Science.gov

Sample records for passive localization processing

  1. Passive localization processing for tactical unattended ground sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, L.C.; Breitfeller, E.F.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes our preliminary results of a development effort to assess the potential capability of a system of unattended ground sensors to detect, classify, and localize underground sources. This report also discusses the pertinent signal processing methodologies, demonstrates the approach with computer simulations, and validates the simulations with experimental data. Specific localization methods discussed include triangulation and measurement of time difference of arrival from multiple sensor arrays.

  2. Low-loss passive waveguides in a generic InP foundry process via local diffusion of zinc.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Domenico; Carnicella, Giuseppe; Ciminelli, Caterina; Thijs, Peter; Veldhoven, Petrus J; Ambrosius, Huub; Smit, Meint

    2015-09-21

    Generic InP foundry processes allow monolithic integration of active and passive elements into a common p-n doped layerstack. The passive loss can be greatly reduced by restricting the p-dopant to active regions. We report on a localized Zn-diffusion process based on MOVPE, which allows to reduce waveguide loss from 2 dB/cm to below 0.4 dB/cm. We confirm this value by fabrication of a 73 mm long spiral ring resonator, with a record quality factor of 1.2 million and an extinction ratio of 9.7 dB. PMID:26406713

  3. Locally contacted rear surface passivated solar cells by inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phiwpha, N.; Fangsuwannarak, T.; Sopitpan, S.

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet printing of photoresist material may provide a new route for low-cost fabrication of patterned oxide passivation layer of solar cells that require fine patterning and simple process. However, printing by liquid-based, environmentally friendly ink and printing device required development efforts aimed at achieving a fine patterning and long used inkjet nozzles under corrosive influence. This work was demonstrated a concept for grooved silicon oxide patterning for rear localized contact of p-n junction solar cells by chemical etching after photoresist patterning obtained. This article reviews the silicon dioxide fabrication on p-Si substrate from sol-gel technique for oxide passivation layer of solar cells. The aluminium was deposited on the patterned oxide layer and then heated at its Al-Si eutectic temperature. Finally, an aluminium-induced solid-phase epitaxial growth of p+ forming into the openings of the oxide passivation layer was presented. The sheet resistance of n-emitter layer, carrier life-time and surface recombination velocity values are investigated. Photoconductive measurements were performed on the prepared samples after each thermal process to measure the effective lifetime of the minority carriers. Carrier lifetime up to 60 microseconds has been measured on c-Si wafer passivated by the opened SiO2 layer. It was shown that the patterned SiO2 passivation has obtained high passivation quality making by the proposed inkjet printing method.

  4. Model-based ocean acoustic passive localization. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    A model-based approach is developed (theoretically) to solve the passive localization problem. Here the authors investigate the design of a model-based identifier for a shallow water ocean acoustic problem characterized by a normal-mode model. In this problem they show how the processor can be structured to estimate the vertical wave numbers directly from measured pressure-field and sound speed measurements thereby eliminating the need for synthetic aperture processing or even a propagation model solution. Finally, they investigate various special cases of the source localization problem, designing a model-based localizer for each and evaluating the underlying structure with the expectation of gaining more and more insight into the general problem.

  5. Model-based ocean acoustic passive localization

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1994-01-24

    The detection, localization and classification of acoustic sources (targets) in a hostile ocean environment is a difficult problem -- especially in light of the improved design of modern submarines and the continual improvement in quieting technology. Further the advent of more and more diesel-powered vessels makes the detection problem even more formidable than ever before. It has recently been recognized that the incorporation of a mathematical model that accurately represents the phenomenology under investigation can vastly improve the performance of any processor, assuming, of course, that the model is accurate. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate more knowledge about the ocean environment into detection and localization algorithms in order to enhance the overall signal-to-noise ratios and improve performance. An alternative methodology to matched-field/matched-mode processing is the so-called model-based processor which is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. If state-space solutions can be accomplished, then many of the current ocean acoustic processing problems can be analyzed and solved using this framework to analyze performance results based on firm statistical and system theoretic grounds. The model-based approach, is (simply) ``incorporating mathematical models of both physical phenomenology and the measurement processes including noise into the processor to extract the desired information.`` In this application, we seek techniques to incorporate the: (1) ocean acoustic propagation model; (2) sensor array measurement model; and (3) noise models (ambient, shipping, surface and measurement) into a processor to solve the associated localization/detection problems.

  6. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  7. Passive localization in ocean acoustics: A model-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    A model-based approach is developed to solve the passive localization problem in ocean acoustics using the state-space formulation for the first time. It is shown that the inherent structure of the resulting processor consists of a parameter estimator coupled to a nonlinear optimization scheme. The parameter estimator is designed using the model-based approach in which an ocean acoustic propagation model is used in developing the model-based processor required for localization. Recall that model-based signal processing is a well-defined methodology enabling the inclusion of environmental (propagation) models, measurement (sensor arrays) models, and noise (shipping, measurement) models into a sophisticated processing algorithm. Here the parameter estimator is designed, or more appropriately the model-based identifier (MBID) for a propagation model developed from a shallow water ocean experiment. After simulation, it is then applied to a set of experimental data demonstrating the applicability of this approach. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Acoustical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  8. Stable surface passivation process for compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    2001-01-01

    A passivation process for a previously sulfided, selenided or tellurated III-V compound semiconductor surface. The concentration of undesired mid-gap surface states on a compound semiconductor surface is reduced by the formation of a near-monolayer of metal-(sulfur and/or selenium and/or tellurium)-semiconductor that is effective for long term passivation of the underlying semiconductor surface. Starting with the III-V compound semiconductor surface, any oxidation present thereon is substantially removed and the surface is then treated with sulfur, selenium or tellurium to form a near-monolayer of chalcogen-semiconductor of the surface in an oxygen-free atmosphere. This chalcogenated surface is then contacted with a solution of a metal that will form a low solubility chalcogenide to form a near-monolayer of metal-chalcogen-semiconductor. The resulting passivating layer provides long term protection for the underlying surface at or above the level achieved by a freshly chalcogenated compound semiconductor surface in an oxygen free atmosphere.

  9. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long-range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca(2+) influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  10. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  11. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  12. Passive acoustic localization with an AUV-mounted hydrophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Spain, Gerald L.; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C. David; Smith, Jerome A.; Zimmerman, Richard

    2001-05-01

    A mid-size Odyssey IIb autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) was retrofitted with the advanced vectored-thrust system presently installed on AUVs manufactured by Bluefin Robotics, Inc. Subsequent modifications to this thrust system decreased the radiated acoustic and vibration noise levels recorded by an eight-element hydrophone array mounted on the AUV's inner shroud by 20 to 50 dB across the 20 Hz to 10 kHz band. This reduction in self-noise levels to near, or at, background ocean noise levels permits the use of the vehicle-mounted hydrophone array in passive ocean acoustic studies. One example is the application of passive synthetic aperture processing techniques to provide greater spatial resolution estimates of the direction of low frequency sources. Doppler spreading caused by medium motion is a limiting factor in array gain. At mid frequencies (1-10 kHz), the complexity of the received acoustic field created by scattering off the AUV body is partly captured in the array processing by the use of replica vectors measured in a calibration tank. These empirical replica vectors decrease the azimuthally dependent degradation in beamforming performance over that of plane waves. [Work supported by ONR, Code 321(US).

  13. Local suppression of turbulent noise by passively inducing relaminarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkman, Richard; Metzger, Meredith

    2010-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow were performed to study potential means of locally suppressing wall pressure noise by passively driving the flow towards relaminarization. The noise reduction is achieved by altering the surface geometry along a wall of the channel. Two separate geometries were investigated, namely a wedge-shaped protrusion and an inverted wedge-shaped depression. In both configurations, the wedge remains stationary and spans the width of the channel. The flow tends toward relaminarization due to local convective acceleration along the upslope of the wedge (in the case of the protrusion) and due to the gradual unstalled expansion along the downslope of the wedge (in the case of the depression). Simulations were performed at a Reynolds number based on friction velocity of 180. The no-slip condition along the surface of the protrusion/depression was enforced using an immersed boundary method. Profiles of turbulence statistics and wall- pressure intensity, as well as the wall-pressure spectra along the front face of the two different wedges are compared in relation to those of the undisturbed approach boundary layer.

  14. Comparative evaluation of passive, active, and passive-active distraction techniques on pain perception during local anesthesia administration in children

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoniem, Soad A.; Mahmoud, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthesia forms the backbone of pain control techniques and is necessary for a painless dental procedure. Nevertheless, administering a local anesthetic injection is among the most anxiety-provoking procedures to children. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of different distraction techniques (passive, active, and passive-active) on children’s pain perception during local anesthesia administration. A total of 90 children aged four to nine years, requiring inferior alveolar nerve block for primary molar extraction, were included in this study and randomly divided into three groups according to the distraction technique employed during local anesthesia administration. Passive distraction group: the children were instructed to listen to a song on headphones; Active distraction group: the children were instructed to move their legs up and down alternatively; and Passive-active distraction group: this was a combination between both techniques. Pain perception during local anesthesia administration was evaluated by the Sounds, Eyes, and Motor (SEM) scale and Wong Baker FACES® Pain Rating Scale. There was an insignificant difference between the three groups for SEM scale and Wong Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale at P = 0.743 and P = 0.112 respectively. The examined distraction techniques showed comparable results in reducing pain perception during local anesthesia administration. PMID:27222759

  15. Use of a liquid-phase ion gun for local breakdown of the passive film on iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fushimi, Koji; Azumi, Kazuhisa; Seo, Masahiro

    2000-02-01

    A silver/silver chloride microelectrode was developed as a liquid-phase ion gun for investigation of precursor processes of pitting corrosion. This electrode was set as a probe electrode of a scanning electrochemical microscope and used to induce a local breakdown of passive film on iron. A small amount of chloride ions generated by cathodic polarization of the silver/silver chloride microelectrode has succeeded in inducing the local breakdown of the passive film formed on iron in deaerated pH 6.5 borate solution. Moreover, the microelectrode could detect ferric ions dissolved from the film at the initial stage of the film breakdown.

  16. Parallel Processing Systems for Passive Ranging During Helicopter Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Bavavar; Suorsa, Raymond E.; Showman, Robert D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The complexity of rotorcraft missions involving operations close to the ground result in high pilot workload. In order to allow a pilot time to perform mission-oriented tasks, sensor-aiding and automation of some of the guidance and control functions are highly desirable. Images from an electro-optical sensor provide a covert way of detecting objects in the flight path of a low-flying helicopter. Passive ranging consists of processing a sequence of images using techniques based on optical low computation and recursive estimation. The passive ranging algorithm has to extract obstacle information from imagery at rates varying from five to thirty or more frames per second depending on the helicopter speed. We have implemented and tested the passive ranging algorithm off-line using helicopter-collected images. However, the real-time data and computation requirements of the algorithm are beyond the capability of any off-the-shelf microprocessor or digital signal processor. This paper describes the computational requirements of the algorithm and uses parallel processing technology to meet these requirements. Various issues in the selection of a parallel processing architecture are discussed and four different computer architectures are evaluated regarding their suitability to process the algorithm in real-time. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that real-time passive ranging is a realistic goal and can be achieved with a short time.

  17. Enhanced Passive and Active Processing of Syllables in Musician Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobert, Julie; Marie, Celine; Francois, Clement; Schon, Daniele; Besson, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of musical expertise in 9-year-old children on passive (as reflected by MMN) and active (as reflected by discrimination accuracy) processing of speech sounds. Musician and nonmusician children were presented with a sequence of syllables that included standards and deviants in vowel frequency,…

  18. Catalytic cracking process with vanadium passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.V.; Jossens, L.W.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a process for the catalytic cracking of metal-containing hydrocarbonaceous feedstock. It comprises contacting the feedstock under cracking conditions with a dual component catalyst composition. The catalyst composition comprises a first component comprising an active cracking catalyst; and a second component, as a separate and distinct entity, the second component comprising the following materials: a calcium and magnesium containing material selected from the group consisting of dolomite, substantially amorphous calcium magnesium silicate, calcium magnesium oxide, calcium magnesium acetate, calcium magnesium carbonate, and calcium magnesium subcarbonate; a magnesium containing material comprising a hydrous magnesium silicate; and a binder selected from the group consisting of kaolin, bentonite, montmorillonite, saponite, hectorite, alumina, silica, titania, zirconia, silica-alumina, and combinations thereof.

  19. Passive localization in the deep ocean based on cross-correlation function matching.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhixiong; Yang, Kunde; Ma, Yuanliang

    2016-06-01

    Passive localization of a sound source in the deep ocean is investigated in this study. The source can be localized by taking advantage of a cross-correlation function matching technique. When a two-sensor vertical array is used in the deep ocean, two types of side lobe curves appear in the ambiguity surface of the localization. The side lobe curves are analytically expressed and they are then used as indicators of the localization result instead of the scanning point with the maximum power. Simulation and experiment demonstrate the performance of the proposed passive localization method. PMID:27369172

  20. Passive electrical monitoring and localization of fluid leakages from wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Mao, D.; Haas, A. K.; Karaoulis, M.; Frash, L.

    2015-02-01

    Electrokinetic phenomena are a class of cross-coupling phenomena involving the relative displacement between the pore water (together with the electrical diffuse layer) with respect to the solid phase of a porous material. We demonstrate that electrical fields of electrokinetic nature can be associated with fluid leakages from wells. These leakages can be remotely monitored and the resulting signals used to localize their causative source distribution both in the laboratory and in field conditions. The first laboratory experiment (Experiment #1) shows how these electrical fields can be recorded at the surface of a cement block during the leakage of a brine from a well. The measurements were performed with a research-grade medical electroencephalograph and were inverted using a genetic algorithm to localize the causative source of electrical current and therefore, localize the leak in the block. Two snapshots of electrical signals were used to show how the leak evolved over time. The second experiment (Experiment #2) was performed to see if we could localize a pulse water injection from a shallow well in field conditions in the case of a heterogeneous subsurface. We used the same equipment as in Experiment #1 and processed the data with a trend removal algorithm, picking the amplitude from 24 receiver channels just after the water injection. The amplitude of the electric signals changed from the background level indicating that a volume of water was indeed flowing inside the well into the surrounding soil and then along the well. We used a least-square inversion algorithm to invert a snapshot of the electrical potential data at the injection time to localize the source of the self-potential signals. The inversion results show positive potential anomalies in the vicinity of the well. For both experiments, forward numerical simulations of the problem using a finite element package were performed in order to assess the underlying physics of the causative source of the

  1. Non-invasive Technology to Study Local Passivity Breakdown of Metal Alloys in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alan M. Shipley

    2005-03-09

    Little is known about the basic mechanisms of passive oxide breakdown, repair, and localized corrosion of metals. A non-invasive instrument and methods have been developed to study local events and mechanisms that initiate passivity breakdown and subsequent corrosion of metals in aqueous media. The ''difference viewer imaging technique'' (DVIT) is a rapid, real time, non-invasive assay to study metal surfaces in corrosive solutions. It has a spatial resolution of less than 10.0 ?m (1cm x 1cm sample, 1000 x 1000 pixel CCD) to observe initial corrosion processes of the order of seconds. DVIT is a software-controlled video microscopy system and methods to collect and analyze pixel changes in video images. These images are recorded from a digital CCD video camera and frame grabber package using visible light for illumination. The DVIT system detects changes in video images that represent initial corrosive events that lead to passivity breakdown and re-passivation on metal surfaces in situ. This visual technique is easy to use and apply. It compliments other metal surface measurement techniques and can be used simultaneously with them. DVIT has proven to be more sensitive in detecting changes than scanning microelectrode techniques. DVIT is also much easier than other methods to apply and operate. It has the further advantage of providing a real time image of the entire metal surface under study instead of waiting for a microelectrode to scan a number of data points over a sample then plot the results. This project has fulfilled all specifications as outlined in the Department of Energy solicitation responsible for this grant application and award and exceeded a number of the specifications. Applicable Electronics, Inc. now has a marketable instrument and software package available for sale now. Further development of the system will be ongoing as driven by customer needs and discoveries. This technology has immediate applications in corrosion labs to further study

  2. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  3. Is Children's Acquisition of the Passive a Staged Process? Evidence from Six- and Nine-Year-Olds' Production of Passives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messenger, Katherine; Branigan, Holly P.; McLean, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    We report a syntactic priming experiment that examined whether children's acquisition of the passive is a staged process, with acquisition of constituent structure preceding acquisition of thematic role mappings. Six-year-olds and nine-year-olds described transitive actions after hearing active and passive prime descriptions involving the same or…

  4. Local-Level Prognostics Health Management Systems Framework for Passive AdvSMR Components. Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roy, Surajit; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Jones, Anthony M.; Deibler, John E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2014-09-12

    This report describes research results to date in support of the integration and demonstration of diagnostics technologies for prototypical AdvSMR passive components (to establish condition indices for monitoring) with model-based prognostics methods. The focus of the PHM methodology and algorithm development in this study is at the localized scale. Multiple localized measurements of material condition (using advanced nondestructive measurement methods), along with available measurements of the stressor environment, enhance the performance of localized diagnostics and prognostics of passive AdvSMR components and systems.

  5. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  6. Delivery of video-on-demand services using local storages within passive optical networks.

    PubMed

    Abeywickrama, Sandu; Wong, Elaine

    2013-01-28

    At present, distributed storage systems have been widely studied to alleviate Internet traffic build-up caused by high-bandwidth, on-demand applications. Distributed storage arrays located locally within the passive optical network were previously proposed to deliver Video-on-Demand services. As an added feature, a popularity-aware caching algorithm was also proposed to dynamically maintain the most popular videos in the storage arrays of such local storages. In this paper, we present a new dynamic bandwidth allocation algorithm to improve Video-on-Demand services over passive optical networks using local storages. The algorithm exploits the use of standard control packets to reduce the time taken for the initial request communication between the customer and the central office, and to maintain the set of popular movies in the local storage. We conduct packet level simulations to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality-of-Service attributes between two passive optical networks, namely the conventional passive optical network and one that is equipped with a local storage. Results from our analysis highlight that strategic placement of a local storage inside the network enables the services to be delivered with improved Quality-of-Service to the customer. We further formulate power consumption models of both architectures to examine the trade-off between enhanced Quality-of-Service performance versus the increased power requirement from implementing a local storage within the network. PMID:23389189

  7. Surface passivation process of compound semiconductor material using UV photosulfidation

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method for passivating compound semiconductor surfaces by photolytically disrupting molecular sulfur vapor with ultraviolet radiation to form reactive sulfur which then reacts with and passivates the surface of compound semiconductors.

  8. Passive acoustic source localization using sources of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Christopher M A; Sarkar, J; Hodgkiss, W S; Kuperman, W A; Sabra, K G

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using data derived replicas from ships of opportunity for implementing matched field processing is demonstrated. The Automatic Identification System (AIS) is used to provide the library coordinates for the replica library and a correlation based processing procedure is used to overcome the impediment that the replica library is constructed from sources with different spectra and will further be used to locate another source with its own unique spectral structure. The method is illustrated with simulation and then verified using acoustic data from a 2009 experiment for which AIS information was retrieved from the United States Coast Guard Navigation Center Nationwide AIS database. PMID:26233061

  9. Apparatus and process for passivating an SRF cavity

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Wallace, John P

    2014-12-02

    An apparatus and process for the production of a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided. The apparatus comprises a first chamber positioned within a second chamber, an RF generator and vacuum pumping systems. The process comprises placing the niobium cavity in a first chamber of the apparatus; thermally treating the cavity by high temperature in the first chamber while maintaining high vacuum in the first and second chambers; and applying a passivating thin film layer to a surface of the cavity in the presence of a gaseous mixture and an RF field. Further a niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients produced by the method of the invention is provided.

  10. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The time-averaged indirect aerosol effects within 200 km downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002-2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2-8 μm at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Wm-2 at distances of 150-400 km from the volcano, with much greater local (< 80 km) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to

  11. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S.K.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions, especially from passive degassing and minor explosions, is a source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect effects. Observations of the impact of volcanic aerosol on clouds contribute to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. We present systematic measurements over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands in regions of low present-day aerosol burden. The timeaveraged indirect aerosol effects within 200 kilometers downwind of island volcanoes are observed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2002-2013) and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR, 2002- 2008) data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (la Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that upwind and downwind retrievals can be compared. The emissions from all three volcanoes - including those from passive degassing, Strombolian activity and minor explosions - lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference ranging from 2 - 8 micrometers at the different volcanoes in different seasons. Estimations of the difference in Top of Atmosphere upward Short Wave flux upwind and downwind of the active volcanoes from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) suggest a downwind elevation of between 10 and 45 Watts per square meter at distances of 150 - 400 kilometers from the volcano, with much greater local (less than 80 kilometers) effects. Comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing or erupting volcanoes suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted

  12. Fabrication of multilayer passive electric components using inkjet printing and low temperature laser processing on polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Chung, Jaewon; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-02-01

    The low temperature fabrication of passive electrical components (conductor, capacitor) on the flexible polymer substrate is presented in this paper. A drop-on-demand (DOD) ink-jetting system was used to print gold nano-particles suspended in Alpha-Terpineol solvent and PVP in PGMEA solvent to fabricate passive electrical components on flexible polymer substrate. Short pulsed laser ablation enabled finer electrical components to overcome limitation of inkjet process. Continuous Argon ion laser was irradiated locally to evaporate carrier solvent as well as to sinter gold nano-particles. In addition, a self alignment technique for PVP layer was demonstrated taking advantage of the deliberate modification of surface wetting characteristics. Finally, a new selective ablation of multilayered gold nanoparticle film was demonstrated using the ablation threshold difference for sintered and non sintered gold nanoparticles.

  13. Sound localization with communications headsets: comparison of passive and active systems.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M; Tsang, Suzanne; Boyne, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional hearing protectors interfere with sound localization. This research examines possible benefits from advanced communications devices. Horizontal plane sound localization was compared in normal-hearing males with the ears unoccluded and fitted with Peltor H10A passive attenuation earmuffs, Racal Slimgard II communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO TM communications earplugs in off (passive attenuation) and push-to-talk (PTT) modes. Localization was assessed using an array of eight loudspeakers, two in each spatial quadrant. The stimulus was 75 dB SPL, 300-ms broadband noise. One block of 120 forced-choice loudspeaker identification trials was presented in each condition. Subjects responded using a laptop response box with a set of eight microswitches in the same configuration as the speaker array. A repeated measures ANOVA was applied to the dataset. The results reveal that the overall percent correct response was highest in the unoccluded condition (94%). A significant reduction of 24% was observed for the communications devices in TTC and PTT modes and a reduction of 49% for the passive muff and plug and muff with ANR. Disruption in performance was due to an increase in front-back reversal errors for mirror image spatial positions. The results support the conclusion that communications devices with advanced technologies are less detrimental to directional hearing than conventional, passive, limited amplification and ANR devices. PMID:18087116

  14. Evolving uses of passive seismic arrays from continental to local scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, B.

    2014-12-01

    Portable passive seismic surveys are generally used to sample scales and locations that are not practical with long-term observatories, but are fundamental to studying Earth systems. The breadth of uses and designs of portable passive surveys is expanding rapidly as result of advances in instrumentation and analysis. Examples from recent passive surveys will be used illustrate how they are bringing new constraint to systems spanning continental to local scales. At continental scale EarthScope's USArray is providing a view of the transition zone between the upper and lower mantle that facilitates integration of seismology, geodynamics, and mineral physics. Recently recognized correlations between mantle flow and abrupt velocity decreases in the top of the lower mantle are consistent with laboratory constraints on the consequences of volatile cycling in the deep Earth. Arrays with similar numbers of seismometers (~103) are also being used in a passive mode on much smaller scales. The Long Beach 3D survey conducted by NodalSeismic in 2011 covered only 7x10 km in southern California with about 5,000 seismometers. The instruments were optimized for recording high frequencies (>10 Hz), but they also successfully recorded local and teleseismic earthquakes. Delay time and amplitude maps for earthquake body-waves revealed coherent structural variations at scales as small as about 400 m. Such dense sampling of teleseismic earthquake wave fields yielded new constraint on localized deep crustal deformation underlying the tectonic boundary between mainland California and the rifted Inner Continental Borderland. The utility of passive data from the Long Beach 3D survey partly motivated a recent deployment of more than 900 exploration industry seismometers to record continuously for 2 weeks at Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington in 2014. New observations of the >50 local earthquakes recorded within the Mt. St. Helens array will also be presented.

  15. Experimental study of passive defect localization in plates using ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Chehami, Lynda; de Rosny, Julien; Prada, Claire; Moulin, Emmanuel; Assaad, Jamal

    2015-08-01

    Passive listening methodology has been shown to be a practical and effective method for passive structural health monitoring. In this work, this approach is applied experimentally to monitor the occurrence of defects in thin aluminum plates. A correlation matrix is estimated from noise vibrations recorded on a transducer array. A defect is localized by applying a beamforming algorithm to the difference between the correlation matrices obtained with and without the defect. We successfully detect defects for different kinds of noise sources. Moreover, we show that this technique is robust to detect massive inclusions, holes, and cracks. With a vibrometer, we observe that the fidelity of the estimated transient responses strongly depends on the number of uncorrelated noise sources. Finally, we show that the defect is successfully localized even if the noise source distribution is not uniform, provided that it remains spatially stationary between the states with and without defect. A simple theoretical framework is proposed to interpret these results. PMID:26276962

  16. Physical processes impacting passive particle dispersal in the Upper Florida Keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, Jerome; Haus, Brian K.; Melo, Nelson; Mooers, Christopher N. K.

    2008-06-01

    Physical processes affecting the dispersion of passive particles (e.g., coral larvae, pollutants) in the Upper Florida Keys are investigated through in situ observations (acoustic Doppler current profilers and surface drifters) and numerical ocean circulation modeling (horizontal resolution: 800 m, vertical resolution: 0.1-1 m). During the study period in August 2006 (set to coincide with an annual coral spawning event), Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the reef tract indicate that alongshelf advection was mainly poleward and due to the subtidal flow of the Florida Current, while cross-shelf advection was mainly onshore and due to wind-driven currents. Tidal currents resulted in predominantly alongshelf displacements, but did not contribute significantly to net passive particle transport on a weekly timescale. Typical advection distances were of the order of 10 to 50 km for pelagic durations of 1 week, with significant variability linked to geographical location. In contrast, the direction of transport from the offshore reefs remained essentially constant (i.e., potential dispersion pathways were limited). In addition, Lagrangian trajectories and progressive vector diagrams in the vicinity of the reef tract indicate that alongshelf variations in the cross-shelf velocity gradient associated with the FC are relatively weak on an alongshore scale of ca. 50 km. For August 2006, the highest particle concentrations typically occur inshore of the reef tract, thereby suggesting that onshore transport associated with wind-driven currents contributes significantly to the local retention of passive organisms (and other tracers) in the Upper Florida Keys. Overall, the results illustrate the necessity of conducting targeted in situ observations and numerical model predictions to quantify the physical processes affecting reef-scale advection, especially in an effort to understand local retention and dispersion mechanisms for larval marine organisms.

