistors. Important considerations in the choice of source/drain electrode materials and improvements in transistor fabrication are discussed to increase device yield and simplify the fabrication process. The performance of the resulting Schottky source/drain nanowire transistor is studied. Addressing the challenges in the synthesis and passivation of nanowires, along with their integration into electronic and photonic devices will be crucial for the successful use of nanowires in any application.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  2. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  3. Implications of passive safety based on historical industrial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been multiple proposals for applying different technologies to achieve passively safe light water reactors (LWRs). A key question for all such concepts is, ''What are the gains in safety, costs, and reliability for passive safety systems.'' Using several types of historical data, estimates have been made of gains from passive safety and operating systems, which are independent of technology. Proposals for passive safety in reactors usually have three characteristics: (1) Passive systems with no moving mechanical parts, (2) systems with far fewer components and (3) more stringent design criteria for safety-related and process systems. Each characteristic reduces the potential for an accident and may increase plant reliability. This paper addresses gains from items (1) and (2). Passive systems often allow adoption of more rigorous design criteria which would be either impossible or economically unfeasible for active systems. This important characteristic of passive safety systems cannot be easily addressed using historical industrial experience.

  4. Lip closing pressure and spoon management in passive spoon feeding.

    PubMed

    Kayanaka-Sekine, H; Saiki, C; Tamura, F; Kikutani, T; Matsumoto, S

    2011-06-01

    To determine the sources of lip closing pressure (P(LC) ) generation during passive spoon feeding, we used a fine pressure transducer glued into a wooden spoon, as well as electromyography (EMG) of the upper and lower lips and the submental muscle complex, in normal adult volunteers (average age 24·5 years). An assistant fed a seated subject 0·6 mL of yogurt and then withdrew the spoon from the subject's closed mouth. The spoon was held at an angle of 0° (i.e. in the naso-auricular plane) during serving and at either 0° or 60° during withdrawal. We detected simultaneous increases in P(LC) and in EMG activity in the lips and the submental muscle complex. The maximum P(LC) was significantly higher at 60° [65 ± 11 g cm(-2) (mean ± s.e.m)] than at 0° (42 ± 8 g cm(-2)). The former was correlated with the maximum EMG amplitude, which was analysed by using the mean of the root-mean-square EMG and presented as a percentage of the maximum EMG obtained in the lower lip region and the submental muscle complex during subsequent swallowing in each subject. In conclusion, in healthy adult subjects, perioral muscles of the lower lip region and the submental muscle complex participate in P(LC) generation, particularly at a steep spoon withdrawal angle. The results suggest that a steep withdrawal angle not only increases P(LC) but also promotes these muscles' activities in passive spoon feeding. PMID:20958342

  5. Optimal gate-width setting for passive neutrons multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    When setting up a passive neutron coincidence counter it is natural to ask what coincidence gate settings should be used to optimize the counting precision. If the gate width is too short then signal is lost and the precision is compromised because in a given period only a few coincidence events will be observed. On the other hand if the gate is too large the signal will be maximized but it will also be compromised by the high level of random pile-up or Accidental coincidence events which must be subtracted. In the case of shift register electronics connected to an assay chamber with an exponential dieaway profile operating in the regime where the Accidentals rate dominates the Reals coincidence rate but where dead-time is not a concern, simple arguments allow one to show that the relative precision on the net Reals rate is minimized when the coincidence gate is set to about 1.2 times the lie dieaway time of the system. In this work we show that making the same assumptions it is easy to show that the relative precision on the Triples rates is also at a minimum when the relative precision of the Doubles (or Reals) is at a minimum. Although the analysis is straightforward to our knowledge such a discussion has not been documented in the literature before. Actual measurement systems do not always behave in the ideal we choose to model them. Fortunately however the variation in the relative precision as a function of gate width is rather flat for traditional safeguards counters and so the performance is somewhat forgiving of the exact choice. The derivation further serves to delineate the important parameters which determine the relative counting precision of the Doubles and Triples rates under the regime considered. To illustrate the similarities and differences we consider the relative standard deviation that might be anticipated for a passive correlation count of an axial section of a spent nuclear fuel assembly under practically achievable conditions.

  6. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  7. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  8. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    L?cis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals. PMID:25354545

  9. Wavelength sharing in WDM passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Barakat, Neil; Iannone, Patrick P.; Reichmann, Kenneth C.

    2008-11-01

    Progress towards the definition of next-generation passive optical networks (PONs) based on wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) is reviewed and compared to emerging requirements. A key challenge is providing ultra-high (e.g. 10 Gbps) bandwidth for demanding users while cost-effectively supporting less-demanding users. A new approach is presented in which diverse bandwidth requirements are supported on a conventional WDM PON outside plant through the use of flexible wavelength sharing in the local office. An example is demonstrated experimentally showing that with 16 users per passive node, each wavelength can be shared by up to 16 users distributed across up to 16 PONs served by the same local office. Factors limiting sharing and throughput are discussed.

  10. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L?cis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  11. Passive control of wing/store flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Foughner, J. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for a passive flutter suppression approach known as the decoupler pylon. The decoupler pylon dynamically isolates the wing from store pitch inertia effects by means of soft spring/damper elements assisted by a low frequency feedback control system which minimizes static pitch deflections of the store because of maneuvers and changing flight conditions. Wind tunnel tests and analyses show that this relatively simple pylon suspension system provides substantial increases in flutter speed and reduces the sensitivity of flutter to changes in store inertia and center of gravity. Flutter characteristics of F-16 and YF-17 flutter models equipped with decoupler pylon mounted stores are presented and compared with results obtained on the same model configuration with active flutter suppression systems. These studies show both passive and active concepts to be effective in suppressing wing/store flutter. Also presented are data showing the influence of pylon stiffness nonlinearities on wing/store flutter.

  12. Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1984-01-01

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  13. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    L?cis, U; Brosse, N; Ingremeau, F; Mazzino, A; Lundell, F; Kellay, H; Bagheri, S

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals. PMID:25354545

  14. Metascreen-Based Acoustic Passive Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Likun

    2015-08-01

    Conventional phased arrays require a large number of sources in forming a complex wave front, resulting in complexity and a high cost to operate the individual sources. We present a passive phased array using an acoustic metascreen that transmits sound energy from a single source and steers the transmitted wave front to form the desired fields. The metascreen is composed of elements that have a discrete resolution along the screen at an order smaller than the wavelength, allowing for fine wave-front shaping beyond the paraxial approximation. The performance is verified in experiment by forming a self-bending beam. Our metascreen-based passive array with its simplicity and capability has applications in places where conventional active arrays are complex and have limitations.

  15. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Haller, Eugene E. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  16. Relaxing passivity for human-robot interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Buerger, Stephen P. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.); Hogan, Neville

    2007-03-01

    Robots for high-force interaction with humans face particular challenges to achieve performance and coupled stability. Because available actuators are unable to provide sufficiently high force density and low impedance, controllers for such machines often attempt to mask the robots physical dynamics, though this threatens stability. Controlling for passivity, the state-of-the-art means of ensuring coupled stability, inherently limits performance to levels that are often unacceptable. A controller that imposes passivity is compared to a controller designed by a new method that uses limited knowledge of human dynamics to improve performance. Both controllers were implemented on a testbed, and coupled stability and performance were tested. Results show that the new controller can improve both stability and performance. The different structures of the controllers yield key differences in physical behavior, and guidelines are provided to assist in choosing the appropriate approach for specific applications.

  17. Passive containment cooling by natural air convection

    SciTech Connect

    Erbacher, F.J.; Neitzel, H.J.

    1995-09-01

    The composite containment proposed aims to cope with beyond-design-basis accidents. The goal is to restrict the consequences of severe core meltdown accidents to the reactor plant. One essential of this new concept is passive decay heat removal from the containment by natural air convection. Experimental and calculational results obtained up to now with the passive containment cooling program suggest that in the composite containment of a 1,300-MW(electric) pressurized water reactor, the decay heat can be safely removed by natural air convection. Detailed experimental investigations and large-scale tests envisaged will complement the results and provide the database for the design of the containment and further development of multidimensional computer codes.

  18. Phase diagram to design passive nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jeng Yi

    2015-01-01

    A phase diagram, defined by the amplitude square and phase of scattering coefficients for absorption cross-section in each individual channel, is introduced as a universal map on the electromagnetic properties for passive scatterers. General physical bounds are naturally revealed based on the intrinsic power conservation in a passive scattering system, entailing power competitions among scattering, absorption, and extinction. Exotic scattering and absorption phenomena, from resonant scattering, invisible cloaking, coherent perfect absorber, and subwavelength superscattering can all be illustrated in this phase diagram. With electrically small core-shell scatterers as an example, we demonstrate a systematic method to design field-controllable structures based on the allowed trajectories in the phase diagram. The proposed phase diagram not only provides a simple tool to design optical devices but also promotes a deep understanding on Mie's scattering theory.

  19. Integration of Passive Components for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, E. J.; Wesseling, E.; White, V.; Lieneweg, U.; Mojarradi, M.; Ulrich, R.; Wasef, M.; Mantooth, A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA roadmap outlining future deep space missions to Europa and other outer planetary destinations calls for continued reductions in the mass and volume of the spacecraft avionics. Spacecraft power electronics, including the power switches and converters, remain difficult to miniaturize due to the need for large numbers of discrete passive components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors and transformers. As part of the System-on-a-chip program at the Center for Integrated Space Microsystems and at the University of Arkansas, we are working to develop integrated or embedded passive components geared specifically for use in power management and distribution (PMAD) in future avionics over the next five to ten years. This will not only enable a scaling down of the power subsystems, but will make possible new architectures such as "distributed" PMAD. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Passive sensor systems for nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Boatner, L.A.; Holcomb, D.E.; McElhaney, S.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Muhs, J.D.; Roberts, M.R.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-09-01

    Passive fiber optic sensor systems capable of confirming the presence of special nuclear materials in storage or process facilities are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These sensors provide completely passive, remote measurement capability. No power supplies, amplifiers, or other active components that could degrade system reliability are required at the sensor location. ORNL, through its research programs in scintillator materials, has developed a variety of materials for use in alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and neutron-sensitive scintillator detectors. In addition to sensors for measuring radiation flux, new sensor materials have been developed which are capable of measuring weight, temperature, and source location. An example of a passive sensor for temperature measurement is the combination of a thermophosphor (e.g., rare-earth activated Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with {sup 6}LiF (95% {sup 6}Li). This combination results in a new class of scintillators for thermal neutrons that absorb energy from the radiation particles and remit the energy as a light pulse, the decay rate of which, over a specified temperature range, is temperature dependent. Other passive sensors being developed include pressure-sensitive triboluminescent materials, weight-sensitive silicone rubber fibers, scintillating fibers, and other materials for gamma and neutron detection. The light from the scintillator materials of each sensor would be sent through optical fibers to a monitoring station, where the attribute quantity could be measured and compared with previously recorded emission levels. Confirmatory measurement applications of these technologies are being evaluated to reduce the effort, costs, and employee exposures associated with inventorying stockpiles of highly enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant.

  1. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  2. Passive magnetic bearings for vehicular electromechanical batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the design of a passive magnetic bearing system to be used in electromechanical batteries (flywheel energy storage modules) suitable for vehicular use. One or two such EMB modules might, for example, be employed in a hybrid-electric automobile, providing efficient means for power peaking, i.e., for handling acceleration and regenerative braking power demands at high power levels. The bearing design described herein will be based on a ''dual-mode'' operating regime.

  3. Passively cooled direct drive wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, Daniel P.

    2008-03-18

    A wind turbine is provided that passively cools an electrical generator. The wind turbine includes a plurality of fins arranged peripherally around a generator house. Each of the fins being oriented at an angle greater than zero degrees to allow parallel flow of air over the fin. The fin is further tapered to allow a constant portion of the fin to extend beyond the air stream boundary layer. Turbulence initiators on the nose cone further enhance heat transfer at the fins.

