Science.gov

Sample records for passive safety injection

  1. Passive safety injection system using borated water

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A passive safety injection system relies on differences in water density to induce natural circulatory flow patterns which help maintain prescribed concentrations of boric acid in borated water, and prevents boron from accumulating in the reactor vessel and possibly preventing heat transfer.

  2. PACTEL experiments for the investigation of passive safety injection systems of advanced light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tuunanen, J.; Munther, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    1996-07-01

    An important aspect of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) decay heat removal concerns the plant response under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. In ALWRs, e.g. Westinghouse AP600, pump driven Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) are replaced by passive safety injection systems, which are gravity driven. It is therefore important that in such accidents, the ALWR coolant system pressure can be controlled to allow gravity fed injection to take place. The safety issue here is whether undesirable system responses could occur in any circumstances. Additionally, it is necessary to prove that the plant always depressurizes sufficiently for the ECCS to operate efficiently. Two experimental series have been carried out with the PACTEL integral test facility on the simulation of passive safety injection systems of ALWRs in accidental conditions. The safety system investigated was a passive core make-up tank (CMT), which was connected to the downcomer of the test facility. This paper starts with a short description of the PACTEL test facility and a summary of the results of the passive safety injection tests on PACTEL. Also included is a summary of the results of the computer simulations of the tests. The second part of the paper consists of a description of the planned third passive safety injection test series and the results of the pre-test simulations of the planned tests.

  3. Passive safety injection experiments with a large-scale pressurized water reactor simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kukita, Yutaka; Anoda, Yoshinari; Asaka, Hideaki

    1995-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted at the ROSA-V/ Large-Scale-Test-Facility to investigate thermal-hydraulic behavior of a gravity-driven passive injection system for a pressurized water reactor under cold-leg small break loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The injection system, used in the tests, consisted of a tank located above the reactor vessel, an injection line, and pressure balance lines. The two tests were conducted using the same break area, corresponding to 2.5% of the scaled cold-leg cross-sectional area, and different actuation logic for the automatic depressurization system (ADS). Both experimental results showed an accumulation of hot water in the upper part of the tank due to the natural circulation, followed by a continuous water level drop, and the existence of a slightly superheated liquid layer near the water surface. Because of the differences in the ADS actuation logic, the system depressurization behavior was different between the two tests. Much larger injection rates from the tank were obtained for the test that experienced the larger depressurization rate. The liquid temperature distributions obtained from these tests were predicted well by an analytical model proposed in a previous paper.

  4. [Post-marketing clinical safety assessment of Shenmai injection based on active monitoring and passive monitoring in large data background].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Ai, Qing-hua; Song, Nian-bin

    2015-12-01

    This paper adopted a series of related analysis methods to comprehensively analyze post-marketing clinical safety data of Shenmai injection from 4,220 cases of SRS and 32,358 cases of multicenter, prospective, registered hospital centralized monitoring in large data background, calculated ADR incidence rate was 0.93 per 1,000, main symptoms of ADR includes chest pain, chills, skin itching, palpitations, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, flushing, numbness, allergic reaction, cyanosis, rash, low back pain, and "breath", "anaphylactoid reaction" and "flush" were the safety warning signals of Shenmai injection. Primary disease for chronic pulmonary heart disease, thyroid disease, and combined with cerebral vascular disease, prior to the injection and continuous use of alprostadil, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, combined with quinolones, penicillins were suspicious influence factors of ADR of Shenmai injection, these promot the clinical safety. PMID:27245017

  5. Passive Safety Features in Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, M.; Chughtai, I. R.; Aslam, M.

    2013-03-01

    For implementation of advance passive safety features in future nuclear power plant design, a passive safety system has been proposed and its response has been observed for Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the cold leg of a reactor coolant system. In a transient simulation the performance of proposed system is validated against existing safety injection system for a reference power plant of 325 MWe. The existing safety injection system is a huge system and consists of many active components including pumps, valves, piping and Instrumentation and Control (I&C). A good running of the active components of this system is necessary for its functionality as high head safety injection system under design basis accidents. Using reactor simulation technique, the proposed passive safety injection system and existing safety injection system are simulated and tested for their performance under large break LOCA for the same boundary conditions. Critical thermal hydraulic parameters of both the systems are presented graphically and discussed. The results obtained are approximately the same in both the cases. However, the proposed passive safety injection system is a better choice for such type of reactors due to reduction in components with improved safety.

  6. Passive injection control for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2004-12-21

    Apparatus for eliminating siphoning, "dead" regions, and fluid concentration gradients in microscale analytical devices. In its most basic embodiment, the present invention affords passive injection control for both electric field-driven and pressure-driven systems by providing additional fluid flow channels or auxiliary channels disposed on either side of a sample separation column. The auxiliary channels are sized such that volumetric fluid flow rate through these channels, while sufficient to move the sample away from the sample injection region in a timely fashion, is less than that through the sample separation channel or chromatograph.

  7. Passive Safety Features for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, Daniel T

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the size and complexity of commercial nuclear power plants in the 1970s spawned an interest in smaller, simpler designs that are inherently or intrinsically safe through the use of passive design features. Several designs were developed, but none were ever built, although some of their passive safety features were incorporated into large commercial plant designs that are being planned or built today. In recent years, several reactor vendors are actively redeveloping small modular reactor (SMR) designs with even greater use of passive features. Several designs incorporate the ultimate in passive safety they completely eliminate specific accident initiators from the design. Other design features help to reduce the likelihood of an accident or help to mitigate the accident s consequences, should one occur. While some passive safety features are common to most SMR designs, irrespective of the coolant technology, other features are specific to water, gas, or liquid-metal cooled SMR designs. The extensive use of passive safety features in SMRs promise to make these plants highly robust, protecting both the general public and the owner/investor. Once demonstrated, these plants should allow nuclear power to be used confidently for a broader range of customers and applications than will be possible with large plants alone.

  8. Safety significance of ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) passive safety response attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was designed with some passive safety response attributes which contribute to the safety posture of the facility. The three passive safety attributes being evaluated in the paper are: (1) In-core and in-vessel natural convection cooling, (2) a passive heat sink capability of the ATR primary coolant system (PCS) for the transfer of decay power from the uninsulated piping to the confinement, and (3) gravity feed of emergency coolant makeup. The safety significance of the ATR passive safety response attributes is that the reactor can passively respond for most transients, given a reactor scram, to provide adequate decay power removal and a significant time for operator action should the normal active heat removal systems and their backup systems both fail. The ATR Interim Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) model ands results were used to evaluate the significance to ATR fuel damage frequency (or probability) of the above three passive response attributes. The results of the evaluation indicate that the first attribute is a major safety characteristic of the ATR. The second attribute has a noticeable but only minor safety significance. The third attribute has no significant influence on the ATR Level 1 PRA because of the diversity and redundancy of the ATR firewater injection system (emergency coolant system). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The LOCA performance of the AP600 passive safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, R.M.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Takeuchi, K.; Garner, D.C.; Nguyen, S.B.; Cunningham, J.P. ); Lee, S.N.K.; Tehrani, A.A.K.; Yang, H.; Bratby, P.A.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The AP600 is an advanced passive safeguards pressurized water reactor (PWR) that is being developed jointly by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Electrical Power Research Institute. The plant has a thermal rating of 1940 MW (thermal) [600 MW(electric)] and has been designed with passive safeguard systems that utilize gravity feed injection rather than safety-grade active pumps and equipment. Calculations performed for a range of break sizes used locations to find the worst set of conditions for depressurizing the reactor coolant system. The main criterion was system inventory such that the core remained covered. The resulting break spectrum study indicates only that the double-ended guillotine shear of the direct vessel injection line (a .68-in. line that feeds the emergency core coolant flow into the vessel) resulted in a momentary core uncover. For all other small-break cases, the core remained covered as the reactor coolant system depressurized. The passive safety systems provided sufficient mass flow to the reactor vessel such that even under the more conservative Appendix K assumptions, the core remained covered and in a coolable state. The LOCA analysis performed for the AP600 confirms that passive safety systems can provide the core cooling necessary to meet the requirements of 10CFR50.46 with ample margin.

  10. Using an IIST 1% Cold-Leg SBLOCA Experiment with Passive Safety Injection to Assess the RELAP5/MOD3.2 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-H.; Huang, I-M.; Chang, C.-J

    2001-08-15

    The thermal-hydraulic behavior of a postulated 1% cold-leg break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor system was investigated experimentally by the three-loop Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) Integral System Test (IIST) facility with the passive core cooling system (PCCS) and numerically by the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code. The PCCS of the IIST facility includes three core makeup tanks (CMTs), three accumulators, and a four-stage automatic depressurization system. The aim of this research is to study the performance of the CMTs with the actuation of the ADS during a small-break LOCA. The experimental results show that the IIST PCCS has the capability to maintain long-term cooling under a postulated 1% cold-leg break LOCA. The comparison of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 simulation against the experimental data shows good agreement in major thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the reactor coolant system, but the prediction of the asymmetric behavior for the three CMTs during a gravity drain period is inadequate.

  11. Divergent effects of transformational and passive leadership on employee safety.

    PubMed

    Kelloway, E Kevin; Mullen, Jane; Francis, Lori

    2006-01-01

    The authors concurrently examined the impact of safety-specific transformational leadership and safety-specific passive leadership on safety outcomes. First, the authors demonstrated via confirmatory factor analysis that safety-specific transformational leadership and safety-specific passive leadership are empirically distinct constructs. Second, using hierarchical regression, the authors illustrated, contrary to a stated corollary of transformational leadership theory (B. M. Bass, 1997), that passive leadership contributes incrementally to the prediction of organizationally relevant outcomes, in this case safety-related variables, beyond transformational leadership alone. Third, further analyses via structural equation modeling showed that both transformational and passive leadership have opposite effects on safety climate and safety consciousness, and these variables, in turn, predict safety events and injuries. Implications for research and application are discussed. PMID:16551176

  12. Vibration of safety injection pump motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wattrelos, D.

    1996-12-01

    This paper covers a fault encountered in the safety injection pump motors of the French 900 MWe unit nuclear power stations. This fault was not revealed either during the low pressure safety injection and containment spray system pump qualification tests under accident conditions or during the special tests on a test bench carried out to attempt to replicate the fault and to identify ways of remedying it. This constitutes a potential common mode of failure of the safety injection system and the containment spray system pumps. The vibration phenomena illustrate the importance of carrying out tests in the plants under conditions as close as possible to those of actual accident situations.

  13. A concept of JAERI passive safety light water reactor system (JPSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Murao, Y.; Araya, F.; Iwamura, T.

    1995-09-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor system concept, JPSR, which was developed for reducing manpower in operation and maintenance and influence of human errors on reactor safety. In the concept the system was extremely simplified. The inherent matching nature of core generation and heat removal rate within a small volume change of the primary coolant is introduced by eliminating chemical shim and adopting in-vessel control rod drive mechanism units, a low power density core and once-through steam generators. In order to simplify the system, a large pressurizer, canned pumps, passive engineered-safety-features-system (residual heat removal system and coolant injection system) are adopted and the total system can be significantly simplified. The residual heat removal system is completely passively actuated in non-LOCAs and is also used for depressurization of the primary coolant system to actuate accumulators in small break LOCAs and reactor shutdown cooling system in normal operation. All of systems for nuclear steam supply system are built in the containment except for the air coolers as a the final heat sink of the passive residual heat removal system. Accordingly the reliability of the safety system and the normal operation system is improved, since most of residual heat removal system is always working and a heat sink for normal operation system is {open_quotes}safety class{close_quotes}. In the passive coolant injection system, depressurization of the primary cooling system by residual heat removal system initiates injection from accumulators designed for the MS-600 in medium pressure and initiates injection from the gravity driven coolant injection pool at low pressure. Analysis with RETRAN-02/MOD3 code demonstrated the capability of passive load-following, self-power-controllability, cooling and depressurization.

  14. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-08-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  15. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented.

  16. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-10-01

    One of the goals of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). A key area deserving special attention for preservation is the data relating to passive safety testing that was conducted in FFTF and EBR-II during the 1980’s. Accidents at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Station and Unit 2 at Three Mile Island changed the safety paradigm of the nuclear power industry. New emphasis was placed on assured safety based on intrinsic plant characteristics that protect not only the public, but the significant investment in the plant as well. Plants designated to perform in this manner are considered to be passively safe since no active sensor/alarm system or human intervention is required to bring the reactor to a safe shutdown condition. The liquid metal reactor (LMR) has several key characteristics needed for a passively safe reactor: reactor coolant with superior heat transfer capability and very high boiling point, low (atmospheric) system pressures, and reliable negative reactivity feedback. The credibility of the design for a passively safe LMR rests on two issues: the validity of analytic methods used to predict passive safety performance and the availability of relevant test data to calibrate design tools. Safety analysis methods used to analyze LMRs under the old safety paradigm were focused on calculating the source term for the Core Disruptive Accident. Passive safety design requires refined analysis methods for transient events because treatment of the detailed reactivity feedbacks is important in predicting the response of the reactor. Similarly, analytic tools should be calibrated against actual test experience in existing LMR facilities. The principal objectives of the combined FFTF natural circulation and Passive Safety Testing program were: 1) to verify natural circulation as a reliable means to safely remove decay heat, 2) to extend passive safety

  17. Intravitreal Injection--Technique and Safety.

    PubMed

    Lai, Timothy Y Y; Liu, Shu; Das, Sudipta; Lam, Dennis S C

    2015-01-01

    Intravitreal (IVT) injection of therapeutic agents has become one of the most commonly performed procedures in ophthalmology. Over the past decade, a number of guidelines have been published that recommend proper techniques to increase the safety of IVT injections. Among the various complications of IVT injections, endophthalmitis can be sight threatening. The reported endophthalmitis rates after IVT injection range from 0.020% to 0.085%, which are higher than what would be expected from a simple, fast, and relatively atraumatic procedure. The 2 key issues involved in the prevention of endophthalmitis are pre-IVT injection disinfection using povidone-iodine (PVI) and the use of topical antibiotics as prophylaxis. Whereas 5% PVI for 5 minutes is most commonly used in cataract surgery for disinfection, the duration in IVT injection is much less and can be as short as 30 seconds. Further studies seem warranted to investigate whether longer duration of PVI application in IVT injection can lower the endophthalmitis rate. Recent data suggest that there is inadequate evidence to support the routine use of prophylactic pre-, peri-, or postinjection antibiotics to reduce the risk of endophthalmitis. However, as many confounding factors such as the PVI regimens were not standardized in previous studies, it is too soon to make a concrete conclusion. Despite the availability of published guidelines, considerable variations still exist in real-life clinical situations. In this article, we describe our IVT injection practice protocol and compare it with the most recent international guidelines. Finally, a summary table that shows the clinical features of true, sterile, and pseudoendophthalmitis is presented. PMID:26649760

  18. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  19. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-06

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  20. Radiation safety in fluoroscopy for neuraxial injections.

    PubMed

    Fink, Gerry E

    2009-08-01

    Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) perform epidural steroid injections for chronic back and extremity pain. Placing epidural needles using fluoroscopy and confirming the needle placement by epidurogram has been suggested as a means to increase the efficacy of epidural injections while decreasing complications. Because of the risk of radiation injury to patients and staff when using fluoroscopy, the purpose of this article is to review the concepts of fluoroscopy and radiation safety for CRNAs. Following a literature search using keywords such as fluoroscopy, radiation injury, and radiation safety, relevant articles were identified. In addition, the reference lists of these articles were reviewed to identify other pertinent sources regarding this topic. The risks of stochastic and deterministic effects from radiation exposure necessitate the need for practitioners who are knowledgeable in equipment, patient, and procedure related factors that influence radiation exposure. Practitioner conduct, using the as-low-as-reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle, results in choices regarding these factors that minimize the time and intensity of radiation exposure to patients, anesthesia providers, and staff. PMID:19731844

  1. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to

  2. The Potential for Further Development of Passive Safety

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Richard; Lenard, James

    2009-01-01

    In Europe, emphasis is being transferred from injury prevention to accident prevention to reduce road casualties. This study attempted to identify the current potential for serious casualty reduction using passive safety by examining the crash performance of new cars with seriously injured occupants. The Co-operative Crash Injury Study conducts in-depth investigations of around 1200 vehicles per year from seven sample regions around England. Attention was focussed on passenger cars manufactured from 2004 to 2008 with at least one occupant injured to AIS level 3 or more. 28% of MAIS 3+ occupants were unbelted and 40% were belted but involved in crashes with limited potential for passive protection. A further 32% of occupants were belted and involved in crashes with potential for improved crashworthiness design. For these occupants, five major functional requirements were identified for crashworthiness improvement: a reduction of seatbelt loads on the chest and abdomen in frontal crashes, particularly for seniors; reduction in femur and tibia loads in frontal crashes; provision of head and chest protection in near-side crashes; and reduction of occupant lateral excursion in far-side impacts. Together these functions accounted for 70% of the identified requirements. Other smaller requirements were identified, each contributing up to 5% of total. Overall, the case supporting further developments in passive safety still appears significant. PMID:20184832

  3. Use of DRACS to Enhance HTGRs Passive Safety and Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of DRACS to Enhance HTGRs Passive Safety and Economy. One of the important requirements for Gen. IV High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGR) is passive safety. Currently all the HTGR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. [1] The decay heat first is transferred to core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. Similar concepts have been widely used in sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) designs, advanced light water reactors like AP1000. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area. RVACS tends to be less expensive. However, it limits the largest achievable power level for modular HTGRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface). When the relative decay heat removal capability is reduced, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annual designs with internal reflector can mitigate this effect therefore further increase the power. Another way to increase power is to increase power density. However, it is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides safety, HTGRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor designs. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of HTGRs. Forsberg [2] pointed out other disadvantages of using RVACS such as conflicting functional requirements for the reactor vessel and scaling distortion for integral effect test of the system performance. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume based passive decay removal system, call Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove

  4. The Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Combined Passive and On-Board Active Safety Applications

    PubMed Central

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006–2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectivenessof the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  5. The evaluation of the safety benefits of combined passive and on-board active safety applications.

    PubMed

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; Hermitte, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006-2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety systems, recent cars are designed to offer overall safety protection. Car structure, load limiters, front airbags, side airbags, knee airbags, pretensioners, padding and non aggressive structures in the door panel, the dashboard, the windshield, the seats, and the head rest also contribute to applying more protection. The whole safety package is very difficult to evaluate separately, one element independently segmented from the others. We decided to consider evaluating the effectiveness of the whole passive safety package, This package,, for the sake of simplicity, was the number of stars awarded at the Euro NCAP testing. The challenges were to compare the effectiveness of some safety configuration SC I, with the effectiveness of a different safety configuration SC II. A safety configuration is understood as a package of safety functions. Ten comparisons have been carried out such as the evaluation of the safety benefit of a fifth star given that the car has four stars and an EBA. The main outcome of this analysis is that any addition of a passive or active safety function selected in this analysis is producing increased safety benefits. For example, if all cars were five stars fitted with EBA and ESC, instead of four stars without ESC and EBA, injury accidents would be reduced by 47.2% for severe injuries and 69.5% for fatal injuries. PMID:20184838

  6. New PANDA Tests to Investigate Effects of Light Gases on Passive Safety Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paladino, D.; Auban, O.; Candreia, P.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J.

    2002-07-01

    The large- scale thermal-hydraulic PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland), has been used over the last few years for investigating different passive decay- heat removal systems and containment phenomena for the next generation of light water reactors (Simplified Boiling Water Reactor: SBWR; European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor: ESBWR; Siedewasserreaktor: SWR-1000). Currently, as part of the European Commission 5. EURATOM Framework Programme project 'Testing and Enhanced Modelling of Passive Evolutionary Systems Technology for Containment Cooling' (TEMPEST), a new series of tests is being planned in the PANDA facility to experimentally investigate the distribution of non-condensable gases inside the containment and their effect on the performance of the 'Passive Containment Cooling System' (PCCS). Hydrogen release caused by the metal-water reaction in the case of a postulated severe accident will be simulated in PANDA by injecting helium into the reactor pressure vessel. In order to provide suitable data for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code assessment and improvement, the instrumentation in PANDA has been upgraded for the new tests. In the present paper, a detailed discussion is given of the new PANDA tests to be performed to investigate the effects of light gas on passive safety systems. The tests are scheduled for the first half of the year 2002. (authors)

  7. Identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs in the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' (Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety) is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document.