  17. Effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Oshiro, Misaki; Namba, Mari; Shibasaki, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of passive heat stress on human somatosensory processing recorded by somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). Fifteen healthy subjects received a median nerve stimulation at the left wrist under two thermal conditions: Heat Stress and normothermic Time Control. The latencies and amplitudes of P14, N20, P25, N35, P45, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, P22, and N30 at Fz were evaluated. Under the Heat Stress condition, SEPs were recorded at normothermic baseline (1st), early in heat stress (2nd), when esophageal temperature had increased by ~1.0°C (3rd) and ~2.0°C (4th), and after heat stress (5th). In the Time Control condition, SEPs were measured at the same time intervals as those in the Heat Stress condition. The peak latencies and amplitudes of SEPs did not change early in heat stress. However, the latencies of P14, N20, and N60 at C4' and P14, N18, and P22 at Fz were significantly shorter in the 4th session than in the 1st session. Furthermore, the peak amplitudes of P25 and N60 at C4', and P22 and N30 at Fz decreased with increases in body temperature. On the other hand, under the Time Control condition, no significant differences were observed in the amplitudes or latencies of any component of SEPs. These results suggested that the conduction velocity of the ascending somatosensory input was accelerated by increases in body temperature, and hyperthermia impaired the neural activity of cortical somatosensory processing. PMID:26468258

  18. Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.

    2001-04-10

    A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

  19. Passivation of InGaAs surfaces with an integrated process including an ammonia DECR plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lescaut, B.; Nissim, Y.I.; Bresse, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Stable and optimum characteristics of micro-optoelectronic devices and circuits require the passivation of the free surface of the III-V materials. An integrated process using a combination of surface cleaning and photochemical dielectric encapsulation is proposed for passivation. The passivation of InGaAs with a short ammonia plasma cleaning has been obtained. The treated surface has been protected with a photochemical dielectric encapsulation. MIS structures fabricated on treated InGaAs surfaces have shown a low density of interface traps and a small hysteresis. This process is an integration of two cold processes that enable its use at the end of the process fabrication of circuits.

  20. Adaptive passive fathometer processing using ambient noise received by vertical nested array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghun; Cho, Sungho; Choi, Jee Woong

    2015-07-01

    A passive fathometer technique utilizes surface-generated ambient noise received by a vertical line array as a sound source to estimate the depths of water-sediment interface and sub-bottom layers. Ambient noise was measured using a 24-channel, vertical nested line array consisting of four sub-arrays, in shallow water off the eastern coast of Korea. In this paper, nested array processing is applied to passive fathometer technique to improve the performance. Passive fathometer processing is performed for each sub-array, and the results are then combined to form a passive fathometer output for broadband ambient noise. Three types of beamforming technique, including conventional and two adaptive methods, are used in passive fathometer processing. The results are compared to the depths of water-sediment interface measured by an echo sounder. As a result, it is found that the adaptive methods have better performance than the conventional method.

  1. Effect of excimer laser annealing on a-InGaZnO thin-film transistors passivated by solution-processed hybrid passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermundo, Juan Paolo; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Fujii, Mami N.; Nonaka, Toshiaki; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of excimer laser annealing (ELA) as a low temperature annealing alternative to anneal amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) passivated by a solution-processed hybrid passivation layer. Usually, a-IGZO is annealed using thermal annealing at high temperatures of up to 400 °C. As an alternative to high temperature thermal annealing, two types of ELA, XeCl (308 nm) and KrF (248 nm) ELA, are introduced. Both ELA types enhanced the electrical characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs leading to a mobility improvement of ~13 cm2 V-1 s-1 and small threshold voltage which varied from ~0-3 V. Furthermore, two-dimensional heat simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics was used to identify possible degradation sites, analyse laser heat localization, and confirm that the substrate temperature is below 50 °C. The two-dimensional heat simulation showed that the substrate temperature remained at very low temperatures, less than 30 °C, during ELA. This implies that any flexible material can be used as the substrate. These results demonstrate the large potential of ELA as a low temperature annealing alternative for already-passivated a-IGZO TFTs.

  2. 43 CFR 2806.43 - How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... subpart to determine rent. See Forest Service regulations at 36 CFR chapter II. (b) For the purposes of... any BLM state or field office in the region in question. For passive reflectors and local exchange... electric power; and (2) Local exchange network means radio service which provides basic telephone...

  3. 43 CFR 2806.43 - How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... subpart to determine rent. See Forest Service regulations at 36 CFR chapter II. (b) For the purposes of... reflectors and local exchange networks? 2806.43 Section 2806.43 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating...-Of-Way § 2806.43 How does BLM calculate rent for passive reflectors and local exchange networks?...

  4. Passive acoustic mapping of magnetic microbubbles for cavitation enhancement and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crake, Calum; de Saint Victor, Marie; Owen, Joshua; Coviello, Christian; Collin, Jamie; Coussios, Constantin-C.; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic targeting of microbubbles functionalized with superparamagnetic nanoparticles has been demonstrated previously for diagnostic (B-mode) ultrasound imaging and shown to enhance gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. In the present work, passive acoustic mapping (PAM) was used to investigate the potential of magnetic microbubbles for localizing and enhancing cavitation activity under focused ultrasound. Suspensions of magnetic microbubbles consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), air and 10 nm diameter iron oxide nanoparticles were injected into a tissue mimicking phantom at different flow velocities (from 0 to 50 mm s-1) with or without an applied magnetic field. Microbubbles were excited using a 500 kHz single element focused transducer at peak negative focal pressures of 0.1-1.0 MPa, while a 64 channel imaging array passively recorded their acoustic emissions. Magnetic localization of microbubble-induced cavitation activity was successfully achieved and could be resolved using PAM as a shift in the spatial distribution and increases in the intensity and sustainability of cavitation activity under the influence of a magnetic field. Under flow conditions at shear rates of up to 100 s-1 targeting efficacy was maintained. Application of a magnetic field was shown to consistently increase the energy of cavitation emissions by a factor of 2-5 times over the duration of exposures compared to the case without targeting, which was approximately equivalent to doubling the injected microbubble dose. These results suggest that magnetic targeting could be used to localize and increase the concentration of microbubbles and hence cavitation activity for a given systemic dose of microbubbles or ultrasound intensity.

  5. Fabrication process of carbon nanotube field effect transistors using atomic layer deposition passivation for biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Okochi, Mina; Honda, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    Fabrication process of the carbon nanotube (CNT) field effect transistors (FETs) for biosensors was studied. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 was applied to the deposition of the passivation/gate insulator film. The CNT-FETs did not show the drain current degradation after ALD passivation even though the passivation by Si3N4 deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) resulted in a significant drain current decrease. This indicates the advantage of the present ALD technique in terms of the damage suppression. The biosensing operation was confirmed using thus fabricated CNT-FETs. PMID:20355371

  6. Passive Sensor Integration for Vehicle Self-Localization in Urban Traffic Environment †

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanlei; Hsu, Li-Ta; Kamijo, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes an accurate vehicular positioning system which can achieve lane-level performance in urban canyons. Multiple passive sensors, which include Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers, onboard cameras and inertial sensors, are integrated in the proposed system. As the main source for the localization, the GNSS technique suffers from Non-Line-Of-Sight (NLOS) propagation and multipath effects in urban canyons. This paper proposes to employ a novel GNSS positioning technique in the integration. The employed GNSS technique reduces the multipath and NLOS effects by using the 3D building map. In addition, the inertial sensor can describe the vehicle motion, but has a drift problem as time increases. This paper develops vision-based lane detection, which is firstly used for controlling the drift of the inertial sensor. Moreover, the lane keeping and changing behaviors are extracted from the lane detection function, and further reduce the lateral positioning error in the proposed localization system. We evaluate the integrated localization system in the challenging city urban scenario. The experiments demonstrate the proposed method has sub-meter accuracy with respect to mean positioning error. PMID:26633420

  7. Starting a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program: an energy planning sourcebook

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, V; Mathews, R

    1982-02-01

    A city planner or a neighborhood activist may wish to initiate a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program but may not have previous experience in doing so. This sourcebook is designed to assist interested individuals with their energy planning efforts, from determining retrofit potential, to financing and implementing the program. An approach or methodology is provided which can be applied to determine retrofit potential in single-family residences, mobile homes, multifamily residences, and nonresidential buildings. Case studies in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are given as examples. Guidelines are provided for evaluating the economic benefits of a retrofit program through benefit-cost analysis and economic base studies at the city and neighborhood levels. Also included are approaches to community outreach, detailing how to get started, how to gain local support, and examples of successful programs throughout the US. The need for financing, the development of a local strategy, public and private financing techniques, and community energy service organizations are examined. In addition to the Albuquerque case studies, a brief technology characterization, heat-loss calculations, economic tools, and a list of resources are appended.

  8. Passive Sensor Integration for Vehicle Self-Localization in Urban Traffic Environment.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanlei; Hsu, Li-Ta; Kamijo, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes an accurate vehicular positioning system which can achieve lane-level performance in urban canyons. Multiple passive sensors, which include Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers, onboard cameras and inertial sensors, are integrated in the proposed system. As the main source for the localization, the GNSS technique suffers from Non-Line-Of-Sight (NLOS) propagation and multipath effects in urban canyons. This paper proposes to employ a novel GNSS positioning technique in the integration. The employed GNSS technique reduces the multipath and NLOS effects by using the 3D building map. In addition, the inertial sensor can describe the vehicle motion, but has a drift problem as time increases. This paper develops vision-based lane detection, which is firstly used for controlling the drift of the inertial sensor. Moreover, the lane keeping and changing behaviors are extracted from the lane detection function, and further reduce the lateral positioning error in the proposed localization system. We evaluate the integrated localization system in the challenging city urban scenario. The experiments demonstrate the proposed method has sub-meter accuracy with respect to mean positioning error. PMID:26633420

  9. Automatic post processing algorithm for passive seismic monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepeina, K.

    2014-05-01

    The problem of monitoring of different types of seismic events - geoacoustic precursors of earthquakes, industrial and field explosions, places fragments fall of separating parts of rockets-carriers, etc. is one of the key in the modern ecology of the environment. The peculiarity of this kind of monitoring is that it is mobile seismic groups, which should be based in the proposed area of occurrence of events. One of the most important steps for solving the problems connected with the detection and identification of recorded data from passive sensors in mobile seismic array (MSA). The task of determining the nature of the source and its' coordinates lies in the basis of direction, referred to as the geoacoustic location. Using a new approach (not by location but by neural classification of waveform "portraits") usability of algorithm which based on quantitative parameters of signal will be demonstrated.

  10. Passivation Behavior of Ultrafine-Grained Pure Copper Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding (ARB) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, passivation behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) pure copper fabricated by ARB process in 0.01 M borax solution has been investigated. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations revealed that with increasing the number of ARB passes, the grain size of specimens decrease. Also, TEM images showed that UFGs with average size of below 100 nm appeared after 7 passes of ARB. To investigate the passivation behavior of the specimens, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky analysis was carried out. For this purpose, three potentials within the passive region were chosen for potentiostatic passive film growth. EIS results showed that both passive film and charge-transfer resistance increases with increasing the number of ARB passes. Moreover, Mott-Schottky analysis revealed that with increasing the number of ARB passes, the acceptor density of the passive films decreased. In conclusion, increasing the number of ARB passes offers better conditions for forming the passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective films.

  11. Combining Radiography and Passive Measurements for Radiological Threat Localization in Cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Sean M.; Wittman, Richard A.

    2015-10-01

    Detecting shielded special nuclear material (SNM) in a cargo container is a difficult problem, since shielding reduces the amount of radiation escaping the container. Radiography provides information that is complementary to that provided by passive gamma-ray detection systems: while not directly sensitive to radiological materials, radiography can reveal highly shielded regions that may mask a passive radiological signal. Combining these measurements has the potential to improve SNM detection, either through improved sensitivity or by providing a solution to the inverse problem to estimate source properties (strength and location). We present a data-fusion method that uses a radiograph to provide an estimate of the radiation-transport environment for gamma rays from potential sources. This approach makes quantitative use of radiographic images without relying on image interpretation, and results in a probabilistic description of likely source locations and strengths. We present results for this method for a modeled test case of a cargo container passing through a plastic-scintillator-based radiation portal monitor and a transmission-radiography system. We find that a radiograph-based inversion scheme allows for localization of a low-noise source placed randomly within the test container to within 40 cm, compared to 70 cm for triangulation alone, while strength estimation accuracy is improved by a factor of six. Improvements are seen in regions of both high and low shielding, but are most pronounced in highly shielded regions. The approach proposed here combines transmission and emission data in a manner that has not been explored in the cargo-screening literature, advancing the ability to accurately describe a hidden source based on currently-available instrumentation.

  12. DHOFAR Seismic Experiment: First results to understand the breakup processes in a passive margin context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, C.; Leroy, S.; D'Acremont, E.; Pointu, A.; Ebinger, C.; Brisbourne, A.; Denton, P.; Al-Lazki, A.; Al-Azri, H.; Bin Monshir Bahlaf, S.; Brunet, C.; Famin, V.; Labrousse, L.

    2004-12-01

    The process of strain localisation preceding the onset of seafloor spreading is still poorly understood, though extensively studied. The reason is the differences in lithospheric properties, proximity to hot spot(s) and melt generation and extraction that lead to a variety of structural styles with major differences. The eastern Gulf of Aden represents a natural laboratory to study passive continental margins for many reasons: post-rift sedimentary strata are relatively thin, both onshore and nearshore structures are well-exposed, and conjugate margins can be precisely reconstructed. A first cruise (ENCENS-SHEBA), in 2000, has established the structural and geophysical framework using bathymetric swath mapping and underway geophysics. Later on, the Dhofar seismic experiment consisted in the deployment of a network of 11 broadband seismic stations from March 2003 to March 2004 on the northern margin, in the Dhofar area, southern Oman. This experiment was dedicated to the detailed study of the crust and upper mantle beneath the northern passive margin. CMG40TD 3-components seismometers from SEIS-UK network were used. We have recorded hundreds of teleseismic events with a good azimuthal coverage. Three main studies are then attempted. First, a teleseismic image of the first 200 km depth will be established using the P- and PKP-phases. This will allow a 3D representation of crustal and upper mantle velocity structures. We present here the preliminary results from the study of the traveltime residuals. The image resolution shall be enhanced by combining gravity data. Second, a receiver function analysis will locally determine the depth of the main interfaces (eg, Moho boundary). Finally, events recorded within the 1000-6000 km distance range will improve the regional S-wave velocity structure in this area and will help to locate the main regional wide structures related to this extended area.

  13. Petrology of exhumed mantle rocks at passive margins: ancient lithosphere and rejuvenation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müntener, Othmar; McCarthy, Anders; Picazo, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    Mantle peridotites from ocean-continent transition zones (OCT's) and ultraslow spreading ridges question the commonly held assumption of a simple link between mantle melting and MORB. 'Ancient' and partly refertilized mantle in rifts and ridges illustrates the distribution of the scale of chemical and isotopic upper mantle heterogeneity even on a local scale. Field data and petrology demonstrates that ancient, thermally undisturbed, pyroxenite-veined subcontinental mantle blobs formed parts of the ocean floor next to thinned continental crust. These heterogeneities might comprise an (ancient?) subduction component. Upwelling of partial melts that enter the conductive lithospheric mantle inevitably leads to freezing of the melt and refertilization of the lithosphere and this process might well be at the origin of the difference between magma-poor and volcanic margins. Similar heterogeneity might be created in the oceanic lithosphere, in particular at slow to ultra-slow spreading ridges where the thermal boundary layer (TBM) is thick and may be veined with metasomatic assemblages that might be recycled in subduction zones. In this presentation, we provide a summary of mantle compositions from the European realm to show that inherited mantle signatures from previous orogenies play a key role on the evolution of rift systems and on the chemical diversity of peridotites exposed along passive margins and ultra-slow spreading ridges. Particularly striking is the abundance of plagioclase peridotites in the Alpine ophiolites that are interpreted as recorders of refertilization processes related to thinning and exhumation of mantle lithosphere. Another important result over the last 20 years was the discovery of extremely refractory Nd-isotopic compositions with highly radiogenic 147Sm/144Nd which indicates that partial melting processes and Jurassic magmatism in the Western Thetys are decoupled. Although the isotopic variability might be explained by mantle heterogeneities

  14. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive degassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important for assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kīlauea (Hawai'i), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius of 4-8 μm at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may also capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  15. Systematic satellite observations of the impact of aerosols from passive volcanic degassing on local cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Mather, T. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Carboni, E.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol indirect radiative effects - the alteration of cloud properties by atmospheric aerosol - have a large, but relatively uncertain impact on the Earth's radiative balance. Quantification of volcanic aerosol indirect effects contributes to our understanding of both present-day atmospheric properties and of the pre-industrial baseline necessary to assess aerosol radiative forcing. The impact of emissions from passively degassing volcanoes and minor volcanic explosions are particularly poorly constrained. We present systematic satellite measurements of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect over several years at multiple active and inactive volcanic islands (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, 2000-2013 and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer 2002-2008). Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea, Yasur and Piton de la Fournaise are rotated about the volcanic vent to be parallel to wind direction, so that average upwind and downwind values can be estimated. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth (<0.1) and decreased cloud droplet effective radius (<8 μm) downwind of the volcanoes. Furthermore, Top of Atmosphere Short Wave flux from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) show downwind perturbations ranging from 10 to 45 Wm-2 within 400 km of degassing volcanoes. Comparison of these observations to cloud properties at isolated islands without degassing volcanoes demonstrates that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. Our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the pre-industrial marine atmosphere.

  16. Systematic Satellite Observations of the Impact of Aerosols from Passive Volcanic Degassing on Local Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebmeier, S. K.; Sayer, A. M.; Grainger, R. G.; Mather, T. A.; Carboni, E.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of volcanic emissions is a significant source of uncertainty in estimations of aerosol indirect radiative forcing, especially with respect to emissions from passive de-gassing and minor explosions. Understanding the impact of volcanic emissions on indirect radiative forcing is important assessing present day atmospheric properties and also to define the pre-industrial baseline to assess anthropogenic perturbations. We present observations of the time-averaged indirect aerosol effect within 200 km downwind of isolated island volcanoes in regions of low present-day aerosol burden using MODIS and AATSR data. Retrievals of aerosol and cloud properties at Kilauea (Hawaii), Yasur (Vanuatu) and Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion) are rotated about the volcanic vent according to wind direction, so that retrievals downwind of the volcano can be averaged to improve signal to noise ratio. The emissions from all three volcanoes, including those from passive degassing, strombolian activity and minor explosions lead to measurably increased aerosol optical depth downwind of the active vent. Average cloud droplet effective radius is lower downwind of the volcano in all cases, with the peak difference in effective radius ranging from 48 microns at the different volcanoes. A comparison of these observations with cloud properties at isolated islands with no significant source of aerosol suggests that these patterns are not purely orographic in origin. This approach sets out a first step for the systematic measurement of the effects of present day low altitude volcanic emissions on cloud properties, and our observations of unpolluted, isolated marine settings may capture processes similar to those in the preindustrial marine atmosphere.

  17. An analytic overview of long range passive detection and localization in an inhomogeneous ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, D

    1991-07-01

    An analytic summary or overview of the problem of long range passive source detection and localization is presented. The principal aims are to provide an analytic basis for developing effective weak-signal detection and estimation algorithms and performance measures in a model-based approach, when the desired source (or sources) are not surely known to be present p(H{sub 1})<1, in a general ambient noise field due primarily to surface or near-surface noise mechanisms. In addition to threshold detection and estimation (when (pH{sub 1})<1: signal not surely present) with correlated space and time noise samples, procedures for modeling the random acoustic noise and signal fields are outlined, from the viewpoint of the ocean as an inhomogeneous acoustic waveguide, {nabla}c{ne}0, with boundaries, and arbitrary (near) surface distributions of noise sources. The latter are required to specify these otherwise canonical results to the present class of problems. The Report concludes with a short list of next steps, and references to pertinent supporting material.

  18. Passive localization of noise-producing targets using a compact volumetric array.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, John; Siderius, Martin; Nielsen, Peter L; Miller, James

    2014-07-01

    A technique is presented for passively localizing multiple noise-producing targets by cross-correlating the elevation beams of a compact volumetric array on separate bearings. A target's multipath structure inherently contains information about its range; however, unknown, random noise waveforms make time separation of individual arrivals difficult. Ocean ambient noise has previously been used to measure multipath delays to the seabed by cross-correlating the beams of a vertical line array [Siderius, Song, Gerstoft, Hodgkiss, Hursky, and Harrison, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 2193-2200 (2010)], but this methodology has not been applied to distant noise sources having non-vertical arrivals. The technique presented in this paper uses a compact volumetric array mounted to an autonomous underwater vehicle to measure the three-dimensional directionality and time delays of multipath arrivals, while adaptively rejecting clutter and multi-target interference. This is validated with experimental results in a shallow ocean environment in which a small workboat maneuvered in the vicinity. Short ranges could be estimated reliably using straight ray paths, but longer ranges required accounting for ray refraction. PMID:24993197

  19. On the Design of Passive Resonant Circuits to Measure Local Pulse Wave Velocity in a Stent.

    PubMed

    Schächtele, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    In-stent restenosis is a frequent complication after stent implantation. This article investigates the design of a passive sensor system to be integrated into a stent for the detection of an in-stent restenosis by measuring the local pulse wave velocity (PWV). The proposed system uses two resonant circuits consisting of a capacitive pressure sensor and a coil as transponders. The pressure sensors are located at the proximal and distal end of the stent. An alternating external magnetic field with a constant frequency is applied such that the resonance frequencies of the transponders cross the excitation frequency when the pulse wave passes. The time delay between the resonances at the transponders can be captured to obtain the PWV. A model for the measurement system and a correlation between transponder design parameters and minimal resolvable time delay are derived. This correlation is based on the criterion that the 3 dB bandwidth of the transponder resonances may not overlap in the measurement time interval. This correlation can be used to design and analyze a transponder system for the proposed measurement system. In an experiment, in which the pressure sensors have been emulated by varactor diodes, it could be shown that the model is valid and that the criterion is suitable. Finally, the relevant design parameters of the transponders have been identified and their limitations investigated. PMID:26800547

  20. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the Galeras volcano (Colombia) from passive local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos Alberto; Torres, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    A three-dimensional estimation of the Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structure at Galeras volcano was conducted by means of passive local earthquake tomography. 14,150 volcano-tectonic events recorded by 58 stations in the seismological network established for monitoring the volcanic activity by the Colombian Geological Survey - Pasto Volcano Observatory between the years 1989 and 2015, were inverted by using the LOTOS code. The seismic events are associated with shear-stress fractures in solid rock as a response to pressure induced by magma flow. Tomography resolution tests suggest a depth of imaging that yield 10 km from the summit of the main crater, illuminating a large portion of the volcanic structure and the interaction of tectonic features like the Buesaco and Silvia-Pijao faults. Full catalog tomographic inversion, that represents the stacked image of the volcanic structure or the most permanent features underneath the volcano, shows vertical structures aligned with seismicity beneath the main crater. We hypothesize that these structures correspond to a system of ducts or fractures through which magma and fluid phases flow up from deeper levels toward the top and related with the intersection of the surface traces of the Silvia-Pijao and Buesaco faults.

  1. Passive monitoring and localization of marine mammals in open ocean environments using widely spaced bottom mounted hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Susan; Moretti, David; Morrissey, Ronald; Dimarzio, Nancy

    2003-10-01

    The Marine Mammal Monitoring on Navy Ranges (M3R) project has developed a toolset for passive detection and localization of marine mammals using the existing infrastructure of Navy's undersea ranges. The Office of Naval Research funded the M3R project as part of the Navy's effort to determine the effects of acoustic and other emissions on marine mammals and threatened/endangered species. A necessary first step in this effort is the creation of a baseline of behavior, which requires long-term monitoring of marine mammals. Such monitoring, in turn, requires the ability to detect and localize the animals. This paper will present the passive acoustic monitoring and localization tools developed under M3R. It will also present results of the deployment of the M3R tools at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), Andros Island, Bahamas from June through November 2003. Finally, it will discuss current work to improve automated species classification.

  2. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  3. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  4. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  5. Structure Process, Weak Values and Local Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    We explain how weak values and the local momentum can be better understood in terms of Bohm's notion of structure process. The basic ideas of this approach can be expressed in a fully algebraic way, generalising Heisenberg's original matrix mechanics. This approach leads to questions that are now being experimentally investigated by our group at University College London.

  6. Target detection using microwave irradiances from natural sources: A passive, local and global surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-11-01

    Detection of metal objects on or near the Earth's surface was investigated using existing, passive, microwave sensors operating from Earth orbit. The range equations are derived from basic microwave principles and theories and the expressions are given explicitly to estimate the signal to noise ratio for detecting metal targets operating as bistatic scatterers. Actual measurements are made on a range of metal objects observed from orbit using existing passive microwave receiving systems. The details of the measurements and the results are tabulated and discussed. The advantages of a passive microwave sensor as it is applied to surveillance of metal objects as viewed from aerial platforms or from orbit, are examined.