  4. Tierra Nueva -- A passive solar cohousing project

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.; Cooper, P.

    1999-10-01

    California architects take on the formidable challenges of designing a cohousing project, and discover that the end result is well worth the effort. The Tierra Nueva Cohousing Project consists of living units, a common house, community orchard, community gardens, community play space, space for a future shop and at the periphery of the site, parking, carports and garages. The units use thermal mass, solar heating, passive solar cooling, perimeter insulation on slabs. Design was agreed to by the community as a whole.

  5. The Acquisition of Passives in Serbian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perovic, Alexandra; Vuksanovic, Jasmina; Petrovic, Boban; Avramovic-Ilic, Irena

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the comprehension of actional and psychological verbs in both their active and passive (short and long) forms by 99 Serbian-speaking children. The children, whose age ranged between 3 years, 6 months (3;6) and 7 years, 6 months (7;6), were divided into three groups: 3;6-5 ("M" = 4.3), 5;1-6;1 ("M" = 5.6),…

  6. Intermittency of a passive scalar advected by a quasifrozen velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Pang, C. S.; Tsang, Y. K.; Wang, X. H.

    1999-08-01

    We use a two-dimensional lattice model to study the intermittency problem of a passive scalar advected by a velocity field of finite correlation time. The stream function generating the incompressible velocity field is modeled by a random Gaussian noise that is identically independently distributed at each lattice point and is updated every certain finite time interval. A fixed scalar difference is maintained across one direction of the lattice. There are three time scales in the problem: the correlation or update time of the velocity field ?c, the diffusion time of the scalar ?diff, and the advection time of the velocity field ?adv. Interesting behavior is observed when ?diffpassive scalar field is found to be intermittent while its dynamics between the updates of the velocity field is dominated by diffusion. The intermittency can be described by log-Poisson statistics and is independent of the ratio ?c/?adv. On the other hand, the passive scalar field exhibits dissipative scaling and is thus nonintermittent when ?diff??c.

  7. Passive monitoring using traffic noise recordings - case study on the Steinachtal Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvermoser, Johannes; Stähler, Simon; Hadziioannou, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Civil structures age continuously. The early recognition of potentially critical damages is an important economical issue, but also one of public safety. Continuous tracking of small changes in the medium by using passive methods would offer an extension to established active non-destructive testing procedures at relatively low cost. Here we present a case study of structural monitoring using continuous recordings of traffic noise on a 200 meter long reinforced concrete highway bridge in Germany. Over two months of continuos geophone records are used in the frequency range of 2-8 Hz. Using passive image interferometry, evaluation of hourly cross-correlations between recordings at pairs of receivers yield velocity variations in the range of -1.5% to +2.1%. We were able to correlate our outcomes with temperature measurements of the same two month period. The measured velocity changes scale with the temperature variations with on average a dv/v of 0.064% per degree Celsius. This value is in accordance with other studies of concrete response to temperature, confirming that we are able to observe subtle changes with physical origin. It is shown that traffic noise is temporally homogenenous enough to fulfill the requirements of passive image interferometry.

  8. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  9. Passive dynamic controllers for nonlinear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Wu, Shih-Chin; Phan, Minh; Longman, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for model-independant controller design for controlling large angular motion of multi-body dynamic systems is outlined. The controlled system may consist of rigid and flexible components that undergo large rigid body motion and small elastic deformations. Control forces/torques are applied to drive the system and at the same time suppress the vibration due to flexibility of the components. The proposed controller consists of passive second-order systems which may be designed with little knowledge of the system parameter, even if the controlled system is nonlinear. Under rather general assumptions, the passive design assures that the closed loop system has guaranteed stability properties. Unlike positive real controller design, stabilization can be accomplished without direct velocity feedback. In addition, the second-order passive design allows dynamic feedback controllers with considerable freedom to tune for desired system response, and to avoid actuator saturation. After developing the basic mathematical formulation of the design methodology, simulation results are presented to illustrate the proposed approach to a flexible six-degree-of-freedom manipulator.

  10. Stable surface passivation process for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A passivation process for a previously sulfided, selenided or tellurated III-V compound semiconductor surface. The concentration of undesired mid-gap surface states on a compound semiconductor surface is reduced by the formation of a near-monolayer of metal-(sulfur and/or selenium and/or tellurium)-semiconductor that is effective for long term passivation of the underlying semiconductor surface. Starting with the III-V compound semiconductor surface, any oxidation present thereon is substantially removed and the surface is then treated with sulfur, selenium or tellurium to form a near-monolayer of chalcogen-semiconductor of the surface in an oxygen-free atmosphere. This chalcogenated surface is then contacted with a solution of a metal that will form a low solubility chalcogenide to form a near-monolayer of metal-chalcogen-semiconductor. The resulting passivating layer provides long term protection for the underlying surface at or above the level achieved by a freshly chalcogenated compound semiconductor surface in an oxygen free atmosphere.

  11. Eighth national passive solar conference. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, A.; Zee, R.

    1983-12-01

    The Eighth National Passive Solar Conference was held near Santa Fe, New Mexico at the Glorieta Conference Center on September 5 to 11, 1983. Nearly 900 people from all across the nation and the world attended the conference. Close to 200 technical papers were presented, 50 solar product exhibits were available; 34 poster sessions were presented; 16 solar workshops were conducted; 10 renowned solar individuals participated in rendezvous sessions; 7 major addresses were delivered; 5 solar home tours were conducted; 2 emerging architecture sessions were held which included 21 separate presentations; and commercial product presentations were given for the first time ever at a national passive solar conference. Peter van Dresser of Santa Fe received the prestigious Passive Solar Pioneer Award, posthumously, from the American Solar Energy Society and Benjamin T. Buck Rogers of Embudo received the prestigious Peter van Dresser Award from the New Mexico Solar Energy Association. This report reviews conference organization, attendance, finances, conference evaluation form results, and includes press coverage samples, selected conference photos courtesy of Marshall Tyler, and a summary with recommendations for future conferences. The Appendices included conference press releases and a report by the New Mexico Solar Industry Development Corporation on exhibits management.

  12. Multiboson Correlation Interferometry with arbitrary single-photon pure states

    E-print Network

    Vincenzo Tamma; Simon Laibacher

    2015-06-09

    We provide a compact full description of multiboson correlation measurements of arbitrary order N in passive linear interferometers with arbitrary input single-photon pure states. This allows us to physically analyze the novel problem of multiboson correlation sampling at the output of random linear interferometers. Our results also describe general multiboson correlation landscapes for an arbitrary number of input single photons and arbitrary interferometers. In particular, we use two different schemes to demonstrate, respectively, arbitrary-order quantum beat interference and 100% visibility entanglement correlations even for input photons distinguishable in their frequencies.

  13. Evaluation of multichannel Wiener filters applied to fine resolution passive microwave images of first-year sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Full, William E.; Eppler, Duane T.

    1993-01-01

    The effectivity of multichannel Wiener filters to improve images obtained with passive microwave systems was investigated by applying Wiener filters to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice. Four major parameters which define the filter were varied: the lag or pixel offset between the original and the desired scenes, filter length, the number of lines in the filter, and the weight applied to the empirical correlation functions. The effect of each variable on the image quality was assessed by visually comparing the results. It was found that the application of multichannel Wiener theory to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice resulted in visually sharper images with enhanced textural features and less high-frequency noise. However, Wiener filters induced a slight blocky grain to the image and could produce a type of ringing along scan lines traversing sharp intensity contrasts.

  14. Gene-environment interactions in genetic epidemiology 

    E-print Network

    Spinka, Christine Marie

    2005-02-17

    , the methodology we develop is also general enough to be used on many different types of genetic information, including haplotypes, and can accommodate missing genotype data. The method is also extended to allow analysis in the presence of population stratification... 5.3 Simulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 5.4 Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 VI ANALYSIS OF ISRAELI OVARIAN CANCER STUDY DATA 36 6.1 Introduction...

  15. Genes, environments and depressions in young people.

    PubMed

    Goodyer, Ian M

    2015-11-01

    Among the common mental illnesses in childhood and adolescence, the unipolar depressions are the most concerning. These mental illnesses are aetiologically and clinically heterogeneous and little is known about their pathophysiology. This selected review considers the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the emergence of these illnesses in the second decade of life. PMID:25877156

  16. Gene-Environment Research and Cancer Epidemiology

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program supports extramural research that investigates both genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to the etiology of cancer and/or impact cancer outcomes.

  17. Incentive Relativity: Gene-environment Interactions

    E-print Network

    Torres, Carmen; Sabariego, Marta

    2014-01-01

    anxiety, novelty-seeking, and shuttlebox behaviors. Physiology &anxiety self-medication induced by incentive loss in rats. Physiology &anxiety tests: Relationship with defecation and self-grooming. Physiology &

  18. Gene–Environment Interactions in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando D.

    2007-01-01

    Many environmental factors and a large number of genetic polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with asthma risk in different locales and at different ages. It seems that what we call asthma is a heterogeneous set of conditions for which the only common feature is recurrent airway obstruction that is at least partially responsive to usual asthma therapy. Recent studies in which environmental factors and genetic variants were studied concomitantly have suggested a potential unifying concept for the disease. It seems that asthma is a genetically mediated development dysregulation of diverse immune and airway responses to a variety of specific and nonspecific exposures. It thus seems improbable that most genetic variants associated with asthma influence the disease regardless of which environmental factors trigger it and at which lifetime phase they are present. More likely, the most important gene variants for asthma are polymorphisms that exert their influence on the network system controlling biological responses to asthma-related exposures. PMID:17202288

  19. Genes, Environment, and Race: Quantitative Genetic Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Keith E.; McClearn, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the origins of racial health disparities is currently a central focus of health-oriented funding agencies and the health policy community. In particular, the role of genetics in the origin of racial health disparities is receiving growing attention and has been susceptible to considerable misinterpretation. In this article, the…

  20. Numerical study of comparison of vorticity and passive vectors in turbulence and inviscid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2002-04-01

    The nonlinear vortex stretching in incompressible Navier-Stokes turbulence is compared with a linear stretching process of passive vectors (PVs). In particular, we pay special attention to the difference of these processes under long and short time evolutions. For finite time evolution, we confirm our previous finding that the stretching effect of vorticity is weaker than that of general passive vectors for a majority of the initial conditions with the same energy spectra. The above difference can be explained qualitatively by examining the Biot-Savart formula. In order to see to what extent infinitesimal time development explains the above difference, we examine the probability density functions (PDFs) of the stretching rates of the passive vectors in the vicinity of a solution of Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that the PDFs are found to have a Gaussian distribution, suggesting that there are equally many PVs that stretched less and more than the vorticity. This suggests the importance of the vorticity-strain correlation built up over finite time in turbulence. We also discuss the case of Euler equations, where the dynamics of the Jacobian matrix relating the physical and material coordinates is examined numerically. A kind of alignment problem associated with the Cauchy-Green tensor is proposed and studied using the results of numerical simulations. It is found that vorticity tends to align itself with the most compressing eigenvector of the Cauchy-Green tensor. A two-dimensional counterpart of active-passive comparison is briefly studied. There is no essential difference between stretching of vorticity gradients and that of passive scalar gradients and a physical interpretation is given to it.

  1. Tracking marine mammals using passive acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2007-12-01

    It is difficult to study the behavior and physiology of marine mammals or to understand and mitigate human impact on them because much of their lives are spent underwater. Since sound propagates for long distances in the ocean and since many cetaceans are vocal, passive acoustics is a valuable tool for studying and monitoring their behavior. After a brief introduction to and review of passive acoustic tracking methods, this dissertation develops and applies two new methods. Both methods use widely-spaced (tens of kilometers) bottom-mounted hydrophone arrays, as well as propagation models that account for depth-dependent sound speed profiles. The first passive acoustic tracking method relies on arrival times of direct and surface-reflected paths. It is used to track a sperm whale using 5 at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) and gives position estimates that are accurate to within 10 meters. With such accuracy, the whale's pitch and yaw are estimated by assuming that its main axis (which points from the tail to the rostrum) is parallel to its velocity. Roll is found by fitting the details of the pulses within each sperm whale click to the so-called bent horn model of sperm whale sound production. Finally, given the position and orientation of the whale, its beam pattern is reconstructed and found to be highly directional with an intense forward directed component. Pair-wise spectrogram (PWS) processing is the second passive acoustic tracking method developed in this dissertation. Although it is computationally more intensive, PWS has several advantages over arrival-time tracking methods, especially in shallow water environments, for long duration calls, and for multiple-animal datasets, as is the case for humpback whales on Hawaiian breeding grounds. Results of simulations with realistic noise conditions and environmental mismatch are given and compared to other passive localization techniques. When applied to the AUTEC sperm whale dataset, PWS position estimates are within meters of those obtained using the time-of-arrival method.