  8. Passive detection of subpixel obstacles for flight safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Matthew D.; Loveland, Rohan C.

    2001-12-01

    Military aircraft fly below 100 ft. above ground level in support of their missions. These aircraft include fixed and rotary wing and may be manned or unmanned. Flying at these low altitudes presents a safety hazard to the aircrew and aircraft, due to the occurrences of obstacles within the aircraft's flight path. The pilot must rely on eyesight and in some cases, infrared sensors to see obstacles. Many conditions can exacerbate visibility creating a situation in which obstacles are essentially invisible, creating a safety hazard, even to an alerted aircrew. Numerous catastrophic accidents have occurred in which aircraft have collided with undetected obstacles. Accidents of this type continue to be a problem for low flying military and commercial aircraft. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have the same problem, whether operating autonomously or under control of a ground operator. Boeing-SVS has designed a passive, small, low- cost (under $100k) gimbaled, infrared imaging based system with advanced obstacle detection algorithms. Obstacles are detected in the infrared band, and linear features are analyzed by innovative cellular automata based software. These algorithms perform detection and location of sub-pixel linear features. The detection of the obstacles is performed on a frame by frame basis, in real time. Processed images are presented to the aircrew on their display as color enhanced features. The system has been designed such that the detected obstacles are displayed to the aircrew in sufficient time to react and maneuver the aircraft to safety. A patent for this system is on file with the US patent office, and all material herein should be treated accordingly.

  9. Testing of Passive Safety System Performance for Higher Power Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    brian G. Woods; Jose Reyes, Jr.; John Woods; John Groome; Richard Wright

    2004-12-31

    This report describes the results of NERI research on the testing of advanced passive safety performance for the Westinghouse AP1000 design. The objectives of this research were: (a) to assess the AP1000 passive safety system core cooling performance under high decay power conditions for a spectrum of breaks located at a variety of locations, (b) to compare advanced thermal hydraulic computer code predictions to the APEX high decay power test data and (c) to develop new passive safety system concepts that could be used for Generation IV higher power reactors.

  10. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.; Hui, Marvin M.; Berglund, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  11. Passive shutdown device for gas cooled fast reactor: Lithium injection module

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Van Der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; Van Dam, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper a passive reactivity control system for a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is proposed. The Generation IV GCFR features a core with a relatively high power density, and control of transients and adequate shutdown under accidental situations must be assured for safe operation. Using a passive shutdown device rules out the possibility of unprotected transients. The proposed devices work by the passive introduction of {sup 6}Li into the core (Lithium Injection Module). Control is by the outlet temperature of the coolant gas in the fuel assemblies, employing a freeze seal. The proposed devices can be integrated into the regular control assemblies. A total of four LIMs is proposed in the core. Thermohydraulic calculations were done using the CATHARE code for a 600 MWth GCFR, for 2 types of transients: a loss of flow, and a control rod withdrawal. The calculations show that activation of one LIM is sufficient to keep the reactor power bounded, while activation of all LIMs in the core will shut down the reactor. The passive LIM devices are able to exclude unprotected transients in the GCFR core. (authors)

  12. 77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The current SRP does not contain guidance on the proposed RTNSS for Passive Advance Light Water Reactors. DATES:...

  13. [Study of post marketing safety reevaluation of shenqi fuzheng injection].

    PubMed

    Ai, Qing-Hua; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2014-09-01

    In order to promote the Shenqifuzheng injection (SQFZ) clinical medication safety, this study reevaluate on SQFZ post marketing safety study systematically. Including multi center large sample registration type safety monitoring research, the analysis based on national spontaneous reporting system data, the analysis based on the 20 national hospital information system data and literature research. Above the analysis, it suggests that SQFZ has good security. The more adverse drug reaction (ADR) as allergic reactions, mainly involved in the damage of skin, appendages and its systemic damage, serious person can appear allergic shock. ADR/E is more common in the elderly, may be related to medication (tumor) populations. Early warning analysis based on SRS data and literature research are of the view that "phlebitis" has a strong association with SQFZ used. PMID:25532410

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Permacol Injection in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Jennifer; Ayantunde, Abraham; Praveen, Bandipalyam V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Permacol has been gaining popularity in recent times for the treatment of fecal incontinence (FI). This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of anal submucosal Permacol injection in the treatment of FI. Methods All consecutive patients who underwent Permacol injection for FI over a 3-year period were included. Patients' data relating to obstetric history, anorectal/pelvic operations, type of FI, preoperative anorectal physiology results and follow-up details for outcome measures were collected. Preoperative and postoperative Cleveland Clinic Florida Incontinence Scores (CCFISs) were noted. Patients were surveyed by using a telephone questionnaire to assess the quality of life and other outcome measures. Data were analysed using SPSS ver.19.0. Results Thirty patients (28 females and 2 males) with a median age of 67 years were included in the study. Of those patients, 37%, 50%, and 13% were noted to have passive, mixed and urge FI, respectively. Six of the patients (20%) had repeat Permacol injections, 5 of whom had sustained responses to the first Permacol injection for a mean of 11 months. There was a significant improvement in the CCFIS from a baseline median of 12.5, mean 12.8 interquartile range [IQR], 6–20), to a median of 3.5, mean 4.8 (IQR, 0–20), P < 0.001. Of the patients surveyed by telephone 89% were satisfied with their overall experience and the improvement in their symptoms following Permacol injections. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that Permacol injection for the treatment of FI is safe and effective and has no associated major complications. However, the results are not permanent; consequently, a significant proportion of the patients with an initial response may require repeat injections. PMID:27218098

  15. Biotelemetric passive sensor injected within tendon for strain and elasticity measurement.

    PubMed

    Pichorim, Sérgio Francisco; Abatti, Paulo José

    2006-05-01

    A passive and injectable (using hypodermic needle) biotelemetric sensor for measurements of tendon length changes has been developed. From these measurements tendon strain and Young's modulus of elasticity can be derived. The sensor (about 2.1 x 29 mm) is a LC circuit fixed in tendon by metallic anchors (barbs), where the value of the resonance frequency is modulated by displacement of a mobile ferrite core. The sensor was injected into digital extensor tendon of pig, allowing the determination of its stress-strain curve and, consequently, of Young's modulus of elasticity of the tendon. Practical results, such as sensitivity of 18.199 kHz/mm (correlation coefficient of 0.9891) for strains up to 5.17%, mechanical hysteresis of 6.5%, and Young's modulus of 0.9146 GPa for a pig tendon (post mortem), are presented and discussed. PMID:16686414

  16. Large Break LOCA Safety Injection Sensitivity for a CE/ABB System 80+ PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Pottorf, J.; Bajorek, S.M.

    2002-07-01

    A WCOBRA/TRAC model of an evolutionary pressurized water reactor with direct vessel injection was constructed using publicly available information and a hypothetical double-ended guillotine break of a cold leg pipe was simulated. The model is an approximation of a ABB/Combustion Engineering System 80+ pressurized water reactor (PWR). WCOBRA/TRAC is the thermal-hydraulics code approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for use in realistic large break LOCA analyses of Westinghouse 3- and 4-loop PWRs and the AP600 passive design. The AP600 design uses direct vessel injection, and the applicability of WCOBRA/TRAC to such designs is supported by comparisons to appropriate test data. This study extends the application of WCOBRA/TRAC to the investigation of the predicted behavior of direct vessel injection in an evolutionary design. A series of large break LOCA simulations were performed assuming a core power of 3914 MWt, and Technical Specification limits of 2.5 on total peaking factor and 1.7 on hot channel enthalpy rise factor. Two cladding temperature peaks were predicted during reflood, one following bottom of core recovery and a second caused by saturated boiling of water in the downcomer. This behavior is consistent with prior WCOBRA/TRAC calculations for some Westinghouse PWRs. The simulation results are described, and the sensitivity to failure assumptions for the safety injection system is presented. (authors)

  17. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs.

  18. Pulsed-incoherent-light-injected Fabry-Perot laser diode for WDM passive optical networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon

    2010-01-18

    We propose and demonstrate a pulsed-incoherent-light-injected Fabry-Perot laser diode (FP-LD) which generates incoherent return-to-zero (RZ) signals for wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical networks. For the generation of the RZ signals, we first convert the continuous-wave (CW) amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) into an ASE pulse train with a pulse carver, spectrum-slice it into multiple channels with a waveguide grating router, and then inject them into FP-LDs for data modulation. Thanks to a wide slicing bandwidth of the injected incoherent light, the spectral linewidth of the generated RZ signals is determined by the slicing bandwidth, without being affected by the use of the RZ format. Thus, compared to incoherent non-return-to-zero (NRZ) signals generated with CW-ASE-injected FP-LDs, the RZ signals have a similar spectral linewidth but a wide timing margin between adjacent bits. Thus, the proposed transmitter can offer better dispersion tolerance than the NRZ signals. For example, our experimental demonstration performed at 1.25 Gb/s shows approximately 50% higher dispersion tolerance than the NRZ signals generated with CW ASE-injected FP-LDs. Despite the large slicing bandwidth of 0.67 nm for the injected ASE, we were able to transmit 1.25-Gb/s signals over 45-km standard single-mode fiber without dispersion compensation. The receiver sensitivity is also improved by 1.5 dB by using the RZ format. PMID:20173999

  19. Passive millimeter-wave imaging for security and safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Sawaya, Kunio; Mizuno, Koji; Uemura, Jun; Takeda, Masamune; Takahashi, Junichi; Yamada, Kota; Morichika, Keiichi; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Hirai, Haruyuki; Niikura, Hirotaka; Matsuzaki, Tomohiko; Kato, Shigeto; Nakada, Jun

    2010-04-01

    77 GHz passive millimeter wave (PMMW) imaging camera for the purpose of security is developed. In order to detect concealed objects in clothes without hindrance to flow of people at airport security checks, video rate imaging is realized using one-dimensional imaging sensor array of 25 elements and a flapping reflector. As receiving antennas, novel antipodal Fermi antenna (APFA) having required characteristics for passive imaging such as broad bandwidth to obtain enough power, axially symmetric directivity with 10dB beam width of 35 degrees to obtain optimum coupling with dielectric lens, narrow width geometry for high spatial resolution of imaging is used. Real-time calibration (RTC) technique is introduced to eliminate the drift of receiving circuits. Interpolation technique to improve the quality of image and marking software for screening of suspicious objects are also developed. High spatial resolution of 20 mm is obtained by using developed imaging camera.

  20. The REPAS Study: Reliability Evaluation of Passive Safety Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ricotti, M.E.; Bianchi, F.; Burgazzi, L.; D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.

    2002-07-01

    The strategy of approach to the problem moves from the consideration that a passive system should be theoretically more reliable than an active one. In fact it does not need any external input or energy to operate and it relies only upon natural physical laws (e.g. gravity, natural circulation, internally stored energy, etc.) and/or 'intelligent' use of the energy inherently available in the system (e.g. chemical reaction, decay heat, etc.). Nevertheless the passive system may fail its mission not only as a consequence of classical mechanical failure of components, but also for deviation from the expected behaviour, due to physical phenomena mainly related to thermal-hydraulics or due to different boundary and initial conditions. The main sources of physical failure are identified and a probability of occurrence is assigned. The reliability analysis is performed on a passive system which operates in two-phase, natural circulation. The selected system is a loop including a heat source and a heat sink where the condensation occurs. The system behavior under different configurations has been simulated via best-estimate code (Relap5 mod3.2). The results are shown and can be treated in such a way to give qualitative and quantitative information on the system reliability. Main routes of development of the methodology are also depicted. (authors)

  1. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  2. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-02-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  3. System Study: High-Pressure Safety Injection 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure safety injection system (HPSI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPSI results.

  4. Injectable actarit-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles as passive targeting therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiesheng; Wang, Qun; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zhang, Na

    2008-03-20

    This work systematically studied the intravenous injection formulation of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) loaded with actarit, a poor water soluble anti-rheumatic drug. The goal of this study was to design passive targeting nanoparticles which could improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce side-effects such as nephrotoxicity and gastrointestinal disorders commonly associated with oral formulations of actarit. Based on the optimized results of single-factor and orthogonal design, actarit-loaded SLNs were prepared by a modified solvent diffusion-evaporation method. The formulated SLNs were found to be relatively uniform in size (241+/-23 nm) with a negative zeta potential (-17.14+/-1.6 mV). The average drug entrapment efficiency and loading were (50.87+/-0.25)% and (8.48+/-0.14)%, respectively. The actarit-loaded SLNs exhibited a longer mean retention time in vivo (t(1/2(beta)), 9.373 h; MRT, 13.53 h) compared with the actarit 50% propylene glycol solution (t(1/2(ke)), 0.917 h; MRT, 1.323 h) after intravenous injection to New Zealand rabbits. The area under curve of plasma concentration-time (AUC) of actarit-loaded SLNs was 1.88 times greater than that of the actarit in 50% propylene glycol solution. The overall targeting efficiency (TE(C)) of the actarit-loaded SLNs was enhanced from 6.31% to 16.29% in spleen while the renal distribution of actarit was significantly reduced as compared to that of the actarit solution after intravenous administration to mice. These results indicated that injectable actarit-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were promising passive targeting therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18054182

  5. Study of Cost Effective Large Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors that Employ Passive Safety Features

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J. W.; Corletti, M. M.; Hayashi, Y.

    2003-11-12

    A report of DOE sponsored portions of AP1000 Design Certification effort. On December 16, 1999, The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Design Certification of the AP600 standard nuclear reactor design. This culminated an 8-year review of the AP600 design, safety analysis and probabilistic risk assessment. The AP600 is a 600 MWe reactor that utilizes passive safety features that, once actuated, depend only on natural forces such as gravity and natural circulation to perform all required safety functions. These passive safety systems result in increased plant safety and have also significantly simplified plant systems and equipment, resulting in simplified plant operation and maintenance. The AP600 meets NRC deterministic safety criteria and probabilistic risk criteria with large margins. A summary comparison of key passive safety system design features is provided in Table 1. These key features are discussed due to their importance in affecting the key thermal-hydraulic phenomenon exhibited by the passive safety systems in critical areas. The scope of some of the design changes to the AP600 is described. These changes are the ones that are important in evaluating the passive plant design features embodied in the certified AP600 standard plant design. These design changes are incorporated into the AP1000 standard plant design that Westinghouse is certifying under 10 CFR Part 52. In conclusion, this report describes the results of the representative design certification activities that were partially supported by the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. These activities are unique to AP1000, but are representative of research activities that must be driven to conclusion to realize successful licensing of the next generation of nuclear power plants in the United States.

  6. Scale Model Test and Transient Analysis of Steam Injector Driven Passive Core Injection System for Innovative-Simplified Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Shuichi; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to serve also as a direct-contact feed-water heater that heats up feed-water by using extracted steam from turbine. Our technology development aims to significantly simplify equipment and reduce physical quantities by applying "high-efficiency SI", which are applicable to a wide range of operation regimes beyond the performance and applicable range of existing SIs and enables unprecedented multistage and parallel operation, to the low-pressure feed-water heaters and emergency core cooling system of nuclear power plants, as well as achieve high inherent safety to prevent severe accidents by keeping the core covered with water (a severe accident-free concept). This paper describes the results of the scale model test, and the transient analysis of SI-driven passive core injection system (PCIS).

  7. Impact of Passive Safety on FHR Instrumentation Systems Design and Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs) will rely more extensively on passive safety than earlier reactor classes. 10CFR50 Appendix A, General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, establishes minimum design requirements to provide reasonable assurance of adequate safety. 10CFR50.69, Risk-Informed Categorization and Treatment of Structures, Systems and Components for Nuclear Power Reactors, provides guidance on how the safety significance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) should be reflected in their regulatory treatment. The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) has provided 10 CFR 50.69 SSC Categorization Guideline (NEI-00-04) that factors in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model insights, as well as deterministic insights, through an integrated decision-making panel. Employing the PRA to inform deterministic requirements enables an appropriately balanced, technically sound categorization to be established. No FHR currently has an adequate PRA or set of design basis accidents to enable establishing the safety classification of its SSCs. While all SSCs used to comply with the general design criteria (GDCs) will be safety related, the intent is to limit the instrumentation risk significance through effective design and reliance on inherent passive safety characteristics. For example, FHRs have no safety-significant temperature threshold phenomena, thus enabling the primary and reserve reactivity control systems required by GDC 26 to be passively, thermally triggered at temperatures well below those for which core or primary coolant boundary damage would occur. Moreover, the passive thermal triggering of the primary and reserve shutdown systems may relegate the control rod drive motors to the control system, substantially decreasing the amount of safety-significant wiring needed. Similarly, FHR decay heat removal systems are intended to be running continuously to minimize the amount of safety-significant instrumentation needed to initiate

  8. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... solicitation for public comment published in the Federal Register on October 12, 2012 (77 FR 62270), on the... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The NRC seeks...

  9. Active and Passive Fatigue in Simulated Driving: Discriminating Styles of Workload Regulation and Their Safety Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Saxby, Dyani J.; Matthews, Gerald; Warm, Joel S.; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Neubauer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of driver fatigue, it is a difficult construct to study empirically. Different forms of task-induced fatigue may differ in their effects on driver performance and safety. Desmond and Hancock (2001) defined active and passive fatigue states that reflect different styles of workload regulation. In 2 driving simulator studies we investigated the multidimensional subjective states and safety outcomes associated with active and passive fatigue. Wind gusts were used to induce active fatigue, and full vehicle automation to induce passive fatigue. Drive duration was independently manipulated to track the development of fatigue states over time. Participants were undergraduate students. Study 1 (N = 108) focused on subjective response and associated cognitive stress processes, while Study 2 (N = 168) tested fatigue effects on vehicle control and alertness. In both studies the 2 fatigue manipulations produced different patterns of subjective response reflecting different styles of workload regulation, appraisal, and coping. Active fatigue was associated with distress, overload, and heightened coping efforts, whereas passive fatigue corresponded to large-magnitude declines in task engagement, cognitive underload, and reduced challenge appraisal. Study 2 showed that only passive fatigue reduced alertness, operationalized as speed of braking and steering responses to an emergency event. Passive fatigue also increased crash probability, but did not affect a measure of vehicle control. Findings support theories that see fatigue as an outcome of strategies for managing workload. The distinction between active and passive fatigue is important for assessment of fatigue and for evaluating automated driving systems which may induce dangerous levels of passive fatigue. PMID:24041288

  10. Fabrication and modelling of injection moulded all-polymer capillary microvalves for passive microfluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Esben Poulsen, Carl; Østergaard, Peter Friis; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Taboryski, Rafael; Wolff, Anders; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel

    2014-12-01

    Rapid prototyping is desirable when developing products. One example of such a product is all-polymer, passive flow controlled lab-on-a-chip systems that are preferential when developing low-cost disposable chips for point-of-care use. In this paper we investigate the following aspects of going from rapid prototyping to pilot (mass) production. (1) Fabrication of an all-polymer microfluidic system using a rapid prototyped master insert for injection moulding and ultrasonic welding, including a systematic experimental characterisation of chip featured geometric capillary microvalve test structures. (2) Numerical modelling of the microvalve burst pressures. Numerical modelling of burst pressures is challenging due to its non-equilibrium nature. We have implemented and tested the level-set method modified with a damped driving term and show that the introduction of the damping term leads to numerically robust results with limited computational demands and a low number of iterations. Numerical and simplified analytical results are validated against the experimental results. We find that injection moulding and ultrasonic welding are effective for chip production and that the experimental burst pressures could be estimated with an average accuracy of 5% using the presented numerical model.

  11. Passive coherent beam combining of four Yb-doped fiber amplifier chains with injection-locked seed source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifeng; Hu, Man; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Houkang; Dai, Shoujun; Wei, Yunrong; Lou, Qihong

    2013-03-15

    An injection-locked fiber laser is introduced to the passive fiber laser coherent beam combination with all-optical feedback loop. A coherent beam combining system with two-dimensional four Yb-doped fiber amplifier chains is established, and the injection-locked fiber laser works as a switchable seed source. The 1064 nm output laser of the injection-locked fiber laser is extinguished automatically as the feedback injection power is high enough, and the injection-locked fiber laser acts as an amplifier for the feedback laser with 7.4 dB gains. We find that the phase-locked far-field interference pattern of our system with seed laser extinguished is stable, and the visibility is up to 91.5%, which is slightly higher than the prevalent method with auxiliary seed laser (88.2%). PMID:23503238

  12. Identification of the permeability field of a porous medium from the injection of a passive tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Lang; Yortsos, Yannis C.