  7. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies in local passive immunization against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J K; Hunjan, M; Smith, R; Lehner, T

    1989-01-01

    Local oral passive immunization in human subjects with a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) raised against the 185-kD antigen I/II from S. mutans significantly reduced or prevented oral colonization of an exogenous strain of the organism. In subjects sham-immunized with either saline or an unrelated MoAb, however, significantly greater proportions of S. mutans persisted for a longer duration than in those immunized with the specific anti-streptococcal MoAb. Recolonization of indigenous S. mutans after this organism was reduced to undetectable levels by an antimicrobial agent has also been completely prevented with specific MoAb. Indeed, S. mutans was not detected for a period of over 1 year, as compared with recolonization within 10-82 days in the control subjects. The specificity of MoAb in preventing colonization of the streptococci was studied with four MoAb. This revealed that: (1) the sub-class of antibody is not an essential factor, as both MoAb Guy's 1 and 13 prevented colonization, although Guy's 1 is an IgG2a and Guy's 13 is an IgG1 class of antibody; (2) serotype specificity is important, as MoAb Guy's 9, which only recognizes S. sobrinus (serotypes d and g), does not prevent colonisation by S. mutans (serotype c); (3) neither protein nor carbohydrate nature of the putative adhesin was a determining factor, because MoAb Guy's 1 recognizes a carbohydrate and Guy's 13 a protein determinant and both MoAb prevented adherence of S. mutans; and (4) epitope specificity appears to be the most important factor in preventing adherence of S. mutans, as MoAb Guy's 11 and 13 share the same serotype specificity and both recognize a protein determinant, yet only Guy's 13 prevents colonisation. The long duration of protection from re-colonization by indigenous S. mutans, lasting about 1 year after application of the specific MoAb was stopped, cannot be accounted for by functional MoAb remaining on the teeth. We suggest that initially the MoAb prevents colonization by S. mutans

  8. Deploying Monitoring Trails for Fault Localization in All- Optical Networks and Radio-over-Fiber Passive Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maamoun, Khaled Mohamed

    Fault localization is the process of realizing the true source of a failure from a set of collected failure notifications. Isolating failure recovery within the network optical domain is necessary to resolve alarm storm problems. The introduction of the monitoring trail (m-trail) has been proven to deliver better performance by employing monitoring resources in a form of optical trails - a monitoring framework that generalizes all the previously reported counterparts. In this dissertation, the m-trail design is explored and a focus is given to the analysis on using m-trails with established lightpaths to achieve fault localization. This process saves network resources by reducing the number of the m-trails required for fault localization and therefore the number of wavelengths used in the network. A novel approach based on Geographic Midpoint Technique, an adapted version of the Chinese Postman's Problem (CPP) solution and an adapted version of the Traveling Salesman's Problem (TSP) solution algorithms is introduced. The desirable features of network architectures and the enabling of innovative technologies for delivering future millimeter-waveband (mm-WB) Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) systems for wireless services integrated in a Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) is proposed in this dissertation. For the conceptual illustration, a DWDM RoF system with channel spacing of 12.5 GHz is considered. The mm-WB Radio Frequency (RF) signal is obtained at each Optical Network Unit (ONU) by simultaneously using optical heterodyning photo detection between two optical carriers. The generated RF modulated signal has a frequency of 12.5 GHz. This RoF system is easy, cost-effective, resistant to laser phase noise and also reduces maintenance needs, in principle. A revision of related RoF network proposals and experiments is also included. A number of models for Passive Optical Networks (PON)/ RoF-PON that combine both innovative and existing ideas along with a number of

  9. Children’s assignment of grammatical roles in the online processing of Mandarin passive sentences

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi Ting; Zheng, Xiaobei; Meng, Xiangzhi; Snedeker, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Children’s difficulty understanding passives in English has been attributed to the syntactic complexity, overall frequency, cue reliability, and/or incremental processing of this construction. To understand the role of these factors, we used the visual-world paradigm to examine comprehension in Mandarin Chinese where passives are infrequent but signaled by a highly valid marker (BEI). Eye-movements during sentences indicated that these markers triggered incremental role assignments in adults and 5-year-olds. Actions after sentences indicated that passives were often misinterpreted as actives when markers appeared after the referential noun (“Seal BEI it eat” → The seal is eaten by it). However, they were more likely to be interpreted correctly when markers appeared before (“It BEI seal eat” → It is eaten by the seal). The actions and the eye-movements suggest that for both adults and children, interpretations of passive are easier when they do not require revision of an earlier role assignment. PMID:24376303

  10. Performance Bounds on the Passive Localization of a Moving Source for Ocean Acoustics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hee Chun

    Matched field processing for locating a point acoustic source in the ocean using a vertical array is extended to treat a moving source problem. The extension involves both temporally nonstationary and spatially inhomogeneous nature of the sound field generated by a time-harmonic point source moving uniformly in a stratified oceanic waveguide. Using normal mode description of the sound field, we focused on the effect of source motion on matched field processing. An optimum receiver based on maximum likelihood method is developed in the presence of spatially and temporally white noise. We used the generalized ambiguity function (GAF) to analyze problems of accuracy, ambiguity, and resolution. The principal result is the demonstration that a moving source problem can be treated as a stationary source problem if the source travel distance (uncompensated speed x time window) is less than half the wavelength of trapped modes. Also a closed-form expression for the optimum potential resolution is derived based on the Cramer-Rao bound. The lower bound provides physical insight of how each mode contributes to the localization process, and can be easily evaluated for a wide range of source positions in any sound channel using sound channel eigenfunctions, eigenvalues, and the number of modes involved. Simulations of GAF and the bounds for Arctic environment illustrate the coupling of ocean environment to the localization performance. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  11. Lexically Specific Knowledge and Individual Differences in Adult Native Speakers' Processing of the English Passive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Street, James A.; Dabrowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    This article provides experimental evidence for the role of lexically specific representations in the processing of passive sentences and considerable education-related differences in comprehension of the passive construction. The experiment measured response time and decision accuracy of participants with high and low academic attainment using an…

  12. Temperature resolution enhancing of commercially available THz passive cameras due to computer processing of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Kuchik, Igor E.

    2014-06-01

    As it is well-known, application of the passive THz camera for the security problems is very promising way. It allows seeing concealed object without contact with a person and this camera is non-dangerous for a person. Efficiency of using the passive THz camera depends on its temperature resolution. This characteristic specifies possibilities of the detection of concealed object: minimal size of the object, maximal distance of the detection, image detail. One of probable ways for a quality image enhancing consists in computer processing of image. Using computer processing of the THz image of objects concealed on the human body, one may improve it many times. Consequently, the instrumental resolution of such device may be increased without any additional engineering efforts. We demonstrate new possibilities for seeing the clothes details, which raw images, produced by the THz cameras, do not allow to see. We achieve good quality of the image due to applying various spatial filters with the aim to demonstrate independence of processed images on math operations. This result demonstrates a feasibility of objects seeing. We consider images produced by THz passive cameras manufactured by Microsemi Corp., and ThruVision Corp., and Capital Normal University (Beijing, China).

  13. Advanced information processing system: Local system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Alger, Linda; Whittredge, Roy; Stasiowski, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a multi-computer architecture composed of hardware and software building blocks that can be configured to meet a broad range of application requirements. The hardware building blocks are fault-tolerant, general-purpose computers, fault-and damage-tolerant networks (both computer and input/output), and interfaces between the networks and the computers. The software building blocks are the major software functions: local system services, input/output, system services, inter-computer system services, and the system manager. The foundation of the local system services is an operating system with the functions required for a traditional real-time multi-tasking computer, such as task scheduling, inter-task communication, memory management, interrupt handling, and time maintenance. Resting on this foundation are the redundancy management functions necessary in a redundant computer and the status reporting functions required for an operator interface. The functional requirements, functional design and detailed specifications for all the local system services are documented.

  14. Application of a passive electrochemical noise technique to localized corrosion of candidate radioactive waste container materials

    SciTech Connect

    Korzan, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    One of the key engineered barriers in the design of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is the waste canister that encapsulates the spent fuel elements. Current candidate metals for the canisters to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain include cast iron, carbon steel, Incoloy 825 and titanium code-12. This project was designed to evaluate passive electrochemical noise techniques for measuring pitting and corrosion characteristics of candidate materials under prototypical repository conditions. Experimental techniques were also developed and optimized for measurements in a radiation environment. These techniques provide a new method for understanding material response to environmental effects (i.e., gamma radiation, temperature, solution chemistry) through the measurement of electrochemical noise generated during the corrosion of the metal surface. In addition, because of the passive nature of the measurement the technique could offer a means of in-situ monitoring of barrier performance.

  15. Competition and cooperation between active intra-network and passive extra-network transport processes

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Dan; Zochowski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Many networks are embedded in physical space and often interact with it. This interaction can be exemplified through constraints exerted on network topology, or through interactions of processes defined on a network with those that are linked to the space that the network is embedded within, leading to complex dynamics. Here we discuss an example of such an interaction in which a signaling agent is actively transported through the network edges and, at the same time, spreads passively through space due to diffusion. We show that these two processes cooperate or compete depending on the network topology leading to complex dynamics. PMID:24920178

  16. Electrochemical and Passive Behaviors of Pure Copper Fabricated by Accumulative Roll-Bonding (ARB) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imantalab, O.; Fattah-alhosseini, A.

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, electrochemical and passive behaviors of pure copper fabricated by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) process in 0.01 M borax solution (pH = 9.1) have been studied. Before any electrochemical measurements, evaluation of microstructure was obtained by Vickers microhardness, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy. The results of microhardness tests revealed that microhardness values increased with the increasing number of ARB cycles. Also a sharp increase was seen in microhardness after the first ARB cycle, whereas mediocre additional increases were observed afterward up to the seven cycles. Moreover, XRD patterns showed that the mean crystallite size values decrease with the increasing number of ARB cycles. To investigate the electrochemical and passive behaviors of the samples, the potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out. Polarization plots revealed that as a result of ARB, the corrosion behavior of the specimens improves compared with the annealed pure copper. Also, the Mott-Schottky analysis and EIS measurements showed that the increasing number of ARB cycles offer better conditions for forming the passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of less-defective films.

  17. Real-time image processing for passive mmW imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozacik, Stephen; Paolini, Aaron; Bonnett, James; Harrity, Charles; Mackrides, Daniel; Dillon, Thomas E.; Martin, Richard D.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Kelmelis, Eric; Prather, Dennis W.

    2015-05-01

    The transmission characteristics of millimeter waves (mmWs) make them suitable for many applications in defense and security, from airport preflight scanning to penetrating degraded visual environments such as brownout or heavy fog. While the cold sky provides sufficient illumination for these images to be taken passively in outdoor scenarios, this utility comes at a cost; the diffraction limit of the longer wavelengths involved leads to lower resolution imagery compared to the visible or IR regimes, and the low power levels inherent to passive imagery allow the data to be more easily degraded by noise. Recent techniques leveraging optical upconversion have shown significant promise, but are still subject to fundamental limits in resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. To address these issues we have applied techniques developed for visible and IR imagery to decrease noise and increase resolution in mmW imagery. We have developed these techniques into fieldable software, making use of GPU platforms for real-time operation of computationally complex image processing algorithms. We present data from a passive, 77 GHz, distributed aperture, video-rate imaging platform captured during field tests at full video rate. These videos demonstrate the increase in situational awareness that can be gained through applying computational techniques in real-time without needing changes in detection hardware.

  18. Comparing passive source localization and tracking approaches with a towed horizontal receiver array in an ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Tran, Duong D; Ratilal, Purnima

    2013-11-01

    Approaches for instantaneous passive source localization using a towed horizontal receiver array in a random range-dependent ocean waveguide are examined. They include: (1) Moving array triangulation, (2) array invariant, (3) bearings-only target motion analysis in modified polar coordinates via the extended Kalman filter, and (4) bearings-migration minimum mean-square error. These methods are applied to localize and track a vertical source array deployed in the far-field of a towed horizontal receiver array during the Gulf of Maine 2006 Experiment. The source transmitted intermittent broadband pulses in the 300 to 1200 Hz frequency range. A nonlinear matched-filter kernel designed to replicate the acoustic signal measured by the receiver array is applied to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The source localization accuracy is found to be highly dependent on source-receiver geometry and the localization approach. For a relatively stationary source drifting at speeds much slower than the receiver array tow-speed, the mean source position can be estimated by moving array triangulation with less than 3% error near broadside direction. For a moving source, the Kalman filter method gives the best performance with 5.5% error. The array invariant is the best approach for localizing sources within the endfire beam of the receiver array with 7% error. PMID:24180781

  19. Passivity and Localized Corrosion of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in High pH Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Ninlachart, Jakraphan; Raja, Krishnan S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2016-06-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests were carried out on AZ31 magnesium alloy specimens in pH: 4.5, 9.5, and 13.0 solutions with 0-2000 ppm of chloride additions at room temperature. No passivity breakdown was observed during cyclic polarization in pH:13 solutions containing up to 1500 ppm of chloride. Addition of sodium sulfate and sodium dihydrogen phosphate as supporting electrolytes offset the chloride effect on the corrosion of AZ31 in pH 4.5 and 9.5 solutions. The Mott-Schottky analysis showed the presence of a duplex surface layer consisting of an n-type MgO1- x inner layer ( x = 0.024-0.05), and a p-type outer layer which thickened with time at the expense of the inner layer.

  20. Passivity and Localized Corrosion of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in High pH Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Ninlachart, Jakraphan; Raja, Krishnan S.; Charit, Indrajit

    2016-05-01

    Electrochemical corrosion tests were carried out on AZ31 magnesium alloy specimens in pH: 4.5, 9.5, and 13.0 solutions with 0-2000 ppm of chloride additions at room temperature. No passivity breakdown was observed during cyclic polarization in pH:13 solutions containing up to 1500 ppm of chloride. Addition of sodium sulfate and sodium dihydrogen phosphate as supporting electrolytes offset the chloride effect on the corrosion of AZ31 in pH 4.5 and 9.5 solutions. The Mott-Schottky analysis showed the presence of a duplex surface layer consisting of an n-type MgO1-x inner layer (x = 0.024-0.05), and a p-type outer layer which thickened with time at the expense of the inner layer.

  1. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  2. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  3. Sensitivity of passive microwave sea ice concentration algorithms to the selection of locally and seasonally adjusted tie points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, Axel

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of passive microwave sea-ice concentration (SIC) algorithms to the selection of tie points was analyzed. SICs were derived with the NASA Team ice algorithm for global tie points and for locally and seasonally adjusted tie points. The SSM/I SIC was then compared to Landsat-MSS-derived SICs. Preliminary results show a mean difference of SSM/I- and Landsat-derived SICs for 50 x 50 km grid cells of 2.7 percent along the ice edge of the Beaufort Sea during fall with local tie points. The accuracy decreased to 9.7 percent when global tie points were used. During freeze-up in the Beaufort Sea, with grey ice and nilas as dominant ice cover, the mean difference was 4.3 percent for local tie points and 13.9 percent for global tie points. For the spring ice cover in the Bering Sea a mean difference of 4.4 percent for local tie points and 15.7 percent for global tie points was found. This large difference reveals some limitations of the NASA-Team algorithm under freeze-up and spring conditions (thin ice areas).

  4. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  5. Comprehensive analytical model for locally contacted rear surface passivated solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas; Biro, Daniel; Nekarda, Jan; Stumpp, Stefan; Kimmerle, Achim; Mack, Sebastian; Preu, Ralf

    2010-12-01

    For optimum performance of solar cells featuring a locally contacted rear surface, the metallization fraction as well as the size and distribution of the local contacts are crucial, since Ohmic and recombination losses have to be balanced. In this work we present a set of equations which enable to calculate this trade off without the need of numerical simulations. Our model combines established analytical and empirical equations to predict the energy conversion efficiency of a locally contacted device. For experimental verification, we fabricate devices from float zone silicon wafers of different resistivity using the laser fired contact technology for forming the local rear contacts. The detailed characterization of test structures enables the determination of important physical parameters, such as the surface recombination velocity at the contacted area and the spreading resistance of the contacts. Our analytical model reproduces the experimental results very well and correctly predicts the optimum contact spacing without the use of free fitting parameters. We use our model to estimate the optimum bulk resistivity for locally contacted devices fabricated from conventional Czochralski-grown silicon material. These calculations use literature values for the stable minority carrier lifetime to account for the bulk recombination caused by the formation of boron-oxygen complexes under carrier injection.

  6. Application of XAD-resin based passive air samplers to assess local (roadside) and regional patterns of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Paul; Thuens, Sabine; Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank; Radke, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We used XAD-resin based passive air samplers (PAS) to measure atmospheric levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at five ombrotrophic bogs in Eastern Canada. The aims of our study were to investigate the influence of local roads on contaminant levels in the bogs, to derive the regional pattern of atmospheric concentrations, and to assess the uncertainties of the method. Expanded uncertainties based on the duplicate PAS deployed at 24 sites were good for the PAHs, while the deployment period of approx. 100 days was too short to yield acceptable uncertainties for PCBs. The regional PAH distribution was in good agreement with the calculated source proximity of the sampled bogs. We conclude that XAD-resin based PAS deployed for comparatively short periods are well suited for measuring atmospheric concentrations of volatile PAHs, while in remote regions longer deployment is necessary for less volatile PAHs and for PCBs. PMID:22516712

  7. Multisensory integration in early vestibular processing in mice: the encoding of passive vs. active motion.

    PubMed

    Medrea, Ioana; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2013-12-01

    The mouse has become an important model system for studying the cellular basis of learning and coding of heading by the vestibular system. Here we recorded from single neurons in the vestibular nuclei to understand how vestibular pathways encode self-motion under natural conditions, during which proprioceptive and motor-related signals as well as vestibular inputs provide feedback about an animal's movement through the world. We recorded neuronal responses in alert behaving mice focusing on a group of neurons, termed vestibular-only cells, that are known to control posture and project to higher-order centers. We found that the majority (70%, n = 21/30) of neurons were bimodal, in that they responded robustly to passive stimulation of proprioceptors as well as passive stimulation of the vestibular system. Additionally, the linear summation of a given neuron's vestibular and neck sensitivities predicted well its responses when both stimuli were applied simultaneously. In contrast, neuronal responses were suppressed when the same motion was actively generated, with the one striking exception that the activity of bimodal neurons similarly and robustly encoded head on body position in all conditions. Our results show that proprioceptive and motor-related signals are combined with vestibular information at the first central stage of vestibular processing in mice. We suggest that these results have important implications for understanding the multisensory integration underlying accurate postural control and the neural representation of directional heading in the head direction cell network of mice. PMID:24089394

  8. Revisiting the stability of 2D passive biped walking: Local behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Granata, Kevin P.; Ross, Shane D.

    2008-12-01

    Models of biped walking have demonstrated that stable walking motions are possible without active control. Stability of these motions has typically been quantified by studying the stability of an associated Poincaré map (orbital stability). However, additional insight may be obtained by examining how perturbations evolve over the short-term (local stability). For example, there may be regions where small perturbations actually diverge from the unperturbed trajectory, even if over the entire cycle small (but perhaps not large) perturbations are dissipated. We present techniques to calculate local stability, and demonstrate the utility of these techniques by examining the local stability of the 2D compass biped. These techniques are relevant to the design of controllers to maintain stability in robots, and in understanding how the neuromuscular system maintains stability in humans.

  9. Moving source localization using seismic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Stafsudd, Jing Z.; Hudson, Ralph E.; Yao, Kung; Taciroglu, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    Accurate localization of a seismic source in a near-field scenario where the distances between sensors and the source are less than a few wavelengths of the generated signal has shown to be a challenging task. Conventional localization algorithms often prove to be ineffective, as near-field seismic signals exhibit characteristics different from the well-studied far-field signals. The current work is aimed at the employment of a seismic sensor array for the localization and tracking of a near-field wideband moving source. In this paper, the mathematical derivation of a novel DOA estimation algorithm-dubbed the Modified Kirlin Method-has been presented in details. The estimated DOAs are then combined using a least-squares optimization method for source localization. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated in a field experiment to track a moving truck. We also compare the DOA estimation and source localization results of the proposed method with those of two other existing methods originally developed for localization of a stationary wideband source; Covariance Matrix Analysis and the Surface Wave Analysis. Our results indicate that both the Surface Wave Analysis and the Modified Kirlin Methods are effective in locating and tracking a moving truck.

  10. Passive Acoustic Source Localization at a Low Sampling Rate Based on a Five-Element Cross Microphone Array

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Yue; Wang, Pengfei; Zha, Fusheng; Li, Mantian; Gao, Wa; Song, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    Accurate acoustic source localization at a low sampling rate (less than 10 kHz) is still a challenging problem for small portable systems, especially for a multitasking micro-embedded system. A modification of the generalized cross-correlation (GCC) method with the up-sampling (US) theory is proposed and defined as the US-GCC method, which can improve the accuracy of the time delay of arrival (TDOA) and source location at a low sampling rate. In this work, through the US operation, an input signal with a certain sampling rate can be converted into another signal with a higher frequency. Furthermore, the optimal interpolation factor for the US operation is derived according to localization computation time and the standard deviation (SD) of target location estimations. On the one hand, simulation results show that absolute errors of the source locations based on the US-GCC method with an interpolation factor of 15 are approximately from 1/15- to 1/12-times those based on the GCC method, when the initial same sampling rates of both methods are 8 kHz. On the other hand, a simple and small portable passive acoustic source localization platform composed of a five-element cross microphone array has been designed and set up in this paper. The experiments on the established platform, which accurately locates a three-dimensional (3D) near-field target at a low sampling rate demonstrate that the proposed method is workable. PMID:26057042

  11. Local Ownership of Education Policies at the Crossroads between the Active Participation and the Passive Compliance to International Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imaniriho, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, perceptions about the role of local population in policy development process have deeply changed. This change is related to the idea promoted by international institutions that the development actions cannot succeed without a strong local ownership and a broad approach that guarantee active participation of local…

  12. Local subcutaneous and muscle pain impairs detection of passive movements at the human thumb

    PubMed Central

    Weerakkody, N S; Blouin, J S; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2008-01-01

    Activity in both muscle spindle endings and cutaneous stretch receptors contributes to the sensation of joint movement. The present experiments assessed whether muscle pain and subcutaneous pain distort proprioception in humans. The ability to detect the direction of passive movements at the interphalangeal joint of the thumb was measured when pain was induced experimentally in four sites: the flexor pollicis longus (FPL), the subcutaneous tissue overlying this muscle, the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle and the subcutaneous tissue distal to the metacarpophalangeal joint of thumb. Tests were conducted when pain was at a similar subjective intensity. There was no significant difference in the ability to detect flexion or extension under any painful or non-painful condition. The detection of movement was significantly impaired when pain was induced in the FPL muscle, but pain in the FCR, a nearby muscle that does not act on the thumb, had no effect. Subcutaneous pain also significantly impaired movement detection when initiated in skin overlying the thumb, but not in skin overlying the FPL muscle in the forearm. These findings suggest that while both muscle and skin pain can disturb the detection of the direction of movement, the impairment is site-specific and involves regions and tissues that have a proprioceptive role at the joint. Also, pain induced in FPL did not significantly increase the perceived size of the thumb. Proprioceptive mechanisms signalling perceived body size are less disturbed by a relevant muscle nociceptive input than those subserving movement detection. The results highlight the complex relationship between nociceptive inputs and their influence on proprioception and motor control. PMID:18467366

  13. Passive ranging errors due to multipath distortion of deterministic transient signals with application to the localization of small arms fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Brian G.; Lo, Kam W.

    2002-01-01

    A passive ranging technique based on wavefront curvature is used to estimate the ranges and bearings of impulsive sound sources represented by small arms fire. The discharge of a firearm results in the generation of a transient acoustic signal whose energy propagates radially outwards from the omnidirectional source. The radius of curvature of the spherical wavefront at any instant is equal to the instantaneous range from the source. The curvature of the acoustic wavefront is sensed with a three-microphone linear array by first estimating the differential time of arrival (or time delay) of the acoustic wavefront at each of the two adjacent sensor pairs and then processing the time-delay information to extract the range and bearing of the source. However, modeling the passive ranging performance of the wavefront curvature method for a deterministic transient signal source in a multipath environment shows that when the multipath and direct path arrivals are unresolvable, the time-delay estimates are biased which, in turn, biases the range estimates. The model explains the observed under-ranging of small arms firing positions during a field experiment.

  14. Passive ranging errors due to multipath distortion of deterministic transient signals with application to the localization of small arms fire.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brian G; Lo, Kam W

    2002-01-01

    A passive ranging technique based on wavefront curvature is used to estimate the ranges and bearings of impulsive sound sources represented by small arms fire. The discharge of a firearm results in the generation of a transient acoustic signal whose energy propagates radially outwards from the omnidirectional source. The radius of curvature of the spherical wavefront at any instant is equal to the instantaneous range from the source. The curvature of the acoustic wavefront is sensed with a three-microphone linear array by first estimating the differential time of arrival (or time delay) of the acoustic wavefront at each of the two adjacent sensor pairs and then processing the time-delay information to extract the range and bearing of the source. However, modeling the passive ranging performance of the wavefront curvature method for a deterministic transient signal source in a multipath environment shows that when the multipath and direct path arrivals are unresolvable, the time-delay estimates are biased which, in turn, biases the range estimates. The model explains the observed under-ranging of small arms firing positions during a field experiment. PMID:11831787

  15. Underwater passive acoustic localization of Pacific walruses in the northeastern Chukchi Sea.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Brendan P; Dosso, Stan E; Hannay, David E

    2013-09-01

    This paper develops and applies a linearized Bayesian localization algorithm based on acoustic arrival times of marine mammal vocalizations at spatially-separated receivers which provides three-dimensional (3D) location estimates with rigorous uncertainty analysis. To properly account for uncertainty in receiver parameters (3D hydrophone locations and synchronization times) and environmental parameters (water depth and sound-speed correction), these quantities are treated as unknowns constrained by prior estimates and prior uncertainties. Unknown scaling factors on both the prior and arrival-time uncertainties are estimated by minimizing Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (a maximum entropy condition). Maximum a posteriori estimates for sound source locations and times, receiver parameters, and environmental parameters are calculated simultaneously using measurements of arrival times for direct and interface-reflected acoustic paths. Posterior uncertainties for all unknowns incorporate both arrival time and prior uncertainties. Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that, for the cases considered here, linearization errors are small and the lack of an accurate sound-speed profile does not cause significant biases in the estimated locations. A sequence of Pacific walrus vocalizations, recorded in the Chukchi Sea northwest of Alaska, is localized using this technique, yielding a track estimate and uncertainties with an estimated speed comparable to normal walrus swim speeds. PMID:23968051

  16. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  17. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  18. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods. PMID:18537362

  19. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew D; Beemer, Brianne T; Greene, Nathaniel T; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  20. Transport process and local thermal reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Trimper, Steffen; Schulz, Michael

    2007-09-01

    A random walk of N particles on a lattice with M sites is studied under the constraint that each lattice site is coupled to its own mesoscopic heat bath. Such a situation can be conveniently described by using the master equation in a quantized Hamiltonian formulation where the exclusion principle is included by using Pauli operators. If all reservoirs are mutually in contact, giving rise to a temperature gradient, an evolution equation for the particle density with two different currents already results in the mean-field approximation. One is the conventional diffusive current, driven by the density gradient, whereas the other includes a coupling between the local density and the temperature gradient. Due to the competitive currents, the system exhibits a stationary solution, where the local density is determined by the local temperature field and depends on the filling factor M/N. The stability of the solution is related to the eigenvalues of a Schrödinger-like equation. In the case of a fixed temperature gradient the stationary density distribution remains stable. The approach used is totally different from and an alternative to the conventional Onsager ansatz. PMID:17930201

  1. The Cold Land Process Experiment's (CLPX) Local Scale Observation Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. P.; Cline, D.; Elder, K.; Davis, R. E.; Pomeroy, J.; Koh, Y.; Armstrong, R.; Koike, T.; McDonald, K.