  2. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Flemming, Jeb H. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Gary D. (Tijeras, NM); Tigges, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  3. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Vance, Steve; Maiwald, Frank; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-11-01

    We present a method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the subsurface ocean depth along with the dielectric properties of the ice shell. The technique is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements in that it works best where interference due to Jupiter's strong decametric emission is the strongest.

  4. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, A.; Vance, S.; Maiwald, F.; Ries, P. A.; Liewer, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present a method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the subsurface ocean depth along with the dielectric properties of the ice shell. The technique is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements in that it works best where interference due to Jupiter's strong decametric emission is the strongest.

  5. Molecular arrangement investigation of copper phthalocyanine grown on hydrogen passivated Si(1 1 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbi, I.; Ben Hamada, B.; Souissi, A.; Menzli, S.; Ben Azzouz, C.; Laribi, A.; Akremi, A.; Chefi, C.

    2014-06-01

    Chemical, electronic and structural properties of ultra thin films of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) grown on hydrogen passivated silicon (1 1 1) surfaces were investigated in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS), X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and electron diffraction (LEED). The early stages of copper phthalocyanine adsorption (1-2) were characterized by the saturation of surface defects and by a flat lying disposition on the surface. Upon further CuPc coverage, the passivation of Si surfaces resulted in the molecule taking a standing position in films. The molecular packing deduced from these studies appears very close to the one in the bulk ? phase of CuPc. The work function of the films was found to be decreasing during the growth and was correlated with the molecular orientation.

  6. Space radiation effects on erbium-doped fiber devices: Sources, amplifiers and passive measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.; Friebele, E.J.

    1998-06-01

    Measurements have been made of the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the performance of active erbium-doped fiber devices. These include the decrease in optical power of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a superluminescent source (SLS), and the shift in centroid wavelength of the SLS with exposure. Calculations have been performed to correlate these effects with the radiation-induced absorption measured passively. Excellent agreement was obtained for the radiation-induced power loss in the EDFA, and a good agreement was obtained for the SLS. However, the calculation underestimated the centroid wavelength shift in the SLS by a factor of {approximately}3. A model has been developed to extrapolate the results of passive loss measurements to the low dose rates typical of the natural space environment.

  7. Passive solar progress: a simplified guide to the 3rd national passive solar conference

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.; Howell, Y.; Richards, D.

    1980-10-01

    Some of the concepts and practices that have come to be known as passive solar heating and cooling are introduced, and a current picture of the field is presented. Much of the material presented is derived from papers given at the 3rd National Passive Solar Conference held in San Jose, California in January 1979 and sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Extracts and data from these papers have been integrated in the text with explanatory and descriptive material. In this way, it is attempted to present technical information in an introductory context. Topics include design considerations, passive and hybrid systems and applications, sizing methods and performance prediction, and implementation issues. A glossary is included. (WHK)

  8. Passive coolers for pre-cooling of JT loops for deep space infrared imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Burt; Larson, Melora; Rodriguez, Jose

    2010-09-01

    Infrared instruments (IR) for deep space imaging missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Planck, require cryogenic cooling for proper operation of their focal plane arrays (FPA) in far infrared and sub-millimeter wavelength ranges. The FPA is sometimes located meters away from the spacecraft. To meet such remote cooling requirement, a Joule-Thomson (J-T) loop becomes a convenient choice for either direct cooling for the FPA or for serving as a heat sink for a cascade cooling system. The refrigerant lines of the JT loop inevitably suffer parasitic heat leak primarily due to IR backload as they traverse from the spacecraft to the FPA. An actively cooled JT loop using a mechanical pre-cooler located at the spacecraft will experience the highest parasitic heat leak since the lines are cold through the entire length whereas a passively cooled JT loop can utilize a number of radiators to cool the lines down gradually in stages and hence reduce the heat leak. In addition to savings in power and mass, a passive cooler offers consistent and predictable performance with practically no performance degradation in a thermally stable orbit, such as one around the Sun-Earth L2 point. Passive coolers are less popular in low temperature applications when their cooling capacity diminishes rapidly in proportion to T4 until the temperature reaches a point where either the parasitic heat leak becomes so significant or its size becomes so excessive that the passive cooling scheme becomes impractical. Despite the limited capacity, passive cooling may still prove to be a viable alternative to active cooling depending on the operating temperature and heat dissipation rate of the FPA. The current effort aims at evaluating the merit of using passive coolers as an alternative to using a mechanical cooler for pre-cooling of a JT loop for remote IR instrument cooling. A parametric study is conducted to explore the merits of passive cooling of a JT loop in a temperature range below 30 K. Correlations between cooling capacity, heat leak from supporting structure, and the operating temperature are investigated to provide design guidelines. Radiator staging options will also be presented and discussed.

  9. Surface passivation and heterojunction cells on Si (100) and (111) wafers using dc and rf plasma deposited Si:H thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Das, U. K.; Burrows, M. Z.; Lu, M.; Bowden, S.; Birkmire, R. W.

    2008-02-11

    The structure of hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) films deposited by rf and dc plasma process on Si (100) and (111) wafers is correlated with the surface passivation quality and heterojunction cell performance. Microstructural defects associated with SiH{sub 2} bonding and apparent ion bombardment in dc plasmas have little or no adverse effect on passivation or cell properties, while presence of crystallinity in Si:H i layer severely deteriorates surface passivation and cell open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}). Excellent surface passivation (lifetime of >1 ms) and high efficiency cells (>18%) with V{sub oc} of 694 mV are demonstrated on n-type textured Czochralski wafer using dc plasma process.

  10. Stability of monitoring weak changes in multiply scattering media with ambient noise correlation: laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Hadziioannou, Céline; Larose, Eric; Coutant, Olivier; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that small changes can be monitored in a scattering medium by observing phase shifts in the coda. Passive monitoring of weak changes through ambient noise correlation has already been applied to seismology, acoustics, and engineering. Usually, this is done under the assumption that a properly reconstructed Green function (GF), as well as stable background noise sources, is necessary. In order to further develop this monitoring technique, a laboratory experiment was performed in the 2.5 MHz range in a gel with scattering inclusions, comparing an active (pulse-echo) form of monitoring to a passive (correlation) one. Present results show that temperature changes in the medium can be observed even if the GF of the medium is not reconstructed. Moreover, this article establishes that the GF reconstruction in the correlations is not a necessary condition: The only condition to monitoring with correlation (passive experiment) is the relative stability of the background noise structure. PMID:19507951

  11. ChemCam Passive Reflectance Spectroscopy at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F.; Cloutis, E.; Bender, S.; Blaney, D. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Gasnault, O.; Kinch, K. M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rice, M. S.; Wiens, R. C.; DeFlores, L.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) portion of the ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover uses 3 dispersive spectrometers to cover the ultraviolet (240-342 nm), visible (382-469 nm) and visible/near-infrared (474-906 nm) spectral regions at high spectral (<0.5nm) and spatial (0.65mrad) resolution. In active LIBS mode, light emitted from a laser-generated plasma is dispersed onto these spectrometers and used to detect elemental emission lines. Typical observations include 3 msec-exposure 'dark' spectra (acquired with the LIBS laser off) used to remove the background signal from the LIBS measurement. Similar 'passive' observations of the ChemCam calibration target holder can be made at similar times of day and at identical exposure times (to minimize variations from dark current). Because this target exhibits ~95% flat reflectance in the ~400-900 nm region, radiance spectra ratios (surface/calibration target) can be normalized to known calibration target lab spectra to produce relative reflectance spectra (400-900 nm) with an estimated accuracy of 10-20%. Initial results replicated the known spectral shape and overall reflectance values of the ChemCam calibration targets and green color chip on the Mastcam calibration target. Dust contamination was evident, although dust on the ChemCam calibration targets is minimized by their tilted placement on the rover deck. All ChemCam targets that were sunlit during LIBS acquisition (~80% of all measurements) provide 'dark' spectra for which relative reflectance spectra can be obtained. Owing to the dusty nature of the Gale landing sites, passive spectra observed to date exhibit spectral shapes indicative of ferric phases, similar to spectra of palagonitic soils. Most spectra are bracketed in reflectance by typical 'bright' and 'dark' spectra from the OMEGA and CRISM orbital spectrometers. Preliminary Mastcam reflectance spectra are similar, providing additional confidence regarding the first-order calibration of the ChemCam spectra. The spectral similarity to palagonitic soils is consistent with the results from the CheMin instrument for Rocknest sands. Changes in the 535 nm band depth are likely indicative of differences in the relative amount of ferric iron in crystalline phases. More strongly negative spectral slopes > 600 nm are typical of lower-reflectance, less dusty rock surfaces, whereas positive slopes < 600 nm are consistent with higher-reflectance, dustier surfaces. ChemCam elemental detections of Ca- and S-bearing veins correlate to high reflectance targets with some dust contamination. Spectra of the John_Klein and Cumberland drill tailings, as well as brushed and broken rock surfaces in the Yellowknife Bay area, exhibit much less 'red' spectral features, including inflections near 550 nm that are consistent with a number of ferrous and ferric iron-bearing clay mineral phases, similar to CheMin results. Ongoing work with ChemCam passive spectra will include efforts to utilize the UV spectral range (sensitive to iron content), investigate photometric effects of illumination variations on the calibration targets, and dust mitigation efforts. As Curiosity traverses toward Mt. Sharp, passive spectra will be used as an additional tool to remotely track variations in surface chemistry and mineralogy, particularly for iron-bearing sulfate, oxide, and clay minerals.

  12. Asymptotic Stability of Interconnected Passive Non-Linear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isidori, A.; Joshi, S. M.; Kelkar, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of stabilization of a class of internally passive non-linear time-invariant dynamic systems. A class of non-linear marginally strictly passive (MSP) systems is defined, which is less restrictive than input-strictly passive systems. It is shown that the interconnection of a non-linear passive system and a non-linear MSP system is globally asymptotically stable. The result generalizes and weakens the conditions of the passivity theorem, which requires one of the systems to be input-strictly passive. In the case of linear time-invariant systems, it is shown that the MSP property is equivalent to the marginally strictly positive real (MSPR) property, which is much simpler to check.

  13. Passive safety and the advanced liquid metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced Liquid Metal Reactors being developed today in the USA are designed to make maximum use of passive safety features. Much of the LMR safety work at Argonne National Laboratory is concerned with demonstrating, both theoretically and experimentally, the effectiveness of the passive safety features. The characteristics that contribute to passive safety are discussed, with particular emphasis on decay heat removal systems, together with examples of Argonne's theoretical and experimental programs in this area.

  14. Approach to interior design for passive direct gain solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Kachadorian, C.C.

    1980-01-01

    In response to requests from buyers and builders of direct gain passive solar homes interior design criteria either specific to, or emphasized by, passive solar buildings are investigated. Problems of high sunlight penetration, secondary illumination, material selection, sound control and psychology are approached. Material deterioration, fading, glare, noise, and a sense of spacial confinement can be minimized, contributing to the appeal and saleability of passive solar homes.