    2000-07-01

    We propose a method for the direct inversion of the permeability field of a porous medium from the analysis of the displacement of a passive tracer. By monitoring the displacement front at successive time intervals (for example, using a tomographic method), the permeability can be directly obtained from the solution of a nonlinear boundary-value problem. Well posedness requires knowledge of the pressure profile or the permeability at no-flow boundaries. The method is tested using synthetic data in two dimensions (2D) (and some 3D) geometries for a variety of heterogeneous fields and found to work well when the permeability contrast is not too large. However, it is sensitive to sharp variations in permeability. In the latter case, a modified approach based on the successive injection in both directions and the use of an optimization technique leads to improved estimates. The sensitivity to measurement errors is analyzed. An important feature of the direct method is that it also applies to anisotropic porous media. When the principal axes of anisotropy are known, a suitable procedure is proposed and demonstrated using synthetic data. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  13. Securing Operating Data From Passive Safety Tests at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

    2011-06-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program. This report is one in a series documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors. A previous report summarized the initial efforts to review, retrieve and preserve the most salient documents related to Passive Safety Testing (PST) in the FFTF. Efforts continue to locate, secure, and retrieve record copies of original plant data tapes for the series of passive safety tests conducted between 1986 and 1991.

  14. Securing Operating Data From Passive Safety Tests at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.; Nelson, Joseph V.; Polzin, David L.

    2011-06-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. The technologies employed in designing and constructing this reactor, along with information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, are currently being secured and archived by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program. This report is one in a series documenting the overall project efforts to retrieve and preserve critical information related to advanced reactors. A previous report summarized the initial efforts to review, retrieve and preserve the most salient documents related to Passive Safety Testing (PST) in the FFTF. Efforts continue to locate, secure, and retrieve record copies of original plant data tapes for the series of passive safety tests conducted between 1986 and 1991.

  15. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

  16. Key safety considerations when administering epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Benyamin, Ramsin M

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and other complications of epidural steroid injections have been widely discussed in recent years. Consequently, the US FDA issued a warning about serious neurological events, some resulting in death, and consequently is requiring label changes. Neurological adverse events numbering 131, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis, have been identified by the FDA, and 700 cases of fungal meningitis following injection of contaminated steroids. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, with the majority of them to cervical transforaminal epidural injections. This perspective describes the prevalence of administering epidural injections, complications, pathoanatomy, mechanism of injury and various preventive strategies. PMID:26059467

  17. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) is a pebble fueled, liquid salt cooled, high temperature nuclear reactor design that can be used for electricity generation or other applications requiring the availability of heat at elevated temperatures. A stage in the design evolution of this plant requires the analysis of the plant during a variety of potential transients to understand the primary and safety cooling system response. This study focuses on the performance of the passive safety cooling system with a dual purpose, to assess the capacity to maintain the core at safe temperatures and to assist the design process of this system to achieve this objective. The analysis requires the use of complex computational tools for simulation and verification using analytical solutions and comparisons with experimental data. This investigation builds upon previous detailed design work for the PB-AHTR components, including the core, reactivity control mechanisms and the intermediate heat exchanger, developed in 2008. In addition the study of this reference plant design employs a wealth of auxiliary information including thermal-hydraulic physical phenomena correlations for multiple geometries and thermophysical properties for the constituents of the plant. Finally, the set of performance requirements and limitations imposed from physical constrains and safety considerations provide with a criteria and metrics for acceptability of the design. The passive safety cooling system concept is turned into a detailed design as a result from this study. A methodology for the design of air-cooled passive safety systems was developed and a transient analysis of the plant, evaluating a scrammed loss of forced cooling event was performed. Furthermore, a design optimization study of the passive safety system and an approach for the validation and verification of the analysis is presented. This study demonstrates that the resulting point design responds properly to the

  18. Safety of immunization injections in Africa: not simply a problem of logistics.

    PubMed Central

    Dicko, M.; Oni, A. Q.; Ganivet, S.; Kone, S.; Pierre, L.; Jacquet, B.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, the WHO Regional Office for Africa launched a logistics project to address the four main areas of immunization logistics: the cold chain, transport, vaccine supply and quality, and the safety of injections in the countries of the region. The impact of this logistic approach on immunization injection safety was evaluated through surveys of injection procedures and an analysis of the injection materials (e.g. sterilizable or disposable syringes) chosen by the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) and those actually seen to be used. Re-use of injection materials without sterilization, accidental needle-stick injuries among health care workers, and injection-related abscesses in patients were common in countries in the WHO African Region. Few health centres used time-steam saturation-temperature (TST) indicators to check the quality of sterilization and, in many centres, the injection equipment was boiled instead of being steam sterilized. Facilities for the proper disposal of used materials were rarely present. Although the official EPI choice was to use sterilizable equipment, use of a combination of sterilizable and disposable equipment was observed in the field. Unsafe injection practices in these countries were generally due to a failure to integrate nursing practices and public awareness with injection safety issues, and an absence of the influence of EPI managers on health care service delivery. Holistic rather than logistic approaches should be adopted to achieve safe injections in immunization, in the broader context of promoting safe vaccines and safety of all injections. PMID:10743280

  19. [Construction and implementation of quality control index for clinical safety of Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-jie; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-12-01

    In order to ensure the authenticity and accuracy of traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring data, Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring quality control indicators, including the monitoring center, monitoring personnel, hardware conditions, monitoring progress and the number of patients into the group, original documents and archives management, electronic data, adverse events, quality management were constructed. Its application in the creation of major new drugs technology major projects, 10 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine injections clinical safety monitoring quality control work, found the missing case surveillance, not reported adverse events, only reported adverse reactions, electronic data reporting lag, lack of level of efforts to control the problem, and corrected, the traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring of quality control and quality assurance, and subsequent Chinese medicine safety monitoring quality control to provide the reference. PMID:27245020

  20. Integration of Active and Passive Safety Technologies--A Method to Study and Estimate Field Capability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingwen; Flannagan, Carol A; Bao, Shan; McCoy, Robert W; Siasoco, Kevin M; Barbat, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method that uses a combination of field data analysis, naturalistic driving data analysis, and computational simulations to explore the potential injury reduction capabilities of integrating passive and active safety systems in frontal impact conditions. For the purposes of this study, the active safety system is actually a driver assist (DA) feature that has the potential to reduce delta-V prior to a crash, in frontal or other crash scenarios. A field data analysis was first conducted to estimate the delta-V distribution change based on an assumption of 20% crash avoidance resulting from a pre-crash braking DA feature. Analysis of changes in driver head location during 470 hard braking events in a naturalistic driving study found that drivers' head positions were mostly in the center position before the braking onset, while the percentage of time drivers leaning forward or backward increased significantly after the braking onset. Parametric studies with a total of 4800 MADYMO simulations showed that both delta-V and occupant pre-crash posture had pronounced effects on occupant injury risks and on the optimal restraint designs. By combining the results for the delta-V and head position distribution changes, a weighted average of injury risk reduction of 17% and 48% was predicted by the 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) model and human body model, respectively, with the assumption that the restraint system can adapt to the specific delta-V and pre-crash posture. This study demonstrated the potential for further reducing occupant injury risk in frontal crashes by the integration of a passive safety system with a DA feature. Future analyses considering more vehicle models, various crash conditions, and variations of occupant characteristics, such as age, gender, weight, and height, are necessary to further investigate the potential capability of integrating passive and DA or active safety systems. PMID

  1. Safety of bilateral intravitreal injections delivered in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Chao, Daniel L; Gregori, Ninel Z; Khandji, Joyce; Goldhardt, Raquel

    2014-07-01

    Intravitreal injection is one of the most common in-office procedures performed in ophthalmic practices. In teaching institutions such as the Veterans Affairs (VA) Hospitals, patient care is delivered by physicians-in-training, while mastering intravitreal injection technique. Infectious endophthalmitis and visual loss are the most feared complications of intravitreal injections, especially in the context of recent outbreaks caused by contaminated compounded medications. Ophthalmologists and ophthalmic educators increasingly face the dilemma of timing as well as balancing the risks and benefits of bilateral treatments required by many patients. In this editorial, we discuss published reports of bilateral injections, summarize our experience with bilateral intravitreal injections in a teaching setting at the Miami VA Hospital and list our recommendations for minimizing the risk of infectious endophthalmitis. PMID:24815986

  2. Development of an advanced boron injection tank

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kaori; Yuasa, Tetsushi; Makihara, Yoshiaki; Okabe, Kazuharu; Ichioka, Takehiko

    1996-12-31

    Mitsubishi has developed a hybrid safety system. This is an optimum combination of active and passive safety systems that provides improved safety, higher reliability, and better economy. As one option of the passive safety systems, Mitsubishi is studying a passive boron injection system that uses an advanced boron injection tank (BIT). The boron injection system to be developed in this study is passive and does not use nitrogen gas as a driving force. These features realize the higher reliability and eliminate a bad influence of the nitrogen gas during natural circulation cooling in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The driving force of the boric acid water injection in our advanced BIT is the boiling and steam expansion due to the depressurization inside the tank. Mitsubishi carried out tests to verify that the injection mechanism of the advanced BIT is basically feasible.

  3. Experimental and design experience with passive safety features of liquid metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucoff, D.M.; Waltar, A.E.; Sackett, J.I.; Salvatores, M.; Aizawa, K.

    1992-10-01

    Liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs) have already been demonstrated to be robust machines. Many reactor designers now believe that it is possible to include in this technology sufficient passive safety that LMRs would be able to survive loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and transient overpower events, even if the plant protective system fails completely and do so without damage to the core. Early whole-core testing in Rapsodie, EBR-II. and FFTF indicate such designs may be possible. The operational safety testing program in EBR-II is demonstrating benign response of the reactor to a full range of controls failures. But additional testing is needed if transient core structural response under major accident conditions is to be properly understood. The proposed international Phase IIB passive safety tests in FFTF, being designed with a particular emphasis on providing, data to understand core bowing extremes, and further tests planned in EBR-II with processed IFR fuel should provide a substantial and unique database for validating the computer codes being used to simulate postulated accident conditions.

  4. Experimental and design experience with passive safety features of liquid metal reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucoff, D.M.; Waltar, A.E. ); Sackett, J.I. ); Aizawa, K. )

    1992-07-01

    Liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs) have already been demonstrated to be robust machines. Many reactor designers now believe that it is possible to include in this technology sufficient passive safety that LMRs would be able to survive loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and transient overpower events, even if the plant protective system fails completely--and do so without damage to the core. Early whole-core testing in Rapsodie, EBR-II, and FFTF indicate such designs may be possible. The operational safety testing program in EBR-II is demonstrating benign response of the reactor to a full range on controls failures. But additional testing is needed if transient core structural response under major accident conditions is to be properly understood. The proposed international Phase IIB passive safety tests in FFTF, being designed with a particular emphasis on providing data to understand core bowing extremes, and further tests planned in EBR-II with processed IFR fuel should provide a substantial and unique database for validating the computer codes being used to simulate postulated accident conditions.

  5. Enhancing VHTR passive safety and economy with thermal radiation based direct reactor auxiliary cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.; Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The RVACS can be characterized as a surface-based decay heat removal system. It is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to the core volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to the vessel surface area). Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environmental side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or inner graphite reflector blocks. There will be gaps or annular regions formed between these cooling pipes and their corresponding surrounding graphite surfaces. Graphite has an excellent heat conduction property. By taking advantage of this feature, we can have a volume-based method to remove decay heat. The scalability can be achieved, if needed, by employing more rows of cooling pipes to accommodate higher decay heat rates. Since heat can easily conduct through the graphite regions among the holes made for the cooling pipes, those cooling pipes located further away from the active core region can still be very

  6. A passive control methodology for seismic safety enhancement of monumental structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalou, Angeliki; Roubien, Denis; Triantafillou, Thanasis; Strepelias, Elias

    2015-04-01

    A passive control methodology to increase the seismic safety of multi-drum columns is presented. The response of a large scale column-model to dynamic excitations is investigated experimentally. A particle damper is used to replace one of the columns' original drums. The influence of the system parameters on the response of the column is also examined. The seismic response of the column can be considerably reduced if a particle damper replaces a drum above the mid-height. Guidelines and a design methodology are proposed to restore and protect monumental structures consisting of multi-drum columns.

  7. Passive injection: a CO2 sequestration strategy that mitigates the threat of induced seismicity and brine migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, D.; Pawar, R.; Kelkar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) faces several challenges including the possibility of shear movement on faults leading to the creation of CO2 leakage pathways and induced seismicity, and the migration of the brine displaced by CO2 into shallow groundwater aquifers, either through leaky wells or faults. Both of these processes are caused by fluid overpressure in the reservoir that a result of large-scale CO2 injection. We detail a novel strategy for CCS, termed passive injection, capable of emplacing megaton quantities of CO2 with no increase, transient or long-term, in reservoir pressure. The strategy leverages negative pressure gradients created by the strategic placement of brine production wells so that CO2 leaves an injection well at ambient reservoir pressure. A multi-stage, square-ring well configuration is considered, in which brine production wells are repurposed for CO2 injection upon CO2 breakthrough, and a new battery of production wells installed at a greater distance. As proof of concept, numerical simulations of passive injection are presented using the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM), multi-fluid simulator FEHM. We consider CO2 injection into a 3km-deep, confined reservoir over a period of 50 years, with up to four stages of injection and production depending on well-spacing and production pressures. Injection rates as high as 3 Mt yr-1 are achieved, with 70% utilization of the reservoir volume and long-term mass production of brine approximately 1.7 times that of CO2 sequestered (including structural and solubility trapping). The model accounts for the geomechanical effects of reservoir drawdown including surface subsidence. The induced seismic threat is quantified in terms of the change in the Coulomb Failure Stress (ΔCFS) for the conservative scenario of an optimally-oriented fault in an extensional tectonic regime. This quantity is shown to be negative in both the caprock and reservoir, which indicates that the

  8. Knowledge and Practice on Injection Safety among Primary Health Care Workers in Kaski District, Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Sudesh; Rathore, Devendra Singh; Shankar, P Ravi; Kc, Vikash Kumar; Jha, Nisha; Sharma, Damodar

    2016-01-01

    Background Unsafe injection practice can transmit various blood borne infections. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and practice of injection safety among injection providers, to obtain information about disposal of injectable devices, and to compare the knowledge and practices of urban and rural injection providers. Methods The study was conducted with injection providers working at primary health care facilities within Kaski district, Nepal. Ninety-six health care workers from 69 primary health care facilities were studied and 132 injection events observed. A semi-structured checklist was used for observing injection practice and a questionnaire for the survey. Respondents were interviewed to complete the questionnaire and obtain possible explanations for certain observed behaviors. Results All injection providers knew of at least one pathogen transmitted through use/re-use of unsterile syringes. Proportion of injection providers naming hepatitis/jaundice as one of the diseases transmitted by unsafe injection practice was significantly higher in urban (75.6%) than in rural (39.2%) area. However, compared to urban respondents (13.3%), a significantly higher proportion of rural respondents (37.3%) named Hepatitis B specifically as one of the diseases transmitted. Median (inter-quartile range) number of therapeutic injection and injectable vaccine administered per day by the injection providers were 2 (1) and 1 (1), respectively. Two handed recapping by injection providers was significantly higher in urban area (33.3%) than in rural areas (21.6%). Most providers were not aware of the post exposure prophylaxis guideline. Conclusion The knowledge of the injection providers about safe injection practice was acceptable. The use of safe injection practice by providers in urban and rural health care facilities was almost similar. The deficiencies noted in the practice must be addressed. PMID:27540325

  9. Improved methodology for integral analysis of advanced reactors employing passive safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, A. Kursad

    After four decades of experience with pressurized water reactors, a new generation of nuclear plants are emerging. These advanced designs employ passive safety which relies on natural forces, such as gravity and natural circulation. The new concept of passive safety also necessitates improvement in computational tools available for best-estimate analyses. The system codes originally designed for high pressure conditions in the presence of strong momentum sources such as pumps are challenged in many ways. Increased interaction of the primary system with the containment necessitates a tool for integral analysis. This study addresses some of these concerns. An improved tool for integral analysis coupling primary system with containment calculation is also presented. The code package is based on RELAP5 and CONTAIN programs, best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code for primary system analysis and containment code for containment analysis, respectively. The suitability is demonstrated with a postulated small break loss of coolant accident analysis of Westinghouse AP600 plant. The thesis explains the details of the analysis including the coupling model.

  10. Availability of high-pressure safety injection system in PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.H.; Fresco, A.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the impact of typical variations in configuration of the design of the High Pressure Injection (HPSI) System on system unavailability. The HPSI systems in seventeen nuclear power plants were reviewed for variations in design, systems operation, testing and maintenance policies, and possible sources for common cause failures. The power plants reviewed include PWRs with two, three and four loop Reactor Coolant Systems and cover all three PWR vendors. As a result of this effort, the following five representative configurations (along with some variations) were identified and their unavailability to initiate injection was estimated.

  11. Nuclear Safety Functions of ITER Gas Injection System Instrumentation and Control and the Concept Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu; Maruyama, S.; Fossen, A.; Villers, F.; Kiss, G.; Zhang, Bo; Li, Bo; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Xiangmei

    2016-08-01

    The ITER Gas Injection System (GIS) plays an important role on fueling, wall conditioning and distribution for plasma operation. Besides that, to support the safety function of ITER, GIS needs to implement three nuclear safety Instrumentation and Control (I&C) functions. In this paper, these three functions are introduced with the emphasis on their latest safety classifications. The nuclear I&C design concept is briefly discussed at the end.

  12. Final report-passive safety optimization in liquid sodium-cooled reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalana, J. E.; Hahn, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    2007-08-13

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to identify and quantify the performance of innovative design features in metallic-fueled, sodium-cooled fast reactor designs. The objective of the work was to establish the reliability and safety margin enhancements provided by design innovations offering significant potential for construction, maintenance, and operating cost reductions. The project goal was accomplished with a combination of advanced model development (Task 1), analysis of innovative design and safety features (Tasks 2 and 3), and planning of key safety experiments (Task 4). Task 1--Computational Methods for Analysis of Passive Safety Design Features: An advanced three-dimensional subassembly thermal-hydraulic model was developed jointly and implemented in ANL and KAERI computer codes. The objective of the model development effort was to provide a high-accuracy capability to predict fuel, cladding, coolant, and structural temperatures in reactor fuel subassemblies, and thereby reduce the uncertainties associated with lower fidelity models previously used for safety and design analysis. The project included model formulation, implementation, and verification by application to available reactor tests performed at EBR-II. Task 2--Comparative Analysis and Evaluation of Innovative Design Features: Integrated safety assessments of innovative liquid metal reactor designs were performed to quantify the performance of inherent safety features. The objective of the analysis effort was to identify the potential safety margin enhancements possible in a sodium-cooled, metal-fueled reactor design by use of passive safety mechanisms to mitigate low-probability accident consequences. The project included baseline analyses using state-of-the-art computational models and advanced analyses using the new model developed in Task 1. Task 3--Safety

  13. A safety audit of the first 10 000 intravitreal ranibizumab injections performed by nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Simcock, P; Kingett, B; Mann, N; Reddy, V; Park, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety of a nurse practitioner (NP)-delivered injection service for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) with ranibizumab. Methods An evaluation of medical staffing resources for providing an injection service for wAMD highlighted difficulties covering lists. An alternative strategy of an NP-delivered injection service was evaluated. Two suitable NPs with previous extensive experience in minor surgical procedures were identified. The department's senior vitreo-retinal consultant supervised the NP's training programme. A prospective safety audit was conducted for the first 5.5 years of the service. Results The NPs administered 10 006 injections in the first 5.5 years of the service (1 May 2008 to 8 October 2013). This represented 84.1% of the total injections performed during this period. Four patients developed presumed infectious endophthalmitis (1 was culture positive and 3 were culture negative). The incidence of post-injection endophthalmitis was 0.04%. There was no evidence of lens touch, retinal detachment, or systemic thrombo-embolic events. Conclusions Carefully selected and well-trained NPs are capable of delivering a safe and effective wAMD injection treatment service. This work demonstrates how such a service can be established and provides safety data that other units can use as a benchmark when evaluating their own practice. PMID:25033899

  14. Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or

  15. Conceptual Design of Passive Safety System for Lead-Bismuth Cooled Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, A. G.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the conceptual design of passive safety systems for reactor power 225 MWth using Pb-Bi coolant. Main purpose of this research is to design of heat removal system from the reactor wall. The heat from the reactor wall is removed by RVACS system using the natural circulation from the atmosphere around the reactor at steady state. The calculation is performed numerically using Newton-Raphson method. The analysis involves the heat transfer systems in a radiation, conduction and natural convection. Heat transfer calculations is performed on the elements of the reactor vessel, outer wall of guard vessel and the separator plate. The simulation results conclude that the conceptual design is able to remove heat 1.33% to 4.67% from the thermal reactor power. It’s can be hypothesized if the reactor had an accident, the system can still overcome the heat due to decay.