    2002-12-01

    The Local Scale Observation Site (LSOS) is the smallest study site of the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) and is located within the Fraser Meso-cell Study Area (MSA), near the Fraser Experimental Forest Headquarters Facility, in Fraser, Colorado USA. The 100- x 100-m site consists of a small, open field, a managed dense canopy, and an open, mixed age canopy. Unlike the other components of the experiment, which focus on spatial distributions at relatively brief "snapshots" in time, measurements at the local-scale site focused on the temporal domain. Measurements made at the LSOS were designed to produce a comprehensive assessment of the snow, soil, and vegetation characteristics viewed by the ground-based remote sensing instruments. The objective of ground-based microwave remote sensing was to collect time series of active and passive microwave spectral signatures over snow, soil, and forest, coincident with intensive physical characterization of these features. Ground-based remote sensing instruments included Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radars operating over multiple microwave bandwidths, the Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer (GBMR-7) (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) Simulator; channels 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0-GHz), and in 2003, an L/C/X/Ku-band scatterometer radar system. Snow and soil measurements included standard snow physical properties, snow surface roughness, snow depth transects, and soil moisture. The stem and canopy temperature, and xylem flux of several trees within the area, were monitored continuously. Two micrometeorological towers, one located in the open snow area and the other in the forested area, monitored ambient conditions and provided forcing data sets for 1-D snow/soil models. Arrays of radiometers (0.3-3 μm) and a scanning thermal radiometer (8-12 μm) characterized the variability of radiative receipt in the forests. These measurements, together with the ground-based remote sensing, provide the

  2. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  3. Nearly Monodispersion CoSm Alloy Nanoparticles Formed by an In-situ Rapid Cooling and Passivating Microfluidic Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yujun; Henry, Laurence L.

    2009-10-01

    An in situ rapid cooling and passivating microfluidic process has been developed for the synthesis of nearly monodispersed cobalt samarium nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable crystal structures and surface properties. This process involves promoting the nucleation and growth of NPs at an elevated temperature and rapidly quenching the NP colloids in a solution containing a passivating reagent at a reduced temperature. We have shown that Cobalt samarium NPs having amorphous crystal structures and a thin passivating layer can be synthesized with uniform nonspherical shapes and size of about 4.8 nm. The amorphous CoSm NPs in our study have blocking temperature near 40 K and average coercivity of 225 Oe at 10 K. The NPs also exhibit high anisotropic magnetic properties with a wasp-waist hysteresis loop and a bias shift of coercivity due to the shape anisotropy and the exchange coupling between the core and the thin oxidized surface layer.

  4. Rapid three-dimensional passive rotation micromixer using the breakup process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Kim, Jung Kyung; Park, Junha; Chung, Seok; Chung, Chanil; Chang, Jun Keun

    2004-01-01

    Stretching and folding, diffusion, and breakup are three basic processes that occur while mixing fluids. Although stretching and folding the interface of two fluids by rotation enables the mixing at microscale level in both low and high Reynolds number flows, rotation is not as effective at a low Reynolds number as at a high Reynolds number. Therefore, developing a rapid micromixer for microfluidic systems that can be used at a low Reynolds number is a challenging task, because it can demonstrate the full potential of microfluidic systems in commercial markets. Here, to enhance the mixing efficiency of a micromixer based on passive rotation, we present a breakup method. The breakup method not only generates interface actively but also enhances the diffusion process at the interface. With our novel design, over 70% mixing can be achieved only after passing through a 4 mm long microchannel. In this work, the mixer was easily fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane by soft lithography and a self-aligned bonding method with methanol. We analyzed the flow in the micromixer using the computational fluid dynamics method. Also, we conducted quantitative analyses using a confocal scanning microscope and image processing.

  5. Fluid transport processes in the passive margins of the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Claudia; Foschi, Martino; Cartwright, Joe; Levell, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    We analyse and produce a synoptic model of the different styles of fluid transport occurring in the various passive margin settings in the Eastern Mediterranean. The common tectonic-stratigraphic setting is dominated, from the Mesozoic, by the interaction of the Tethyan platforms with Cenozoic to recent, mainly clastic, deposits interacting with the ubiquitous thick late Miocene (Messinian) evaporitic sediments. This created different specific modes of fluid-lithology coupling behaviours, and generated an extraordinary suite of seismically resolvable fluid flow phenomena, including mud volcanoes, pockmarks, dissolution/collapse structures, chimneys and pipes. We integrate this evidence with the analysis of the regional pressure/temperature gradient, and with published hydrocarbon generation models, to propose a regional synthesis of all fluid transport processes in a specific basinal context. We place the fluid flow evidence observed in the Eastern Mediterranean in the framework of the three main fluid flow settings, which are typically defined in sedimentary basins, in terms of depth: 1) A thermobaric fluid regime, where fluid transport is limited and convection can be the dominant transport mechanism, 2) A thermogenic regime, where fluids supplied by hydrocarbon generation can migrate by hydraulic fracturing and advection (along open faults/conduits), by matrix flow and in the longer term, by diffusion processes, 3) A shallow compactional regime, where the fluids are generated by sediment dewatering and shallow diagenesis, and the main transport mechanism is characterised by vertical fluid flow, either through advection and hydrofracturing along faults, or matrix flow. In the Eastern Mediterranean passive margins, this depth-related subdivision needs to be modified in order to accommodate the influence of the laterally and vertically extensive evaporitic series, which acts as a regional aquitard/aquiclude to water or a seal to hydrocarbon flow. The presence of

  6. Locality and time irreversibility in quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    We discuss problems arising in three very different physical processes: an electron scattering on a nucleus, an experiment with delayed choice, and the cosmological Big Bang. We describe the role of soft and supersoft photons in solutions of the arising problems.

  7. Is Broca's Area Involved in the Processing of Passive Sentences? An Event-Related fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokoyama, Satoru; Watanabe, Jobu; Iwata, Kazuki; Ikuta, Naho; Haji, Tomoki; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato; Miyamoto, Tadao; Nakamura, Wataru; Sato, Shigeru; Horie, Kaoru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2007-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether activation in Broca's area is greater during the processing of passive versus active sentences in the brains of healthy subjects. Twenty Japanese native speakers performed a visual sentence comprehension task in which they were asked to read a visually presented sentence…

  8. The Comparative Effects of Processing Instruction and Dictogloss on the Acquisition of the English Passive by Speakers of Turkish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uludag, Onur; Vanpatten, Bill

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents the results of an experiment investigating the effects of processing instruction (PI) and dictogloss (DG) on the acquisition of the English passive voice. Sixty speakers of Turkish studying English at university level were assigned to three groups: one receiving PI, the other receiving DG and the third serving as a…

  9. Update on scribe-cleave-passivate (SCP) slim edge technology for silicon sensors: Automated processing and radiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Ely, S.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Christophersen, M.; Phlips, B. F.; Pellegrini, G.; Rafi, J. M.; Quirion, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Casse, G.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.; Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Vaitkus, J. V.

    2014-11-01

    We pursue scribe-cleave-passivate (SCP) technology for making "slim edge" sensors. The goal is to reduce the inactive region at the periphery of the devices while maintaining their performance. In this paper we report on two aspects of the current efforts. The first one involves fabrication options for mass production. We describe the automated cleaving tests and a simplified version of SCP post-processing of n-type devices. Another aspect is the radiation resistance of the passivation. We report on the radiation tests of n- and p-type devices with protons and neutrons.

  10. Hydrogen passivation of defects and rapid thermal processing for high-efficiency silicon ribbon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Weon

    2002-01-01

    The use of photovoltaic (PV) system offers a unique opportunity to solve the energy and the environmental problems simultaneously because solar energy is free and can be directly converted into electrical energy by solar cells without any undesirable impact on the environment. In spite of the many advantages, PV still accounts for less than 0.05% of the current U.S. energy portfolio. This is mainly because PV is 2-4 times more expensive than traditional energy sources. PV modules should cost about $1/W to produce electricity at a rate of 6¢/kWh and to compete with fossil fuels. Since Si material accounts for ˜40% of the cost of current Si PV modules, the use of low-cost Si substrate is critical for cost reduction. Edge-defined film-fed grown (EFG) Si ribbon is the focus as substrate materials for this research because it is one of the most promising for low-cost PV. However, as-grown EFG Si has a lot of impurities and crystal defects resulted from the Si feedstock and its growth system, which reduce the bulk lifetime of less than 3 ms. In this research, first, the requirements for achieving 16% efficiency have been established using computer model simulations. To improve the bulk lifetime, manufacturable P and Al gettering techniques are developed to remove the lifetime-killing impurities from the active to inactive device regions. PECVD SiN-induced hydrogen defect passivation is investigated and maximized through the fundamental understanding of the role of Al, the impact of RTP firing, and the difference between two PECVD SiN films. For low-cost contact formation, a novel RTP firing process is developed for high-quality screen-printed contacts and Al-BSF. Finally, a complete process sequence that involves the optimal conditions for defect passivation and contacts is developed to produce ˜16% efficiency on screen-printed EFG Si solar cells, which is the highest efficiency for any screen-printed Si ribbon solar cells to date.

  11. Upstream vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers for fault monitoring and localization in WDM passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elaine; Zhao, Xiaoxue; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.

    2008-04-01

    As wavelength division multiplexed passive optical networks (WDM-PONs) are expected to be first deployed to transport high capacity services to business customers, real-time knowledge of fiber/device faults and the location of such faults will be a necessity to guarantee reliability. Nonetheless, the added benefit of implementing fault monitoring capability should only incur minimal cost associated with upgrades to the network. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a fault monitoring and localization scheme based on a highly-sensitive and potentially low-cost monitor in conjunction with vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The VCSELs are used as upstream transmitters in the WDM-PON. The proposed scheme benefits from the high reflectivity of the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror of optical injection-locked (OIL) VCSELs to reflect monitoring channels back to the central office for monitoring. Characterization of the fault monitor demonstrates high sensitivity, low bandwidth requirements, and potentially low output power. The added advantage of the proposed fault monitoring scheme incurs only a 0.5 dB penalty on the upstream transmissions on the existing infrastructure.

  12. Quality of Life and Toxicity from Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs. SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after PBT. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified RTOG grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity and argon plasma coagulation (APC) were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results 226 men received PSPT and 65 SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel EPIC summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was one Grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade 3 or greater GI or GU toxicity. APC application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs. SSPT 1.5%; p = 0.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥ 2 GI or GU toxicity with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted. PMID:24139077

  13. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Thomas J.; Munsell, Mark F.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson; Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A.; Dong, Lei; Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ≥0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a

  14. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  15. Surface Passivation for 3-5 Semiconductor Processing: Stable Gallium Sulphide Films by MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macinnes, Andrew N.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Power, Michael B.; Kang, Soon; Barron, Andrew R.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1994-01-01

    Gallium sulphide (GaS) has been deposited on GaAs to form stable, insulating, passivating layers. Spectrally resolved photoluminescence and surface recombination velocity measurements indicate that the GaS itself can contribute a significant fraction of the photoluminescence in GaS/GaAs structures. Determination of surface recombination velocity by photoluminescence is therefore difficult. By using C-V analysis of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, passivation of the GaAs with GaS films is quantified.

  16. Effects of obesity and mild hypohydration on local sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heat stress in females.

    PubMed

    Moyen, Nicole E; Burchfield, Jenna M; Butts, Cory L; Glenn, Jordan M; Tucker, Matthew A; Treece, Keeley; Smith, Amber J; McDermott, Brendon P; Ganio, Matthew S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of obesity and mild hypohydration on local sweating (LSR) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) responses during passive heat stress in females. Thirteen obese (age, 24 ± 4 years; 45.4% ± 5.2% body fat) and 12 nonobese (age, 22 ± 2 years; 25.1% ± 3.9% body fat) females were passively heated (1.0 °C rectal temperature increase) while either euhydrated (EUHY) or mildly hypohydrated (HYPO; via fluid restriction). Chest and forearm LSR (ventilated capsule) and CVC (Laser Doppler flowmetry) onset, sensitivity, and plateau/steady state were recorded as mean body temperature increased (ΔTb). Participants began trials EUHY (urine specific gravity, Usg = 1.009 ± 0.006) or HYPO (Usg = 1.025 ± 0.004; p < 0.05), and remained EUHY or HYPO. Independent of obesity, HYPO decreased sweat sensitivity at the chest (HYPO = 0.79 ± 0.35, EUHY = 0.95 ± 0.39 Δmg·min(-1)·cm(-2)/°C ΔTb) and forearm (HYPO = 0.82 ± 0.39, EUHY = 1.06 ± 0.34 Δmg·min(-1)·cm(-2)/°C ΔTb); forearm LSR plateau was also decreased (HYPO = 0.66 ± 0.19, EUHY = 0.78 ± 0.23 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2); all p < 0.05). Overall, obese females had lower chest-sweat sensitivity (0.72 ± 0.35 vs. 1.01 ± 0.33 Δmg·min(-1)·cm(-2)/°C ΔTb) and plateau (0.55 ± 0.27 vs. 0.80 ± 0.25 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2); p < 0.05). While hypohydrated, obese females had a lower chest LSR (p < 0.05) versus nonobese females midway (0.45 ± 0.26 vs. 0.73 ± 0.23 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) and at the end (0.53 ± 0.27 vs. 0.81 ± 0.24 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2)) of heating. Furthermore, HYPO (relative to the EUHY trials) led to a greater decrease in CVC sensitivity in obese (-28 ± 27 Δ% maximal CVC/°C ΔTb) versus nonobese females (+9.2 ± 33 Δ% maximal CVC/°C ΔTb; p < 0.05). In conclusion, mild hypohydration impairs females' sweating responses during passive heat stress, and this effect is exacerbated when obese. PMID:27455036

  17. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  18. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients

  19. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-03-01

    Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients. This

  20. Computer processing of image captured by the passive THz imaging device as an effective tool for its de-noising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.; Kuchik, Igor E.; Zhang, Cun-lin; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    As it is well-known, passive THz imaging devices have big potential for solution of the security problem. Nevertheless, one of the main problems, which take place on the way of using these devices, consists in the low image quality of developed passive THz camera. To change this situation, it is necessary to improve the engineering characteristics (resolution, sensitivity and so on) of the THz camera or to use computer processing of the image. In our opinion, the last issue is more preferable because it is more inexpensive. Below we illustrate possibility of suppression of the noise of the image captured by three THz passive camera developed in CNU (Beijing. China). After applying the computer processing of the image, its quality enhances many times. Achieved quality in many cases becomes enough for the detection of the object hidden under opaque clothes. We stress that the performance of developed computer code is enough high and does not restrict the performance of passive THz imaging device. The obtained results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem. Nevertheless, developing the new spatial filter for treatment of the THz image remains a modern problem at present time.

  1. Geothermal policy development program: expediting the local geothermal permitting process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    For a number of years, concerns have been raised about the length of time and the complexity involved in obtaining required permits in order to develop the geothermal resource at the Geysers. Perhaps the most important factor is jurisdiction. At the Geysers, all three levels of government - local, state, and federal - exercise significant authority over various aspects of geothermal development. In addition, several agencies within each governmental level play an active role in the permitting process. The present study is concerned primarily with the local permitting process, and the ways in which this process could be expedited. This report begins by looking at the local role in the overall permitting process, and then reviews the findings and conclusions that have been reached in other studies of the problem. This is followed by a case study evaluation of recent permitting experience in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties, and the report concludes by outlining several approaches to expediting the local permitting process.

  2. Deciphering the influence of the thermal processes on the early passive margins formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Romain; Nalpas, Thierry; Ballard, Jean-François; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Chelalou, Roman; Clerc, Camille

    2015-04-01

    Many large-scale dynamic processes, from continental rifting to plate subduction, are intimately linked to metamorphic reactions. This close relation between geodynamic processes and metamorphic reactions is, in spite of appearances, yet poorly understood. For example, during extension processes, rocks will be exposed to important temperature, pressures and stress changes. Meanwhile less attention has been paid to other important aspects of the metamorphic processes. When reacting rocks expand and contract, density and volume changes will set up in the surrounding material. While several tectonic models are proposed to explain the formation of extensive basins and passive margins ( simple shear detachment mantle exhumation .... ) a single thermal model (McKenzie , 1978), as a dogma, is used to understanding and modeling the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins . This model is based on the assumption that the extension is only by pure shear and it is instantaneous. Under this approach, the sedimentary deposits occur in two stages. i) A short step , 1 to 10 Ma , controlled by tectonics. ii) A longer step , at least 50 Ma as a result of the thermal evolution of the lithosphere.
However, most stratigraphic data indicate that less thermal model can account for documented vertical movements. The study of the thermal evolution , coupled with other tectonic models , and its consequences have never been studied in detail , although the differences may be significant and it is clear that the petrological changes associated with changes in temperature conditions , influence changes reliefs.
In addition, it seems that the relationship between basin formation and thermal evolution is not always the same:
- Sometimes the temperature rise above 50 to 100 Ma tectonic extension. In the Alps, a significant rise in geothermal gradient Permo -Triassic followed by a "cold" extension , leading to the opening of the Ligurian- Piedmont ocean, from the Middle Jurassic .

  3. A sequential method for passive detection, characterization, and localization of multiple low probability of intercept LFMCW signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamschin, Brandon M.

    A method for passive Detection, Characterization, and Localization (DCL) of multiple low power, Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (LFMCW) (i.e., Low Probability of Intercept (LPI)) signals is proposed. We demonstrate, via simulation, laboratory, and outdoor experiments, that the method is able to detect and correctly characterize the parameters that define two simultaneous LFMCW signals with probability greater than 90% when the signal to noise ratio is -10 dB or greater. While this performance is compelling, it is far from the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), which we derive, and the performance of the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE), whose performance we simulate. The loss in performance relative to the CRLB and the MLE is the price paid for computational tractability. The LFMCW signal is the focus of this work because of its common use in modern, low-cost radar systems. In contrast to other detection and characterization approaches, such as the MLE and those based on the Wigner-Ville Transform (WVT) or the Wigner-Ville Hough Transform (WVHT), our approach does not begin with a parametric model of the received signal that is specified directly in terms of its LFMCW constituents. Rather, we analyze the signal over time intervals that are short, non-overlapping, and contiguous by modeling it within these intervals as a sum of a small number sinusoidal (i.e., harmonic) components with unknown frequencies, deterministic but unknown amplitudes, unknown order (i.e., number of harmonic components), and unknown noise autocorrelation function. It is this model of the data that makes the solution computationally feasible, but also what leads to a degradation in performance since estimates are not based on the full time series. By modeling the signal in this way, we reliably detect the presence of multiple LFMCW signals in colored noise without the need for prewhitening, efficiently estimate (i.e. , characterize) their parameters, provide estimation error

  4. The use of passive, secure cells for processing of highly active nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Ch.; Cavanah, P.; Richardson, J.

    2007-07-01

    Passive, secure cells (PSCs) have been used for over 50 years at the Sellafield nuclear site in the UK for radioactive processing plants. PSCs are designed and constructed with the expectation that there will be no need to enter them throughout the life of the plant. EnergySolutions has full and exclusive rights in North America to use the intellectual property and know-how generated at the Sellafield site and this includes all the design and operational data for PSCs. These data are thus available for use in the new build of nuclear plant currently being envisaged under the GNEP initiative. There are three types of PSC. Type 1 PSCs contain plant items with no maintainable moving parts, and pipework is all welded and radiographed to nuclear standards. Type 2 PSCs contain plant items with slowly rotating or intermittently moveable parts, but all maintainable items such as motors and gearboxes are located outside the cell, with sealed through-cell-wall drives. Type 3 PSCs are a newer design, dating from the 1980's, in which all maintainable in-cell items are designed as removable modules. The housings for the equipment are permanently welded into the in-cell pipework, and the modules can be withdrawn from these housings, through removable hatches in the PSC roof, into shielded steel 'flasks'. The flasks are moved to a maintenance cell where the modules are repaired or prepared for disposal. The process is reversed to re-install the modules back into service in the PSC. All three types of PSC have been shown to have operability, maintainability, reliability, space utilization, contamination control and worker radiation dose uptake advantages over canyon-based plants. The increased capital cost of PSCs over canyons is offset by decreased operating costs. Although PSCs have lower flexibility for process change than do canyons, this can be mitigated by the provision of spare cells and pipework at the design stage. Entry to PSCs is possible but has been required only

  5. Comparison of the Effects of Local Cryotherapy and Passive Cross-Body Stretch on Extensibility in Subjects with Posterior Shoulder Tightness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Weon, Jong-hyuck; Choung, Sung-dae; Kim, Si-hyun

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to compare the immediate effects of local cryotherapy (LC) and passive cross-body stretch on the extensibility of the posterior shoulder muscle in individuals with posterior shoulder tightness. Eighty-seven healthy subjects with a between-shoulder difference in internal rotation (IR) range of motion (ROM) greater than 10° were randomly divided into three groups: LC group, stretching group, and control group (n = 29 in each group). Subjects in the LC group received LC on infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles and subjects in the stretching group performed passive cross-body stretch. Stretch sensation was measured at the end range of passive IR and horizontal adduction (HA) using numerical rating scale, and the pressure pain threshold (PPT) at the infraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles was measured using pressure algometry. Passive and active ROM of IR and HA of the glenohumeral joint were measured using an inclinometer. All measurements were performed at pre-intervention, post- intervention, and 10-min follow-up. Stretch sensation was significantly decreased and PPT was significantly increased in the LC and stretching groups at post-intervention, and these effects were maintained at 10-min follow-up, compared to the control group. Both the LC group and stretching group had a significantly greater increase in passive and active ROM of IR and HA, compared to the control group at post-intervention and 10-min follow-up. However, there were no significant differences in stretch sensation, PPT, or ROM of IR and HA between the LC group and stretching group. LC can be used to decrease the stretch sensation and increase PPT and ROM of IR and HA as much as a stretching exercise. LC could be an alternative method for increasing the restricted ROM of glenohumeral IR and HA for individuals with posterior shoulder tightness, especially for patients and sports players who have severe stretching discomfort. Key Points Local cryotherapy (LC) decreased

  6. Field test on signal processing methods for passive FTIR remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagann, Robert H.; Walter, William T.; Wang, C. D.; Kotter, Dale K.; McManus, Gary J.

    1995-02-01

    Passive FTIR remote sensing measurements were made to test real-time detection of an SF6 seeded stack plume using a probabilistic neural network (PNN) algorithm. The plume concentrations were determined using a classical least squares (CLS) algorithm and compared well with calculations using measured flow rates for the SF6 and the waste stream.

  7. Cultural Variations in Global versus Local Processing: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Jaswal, Vikram K.; Lillard, Angeline S.; Mizokawa, Ai; Hitokoto, Hidefumi; Tsutsui, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    We conducted 3 studies to explore cultural differences in global versus local processing and their developmental trajectories. In Study 1 ("N" = 363), we found that Japanese college students were less globally oriented in their processing than American or Argentine participants. We replicated this effect in Study 2 ("N" =…

  8. Local Conjecturing Process in the Solving of Pattern Generalization Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutarto; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Sisworo

    2016-01-01

    This aim of this study is to describe the process of local conjecturing in generalizing patterns based on Action, Process, Object, Schema (APOS) theory. The subjects were 16 grade 8 students from a junior high school. Data collection used Pattern Generalization Problem (PGP) and interviews. In the first stage, students completed PGP; in the second…

  9. Molecular kinetic theory of strongly nonequilibrium processes of mass, momentum, and energy transfer: Local equilibrium criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2015-09-01

    Consequences of the complete system of transfer equations of the properties (momentum, energy, and mass) of particles and their pairs are considered under local equilibrium conditions with regard to the Bogoliubov hierarchy of relaxation times between the first and second distribution functions (DFs) and distinctions in the characteristic relaxation times of particle momentum, energy, and mass. It is found that even under the local equilibrium condition in the Bogoliubov hierarchy of relaxation times between the first and second DFs, pair correlations are maintained between all dynamic variables (velocity, temperature, and density) whose values are proportional to the gradients of transferable properties. A criterion is introduced requiring there be no local equilibrium condition upon reaching the critical value at which the description of the transfer process becomes incorrect in classical nonequilibrium thermodynamics. External forces are considered in the equations for strongly nonequilibrium processes. Along with allowing for intermolecular potentials, it becomes possible to discuss the concept of passive forces (introduced in thermodynamics by Gibbs) from the standpoint of the kinetic theory. It is shown that use of this concept does not reflect modern representations of real processes.

  10. Simple numerical models of the dynamic effects of surface processes on the evolution of rifted passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Many passive margins show evidence of large-scale surface transport of sediments from the onshore to the offshore during their evolution from continental rifting to post-rift margins. Examples can be found in the thick syn- and/or post-rift sedimentary packages of the Norwegian, Greenland, and West African margins. Surface processes not only directly impact the development of offshore sedimentary basins, but the resulting isostatic response to the redistribution of surface loads may influence onshore topography. For example, the flexural response to rift flank erosion and offshore sedimentation may assist in the preservation of rift escarpments. In addition, the redistribution of material by erosion and sedimentation also influences flow of viscous layers and impacts brittle strength of the crust. I use simple numerical experiments to explore the response of passive margin evolution to surface processes. The models are built of crustal layers, a lithospheric mantle, and the underlying upper mantle. The lithologies have pressure-dependent brittle strength and a temperature-dependent viscous rheology. The numerical experiments examine the dynamic feedback relationships between surface processes (including fluvial or hillslope erosion), lithospheric thinning and strength. Results highlight the importance of crustal strength evolution in relation to surface processes. For a wide range of surface processes, a strong lower crust leads to relatively fast lithospheric break-up accompanied by rift flank uplift and focussed mantle upwelling. A weak lower crust generally delays break-up. But increasing surface processes can switch break-up style for intermediate strength lower crust. In that case, sedimentation has a delocalising effect, which delays break-up. Further experiments are aimed at investigating the longer-term response of mature passive margins to the continued action of surface processes.

  11. Effect of Film Formation Potential on Passive Behavior of Ultra-Fine-Grained 1050 Al Alloy Fabricated via ARB Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, A.; Gashti, S. O.; Keshavarz, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the effect of film formation potential on the passive behavior of ultra-fine-grained 1050 Al alloy in a borate buffer solution is investigated. For this purpose, the specimens were fabricated via accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process up to 1, 3, 5, and 7 passes. To determine the evolution of microstructure as a function of ARB process, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used. AFM images revealed that the grain size values decreased as the number of ARB passes increased. Moreover, TEM micrograph showed that mean grain size of the sample reached to about 340 nm after applying 7 passes of ARB. Potentiodynamic polarization plots indicated that, as the number of ARB passes increased, the corrosion and passive current densities decreased. Also, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that at selected applied potential above open circuit potential, the corrosion resistance of the 1050 Al alloy was systematically increased by applying further ARB passes. It was found that passive behavior of the ARBed 1050 Al alloy specimens were improved by reducing the grain size.