  15. Passive Wireless SAW Sensors for IVHM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Perey, Daniel F.; Atkinson, Gary M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    2008-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicles. Future IVHM sensors need to be small, light weight, inexpensive, and wireless. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology meets all of these constraints. In addition it operates in harsh environments and over wide temperature ranges, and it is inherently radiation hardened. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new sensors that address anticipated IVHM needs for aerospace vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless SAW sensors from ground testing to high altitude aircraft operations are presented, along with some of the challenges and issues of the technology.

  16. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M. (Needham, MA); Peramunage, Dharmasena (Norwood, MA)

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  17. Passive long range acousto-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Alexander Graham Bell's photophone of 1880 was a simple free space optical communication device that used the sun to illuminate a reflective acoustic diaphragm. A selenium photocell located 213 m (700 ft) away converted the acoustically modulated light beam back into sound. A variation of the photophone is presented here that uses naturally formed free space acousto-optic communications links to provide passive multichannel long range acoustic sensing. This system, called RAS (remote acoustic sensor), functions as a long range microphone with a demonstrated range in excess of 40 km (25 miles).

  18. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics.

    PubMed

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-05-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds, amphibians, and insects, especially in situations where inferences are required over long periods of time. There is considerable work ahead, with several potentially fruitful research areas, including the development of (i) hardware and software for data acquisition, (ii) efficient, calibrated, automated detection and classification systems, and (iii) statistical approaches optimized for this application. Further, survey design will need to be developed, and research is needed on the acoustic behaviour of target species. Fundamental research on vocalization rates and group sizes, and the relation between these and other factors such as season or behaviour state, is critical. Evaluation of the methods under known density scenarios will be important for empirically validating the approaches presented here. PMID:23190144

  19. A passive vibration-cancelling isolation mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Alan O.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of an idealized passive vibration-cancelling two-terminal mount with one degree of freedom at each mechanical terminal isolating a nonrigid machine from a nonrigid foundation is presented. To evaluate a vibration-cancelling (VC) mount, its effectiveness as a function of frequency is compared with the effectiveness of both conventional and compound mounts isolating a rigid machine from a nonrigid foundation. The comparisons indicate that a carefully designed and manufactured VC mount should provide substantially greater vibration reduction at its cancellation frequency than either a conventional or compound mount having the same low frequency stiffness, i.e., stiffness at the natural frequency of the machine mount system.

  20. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  1. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Fairfax, VA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  2. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to 'see' through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  3. Passive Millimeter Wave Camera (PMMWC) at TRW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Engineers at TRW, Redondo Beach, California, inspect the Passive Millimeter Wave Camera, a weather-piercing camera designed to see through fog, clouds, smoke and dust. Operating in the millimeter wave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the camera creates visual-like video images of objects, people, runways, obstacles and the horizon. A demonstration camera (shown in photo) has been completed and is scheduled for checkout tests and flight demonstration. Engineer (left) holds a compact, lightweight circuit board containing 40 complete radiometers, including antenna, monolithic millimeter wave integrated circuit (MMIC) receivers and signal processing and readout electronics that forms the basis for the camera's 1040-element focal plane array.

  4. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  5. Passive injection control for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2004-12-21

    Apparatus for eliminating siphoning, "dead" regions, and fluid concentration gradients in microscale analytical devices. In its most basic embodiment, the present invention affords passive injection control for both electric field-driven and pressure-driven systems by providing additional fluid flow channels or auxiliary channels disposed on either side of a sample separation column. The auxiliary channels are sized such that volumetric fluid flow rate through these channels, while sufficient to move the sample away from the sample injection region in a timely fashion, is less than that through the sample separation channel or chromatograph.

  6. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E. (Hookstown, PA); Fanto, Susan V. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  7. Estimating animal population density using passive acoustics

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Martin, Stephen W; Mellinger, David K; Ward, Jessica A; Moretti, David J; Harris, Danielle; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimation of the size or density of wild animal populations is very important for effective wildlife management, conservation and ecology. Currently, the most widely used methods for obtaining such estimates involve either sighting animals from transect lines or some form of capture-recapture on marked or uniquely identifiable individuals. However, many species are difficult to sight, and cannot be easily marked or recaptured. Some of these species produce readily identifiable sounds, providing an opportunity to use passive acoustic data to estimate animal density. In addition, even for species for which other visually based methods are feasible, passive acoustic methods offer the potential for greater detection ranges in some environments (e.g. underwater or in dense forest), and hence potentially better precision. Automated data collection means that surveys can take place at times and in places where it would be too expensive or dangerous to send human observers. Here, we present an overview of animal density estimation using passive acoustic data, a relatively new and fast-developing field. We review the types of data and methodological approaches currently available to researchers and we provide a framework for acoustics-based density estimation, illustrated with examples from real-world case studies. We mention moving sensor platforms (e.g. towed acoustics), but then focus on methods involving sensors at fixed locations, particularly hydrophones to survey marine mammals, as acoustic-based density estimation research to date has been concentrated in this area. Primary among these are methods based on distance sampling and spatially explicit capture-recapture. The methods are also applicable to other aquatic and terrestrial sound-producing taxa. We conclude that, despite being in its infancy, density estimation based on passive acoustic data likely will become an important method for surveying a number of diverse taxa, such as sea mammals, fish, birds, amphibians, and insects, especially in situations where inferences are required over long periods of time. There is considerable work ahead, with several potentially fruitful research areas, including the development of (i) hardware and software for data acquisition, (ii) efficient, calibrated, automated detection and classification systems, and (iii) statistical approaches optimized for this application. Further, survey design will need to be developed, and research is needed on the acoustic behaviour of target species. Fundamental research on vocalization rates and group sizes, and the relation between these and other factors such as season or behaviour state, is critical. Evaluation of the methods under known density scenarios will be important for empirically validating the approaches presented here. PMID:23190144

  8. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  9. An investigation of a passively controlled haptic interface

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.T.; Book, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Haptic interfaces enhance cooperation between humans and robotic manipulators by providing force and tactile feedback to the human user during the execution of arbitrary tasks. The use of active actuators in haptic displays presents a certain amount of risk since they are capable of providing unacceptable levels of energy to the systems upon which they operate. An alternative to providing numerous safeguards is to remove the sources of risk altogether. This research investigates the feasibility of trajectory control using passive devices, that is, devices that cannot add energy to the system. Passive actuators are capable only of removing energy from the system or transferring energy within the system. It is proposed that the utility of passive devices is greatly enhanced by the use of redundant actuators. In a passive system, once motion is provided to the system, presumably by a human user, passive devices may be able to modify this motion to achieve a desired resultant trajectory. A mechanically passive, 2-Degree-of-Freedom (D.O.F.) manipulator has been designed and built. It is equipped with four passive actuators: two electromagnetic brakes and two electromagnetic clutches. This paper gives a review of the literature on passive and robotics and describes the experimental test bed used in this research. Several control algorithms are investigated, resulting in the formulation of a passive control law.

  10. Passive Superconducting Shielding: Experimental Results and Computer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent; Kamiya, Koki

    2003-01-01

    Passive superconducting shielding for magnetic refrigerators has advantages over active shielding and passive ferromagnetic shielding in that it is lightweight and easy to construct. However, it is not as easy to model and does not fail gracefully. Failure of a passive superconducting shield may lead to persistent flwc and persistent currents. Unfortunately, modeling software for superconducting materials is not as easily available as is software for simple coils or for ferromagnetic materials. This paper will discuss ways of using available software to model passive superconducting shielding.

  11. Passive Superconducting Shielding: Experimental Results and Computer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, B. A.; Kamiya, K.

    2003-01-01

    Passive superconducting shielding for magnetic refrigerators has advantages over active shielding and passive ferromagnetic shielding in that it is lightweight and easy to construct. However, it is not as easy to model and does not fail gracefully. Failure of a passive superconducting shield may lead to persistent flux and persistent currents. Unfortunately, modeling software for superconducting materials is not as easily available as is software for simple coils or for ferromagnetic materials. This paper will discuss ways of using available software to model passive superconducting shielding.

  12. Passive recirculation in the National Launch System's fuel feedlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. R.; Holt, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the passive recirculation tests on the fuel feedline of the National Launch System (NLS). The majority of testing was performed in February 1992, at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, CO. The primary objective was to characterize passive recirculation in the NLS fuel feedline. The objective was met by observing the passive recirculation in a one-fifth scale model of the feedline with clear glass sections. The testing was recorded on video tape and with photographs. A description of the testing apparatus and support equipment is included. The experiment indicates that passive recirculation was occurring; higher angles from the horizontal transfer more heat.

  13. A Semi-classical calculus of correlations

    E-print Network

    Yves Colin De Verdière

    2011-03-08

    The method of passive imaging in seismology has been developped recently in order to image the earth crust from recordings of the seismic noise. This method is founded on the computation of correlations of the seismic noise. In this paper, we give an explicit formula for this correlation in the "semi-classical" regime. In order to do that, we define the power spectrum of a random field as the ensemble average of its Wigner measure, this allows phase-space computations: the pseudo-differential calculus and the ray theory. This way, we get a formula for the correlation of the seismic noise in the semi-classcial regime with a source noise which can be localized and non homogeneous. After that, we show how the use of surface guided waves allows to image the earth crust.

  14. Orthogonal frequency coded surface acoustic wave passive remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malocha, D. C.; Puccio, D.; Saldanha, N.

    2006-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are attractive for sensing of the physical, gas, liquid or biological environment because the device has many parameters which can be adjusted for various applications. The temperature coefficient of delay can provide temperature sensing, coupling to liquids, gases or applied films can be controlled by choice of mode, and putting the device under stress or strain can measure pressure or vibration. In addition, there are many substrate choices to attempt to optimize a given measurand. Finally, substrate choices allow sensing from cryogenic to high temperatures (1000°C), which has the potential for use in a wide spectrum of space applications. This paper will describe a novel SAW sensor platform for sensing of various measurands which is passive and wireless, and has several levels of coding available for providing identification. The paper will describe the concept of orthogonal frequency coding used in the device identification and its advantages in communications and sensing, and the mechanism for implementation using reflectors in a SAW sensor. Results of measured SAW device performance versus the coupling of mode (COM) model predictions show excellent correlation for a 250 MHz device on a lithium niobate substrate. The approach presented uses frequency selective reflectors in a differential delay line to measure temperature; measured from cryogenic temperatures to 150°C with the same device. A discussion of substrate materials and device parameters will be presented to exemplify the versatility and practicality of these devices to a wide range of sensor applications.

  15. Nondiffuse elastic and anelastic passive imaging.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco; Castellaro, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    The property at the basis of passive acoustic imaging is that, taken any two points, one of them can be seen as the source of the waves and the other as the recording station. This property, which was shown to hold also in nondiffuse fields, is here exploited: (1) to allow an undistorted passive imaging through the simple use of the statistical mode to estimate wave velocity, (2) to determine the azimuth of the instantaneous Huygens sources of the noise wavefield, and (3) to measure, provided that the noise bandwidth is wide with respect to that of the local system, the material dissipation constant as a function of frequency. The authors applied this theory to study the seismic noise field in the Ravenna, North-Central Italy, shore area and found it capable to provide velocity dispersion curves matching those of independent surveys, to track the sources of seismic noise to a few major firms in Ravenna port, with the prevailing source switching at the time scale of seconds, and to measure the dissipation quality factor Q at approximately 20 independent of frequency in the range 1-30 Hz. PMID:20329839

  16. Coherent and passive one dimensional quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuting; Jefferson, John H.; Lovett, Brendon W.

    2014-10-01

    We show that the state of a flying qubit may be transferred to a chain of identical, (near) ferromagnetically polarized, but non-interacting, static spin-\\frac{1}{2} particles in a passive way. During this process the flying qubit is coherently polarized, emerging in the direction of the majority static spins. We conjecture that this process is reversible for any number of flying qubits injected sequentially in an arbitrary superposition state, proving this explicitly for an arbitrary state of one and two flying qubits. We also find a special case in which we are able to prove the conjecture for an arbitrary number of qubits. Our architecture thus has the potential to be exploited as a passive quantum memory to encode the flying qubits without the necessity of resetting between successive encoding operations. We also illustrate that the quantum information may be spread over many static spins in the memory chain, making the mechanism resistant to spin decoherence and other imperfections. We discuss implementing the memory system with trapped bosonic atoms, controlled by a spatial light modulator.