  16. Testing of the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) Passive Safety Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Jose N.; Groome, John; Woods, Brian G.; Young, Eric; Abel, Kent; Yao, You; Yeon Jong Yoo

    2006-07-01

    Experimental thermal hydraulic research has been conducted at Oregon State University for the purpose of assessing the performance of a new reactor design concept, the Multi-application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR). MASLWR is a pressurized light water reactor that uses natural circulation in both normal and transient operation. The purpose of the OSU MASLWR Test Facility is to assess the operation of the MASLWR under normal full pressure and full temperature conditions and to assess the passive safety systems under transient conditions. The data generated by the testing program will be used to assess computer code calculations and to provide a better understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the design of the MASLWR NSSS. During this testing program, four tests were conducted at the OSU MASLWR Test Facility. These tests included one design basis accident and one beyond design basis accident. Plant start up, normal operation and shut down evolutions were also examined. (authors)

  17. Applications of 1.55 μm optically injection-locked VCSELs in wavelength division multiplexed passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elaine; Zhao, Xiaoxue; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Hofmann, Werner; Amann, Marcus C.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we will discuss the utilization of optically injection-locked (OIL) 1.55 μm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) for operation as low-cost, stable, directly modulated, and potentially uncooled transmitters, whereby the injection-locking master source is furnished by modulated downstream signals. Such a transmitter will find useful application in wavelength division multiplexed passive optical networks (WDM-PONs) which is actively being developed to meet the ever-increasing bandwidth demands of end users. Our scheme eliminates the need for external injection locking optical sources, external modulators, and wavelength stabilization circuitry. We show through experiments that the injection-locked VCSEL favors low injection powers and responds only strongly to the carrier but not the modulated data of the downstream signal. Further, we will discuss results from experimental studies performed on the dependence of OIL-VCSELs in bidirectional networks on the degree of Rayleigh backscattered signal and extinction ratio. We show that error-free upstream performance can be achieved when the upstream signal to Rayleigh backscattering ratio is greater than 13.4 dB, and with minimal dependence on the downstream extinction ratio. We will also review a fault monitoring and localization scheme based on a highly-sensitive yet low-cost monitor comprising a low output power broadband source and low bandwidth detectors. The proposed scheme benefits from the high reflectivity top distributed Bragg reflector mirror of the OIL-VCSEL, incurring only a minimal penalty on the upstream transmissions of the existing infrastructure. Such a scheme provides fault monitoring without having to further invest in the upgrade of customer premises.

  18. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral

  19. Providing the Basis for Innovative Improvements in Advanced LWR Reactor Passive Safety Systems Design: An Educational R&D Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brian G. Williams; Jim C. P. Liou; Hiral Kadakia; Bill Phoenix; Richard R. Schultz

    2007-02-27

    This project characterizes typical two-phase stratified flow conditions in advanced water reactor horizontal pipe sections, following activation of passive cooling systems. It provides (1) a means to educate nuclear engineering students regarding the importance of two-phase stratified flow in passive cooling systems to the safety of advanced reactor systems and (2) describes the experimental apparatus and process to measure key parameters essential to consider when designing passive emergency core cooling flow paths that may encounter this flow regime. Based on data collected, the state of analysis capabilities can be determined regarding stratified flow in advanced reactor systems and the best paths forward can be identified to ensure that the nuclear industry can properly characterize two-phase stratified flow in passive emergency core cooling systems.

  20. Passive fiber alignment to single-mode plastic waveguides fabricated by injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompe, Guido; Lehmacher, Stefan; Rudolph, Stefan; Kalveram, Stefan; Joenck, Matthias; Neyer, Andreas

    1998-04-01

    Passive fibre-waveguide coupling is a promising alternative to expensive active coupling in single-mode fibre-optics. The idea to utilize replication techniques in transparent polymeric materials for waveguide and alignment structure fabrication has led to the SIGA-process (Silizium, Galvanik und Abformung) which allows a cost effective production of low loss polymer waveguides in the near IR. Major difficulties in passive fibre coupling are caused by the high lateral alignment accuracy (of about 1 micrometer) in fibre positioning. In the SIGA process, the exact position of the V- grooves relative to the waveguide trenches is defined by the etch mask for the silicon master wafer. The width of the V- grooves is determined by the KOH etching time. It is controlled precisely at various stages in the etching process by means of a microscope based piezo driven measurement system with a resolution better than 0.5 micrometer, thus allowing a final vertical precision of fibre positioning of 350 nm. In order to specify the capability of our technology we have measured the position of dozens of fibres glued into V- grooves. The result was that an amount of 55% of the fibre cores was closer than 1.5 micrometer to the waveguide centre. As the experience has shown, a two-step process for the fabrication of passively fibre coupled waveguides is necessary. First, the waveguides are produced by filling the waveguide trenches with an IR-transparent monomer and by polymerizing it using UV curing. The waveguides are inspected with visible and IR light by clamping a fibre ribbon mechanically into the integrated plastic V-grooves. In a second step the fibre ribbon is fixed irreversibly in the V- grooves. By that way we have reached an insertion loss of 3.5 dB at 1300nm and 1550nm for passively coupled 22mm single mode waveguides. Most of the losses are attributed to waveguide imperfections. More details concerning the coupling losses and the device performances will be reported at the

  1. Advanced Fuel Cycles for Fusion Reactors: Passive Safety and Zero-Waste Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo; Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is seen as a much ''cleaner'' energy source than fission. Most of the studies and experiments on nuclear fusion are currently devoted to the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) fuel cycle, since it is the easiest way to reach ignition. The recent stress on safety by the world's community has stimulated the research on other fuel cycles than the DT one, based on 'advanced' reactions, such as the Deuterium-Helium-3 (DHe) one. These reactions pose problems, such as the availability of 3He and the attainment of the higher plasma parameters that are required for burning. However, they have many advantages, like for instance the very low neutron activation, while it is unnecessary to breed and fuel tritium. The extrapolation of Ignitor technologies towards a larger and more powerful experiment using advanced fuel cycles (Candor) has been studied. Results show that Candor does reach the passive safety and zero-waste option. A fusion power reactor based on the DHe cycle could be the ultimate response to the environmental requirements for future nuclear power plants.

  2. Influence of Steering Control Devices Mounted in Cars for the Disabled on Passive Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiá, J.; Eixerés, B.; Dols, J. F.; Colomina, F. J.

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the influence of steering control devices for disabled people on passive safety. It is based on the advances made in the modelling and simulation of the driver position and in the suit verification test. The influence of these devices is studied through airbag deployment and/or its influence on driver safety. We characterize the different adaptations that are used in adapted cars that can be found mounted in vehicles in order to generating models that are verified by experimental test. A three dimensional design software package was used to develop the model. The simulations were generated using a dynamic simulation program employing LSDYNA finite elements. This program plots the geometry and assigns materials. The airbag is shaped, meshed and folded just as it is mounted in current vehicles. The thermodynamic model of expansion of gases is assigned and the contact interfaces are defined. Static tests were carried out on deployment of the airbag to contrast with and to validate the computational models and to measure the behaviour of the airbag when there are steering adaptations mounted in the vehicle.

  3. Passive safety device and internal short tested method for energy storage cells and systems

    DOEpatents

    Keyser, Matthew; Darcy, Eric; Long, Dirk; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-22

    A passive safety device for an energy storage cell for positioning between two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage cell. The safety device also comprising a separator and a non-conductive layer. A first electrically conductive material is provided on the non-conductive layer. A first opening is formed through the separator between the first electrically conductive material and one of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. A second electrically conductive material is provided adjacent the first electrically conductive material on the non-conductive layer, wherein a space is formed on the non-conductive layer between the first and second electrically conductive materials. A second opening is formed through the non-conductive layer between the second electrically conductive material and another of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. The first and second electrically conductive materials combine and exit at least partially through the first and second openings to connect the two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device at a predetermined temperature.

  4. Safety of approved MR contrast media for intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M

    2000-08-01

    In the last 10 years, the use of intravenous contrast media in magnetic resonance (MR) has become well-established clinical practice. Contrast media provide critical additional diagnostic information in many instances. The gadolinium chelates constitute the largest group of MR contrast media and are considered to be very safe. These agents are thought to be safer than nonionic iodinated contrast agents. Unlike x-ray agents, the gadolinium chelates are not nephrotoxic. Minor adverse reactions, including nausea (1%-2% for all agents) and hives (<1% for all agents), occur in a very low percent of cases. Health care personnel should be aware of the (extremely uncommon) potential for severe anaphylactoid reactions in association with the use of MR contrast media and be prepared should complications arise. The four gadolinium chelates currently available worldwide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoteridol, gadodiamide, and gadoterate meglumine, cannot be differentiated on the basis of adverse reactions. Far fewer patients have been examined to date with the two other agents that have widespread approval, mangafodipir trisodium and ferumoxides. These latter two agents are considered to be very safe but have a higher percentage of associated adverse reactions (7%-17% with mangafodipir trisodium and 15% with ferumoxides). This review discusses the safety issues involved with administration of intravenous contrast media in MR imaging, focusing on the six agents (four gadolinium chelates, one manganese chelate, and the last a large iron particle) with widespread use world-wide. PMID:10931582

  5. The Effect and Safety of Steroid Injection in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: With or Without Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Hyuk; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ho Jun; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kim, Hyojun; Kim, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the long-term effect and safety of an epidural steroid injection in spinal stenosis patients, with or without local anesthetics. Methods Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with spinal stenosis were included and randomly divided into two groups. Translaminar epidural and selective nerve root spinal injection procedures were performed using steroids mixed with local anesthetics or normal saline. The effects of spinal injection procedures were measured with visual analogue scale (VAS) and functional rate index (FRI). These measurements were performed before injection, at 1 month after injection and at 3 months after injection. The occurrence of side effects was investigated each time. Results The VAS and FRI scores were significantly reduced in both the local anesthetics group and normal saline group at 1 and 3 months after the injection. However, there was no significant difference in VAS and FRI score reduction between the two groups each time. Side effects are not noted in both groups. Conclusion The spinal injection procedures using steroids mixed either with local anesthetics or normal saline have an effect in reducing pain and improving functional activities. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in relation to side effects and the long-term effects of pain and function. PMID:26949664

  6. Identification of the Permeability Field of Porous Medium from the Injection of Passive Tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Lang; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1999-10-18

    In this paper, a method was proposed which focused on the question, namely on how to invert data on arrival times at various (and numerous) points in the porous medium to map the permeability field. The method, elements of which were briefly described in (9), is based on a direct inversion of the data, as will be described below , rather than on the optimization of initial random (or partly constrained) guesses of the permeability field, to match the available data, as typically done in the analogous problem of pressure transients. The direct inversion is based on two conditions, that Darcy's law for single-phase flow in porous media is valid, and that dispersion of the concentration of the injected tracer is negligible. While the former is a well-accepted premise, the latter depends on injection and field conditions, and may not necessarily apply in all cases. Based on these conditions, we formulate a nonlinear boundary value problem, the coefficients of which depend on the experimental arrival time data.

  7. On demand nanoliter-scale microfluidic droplet generation, injection, and mixing using a passive microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Uwe; Sharma, Abhishek; Wagler, Patrick; McCaskill, John S

    2015-01-01

    We here present and characterize a programmable nanoliter scale droplet-on-demand device that can be used separately or readily integrated into low cost single layer rapid prototyping microfluidic systems for a wide range of user applications. The passive microfluidic device allows external (off-the-shelf) electronically controlled pinch valves to program the delivery of nanoliter scale aqueous droplets from up to 9 different inputs to a central outlet channel. The inputs can be either continuous aqueous fluid streams or microliter scale aqueous plugs embedded in a carrier fluid, in which case the number of effective input solutions that can be employed in an experiment is no longer strongly constrained (100 s-1000 s). Both nanoliter droplet sequencing output and nanoliter-scale droplet mixing are reported with this device. Optimization of the geometry and pressure relationships in the device was achieved in several hardware iterations with the support of open source microfluidic simulation software and equivalent circuit models. The requisite modular control of pressure relationships within the device is accomplished using hydrodynamic barriers and matched resistance channels with three different channel heights, custom parallel reversible microfluidic I/O connections, low dead-volume pinch valves, and a simply adjustable array of external screw valves. Programmable sequences of droplet mixes or chains of droplets can be achieved with the device at low Hz frequencies, limited by device elasticity, and could be further enhanced by valve integration. The chip has already found use in the characterization of droplet bunching during export and the synthesis of a DNA library. PMID:25759752

  8. On demand nanoliter-scale microfluidic droplet generation, injection, and mixing using a passive microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Tangen, Uwe; Sharma, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    We here present and characterize a programmable nanoliter scale droplet-on-demand device that can be used separately or readily integrated into low cost single layer rapid prototyping microfluidic systems for a wide range of user applications. The passive microfluidic device allows external (off-the-shelf) electronically controlled pinch valves to program the delivery of nanoliter scale aqueous droplets from up to 9 different inputs to a central outlet channel. The inputs can be either continuous aqueous fluid streams or microliter scale aqueous plugs embedded in a carrier fluid, in which case the number of effective input solutions that can be employed in an experiment is no longer strongly constrained (100 s–1000 s). Both nanoliter droplet sequencing output and nanoliter-scale droplet mixing are reported with this device. Optimization of the geometry and pressure relationships in the device was achieved in several hardware iterations with the support of open source microfluidic simulation software and equivalent circuit models. The requisite modular control of pressure relationships within the device is accomplished using hydrodynamic barriers and matched resistance channels with three different channel heights, custom parallel reversible microfluidic I/O connections, low dead-volume pinch valves, and a simply adjustable array of external screw valves. Programmable sequences of droplet mixes or chains of droplets can be achieved with the device at low Hz frequencies, limited by device elasticity, and could be further enhanced by valve integration. The chip has already found use in the characterization of droplet bunching during export and the synthesis of a DNA library. PMID:25759752

  9. A Single Neonatal Injection of Ethinyl Estradiol Impairs Passive Avoidance Learning and Reduces Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Hippocampus and Cortex of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Tatsuomi; Nakamura, Takahiro J.; Komine, Chiaki; Goto, Yoshikuni; Mizoguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Midori; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2016-01-01

    Although perinatal exposure of female rats to estrogenic compounds produces irreversible changes in brain function, it is still unclear how the amount and timing of exposure to those substances affect learning function, or if exposure alters estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression in the hippocampus and cortex. In adult female rats, we investigated the effects of neonatal exposure to a model estrogenic compound, ethinyl estradiol (EE), on passive avoidance learning and ERα expression. Female Wistar-Imamichi rats were subcutaneously injected with oil, 0.02 mg/kg EE, 2 mg/kg EE, or 20 mg/kg 17β-estradiol within 24 h after birth. All females were tested for passive avoidance learning at the age of 6 weeks. Neonatal 0.02 mg/kg EE administration significantly disrupted passive avoidance compared with oil treatment in gonadally intact females. In a second experiment, another set of experimental females, treated as described above, was ovariectomized under pentobarbital anesthesia at 10 weeks of age. At 15–17 weeks of age, half of each group received a subcutaneous injection of 5 μg estradiol benzoate a day before the passive avoidance learning test. Passive avoidance learning behavior was impaired by the 0.02 mg/kg EE dose, but notably only in the estradiol benzoate-injected group. At 17–19 weeks of age, hippocampal and cortical samples were collected from rats with or without the 5 μg estradiol benzoate injection, and western blots used to determine ERα expression. A significant decrease in ERα expression was observed in the hippocampus of the estradiol-injected, neonatal EE-treated females. The results demonstrated that exposure to EE immediately after birth decreased learning ability in adult female rats, and that this may be at least partly mediated by the decreased expression of ERα in the hippocampus. PMID:26741502

  10. A Single Neonatal Injection of Ethinyl Estradiol Impairs Passive Avoidance Learning and Reduces Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Hippocampus and Cortex of Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Tatsuomi; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Komine, Chiaki; Goto, Yoshikuni; Mizoguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Midori; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2016-01-01

    Although perinatal exposure of female rats to estrogenic compounds produces irreversible changes in brain function, it is still unclear how the amount and timing of exposure to those substances affect learning function, or if exposure alters estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression in the hippocampus and cortex. In adult female rats, we investigated the effects of neonatal exposure to a model estrogenic compound, ethinyl estradiol (EE), on passive avoidance learning and ERα expression. Female Wistar-Imamichi rats were subcutaneously injected with oil, 0.02 mg/kg EE, 2 mg/kg EE, or 20 mg/kg 17β-estradiol within 24 h after birth. All females were tested for passive avoidance learning at the age of 6 weeks. Neonatal 0.02 mg/kg EE administration significantly disrupted passive avoidance compared with oil treatment in gonadally intact females. In a second experiment, another set of experimental females, treated as described above, was ovariectomized under pentobarbital anesthesia at 10 weeks of age. At 15-17 weeks of age, half of each group received a subcutaneous injection of 5 μg estradiol benzoate a day before the passive avoidance learning test. Passive avoidance learning behavior was impaired by the 0.02 mg/kg EE dose, but notably only in the estradiol benzoate-injected group. At 17-19 weeks of age, hippocampal and cortical samples were collected from rats with or without the 5 μg estradiol benzoate injection, and western blots used to determine ERα expression. A significant decrease in ERα expression was observed in the hippocampus of the estradiol-injected, neonatal EE-treated females. The results demonstrated that exposure to EE immediately after birth decreased learning ability in adult female rats, and that this may be at least partly mediated by the decreased expression of ERα in the hippocampus. PMID:26741502

  11. Incorporation of Passive Safety Systems in the Generation-IV Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR)

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Fisher, James; Weaver, Kevan

    2002-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Nexant Inc. and the Oregon State University (OSU) developed an innovative Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) concept. The MASLWR is a small, modular, safe, and economic natural circulation light water reactor developed with the primary goal of producing electric power, but with the flexibility to be used for water desalination or district heating with deployment in a variety of locations. The MASLWR was developed, by design, to be a safe and economic reactor concept that can be deployed in the near term by utilizing current experience and capabilities of the industry. The key features of the MASLWR concept are the extreme simplicity of the design and its passive safety systems. This paper provides an overview of safety analyses performed for the MASLWR concept and explores potential for the increase in passive safety via the implementation of new features. The results of these safety studies demonstrate that the reactor core will be provided with a stable cooling source adequate to remove decay heat without significant cladding heatup under all credible scenarios. The response of the system to accident conditions is a controlled depressurization, whereby most of the primary system blowdown occurs via the submerged ADS blowdown pathway. (authors)

  12. Safety and efficacy of administering abobotulinumtoxinA through a single injection point when treating lateral periocular rhytides.

    PubMed

    Kiripolsky, Monika G; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2011-09-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to assess efficacy and patient satisfaction associated with AbobotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of dynamic periocular rhytides. When keeping the total dose of ABA the same for each side of the face, one injection point yielded the same efficacy and safety as three separate injection points into the lateral periocular areas. PMID:21896136

  13. Preliminary investigation of interconnected systems interactions for the safety injection system of Indian Point-3

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Lappa, D.A.; Smith, C.F.; Sacks, I.J.