  12. Wetland-based passive treatment systems for gold ore processing effluents containing residual cyanide, metals and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Ordóñez, A; Loredo, J; Younger, P L

    2013-10-01

    Gold extraction operations generate a variety of wastes requiring responsible disposal in compliance with current environmental regulations. During recent decades, increased emphasis has been placed on effluent control and treatment, in order to avoid the threat to the environment posed by toxic constituents. In many modern gold mining and ore processing operations, cyanide species are of most immediate concern. Given that natural degradation processes are known to reduce the toxicity of cyanide over time, trials have been made at laboratory and field scales into the feasibility of using wetland-based passive systems as low-cost and environmentally friendly methods for long-term treatment of leachates from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. Laboratory experiments on discrete aerobic and anaerobic treatment units supported the development of design parameters for the construction of a field-scale passive system at a gold mine site in northern Spain. An in situ pilot-scale wetland treatment system was designed, constructed and monitored over a nine-month period. Overall, the results suggest that compost-based constructed wetlands are capable of detoxifying cyanidation effluents, removing about 21.6% of dissolved cyanide and 98% of Cu, as well as nitrite and nitrate. Wetland-based passive systems can therefore be considered as a viable technology for removal of residual concentrations of cyanide from leachates emanating from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. PMID:24089077

  13. On comprehension of active/passive sentences and language processing in a Polish agrammatic aphasic.

    PubMed

    Jarema, G; Kadzielawa, D; Waite, J

    1987-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of active/passive sentence comprehension by a Polish-speaking agrammatic aphasic. The patient showed good performance on canonically ordered active and passive structures, but performed poorly on inverted variants. The systematically normal and deviant comprehension patterns observed are accounted for by normal interpretative strategies applied to syntactic structures built around verbs with reduced inflectional morphology. The differences between our Polish data and the English data discussed in the literature are explained by the fact that Polish possesses a richer derivational verb morphology. The interpretation of inverted sentences demonstrates the importance of S-V-O word order preference. Our analysis draws upon the notion of grammatical functions to explain the data. PMID:3690252

  14. Photon-counting passive 3D image sensing and processing for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we overview the nonlinear matched filtering for photon counting recognition with 3D passive sensing. The first and second order statistical properties of the nonlinear matched filtering can improve the recognition performance compared to the linear matched filtering. Automatic target reconstruction and recognition are addressed for partially occluded objects. The recognition performance is shown to be improved significantly in the reconstruction space. The discrimination capability is analyzed in terms of Fisher ratio (FR) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.

  15. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  16. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF–PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF–PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8. PMID:26963482

  17. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers.

    PubMed

    Herkert, Nicholas J; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF-PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF-PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8. PMID:26963482

  18. Influences of consolidation processes on local paper structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjoo

    The accurate measurement of the structural parameters such as thickness, grammage, apparent density and surface topography, and the proper evaluation of the variation of each parameter, are very important not only for predicting the end use properties of the paper, but also for diagnosing the pa permaking processes. The difficulty of the measurement of thickness at fine scale ˜1 mm has been an impediment to the understanding of local paper structure. To address this problem, a twin laser profilometer instrument (TLP) for non-contacting measurement of local thickness and surface topography was developed, characterized and calibrated in this work. The fundamental relationships between structural parameters were reexamined with various handsheet samples. The effects of wet pressing on the local paper structure were evaluated using laboratory static press and commercial press felts. The different press pressure had no significant influence on the local density variation of the handsheet samples. The influences of felts on the surface topography were also successfully observed. The different densification effects of soft nip and hard nip calendering processes were evaluated by direct comparison of structural parameters before and after processing. The much higher selective reduction in local thickness (larger reduction for the thicker area) by the hard nip calendering process resulted in different relationships between structural parameters. The various periodic variations in the paper structure were also detected, analyzed and identified. The effects of different forming elements such as the conventional foil system and the velocity induced drainage (VID) system on the paper structure and end use properties were evaluated with pilot machine trials and commercial product produced using different forming elements. Generally, the VID samples showed better formation, less two sidedness in the fine distribution through thickness direction, and less densification during

  19. Synergistic Use of Passive and Active Data for Cloud Process Studies: Examples from the A-Train Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. J.

    2013-05-01

    Clouds play a critical role in regulating the energy budget and water cycle of our planet. Developing a global observation and understanding of clouds requires space-borne remote sensing systems. Through internationally coordinated efforts, various observation systems and cloud products have been developed over the past 30 years. An especially fruitful area involves the synergy between passive and active sensing. Since a number of textbooks and review articles have been published on the remote sensing techniques of these systems, we do not intend to repeat them. Rather, the focus of this paper is on the application side, that is, we illustrate how synergistic use of passive and active observations can be employed to study cloud microphysical and dynamical processes using examples from recent studies that utilized the A-Train data, including a short study of warm cloud droplet growth mechanisms using CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E, and a series of studies of tropical convective dynamics using CloudSat and MODIS. Compared to cloud retrieval algorithm development, synergistic use of passive and active data for cloud process studies is a relatively new area. Strictly speaking, it may not be proper to classify it as an "area" because there is no clear roadmap to guide its development, nor any well defined envelop to contain it. Most such studies appear ad hoc in nature and almost always have a certain innovative touch that defies any rigid a priori framework. Yet, it is through these novel studies that cloud processes are systematically investigated from a global perspective. Conclusions drawn from them can thus be generalized that will help evaluate and improve cloud parameterizations in global climate models. It is our hope that more of this kind of studies will blossom out in the future. Finally, from a satellite mission development perspective, these applications will feed back to the design of the observation systems so that guidance can be provided to help define the

  20. Design of an HF-Band RFID System with Multiple Readers and Passive Tags for Indoor Mobile Robot Self-Localization.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jian; Takahashi, Yasutake

    2016-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has already been explored for efficient self-localization of indoor mobile robots. A mobile robot equipped with RFID readers detects passive RFID tags installed on the floor in order to locate itself. The Monte-Carlo localization (MCL) method enables the localization of a mobile robot equipped with an RFID system with reasonable accuracy, sufficient robustness and low computational cost. The arrangements of RFID readers and tags and the size of antennas are important design parameters for realizing accurate and robust self-localization using a low-cost RFID system. The design of a likelihood model of RFID tag detection is also crucial for the accurate self-localization. This paper presents a novel design and arrangement of RFID readers and tags for indoor mobile robot self-localization. First, by considering small-sized and large-sized antennas of an RFID reader, we show how the design of the likelihood model affects the accuracy of self-localization. We also design a novel likelihood model by taking into consideration the characteristics of the communication range of an RFID system with a large antenna. Second, we propose a novel arrangement of RFID tags with eight RFID readers, which results in the RFID system configuration requiring much fewer readers and tags while retaining reasonable accuracy of self-localization. We verify the performances of MCL-based self-localization realized using the high-frequency (HF)-band RFID system with eight RFID readers and a lower density of RFID tags installed on the floor based on MCL in simulated and real environments. The results of simulations and real environment experiments demonstrate that our proposed low-cost HF-band RFID system realizes accurate and robust self-localization of an indoor mobile robot. PMID:27483279

  1. Method for localizing and isolating an errant process step

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Ferrell, Regina K.

    2003-01-01

    A method for localizing and isolating an errant process includes the steps of retrieving from a defect image database a selection of images each image having image content similar to image content extracted from a query image depicting a defect, each image in the selection having corresponding defect characterization data. A conditional probability distribution of the defect having occurred in a particular process step is derived from the defect characterization data. A process step as a highest probable source of the defect according to the derived conditional probability distribution is then identified. A method for process step defect identification includes the steps of characterizing anomalies in a product, the anomalies detected by an imaging system. A query image of a product defect is then acquired. A particular characterized anomaly is then correlated with the query image. An errant process step is then associated with the correlated image.

  2. Exciton localization in solution-processed organolead trihalide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    He, Haiping; Yu, Qianqian; Li, Hui; Li, Jing; Si, Junjie; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; He, Jingwen; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Zhizhen

    2016-01-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have attracted great attention due to the stunning advances in both photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. However, the photophysical properties, especially the recombination dynamics of photogenerated carriers, of this class of materials are controversial. Here we report that under an excitation level close to the working regime of solar cells, the recombination of photogenerated carriers in solution-processed methylammonium–lead–halide films is dominated by excitons weakly localized in band tail states. This scenario is evidenced by experiments of spectral-dependent luminescence decay, excitation density-dependent luminescence and frequency-dependent terahertz photoconductivity. The exciton localization effect is found to be general for several solution-processed hybrid perovskite films prepared by different methods. Our results provide insights into the charge transport and recombination mechanism in perovskite films and help to unravel their potential for high-performance optoelectronic devices. PMID:26996605

  3. Exciton localization in solution-processed organolead trihalide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiping; Yu, Qianqian; Li, Hui; Li, Jing; Si, Junjie; Jin, Yizheng; Wang, Nana; Wang, Jianpu; He, Jingwen; Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Zhizhen

    2016-03-01

    Organolead trihalide perovskites have attracted great attention due to the stunning advances in both photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. However, the photophysical properties, especially the recombination dynamics of photogenerated carriers, of this class of materials are controversial. Here we report that under an excitation level close to the working regime of solar cells, the recombination of photogenerated carriers in solution-processed methylammonium-lead-halide films is dominated by excitons weakly localized in band tail states. This scenario is evidenced by experiments of spectral-dependent luminescence decay, excitation density-dependent luminescence and frequency-dependent terahertz photoconductivity. The exciton localization effect is found to be general for several solution-processed hybrid perovskite films prepared by different methods. Our results provide insights into the charge transport and recombination mechanism in perovskite films and help to unravel their potential for high-performance optoelectronic devices.

  4. The role of local feature processing in object perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Hyejean

    One of the outstanding questions in the study of human visual perception of objects is how local feature processing affects object perception. In this thesis, we addressed this fundamental question by examining human perceptual performance on images containing whole objects or partial images of objects (containing one, two or three features) for two perceptual tasks: detection ("something" vs. random dot noise) and classification (perception of the object category, e.g., car vs. other objects). Images were embedded in visual noise and we measured human subjects' performance in a range of noise levels close to subjects' perceptual threshold. First, we found that human detection performance increases when more object area (A) is revealed and when the noise variance (N) decreases. The contribution of these factors can be characterized as a function of Ln(A/N), which we will refer to as the Area-to-Noise ratio (ANR). When the ANR was equated in the subsequent experiments, comparison of detection performance on partial vs. whole images of objects revealed the dynamic role of local feature processing in object detection: (i) detection based on a single useful feature was better than detection based on a whole object suggesting the effectiveness of local feature processing, (ii) however, detection of a whole object did not require detection of its features and (iii) detection performance varied across features; useful features (such as eyes for faces and wheels for cars) yielded better performance than suboptimal features (such as nose and mouth for faces). This pattern of results did not significantly vary across two methods we used to select features (features based on semantic judgments and a computer algorithm), and two object categories (faces and cars). For classification, results were largely similar, except that in low ANR levels (below the level sufficient for successful detection of a whole object) classification performance was better on a single useful feature

  5. Applicability of radio astronomy techniques to the processing and interpretation of aperture synthesis passive millimetre-wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Salmon, Neil A.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2012-06-01

    This PhD programme is contributing to the development of Passive Millimetre-Wave Imagers (PMMWI) using the principles of interferometric aperture synthesis and digital signal processing. The principal applications are security screening, all-weather flight aids and earth observation. To enhance the cost-effectiveness of PMMWI systems the number of collecting elements must be minimised whilst maintaining adequate image fidelity. A wide range of techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community for improving the fidelity of sparse interferometric array imagery. This paper brings to the attention of readers these techniques and discusses how they may be applied to imaging using software packages publicly available from the radio astronomy community. The intention of future work is to adapt these algorithms to process experimental data from a range of realistic simulations and real-world targets.

  6. Passive signal processing for a miniature Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor with a multimode laser-diode source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezbiri, A.; Tatam, R. P.

    1995-09-01

    A passive signal-processing technique for addressing a miniature low-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor with a multimode laser diode is reported. Two modes of a multimode laser diode separated by 3 nm are used to obtain quadrature outputs from an \\similar 20 - mu m cavity. Wavelength-division demultiplexing combined with digital signal processing is used to recover the measurand-induced phase change. The technique is demonstrated for the measurement of vibration. The signal-to-noise ratio is \\similar 70 dB at 500 Hz for \\similar pi /2 rad displacement of the mirror, which results in a minimum detectable signal of \\similar 200 mu rad H z-1/2 . A quantitative discussion of miscalibration and systematic errors is presented.

  7. Contribution of active and passive acoustics to study oceanographic processes feeding whales in a critical habitat of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Simard, Yvan; Cotté, Cédric

    2001-05-01

    The head of the main channel of the continent in eastern Canada is the site of particular oceanographic processes that are responsible for the creation of a persistent feeding ground regularly visited by baleen whales from the Atlantic for centuries. Multifrequency acoustics coupled with ADCP and hydrographic measurements has been used to map the krill and capelin aggregations in 3D and visualize their local concentration process under tidal forcing and upwelling at the channel head. The krill scattering layers, pumped into the area by the strong two-layer estuarine circulation, appear to be concentrated during flood by tidal currents forced against the slopes and upwelling, to which depth-keeping krill is reacting by swimming down. Capelin also tends to concentrate on slopes and neighboring shallows. This highly recurrent process generates rich patches that are contributing with the mean circulation to make this area the richest krill aggregation in Northwest Atlantic. This critical habitat is located in a major continental seaway. Passive acoustics techniques are explored to locate whale calls and map the use of this area in continuing months, especially by blue and fin whales, with the aim of understanding their movements to improve their protection.

  8. Global processing takes time: A meta-analysis on local-global visual processing in ASD.

    PubMed

    Van der Hallen, Ruth; Evers, Kris; Brewaeys, Katrien; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-05-01

    What does an individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) perceive first: the forest or the trees? In spite of 30 years of research and influential theories like the weak central coherence (WCC) theory and the enhanced perceptual functioning (EPF) account, the interplay of local and global visual processing in ASD remains only partly understood. Research findings vary in indicating a local processing bias or a global processing deficit, and often contradict each other. We have applied a formal meta-analytic approach and combined 56 articles that tested about 1,000 ASD participants and used a wide range of stimuli and tasks to investigate local and global visual processing in ASD. Overall, results show no enhanced local visual processing nor a deficit in global visual processing. Detailed analysis reveals a difference in the temporal pattern of the local-global balance, that is, slow global processing in individuals with ASD. Whereas task-dependent interaction effects are obtained, gender, age, and IQ of either participant groups seem to have no direct influence on performance. Based on the overview of the literature, suggestions are made for future research. PMID:25420221

  9. Array processing for RFID tag localization exploiting multi-frequency signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yimin; Li, Xin; Amin, Moeness G.

    2009-05-01

    RFID is an increasingly valuable business and technology tool for electronically identifying, locating, and tracking products, assets, and personnel. As a result, precise positioning and tracking of RFID tags and readers have received considerable attention from both academic and industrial communities. Finding the position of RFID tags is considered an important task in various real-time locating systems (RTLS). As such, numerous RFID localization products have been developed for various applications. The majority of RFID positioning systems is based on the fusion of pieces of relevant information, such as the range and the direction-of-arrival (DOA). For example, trilateration can determine the tag position by using the range information of the tag estimated from three or more spatially separated reader antennas. Triangulation is another method to locate RFID tags that use the direction-of-arrival (DOA) information estimated at multiple spatially separated locations. The RFID tag positions can also be determined through hybrid techniques that combine the range and DOA information. The focus of this paper to study the design and performance of the localization of passive RFID tags using array processing techniques in a multipath environment, and exploiting multi-frequency CW signals. The latter are used to decorrelate the coherent multipath signals for effective DOA estimation and for the purpose of accurate range estimation. Accordingly, the spatial and frequency dimensionalities are fully utilized for robust and accurate positioning of RFID tags.

  10. The Impact of Number Mismatch and Passives on the Real-Time Processing of Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contemori, Carla; Marinis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Language processing plays a crucial role in language development, providing the ability to assign structural representations to input strings (e.g., Fodor, 1998). In this paper we aim at contributing to the study of children's processing routines, examining the operations underlying the auditory processing of relative clauses in children…

  11. A Mask-Free Passivation Process for Low Noise Nanopore Devices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Min-Cheol; Lee, Min-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Bum; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Young-Rok

    2015-08-01

    Solid-state nanopores have been studied widely for the label-free analysis of single biomolecules. The translocation of charged biomolecules through a solid-state nanopore is driven by the applied voltage across a thin membrane. The ionic current changes in response to the translocation of DNA through the nanopore. Solid-state nanopores have many advantages over biological nanopores, such as α-hemolysin and MspA, but the high DNA translocation velocity and the inherent noise in solid-state nanopores have hindered its applications to more precise measurements, such as DNA sequencing. This paper reports a simple and reproducible way of passivating the surface of a nanopore device using an insulating layer, photodefinable PDMS (P-PDMS), to reduce noise and enhance the accuracy of the electrical measurements. This new approach does not require a separate photo-mask or sophisticated micro-alignment equipment to pattern the insulating layer. The pit structure on the back side of the support chip serves as a mask, enabling mask-free photolithography, and the insulating layer only on top of the free-standing silicon nitride membrane can be irradiated selectively by UV and removed by subsequent development in toluene. The resulting nanopore device with a small free standing silicon nitride membrane surrounded by a thick insulating layer showed improved noise characteristics. The root-mean-square noise of the ionic current was reduced to 3.8 pA from 90.8 pA by the formation of a micron-thick insulating layer. The overall performance of the nanopores with an insulating layer was improved significantly when tested with the double-stranded DNA (λ-DNA). PMID:26369183

  12. Scalable Indoor Localization via Mobile Crowdsourcing and Gaussian Process

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei; Wang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Indoor localization using Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) fingerprinting has been extensively studied for decades. The positioning accuracy is highly dependent on the density of the signal database. In areas without calibration data, however, this algorithm breaks down. Building and updating a dense signal database is labor intensive, expensive, and even impossible in some areas. Researchers are continually searching for better algorithms to create and update dense databases more efficiently. In this paper, we propose a scalable indoor positioning algorithm that works both in surveyed and unsurveyed areas. We first propose Minimum Inverse Distance (MID) algorithm to build a virtual database with uniformly distributed virtual Reference Points (RP). The area covered by the virtual RPs can be larger than the surveyed area. A Local Gaussian Process (LGP) is then applied to estimate the virtual RPs’ RSSI values based on the crowdsourced training data. Finally, we improve the Bayesian algorithm to estimate the user’s location using the virtual database. All the parameters are optimized by simulations, and the new algorithm is tested on real-case scenarios. The results show that the new algorithm improves the accuracy by 25.5% in the surveyed area, with an average positioning error below 2.2 m for 80% of the cases. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can localize the users in the neighboring unsurveyed area. PMID:26999139

  13. Gaussian process regression for sensor networks under localization uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jadaliha, M.; Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun; Johnson, N.S.; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate Gaussian process regression with observations under the localization uncertainty due to the resource-constrained sensor networks. In our formulation, effects of observations, measurement noise, localization uncertainty, and prior distributions are all correctly incorporated in the posterior predictive statistics. The analytically intractable posterior predictive statistics are proposed to be approximated by two techniques, viz., Monte Carlo sampling and Laplace's method. Such approximation techniques have been carefully tailored to our problems and their approximation error and complexity are analyzed. Simulation study demonstrates that the proposed approaches perform much better than approaches without considering the localization uncertainty properly. Finally, we have applied the proposed approaches on the experimentally collected real data from a dye concentration field over a section of a river and a temperature field of an outdoor swimming pool to provide proof of concept tests and evaluate the proposed schemes in real situations. In both simulation and experimental results, the proposed methods outperform the quick-and-dirty solutions often used in practice.

  14. Scalable Indoor Localization via Mobile Crowdsourcing and Gaussian Process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei; Wang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Indoor localization using Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) fingerprinting has been extensively studied for decades. The positioning accuracy is highly dependent on the density of the signal database. In areas without calibration data, however, this algorithm breaks down. Building and updating a dense signal database is labor intensive, expensive, and even impossible in some areas. Researchers are continually searching for better algorithms to create and update dense databases more efficiently. In this paper, we propose a scalable indoor positioning algorithm that works both in surveyed and unsurveyed areas. We first propose Minimum Inverse Distance (MID) algorithm to build a virtual database with uniformly distributed virtual Reference Points (RP). The area covered by the virtual RPs can be larger than the surveyed area. A Local Gaussian Process (LGP) is then applied to estimate the virtual RPs' RSSI values based on the crowdsourced training data. Finally, we improve the Bayesian algorithm to estimate the user's location using the virtual database. All the parameters are optimized by simulations, and the new algorithm is tested on real-case scenarios. The results show that the new algorithm improves the accuracy by 25.5% in the surveyed area, with an average positioning error below 2.2 m for 80% of the cases. Moreover, the proposed algorithm can localize the users in the neighboring unsurveyed area. PMID:26999139

  15. Local and Global Limits on Visual Processing in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been linked to impaired performance on a range of visual processing tasks (e.g. detection of coherent motion and contour detection). It has been proposed that this is due to a general inability to integrate visual information at a global level. To test this theory, we assessed the performance of people with schizophrenia on a battery of tasks designed to probe voluntary averaging in different visual domains. Twenty-three outpatients with schizophrenia (mean age: 40±8 years; 3 female) and 20 age-matched control participants (mean age 39±9 years; 3 female) performed a motion coherence task and three equivalent noise (averaging) tasks, the latter allowing independent quantification of local and global limits on visual processing of motion, orientation and size. All performance measures were indistinguishable between the two groups (ps>0.05, one-way ANCOVAs), with one exception: participants with schizophrenia pooled fewer estimates of local orientation than controls when estimating average orientation (p = 0.01, one-way ANCOVA). These data do not support the notion of a generalised visual integration deficit in schizophrenia. Instead, they suggest that distinct visual dimensions are differentially affected in schizophrenia, with a specific impairment in the integration of visual orientation information. PMID:25689281

  16. Three-dimensional line interpretation via local processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentland, Alexander P.; Kuo, Jeff

    1990-10-01

    The interpretation of line drawings is known to be very difficult, and has a long history in vision research. However for certain restricted but important types of drawings we have been able to produce good 3-D interpretations quite efficiently using only local image-plane computations. The types of drawings we can handle are line drawings of 3-D space curves, for instance, a drawing of the 3-D path followed by a butterfly or a line drawing of a potato chip. Such line drawings are, of course, intrinsically ambiguous - there is simply not enough information in the 2-D image to arrive at a unique 3-D interpretation. Despite this difficulty, there remains the fact that for any given image all people see pretty much exactly the same 3-D interpretation (or sometimes a small number of interpretations). People, therefore, must be bringing additional knowledge or assumptions to the problem. In this paper we show that by picking the smoothest 3-D space curve that is consistent with the image data we can obtain a 3-D interpretation which is very similar to the people's interpretation. The teleological motivation for selecting the smoothest 3-D space curve is that it is the most stable 3-D interpretation, and thus in one sense the most likely 3-D interpretation. The process of computing the smoothest 3-D space curve is carried out by simple, local processing that can be implemented by a neural network.

  17. Extension in the Colorado Plateau/Basin and Range Transition Zone, Central Utah: An Active or Passive Process?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Chapman, D. S.; Doerner, W.