  17. Passive and active middle ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Besides eradication of chronic middle ear disease, the reconstruction of the sound conduction apparatus is a major goal of modern ear microsurgery. The material of choice in cases of partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is the autogenous ossicle. In the event of more extensive destruction of the ossicular chain diverse alloplastic materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, plastics or composits are used for total reconstruction. Their specialised role in conducting sound energy within a half-open implant bed sets high demands on the biocompatibility as well as the acoustic-mechanic properties of the prosthesis. Recently, sophisticated titanium middle ear implants allowing individual adaptation to anatomical variations are widely used for this procedure. However, despite modern developments, hearing restoration with passive implants often faces its limitations due to tubal-middle-ear dysfunction. Here, implantable hearing aids, successfully used in cases of sensorineural hearing loss, offer a promising alternative. This article reviews the actual state of affairs of passive and active middle ear implants. PMID:22073102

  18. Passive Remote Sensing of Cloud Ice Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Wang, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Hurricanes, blizzards and other weather events are important to understand not only for disaster preparation, but also to track the global energy balance and to improve weather and climate forecasts. For several decades, passive radiometers and active radars on aircraft and satellites have been employed to remotely sense rain rates and the properties of liquid particles. In the past few years the relationships between frozen particles and millimeter-wave observations have become understood well enough to estimate the properties of ice in clouds. A brief background of passive remote sensing of precipitation will be presented followed by a focused discussion of recent research at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center estimating the properties of frozen particles in clouds. The retrievals are for (1) ice that will eventually melt into rain, (2) for solid precipitation falling in northern climates, and (3) cirrus ice clouds. The electromagnetic absorption and scattering properties and differences of liquid rain versus frozen particles will be summarized for frequencies from 6 to 340+ GHz. Challenges of this work including surface emissivity variability, non-linear and under-constrained relationships, and frozen particle unknowns will be discussed. Retrieved cloud particle contents and size distributions for ice above the melting layer in hurricanes, retrieved snowfall rates for a blizzard, and cirrus ice estimates will be presented. Future directions of this work will also be described.

  19. Passive remote sensing of cloud ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick Jackson, Gail; Wang, James R.

    2004-12-01

    Hurricanes, blizzards and other weather events are important to understand not only for disaster preparation, but also to track the global energy balance and to improve weather and climate forecasts. For several decades, passive radiometers and active radars on aircraft and satellites have been employed to remotely sense rain rates and the properties of liquid particles. In the past few years the relationships between frozen particles and millimeter-wave observations have become understood well enough to estimate the properties of ice in clouds. In this paper, a brief background of passive remote sensing of precipitation will be presented followed by a focused discussion of recent research at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center estimating the properties of frozen particles in clouds. The retrievals are for (1) ice that will eventually melt into rain, (2) for solid precipitation falling in northern climates, and (3) cirrus ice clouds. The electromagnetic absorption and scattering properties and differences of liquid rain versus frozen particles will be summarized for frequencies from 6 to 340+ GHz. Challenges of this work including surface emissivity variability, non-linear and under-constrained relationships, and frozen particle unknowns will be discussed. Retrieved cloud particle contents and size distributions for ice above the melting layer in hurricanes, retrieved snowfall rates for a blizzard, and cirrus ice estimates will be presented. Future directions of this work will also be described.

  20. Silicone Wristbands as Personal Passive Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual’s exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log Kow from ?0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  1. Silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Steven G; Kincl, Laurel D; Anderson, Kim A

    2014-03-18

    Active-sampling approaches are commonly used for personal monitoring, but are limited by energy usage and data that may not represent an individual's exposure or bioavailable concentrations. Current passive techniques often involve extensive preparation, or are developed for only a small number of targeted compounds. In this work, we present a novel application for measuring bioavailable exposure with silicone wristbands as personal passive samplers. Laboratory methodology affecting precleaning, infusion, and extraction were developed from commercially available silicone, and chromatographic background interference was reduced after solvent cleanup with good extraction efficiency (>96%). After finalizing laboratory methods, 49 compounds were sequestered during an ambient deployment which encompassed a diverse set of compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), consumer products, personal care products, pesticides, phthalates, and other industrial compounds ranging in log K(ow) from -0.07 (caffeine) to 9.49 (tris(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate). In two hot asphalt occupational settings, silicone personal samplers sequestered 25 PAHs during 8- and 40-h exposures, as well as 2 oxygenated-PAHs (benzofluorenone and fluorenone) suggesting temporal sensitivity over a single work day or week (p < 0.05, power =0.85). Additionally, the amount of PAH sequestered differed between worksites (p < 0.05, power = 0.99), suggesting spatial sensitivity using this novel application. PMID:24548134

  2. Passive Damping of Spacraft-Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romberg, O.

    2002-01-01

    For a wide range of spacecraft structures dynamic loads are critical. The structural stresses caused by these loads can be reduced by the increase of mechanical damping. A simple, lightweight and reliable method is artificial friction damping which is applied in many areas of classical mechanical engineering. Friction damping covers potential to save mass and cost and can increase the service life of structures. It is capable of suppressing a wide range of mechanical vibrations. The method is low priced, simple in manufacturing and application as well as maintenance-free. The paper describes the work on the design, development and experimental testing of passive damping methods applied for S/C lightweight structures. The expected dynamic loads relevant for future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) are investigated from present point of view. A possibility is shown where friction elements are integrated between the layers of sandwich panels. In a further example friction elements are implemented into a fin-model representative for a RLV-demonstrator. Here, theoretical investigations show a mass saving potential of almost 30%. Further possibilities for application in future RLV technologies, mass saving as well as life-span extension potential of such passive damping devices are subjects of investigation.

  3. Passive Broad-Spectrum Influenza Immunoprophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Cassandra M.; Penhale, William J.; Sangster, Mark Y.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza is a perennial problem affecting millions of people annually with the everpresent threat of devastating pandemics. Active prophylaxis by vaccination against influenza virus is currently the main countermeasure supplemented with antivirals. However, disadvantages of this strategy include the impact of antigenic drift, necessitating constant updating of vaccine strain composition, and emerging antiviral drug resistance. The development of other options for influenza prophylaxis, particularly with broad acting agents able to provide protection in the period between the onset of a pandemic and the development of a strain specific vaccine, is of great interest. Exploitation of broad-spectrum mediators could provide barricade protection in the early critical phase of influenza virus outbreaks. Passive immunity has the potential to provide immediate antiviral effects, inhibiting virus replication, reducing virus shedding, and thereby protecting vulnerable populations in the event of an impending influenza pandemic. Here, we review passive broad-spectrum influenza prophylaxis options with a focus on harnessing natural host defenses, including interferons and antibodies. PMID:25328697

  4. Exploring passive transfer in muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus).

    PubMed

    Rosa, Cheryl; Miller, Debra; Gray, Matthew J; Merrill, Anita; Vann, Tammie; Blake, John

    2007-03-01

    Poor calf production and ill thrift in 3-4 mo olds are common limiting problems in raising and maintaining captive muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus). Acute onset of a rapidly progressing enteritis and septicemia in neonatal calves (2-7 days of age) caused by Escherichia coli not normally considered pathogenic in domestic animals is a serious problem in many captive muskoxen facilities. Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, total protein, albumin, and globulin levels in captive periparturient muskox females and their neonatal calves were compared with levels found in other species in which these parameters have been well described. Results showed that all females in the study had IgG present in their serum (mean = 1,232.14 mg/dl, SD = 178.34 mg/dl, as measured via radial immunodiffusion). Calves were probably born agammaglobulinemic or hypogammaglobulinemic. IgG levels quickly rose in calves after initial colostrum intake to levels similar to those seen in other domestic ruminants. Our results suggest that passive transfer of immunity in muskoxen is similar to what is reported in domestic livestock and that reference ranges from domestic cattle may be used to assist interpretation of serum IgG levels in muskoxen. In addition, the positive relationship between serum protein and globulin levels with serum IgG levels is similar to that reported for Holstein cattle and thus provides a useful indicator of passive transfer in muskoxen. PMID:17469276

  5. Passive solar energy information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-11-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on passive solar heating and cooling are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven passive groups respondents are analyzed in this report: Federally Funded Researchers, Manufacturer Representatives, Architects, Builders, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, and Homeowners. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  6. Passive VHF radar for ionospheric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahr, J. D.; Gidner, D. M.; Zhou, C.; Lind, F. D.

    2001-01-01

    Recent technological advances enable a new class of passive radar instruments. These radars have no dedicated transmitter, observing serendipitous scatter of existing sources. Such radars may have very high performance and cost far less than conventional radars. The resulting equipment is essentially reduced to simple antennas, desktop computers, and Global Positioning System equipment. The safety hazards, interference problems, licensing issues, and financial costs associated with high-power transmitters are conspicuously absent. We will offer general design considerations and describe our own instrument, which observes the scatter of commercial FM broadcasts. Our system provides far better range and Doppler resolution than any conventional radar used in ionospheric coherent scatter studies, and is completely free of any range or Doppler aliasing problems. There are two principal drawbacks to passive radars: the ``front end'' signal processing cost is very large, and there is a significant data transport problem. However, spectacular advances in low-cost computing and internet bandwidth have rendered these problems quite easy to solve.

  7. Passive cambering and flexible propulsors: cetacean flukes.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Nusbaum, Moira K; Beneski, John T; Ketten, Darlene R

    2006-12-01

    The flukes are the primary locomotor structure in cetaceans, which produce hydrodynamic thrust as the caudal vertebrae are oscillated dorso-ventrally. Effective thrust generation is a function of the kinematics of the flukes, the angle of attack between the flukes and the incident water flow, and the shape of the flukes. We investigated the effect of bending within the caudal region of odontocete cetaceans to determine how changes in angular displacement between caudal vertebrae could effect passive shape change of the flukes. The internal and external changes of bent flukes were examined with computer tomography. Flukes and tailstock were removed from deceased Delphinus delphis, Lagenorhynchus acutus, Peponocephala electra, Phocoena phocoena and Tursiops truncatus, and bent on an adjustable support at 0, 45 and 90 degrees . At 0 degrees , cross-sections of the flukes displayed a symmetrical profile. Cross-sections of bent flukes (45 degrees , 90 degrees ) were asymmetrical and showed a cambered profile. Maximum cambering occurred close to the tailstock and decreased toward the fluke tip. Maximum angular displacement occurred at the 'ball vertebra', which was located posterior of the anterior insertion of the flukes on the tailstock. Bending at the 'ball vertebra' passively cambers the flexible flukes. Cambering could increase hydrodynamic force production during swimming, particularly during direction reversal in the oscillatory cycle. PMID:17671317

  8. Is “fear of passive movement” a distinctive component of the Fear-Avoidance Model in whiplash?

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Howard; Guerriero, Rocco; Kavanaugh, Shawn; Puhl, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Modify the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) for ‘fear of passive motion’ beliefs. Methods: With permission, a 14-item modification, the TSK-PM (passive movement), was created. Test-retest reliability was tested first. Construct validity was tested in chronic whiplash patients by comparing the TSK-PM with the TSK, the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and cervical ranges of motion. Results: The TSK-PM showed high test-retest reliability (r = 0.83) and high correlation with the original TSK (r = 0.84). Low, non-significant correlations were found with other variables. NDI scores were strongly correlated with ranges of motion. Conclusions: While having high test-retest reliability and a single factor structure, the TSK-PM failed to demonstrate distinctive construct validity vs the original TSK. The original TSK is likely to be sufficient to assess fear of being moved in neck pain patients in a clinical setting. Modifications to the current version of the TSK-PM might improve its construct validity in future studies. PMID:26500363