    1983-03-04

    The rich diversity of ideas and techniques for analyzing interconnected systems interaction has presented the NRC with the problem of identifying methods appropriate for their own review and audit. This report presents the findings of a preliminary study using the Digraph Matrix Analysis method to evaluate interconnected systems interactions for the safety injection system of Indian Point-3. The analysis effort in this study was subjected to NRC constraints regarding the use of Boolean logic, the construction of simplified plant representations or maps, and the development of heuristic measures as specified by the NRC. The map and heuristic measures were found to be an unsuccessful approach. However, from the effort to model and analyze the Indian Point-3 safety injection system, including Boolean logic in the model, singleton and doubleton cut-sets were identified. It is recommended that efforts excluding Boolean logic and utilizing the NRC heuristic measures not be pursed further and that the Digraph Matrix approach (or other comparable risk assessment technique) with Boolean logic included to conduct the audit of the Indian Point-3 systems interaction study.

  14. [Pharmacokinetics and safety of aripiprazole long-acting injection, following multiple deltoid administrations in schizophrenia patients in Japan].

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, Jun; Noda, Takamasa; Nishiyama, Kosuke; Tamaru, Noriko; Shima, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yumiko; Tadori, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) was previously approved for treatment of schizophrenia as monthly injections in the gluteal muscle. The deltoid muscle provides a more accessible injection site. The present study was conducted in Japanese schizophrenia patients as a 24-week, open-label trial that assessed the pharmacokinetics and safety of 5 sequential doses of AOM 400 mg (AOM 400) once every 4 weeks administered in the deltoid muscle. Patients treated with an oral atypical antipsychotic (other than aripiprazole) continued to receive their pre-study medication up to 14 days after the first AOM 400 injection. The completion rate was 76.5% (n = 13/17). Mean aripiprazole plasma C(min) almost reached steady-state by the fourth AOM 400 injection. After the fifth AOM 400 injection, mean aripiprazole AUC(28d), C(max) and C(min) were 165 μg x h/ml, 331 ng/ml and 201 ng/ml, respectively, which were similar to previously published pharmacokinetic parameters after the fifth gluteal injection of AOM 400. The most common treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) was injection site pain (35.3%). Most TEAEs were classified as mild in intensity. In conclusion, the deltoid injection of AOM can be considered an alternative route of administration, as deltoid and gluteal injections are interchangeable in terms of aripiprazole plasma concentrations, with no additional safety issues. PMID:27506082

  15. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.1 for gravity-driven injection experiment in the core makeup tank of the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.I.; No, H.C.; Bang, Y.S.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to improve the analysis capability of RELAP5/MOD3.1 on the direct contact condensation in the core makeup tank (CMT) of passive high-pressure injection system (PHPIS) in the CARR Passive Reactor (CP-1300). The gravity-driven injection experiment is conducted by using a small scale test facility to identify the parameters having significant effects on the gravity-driven injection and the major condensation modes. It turns out that the larger the water subcooling is, the more initiation of injection is delayed, and the sparger and the natural circulation of the hot water from the steam generator accelerate the gravity-driven injection. The condensation modes are divided into three modes: sonic jet, subsonic jet, and steam cavity. RELAP5/MOD3.1 is chosen to evaluate the cod predictability on the direct contact condensation in the CMT. It is found that the predictions of MOD3.1 are in better agreement with the experimental data than those of MOD3.0. From the nodalization study of the test section, the 1-node model shows better agreement with the experimental data than the multi-node models. RELAP5/MOD3.1 identifies the flow regime of the test section as vertical stratification. However, the flow regime observed in the experiment is the subsonic jet with the bubble having the vertical cone shape. To accurately predict the direct contact condensation in the CMT with RELAP5/MOD3.1, it is essential that a new set of the interfacial heat transfer coefficients and a new flow regime map for direct contact condensation in the CMT be developed.

  16. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  17. A phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of ATX-101: injectable, synthetic deoxycholic acid for submental contouring.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patricia; Fellmann, Jere; Lizzul, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid [DCA] injection) is a proprietary formulation of pure synthetic DCA. When injected into subcutaneous fat, ATX-101 results in focal adipocytolysis, the targeted destruction of fat cells. ATX-101 is undergoing investigation as an injectable drug for contouring the submental area by reducing submental fat (SMF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the maximal therapeutic dose of ATX-101 (100 mg total dose). Following PK evaluation of endogenous DCA, subjects (N=24) received subcutaneous injections of ATX-101 (2 mg/cm2, with or without 0.9% benzyl alcohol) into SMF; PK evaluation was repeated periodically over 24 hours. Endogenous DCA plasma concentrations measured prior to injection were highly variable within and between subjects. Similarly, following ATX-101 injection, DCA plasma concentrations were highly variable, peaked rapidly, and returned to the range observed for endogenous values by 24 hours postdose. All subjects experienced at least 1 adverse event (AE). No death, serious AE, or AE-related discontinuations occurred. The majority of AEs were transient, associated with the area treated, and of mild or moderate severity. No clinically significant changes were reported for laboratory test results, vital signs, or Holter electrocardiograms postdosing. These data support the favorable safety and efficacy observations of ATX-101 as an injectable drug to reduce SMF. PMID:25738850

  18. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

    1994-05-03

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  19. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    DOEpatents

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  20. Thermal Hydraulic Challenges of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Passive Safety Features

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Pope; Jeong-Ik Lee; Pavel Hejzlar; Michael J. Driscoll

    2009-05-01

    Transient response of a Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) coupled to a recompression supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) power conversion system (PCS) in a direct cycle to Loss of Coolant and Loss of Generator Load Accidents is analyzed using RELAP5-3D. A number of thermal hydraulic challenges for GFR design are pointed out as the designers strive to accommodate cooling of the high power density core of a fast reactor by a gas with its inherently low heat transfer capability, in particular under post LOCA events when system pressure is lost and when reliance on passive decay heat removal is emphasized. Although it is possible to design a S-CO2 cooled GFR that can survive LOCA by cooling the core through natural circulating loops between the core and elevated emergency cooling heat exchangers, it is not an attractive approach because of various bypass paths that can, depending on break location, degrade core cooling. Moreover, natural circulation gas loops can operate in deteriorated heat transfer regimes with substantial reduction of heat transfer coefficient: as low as 30% of forced convection values, and data and correlations in these regimes carry large uncertainties. Therefore, reliable battery powered blowers for post-LOCA decay heat removal (DHR) that provide flow in well defined regimes with low uncertainty, and can be easily over-designed to accommodate bypass flows were selected. The results confirm that a GFR with such a DHR system and negative coolant void worth can withstand LOCA with and without scram as well as loss of electrical load without exceeding core temperature and turbomachinery overspeed limits.

  1. Safety and immunogenicity of CPG 7909 injection as an adjuvant to Fluarix influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C L; Davis, H L; Morris, M L; Efler, S M; Krieg, A M; Li, Y; Laframboise, C; Al Adhami, M J; Khaliq, Y; Seguin, I; Cameron, D W

    2004-08-13

    CPG 7909, a 24-mer B-Class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), was tested for safety, tolerability and its ability to augment the immunogenicity of a commercial trivalent killed split influenza vaccine (Fluarix containing A/Beijing/262/95, A/Sydney/5/97 and B/Harbin/7/94; SmithKline Beecham) in a phase Ib blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Sixty healthy volunteers were recruited in two consecutive cohorts of 30 subjects, who were randomly assigned to receive Fluarix plus 1mg CPG 7909 or Fluarix plus saline control (15 subjects each). Vaccines were administered by intramuscular injection on a single occasion with subjects in the first cohort receiving a 1/10th dose of Fluarix and those in the second cohort receiving the full-dose. All safety measures including physical evaluation, laboratory blood assays, and assays for DNA autoimmunity were within normal values except for transient and clinically inconsequential decreases in total white blood cell counts in groups receiving CPG 7909. All vaccines were found to be generally well tolerated with similar frequency and intensity for most adverse reactions for groups receiving CPG 7909 as controls. Exceptions were injection site pain and headache, which were reduced in frequency in subjects receiving the 1/10th Fluarix dose without CpG, compared to the frequency in all other groups. There was a lack of pre-existing immunity, defined as hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) activity < or =20, for all subjects to the influenza strains A/Beijing/262/95 and B/Harbin/7/94 and for some subjects to A/Sydney/5/97. Post-vaccination humoral immune responses, as determined 2 and 4 weeks later by assay of HI activity and ELISA to detect antibodies against hemagglutinin (anti-HA) were similar for both full and reduced Fluarix doses but the cellular immune responses (measured as PBMC antigen-specific IFN-gamma secretion) were reduced in the 1/10th Fluarix dose group. Humoral responses were not significantly enhanced by the addition

  2. The safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection in men with hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Hong, Yan; Xu, Bing; Tong, Jing; Xia, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we aimed to evaluate the safety of using different sources of sperm when male partners were infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Material and methods A total of 338 couples receiving their first intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycle at the Department of Reproduction, Ren Ji Hospital, between 2007 and 2012 were enrolled if the female partner tested negative for HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBeAg, HBeAb and HBcAb. Couples were divided into HBV active infection (group B), convalescent infection (group C) and controls (group A). Subgroups were divided by source of sperm: ejaculated sperm and testicular sperm aspiration/percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (TESA/PESA) sperm. Results When using ejaculated sperm for ICSI, two pronuclear (2PN) fertilization rate, implantation rate, clinical pregnant rate, early miscarriage rate and live birth rate showed no significant difference between the three groups. However, in the three TESA/PESA groups, the early miscarriage rate was highest in men with active HBV infection (B2) (23.1%, p = 0.035). The 2PN fertilization rate and CPR were also lower in the active infection group (76.7%, 26.3%) than the convalescent infection (82.9%, 36.2%) and control group (78.2%, 50%), but the difference was not statistically significant. No malformed infant was found in any of these groups. Conclusions When men have an active HBV infection, using TESA/PESA sperm may cause lower fertilization, a high miscarriage rate and a lower live birth rate, which indicates that HBV active infection may cause adverse effects on ICSI reproductive performance when using testicular or epididymal aspirated sperm. PMID:27279852

  3. A phase I clinical trial assessing the safety and tolerability of combretastatin A4 phosphate injections.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Wu, Lingying; Yang, Sheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Haijun; Xu, Haiyan; Sun, Kelin; Zhang, Shuxiang; Han, Xiaohong; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2014-04-01

    Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) is a prodrug that selectively destroys tumor blood vessels, and has shown efficacy as a targeted anticancer drug in both animal models and clinical trials. The aims of this single-center, open label, phase I clinical trial were to investigate the safety and tolerability of CA4P administered intravenously to patients aged 18-65 years with advanced solid tumors. Using a dose-escalation protocol, patients were assigned to five groups that received injections with 20 (n=3), 33 (n=3), 50 (n=11), 65 (n=6), or 85 (n=2) mg/m² CA4P. Patients in the 20 and 85 mg/m² groups received a single dose and the other groups received multiple doses. Adverse events (AE), cardiovascular parameters, and biochemical investigations were studied, and the maximum tolerated dose was determined. Of twenty-five patients enrolled, eight were withdrawn/excluded (not because of AE). There were no deaths. A total of 394 AE occurred in the 25 patients, with 89.3% considered related/possibly related to the drug. AE included headache and dizziness (19.8%), tumor-induced pain (14.2%), vascular vagal excitation (10.7%), and vomiting (9.4%). Ninety-five percent of AE were mild (grades 0-II), with only 5% being grade III-IV. Drug administration was associated with biphasic changes in heart rate and blood pressure, and only limited abnormalities in the laboratory investigations performed. The maximum tolerated dose was 65 mg/m². We conclude that CA4P is generally well tolerated, with the vast majority of AE that occurred being of mild severity. Further studies will establish the role of CA4P in cancer therapy. PMID:24500030

  4. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  5. Long-term safety and tolerability of long-acting injectable risperidone in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Khan, Akbar; Eerdekens, Mariëlle; Van Hove, Ilse; Kushner, Stuart

    2007-01-15

    Subjects were patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder enrolled in extension studies (Study A and Study B) after participating in 12-week studies of long-acting injectable risperidone [Kane, J.M., Eerdekens, M., Lindenmayer, J.-P., Keith, S.J., Lesem, M., Karcher, K., 2003. Long-acting injectable risperidone: efficacy and safety of the first long-acting atypical antipsychotic. Am. J. Psychiatry 160, 1125-1132; Lindenmayer, J.-P., Eerdekens, L., Berry, S., Eerdekens, M., 2004. Safety and efficacy of long-acting risperidone in schizophrenia: a 12-week, multicenter, open-label study in stable patients switched from typical and atypical oral antipsychotics. J. Clin. Psychiatry 65, 1084-1089]. Twelve months of treatment were completed by 55% of Study A patients and 52% of Study B patients. The median modal dose of long-acting injectable risperidone was 50 mg/14 days in both studies. Most frequent adverse events were psychosis, headache, insomnia, agitation, and rhinitis. EPS-related adverse events were reported in 33% of patients in Study A and 22% in Study B. Patients with Clinical Global Impressions ratings of "not ill" and "mild" increased from 14% at baseline to 54% at endpoint in Study A and from 42% to 65% in Study B. It is concluded that treatment with long-acting injectable risperidone for 1 year or longer appeared to be safe and well tolerated in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. PMID:17049818

  6. [Literature review on premarketing and postmarketing evidence of xiyanping injection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Fei; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Wen; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2014-09-01

    This article systematically summarizes the non-clinical safety studies, pharmacological studies and postmarketing safety studies of Xiyanping injection based on literature. These studies include acute toxicity test, long-term toxicity test, reproductive toxicity test, active and passive anaphylaxis test, curative mechanism study, clinical trials of effectiveness, active surveillance, security analysis of passive monitoring data, the real world analysis of hospital information system (HIS) data, literature analysis, etcetera This article also analysis the relationship of the different evidence, summarizes the strategy of the researches, in order to make it to be a reference for making a systemic research program of traditional Chinese medicine injection. PMID:25532411

  7. Passive atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping in {sup 87}Rb using injection-locked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Han Seb; Park, Sang Eon; Park, Young-Ho; Lee, Lim; Kim, Jung Bog

    2006-11-15

    We present a microwave frequency standard based on coherent population trapping (CPT) in the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line. The CPT spectrum is obtained using two Raman lasers with a 6.8 GHz frequency offset by injection locking of a master laser to a slave laser. We have constructed an atomic clock employing a 5 cm long Rb vapor cell confined with 6.67 kPa neon buffer gas at 70 degree sign C. Using this system, we improve the CPT contrast through the elimination of undesired off-resonant fields created by the direct modulation method. We measured the frequency shift of the CPT signal as a function of the temperature of the Rb cell and estimated it to be approximately 1.3x10{sup -9}/K. The frequency of a 10 MHz crystal oscillator has been stabilized to the CPT spectrum between the two ground states in {sup 87}Rb. The relative frequency stability is approximately 2.3x10{sup -12} for an average time of 68 s.

  8. Gene Delivery by Subconjunctival Injection of Adenovirus in Rats: A Study of Local Distribution, Transgene Duration and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jia Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jhen; Tsai, Han-En; Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Dusting, Gregory J.; Tai, Ming-Hong; Bee, Youn-Shen

    2015-01-01

    Subconjunctival injection is a minimally invasive route for gene delivery to ocular tissues, but has traditionally been limited to use in the cornea. The accurate ocular distribution of virus has not, however, been previously investigated. Adenovirus is an attractive gene vector as it can deliver large genes and allow for short-term gene expression, but how safe it is when delivered via subconjunctival injection remains to be established. We have characterized the bio-distribution and safety of subconjunctivally administered adenovirus in Brown Norway rats. The bio-distribution and transgene duration of adenovirus carrying luciferase gene (Ad-Luci) at various time intervals were evaluated via bioluminescence imaging after subconjunctival injection. Adenovirus carrying a reporter gene, β-galactosidase (Ad-LacZ) or hrGFP (Ad-hrGFP) was administered subconjunctivally and the viral distribution in various ocular tissues was assessed by histological analysis and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Hepatic damage was assessed by biochemical and immunohistological analysis with TUNEL stain. Systemic immunogenicity was assessed by measuring serum level of TNF-α via ELISA, 2 hours and 14 days after administration of adenovirus. Retinal function was examined by electroretinography. Subconjunctival injection of Ad-Luci induced luciferase expression in the injected eyes within 24 hours, for at least 64 days. Histological analysis showed adenovirus distributed across anterior and posterior ocular tissues. qPCR demonstrated different amounts of adenovirus in different ocular tissues, with the highest amounts closest to the injection site Unlike the intravenous route, subconjunctivally delivered adenovirus did not elicit any detectable hepatic injury or systemic immunogenicity. Retinal function was unaffected by adenovirus irrespective of administration route. In conclusion, an adenoviral vector administered subconjunctivally can infiltrate into different ocular tissues and lead to short

  9. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  10. Industrial-grade silicone injections causing intermittent bilateral malar swelling: review of safety and efficacy of techniques and products available.

    PubMed

    Seward, Austin C; Meara, Daniel J

    2013-07-01

    Silicone and other fillers have become a popular aid to increase soft tissue density, decrease static skin rhytids, and treat muscle wasting, particularly in the face. As a result, injectable silicone has become popular in patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It has been postulated that highly active antiretroviral therapy detrimentally induces the physiologic process of fat atrophy of the temporal and buccal fat pads of the face and regional fat wasting of the arms, legs, and buttocks and that HIV protease inhibitors may induce fat atrophy by binding and inhibiting homologous human proteins that are involved in fat metabolism. The classic hollowed-out facial appearance linked to HIV positivity can have detrimental social implications in infected patients who are otherwise very functional. In consequence, facial implantation, fat transplantation, and dermal and subcutaneous fillers have been used to aid in the restoration of facial appearance. This report describes the case of a patient who underwent multiple rounds of silicone injections and complained of intermittent facial swelling and pain long after the injections. The authors report on the safety of specific medical-grade injectable fillers and techniques found to be safely effective, especially in the HIV-positive population. PMID:23522770

  11. Poly(ortho ester) nanoparticles targeted for chronic intraocular diseases: ocular safety and localization after intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiling; Palamoor, Mallika; Jablonski, Monica M

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of posterior eye diseases is more challenging than the anterior segment ailments due to a series of anatomical barriers and physiological constraints confronted by drug delivery to the back of the eye. In recent years, concerted efforts in drug delivery have been made to prolong the residence time of drugs injected in the vitreous humor of the eye. Our previous studies demonstrated that poly(ortho ester) (POE) nanoparticles were biodegradable/biocompatible and were capable of long-term sustained release. The objective of the present study was to investigate the safety and localization of POE nanoparticles in New Zealand white rabbits and C57BL/6 mice after intravitreal administration for the treatment of chronic posterior ocular diseases. Two concentration levels of POE nanoparticles solution were chosen for intravitreal injection: 1.5 mg/ml and 10 mg/ml. Our results demonstrate that POE nanoparticles were distributed throughout the vitreous cavity by optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination 14 days post-intravitreal injection. Intraocular pressure was not changed from baseline. Inflammatory or adverse effects were undetectable by slit lamp biomicroscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that POE nanoparticles have negligible toxicity assessed at the cellular level evidenced by a lack of glia activation or apoptosis estimation after intravitreal injection. Collectively, POE nanoparticles are a novel and nontoxic as an ocular drug delivery system for the treatment of posterior ocular diseases. PMID:27108911

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection in Patients with Detrusor Hyperactivity and Impaired Contractility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection in patients with detrusor hyperactivity and impaired contractility (DHIC). Twenty-one patients with urodynamically proven DHIC and 21 age-matched patients with overactive bladder (OAB) with urodynamic detrusor overactivity were treated with intravesical injections of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA. The overactive bladder symptom score, urgency severity score, patient perception of bladder condition, global response assessment, voiding diary, and procedure-related adverse events (AE) at baseline, two weeks, one, three, and six months after treatment were assessed. The results showed that the subjective symptom scores improved significantly in both groups, and the scores did not differ between the groups. The decrease in urgency episodes and urgency urinary incontinence were noted in OAB patients but not in DHIC patients. Although the incidence of AEs was comparable between the groups, the therapeutic efficacy lasted for a mean of 4.9 ± 4.8 months in DHIC patients and 7.2 ± 3.3 months in OAB patients (p = 0.03). We concluded that the efficacy of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection for DHIC patients was limited and short-term. Nevertheless, AEs did not increase in DHIC. Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA might not be a good indication in patients with DHIC and high post-voiding residual urine. Physicians should inform patients of the potential benefits and risks of onabotulinumtoxinA injection for treatment of DHIC. PMID:26999209

  13. Safety evaluation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(lactic-acid) microspheres through intravitreal injection in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xianfang; Yuan, Weien; Lu, Yi; Mo, Xiaofen

    2014-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and/or poly(lactic-acid) (PLA) microspheres are important drug delivery systems. This study investigated eye biocompatibility and safety of PLGA/PLA microspheres through intravitreal injection in rabbits. Normal New Zealand rabbits were randomly selected and received intravitreal administration of different doses (low, medium, or high) of PLGA/PLA microspheres and erythropoietin-loaded PLGA/PLA microspheres. The animals were clinically examined and sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postadministration, and retinal tissues were prepared for analysis. Retinal reactions to the microspheres were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end staining and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemistry. Retinal structure changes were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, retinal function influences were explored by the electroretinography test. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end staining revealed no apoptotic cells in the injected retinas; immunohistochemistry did not detect any increased glial fibrillary acidic protein expression. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy revealed no micro- or ultrastructure changes in the retinas at different time points postintravitreal injection. The electroretinography test showed no significant influence of scotopic or photopic amplitudes. The results demonstrated that PLGA/PLA microspheres did not cause retinal histological changes or functional damage and were biocompatible and safe enough for intravitreal injection in rabbits for controlled drug delivery. PMID:25028546

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection in Patients with Detrusor Hyperactivity and Impaired Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chung-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection in patients with detrusor hyperactivity and impaired contractility (DHIC). Twenty-one patients with urodynamically proven DHIC and 21 age-matched patients with overactive bladder (OAB) with urodynamic detrusor overactivity were treated with intravesical injections of 100 U of onabotulinumtoxinA. The overactive bladder symptom score, urgency severity score, patient perception of bladder condition, global response assessment, voiding diary, and procedure-related adverse events (AE) at baseline, two weeks, one, three, and six months after treatment were assessed. The results showed that the subjective symptom scores improved significantly in both groups, and the scores did not differ between the groups. The decrease in urgency episodes and urgency urinary incontinence were noted in OAB patients but not in DHIC patients. Although the incidence of AEs was comparable between the groups, the therapeutic efficacy lasted for a mean of 4.9 ± 4.8 months in DHIC patients and 7.2 ± 3.3 months in OAB patients (p = 0.03). We concluded that the efficacy of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA injection for DHIC patients was limited and short-term. Nevertheless, AEs did not increase in DHIC. Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA might not be a good indication in patients with DHIC and high post-voiding residual urine. Physicians should inform patients of the potential benefits and risks of onabotulinumtoxinA injection for treatment of DHIC. PMID:26999209

  15. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  16. Experimental investigations of thermal-hydraulic processes arising during operation of the passive safety systems used in new projects of nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.; Kalyakin, D. S.