    2007-12-01

    The Colorado Plateau-Great Basin transition zone (TZ) in central Utah is a presently extending lithospheric block composed of previously stable Proterozoic lithosphere. TZ extension may be driven by high topography resulting from overthickening during the Laramide Orogeny and passive plate boundary forces similar to the Great Basin. However, high TZ topography coupled with a thinned lithosphere may indicate dynamic mantle upwelling and active processes acting within the TZ. To investigate the active vs. passive rifting hypotheses we have collected 56 new broadband and 9 long-period MT stations to merge two existing MT lines for a combined length of 400~km (124 sites) covering the eastern Great Basin into the Colorado Plateau at a latitude of ~38.5°N. We have also collected over 300 new heat production and thermal conductivity measurements across the southwest to develop a thermal model of the eastern Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau. MT data show a semi-contiguous highly conductive body in the lower crust of the eastern Great Basin that rises to a shallow depth of <20~km beneath the TZ. This conductive layer appears to be connected to the surface by a series of symmetric rift related normal faults mapped at the surface. These normal faults may be acting as pathways for large-scale fluid connection between the upper and lower crust. MT inversion results suggest an electrical anisotropy factor >3 in the upper mantle with an enhanced conductivity in a N-S orientation that is in agreement with observations of fast seismic SKS split direction. We propose that anisotropy observations may be due to small degrees of interconnected partial melt aligned with a N-S geologic strike beneath the Basin and Range. A thermal model, combining measured thermophysical properties with existing heat flow data, MT measurements, and estimates of seismogenic depth is used to predict lithospheric thickness and mantle temperature variations along the MT profile. Lithospheric thicknesses

  18. Passive and motivated perception of emotional faces: qualitative and quantitative changes in the face processing network.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Laurie R; Decety, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Emotionally expressive faces are processed by a distributed network of interacting sub-cortical and cortical brain regions. The components of this network have been identified and described in large part by the stimulus properties to which they are sensitive, but as face processing research matures interest has broadened to also probe dynamic interactions between these regions and top-down influences such as task demand and context. While some research has tested the robustness of affective face processing by restricting available attentional resources, it is not known whether face network processing can be augmented by increased motivation to attend to affective face stimuli. Short videos of people expressing emotions were presented to healthy participants during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Motivation to attend to the videos was manipulated by providing an incentive for improved recall performance. During the motivated condition, there was greater coherence among nodes of the face processing network, more widespread correlation between signal intensity and performance, and selective signal increases in a task-relevant subset of face processing regions, including the posterior superior temporal sulcus and right amygdala. In addition, an unexpected task-related laterality effect was seen in the amygdala. These findings provide strong evidence that motivation augments co-activity among nodes of the face processing network and the impact of neural activity on performance. These within-subject effects highlight the necessity to consider motivation when interpreting neural function in special populations, and to further explore the effect of task demands on face processing in healthy brains. PMID:22768287

  19. Passive Localization of Mixed Far-Field and Near-Field Sources without Estimating the Number of Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Tao, Haihong; Rao, Xuan; Su, Jia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs) and near-field sources (NFSs) without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D) spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25668212

  20. Passive localization of mixed far-field and near-field sources without estimating the number of sources.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian; Tao, Haihong; Rao, Xuan; Su, Jia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs) and near-field sources (NFSs) without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D) spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25668212

  1. Regularized matched-mode processing for source localization.

    PubMed

    Collison, N E; Dosso, S E

    2000-06-01

    This paper develops a new approach to matched-mode processing (MMP) for ocean acoustic source localization. MMP consists of decomposing far-field acoustic data measured at an array of sensors to obtain the excitations of the propagating modes, then matching these with modeled replica excitations computed for a grid of possible source locations. However, modal decomposition can be ill-posed and unstable if the sensor array does not provide an adequate spatial sampling of the acoustic field (i.e., the problem is underdetermined). For such cases, standard decomposition methods yield minimum-norm solutions that are biased towards zero. Although these methods provide a mathematical solution (i.e., a stable solution that fits the data), they may not represent the most physically meaningful solution. The new approach of regularized matched-mode processing (RMMP) carries out an independent modal decomposition prior to comparison with the replica excitations for each grid point, using the replica itself as the a priori estimate in a regularized inversion. For grid points at or near the source location, this should provide a more physically meaningful decomposition; at other points, the procedure provides a stable inversion. In this paper, RMMP is compared to standard MMP and matched-field processing for a series of realistic synthetic test cases, including a variety of noise levels and sensor array configurations, as well as the effects of environmental mismatch. PMID:10875355

  2. Novel Surface Passivation Technique for Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Perovskite PV Cells.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Karen, Akiya; Miyano, Kenjiro

    2016-02-24

    Low-temperature solution-processed perovskite solar cells are attracting immense interest due to their ease of fabrication and potential for mass production on flexible substrates. However, the unfavorable surface properties of planar substrates often lead to large variations in perovskite crystal size and weak charge extractions at interfaces, resulting in inferior performance. Here, we report the improved performance, reproducibility, and high stability of "p-i-n" planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. The key fabrication process is the addition of the amine-polymer poly[(9,9-bis(3'-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN-P1) to a simple spin-coating process. The PFN-P1 works as a surfactant and helps promote uniform crystallization. As a result, perovskite films with PFN-P1 have a uniform distribution of grain sizes and improved open circuit voltage. Devices with PFN-P1 showed the best efficiency (13.2%), with a small standard deviation (0.40), out of 60 cells. Moreover, ∼90% of the initial efficiency was retained over more than 6 months. Additionally, devices fabricated from PFN-P1 mixed perovskite films showed higher stability under continuous operation at maximum power point over 150 h. Our results show that this approach is simple and effective for improving device performance, reproducibility, and stability by modifying perovskite properties with PFN-P1. Because of the simplicity of the fabrication process and reliable performance increase, this approach marks important progress in low-temperature solution-processed perovskite solar cells. PMID:26821862

  3. Enclosed passive infraversion lavage-drainage system (EPILDS): a novel safe technique for local management of early stage bile leakage and pancreatic fistula Post Pancreatoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Zhang, Wenzhi; Feng, Yuquan; Su, Ming; Dong, Jiahong; Huang, Zhiqiang

    2014-04-01

    This study's objective was to test the new drainage apparatus called enclosed passive infraversion lavage-drainage system (EPILDS) in the treatment of bile leakage and pancreatic fistula Post Pancreatoduodenectomys. The EPILDS device has a design of a siphon. The inlet bag that contains the rinse liquid is put lower than the abdominal lacuna to be washed but higher than the outlet bag. The hydrostatic pressure difference between the inlet and outlet bags constitutes the driving force of the flow. The three-way cock valves are installed in the inlet and outlet tubes to facilitate the washing of occluded tubes. Two side by side Penrose drainage tubes were placed during the operation. One tube passed through the posterior side of pancreatico-jejunal and biliary-jejunal anastomoses, right paracolic gutter, and exited through an opening made in the right lower abdomen. Second tube came from the smaller sac, went through the anterior side of pancreatico-jejunal and biliary-jejunal anastomoses, and exited through an opening made in the left upper abdomen. Using this system, we successfully treated two patients. Both inlet and outlet volumes were observed to verify that the outlet exceeds the inlet volume. In conclusion, EPILDS has a simple and practical design. It changes the active washing process into a passive one, in which the input is controlled by the exiting fluid. This is the effective and safe system for treatment of severe bile leakage and pancreatic fistula at the early postoperative stage. PMID:24006154

  4. Method of drying passivated micromachines by dewetting from a liquid-based process

    DOEpatents

    Houston, Michael R.; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya; Srinivasan, Uthara

    2000-01-01

    A method of fabricating a micromachine includes the step of constructing a low surface energy film on the micromachine. The micromachine is then rinsed with a rinse liquid that has a high surface energy, relative to the low surface energy film, to produce a contact angle of greater than 90.degree. between the low surface energy film and the rinse liquid. This relatively large contact angle causes any rinse liquid on the micromachine to be displaced from the micromachine when the micromachine is removed from the rinse liquid. In other words, the micromachine is dried by dewetting from a liquid-based process. Thus, a separate evaporative drying step is not required, as the micromachine is removed from the liquid-based process in a dry state. The relatively large contact angle also operates to prevent attractive capillary forces between micromachine components, thereby preventing contact and adhesion between adjacent microstructure surfaces. The low surface energy film may be constructed with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer film. The processing of the invention avoids the use of environmentally harmful, health-hazardous chemicals.

  5. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation on Passively Excited Flows by Distributed Local Hot Sources Settled at the D" Layer Below Hotspots and/or Large-Scale Cool Masses at Subduction Zones Within the Static Layered Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.; Matsubara, K.; Ishida, M.

    2001-12-01

    To unveil dynamic process associated with three-dimensional unsteady mantle convection, we carried out numerical simulation on passively exerted flows by simplified local hot sources just above the CMB and large-scale cool masses beneath smoothed subduction zones. During the study, we used our individual code developed with the finite difference method. The basic three equations are for the continuity, the motion with the Boussinesq (incompressible) approximation, and the (thermal) energy conservation. The viscosity of our model is sensitive to temperature. To get time integration with high precision, we used the Newton method. In detail, the size and thermal energy of the hot or cool sources are not uniform along the latitude, because we could not select uniform local volumes assigned for the sources within the finite difference grids throughout the mantle. Our results, thus, accompany some latitude dependence. First, we treated the case of the hotspots, neglecting the contribution of the subduction zones. The local hot sources below the currently active hotspots were settled as dynamic driving forces included in the initial condition. Before starting the calculation, we assumed that the mantle was statically layered with zero velocity component. The thermal anomalies inserted instantaneously in the initial condition do excite dynamically passive flows. The type of the initial hot sources was not 'plume' but 'thermal.' The simulation results represent that local upwelling flows which were directly excited over the initial heat sources reached the upper mantle by approximately 30 My during the calculation. Each of the direct upwellings above the hotspots has its own dynamic potential to exert concentric down- and up-welling flows, alternately, at large distances. Simultaneously, the direct upwellings interact mutually within the spherical mantle. As an interesting feature, we numerically observed secondary upwellings somewhere in a wide region covering east Eurasia

  6. Potential N processing by southern Everglades freshwater marshes: Are Everglades marshes passive conduits for nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Anderson, William T.; Childers, Daniel L.; Gaiser, Evelyn E.; Madden, Christopher J.; Rudnick, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The degree of hydrological connectivity in wetlands plays a vital role in determining the flux of energy, material, and nutrients across these wet landscapes. During the last century, compartmentalization of hydrologic flows in the Florida Everglades by canals and levees has had a profound impact on the natural timing and supply of freshwater and nutrients across the southern Everglades. Nitrogen (N) is an understudied nutrient in the phosphorus-limited Everglades; it plays an important role in many Everglades processes. To gain a better understanding of the overall N-dynamics in southern Everglades' marshes and the role that canals play in the distribution of N across this landscape, we analyzed δ 15N natural abundance data for the primary ecosystem components (the macrophyte Cladium jamaicense, marl soils, peat soils, and periphyton). Three sample transects were established in the three main basins of the southern Everglades: Shark River Slough, Taylor Slough, and the C-111 basin. Each transect included sample sites near canal inflows, in interior marshes, and at the estuarine ecotone. Natural abundance δ 15N signatures provided insights into processes that may be enriching the 15N content of ecosystem components across the marsh landscape. We also conducted a combined analysis of δ 15N data, tissue N concentrations, and water column N data to provide a broad overview of N cycling in the freshwater marshes of the southern Everglades. The primary trend that emerged from each basin was a significant 15N enrichment of all ecosystem components at near-canal sites, relative to more downstream sample sites. These data suggest that the phosphorus-limited marshes of the southern Everglades are not inactive conduits for N. Rather, these marshes appear to be actively cycling and processing N as it flows from the canal-marsh interface through downstream freshwater marshes. This finding has important implications to downstream coastal estuaries, including Florida Bay, and

  7. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma process for InP passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Z.; Li, M.; Wang, Y.; Irene, E. A.

    1993-05-01

    In-situ ellipsometry has been used to monitor electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma oxidation of InP at room temperature in the shadow plasma between a shutter and the sample. This process leaves no detectable excess P at the InP-oxide interface. A capping layer of SiO2 was grown by ECR chemical-vapor deposition at a substrate temperature of 150 deg C. The samples were rapid-thermal annealed at 500 deg C for 1 min in an oxygen ambient. The dielectric layers were evaluated by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements on metal-oxide n-type InP capacitors.

  8. Influence of Second Language Proficiency and Syntactic Structure Similarities on the Sensitivity and Processing of English Passive Sentence in Late Chinese-English Bilinguists: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Xin; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of L2 proficiency and syntactic similarity on English passive sentence processing, the present ERP study asked 40 late Chinese-English bilinguals (27 females and 13 males, mean age = 23.88) with high or intermediate L2 proficiency to read the sentences carefully and to indicate for each sentence whether or not it was…

  9. Weathering processes in clayey sediments - on local to catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstsen, Vibeke

    2013-04-01

    In Denmark, postglacial weathering processes have introduced considerable changes in the inherited properties of the young sediments of Weichselian age. Over the last 12.000 years, oxidation and acidification are the main responsible processes for the changes that have taken place in water recharge areas. The distribution of nitrate has been shown to be closely related to the geochemical environment above the interface between the oxidized and reduced sediments and present in the oxic environment only. In the present study, the formation of oxidized geochemical environments was studied at different scales, from local to catchment scale, in areas dominated by clayey till. Sediment samples were collected in the field from surface and down to below the redox interface and described by color, redoximorphic features, and sediment type and analyzed for e.g., total amount of reduced compounds and reduced compounds (pyrite, ferrous iron, and organic matter). The results were used to describe the spatial development of oxidized environments and to identify the smallest possible scale at witch nitrate reduction in the subsurface can be assessed for Danish catchments.

  10. Local permeability changes, passive degassing and related gas hazard at the Baia di Levante area (Vulcano island, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diliberto, Iole Serena; Cangemi, Marianna; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Madonia, Paolo; Pedone, Maria; Fabio Pisciotta, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Vulcano, the southernmost island of the Aeolian archipelago (Italy), is presently characterized by active fumarolic fields located along the rim of La Fossa cone and the shoreline of the Baia di Levante beach, in the northern portion of the island.The Baia di Levante fumarolic vents are fed by a shallow hydrothermal aquifer heated by magmatic gases rising from the deep down, with a spatial distribution strongly affected by the local fracture network. These fractures are the expression of a deformation field, dominated by a northward motion to Lipari, abruptly decaying to the Vulcanello peninsula, immediately northward of the Baia di Levante beach. Variable rates of fluid transfer to the surface, following permeability changes affecting the fracture network are among the results of stress field variations over time which induce fluctuations in the pressure state of the hydrothermal system. Under these conditions, increments in hydrothermal gas flow, able to cause an increase of gas hazard, could be determined by a rearrangement of the shallow permeability distribution induced by changes in the deformation field. In this case not associated to any variation in the volcanic activity state. Since 2009 an huge gas flow increment has been noticed in some undersea vents of the Baia di Levante area, leading to increase of gas hazard in their immediate surroundings. On the contrary, the acquired data from the INGV volcanic surveillance program didn't suggest any correlated increase of the magmatic fluid component in the degassing activity.In July 2015, we carried out multi-parametric geochemical surveys in this area, based on direct (thermocouple) and indirect (thermal infrared camera and pyrometer) soil temperature, soil CO2 flux, atmospheric concentration of CO2 and H2S measurements at low elevation (one meter a.s.l.). The chemical and isotopic composition of low temperature fumarole gases was determined too.The comparison of the new data with previous surveys carried out

  11. Investigation of radio astronomy image processing techniques for use in the passive millimetre-wave security screening environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher T.; Hutchinson, Simon; Salmon, Neil A.; Wilkinson, Peter N.; Cameron, Colin D.

    2014-06-01

    Image processing techniques can be used to improve the cost-effectiveness of future interferometric Passive MilliMetre Wave (PMMW) imagers. The implementation of such techniques will allow for a reduction in the number of collecting elements whilst ensuring adequate image fidelity is maintained. Various techniques have been developed by the radio astronomy community to enhance the imaging capability of sparse interferometric arrays. The most prominent are Multi- Frequency Synthesis (MFS) and non-linear deconvolution algorithms, such as the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) and variations of the CLEAN algorithm. This investigation focuses on the implementation of these methods in the defacto standard for radio astronomy image processing, the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package, building upon the discussion presented in Taylor et al., SPIE 8362-0F. We describe the image conversion process into a CASA suitable format, followed by a series of simulations that exploit the highlighted deconvolution and MFS algorithms assuming far-field imagery. The primary target application used for this investigation is an outdoor security scanner for soft-sided Heavy Goods Vehicles. A quantitative analysis of the effectiveness of the aforementioned image processing techniques is presented, with thoughts on the potential cost-savings such an approach could yield. Consideration is also given to how the implementation of these techniques in CASA might be adapted to operate in a near-field target environment. This may enable a much wider usability by the imaging community outside of radio astronomy and thus would be directly relevant to portal screening security systems in the microwave and millimetre wave bands.

  12. Linking margin morphology to sedimentary processes along the US East Coast passive continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, D. S.; ten Brink, U. S.; Andrews, B.; Twichell, D.

    2010-12-01

    The morphology of the US East Coast continental slope and rise has a surprising amount of along-margin variation. Multibeam bathymetry datasets that cover the slope and rise from Cape Hatteras to Georges Bank provide a unique opportunity to analyze both first-order and higher-order morphologies, including submarine canyons, landslides, slumps and sedimentary bedforms. Using the morphological characterization coupled with seismic and core data, we hope to better understand how ancient and modern sedimentary processes control the shape of the margin. As a first step, the margin bathymetry was subdivided into 20 shelf-perpendicular regions from which several statistical parameters were analyzed. Within each region, the slope gradient was computed separately for down-slope and across-slope aspect directions. Distribution curves in each region for down- and across-slope gradients and seafloor roughness as functions of depth were grouped according to their statistical similarities. Four basic groups emerge and each approximately corresponds to known regions of Quaternary glacial, fluvial, current-controlled and gravity-driven sedimentary transport. In the second part of the study, published lithologic and chronostratigraphic frameworks of this margin were used to examine the relationship between seafloor morphology and the underlying geology. Along the upper continental rise, thick Quaternary deposits appear to have a strong influence on the short- and long-wavelength variation in rise topography, revealing a complex interplay between down-slope and along-slope sediment transport. Despite the close correlation between continental slope morphology and Quaternary environmental conditions, initial results suggest that the underlying, older, stratigraphy also plays a primary role. Along the continental slope, Quaternary processes appear to control the relief of slope-confined canyons and other short-wavelength (<5 km) topography, but the first order morphology of the slope

  13. Effect of passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition and sputtering processes on Si quantum dot superlattice to generate high photocurrent for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksudur Rahman, Mohammad; Higo, Akio; Sekhar, Halubai; Erman Syazwan, Mohd; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka; Samukawa, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    The effect of passivation films on a Si quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) was investigated to generate high photocurrent in solar-cell applications. Three types of passivation films, sputter-grown amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), hydrogenated a-SiC (a-SiC:H), and atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (ALD-Al2O3), were used to passivate the Si QDSLs containing a stack of four 4 nm Si nanodisks (NDs) and 2 nm silicon carbide (SiC) films fabricated by neutral beam etching (NBE). Because of the high surface-to-volume ratio typically present in quantum Si-NDs formed in the top-down NBE process, there is a tendency to form larger surface dangling bonds on untreated Si-ND surfaces as well as to have short distance (<10 nm) between high-aspect-ratio nanopillars of stacked 4 nm Si-NDs/2 nm SiC films, which conventionally sputter SiC films cannot uniformly cover. Therefore, we optimized the passivation techniques with an ALD-Al2O3 film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis helped to explain the surface morphology before and after the passivation of the QDSLs. After the completion of the passivation process, the quality of the top surface films of the QDSLs was analyzed from the surface roughness by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis, which revealed that ALD-Al2O3 passivated films had the smallest roughness (RMS) of 1.09 nm with respect to sputter-grown a-SiC (RMS: 1.75 nm) and a-SiC:H (RMS: 1.54 nm) films. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) revealed that ALD-Al2O3 passivation decreased the surface-leakage current as a result of proper passivation of side-wall surface defects in the QDSLs. The carrier transport characteristics were extracted from the QDSLs using the photovoltaic (PV) properties of p++/i/n+ solar cells, where the QDSLs consisted of different passivation layers acting as intermediate layers (i-layers) between the high-doping-density p++ Si (1 × 1020 cm-3) and n+ Si (1 × 1019 cm-3) substrates. High-doping-density p++ Si acted as a hole

  14. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  15. A novel local anti-colorectal cancer drug delivery system: negative lipidoid nanoparticles with a passive target via a size-dependent pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weifeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Guo, Yibing; Ju, Shaoqing; Wang, Huimin

    2013-09-01

    The nontoxic, targeted and effective delivery of nucleic acid drugs remains an important challenge for clinical development. Here, we describe a novel negative lipidoid nanoparticle delivery system, providing entrapment-based transfection agents for local delivery of siRNA to the colorectal cancer focus. The delivery system was synthesized with lipidoid material 98N12-5(1), mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride and cholesterol at a desired molar ratio to realize the anionic surface charge of particles, which could alleviate to a larger degree the inflammatory response and immune stimulation of the organism, embodying dramatic biocompatibility. In particular, mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride was selected to ameliorate the stability of the delivery system and protection of nucleic acids by extending the tail length of the carbons, crucial also to neutralize the positive charge of 98N12-5(1) to form a resultant anionic particle. In vivo experiments revealed that a particle size of 90 nm perfectly realized a passive target in a size-dependent manner and did not affect the function of the liver and kidneys by a local delivery method, enema. We clarified that the uptake of negative lipidoid nanoparticles internalized through a lipid raft endocytotic pathway with low cytotoxicity, strong biocompatibility and high efficacy. This study suggests that negative lipidoid nanoparticles with enema delivery costitute, uniquely and appropriately, a local anti-colorectal cancer nucleic acid drug delivery platform, and the application of similar modes may be feasible in other therapeutic settings.

  16. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) of High Aspect Ratio SiC Microstructures using a Time-Multiplexed Etch-Passivate Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2006-01-01

    High aspect ratio silicon carbide (SiC) microstructures are needed for microengines and other harsh environment micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Previously, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of low aspect ratio (AR less than or = 1) deep (greater than 100 micron) trenches in SiC has been reported. However, existing DRIE processes for SiC are not well-suited for definition of high aspect ratio features because such simple etch-only processes provide insufficient control over sidewall roughness and slope. Therefore, we have investigated the use of a time-multiplexed etch-passivate (TMEP) process, which alternates etching with polymer passivation of the etch sidewalls. An optimized TMEP process was used to etch high aspect ratio (AR greater than 5) deep (less than 100 micron) trenches in 6H-SiC. Power MEMS structures (micro turbine blades) in 6H-SiC were also fabricated.

  17. Comparison of the reversed passive Arthus and local Shwartzman reactions of rabbit skin: effects of the long-acting PAF antagonist UK-74,505

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Keith E; Williams, Timothy J; Rossi, Adriano G

    1997-01-01

    By using the selective, potent and long acting platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist, UK-74,505, we investigated the role of PAF in a local Shwartzman reaction (LSR) and a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in rabbit skin. For comparison, we also studied the effect of the PAF antagonist on neutrophil aggregation in vitro and on acute inflammatory responses induced by intradermally (i.d.) injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PAF, bradykinin and zymosan-activated plasma.Neutrophil aggregation was assessed photometrically. Haemorrhage, oedema formation, platelet deposition and neutrophil accumulation were quantified in rabbit skin by measuring the accumulation of i.v. injected 51Cr-labelled red blood cells (RBC), 125I-labelled human serum albumin, 111In-labelled platelets and 111In-labelled neutrophils respectively.UK-74,505 inhibited in vitro neutrophil aggregation induced by PAF but not by leukotriene B4. When injected i.v. into rabbits UK-74,505 suppressed oedema formation in response to i.d. PAF for up to 4 h but had no effect on oedema induced by bradykinin or zymosan-activated plasma.Oedema formation, but not neutrophil accumulation, produced during the RPA reaction was significantly inhibited by i.v. UK-74,505. The PAF antagonist also suppressed 111In-platelet but not 111In-neutrophil accumulation in response to i.d. LPS. UK-74,505 did not affect haemorrhage or oedema formation produced during the LPS-mediated LSR.The results demonstrate that PAF is an important mediator of oedema formation, but not neutrophil accumulation, in the immune-complex mediated RPA reaction in rabbit skin. PAF also appears to be required for platelet, but not neutrophil, accumulation in response to locally injected LPS. Our studies do not suggest a role for PAF in the LPS-mediated LSR. PMID:9105704

  18. Local Seismic Event Detection Using Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. D.; Fouch, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The large footprint of regularly-spaced broadband seismometers afforded by EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) [www.usarray.org] presents an unprecedented opportunity to develop novel seismic array processing methods. Here we report preliminary results from a new automated method for detecting small local seismic events within the footprint of the TA using image processing techniques. The overarching goal is to develop a new methodology for automated searches of large seismic datasets for signals that are difficult to detect by traditional means, such as STA/LTA triggering algorithms. We first process the raw broadband data for each station by bandpass filtering at 7-19 Hz and integrating the absolute value of the velocity waveform over a sequence of 5-second intervals. We further combine the integrated values of all three orthogonal channels into a single new time series with a 5-second sampling rate. This new time series is analogous to a measurement of the total seismic energy recorded at the station in each 5-second interval; we call this time series Integrated Ground Motion (IGM). Each sample is compared to a sliding longer-term average to remove diurnal and long-term noise effects. We create an image file by mapping each station location to an equivalent position in a blank image array, and use a modified Voronoi tessellation algorithm to assign each pixel in the image to the IGM value of the nearest station. We assign a value of zero if the pixel is more than a maximum distance from the nearest station. We apply 2-dimensional spatial image filtering techniques to remove large-scale features affecting much of the image, as we assume these likely result from teleseismic events. We also filter the time series to remove very small-scale features from noise spikes affecting a single seismic station. The resulting image contains only features of regional scale affecting 2 or more stations. For each of the remaining image features, we find the center

  19. Local Risk-Minimization for Defaultable Claims with Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, Francesca; Cretarola, Alessandra

    2012-06-15

    We study the local risk-minimization approach for defaultable claims with random recovery at default time, seen as payment streams on the random interval [0,{tau} Logical-And T], where T denotes the fixed time-horizon. We find the pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy in the case when the agent information takes into account the possibility of a default event (local risk-minimization with G-strategies) and we provide an application in the case of a corporate bond. We also discuss the problem of finding a pseudo-locally risk-minimizing strategy if we suppose the agent obtains her information only by observing the non-defaultable assets.

  20. Mechanism of cation exchange process for epitaxy of superconducting mercury barium calcium copper oxide films and passive microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua

    The record high superconducting transition temperature (T c) in Hg-based High temperature superconducting (HTS) cuprates make them very promising for both fundamental physics and practical applications. The high volatile nature of Hg presents a major challenge in epitaxy of high quality Hg-based HTS films. In a novel cation exchange process developed by our group recently, epitaxial HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta (Hg-1212) films can be obtained by diffusing volatile Tl cations out of, and simultaneously diffusing Hg cations into, the lattice of epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 (Tl-2212) or TlBa 2CaCu2O7 (Tl-1212) precursor films. Aiming at the remained issues in understanding the mechanism of the cation exchange (CE) process, this thesis work has studied the reversibility of CE. We have found that the CE process is completely reversible between Hg-1212 and Tl-2212, confirming further the thermal perturbation diffusion model. One of the experimental works unveiled that the conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 involves two steps: conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-1212 via CE followed by Tl intercalation to form double Tl--O plans in each unit cell. Two improvements have been made in raising the quality of the Hg-1212 films. First, by successfully introducing micro-channels in Tl-1212 precursor with reversible CE, purer HTS Hg-1212 thin films have been obtained. Secondly, by pinning lattice with nonvolatile Re atoms, the surface morphology of Hg-1212 films have been improved. In addition to making the high quality Hg-1212 films, we have fabricated a two-pole X-band Hg-1212 microstrip filter and then investigated its nonlinearity by measuring the third-order intermodulation (IM3) signals since the major limitation for real application still comes from the nonlinearity. By a comparison between different structural materials of Hg-1212, Tl-2212 and YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO), the third-order intercept (IP3) of the Hg-1212 filter is consistently higher than that in the YBCO and Tl-2212. The surprising

  1. Experimental investigations of thermal-hydraulic processes arising during operation of the passive safety systems used in new projects of nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.; Kalyakin, D. S.

    2014-05-01

    The results obtained from experimental investigations into thermal-hydraulic processes that take place during operation of the passive safety systems used in new-generation reactor plants constructed on the basis of VVER technology are presented. The experiments were carried out on the model rigs available at the Leipunskii Institute for Physics and Power Engineering. The processes through which interaction occurs between the opposite flows of saturated steam and cold water moving in the vertical steam line of the additional system for passively flooding the core from the second-stage hydro accumulators are studied. The specific features pertinent to undeveloped boiling of liquid on a single horizontal tube heated by steam and steam-gas mixture that is typical for of the condensing operating mode of a VVER reactor steam generator are investigated.