  9. Blood drop size in passive dripping from weapons.

    PubMed

    Kabaliuk, N; Jermy, M C; Morison, K; Stotesbury, T; Taylor, M C; Williams, E

    2013-05-10

    Passive dripping, the slow dripping of blood under gravity, is responsible for some bloodstains found at crime scenes, particularly drip trails left by a person moving through the scene. Previous work by other authors has established relationships, under ideal conditions, between the size of the stain, the number of spines and satellite stains, the roughness of the surface, the size of the blood droplet and the height from which it falls. To apply these relationships to infer the height of fall requires independent knowledge of the size of the droplet. This work aims to measure the size of droplets falling from objects representative of hand-held weapons. Pig blood was used, with density, surface tension and viscosity controlled to fall within the normal range for human blood. Distilled water was also tested as a reference. Drips were formed from stainless steel objects with different roughnesses including cylinders of diameter between 10 and 100 mm, and flat plates. Small radius objects including a knife and a wrench were also tested. High speed images of the falling drops were captured. The primary blood drop size ranged from 4.15±0.11 mm up to 6.15±0.15 mm (depending on the object), with the smaller values from sharper objects. The primary drop size correlated only weakly with surface roughness, over the roughness range studied. The number of accompanying droplets increased with the object size, but no significant correlation with surface texture was observed. Dripping of blood produced slightly smaller drops, with more accompanying droplets, than dripping water. PMID:23597743

  10. Condensation heat transfer analysis of the passive containment cooling system of the Purdue University Multi-dimensional Integral Test Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmarth de Leonardi, Tauna Lea

    2000-10-01

    The development of a reliable containment cooling system is one of the key areas in advanced nuclear reactor development. There are two categories of containment cooling: active and passive. The active containment cooling consists usually of systems that require active participation in their use. The passive systems have, in the past, been reliant on the supply of electrical power. This has instigated worldwide efforts in the development of passive containment cooling systems that are safer, more reliable, and simpler in their use. The passive containment cooling system's performance is deteriorated by noncondensable gases that come from the containment and from the gases produced by cladding/steam interaction during a severe accident. These noncondensable gases degrade the heat transfer capabilities of the condensers in the passive containment cooling systems since they provide a heat transfer resistance to the condensation process. There has been some work done in the area of modeling condensation heat transfer with noncondensable gases, but little has been done to apply the work to integral facilities. It is important to fully understand the heal transfer capabilities of the passive systems so a detailed assessment of the long term cooling capabilities can be performed. The existing correlations and models are for the through-flow of the mixture of steam and the noncondensable gases. This type of analysis may not be applicable to passive containment cooling systems, where there is no clear passage for the steam to escape. This allows the steam to accumulate in the lower header and tubes, where all of the steam condenses. The objective of this work was to develop a condensation heat transfer model for the downward cocurrent flow of a steam/air mixture through a condenser tube, taking into account the atypical characteristics of the passive containment cooling system. An empirical model was developed that depends solely on the inlet conditions to the condenser system, including the mixture Reynolds number and noncondensable gas concentration. This empirical model is applicable to the condensation heat transfer of the passive containment cooling system. This study was also used to characterize the local heat transfer coefficient with a noncondensable gas present.

  11. De-noising of passive and active microwave satellite soil moisture time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Western, Andrew W.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    Satellite microwave retrievals and in situ measurements of surface soil moisture are usually compared in the time domain. This paper examines their differences in the conjugate frequency domain to develop a spectral description of the satellite data, suggesting the presence of stochastic random and systematic periodic errors. Based on a semiempirical model of the observed power spectral density, we describe systematic designs of causal and noncausal filters to remove these erroneous signals. The filters are applied to the retrievals from active and passive satellite sensors and evaluated against field data from the Murrumbidgee Basin, southeast Australia, to show substantive increase in linear correlations.

  12. Latest Proterozoic to early Cambrian sedimentary-tectonic evolution of a passive margin sequence, northeastern Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, K.A.; Gaylord, D.R.

    1987-08-01

    The late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian Three Sisters formation, Addy Quartzite, and Gypsy Quartzite lie near the base of the Cordilleran miogeocline in northeastern Washington. Detailed stratigraphic and sedimentary examination of these units extends understanding of the evolution of western North America. These units were deposited on a newly rifted passive margin and record the final stages of late Proterozoic rifting and the early stages of subsequent early Paleozoic subsidence and transgression. The three Sisters formation, Addy Quartzite, and Gypsy Quartzite are correlative with the Brigham Group in southeastern Idaho and Utah, the Gold Creek Quartzite in northern Idaho, and the Flathead Quartzite in Montana and Wyoming.

  13. Method and means of passive detection of leaks in buried pipes

    DOEpatents

    Claytor, Thomas N. (Woodridge, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A method and means for passive detection of a leak in a buried pipe containing fluid under pressure includes a plurality of acoustic detectors that are placed in contact with the pipe. Noise produced by the leak is detected by the detectors, and the detected signals are correlated to locate the leak. In one embodiment of the invention two detectors are placed at different locations to locate a leak between them. In an alternate embodiment two detectors of different waves are placed at substantially the same location to determine the distance of the leak from the location.

  14. A passive probe for subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jupiter's icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Vance, Steve; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2015-03-01

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmitter failure. The interferometric reflectometer could operate with electrically short antennas, thus extending ice depth measurements to lower frequencies, and potentially providing a deeper view into the ice shells of jovian moons.

  15. Monitoring of urban particulate using an electret-based passive sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, A.; Hemingway, M.A.; Brown, R.C.

    1999-11-01

    Site sampling trials have been carried out in the urban environment in order to assess the usefulness of a passive sampling device, originally developed for personal monitoring of airborne dust levels in industry. The sampling element is a small disc of elect material (polymer carrying a permanent electric charge) within a metal frame weighing approximately 15 g. The sampler is designed to capture particles by electrostatic attraction, in which case the capture rate depends on their electrical mobility but is independent of the rate at which air flows past the device. Passive samplers, along with miniaturized cascade impactors, have been exposed to urban particulate for periods of up to 28 days in locations with significant different levels of airborne pollution. The cascade impactor data enabled good estimates to be made of PM{sub 10} and PMN{sub 2.5} levels, and data from the passive sampler correlated with the total dust sampled by the impactor and with both the size fractions, that with the PM{sub 10} being better. Too few data have yet been obtained for its accuracy to be established, but it is unlikely that it will approach that of pumped samplers. It has been shown to be potentially useful for multiple, simultaneous site sampling and for monitoring personal environmental exposure situations in which dispensing with a power source is particularly useful. Being small, the sampler is easy to hide or camouflage, and because it is cheap, its loss or damage is not a serious matter.

  16. An Intercomparison of Passive Terrestrial Remote Sensing Technologies to Derive Lai and Canopy Cover Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodgate, W. L.

    2012-07-01

    Forest indicators such as Leaf Area Index (LAI) and vegetation cover type are recognised as Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) which support the '…research, modelling, analysis, and capacity-building activities…' requirements of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This research compares the use of passive terrestrial remote sensing technologies for LAI and canopy cover metrics. The passive sensors used are the LAI-2200 and Digital Hemispherical Photography (DHP). The research was conducted at a Victorian reference site containing tree species with predominantly erectophile leaf angle distributions, which are significantly under-represented in the literature. The reference site contributes to a network of sites representative of Victorian land systems and is considered to be in good condition. Preliminary results indicate a low correlation (R2=0.46) between the LAI-2200 and DHP. Further comparisons to be conducted include adding a passive CI-110 plant canopy analyser and an active Terrestrial Laser Scanner. The future objective is to scale the in situ data to aerial and satellite remotely sensed datasets. The aerial remotely sensed data include LiDAR flown by a Riegl LMS Q560, and high resolution multispectral and hyperspectral imagery flown by the ASIA Eagle and Hawk system. The in situ data can be utilised for both calibration and validation of the coincident aerial imagery and LiDAR. Finally, the derived datasets are intended for use to validate the global MODIS LAI product.

  17. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented. PMID:25583863

  18. Design and fabrication of passive wireless sensor array system using composite coding resonant SAW transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a novel composite SAW (surface acoustic wave) passive wireless sensor system involving a resonator and a delay line. While the interrogational signal is a sinusoidal burst, the response is a delayed and damped oscillation. The frequency and the delay time of response are related to the measurand and the coding of the sensor element, respectively. The composite sensor consists of a SAW resonator and a delay line. It combines the advantages of these two devices and can be used as elements of multiple sensors for longer distance passive wireless measurements. As the wireless sensing response is weak and transient, in order to get the response with the maximum signal-to-noise ratio, the interrogational frequency is designed to be adjustable according to the result of frequency estimation. As a result, an optimal sensing result is achieved. In the transceiver set-up, the software DDS (direct digital synthesis) source with a rather high resolution is implemented to track the passive wireless sensor. An isolated switch is set in transmitter to depress the correlation leakage noise after switching off the wireless RF (radio frequency) interrogation signal. In this paper, the characteristics of the response, the working procedure of the signal processing, sensor temperature test results and the system error analyses are elaborated. A prototype instrument is built. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the instrumentation and the advantages of the composite sensor system.

  19. Investigation of ICPECVD Silicon Nitride Films for HgCdTe Surface Passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Umana-Membreno, G. A.; Gu, R.; Lei, W.; Antoszewski, J.; Dell, J. M.; Faraone, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report results of a study of SiN x thin films for surface passivation of HgCdTe epitaxial layers. The hydrogenated amorphous SiN x films under study were deposited by a SENTECH SI500D inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (ICPECVD) system with a high-density and low-ion-energy plasma source at relatively low substrate temperatures (80°C to 100°C). A series of SiN x films were first deposited on CdTe/GaAs and Si substrates under different deposition conditions to examine the influence of ICP power, deposition temperature, and NH3/SiH4 ratio on properties of the SiN x films. To investigate SiN x deposition conditions suitable for surface passivation of HgCdTe, the SiN x / n-Hg0.68Cd0.32Te interface characteristics were investigated employing capacitance-voltage measurements, and the corresponding interface trap densities D it were extracted from the high-frequency and low-frequency characteristics. Analysis of SiN x / n-Hg0.68Cd0.32Te metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures indicated that Si-rich SiN x films deposited at 100°C by ICPECVD exhibit electrical characteristics suitable for surface passivation of HgCdTe-based devices, that is, interface trap densities in the range of mid-1010 cm-2 eV-1 and fixed negative interface charge densities of ˜1011 cm-2. In addition, the relationship between bond concentration and surface passivation performance has been explored based on infrared (IR) absorbance spectra. The Si-H and N-H bond concentrations were found to be directly correlated with passivation performance, such that SiN x films with a combination of high [Si-H] and low [N-H] bond concentrations were found to be suitable as electrical passivation layers on HgCdTe.

  20. Passive machine augmented composite for multifunctional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun

    This dissertation studies by experiment and numerical analysis an advanced composite material (Machine Augmented Composite or MAC) for enhancement of the passive damping while maintaining its stiffness. This MAC is composed of a pre-buckled wall structure placed within a viscoelastic matrix. The pre-buckled machine can contain viscous fluids for additional energy dissipation. For the experiments, the MAC was fabricated by using rigid and soft polyurethane as a machine and matrix material respectively. Various viscosity fluids (0.83 ˜ 4730 cps) filled the inner-channel of the machine structure. Dynamic properties such as tan delta and the loss modulus (E'') of the composite were measured and compared with those of a homogeneous matrix sample over a frequency range of 0.1 to 100 Hz at room temperature through load-controlled cyclic testing. Measured tan delta and loss modulus values for the composite were higher than those of the matrix alone in the 1 to 40 Hz range. However the viscous fluid effects on the overall damping properties were small. The performance of a theoretical MAC was explored through numerical analysis. The amount of inner-channel gap closure was calculated for various matrix Poisson's ratios, for various Young's modulus ratios between the machine and matrix (Emachine/Ematrix), and for the volume fraction of the machines. The most desirable performance of the composite was obtained when the matrix Poisson's ratio was 0.49, and there was interaction between the Emachine/Ematrix and the volume fraction of the machines. Also the proper volume fraction range of the machine was predicted to be between 0.15 and 0.2 for the lamina shape MAC. Based upon the analysis, a sandwich structure MAC was fabricated and tested. This composite showed 11 times higher stiffness than the matrix without loosing the matrix damping property. This dissertation shows that the research met these objectives: (1) the MAC concept is effective for passive damping of vibrations, (2) that material combinations studied here had optimal combinations for best performance, and (3) that this is a promising field study for future passive and active materials development.