    2014-05-01

    The results obtained from experimental investigations into thermal-hydraulic processes that take place during operation of the passive safety systems used in new-generation reactor plants constructed on the basis of VVER technology are presented. The experiments were carried out on the model rigs available at the Leipunskii Institute for Physics and Power Engineering. The processes through which interaction occurs between the opposite flows of saturated steam and cold water moving in the vertical steam line of the additional system for passively flooding the core from the second-stage hydro accumulators are studied. The specific features pertinent to undeveloped boiling of liquid on a single horizontal tube heated by steam and steam-gas mixture that is typical for of the condensing operating mode of a VVER reactor steam generator are investigated.

  17. Safety and efficacy of mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP) injection for hepatic MRI in adults: results of the U.S. multicenter phase III clinical trials (safety).

    PubMed

    Federle, M P; Chezmar, J L; Rubin, D L; Weinreb, J C; Freeny, P C; Semelka, R C; Brown, J J; Borello, J A; Lee, J K; Mattrey, R; Dachman, A H; Saini, S; Harmon, B; Fenstermacher, M; Pelsang, R E; Harms, S E; Mitchell, D G; Halford, H H; Anderson, M W; Johnson, C D; Francis, I R; Bova, J G; Kenney, P J; Klippenstein, D L; Foster, G S; Turner, D A

    2000-07-01

    The short-term safety of mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP) injection was studied in 546 adults with known or suspected focal liver lesions. An initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography examination was followed by unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), injection of MnDPDP (5 micromol/kg), and enhanced MRI. Adverse events were reported for 23% of the patients; most were mild to moderate in intensity, did not require treatment, and were not drug related. The most commonly reported adverse events were nausea (7%) and headache (4%). The incidence of serious adverse events was low (nine events in six patients) and not drug related. Injection-associated discomfort was reported for 69% of the patients, and the most commonly reported discomforts included heat (49%) and flushing (33%). Changes in laboratory values and vital signs were generally transient, were not clinically significant, and did not require treatment. There were no clinically significant short-term risks from exposure to MnDPDP. PMID:10931579

  18. Performance of a Fuel-Injection Spark-Ignition Engine Using a Hydrogenated Safety Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, Oscar W; Young, Alfred W

    1934-01-01

    This report presents the performance of a single-cylinder test engine using a hydrogenated safety fuel. The safety fuel has a flash point of 125 degrees f. (Cleveland open-dup method), which is high enough to remove most of the fire hazard, and an octane number of 95, which permits higher compression ratios to be used than are permissible with most undoped gasolines.

  19. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (p<0.001). By esophageal manometric study, mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was reduced from 46.9 to 29.1 mmHg after treatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (p<0.001). There were no side effects in any cases. Botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan. PMID:26566311

  20. Injection-associated pain in femoral arteriography: A European multicenter study comparing safety, tolerability, and efficacy of iodixanol and iopromide

    SciTech Connect

    Justesen, Per; Downes, Mark; Grynne, Birthe Hougens; Lang, Hanne; Rasch, Wenche; Seim, Eva

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate injection-associated pain, safety, and efficacy with the isotonic contrast medium iodixanol (Visipaque 270 mg I/ml) compared with iopromide (Ultravist 300 mg I/ml) in femoral arteriography. Methods. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group clinical investigation was carried out in 54 hospitals in Europe. Of the patients evaluated, 1225 received iodixanol and 1227 iopromide in conventional and/or digital subtraction angiography. Results. The iodixanol group reported statistically significantly less injection-associated pain (0.9%) than the iopromide group (9.5%) (p<0.001). Further, 4.1% in the iodixanol group experienced pain and/or severe heat sensation vs 19.8% in the iopromide group (p<0.001). In the iodixanol group, 1.8% of the patients experienced contrast-related adverse events vs 2.4% in the iopromide group (p=NS). Overall diagnostic information was optimal for 94.1% in the iodixanol group and 95.3% in the iopromide group (p=NS). Conclusions. Iodixanol 270 mg I/ml causes significantly less injection-associated pain during femoral arteriography and is as safe and efficatious as iopromide 300 mg I/ml.

  1. Efficacy and safety of Pro Re Nata regimen without loading dose ranibizumab injections in retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Unsal, Erkan; Eltutar, Kadir; Sultan, Pınar; Gungel, Hulya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab on visual acuity and anatomic results in the treatment of macular edema due to retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods: Forty Six eyes of 45 patients who were administered intravitreal ranibizumab because of macular edema due to Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO) were included in this retrospective clinical study. During monthly follow-up, the best corrected visual acuity values in terms of LogMAR with The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart, central macular thickness (CMT), and complications were examined. Cases were classified as central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), superotemporal branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), and inferotemporal BRVO. We only included RVO patients but using ETDRS chart for the vision measurement. Results: In all follow-up months, there was a significant increase in BCVA in all RVO cases and in superotemporal BRVO cases after the first injection of ranibizumab. Although there was no significant increase in the 1st month of follow-up period compared to pre-treatment, there was significant increase in 2-6 months in inferotemporal BRVO patients. There was no statistically significant increase in 1st and 2nd month follow-up periods compared to pre-treatment; however there was a significant increase in 3-6 months in the CRVO patients. There was a significant decrease in average CMT measurements in all follow-up months compared to pre-treatment in all RVO cases, in superotemporal and inferotemporal BRVO cases. There was no significant decrease in average CMT measurements in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd months compared to pre-treatment although there was a significant decrease in 4-6 months in cases included in the CRVO patients. Conclusions: Intraocular ranibizumab injections provided rapid, effective treatment for macular edema due to RVO with low rates of ocular and nonocular safety events. However, repeated injections and frequent follow-up intervals may be

  2. Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Repeated Intravescial OnabotulinumtoxinA Injections Plus Hydrodistention in the Treatment of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Ling; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) injection can relieve symptoms of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS), but lacks sustainability. Repeated injections have been shown to provide a superior outcome to a single injection, but data on long-term efficacy and safety is limited. In this prospective study, we enrolled patients with refractory IC/BPS, and treated them with 100 U of BoNT-A injection plus hydrodistention followed by repeated injections every six months for up to two years or until the patient wished to discontinue. A “top-up” dose was offered after the fourth injection. Of these 104 participants, 56.7% completed four BoNT-A injections and 34% voluntarily received the fifth injection due to exacerbated IC symptoms. With a follow-up period of up to 79 months, O’Leary-Sant symptom and problem indexes (ICSI, ICPI, OSS), pain visual analogue scale (VAS) functional bladder capacity, frequency episodes, and global response assessment (GRA) all showed significant improvement (p < 0.0001). Those who received repeated injections had a better success rate during the long-term follow-up period. The incidence of adverse events did not rise with the increasing number of BoNT-A injections. A higher pre-treatment ICSI and ICPI score was predictive for successful response to repeated intravesical BoNT-A injections plus hydrodistention. PMID:26506388

  3. Experimental Validation of Passive Safety System Models: Application to Design and Optimization of Fluoride-Salt-Cooled, High-Temperature Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibaum, Nicolas

    The development of advanced nuclear reactor technology requires understanding of complex, integrated systems that exhibit novel phenomenology under normal and accident conditions. The advent of passive safety systems and enhanced modular construction methods requires the development and use of new frameworks to predict the behavior of advanced nuclear reactors, both from a safety standpoint and from an environmental impact perspective. This dissertation introduces such frameworks for scaling of integral effects tests for natural circulation in fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactors (FHRs) to validate evaluation models (EMs) for system behavior; subsequent reliability assessment of passive, natural- circulation-driven decay heat removal systems, using these validated models; evaluation of life cycle carbon dioxide emissions as a key environmental impact metric; and recommendations for further work to apply these frameworks in the development and optimization of advanced nuclear reactor designs. In this study, the developed frameworks are applied to the analysis of the Mark 1 pebble-bed FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) under current investigation at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  4. Building on safety, feasibility, and acceptability: the impact and cost of community health worker provision of injectable contraception

    PubMed Central

    Chin-Quee, Dawn; Bratt, John; Malkin, Morrisa; Nduna, Mavis Mwale; Otterness, Conrad; Jumbe, Lydia; Mbewe, Reuben Kamoto

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: A critical shortage of doctors, nurses, and midwives in many sub-Saharan African countries inhibits efforts to expand access to family planning services, especially in rural areas. One way to fill this gap is for community health workers (CHWs) to provide injectable contraceptives, an intervention for which there is growing evidence and international support. In 2009, with approval from the Government of Zambia (GoZ), FHI 360 collaborated with ChildFund Zambia to design and implement such an intervention as part of its existing CHW family planning program. Methods: The safety of CHW provision of injectable DMPA (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) was measured by client reports and by a 21-item structured observation checklist. Feasibility and acceptability were measured by interviews with CHWs and a subset of DMPA clients. The impact of adding DMPA to pill and condom provision was assessed by family planning uptake among the clients of trained CHWs from February 2010 to February 2011. Costs were documented using spreadsheets over the period November 2009 to February 2011. Results: Scores were high on all measures of safety, feasibility, and acceptability. Couple-years of protection (CYP, protection from pregnancy for 1 year) was provided to 51 condom clients, 391 pill clients, and 2,206 DMPA clients. Of the 1,739 clients new to family planning, 85% chose injectable DMPA, while 13% chose pills and 2% chose condoms. Continuation rates were also high, at 63% after 1 year as compared with 47% for pill users. Incremental costs per couple-year were US$21.24 if 50% of users continue with CHW-provided DMPA. Conclusion: The study affirms that the provision of injectable contraceptives by CHWs is safe, acceptable, and feasible in the Zambian context, with very high rates of uptake in hard-to-reach areas. High continuation rates among clients mean that costs of the intervention can be low when added to an existing community-based distribution program

  5. Risperidone long-acting injection: a review of its long term safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Rainer, Michael K

    2008-01-01

    A long-acting form of the second-generation antipsychotic drug risperidone is now broadly available for the treatment of schizophrenia and closely related psychiatric conditions. It combines the advantage of previously available depot formulations for first-generation drugs with the favorable characteristics of the modern “atypical” antipsychotics, namely higher efficacy in the treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia and reduced motor disturbances. Published clinical studies show an objective clinical efficacy (as per psychiatric symptom scores and relapse data) that exceeds that of oral atypical antipsychotics when patients are switched to the long-acting injectable form, a low incidence of treatment-emergent extrapyramidal side effects, and very good acceptance by patients. Available data for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder show equivalence with the oral form instead of superiority, but are still limited. As it seems likely that efficacy benefits are mostly due to the fact that the injectable form reduces the demand for patient compliance to one physician visit every 2 weeks instead of self-administration on a daily or twice-daily basis, additional potential could exist in other psychiatric disorders where atypical antipsychotic drugs are of benefit but where patient adherence to treatment schedules is typically low. PMID:19183782

  6. Percutaneous Ethanol Injection of Unresectable Medium-to-Large-Sized Hepatomas Using a Multipronged Needle: Efficacy and Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S. Kachura, J.R.; Gallinger, S.; Grant, D.; Greig, P.; McGilvray, I.; Knox, J.; Sherman, M.; Wong, F.; Wong, D.

    2007-04-15

    Fine needles with an end hole or multiple side holes have traditionally been used for percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) of hepatomas. This study retrospectively evaluates the safety and efficacy of PEI of unresectable medium-to-large (3.5-9 cm) hepatomas using a multipronged needle and with conscious sedation. Twelve patients, eight men and four women (age 51-77 years; mean: 69) received PEI for hepatomas, mostly subcapsular or exophytic in location with average tumor size of 5.6 cm (range: 3.5-9.0 cm). Patients were consciously sedated and an 18G retractable multipronged needle (Quadrafuse needle; Rex Medical, Philadelphia, PA) was used for injection under real-time ultrasound guidance. By varying the length of the prongs and rotating the needle, the alcohol was widely distributed within the tumor. The progress of ablation was monitored by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after each weekly injection and within a month after the final (third) injection and 3 months thereafter. An average total of 63 mL (range: 20-154 ml) of alcohol was injected per patient in an average of 2.3 sessions. Contrast-enhanced CT, ultrasound, or MRI was used to determine the degree of necrosis. Complete necrosis was noted in eight patients (67%), near-complete necrosis (90-99%) in two (16.7%), and partial success (50-89%) in two (16.7%). Follow-up in the first 9 months showed local recurrence in two patients and new lesions in another. There was no mortality. One patient developed renal failure, liver failure, and localized perforation of the stomach. He responded to medical treatment and surgery was not required for the perforation. One patient had severe postprocedural abdominal pain and fever, and another had transient hyperbilirubinemia; both recovered with conservative treatment. PEI with a multipronged needle is a new, safe, and efficacious method in treating medium-to-large-sized hepatocellular carcinoma under conscious

  7. Tolerance of ciprofloxacin at injection site, systemic safety and effect on electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Thorsteinsson, S B; Bergan, T; Johannesson, G; Thorsteinsson, H S; Rohwedder, R

    1987-01-01

    The safety of ciprofloxacin, given via 30- and 60-min intravenous infusions at a dose of 300 mg every 12 h for 4 days, was studied in 12 healthy subjects (6 females, 6 males). Local effects of the drug were assessed by frequent examination at the infusion site while systemic safety was determined by haematological and biochemical tests and by careful microscopic examination of the urine for drug crystals and by electroencephalographic studies performed in all subjects before and after dosing. At the site of infusion erythema, itching and a burning sensation developed 10-15 min after onset of infusion in some subjects. These symptoms were slight and did not necessitate termination of the infusions. The rash disappeared in some instances during the infusion and in others within minutes after the end of infusion. The changes usually disappeared, even during the infusion. The incidence of the adverse reactions was not related to the duration of the infusion (30 or 60 min), but was less (frequency and extent) when the anticubital vein was used for infusion rather than when smaller more peripheral veins were employed. Thrombophlebitis occurred after 1 of 96 administrations, and was followed by a return to normal. The electroencephalograms remained normal in all instances. One subject experienced mild nausea of a few hours duration. Only 1 volunteer showed crystalluria; the two such specimens from this subject had the most alkaline pH of all urine samples collected in this study. The probability of crystalluria upon intravenous administration appears not to be higher than after oral administration of ciprofloxacin. PMID:3428012

  8. The efficacy and safety of urethral injection therapy for urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Priscila Katsumi; Locali, Rafael Fagionato; Pacetta, Aparecida Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Haddad, Jorge Milhem

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different bulking agents for treating urinary incontinence in women, a systematic review including only randomized controlled trials was performed. The subjects were women with urinary incontinence. The primary outcomes were clinical and urodynamic parameters. The results were presented as a weighted mean difference for non-continuous variables and as relative risk for continuous variables, both with 95% confidence intervals. Initially, 942 studies were identified. However, only fourteen eligible trials fulfilled the prerequisites. Altogether, the review included 1814 patients in trials of eight different types of bulking agents, and all studies were described and analyzed. The measured outcomes were evaluated using a large variety of instruments. The most common complications of the bulking agents were urinary retention and urinary tract infection. Additionally, there were certain major complications, such as one case of death after use of autologous fat. However, the lack of adequate studies, the heterogeneous populations studied, the wide variety of materials used and the lack of long-term follow-up limit guidance of practice. To determine which substance is the most suitable, there is a need for more randomized clinical trials that compare existing bulking agents based on standardized clinical outcomes. PMID:26934239

  9. The efficacy and safety of urethral injection therapy for urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Priscila Katsumi; Locali, Rafael Fagionato; Pacetta, Aparecida Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Haddad, Jorge Milhem

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different bulking agents for treating urinary incontinence in women, a systematic review including only randomized controlled trials was performed. The subjects were women with urinary incontinence. The primary outcomes were clinical and urodynamic parameters. The results were presented as a weighted mean difference for non-continuous variables and as relative risk for continuous variables, both with 95% confidence intervals. Initially, 942 studies were identified. However, only fourteen eligible trials fulfilled the prerequisites. Altogether, the review included 1814 patients in trials of eight different types of bulking agents, and all studies were described and analyzed. The measured outcomes were evaluated using a large variety of instruments. The most common complications of the bulking agents were urinary retention and urinary tract infection. Additionally, there were certain major complications, such as one case of death after use of autologous fat. However, the lack of adequate studies, the heterogeneous populations studied, the wide variety of materials used and the lack of long-term follow-up limit guidance of practice. To determine which substance is the most suitable, there is a need for more randomized clinical trials that compare existing bulking agents based on standardized clinical outcomes. PMID:26934239

  10. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. A Global Health Partnership's Use of Time-Limited Support to Catalyze Health Practice Change: The Case of GAVI's Injection Safety Support

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ann; Fang, Arnold; Hansen, Peter M.; Pyle, David; Dia, Ousmane; Schwalbe, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study to assess the effectiveness and sustainability of a GAVI (Global Alliance of Vaccines and Immunization) sponsored, time-limited Injection Safety (INS) support. The support came in two forms: 1) in-kind, in the form of AD syringes and safety boxes, and 2) in cash, for those countries that already had a secure, multi-year source of AD syringes and safety boxes, but proposed to use INS support to strengthen their injection safety activities. In total, GAVI gave INS support for a three-year period to 58 countries: 46 with commodities and 12 with cash support. To identify variables that might be associated with financial sustainability, frequencies and cross-tabulations were run against various programmatic and socio-economic variables in the 58 countries. All but two of the 46 commodity-recipient countries were able to replace and sustain the use of AD syringes and safety boxes after the end of their GAVI INS support despite the fact that standard disposable syringes are less costly than ADs (10–15 percent differential). In addition, all 12 cash-recipient countries continued to use AD syringes and safety boxes in their immunization programs in the years following GAVI INS assistance. At the same time, countries were often not prepared for the increased waste management requirements associated with the use of the syringes, suggesting the importance of anticipating challenges with the introduction of new technologies. The sustained use of AD syringes in countries receiving injection safety support from GAVI, in a majority of cases through government financing, following the completion of three years of time-limited support, represents an early indication of how GHPs can contribute to improved health outcomes in immunization safety in the world's poorest countries in a sustainable way. PMID:20885995

  12. Assessment of a large break loss of coolant accident scenario requiring operator action to initiate safety injection

    SciTech Connect

    Grendys, R.C.; Nissley, M.E.; Baker, D.C.