  2. Realistic Modeling of Local Dynamo Processes on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic fields are usually observed in the quiet Sun as small-scale elements that cover the entire solar surface (the “salt-and-pepper” patterns in line-of-sight magnetograms). By using 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations, we find that these fields result from a local dynamo action in the top layers of the convection zone, where extremely weak “seed” magnetic fields (e.g., from a 10-6 G) can locally grow above the mean equipartition field to a stronger than 2000 G field localized in magnetic structures. Our results reveal that the magnetic flux is predominantly generated in regions of small-scale helical downflows. We find that the local dynamo action takes place mostly in a shallow, about 500 km deep, subsurface layer, from which the generated field is transported into the deeper layers by convective downdrafts. We demonstrate that the observed dominance of vertical magnetic fields at the photosphere and horizontal fields above the photosphere can be explained by small-scale magnetic loops produced by the dynamo. Such small-scale loops play an important role in the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere and their detection in observations is critical for understanding the local dynamo action on the Sun.

  3. Realistic Modeling of Local Dynamo Processes on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic fields are usually observed in the quiet Sun as small-scale elements that cover the entire solar surface (the “salt-and-pepper” patterns in line-of-sight magnetograms). By using 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations, we find that these fields result from a local dynamo action in the top layers of the convection zone, where extremely weak “seed” magnetic fields (e.g., from a 10‑6 G) can locally grow above the mean equipartition field to a stronger than 2000 G field localized in magnetic structures. Our results reveal that the magnetic flux is predominantly generated in regions of small-scale helical downflows. We find that the local dynamo action takes place mostly in a shallow, about 500 km deep, subsurface layer, from which the generated field is transported into the deeper layers by convective downdrafts. We demonstrate that the observed dominance of vertical magnetic fields at the photosphere and horizontal fields above the photosphere can be explained by small-scale magnetic loops produced by the dynamo. Such small-scale loops play an important role in the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere and their detection in observations is critical for understanding the local dynamo action on the Sun.

  4. Improvement of bias-stability in amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by using solution-processed Y2O3 passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Sungjin; Mativenga, Mallory; Kim, Youngoo; Jang, Jin

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate back channel improvement of back-channel-etch amorphous-indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors by using solution-processed yttrium oxide (Y2O3) passivation. Two different solvents, which are acetonitrile (35%) + ethylene glycol (65%), solvent A and deionized water, solvent B are investigated for the spin-on process of the Y2O3 passivation—performed after patterning source/drain (S/D) Mo electrodes by a conventional HNO3-based wet-etch process. Both solvents yield devices with good performance but those passivated by using solvent B exhibit better light and bias stability. Presence of yttrium at the a-IGZO back interface, where it occupies metal vacancy sites, is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passivation effect of yttrium is more significant when solvent A is used because of the existence of more metal vacancies, given that the alcohol (65% ethylene glycol) in solvent A may dissolve the metal oxide (a-IGZO) through the formation of alkoxides and water.

  5. Investigation of the surface passivation mechanism through an Ag-doped Al-rich film using a solution process.

    PubMed

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2016-01-14

    Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device applications. Previously, it was reported that a low cost sol-gel derived Al-rich zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) film serves as an effective passivating layer for p-type silicon but is not effective for n-type silicon. Herein, we studied the elemental composition of the film and the interfacial structure of ZnO:Al:Ag/n-Si using TEM, XPS, FTIR, and SIMS analyses. The XPS analysis revealed that Ag-rich zones randomly formed in the film near the ZnO:Al:Ag//n-Si interface, which induced a positive charge at the interface. The maximal value of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff ≈ 1581 μs) is obtained for a wafer using the ZnO:Al:Ag passivating layer with RAg/Zn = 2%. The corresponding limiting surface recombination velocity is ∼16 cm s(-1). The FTIR absorption area of Si-H bonds is used to calculate the hydrogen content in the film. The hydrogen content is increased with increasing Ag content up to RAg/Zn = 2% to a maximal value of 3.89 × 10(22) atoms per cm(3) from 3.03 × 10(22) atoms per cm(3) for RAg/Zn = 0%. The positive charge induced at the interface may cause band bending, which would produce an electric field that repels the minority charge carriers from the interface to the bulk of n-Si. Two basic phenomena, chemical passivation due to Si-H bonding and field effect passivation due to the charge induced at the interface, have been observed for effective passivation of the n-Si surface. An implied Voc of 688.1 mV is obtained at an illumination intensity of 1 sun. PMID:26661502

  6. Challenges of Engaging Local Stakeholders for Statewide Program Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.; Leuci, Mary; Stewart, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The University of Missouri Extension needed to develop an annual program review process that collaboratively engaged county-level stakeholders. The results from the first 2 years highlight the results, challenges, and implications of the design process. The annual review process needs to be adaptive, responsive, and reflective from year to year…

  7. Local and Global Processing: Observations from a Remote Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Fagot, Joel

    2008-01-01

    In Experiment 1, a normal adult population drawn from a remote culture (Himba) in northern Namibia made similarity matches to [Navon, D. (1977). Forest before trees: The precedence of global features in visual perception. "Cognitive Psychology", 9, 353-383] hierarchical figures. The Himba showed a local bias stronger than that has been previously…

  8. Local and global visual processing and eating disorder traits: An event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, Jennifer; Rose, Mark; van Velzen, Jose; de Fockert, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that individuals with eating disorders show a stronger local processing bias and/or a weaker global bias in visual processing than typical individuals. In this study, healthy participants with varying scores on the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) performed the Navon task, a standard task of local and global visual processing, whilst electrophysiological measures were recorded. Global stimuli were presented that were made up of many local parts, and the information between levels was either compatible or incompatible. Participants were instructed to report the identity of either a global or a local target shape, while ignoring the other level. Higher EDE-Q scores were associated with enhanced amplitude of the P3 component during local visual processing, as well as greater P1 amplitude during local incompatible trials. These findings support the claim that eating disorders are associated with differences in local and global visual processing. PMID:26777337

  9. Investigation of the surface passivation mechanism through an Ag-doped Al-rich film using a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device applications. Previously, it was reported that a low cost sol-gel derived Al-rich zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) film serves as an effective passivating layer for p-type silicon but is not effective for n-type silicon. Herein, we studied the elemental composition of the film and the interfacial structure of ZnO:Al:Ag/n-Si using TEM, XPS, FTIR, and SIMS analyses. The XPS analysis revealed that Ag-rich zones randomly formed in the film near the ZnO:Al:Ag//n-Si interface, which induced a positive charge at the interface. The maximal value of the effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff ~ 1581 μs) is obtained for a wafer using the ZnO:Al:Ag passivating layer with RAg/Zn = 2%. The corresponding limiting surface recombination velocity is ~16 cm s-1. The FTIR absorption area of Si-H bonds is used to calculate the hydrogen content in the film. The hydrogen content is increased with increasing Ag content up to RAg/Zn = 2% to a maximal value of 3.89 × 1022 atoms per cm3 from 3.03 × 1022 atoms per cm3 for RAg/Zn = 0%. The positive charge induced at the interface may cause band bending, which would produce an electric field that repels the minority charge carriers from the interface to the bulk of n-Si. Two basic phenomena, chemical passivation due to Si-H bonding and field effect passivation due to the charge induced at the interface, have been observed for effective passivation of the n-Si surface. An implied Voc of 688.1 mV is obtained at an illumination intensity of 1 sun.Electronic recombination loss is an important issue for photovoltaic (PV) devices. While it can be reduced by using a passivating layer, most of the techniques used to prepare passivating layers are either not cost effective or not applicable for device

  10. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision.

    PubMed

    Goavec-Mérou, G; Chrétien, N; Friedt, J-M; Sandoz, P; Martin, G; Lenczner, M; Ballandras, S

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates. PMID:24517814

  11. Fast contactless vibrating structure characterization using real time field programmable gate array-based digital signal processing: Demonstrations with a passive wireless acoustic delay line probe and vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goavec-Mérou, G.; Chrétien, N.; Friedt, J.-M.; Sandoz, P.; Martin, G.; Lenczner, M.; Ballandras, S.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrating mechanical structure characterization is demonstrated using contactless techniques best suited for mobile and rotating equipments. Fast measurement rates are achieved using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices as real-time digital signal processors. Two kinds of algorithms are implemented on FPGA and experimentally validated in the case of the vibrating tuning fork. A first application concerns in-plane displacement detection by vision with sampling rates above 10 kHz, thus reaching frequency ranges above the audio range. A second demonstration concerns pulsed-RADAR cooperative target phase detection and is applied to radiofrequency acoustic transducers used as passive wireless strain gauges. In this case, the 250 ksamples/s refresh rate achieved is only limited by the acoustic sensor design but not by the detection bandwidth. These realizations illustrate the efficiency, interest, and potentialities of FPGA-based real-time digital signal processing for the contactless interrogation of passive embedded probes with high refresh rates.

  12. The Community Development Process: The Rediscovery of Local Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, William W.; Biddle, Loureide J.

    The development process in two communities, a mining county in rural Appalachia and a deteriorating neighborhood in a northern industrial city, is presented in case-study form. Concepts and commonly used terms are defined; a process of development is identified that can be used in groups small enough to permit attention to the growth of persons.…

  13. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  14. Remote trap passivation in colloidal quantum dot bulk nano-heterojunctions and its effect in solution-processed solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, Arup K; Pelayo Garcia de Arquer, F; Stavrinadis, Alexandros; Lasanta, Tania; Bernechea, Maria; Diedenhofen, Silke L; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2014-07-16

    More-efficient charge collection and suppressed trap recombination in colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells is achieved by means of a bulk nano-heterojunction (BNH) structure, in which p-type and n-type materials are blended on the nanometer scale. The improved performance of the BNH devices, compared with that of bilayer devices, is displayed in higher photocurrents and higher open-circuit voltages (resulting from a trap passivation mechanism). PMID:24895324

  15. Study of surface passivation as a function of InP closed-ampoule solar cell fabrication processing variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Jenkins, Phillip; Goradia, Manju; Goradia, Chandra; Bailey, Sheila; Weinberg, Irving; Jayne, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various surface preparation procedures, including chemical treatment and anodic or chemical oxidation, closed-ampoule diffusion conditions, and post-diffusion surface preparation and annealing conditions, on the passivating properties of InP have been investigated in order to optimize the fabrication procedures of n(+)p InP solar cells made by closed-ampoule diffusion of sulfur into p-type InP. The InP substrates used were p-type Cd-doped to a level of 1.7 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm, Zn-doped to levels of 2.2 x 10 to the 16th and 1.2 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm, and n-type S-doped to 4.4 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm. The passivating properties have been evaluated from photoluminescence (PL) and conductance-voltage (G-V) data. Good agreement was found between the level of surface passivation and the composition of different surface layers as revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis.

  16. Local Authorities' Experiences of Improving Parental Confidence in the Special Educational Needs Process. LGA Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard; Macleod, Shona; Jeffes, Jennifer; Atkinson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    How can we help parents to understand the special educational needs (SEN) process? What sort of information and support do they need? This report details the results of research with SEN officers (or their equivalent) in 26 local authorities, covering: (1) the referral process; (2) early identification and intervention; (3) local authority and…

  17. Enhanced Local Processing of Dynamic Visual Information in Autism: Evidence from Speed Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Y.; Norton, D. J.; McBain, R.; Gold, J.; Frazier, J. A.; Coyle, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    An important issue for understanding visual perception in autism concerns whether individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder possess an advantage in processing local visual information, and if so, what is the nature of this advantage. Perception of movement speed is a visual process that relies on computation of local spatiotemporal signals…

  18. Absolute and relative pitch: Global versus local processing of chords

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Naomi; Radin, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce notes without any reference note. An ongoing debate exists regarding the benefits or disadvantages of AP in processing music. One of the main issues in this context is whether the categorical perception of pitch in AP possessors may interfere in processing tasks requiring relative pitch (RP). Previous studies, focusing mainly on melodic and interval perception, have obtained inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of AP and RP separately, using isolated chords. Seventy-three musicians were categorized into four groups of high and low AP and RP, and were tested on two tasks: identifying chord types (Task 1), and identifying a single note within a chord (Task 2). A main effect of RP on Task 1 and an interaction between AP and RP in reaction times were found. On Task 2 main effects of AP and RP, and an interaction were found, with highest performance in participants with both high AP and RP. Results suggest that AP and RP should be regarded as two different abilities, and that AP may slow down reaction times for tasks requiring global processing. PMID:24855499

  19. Absolute and relative pitch: Global versus local processing of chords.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Naomi; Radin, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce notes without any reference note. An ongoing debate exists regarding the benefits or disadvantages of AP in processing music. One of the main issues in this context is whether the categorical perception of pitch in AP possessors may interfere in processing tasks requiring relative pitch (RP). Previous studies, focusing mainly on melodic and interval perception, have obtained inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of AP and RP separately, using isolated chords. Seventy-three musicians were categorized into four groups of high and low AP and RP, and were tested on two tasks: identifying chord types (Task 1), and identifying a single note within a chord (Task 2). A main effect of RP on Task 1 and an interaction between AP and RP in reaction times were found. On Task 2 main effects of AP and RP, and an interaction were found, with highest performance in participants with both high AP and RP. Results suggest that AP and RP should be regarded as two different abilities, and that AP may slow down reaction times for tasks requiring global processing. PMID:24855499

  20. The Influence of Local Geometric Effects on Mars Polar Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Using simple, qualitative heat balance models, this paper addresses textures and structures that will result from the evolution of volatile layers by accretion and by ablation. Such phenomena may have global implications that are not apparent when only flat or sloped surfaces are modeled. In general, structures such as mounds or depressions formed out of volatile materials will evolve in shape such that the growth or retreat of any particular surface will be maximized. It can be shown that the local radius of curvature is proportional to the growth or retreat rate. For example, icy surfaces will tend to form facets that face the dominant sun direction. Two such cases are evaluated: a) Features associated with condensation of volatiles, include cold-trapping and redistribution, such as the concentration of frost around the Viking 2 lander [1]. Here I will focus on textures that likely result from the formation of seasonal CO2 deposits. b) Features associated with sublimation of volatiles, such as those described by Ingersoll et. al. [2] result in textured surfaces that affect both the apparent emissivity and albedo. Similar calculations have been performed with respect to the "Swiss cheese" features on the South Polar Cap [3]. Here, I evaluate the likely sublimation rates from optimal ice scarp structures and their implications for the long-term evolution of the polar caps and formation of layered terrain.

  1. Local adaptation in Trinidadian guppies alters ecosystem processes.

    PubMed

    Bassar, Ronald D; Marshall, Michael C; López-Sepulcre, Andrés; Zandonà, Eugenia; Auer, Sonya K; Travis, Joseph; Pringle, Catherine M; Flecker, Alexander S; Thomas, Steven A; Fraser, Douglas F; Reznick, David N

    2010-02-23

    Theory suggests evolutionary change can significantly influence and act in tandem with ecological forces via ecological-evolutionary feedbacks. This theory assumes that significant evolutionary change occurs over ecologically relevant timescales and that phenotypes have differential effects on the environment. Here we test the hypothesis that local adaptation causes ecosystem structure and function to diverge. We demonstrate that populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata), characterized by differences in phenotypic and population-level traits, differ in their impact on ecosystem properties. We report results from a replicated, common garden mesocosm experiment and show that differences between guppy phenotypes result in the divergence of ecosystem structure (algal, invertebrate, and detrital standing stocks) and function (gross primary productivity, leaf decomposition rates, and nutrient flux). These phenotypic effects are further modified by effects of guppy density. We evaluated the generality of these effects by replicating the experiment using guppies derived from two independent origins of the phenotype. Finally, we tested the ability of multiple guppy traits to explain observed differences in the mesocosms. Our findings demonstrate that evolution can significantly affect both ecosystem structure and function. The ecosystem differences reported here are consistent with patterns observed across natural streams and argue that guppies play a significant role in shaping these ecosystems. PMID:20133670

  2. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  3. Physically secured orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network employing noise-based encryption and signal recovery process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei; Zhang, Chongfu; Yuan, Weicheng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a physically enhanced secure scheme for direct detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network (DD-OFDM-PON) and long reach coherent detection-orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-passive optical network (LRCO-OFDM-PON), by employing noise-based encryption and channel/phase estimation. The noise data generated by chaos mapping are used to substitute training sequences in preamble to realize channel estimation and frame synchronization, and also to be embedded on variable number of key-selected randomly spaced pilot subcarriers to implement phase estimation. Consequently, the information used for signal recovery is totally hidden as unpredictable noise information in OFDM frames to mask useful information and to prevent illegal users from correctly realizing OFDM demodulation, and thereby enhancing resistance to attackers. The levels of illegal-decryption complexity and implementation complexity are theoretically discussed. Through extensive simulations, the performances of the proposed channel/phase estimation and the security introduced by encrypted pilot carriers have been investigated in both DD-OFDM and LRCO-OFDM systems. In addition, in the proposed secure DD-OFDM/LRCO-OFDM PON models, both legal and illegal receiving scenarios have been considered. These results show that, by utilizing the proposed scheme, the resistance to attackers can be significantly enhanced in DD-OFDM-PON and LRCO-OFDM-PON systems without performance degradations.

  4. Effect of flexible vegetation on localized erosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termini, Donatella

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the hydraulic characteristics of flow over vegetation is very important to support the management of fluvial processes. The effects of vegetation on flow velocity are significant and of crucial importance for stabilizing sediments and reducing erosion along the channel. But, because of the temporal changing of roughness due to natural vegetative growth, the response of vegetation to the flow can change in time. Thus, vegetation has a complex effect on walls roughness and the study of the hydrodynamic conditions of flow is difficult. Many theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed in order to analyze both the mean flow and turbulence structure of open-channel flow (Nezu and Rodi 1986; Ghisalberti and Nepf, 2002). Recent experimental runs carried out in laboratory channels with flexible vegetation, realized by using artificial filaments (Kutija and Hong 1996; Ikeda and Kanazawa 1996), investigated some peculiar characteristics of flow turbulence structure and revealed the generation of periodic organized vortices whose center is located slightly above the top of the vegetation layer. Ghisalberti and Nepf (2002) confirmed the formation of such vortices, highlighting that, in the case of flexible vegetation, the vortex-driven oscillation of velocity drives coherent vegetation waving, producing a spatially and temporally variable drag force. In this paper, attention is paid to the influence of vegetation on the erosion processes both on the bed and on the channel banks. Experiments were carried out both in a straight channel and in a meandering channel, both constructed at the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy). The formation of turbulence structures inside the vegetated layer is verified, providing some insight into the mechanisms of sediment transport. Nezu, I. & Rodi, W. 1986. Open-channel flow measurements with a Laser Doppler Anemometer. Journal of Hydraulic

  5. Gaussian Process Regression Plus Method for Localization Reliability Improvement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kehan; Meng, Zhaopeng; Own, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Location data are among the most widely used context data in context-aware and ubiquitous computing applications. Many systems with distinct deployment costs and positioning accuracies have been developed over the past decade for indoor positioning. The most useful method is focused on the received signal strength and provides a set of signal transmission access points. However, compiling a manual measuring Received Signal Strength (RSS) fingerprint database involves high costs and thus is impractical in an online prediction environment. The system used in this study relied on the Gaussian process method, which is a nonparametric model that can be characterized completely by using the mean function and the covariance matrix. In addition, the Naive Bayes method was used to verify and simplify the computation of precise predictions. The authors conducted several experiments on simulated and real environments at Tianjin University. The experiments examined distinct data size, different kernels, and accuracy. The results showed that the proposed method not only can retain positioning accuracy but also can save computation time in location predictions. PMID:27483276

  6. Passive Active Multi-Junction 3, 7 GHZ launcher for Tore-Supra Long Pulse Experiments. Manufacturing Process and Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Guilhem, D.; Achard, J.; Bertrand, B.; Bej, Z.; Bibet, Ph.; Brun, C.; Chantant, M.; Delmas, E.; Delpech, L.; Doceul, Y.; Ekedahl, A.; Goletto, C.; Goniche, M.; Hatchressian, J. C.; Hillairet, J.; Houry, M.; Joubert, P.; Lipa, M.; Madeleine, S.; Martinez, A.

    2009-11-26

    The design and the fabrication of a new Lower Hybrid (LH) actively cooled antenna based on the passive active concept is a part of the CIMES project (Components for the Injection of Mater and Energy in Steady-state). The major objectives of Tore-Supra program is to achieve 1000 s pulses with this LH launcher, by coupling routinely >3 MW of LH wave at 3.7 GHz to the plasma with a parallel index n{sub ||} = 1.7 {sup {+-}}{sup 0.2}. The launcher is on its way to achieve its validation tests--low power Radio Frequency (RF) measurements, vacuum and hydraulic leak tests--and will be installed and commissioned on plasma during the fall of 2009.

  7. Dynamic processes and their influence on the transformation of the passive admixture in the sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.; Cherkesov, L. V.; Shul'ga, T. Ya.

    2014-07-01

    In this model, we apply a nonlinear three-dimensional sigma-coordinate model to study the waves and currents in the Sea of Azov generated by different fields of wind forcing: a constant wind, a quickly varying real wind obtained using the data of reanalysis applying the SKIRON model, and the wind resulting from their combined forcing. This mathematical model was also applied to study the transformation of the passive admixture appearing under the influence of wind fields in the Sea of Azov considered here. We compared the results of numerical calculations with the field data obtained under the wind forcing at a number of hydrological stations. We found the regularities of the water transport driven by onshore and offshore winds, the velocities of the currents, and the characteristics of the evolution of polluted regions at different depths as functions of the nonstationary wind intensity and the velocities of the stationary currents.

  8. Prediction of the residue levels of drugs in eggs, using physicochemical properties and their influence on passive diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Schefferlie, G J; Hekman, P

    2016-08-01

    Based on a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, describing the relationship between the plasma concentration of a drug and its deposition into eggs, general transport constants into yolk and albumen were derived, for a number of compounds, using experimental data from literature. Using only generally accepted concepts in passive diffusion theory, these transport constants were used to derive and calibrate general equations, describing the transport into yolk and albumen, in terms of the physicochemical properties of a drug. It is shown that, in theory, it is possible to calculate/predict the transport constants, using the physicochemical parameters: pKa and plasma protein binding. For a number of sulfonamides, the model was used to predict their distribution between egg yolk and albumen; the outcome was compared to data found in literature. Within this dataset, the lipophilic nature of a drug does not seem to play a major role in explaining the distribution ratio of a drug between albumen and yolk. PMID:26763131

  9. Cellular growth defects triggered by an overload of protein localization processes

    PubMed Central

    Kintaka, Reiko; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    High-level expression of a protein localized to an intracellular compartment is expected to cause cellular defects because it overloads localization processes. However, overloads of localization processes have never been studied systematically. Here, we show that the expression levels of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) with localization signals were limited to the same degree as a toxic misfolded GFP in budding yeast cells, and that their high-level expression caused cellular defects associated with localization processes. We further show that limitation of the exportin Crm1 determined the expression limit of GFP with a nuclear export signal. Although misfolding of GFP with a vesicle-mediated transport signal triggered endoplasmic reticulum stress, it was not the primary determinant of its expression limit. The precursor of GFP with a mitochondrial targeting signal caused a cellular defect. Finally, we estimated the residual capacities of localization processes. High-level expression of a localized protein thus causes cellular defects by overloading the capacities of localization processes. PMID:27538565

  10. Cellular growth defects triggered by an overload of protein localization processes.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Reiko; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2016-01-01

    High-level expression of a protein localized to an intracellular compartment is expected to cause cellular defects because it overloads localization processes. However, overloads of localization processes have never been studied systematically. Here, we show that the expression levels of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) with localization signals were limited to the same degree as a toxic misfolded GFP in budding yeast cells, and that their high-level expression caused cellular defects associated with localization processes. We further show that limitation of the exportin Crm1 determined the expression limit of GFP with a nuclear export signal. Although misfolding of GFP with a vesicle-mediated transport signal triggered endoplasmic reticulum stress, it was not the primary determinant of its expression limit. The precursor of GFP with a mitochondrial targeting signal caused a cellular defect. Finally, we estimated the residual capacities of localization processes. High-level expression of a localized protein thus causes cellular defects by overloading the capacities of localization processes. PMID:27538565

  11. Broadband continuous wave source localization via pair-wise, cochleagram processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Frazer, L. Neil

    2005-04-01

    A pair-wise processor has been developed for the passive localization of broadband continuous-wave underwater sources. The algorithm uses sparse hydrophone arrays and does not require previous knowledge of the source signature. It is applicable in multiple source situations. A spectrogram/cochleagram version of the algorithm has been developed in order to utilize higher frequencies at longer ranges where signal incoherence, and limited computational resources, preclude the use of full waveforms. Simulations demonstrating the robustness of the algorithm with respect to noise and environmental mismatch will be presented, together with initial results from the analysis of humpback whale song recorded at the Pacific Missile Range Facility off Kauai. [Work supported by MHPCC and ONR.