  1. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    SciTech Connect

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

  2. Will Passive Protection Save Congo Forests?

    PubMed Central

    Galford, Gillian L.; Soares-Filho, Britaldo S.; Sonter, Laura J.; Laporte, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Central Africa’s tropical forests are among the world’s largest carbon reserves. Historically, they have experienced low rates of deforestation. Pressures to clear land are increasing due to development of infrastructure and livelihoods, foreign investment in agriculture, and shifting land use management, particularly in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The DRC contains the greatest area of intact African forests. These store approximately 22 billion tons of carbon in aboveground live biomass, yet only 10% are protected. Can the status quo of passive protection — forest management that is low or nonexistent — ensure the preservation of this forest and its carbon? We have developed the SimCongo model to simulate changes in land cover and land use based on theorized policy scenarios from 2010 to 2050. Three scenarios were examined: the first (Historical Trends) assumes passive forest protection; the next (Conservation) posits active protection of forests and activation of the national REDD+ action plan, and the last (Agricultural Development) assumes increased agricultural activities in forested land with concomitant increased deforestation. SimCongo is a cellular automata model based on Bayesian statistical methods tailored for the DRC, built with the Dinamica-EGO platform. The model is parameterized and validated with deforestation observations from the past and runs the scenarios from 2010 through 2050 with a yearly time step. We estimate the Historical Trends trajectory will result in average emissions of 139 million t CO2 year-1 by the 2040s, a 15% increase over current emissions. The Conservation scenario would result in 58% less clearing than Historical Trends and would conserve carbon-dense forest and woodland savanna areas. The Agricultural Development scenario leads to emissions of 212 million t CO2 year-1 by the 2040s. These scenarios are heuristic examples of policy’s influence on forest conservation and carbon storage. Our results suggest that 1) passive protection of the DRC’s forest and woodland savanna is insufficient to reduce deforestation; and 2): enactment of a REDD+ plan or similar conservation measure is needed to actively protect Congo forests, their unique ecology, and their important role in the global carbon cycle. PMID:26106897

  3. Supine effect of passive cycling movement induces vagal withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Daisuke; Kubo, Kousei; Takagi, Daisuke; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine changes in vagal tone during passive exercise while supine. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy males lay supine for 5?min and then performed passive cycling for 10?min using a passive cycling machine. The lower legs moved through a range of motion defined by 90° and 180° knee joint angles at 60?rpm. Respiratory rates were maintained at 0.25?Hz to elicit respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Heart rate variability was analyzed using the time domain analysis, as the root mean squared standard differences between adjacent R-R intervals (rMSSD), and spectrum domain analysis of the high frequency (HF) component. [Results] Compared to rest, passive cycling decreased rMSSD (rest, 66.6 ± 92.6?ms; passive exercise, 53.5 ± 32.5?ms). However, no significant changes in HR or HF were observed (rest, 68.2 ± 6.9 bpm, 65.6 ± 12.0 n.u.; passive exercise, 70.2 ± 7.2 bpm, 67.9 ± 10.0 n.u.). [Conclusion] These results suggest that passive exercise decreases rMMSD through supine-stimulated mechanoreceptors with no effect on HR or HF. Therefore, rMSSD is not affected by hydrostatic pressure during passive cycling in the supine position. PMID:26696706

  4. Avian Influenza Vaccination of Poultry and Passive Case Reporting, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Grosbois, Vladimir; Jobre, Yilma; Saad, Ahmed; El Nabi, Amira Abd; Galal, Shereen; Kalifa, Mohamed; El Kader, Soheir Abd; Dauphin, Gwenaëlle; Roger, François; Lubroth, Juan; Peyre, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of a mass poultry vaccination campaign on passive surveillance of highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype (H5N1) outbreaks among poultry in Egypt. Passive reporting dropped during the campaign, although probability of infection remained unchanged. Future poultry vaccination campaigns should consider this negative impact on reporting for adapting surveillance strategies. PMID:23171740

  5. Kinematic Decoupling in Mechanisms and Application to a Passive Hand

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    Kinematic Decoupling in Mechanisms and Application to a Passive Hand Controller Design Vincent, 1992 Observations regarding the kinematics of mechanisms are applied to the synthesis of a passive hand yet effective hand-held mechanism in- tended to be used as an input device. Such a device can be used

  6. Analysis of YouTube User Experience from Passive Measurements

    E-print Network

    Barlet-Ros, Pere

    Analysis of YouTube User Experience from Passive Measurements Giorgos Dimopoulos Pere Barlet}@ac.upc.edu Abstract--In this paper, we analyze the YouTube service and the traffic generated from its usage of collecting these metrics, a tool was developed to perform YouTube traffic measurements by means of passive

  7. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  8. Controlling the Apparent Inertia of Passive Human-Interactive Robots

    E-print Network

    Amaral, Luis A.N.

    Controlling the Apparent Inertia of Passive Human- Interactive Robots Tom Worsnopp Michael Peshkin of cobots is to use computer- controllable CVTs (continuously variable transmissions) to produce high@northwestern.edu kmlynch@northwestern.edu Abstract--We have been exploring the use of passive robotic mechanisms

  9. Vestibuloocular Reflex Signal Modulation During Voluntary and Passive Head Movements

    E-print Network

    to the differential processing of head-velocity information by PVP neurons. We show that neither neck proprioceptiveVestibuloocular Reflex Signal Modulation During Voluntary and Passive Head Movements JEFFERSON E and passive head movements. J Neurophysiol 87: 2337­2357, 2002; 10.1152/jn.00625.2001. The vestibuloocular

  10. Factors affecting the increased energy expenditure during passive cycling.

    PubMed

    Peterman, James E; Kram, Rodger; Byrnes, William C

    2012-09-01

    Short-duration passive cycling, during which a motor drives the pedals, elevates metabolic energy expenditure. Our purpose was to investigate the feasibility of passive cycling as a physical inactivity countermeasure by quantifying how the number of legs involved, cycling cadence, and habituation influence energy expenditure. Eleven non-cyclists participated. We compared one- and two-leg passive cycling at cadences of 60 and 90 RPM. To investigate if there are habituation effects, we conducted multiple 5-min trials and a prolonged 30-min passive cycling trial. The increase in energy expenditure above rest during passive cycling was significantly greater for two legs compared to one leg (39 vs. 16% at 60 RPM and 96 vs. 45% at 90 RPM). The increase in energy expenditure above rest was greater for 90 versus 60 RPM two-leg passive cycling (96 vs. 39%; p < 0.001). Repeated trials showed no evidence of habituation and the increase in energy expenditure was maintained for the duration of the 30-min trial. In conclusion, energy expenditure during passive cycling is directly related to the number of legs involved and cycling cadence. Two-leg passive cycling at 90 RPM resulted in energy expenditures similar to the walking workstation, suggesting its potential as a physical inactivity countermeasure. PMID:22270489

  11. Combined Passive Active Soil Moisture Observations during CLASIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important research direction in advancing higher spatial resolution and better accuracy in soil moisture remote sensing is the integration of active and passive observations. In an effort to address this objective, an airborne instrument, the passive/active L-band system (PALS), was flown as part...

  12. Fully Autonomous Trajectory Estimation with Long-Range Passive RFID

    E-print Network

    Zell, Andreas

    Fully Autonomous Trajectory Estimation with Long-Range Passive RFID Philipp Vorst and Andreas Zell in an unknown envi- ronment with long-range passive radio-frequency identification (RFID). The estimation is based only on odometry and RFID measurements. The technique requires no prior observation model

  13. Three types of RFID tags Passive / Active / Semi-Active

    E-print Network

    Robins, Gabriel

    Radio--Frequency Identification (RFID)Frequency Identification (RFID) Assumptions Tags are passive Tags have limited computational-Frequency Identification (RFID) tag RFID reader starting / closing tags · Develop new RFID "yoking-proofs" where tagsThree types of RFID tags · Passive / Active / Semi-Active · up to 19m range for UHF Computer

  14. Passivation of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Morrison, S. R.; Farley, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    Various redox couple surface additives are studied which increase the photostability of coprecipitated zinc orthotitanate pigment. The electron spin resonance technique was used to examine the characteristic photodamage centers. Results indicate that cerium surface redox additive completely passivates the pigment at the surface concentrations studied. Less passivation occurs with the iridium chloride and the iron cyanide redox couples.

  15. 17 CFR 242.103 - Nasdaq passive market making.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasdaq passive market making... Regulation M § 242.103 Nasdaq passive market making. (a) Scope of Section. This section permits broker-dealers to engage in market making transactions in covered securities that are Nasdaq securities...

  16. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  17. Passive stability and active control in a rhythmic task.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kunlin; Dijkstra, Tjeerd M H; Sternad, Dagmar

    2007-11-01

    Rhythmically bouncing a ball with a racket is a task that affords passively stable solutions as demonstrated by stability analyses of a mathematical model of the task. Passive stability implies that no active control is needed as errors die out without requiring corrective actions. Empirical results from human performance demonstrated that actors indeed exploit this passive dynamics in steady-state performance, thereby reducing computational demands of the task. The present study investigated the response to perturbations of different magnitudes designed on the basis of the model's basin of attraction. Humans performed the task in a virtual reality set-up with a haptic interface. Relaxation times of the performance errors showed significantly faster returns than predicted from the purely passive model, indicative of active error corrections. Systematic adaptations in the racket trajectories were a monotonic function of the perturbation magnitudes, indicating that active control was applied in proportion to the perturbation. These results did not indicate any sensitivity to the boundary of stability. Yet the influence of passive dynamics was also seen: the pattern of relaxation times in the major performance variable ball height was consistent with qualitative predictions derived from the basin of attraction and racket accelerations at contact were generally negative signaling use of passive stability. These findings suggest that the fast return back to steady state was assisted by passive properties of the task. It was concluded that actors used a blend of active and passive control for all sizes of perturbations. PMID:17881482

  18. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  19. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  20. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  1. 48 CFR 211.275 - Passive radio frequency identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Passive radio frequency identification. 211.275 Section 211.275 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... Requirements Documents 211.275 Passive radio frequency identification....

  2. Routing Permutations in Partitioned Optical Passive Stars Networks Alessandro Mei

    E-print Network

    Mei, Alessandro

    Routing Permutations in Partitioned Optical Passive Stars Networks Alessandro Mei Department Optical Passive Stars (POPS) network with g groups and d processors per group can route any permutation is optimal in the worst case, and is at most the double of the optimum for all permutations such that ´iµ i

  3. THE IMPACT OF PASSIVE SAMPLING METHODOLOGIES USED IN THE DEARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract details the use of passive sampling methodologies in the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS). A discussion about the utility of various gas-phase passive samplers used in the study will be described along with examples of field data measurements empl...

  4. Counseling Practice: In Defense of Passive Modes of Professional Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, passive ideologies of counseling have regularly morphed into active approaches. The author contends that professional power and status are the underlying motives for this ideological transition. Based on empirical findings and recent philosophical developments, a case is made for the counseling profession to revalue passive

  5. Style in Advanced Composition: Active Students and Passive Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frischkorn, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Argues that, as decision makers, students must sort out their rhetorical contexts to determine whether a sentence needs the active voice or the passive voice. Notes that one source for finding realistic sample sentences for learning about the passive voice is the daily newspaper, and offers examples from the business section, sports page,…

  6. RADON MITIGATION EFFECTS OF PASSIVE STACKS IN RESIDENTIAL NEW CONSTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effects of passive stacks in mitigating radon levels in residential new construction. Although passive stacks have been installed as a radon resistant measure in new houses, little quantitative data on their performance has been collected. This study invol...