    1996-11-01

    As part of the licensing basis for a nuclear power plant, the acceptability of the Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) following a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) as described in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 10, Chapter 1, Part 50.46, must be verified. The LOCA analysis is performed with an acceptable ECCS Evaluation Model and results must show compliance with the 10 CFR 50.46 acceptance criteria. Westinghouse Electric Corporation performs Large and Small Break LOCA and LOCA-related analyses to support the licensing basis of various nuclear power plants and also performs evaluations against the licensing basis analyses as required. Occasionally, the need arises for the holder of an operating license of a nuclear power plant to submit a Licensee Event Report (LER) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for any event of the type described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Chapter 1, Part 50.73. To support the LER, a Justification for Past Operation (JPO) may be performed to assess the safety consequences and implications of the event based on previous operating conditions. This paper describes the work performed for the Large Break LOCA to assess the impact of an event discovered by Florida Power and Light and reported in LER-94-005-02. For this event, it was determined that under certain circumstances, operator action would have been required to initiate safety injection (SI), thus challenging the acceptability of the ECCS. This event was specifically addressed for the Large Break LOCA by using an advanced thermal hydraulic analysis methodology with realistic input assumptions.

  13. Solitary pulse-on-demand production by optical injection locking of passively Q-switched InGaN diode laser near lasing threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X. E-mail: dmitri.boiko@csem.ch; Stadelmann, T.; Grossmann, S.; Hoogerwerf, A. C.; Boïko, D. L. E-mail: dmitri.boiko@csem.ch; Sulmoni, L.; Lamy, J.-M.; Grandjean, N.

    2015-02-16

    In this letter, we investigate the behavior of a Q-switched InGaN multi-section laser diode (MSLD) under optical injection from a continuous wave external cavity diode laser. We obtain solitary optical pulse generation when the slave MSLD is driven near free running threshold, and the peak output power is significantly enhanced with respect to free running configuration. When the slave laser is driven well above threshold, optical injection reduces the peak power. Using standard semiconductor laser rate equation model, we find that both power enhancement and suppression effects are the result of partial bleaching of the saturable absorber by externally injected photons.

  14. Solitary pulse-on-demand production by optical injection locking of passively Q-switched InGaN diode laser near lasing threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Sulmoni, L.; Lamy, J.-M.; Stadelmann, T.; Grossmann, S.; Hoogerwerf, A. C.; Grandjean, N.; Boïko, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    In this letter, we investigate the behavior of a Q-switched InGaN multi-section laser diode (MSLD) under optical injection from a continuous wave external cavity diode laser. We obtain solitary optical pulse generation when the slave MSLD is driven near free running threshold, and the peak output power is significantly enhanced with respect to free running configuration. When the slave laser is driven well above threshold, optical injection reduces the peak power. Using standard semiconductor laser rate equation model, we find that both power enhancement and suppression effects are the result of partial bleaching of the saturable absorber by externally injected photons.

  15. [Clinical safety studies based on 30 026 post-marketing cases of Shenqi Fuzheng injection by intensive hospital monitoring nested NCCS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Ai, Qing-hua; Xu, Wen-fu

    2015-12-01

    This study adopted a large sample, multicenter, registered hospital centralized monitoring nested prospective case-control study design. From the real world clinical application of Shenqi Fuzheng injection, monitored 30 026 cases of patients with the use of Shenqi Fuzheng injection. A total of 51 adverse drug reaction (ADR) cases was monitored, including 1 case of severe adverse reactions. ADR incidence rate was 1.7 per 1,000. Blood samples were collected from patients with allergic reactions and their matched controls. Related biological indicators of allergic reactions were unified detected and analysed in order to explore the mechanism of allergic reaction and promote the clinical safety. PMID:27245015

  16. Principles of providing inherent self-protection and passive safety characteristics of the SVBR-75/100 type modular reactor installation for nuclear power plants of different capacity and purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Novikova, N.N.; Tormyshev, I.V.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Dedoul, A.V.

    2007-07-01

    The report presents a brief description of the reactor installation SVBR-75/100, states a concept of providing the RI safety and presents the basic results of the analysis of the most dangerous pre-accidental situations and beyond the design basis accidents, which have been obtained in the process of validating the RI safety. It has been shown that the safety functions concerning the accidental shutdown of the reactor, total blacking out of the NPP and localization of the accidental situation relating to the postulated simultaneous rupture of several steam-generator tubes are not subject to influence of the human factor and are entirely realized in a passive way. (authors)

  17. Assessment of Knowledge and Practices regarding Injection Safety and Related Biomedical Waste Management amongst Interns in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital, Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anita Shankar; Priyanka; Khandekar, Jyoti; Bachani, Damodar

    2014-01-01

    Injuries caused by needle sticks and sharps due to unsafe injection practices are the most common occupational hazard amongst health care personnel. The objectives of our study were to determine the existing knowledge and practices of interns and change in their level following an information education and communication (IEC) package regarding safe injection practices and related biomedical waste management and to determine the status of hepatitis B vaccination. We conducted a follow-up study among all (106) interns in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Delhi. A predesigned semistructured questionnaire was used. IEC package in the form of hands-on workshop and power point presentation was used. A highly significant (P < 0.001) improvement in the knowledge of interns was observed after intervention with respect to the “three criteria of a safe injection” and cleaning of injection site. Thus, the baseline knowledge of interns was good in certain aspects of injection safety, namely, diseases transmitted by unsafe injections and their prevention. We conclude that IEC intervention package was effective in significantly improving the interns' knowledge regarding safe injection practices and biomedical waste management. Almost two-thirds of interns were immunised against hepatitis B before the intervention and this proportion rose significantly after the intervention.

  18. Safety Evaluation of Chinese Medicine Injections with a Cell Imaging-Based Multiparametric Assay Revealed a Critical Involvement of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Liu, Chen-Xiang; Dong, Ran-Ran; He, Shuang; Liu, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Tie-Chan; Wang, Zhi-Long; Shen, Xi-Ya; Zhang, Bo-Li; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Zhu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The safety of herbal medicine products has been a widespread concern due to their complex chemical nature and lack of proper evaluation methods. We have adapted a sensitive and reproducible multiparametric cell-based high-content analysis assay to evaluate the hepatic-safety of four Chinese medicine injections and validated it with classical animal-based toxicity assays. Our results suggested that the reported hepatotoxicity by one of the drugs, Fufangkushen injection, could be attributed at least in part to the interference of mitochondrial function in human HepG2 cells by some of its constituents. This method should be useful for both preclinical screen in a drug discovery program and postclinical evaluation of herbal medicine preparations. PMID:25792997

  19. Are needle-free injections a useful alternative for growth hormone therapy in children? Safety and pharmacokinetics of growth hormone delivered by a new needle-free injection device compared to a fine gauge needle.

    PubMed

    Dörr, H G; Zabransky, S; Keller, E; Otten, B J; Partsch, C J; Nyman, L; Gillespie, B K; Lester, N R; Wilson, A M; Hyrén, Cecilia; van Kuijck, M A; Schuld, P; Schoenfeld, S L

    2003-03-01

    The clinical safety, use and pharmacokinetics of a new needle-free device for delivery of growth hormone (GH) were compared with those of conventional needle injection devices. In an open-label, randomized, 4-period crossover study, 18 healthy adults received single subcutaneous injections of Genotropin administered by the Genotropin ZipTip needle-free device and by conventional injection. Bioequivalence was established between the devices. In a separate open-label, randomized, multicenter, 2-period crossover study, pediatric patients underwent 2-weeks Genotropin treatment administered by the Genotropin ZipTip and by a fine-gauge needle device (>95% used the Genotropin Pen). In total, 128/133 patients who were treated completed the study. Genotropin ZipTip was well tolerated and >50% of patients found no difference between the devices for all parameters assessed. After study completion, >20% patients preferred to continue using Genotropin ZipTip. Although statistical analyses demonstrated superiority of the Genotropin Pen versus Genotropin ZipTip for bleeding, pain, soreness, and bruising, Genotropin ZipTip was considered to provide a safe and bioequivalent alternative to needle injection. PMID:12705363

  20. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    MedlinePlus

    (rim a bott' you lye num bee)RimabotulinumtoxinB injection may spread from the area of injection and ... Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  1. Efficacy and safety of cross-linked hyaluronic acid single injection on osteoarthritis of the knee: a post-marketing Phase IV study

    PubMed Central

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon; Naser, Ziad; Hawadya, Khaled Al; Sorour, Sorour; Al-Khateeb, Rami Nabeel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and duration of action of viscosupplementation with Crespine® Gel over a 9-month period. Materials and methods The study was a post-marketing Phase IV study. A total of 109 participants with osteoarthritis of the knee (grades 1–4) in the tibio–femoral compartment were recruited in Jordan. Data were collected from each participant during the baseline visit. Each participant received Crespine® Gel injection, and follow-up visits took place at 3 months, 6 months, and 9 months post-injection. Main outcome measure(s) An assessment of participants by phone was conducted at 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 5 months, 7 months, and 8 months post-injection. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index questionnaires were completed during each visit. A 72-hour visit questionnaire was used to assess the safety of the injection. Statistical analysis included a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the difference between pain scores across visits, and the percent change from baseline was calculated. Main results The full analysis included 84 participants who gave their informed consent and finished the necessary baseline and follow-up visits needed to assess efficacy and safety. Peak improvement was noted at 5 months post-injection, when pain and physical performance scores had decreased to 2.60 and 9.90, respectively, and the stiffness score was 0.33. The peak improvement in stiffness was noted at 8 months post-injection, when the stiffness score had decreased to 0.32. Significant improvements were still apparent at 9 months post-injection, when the pain score was 3.36, the stiffness score was 0.42, and the physical performance score was 11.5. All side effects were local and transient, and included pain, swelling, and redness of the knee. Most side effects were treated. Conclusion Hyaluronan should be encouraged as an alternative or adjunct treatment to oral analgesics to reduce

  2. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... have received ibritumomab injection.do not have any vaccinations without talking to your doctor.you should know ... cells) and myelodysplastic syndrome (condition in which blood cells do not ... online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  3. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... have received tositumomab injection.do not have any vaccinations without talking to your doctor.you should know ... blood cells), myelodysplastic syndrome (condition in which blood cells do not ... online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  4. Intravitreal injection

    MedlinePlus

    Retinal vein occlusion-intravitreal injection; Triamcinolone-intravitreal injection; Dexamethasone-intravitreal injection; Lucentis-intravitreal injection; Avastin-intravitreal injection; Bevacizumab-intravitreal injection; Ranibizumab- ...

  5. A comparison of the oral application and injection routes using the onderstepoort biological products fowl typhoid vaccine, its safety, efficacy and duration of protection in commercial laying hens.

    PubMed

    Purchase, C; Picard, J; McDonald, R; Bisschop, S P R

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to establish whether the Onderstepoort Biological Products Fowl Typhoid (OBPft) vaccine registered as an injectable vaccine was effective and safe when administered orally to commercial layers. Its efficacy and duration of protection were compared with application by intramuscular injection. Commercial brown layer hens were used as they were found to be highly susceptible to Salmonella gallinarum infections. In the vaccine safety trial birds were euthanased at timed intervals spanning 4 weeks postvaccination. Necropsies were performed and samples were taken and tested. No clinical signs or mortalities could be attributed to the OBPft vaccine nor could active shedding of the vaccine strain be detected. Slight pathological changes were noted with both routes of vaccination; however, these changes were transient, returning to normal within the observation period. The injected groups showed a better serological response with the rapid serum plate agglutination (RSPA) test than the orally vaccinated groups. In the duration of protection trial, birds were challenged at 3-8-week intervals post-vaccination. All unvaccinated birds died. Protection 8 and 16 weeks after vaccination was above 60 %,by 24 weeks after challenge, the vaccine protection was below 30 %. It was found that there was no significant difference (P < 0.05) in the protection offered by either the oral or injected route of vaccination with the OBPft vaccine. PMID:18678191

  6. Evaluation of efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A injection in patients requiring temporary tarsorrhaphy to improve corneal epithelial defects

    PubMed Central

    Kasaee, Abolfazl; Musavi, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Hashemian, Mohammad Nasser; Mohebbi, Shahrzad; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Taher Rajabi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type A (Dysport, (Ipsen Biopharm Ltd, Wrexham, UK)) injection in patients requiring temporary tarsorrhaphy to improve corneal epithelial defects. METHODS Thirty patients were enrolled into the prospective study between March 2007 and September 2009. Doses of 15 and 30U of Dysport were injected into the levator palpebrae superioris muscle through the eyelid. The patients were followed daily until completion of ptosis and then 1-2 weekly until complete resolution of levator function and improvement of corneal condition. RESULTS Ptosis took 2.64±1.85 days to be completed (range 1-9 days) and lasted for 12±2.19 weeks. For patients with seventh nerve palsy, 30U Dysport was appropriate to produce sufficient ptosis whereas in other patients 15U of toxin was sufficient. In 83.3% of patients ptosis was sufficient for complete recovery of corneal epithelium and 16.7% required a second procedure (Amniotic membrane transplantation, conjunctival flap). There was a direct correlation between age and duration of ptosis. In patients with seventh nerve palsy, the amount of resultant ptosis was significantly lower than that of other patients. The only adverse effects of injection were superior rectus underaction (33.3%) and diplopia (16.7%) which resolved in all patients without any intervention. CONCLUSION Dysport injection is a safe and effective substitute for surgical tasorrhaphy with fewer complications. PMID:22553562

  7. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  8. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  9. Assessment on the Efficacy and Safety of Aidi Injection Combined with Vinorelbine and Cisplatin for Treatment of Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua-Ye; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Wang, Yan-Ting; Chen, Wei; Qi, Shu-Ya; Cao, Jun-Ling; Li, Guo-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of vinorelbine and cisplatin (NP chemotherapy) alone or in combination with Aidi injection for the treatment of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Pertinent publications were identified in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, CQVIP, and Wanfang databases, up to December 8, 2015. After quality assessment of all included randomized controlled trials evaluating Aidi injection combined with NP chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced NSCLC, a meta-analysis was performed by Review Manager 5.2 and STATA 12.0 for statistical analyses. Results: Twelve studies including 509 and 503 cases in the experimental and control groups, respectively, were finally analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed that when cisplatin dose ranging from 20 to 40 mg/m2, combination of Aidi injection and NP chemotherapy was statistically different compared with NP chemotherapy alone in enhancing efficiency (relative risk [RR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.05–1.47], P = 0.010) and reducing the incidence of Grade II or above nausea and vomiting (RR = 0.49, 95% CI [0.30–0.80], P = 0.005). Meanwhile, with cisplatin ranging from 80 to 120 mg/m2, no significant differences in efficiency (RR = 1.11, 95% CI [0.87–1.42], P = 0.390) and Grade II or above nausea and vomiting (RR = 0.88, 95% CI [0.71–1.10], P = 0.260) were obtained. In addition, Aidi injection combined with NP chemotherapy was superior to NP chemotherapy alone in improving the quality of life, alleviating Grade II or above leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Aidi injection combined with NP chemotherapy can enhance efficiency, improve the quality of life, and decrease adverse effects in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:26960377

  10. Comparative safety, efficacy, and cycle control of Lunelle monthly contraceptive injection (medroxyprogesterone acetate and estradiol cypionate injectable suspension) and Ortho-Novum 7/7/7 oral contraceptive (norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol triphasic). Lunelle Study Group.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M; Garceau, R J; Cromie, M A

    1999-10-01

    An open-label, nonrandomized, parallel, controlled study compared the efficacy, safety, and cycle control of a new monthly injectable contraceptive containing 25 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 5 mg of estradiol cypionate (E2C) (MPA/E2C) (Lunelle Monthly Contraceptive Injection) with that of a norethindrone 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 mg/0.035 mg ethinyl estradiol (NET/EE) triphasic oral contraceptive (Ortho-Novum 7/7/7). At study enrollment, women chose either the injections or the oral contraceptive. A higher proportion of women in the NET/EE group (65.1%) than in the MPA/E2C group (48.7%) had used hormonal contraception during the month before the study (p < 0.01). Overall, 55.5% (434/782) of MPA/E2C users and 67.6% (217/321) of NET/EE users completed the 60-week trial. One-year contraceptive efficacy (13 cycles of 28 days) for MPA/E2C and NET/EE was based on 8008 and 3434 woman-cycles of use, respectively. During the first year, one pregnancy occurred in an NET/EE user for a life table rate of 0.3; no pregnancies occurred in users of MPA/E2C. One additional pregnancy in the NET/EE group occurred during the 15th treatment cycle. After the first treatment cycle, women in both groups experienced regular menses, with an average cycle length of 28 days in MPA/E2C users and 27 days in NET/EE users. Although MPA/E2C users were more likely to experience bleeding irregularities, only 2.5% (19/775) cited metrorrhagia as a reason for discontinuing treatment. The adverse events reported in both treatment groups are consistent with those expected with the use of combined hormonal contraceptives. Overall, the results of this first Phase III US clinical trial of MPA/E2C confirm this method's high contraceptive efficacy and safety, as shown in previous studies by the World Health Organization. These results suggest that a monthly combination injectable would represent a welcome new contraceptive option for women in the US. PMID:10640164

  11. Optimising health and safety of people who inject drugs during transition from acute to outpatient care: narrative review with clinical checklist.