  12. Managed Moves: School and Local Authority Staff Perceptions of Processes, Success and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Christopher; Hallam, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The current research aimed to increase understanding of the processes of managed moves for children at risk of exclusion from school, particularly exploring what contributed to success and the nature of the challenges experienced. The study was conducted in one English local authority where 11 school staff and 5 local authority staff were…

  13. Global/Local Processing in Autism: Not a Disability, but a Disinclination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koldewyn, Kami; Jiang, Yuhong V.; Weigelt, Sarah; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    It is widely suggested that ASD is characterized by atypical local/global processing, but the published findings are contradictory. In an effort to resolve this question, we tested a large group of children on both a free-choice task and an instructed task using hierarchical local-global stimuli. We find that although children with autism showed a…

  14. The Development of Global and Local Processing: A Comparison of Children to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Eric; Peterson, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    In light of the adult model of a hemispheric asymmetry of global and local processing, we compared children (M [subscript age] = 8.4 years) to adults in a global-local reaction time (RT) paradigm. Hierarchical designs (large shapes made of small shapes) were presented randomly to each visual field, and participants were instructed to identify…

  15. 'Autistic' local processing bias also found in children gifted in realistic drawing.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer E; Redash, Amanda; Coleman, Katelyn; Haimson, Jennifer; Winner, Ellen

    2010-06-01

    We investigated whether typically-developing children with a gift for drawing realistically show the local processing bias seen in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Twenty-seven 6-12 year-olds made an observational drawing (scored for level of realism) and completed three local processing tasks, and parents completed the Childhood Asperger Syndrome Test (CAST). Drawing score predicted local processing performance on all tasks independently of verbal IQ, age, and years of art lessons. Drawing score also predicted more frequent repetitive behaviors as assessed by the CAST. Thus, skill in realistic drawing is associated with a strong local processing bias and a tendency towards repetitive behaviors, showing that traits found in individuals with ASD irrespective of artistic talent are also found in typically developing children with artistic talent. PMID:20049633

  16. Statistical validation and an empirical model of hydrogen production enhancement found by utilizing passive flow disturbance in the steam-reformation process

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Paul A.; Liao, Chang-hsien

    2007-11-15

    A passive flow disturbance has been proven to enhance the conversion of fuel in a methanol-steam reformer. This study presents a statistical validation of the experiment based on a standard 2{sup k} factorial experiment design and the resulting empirical model of the enhanced hydrogen producing process. A factorial experiment design was used to statistically analyze the effects and interactions of various input factors in the experiment. Three input factors, including the number of flow disturbers, catalyst size, and reactant flow rate were investigated for their effects on the fuel conversion in the steam-reformation process. Based on the experimental results, an empirical model was developed and further evaluated with an uncertainty analysis and interior point data. (author)

  17. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  18. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  19. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  20. Coexistence of passive and proton antiporter-mediated processes in nicotine transport at the mouse blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Cisternino, Salvatore; Chapy, Hélène; André, Pascal; Smirnova, Maria; Debray, Marcel; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel

    2013-04-01

    Nicotine, the main tobacco alkaloid leading to smoking dependence, rapidly crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to become concentrated in the brain. Recently, it has been shown that nicotine interacts with some organic cation transporters (OCT), but their influence at the BBB has not yet been assessed in vivo. In this study, we characterized the transport of nicotine at the mouse luminal BBB by in situ brain perfusion. Its influx was saturable and followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(m)=2.60 mM, V(max)=37.60 nmol/s/g at pH 7.40). At its usual micromolar concentrations in the plasma, most (79%) of the net transport of nicotine at the BBB was carrier-mediated, while passive diffusion accounted for 21%. Studies on knockout mice showed that the OCT Oct1-3, P-gp, and Bcrp did not alter [(3)H]-nicotine transport at the BBB. Neither did inhibiting the transporters Mate1, Octn, or Pmat. The in vivo manipulation of intracellular and/or extracellular pH, the chemical inhibition profile, and the trans-stimulation experiments demonstrated that the nicotine transporter at the BBB shared the properties of the clonidine/proton antiporter. The molecular features of this proton-coupled antiporter have not yet been identified, but it also transports diphenhydramine and tramadol and helps nicotine cross the BBB at a faster rate and to a greater extent. The pharmacological inhibition of this nicotine/proton antiporter could represent a new strategy to reduce nicotine uptake by the brain and thus help curb addiction to smoking. PMID:23212563

  1. Blasting and Passivation Treatments for ASTM F139 Stainless Steel for Biomedical Applications: Effects on Surface Roughness, Hardening, and Localized Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Adriana L. Lemos; Kang, Kyung Won; Bonetto, Rita D.; Llorente, Carlos L.; Bilmes, Pablo D.; Gervasi, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the combination of good biofunctionality and biocompatibility at low cost, AISI 316 low carbon vacuum melting (LVM) stainless steel, as considered in ASTM F139 standard, is often the first choice for medical implants, particularly for use in orthopedic surgery. Proper surface finish must be provided to ensure adequate interactions of the alloy with human body tissues that in turn allows the material to deliver the desired performance. Preliminary studies performed in our laboratory on AISI 316LVM stainless steel surfaces modified by glass bead blasting (from industrial supplier) followed by different nitric acid passivation conditions disclosed the necessity to extend parameters of the surface treatments and to further consider roughness, pitting corrosion resistance, and surface and subsurface hardening measurements, all in one, as the most effective characterization strategy. This was the approach adopted in the present work. Roughness assessment was performed by means of amplitude parameters, functional parameters, and an estimator of the fractal dimension that characterizes surface topography. We clearly demonstrate that the blasting treatment should be carried out under controlled conditions in order to obtain similar surface and subsurface properties. Otherwise, a variation in one of the parameters could modify the surface properties, exerting a profound impact on its application as biomaterial. A passivation step is necessary to offset the detrimental effect of blasting on pitting corrosion resistance.

  2. [Changing the contents of Fe and Mn in the tonsils of children exposed to passive smoking and their local imission example Chorzow].

    PubMed

    Nogaj, Ewa; Kwapuliński, Jerzy; Bazowska, Maria; Krawczyk, Łukasz; Ahnert, Bozena; Rzepka, Jerzy; Nogaj, Piotr; Olender, Jacek; Paprotny, Łukasz

    2010-01-01

    The subject of the research were samples of overgrown adenoids removed by adenoidectomy 56 children, including 30 boys and 26 girls, exposure and unexposure from passive smoking, living in the administrative area of Chorzów. The statistic characteristic of Fe and Mn occurrence is presented in the thesis. The studies were carried out on the changes of Fe and Mn and other elements, (B, Al, La, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As, Se, Hg, V, Be, Mo, Sn, V, Ti, Sb, Bi, TI, Zr, Ca, Mg, Na, Ba, Sr, Li) respectively. The elemental composition of adenoids was determined with ICP-AES method (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy). The studies on Fe and Mn occurrence in adenoids showed the presence of its higher concentrations in exposure boys (Fe - 116.13 microg/g; Mn - 0.70 microg/g), in comparison with exposure girls from passive smoking (93.06 microg/g; Mn - 0.57 microg/g). PMID:21360931

  3. Use of unidirectional microphones and signal processing for the localization of sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Bordoni, Giacomo; Marzani, Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    Targeting people or objects by passive acoustic sensors is of relevant interest in several military and civil applications, spanning from surveillance and patrolling systems to teleconferencing and human-robot interaction. To date methods and patents focused solely on the use of beamforming algorithms to compute the time of arrival of sounds detected by using omnidirectional microphones (OM) sparsely deployed. This paper describes the preliminary results of a novel approach devoted to the localization of ground borne acoustic sources. It is demonstrated that an array made of at least three unidirectional microphones can be exploited to detect the position the source. Pulse features extracted either in the time domain or in the frequency domain are used to identify the direction of the incoming sound. This information is then fed into a semi-analytical algorithm devoted to the identification of the source location. The novelty of the method presented here consists on the use of unidirectional microphones rather than omnidirectional microphones and on the ability to extract the sound direction by considering features like the pulse amplitude rather than the pulse arrival time. It is believed that this method may pave the road toward a new generation of reduced size sound detectors and localizers.

  4. From Local to Global Processing: The Development of Illusory Contour Perception

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Kritika; Franchak, John; Adolph, Karen; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Global visual processing is important for segmenting scenes, extracting form from background, and recognizing objects. Local processing involves attention to the local elements, contrast, and boundaries of an image at the expense of extracting a global percept. Previous work is inconclusive regarding the relative development of local and global processing. Some studies suggest that global perception is already present by 8 months of age, whereas others suggest that the ability arises in childhood and continues to develop in adolescence. We used a novel method to assess the development of global processing in 3- to 10-year-old children and an adult comparison group. We used Kanizsa illusory contours as an assay of global perception and measured responses on a touch screen while monitoring eye position with a head-mounted eye tracker. Participants were tested using a similarity match-to-sample paradigm. Using converging measures, we found a clear developmental progression with age such that the youngest children performed near chance on the illusory contour discrimination whereas 7- to 8-year-olds performed nearly perfectly, as did adults. There was clear evidence of a gradual shift from a local to a global processing strategy: Young children looked predominantly at and touched the pacman inducers of the illusory form, whereas older children and adults looked predominantly at and touched the middle of the form. These data show a prolonged developmental trajectory in appreciation of global form, with a transition from local to global visual processing between 4 and 7 years of age. PMID:25514785

  5. Perception of Shapes Targeting Local and Global Processes in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinter, Emma J.; Maybery, Murray T.; Pellicano, Elizabeth; Badcock, Johanna C.; Badcock, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several researchers have found evidence for impaired global processing in the dorsal visual stream in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, support for a similar pattern of visual processing in the ventral visual stream is less consistent. Critical to resolving the inconsistency is the assessment of local and…

  6. Influence of focal point properties on energy transfer and plasma evolution during laser ignition process with a passively q-switched laser.

    PubMed

    Bärwinkel, Mark; Lorenz, Sebastian; Stäglich, Robert; Brüggemann, Dieter

    2016-07-11

    Miniaturized passively q-switched laser ignition systems are a promising alternative to conventional ignition sources to ensure a reliable ignition under difficult conditions. In this study the influences of focal point properties on energy transfer from laser to plasma as well as plasma formation and propagation are investigated as the first steps of the laser induced ignition process. Maximum fluence and fluence volume are introduced to characterize focal point properties for varying laser pulse energies and focusing configurations. The results show that the transferred laser energy increases with increasing maximum fluence. During laser emission plasma propagates along the beam path of the focused laser beam. Rising maximum fluence results in increased plasma volume, but expansion saturates when fluence volume reaches its maximum. PMID:27410797

  7. Auditory global-local processing: effects of attention and musical experience.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Tia; Foster, Nicholas E V; Hyde, Krista L

    2012-10-01

    In vision, global (whole) features are typically processed before local (detail) features ("global precedence effect"). However, the distinction between global and local processing is less clear in the auditory domain. The aims of the present study were to investigate: (i) the effects of directed versus divided attention, and (ii) the effect musical training on auditory global-local processing in 16 adult musicians and 16 non-musicians. Participants were presented with short nine-tone melodies, each comprised of three triplet sequences (three-tone units). In a "directed attention" task, participants were asked to focus on either the global or local pitch pattern and had to determine if the pitch pattern went up or down. In a "divided attention" task, participants judged whether the target pattern (up or down) was present or absent. Overall, global structure was perceived faster and more accurately than local structure. The global precedence effect was observed regardless of whether attention was directed to a specific level or divided between levels. Musicians performed more accurately than non-musicians overall, but non-musicians showed a more pronounced global advantage. This study provides evidence for an auditory global precedence effect across attention tasks, and for differences in auditory global-local processing associated with musical experience. PMID:23039447

  8. Systems Factorial Technology provides new insights on global–local information processing in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shannon A.; Blaha, Leslie M.; Houpt, Joseph W.; Townsend, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of global–local processing in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have indicated mixed findings, with some evidence of a local processing bias, or preference for detail-level information, and other results suggesting typical global advantage, or preference for the whole or gestalt. Findings resulting from this paradigm have been used to argue for or against a detail focused processing bias in ASDs, and thus have important theoretical implications. We applied Systems Factorial Technology, and the associated Double Factorial Paradigm (both defined in the text), to examine information processing characteristics during a divided attention global–local task in high-functioning individuals with an ASD and typically developing controls. Group data revealed global advantage for both groups, contrary to some current theories of ASDs. Information processing models applied to each participant revealed that task performance, although showing no differences at the group level, was supported by different cognitive mechanisms in ASD participants compared to controls. All control participants demonstrated inhibitory parallel processing and the majority demonstrated a minimum-time stopping rule. In contrast, ASD participants showed exhaustive parallel processing with mild facilitatory interactions between global and local information. Thus our results indicate fundamental differences in the stopping rules and channel dependencies in individuals with an ASD. PMID:23750050

  9. Localization in covariance matrices of coupled heterogenous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    We define a random-matrix ensemble given by the infinite-time covariance matrices of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes at different temperatures coupled by a Gaussian symmetric matrix. The spectral properties of this ensemble are shown to be in qualitative agreement with some stylized facts of financial markets. Through the presented model formulas are given for the analysis of heterogeneous time series. Furthermore evidence for a localization transition in eigenvectors related to small and large eigenvalues in cross-correlations analysis of this model is found, and a simple explanation of localization phenomena in financial time series is provided. Finally we identify both in our model and in real financial data an inverted-bell effect in correlation between localized components and their local temperature: high- and low-temperature components are the most localized ones.

  10. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  11. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  12. Impairment in local and global processing and set-shifting in body dysmorphic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kerwin, Lauren; Hovav, Sarit; Helleman, Gerhard; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2014-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by distressing and often debilitating preoccupations with misperceived defects in appearance. Research suggests that aberrant visual processing may contribute to these misperceptions. This study used two tasks to probe global and local visual processing as well as set shifting in individuals with BDD. Eighteen unmedicated individuals with BDD and 17 non-clinical controls completed two global-local tasks. The embedded figures task requires participants to determine which of three complex figures contained a simpler figure embedded within it. The Navon task utilizes incongruent stimuli comprised of a large letter (global level) made up of smaller letters (local level). The outcome measures were response time and accuracy rate. On the embedded figures task, BDD individuals were slower and less accurate than controls. On the Navon task, BDD individuals processed both global and local stimuli slower and less accurately than controls, and there was a further decrement in performance when shifting attention between the different levels of stimuli. Worse insight correlated with poorer performance on both tasks. Taken together, these results suggest abnormal global and local processing for non-appearance related stimuli among BDD individuals, in addition to evidence of poor set-shifting abilities. Moreover, these abnormalities appear to relate to the important clinical variable of poor insight. Further research is needed to explore these abnormalities and elucidate their possible role in the development and/or persistence of BDD symptoms. PMID:24972487

  13. Physical Processes Contributing To Small-scale Vertical Movements During Changing Inplane Stresses In Rift Basins and At Passive Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G. E.; Nielsen, S. B.; Hansen, D. L.

    The vertical movements during a regional stress reversal in a rifted basin or on a passive continental margin are examined using a numerical 2D thermo-mechanical finite element model with a visco-elastic-plastic rheology. Three different physical mechanisms are recognized in small-scale vertical movements at small inplane force variations: elastic dilatation, elastic flexure, and permanent deformation. Their rela- tive importance depend on the applied force, the duration of the force, and the thermal structure of the lithosphere. Elastic material dilatation occurs whenever the stress state changes. A reversal from extension to compression therefore immediately leads to elastic dilatation, and re- sults in an overall subsidence of the entire profile. Simultaneously with dilatation the lithosphere reacts with flexure. The significance of the flexural component strongly depends on the thermal structure of the lithosphere. The polarity and amplitude of the flexure depends on the initial (before compression) loading of the lithosphere. Gener- ally, the flexural effects lead to subsidence of the overdeep in the landward part of the basin and a small amount of uplift at the basin flanks. The amplitudes of the flexural response are small and comparable with the amplitudes of the elastic dilatation. With continuing compression permanent deformation and lithospheric thickening becomes increasingly important. Ultimately, the thickened part of the lithosphere stands out as an inverted zone. The amount of permanent deformation is directly connected with the size and duration of the applied force, but even a relatively small force leads to inversion tectonics in the landward part of the basin. The conclusions are: 1) small stress induced vertical movements in rift basins and at passive continental margins are the result of a complex interaction of at least three different processes, 2) the total sediment loaded amplitudes resulting from these pro- cesses are small (2-300 m) for

  14. Enhanced Carrier Collection from CdS Passivated Grains in Solution-Processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, Melanie; Keller, Debora; Haass, Stefan G; Gretener, Christina; Bissig, Benjamin; Fuchs, Peter; La Mattina, Fabio; Erni, Rolf; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2015-06-10

    Solution processing of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe)-kesterite solar cells is attractive because of easy manufacturing using readily available metal salts. The solution-processed CZTSSe absorbers, however, often suffer from poor morphology with a bilayer structure, exhibiting a dense top crust and a porous bottom layer, albeit yielding efficiencies of over 10%. To understand whether the cell performance is limited by this porous layer, a systematic compositional study using (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the dimethyl sulfoxide processed CZTSSe absorbers is presented. TEM investigation revealed a thin layer of CdS that is formed around the small CZTSSe grains in the porous bottom layer during the chemical bath deposition step. This CdS passivation is found to be beneficial for the cell performance as it increases the carrier collection and facilitates the electron transport. Electron-beam-induced current measurements reveal an enhanced carrier collection for this buried region as compared to reference cells with evaporated CdS. PMID:25985349

  15. Zinc recovery and waste sludge minimization from chromium passivation baths.

    PubMed

    Diban, Nazely; Mediavilla, Rosa; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2011-08-30

    This work reports the feasibility of applying emulsion pertraction technology (EPT) aiming at zinc recovery and waste minimization in the zinc electroplating processes that include Cr (III) passivation. The assessment consists of firstly the lifetime extension of the passivation baths by selective removal of the tramp ions zinc and iron, and secondly, the recovery of zinc for further reuse. Spent passivation baths from a local industry were tested, being the major metallic content: Cr(3+) 9000mg L(-1), Zn(2+) 12,000mg L(-1), Fe(3+) 100mg L(-1). Working in a Liqui-Cel hollow fiber membrane contactor and using the extractant bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid, reduction of zinc and iron concentrations below 60mg L(-1) and 2mg L(-1), respectively were obtained, while trivalent chromium, the active metal that generates the passivation layer, was retained in the baths. Zinc was selectively transferred to an acidic stripping phase that in the experimental time reached a concentration of 157,000mg L(-1). Zinc recovery by electrowinning from the acidic stripping phase without any pretreatment of the electrolyte solution provided a purity of 98.5%, matching the lower commercial zinc grade. As a result of the extension of the life time of the passivation bath, significant environmental advantages are derived such as minimization of the volume of hazardous wastes and savings in the consumption of raw materials. PMID:21704452

  16. A signal processing approach to exploit chirp excitation in Lamb wave defect detection and localization procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Luca; Perelli, Alessandro; Marzani, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    A non-linear Lamb wave signal processing strategy aimed at extending the capability of active-passive networks of PZT transducers for defect detection is proposed. In particular, the proposed signal processing allows to use chirp shaped pulses in actuation, instead of classically applied spiky pulses, requiring thus lower input voltages. To such aim, the acquired Lamb waves are processed by means of a two-step procedure: a warped frequency transform (WFT) to compensate for the dispersion due to the traveled distance, followed by a compression procedure to remove from the signals the induced chirp frequency modulation. Next, the resulting signals are exploited to feed an imaging algorithm aimed at providing the position of the defect on the plate. The potential of the procedure is demonstrated and validated by analyzing experimental Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate where defects were emulated by posing an added mass on the plate. The proposed automatic procedure is suitable to locate defect-induced reflections and can be easily implemented in real applications for structural health monitoring.

  17. Prism adaptation reverses the local processing bias in patients with right temporo-parietal junction lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rafal, Robert D.; List, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Lesions to the right temporo-parietal cortex commonly result in hemispatial neglect. Lesions to the same area are also associated with hyperattention to local details of a scene and difficulty perceiving the global structure. This local processing bias is an important factor contributing to neglect and may contribute to the higher prevalence of the disorder following right compared with left hemisphere strokes. In recent years, visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms has been introduced as a promising treatment for hemispatial neglect. Explanations for these improvements have generally described a leftward realignment of attention, however, the present investigation provides evidence that prism adaptation reduces the local processing bias. Five patients with right temporal-parietal junction lesions were asked to identify the global or local levels of hierarchical figures before and after visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms. Prior to prism adaptation the patients had difficulty ignoring the local elements when identifying the global component. Following prism adaptation, however, this pattern was reversed, with greater global interference during local level identification. The results suggest that prism adaptation may improve non-spatially lateralized deficits that contribute to the neglect syndrome. PMID:19416951

  18. Permeability Reduction in Passively Degassing Seawater-dominated Volcanic-hydrothermal systems: Processes and Perils on Raoul Island, Kermadecs (NZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, B. W.; Reyes, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2006 eruption from Raoul Island occurred apparently in response to local tectonic swarm activity, but without any precursory indication of volcanic unrest within the hydrothermal system on the island. The eruption released some 200 T of SO2, implicating the involvement of a deep magmatic vapor input into the system during/prior to the event. In the absence of any recognized juvenile material in the eruption products, previous explanations for this eruptive event focused on this vapor being a driving force for the eruption. In 2004, at least 80 T/d of CO2 was escaping from the hydrothermal system, but mainly through areas that did not correspond to the 2006 eruption vents. The lack of a pre-eruptive hydrothermal system response related to the seismic event in 2006 can be explained by the presence of a hydrothermal mineralogic seal in the vent area of the volcano. Evidence for the existence of such a seal was found in eruption deposits in the form of massive fracture fillings of aragonite, calcite and anhydrite. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in these phases range from ca. 140 °C to 220 °C which, for pure water indicate boiling point depths of between 40 and 230 m assuming a cold hydrostatic pressure constraint. Elevated pressures behind this seal are consistent with the occurrence of CO2 clathrates in some inclusion fluids, indicating CO2 concentrations approaching 1 molal in the parent fluids. Reactive transport modeling of magmatic volatile inputs into what is effectively a seawater-dominated hydrothermal system provide valuable insights into seal formation. Carbonate mineral phases ultimately come to saturation along this flow path, but we suggest that focused deposition of the observed massive carbonate seal is facilitated by near-surface boiling of these CO2-enriched altered seawaters, leading to large degrees of supersaturation which are required for the formation of aragonite. As the seal grew and permeability declined, pore pressures

  19. EMu: probabilistic inference of mutational processes and their localization in the cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of mutations discovered in cancer genomes can be explained by the activity of a few elementary mutational processes. We present a novel probabilistic method, EMu, to infer the mutational signatures of these processes from a collection of sequenced tumors. EMu naturally incorporates the tumor-specific opportunity for different mutation types according to sequence composition. Applying EMu to breast cancer data, we derive detailed maps of the activity of each process, both genome-wide and within specific local regions of the genome. Our work provides new opportunities to study the mutational processes underlying cancer development. EMu is available at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/resources/software/emu/. PMID:23628380

  20. Rhythmic TMS over Parietal Cortex Links Distinct Brain Frequencies to Global versus Local Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Romei, Vincenzo; Driver, Jon; Schyns, Philippe G.; Thut, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Summary Neural networks underlying visual perception exhibit oscillations at different frequencies (e.g., [1–6]). But how these map onto distinct aspects of visual perception remains elusive. Recent electroencephalography data indicate that theta or beta frequencies at parietal sensors increase in amplitude when conscious perception is dominated by global or local features, respectively, of a reversible visual stimulus [6]. But this provides only correlative, noninterventional evidence. Here we show via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) interventions that short rhythmic bursts of right-parietal TMS at theta or beta frequency can causally benefit processing of global or local levels, respectively, for hierarchical visual stimuli, especially in the context of salient incongruent distractors. This double dissociation between theta and beta TMS reveals distinct causal roles for particular frequencies in processing global versus local visual features. PMID:21315592

  1. Gibbs free energy assisted passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Tansel, T.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2016-05-01

    Reduction of surface leakage is a major challenge in most photodetectors that requires the elimination of surface oxides on etched mesas during passivation. Engineering the passivation requires close attention to chemical reactions that take place at the interface during the process. In particular, removal of surface oxides may be controlled via Gibbs reactivity. We have compared electrical performance of type-II superlattice photodetectors, designed for MWIR operation, passivated by different passivation techniques. We have used ALD deposited Al2O3, HfO2, TiO2, ZnO, PECVD deposited SiO2, Si3N4 and sulphur containing octadecanethiol (ODT) selfassembled monolayers (SAM) passivation layers on InAs/GaSb p-i-n superlattice photodetectors with cutoff wavelength at 5.1 μm. In this work, we have compared the result of different passivation techniques which are done under same conditions, same epitaxial structure and same fabrication processes. We have found that ALD deposited passivation is directly related to the Gibbs free energy of the passivation material. Gibbs free energies of the passivation layer can directly be compared with native surface oxides to check the effectiveness of the passivation layer before the experimental study.

  2. Are the Autism and Positive Schizotypy Spectra Diametrically Opposed in Local versus Global Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Smith, Suzanna N.; Maybery, Murray T.; Bayliss, Donna M.

    2010-01-01

    Crespi and Badcock (2008) proposed that autism and psychosis represent two extremes on a cognitive spectrum with normality at its center. Their specific claim that autistic and positive schizophrenia traits contrastingly affect preference for local versus global processing was investigated by examining Embedded Figures Test performance in two…

  3. The Process of Evaluation Use in Local School Settings. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, J. A.; Pechman, E. M.

    This report presents the results of a yearlong study of the process of evaluation use in a large city school district. Based on extensive naturalistic data-gathering, the research documents how local school administrators use evaluation information generated by the district's research and evaluation unit. The significance of the research is the…

  4. Gestalt Perception and Local-Global Processing in High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz; Scheurich, Armin; Schmidt, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    This study examined gestalt perception in high-functioning autism (HFA) and its relation to tasks indicative of local visual processing. Data on of gestalt perception, visual illusions (VI), hierarchical letters (HL), Block Design (BD) and the Embedded Figures Test (EFT) were collected in adult males with HFA, schizophrenia, depression and…

  5. Effects of Local and Global Context on Processing Sentences with Subject and Object Relative Clauses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fang; Mo, Lun; Louwerse, Max M.

    2013-01-01

    An eye tracking study investigated the effects of local and global discourse context on the processing of subject and object relative clauses, whereby the contexts favored either a subject relative clause interpretation or an object relative clause interpretation. The fixation data replicated previous studies showing that object relative clause…

  6. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of processing nonsymbolic number: an event-related potential source localization study.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Daniel C; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2012-09-01

    Coordinated studies with adults, infants, and nonhuman animals provide evidence for two distinct systems of nonverbal number representation. The "parallel individuation" (PI) system selects and retains information about one to three individual entities and the "numerical magnitude" system establishes representations of the approximate cardinal value of a group. Recent event-related potential (ERP) work has demonstrated that these systems reliably evoke functionally and temporally distinct patterns of brain response that correspond to established behavioral signatures. However, relatively little is known about the neural generators of these ERP signatures. To address this question, we targeted known ERP signatures of these systems, by contrasting processing of small versus large nonsymbolic numbers, and used a source localization algorithm (LORETA) to identify their cortical origins. Early processing of small numbers, showing the signature effects of PI on the N1 (∼150 ms), was localized primarily to extrastriate visual regions. In contrast, qualitatively and temporally distinct processing of large numbers, showing the signatures of approximate number representation on the mid-latency P2p (∼200-250 ms), was localized primarily to right intraparietal regions. In comparison, mid-latency small number processing was localized to the right temporal-parietal junction and left-lateralized intraparietal regions. These results add spatial information to the emerging ERP literature documenting the process by which we represent number. Furthermore, these results substantiate recent claims that early attentional processes determine whether a collection of objects will be represented through PI or as an approximate numerical magnitude by providing evidence that downstream processing diverges to distinct cortical regions. PMID:21830257

  8. An improved solution of local window parameters setting for local singularity analysis based on Excel VBA batch processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daojun; Cheng, Qiuming; Agterberg, Frits; Chen, Zhijun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper Excel VBA is used for batch calculation in Local Singularity Analysis (LSA), which is for the information extracting from different kinds of geoscience data. Capabilities and advantages of a new module called Batch Tool for Local Singularity Index Mapping (BTLSIM) are: (1) batch production of series of local singularity maps with different settings of local window size, shape and orientation parameters; (2) local parameter optimization based on statistical tests; and (3) provision of extra output layers describing how spatial changes induced by parameter optimization are related to spatial structure of the original input layers.

  9. Understanding the local socio-political processes affecting conservation management outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level. PMID:24522894

  10. Understanding the Local Socio-political Processes Affecting Conservation Management Outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M.; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.