  7. HCI Gesture Tracking Using Wearable Passive Rachel M. Bainbridge

    E-print Network

    HCI Gesture Tracking Using Wearable Passive Tags by Rachel M. Bainbridge S.B. EE, M.I.T. (2009 Tracking Using Wearable Passive Tags by Rachel M. Bainbridge Submitted to the Department of Electrical of Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Abstract In this thesis, a wearable

  8. Mapping Hypercube Computations onto Partitioned Optical Passive Star Networks

    E-print Network

    Mei, Alessandro

    . The number of couplers used is g2 . Such an architecture will be denoted by POPS(d, g). The POPS networkMapping Hypercube Computations onto Partitioned Optical Passive Star Networks Alessandro Mei Op- tical Passive Stars (POPS) network with g groups and d processors per group can simulate either

  9. Spatial memory and path integration studied by self-driven passive linear displacement. I. Basic properties.

    PubMed

    Israël, I; Grasso, R; Georges-Francois, P; Tsuzuku, T; Berthoz, A

    1997-06-01

    According to path integration, the brain is able to compute the distance of a traveled path. In this research we applied our previously reported method for studying memory of linear distance, a crucial mechanism in path integration; our method is based on the overt reconstruction of a passive transport. Passive transport is a special case of navigation in which no active control is performed. Blindfolded subjects were first asked to travel 2 m forward, in darkness, by driving with a joystick the robot on which they were seated. The results show that all subjects but two undershot this distance, i.e., overestimated their own displacement. Then, subjects were submitted to a passive linear forward displacement along 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 m, and had to reproduce the same distance, still blindfolded. The results show that the distance of the stimulus was accurately reproduced, as well as stimulus duration, peak velocity, and velocity profile. In this first condition, the imposed velocity profile was triangular and therefore stimulus distance and duration were correlated. In a second condition, it was shown that distance was correctly reproduced also when the information about stimulus duration was kept constant. Here, different velocity profiles were used as stimuli, and most subjects also reproduced the velocity profile. Statistical analyses indicated that distance was not reproduced as a consequence of duration, peak velocity, or velocity profile reproduction, but was uniquely correlated to stimulus distance. The previous hypothesis of a double integration of the otolith signal to provide a distance estimate can explain our results. There was a large discrepancy between the accuracy with which the subjects matched the velocity profiles and that of distance reproduction. It follows that, whereas the dynamics of passive motion are stored and available to further use, distance is independently estimated. It is concluded that vestibular and somatosensory signals excited by passive transport can be used to build a dynamic as well as a static representation of the traveled path. We found a close quantitative similarity between the present findings on distance reproduction and those obtained from active locomotion experiments in which the same paradigm was used. This resemblance suggests that the two types of navigation tasks draw on common physiological processes and extends the relevance of our results to naturally occurring path integration. PMID:9212267

  10. 48 CFR 552.211-92 - Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...false Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags. 552.211-92...211-92 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) using passive tags. As prescribed...clause: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Using Passive Tags (JAN...

  11. Passive Samplers for Investigations of Air Quality: Method Description, Implementation, and Comparison to Alternative Sampling Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Paper covers the basics of passive sampler design, compares passive samplers to conventional methods of air sampling, and discusses considerations when implementing a passive sampling program. The Paper also discusses field sampling and sample analysis considerations to ensu...

  12. Modification of a PAMPA model to predict passive gastrointestinal absorption and plasma protein binding.

    PubMed

    Bujard, Alban; Voirol, Hervé; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Schappler, Julie

    2015-09-18

    The Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay (PAMPA) is a well-known high throughput screening (HTS) technique for predicting in vivo passive absorption. In this technique, two compartments are separated by an artificial membrane that mimics passive permeability through biological membranes such as the dermal layer, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and the blood brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, a hexadecane artificial membrane (HDM)-PAMPA was used to predict the binding of compounds towards the human plasma using a mixture of human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). The ratio of HSA and AGP was equivalent to that found in the human plasma for both proteins (?20:1). A pH gradient (5.0-7.4) was performed to increase the screening capacity and overcome the issue of passive permeability for acidic and amphoteric compounds. With this assay, the prediction of passive GIT absorption was maintained and the compounds were discriminated according to their permeability (on a no-to-high scale). The plasma protein binding (PPB) was estimated via the correlation of the differences between the amount of compound crossing the artificial membrane in assays conducted with and without protein using only a two end-point measurement. The use of a mixture of HSA and AGP to modulate drug permeation was compared to the use of the same concentrations of HSA and AGP used separately. The addition of HSA alone in the acceptor compartment was sufficient for estimating PPB, while it was demonstrated that AGP alone could enable the estimation of AGP binding. PMID:26118348

  13. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, N. E.; Ganio, M. S.; Burchfield, J. M.; Tucker, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Dougherty, E. K.; Robinson, F. B.; Ridings, C. B.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for >4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature (T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p > 0.05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s-1) to 1.5 °C ?T C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s-1; p < 0.005), suggesting heat stress acutely increased central arterial stiffness. pPWV did not change with heating (grand mean: baseline = 691.9 ± 92.9 cm · s-1; 1.5 °C ?T C = 691.9 ± 79.5 cm · s-1; p > 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated (p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  14. Passive Acoustic Tracking of Singing Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) on a Northwest Atlantic Feeding Ground

    PubMed Central

    Stanistreet, Joy E.; Risch, Denise; Van Parijs, Sofie M.

    2013-01-01

    Passive acoustic tracking provides an unobtrusive method of studying the movement of sound-producing animals in the marine environment where traditional tracking methods may be costly or infeasible. We used passive acoustic tracking to characterize the fine-scale movements of singing humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) on a northwest Atlantic feeding ground. Male humpback whales produce complex songs, a phenomenon that is well documented in tropical regions during the winter breeding season, but also occurs at higher latitudes during other times of year. Acoustic recordings were made throughout 2009 using an array of autonomous recording units deployed in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Song was recorded during spring and fall, and individual singing whales were localized and tracked throughout the array using a correlation sum estimation method on the time-synchronized recordings. Tracks were constructed for forty-three song sessions, revealing a high level of variation in movement patterns in both the spring and fall seasons, ranging from slow meandering to faster directional movement. Tracks were 30 min to 8 h in duration, and singers traveled distances ranging from 0.9 to 20.1 km. Mean swimming speed was 2.06 km/h (SD 0.95). Patterns and rates of movement indicated that most singers were actively swimming. In one case, two singers were tracked simultaneously, revealing a potential acoustic interaction. Our results provide a first description of the movements of singers on a northwest Atlantic feeding ground, and demonstrate the utility of passive acoustic tracking for studying the fine-scale movements of cetaceans within the behavioral context of their calls. These methods have further applications for conservation and management purposes, particularly by enhancing our ability to estimate cetacean densities using passive acoustic monitoring. PMID:23593447

  15. Passive Stiffness in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscle Reduced by Disrupting Paramyosin Phosphorylation, but Not by Embryonic Myosin S2 Hinge Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yudong; Miller, Mark S.; Swank, Douglas M.; Liu, Hongjun; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2006-01-01

    High passive stiffness is one of the characteristic properties of the asynchronous indirect flight muscle (IFM) found in many insects like Drosophila. To evaluate the effects of two thick filament protein domains on passive sarcomeric stiffness, and to investigate their correlation with IFM function, we used microfabricated cantilevers and a high resolution imaging system to study the passive IFM myofibril stiffness of two groups of transgenic Drosophila lines. One group (hinge-switch mutants) had a portion of the endogenous S2 hinge region replaced by an embryonic version; the other group (paramyosin mutants) had one or more putative phosphorylation sites near the N-terminus of paramyosin disabled. Both transgenic groups showed severely compromised flight ability. In this study, we found no difference (compared to the control) in passive elastic modulus in the hinge-switch group, but a 15% reduction in the paramyosin mutants. All results were corroborated by muscle fiber mechanics experiments performed on the same lines. The fact that myofibril elasticity is unaffected by hinge switching implies alternative S2 hinges do not critically affect passive sarcomere stiffness. In contrast, the mechanical defects observed upon disrupting paramyosin phosphorylation sites in Drosophila suggests that paramyosin phosphorylation is important for maintaining high passive stiffness in IFM myofibrils, probably by affecting paramyosin's interaction with other sarcomeric proteins. PMID:17012313

  16. Passive immunization of pigeons against trichomoniasis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    Nonimmune homing pigeons Columba livia were infected with the Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae and subsequently transfused with plasma from acute or chronically infected pigeons harboring one of 3 different strains of T. gallinae. The transfusions were either a single 2 mi dose given one day after inoculation or three 1 ml doses given 0, 5, and 10 days after inoculation. Plasma from pigeons harboring any of the 3 strains was capable of passively immunizing nonimmune birds. All birds which were immunized with plasma from infected pigeons survived until killed at the end of the test period and no visceral lesions were found on necropsy but trichomonads were present in the oropharynx. All controls (untreated or transfused with normal plasma) died of visceral trichomoniasis. Immune plasma produced some lysis of trichomonads in vitro, and inhibition of motility and vacuolization occurred in some of the non-lysed organisms. The overall lytic activity in vitro affected less than 10% of the suspended trichomonads.

  17. All fiber passively Q-switched laser

    DOEpatents

    Soh, Daniel B. S.; Bisson, Scott E

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments relate to an all fiber passively Q-switched laser. The laser includes a large core doped gain fiber having a first end. The large core doped gain fiber has a first core diameter. The laser includes a doped single mode fiber (saturable absorber) having a second core diameter that is smaller than the first core diameter. The laser includes a mode transformer positioned between a second end of the large core doped gain fiber and a first end of the single mode fiber. The mode transformer has a core diameter that transitions from the first core diameter to the second core diameter and filters out light modes not supported by the doped single mode fiber. The laser includes a laser cavity formed between a first reflector positioned adjacent the large core doped gain fiber and a second reflector positioned adjacent the doped single mode fiber.

  18. Passive microwave algorithm development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    The scientific objectives of this grant are: (1) thoroughly evaluate, both theoretically and empirically, all available Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) retrieval algorithms for column water vapor, column liquid water, and surface wind speed; (2) where both appropriate and feasible, develop, validate, and document satellite passive microwave retrieval algorithms that offer significantly improved performance compared with currently available algorithms; and (3) refine and validate a novel physical inversion scheme for retrieving rain rate over the ocean. This report summarizes work accomplished or in progress during the first year of a three year grant. The emphasis during the first year has been on the validation and refinement of the rain rate algorithm published by Petty and on the analysis of independent data sets that can be used to help evaluate the performance of rain rate algorithms over remote areas of the ocean. Two articles in the area of global oceanic precipitation are attached.

  19. Passive chip-based droplet sorting

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham P; Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for passive sorting of microdroplets including a main flow channel, a flow stream of microdroplets in the main flow channel wherein the microdroplets have substantially the same diameter and wherein the flow stream of microdroplets includes first microdroplets having a first degree of stiffness and second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness wherein the second degree of stiffness is different than the first degree of stiffness. A second flow channel is connected to the main flow channel for the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness. A separator separates the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness from the first microdroplets and directs the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness into the second flow channel.

  20. Passive runaway electron suppression in tokamak disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H. M.; Helander, P.

    2013-07-15

    Runaway electrons created in disruptions pose a serious problem for tokamaks with large current. It would be desirable to have a runaway electron suppression method which is passive, i.e., a method that does not rely on an uncertain disruption prediction system. One option is to let the large electric field inherent in the disruption drive helical currents in the wall. This would create ergodic regions in the plasma and increase the runaway losses. Whether these regions appear at a suitable time and place to affect the formation of the runaway beam depends on disruption parameters, such as electron temperature and density. We find that it is difficult to ergodize the central plasma before a beam of runaway current has formed. However, the ergodic outer region will make the Ohmic current profile contract, which can lead to instabilities that yield large runaway electron losses.