    PubMed

    Thakarar, Kinna; Weinstein, Zoe M; Walley, Alexander Y

    2016-06-01

    The opioid epidemic in the USA continues to worsen. Medical providers are faced with the challenge of addressing complications from opioid use disorders and associated injection drug use. Unsafe injection practices among people who inject drugs (PWID) can lead to several complications requiring acute care encounters in the emergency department and inpatient hospital. Our objective is to provide a narrative review to help medical providers recognise and address key health issues in PWID, who are being released from the emergency department and inpatient hospital. In the midst of rises in overdose deaths and infections such as hepatitis C, we highlight several health issues for PWID, including overdose and infection prevention. We provide a clinical checklist of actions to help guide providers in the care of these complex patients. The clinical checklist includes strategies also applicable to low-resource settings, which may lack addiction treatment options. Our review and clinical checklist highlight key aspects of optimising the health and safety of PWID. PMID:27004476

  12. Efficacy and safety evaluation of intra-articular injection of tranexamic acid in total knee arthroplasty operation with temporarily drainage close

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guowei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Bingchen; Lin, Yongjie; Sun, Shui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) injection during primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for reducing postoperative hemorrhage. Methods: 100 cases of patients admitted to our hospital and underwent primary unilateral TKA from January 2012 to December 2014 were enrolled in this study and they were divided randomly into two groups. For the TXA group, 1 g TXA was dissolved in 50 ml 0.9% sodium chloride solution and injected after prosthesis implantation but before cavity close. Conventional drainage clamping was carried for 4 h and the drainage tube was removed 48 h postoperative. For the control group, similar measures were taken except for that no TXA was dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Postoperative hemoglobin, blood coagulation index, total blood loss volume, drainage volume, blood transfusion rate and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) rate in both groups were observed and the efficacy and safety of this surgical treatment were evaluated. Results: There were no significant differences in operation time, postoperative platelet and APPT, D-dimer, lower limb venous thrombosis incidence rate 1 week after operation between the two groups. Postoperative drainage volume, hemoglobin, total blood loss and blood transfusion rate in the TXA group were significantly lower than those of the control group. Ecchymosis of lower extremity peripheral incision and its surroundings was significantly milder than that of the control group. Conclusion: Intraoperative intra-articular injection of TXA in TKA can significantly reduce the initial postoperative hemorrhage and blood transfusion rate at the early stage after operation. PMID:26550418

  13. Clinical effects and safety of treating diabetic macular edema with intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with retinal photocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Panshi; Qian, Cheng; Wang, Wenzhan; Dong, Yi; Wan, Guangming; Chen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to examine the clinical effects of treating diabetic macular edema with an intravitreal injection of ranibizumab in combination with retinal photocoagulation. Methods Sixty-two cases (75 eyes) with confirmed severe proliferative diabetic retinopathy or proliferative diabetic retinopathy in combination with macular edema were randomly divided into the observation group (37 eyes were given an intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with retinal photocoagulation) and the control group (38 eyes received retinal photocoagulation only). Vision, fundus condition, central macular thickness, and the macular leakage area were recorded before and after treatment. Results The best-corrected visual acuity and macular leakage area were similar between the observation and control groups (P>0.05). The best-corrected visual acuity in the observation group was higher than that in the control group 3 and 6 months after treatment (P<0.05) and showed a rising tendency. The macular leakage area in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group 1 and 3 months after treatment (P<0.05). However, the macular leakage area was similar 6 months after treatment (P>0.05). The central macular thickness of the observation group was lower than that in the control group 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment (P<0.05). The laser energy used in the observation group was also smaller than that in the control group (P<0.05). The intraocular pressure was not significantly different between the groups (P<0.05). No patients in the two groups developed eye or systemic complications, such as glaucoma, cataract, or vitreous hemorrhage during treatment. Conclusion Intravitreal injection of ranibizumab combined with retinal photocoagulation was proven to be effective in treating diabetic macular edema as it improved vision and resulted in fewer complications. PMID:27103811

  14. Efficacy and safety of second-generation long-acting injections in schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of randomized-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Kempton, Matthew J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to test at a meta-analytical level the efficacy and safety of second-generation long-acting antipsychotic injections (SGLAI) in schizophrenia. Thirteen randomized-controlled trials comparing SGLAI with either placebo or oral antipsychotics were included in a quantitative meta-analysis (6313 patients). Efficacy and safety measures as well as demographic and clinical variables were extracted from each publication or obtained directly from authors. Publication bias was assessed with funnel plots and Egger's intercept. Heterogeneity was addressed with the Q statistic and the I² index. SGLAI were more effective than placebo injections [Hedges's g=0.336, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.246-0.426, Z=7.325, P<0.001] in reducing the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores, but no differences were observed compared with oral antipsychotics (Hedges's g=0.072, 95% CI -0.072 to 0.217, Z=0.983, P=0.326). There were more responders under SGLAI than placebo (47 vs. 24%, NNT 4, 95% CI 3-6), but no differences in comparison with oral antipsychotics [relative risk (RR)=0.962, P=0.094]. SGLAI and controls groups shared a common safety profile with respect to the number of deaths, overall number of treatment-adverse events, insomnia, QT prolongation, or pain in the injection site. There was a greater risk of developing extrapyramidal side effects with SGLAI than with placebo (RR=2.037, P<0.001) or with oral antipsychotics (RR=1.451, P=0.048). There was no evidence of publication bias (Egger's P=0.476), and sensitivity analysis confirmed the robustness of results. The present meta-analysis shows superior efficacy for the SGLAI over placebo on psychotic symptoms, although with a relatively small effect size; no evidence of superiority in efficacy over oral antipsychotics; and modest evidence of greater symptoms of extrapyramidal side effects. These data suggest that SGLAI lack an advantage in reducing psychotic symptoms over oral medications

  15. Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerance of a New Injection Technique for High- and Low-Molecular-Weight Hyaluronic Acid Hybrid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Coacci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Facial aging is characterized by skin laxity and loss of skin elasticity. Hyaluronic acid, a biological component of the extracellular matrix, whose level decreases during aging, plays structural, rheological, and physiological roles in the skin. Hyaluronic acid may possess different molecular weights: low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (from 50 kDa) and high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (just up to 2 million kDa). This monocentric, retrospective, observational study investigates the efficacy, security, and tolerability of a new injective low- and high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid for facial skin rejuvenation. Methods: Eleven women received once a month, for 2 months, 2 mL of the product in the subcutaneous layer of the right and left malar/submalar areas. Facial skin echography, facial skin hydration, elasticity, and transepidermal water loss were assessed before (T0), after 1 month (T1), and after 3 months of treatment (T2). The injective features of the product, physician subjective satisfaction, and patient satisfaction were also reported. Results: Facial face hydration, elasticity, and transepidermal water loss values significantly improved at T1 and T2 (P < .01). Patients were very satisfied at the end of the treatment, and the compound's profit evaluated by the physician was optimal in the absence of local side effects. Conclusions: This treatment represents a good treatment option to restore vitality and turgidity of skin presenting the signs of aging in the absence of intolerance symptoms. PMID:26491508

  16. Assessment of Well Safety from Pressure and Temperature-Induced Damage during CO2 Injection in Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Delfs, J.; Goerke, U.; Kolditz, O.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) technology is known for disposing a specific amount of CO2 from industrial release of flue gases into a suitable storage where it stays for a defined period of time in a safe way. Types of storage sites for CO2 are depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs, unmineable coal seams and saline aquifers. In this poster, we address the problem of CO2 sequestration into deep saline aquifers. The main advantage of this kind of site for the CO2 sequestration is its widespread geographic distribution. However, saline aquifers are very poorly characterized and typically located at one kilometer depth below the earth's surface. To demonstrate that supercritical CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers is technically and environmentally safe, it is required to perform thermo-hydro-mechanical analysis of failure moods with numerical models. In the poster, we present simple process-catching benchmark for testing the scenario of compressed CO2 injection into a multi- layered saline aquifer.The pores of the deformable matrix are initially filled with saline water at hydrostatic pressure and geothermal temperature conditions. This benchmark investigates (i) how the mechanical and thermal stresses enhance the permeability for CO2 migration; and (ii) subsequent failures mode, i.e., tensile, and shear failures. The tensile failure occurs when pore fluid pressure exceeds the principle stress whereas the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion defines the shear failure mode. The thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) model is based on a ';multi-componential flow' module . The coupled system of balance equations is solvedin the monolithic way. The Galerkin finite element approach is used for spatial discretization, whereas temporal discretization is performed with a generalized single step scheme. This numerical module has been implemented in the open-source scientific software OpenGeoSys.

  17. Profile of paliperidone palmitate once-monthly long-acting injectable in the management of schizophrenia: long-term safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability – a review

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Catalán, Rosa; Penadés, Rafael; Garcia-Rizo, Clemente; Bioque, Miquel; Parellada, Eduard; Bernardo, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Short-term studies focused on once-monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP) at doses of 25 mg eq, 50 mg eq, 75 mg eq, 100 mg eq, or 150 mg eq have shown its efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of schizophrenia patients. However, few open-label and long-term studies are available regarding this new pharmacological formulation. Thus, our main aim was to review the scientific evidence on efficacy, safety, tolerability, and preference of PP in these populations. Method Electronic searches were conducted by using PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. All relevant studies published from 2009 until January 2015 were included without any language restriction if patients met diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, and adequate information on efficacy, safety, and tolerability of once-monthly PP was available. Results Nineteen studies were identified irrespective of the study design and duration of the follow-up period. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials found that schizophrenia patients receiving PP showed a significant improvement in psychotic symptoms and similar adverse events compared to placebo and suggested that all doses of PP were efficacious and well tolerated. Other studies demonstrated noninferiority of PP compared to risperidone long-acting injectable in recently diagnosed schizophrenia patients, chronically ill patients, as well as in acute and nonacute symptomatic schizophrenia patients, and a similar proportion of treatment-emergent adverse events between both groups were also noted. Conclusion Several studies have demonstrated that schizophrenia patients treated with PP show higher rates of improvement of psychotic symptoms compared to placebo, and similar efficacy and tolerability outcomes were noted when comparing PP to risperidone long-acting injectable or oral, paliperidone extended release. PMID:26082620

  18. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  19. An Open Multicenter Study of Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Urolastic, an Injectable Implant for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: One-Year Observation

    PubMed Central

    Miotła, Paweł; Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Włodzimierz; Doniec, Jacek; Jóźwik, Maciej; Oniszczuk, Małgorzata; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence rises and affects up to 30% of women after 50 years of age. Midurethral slings are currently the mainstay of surgical anti-incontinence therapy. Some patients experience recurrent SUI (RSUI) which is defined as a failure of anti-incontinence surgery after a period of time or persistence of SUI after the procedure aimed at correcting it. The urethral bulking agent application decreases invasiveness of treatment and meets patients requirements. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and clinical efficacy of Urolastic injection. One hundred and five patients with SUI (including 91 patients with RSUI) were treated with Urolastic in three tertiary gynecological clinics. The efficacy of the procedure was assessed objectively at each follow-up visit by means of cough test and a standard 1-hour pad test. Objective success rate after 12 months after primary procedure in RSUI patients was found in 59.3% of patients. In 14 patients with primary SUI improvement after 1 year was found in 71.4% of patients. Although cure rates after MUS are up to 90% there is still place for less invasive treatment option like periurethral injection of bulking agents, especially in patients with previous SUI surgical management. PMID:26106616

  20. An Open Multicenter Study of Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Urolastic, an Injectable Implant for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: One-Year Observation.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Baranowski, Włodzimierz; Doniec, Jacek; Wodzisławska, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Maciej; Oniszczuk, Małgorzata; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence rises and affects up to 30% of women after 50 years of age. Midurethral slings are currently the mainstay of surgical anti-incontinence therapy. Some patients experience recurrent SUI (RSUI) which is defined as a failure of anti-incontinence surgery after a period of time or persistence of SUI after the procedure aimed at correcting it. The urethral bulking agent application decreases invasiveness of treatment and meets patients requirements. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and clinical efficacy of Urolastic injection. One hundred and five patients with SUI (including 91 patients with RSUI) were treated with Urolastic in three tertiary gynecological clinics. The efficacy of the procedure was assessed objectively at each follow-up visit by means of cough test and a standard 1-hour pad test. Objective success rate after 12 months after primary procedure in RSUI patients was found in 59.3% of patients. In 14 patients with primary SUI improvement after 1 year was found in 71.4% of patients. Although cure rates after MUS are up to 90% there is still place for less invasive treatment option like periurethral injection of bulking agents, especially in patients with previous SUI surgical management. PMID:26106616

  1. IND-Directed Safety and Biodistribution Study of Intravenously Injected Cetuximab-IRDye800 in Cynomolgus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Zinn, Kurt R.; Korb, Melissa; Samuel, Sharon; Warram, Jason M.; Dion, David; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Fan, Jinda; Schoeb, Trenton; Strong, Theresa V.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The use of receptor-targeted antibodies conjugated to fluorophores is actively being explored for real-time imaging of disease states, however, the toxicity of the bioconjugate has not been assessed in non-human primates. Procedures To this end, the in vivo toxicity and pharmacokinetics of IRDye800 conjugated to cetuximab (cetuximab-IRDye800; 21 mg/kg; equivalent to 250 mg/m2 human dose) was assessed in male cynomolgus monkeysover15 days following intravenous injection and compared with an unlabeled cetuximab-dosed control group. Results Cetuximab-IRDye800 was well tolerated. There were no infusion reactions, adverse clinical signs, mortality, weight loss, or clinical histopathology findings. The plasma half-life for the cetuximab-IRDye800 and cetuximab groups were equivalent (2.5 days). The total recovered cetuximab-IRDye800 in all tissues at study termination was estimated to be 12% of the total dose. Both cetuximab-IRDye800 and cetuximab groups showed increased QTc after dosing. The QTc for the cetuximab-dosed group returned to baseline by day 15, while the QTc of the cetuximab-IRDye800 remained elevated compared to baseline. Conclusion IRDye800 in low molar ratios does not significantly impact cetuximab half-life or result in organ toxicity. These studies support careful cardiac monitoring (ECG) for human studies using fluorescent dyes. PMID:25080323

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Lixisenatide Once-Daily Morning or Evening Injections in Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled on Metformin (GetGoal-M)

    PubMed Central

    Ahrén, Bo; Leguizamo Dimas, Aniceto; Miossec, Patrick; Saubadu, Stéphane; Aronson, Ronnie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the efficacy and safety of lixisenatide (20 μg once daily, administered before the morning or evening meal) as add-on therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes insufficiently controlled with metformin alone. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 680 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c 7–10% [53−86 mmol/mol]). Patients were randomized to lixisenatide morning (n = 255), lixisenatide evening (n = 255), placebo morning (n = 85), or placebo evening (n = 85) injections. RESULTS Lixisenatide morning injection significantly reduced mean HbA1c versus combined placebo (mean change −0.9% [9.8 mmol/mol] vs. −0.4% [4.4 mmol/mol]; least squares [LS] mean difference vs. placebo −0.5% [5.5 mmol/mol], P < 0.0001). HbA1c was significantly reduced by lixisenatide evening injection (mean change –0.8% [8.7 mmol/mol] vs. –0.4% [4.4 mmol/mol]; LS mean difference –0.4% [4.4 mmol/mol], P < 0.0001). Lixisenatide morning injection significantly reduced 2-h postprandial glucose versus morning placebo (mean change −5.9 vs. −1.4 mmol/L; LS mean difference −4.5 mmol/L, P < 0.0001). LS mean difference in fasting plasma glucose was significant in both morning (–0.9 mmol/L, P < 0.0001) and evening (–0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.0046) groups versus placebo. Mean body weight decreased to a similar extent in all groups. Rates of adverse events were 69.4% in both lixisenatide groups and 60.0% in the placebo group. Rates for nausea and vomiting were 22.7 and 9.4% for lixisenatide morning and 21.2 and 13.3% for lixisenatide evening versus 7.6 and 2.9% for placebo, respectively. Symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred in 6, 13, and 1 patient for lixisenatide morning, evening, and placebo, respectively, with no severe episodes. CONCLUSIONS In patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin, lixisenatide 20 μg once daily administered in the morning or evening

  3. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  4. A Study on the Conceptual Design of a 1,500 MWe Passive PWR with Annular Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kwi Lim Lee; Soon Heung Chang

    2004-07-01

    In this study, the preliminary conceptual design of a 1500 MWe pressurized water reactor (PWR) with annular fuel has been performed. This design is derived from the AP1000 which is a 1000 MWe PWR with two-loop. However, the present design is a 1500 MWe PWR with three-loop, passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications to enhance the construction, operation, and maintenance. The preliminary design parameters of this reactor have been determined through simple relation to those of AP1000 for reactor, reactor coolant system, and passive safety injection system. Using the MATRA code, we analyze the core designs for two alternatives on fuel assembly types: solid fuel and annular fuel. The performance of reactor cooling systems is evaluated through the accident of the cold leg break in the core makeup tank loop by using MARS2.1 code. This study presents the developmental strategy, preliminary design parameters and safety analysis results. (authors)

  5. Critical appraisal of the efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability of hydroxyprogesterone caproate injection to reduce the risk of preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Vidaeff, Alex C; Belfort, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of preterm delivery is a major desiderate in contemporary obstetrics and a societal necessity. The means to achieve this goal remain elusive. Progesterone has been used in an attempt to prevent preterm delivery since the 1970s, but the evidence initially accumulated was fraught by mixed results and was based on mostly underpowered studies with variable eligibility criteria, including history of spontaneous abortion as an indication for treatment. More recent randomized controlled clinical trials restimulated the interest in progesterone supplementation, suggesting that progesterone may favorably influence the rate of preterm delivery. Preterm delivery is a complex disorder and consequently it is unlikely that one generalized prevention strategy will be effective in all patients. Further, an additional impediment in accepting progesterone as the “magic bullet” in the prevention of preterm delivery is that its mechanism of action is not fully understood and the optimal formulations, route of administration, and dose have yet to be established. We have concerned ourselves in this review with the most recent status of 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17OH-PC) supplementation for prevention of preterm delivery. Our intention is to emphasize the efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability of this intervention, based on a comprehensive and unbiased review of the available literature. Currently there are insufficient data to suggest that 17OH-PC is superior or inferior to natural progesterone. Based on available evidence, we suggest a differential approach giving preferential consideration to either 17OH-PC or other progestins based on obstetric history and cervical surveillance. Progestin therapy for risk factors other than a history of preterm birth and/or a short cervix in the current pregnancy is not currently supported by the published evidence. The experience to date with 17OH-PC indicates that there are population subgroups that may be harmed by

  6. Effectiveness and safety of double-balloon catheter versus intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate for termination of second trimester pregnancy in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wu, Peng; Zhao, Jie; Feng, Ling; Qiao, Fu-yuan; Zeng, Wan-jiang

    2015-02-01

    Severe liver dysfunction in pregnancy (SLDP) is rare but serious complications with high mortality rate. This study compared the effectiveness and safety of double-balloon catheter versus intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate for the termination of second trimester pregnancy in patients with SLD. A total of 55 patients with indications of labor induction were enrolled and analyzed by retrospective control analysis method. Twenty-three cases adopted Cook double balloon dilation as Cook group, and 32 cases received intra-amniotic injection of ethacridine lactate as EL group. The primary outcome was evaluated by successful abortion rate and the difference in the induction-to-abortion interval. Secondary outcomes included liver function recovery and the frequency of adverse events. Both Cook and EL regimens were effective, with successful abortion rate of 87.0% and 93.8%, respectively (P=0.639). The induction-to-delivery interval was similar between Cook group and EL group (38.1 ± 21.5 vs. 41.3 ± 17.4, P=0.543). The liver disease status was more severe in Cook group than in EL group, but it did not show any significant difference after pregnancy termination between the two groups and the improvement rate also did not show any significant difference. Both treatments were safe and there was no significant difference in bleeding and cervical laceration adverse events between the two groups. Our study firstly compared double-balloon catheter and ethacridine lactate for the induction of labor in women with SLD during second trimester pregnancy. PMID:25673206

  7. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1995-04-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

  8. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... it.Golimumab injection comes in prefilled syringes and auto-injection devices for subcutaneous injection. Use each syringe ... method.Do not remove the cap from the auto-injection device or the cover from the prefilled ...

  9. Therapeutic Efficacy and Safety of Percutaneous Ethanol Injection with or without Combined Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinomas in High Risk Locations

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Dong Ik; Rhim, Hyunchul; Choi, Dongil; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) alone and combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) in high risk locations. Materials and Methods We performed PEI for HCCs in RFA-high risk locations, either alone or in combination with RFA. There were 20 HCCs (1.7 ± 0.9 cm) in 20 patients (PEI group: n = 12; PEI + RFA group: n = 8). We evaluated technical success, local tumor progression and complications in both groups. Results Technical success was achieved in all HCCs in both groups. During follow-up, local tumor progression was found in 41.7% (5/12) in the PEI group, whereas 12.5% (1/8) for the PEI + RFA group (p = 0.32). Bile duct dilatation was the most common complication, especially when the tumors were in periportal locations; 55% (5/9) in the PEI group and 50% (2/4) in the PEI + RFA group (p = 1.00). One patient in the PEI group developed severe biliary stricture and upstream dilatation that resulted in atrophy of the left hepatic lobe. One patient treated with PEI + RFA developed cholangitis and an abscess. Conclusion Combined PEI and RFA treatment has a tendency to be more effective than PEI alone for managing HCCs in high risk locations, although the difference is not statistically significant. Even though PEI is generally accepted as a safe procedure, it may cause major biliary complications for managing HCCs adjacent to the portal vein. PMID:23483664

  10. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  11. Long-term safety and efficacy of olanzapine long-acting injection in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder: a 6-year, multinational, single-arm, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Landry, John; Detke, Holland C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI). A 6-year, single-arm, open-label extension study of olanzapine LAI was conducted at 127 sites in 25 countries. Patients were 18–76 years of age, were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N=931), and had been previously enrolled in one of three clinical trials of olanzapine LAI. Patients received flexibly dosed (45-405 mg) olanzapine LAI every 2–4 weeks. The mean duration of exposure was ∼3 years. A total of 393 (42.2%) patients completed the study. The mean weight change was +2.1 kg (P<0.001), with 40.6% of patients experiencing 7% or higher weight gain. Treatment-emergent categorical changes occurred in fasting glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. Pharmacokinetic analyses revealed no systemic accumulation of olanzapine after long-term treatment. There were 36 occurrences of post-injection delirium/sedation syndrome, all resolving within 72 h. The mean Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total and subscale scores did not change significantly over the course of the study, indicating clinical stability. Olanzapine LAI appeared effective as a long-term maintenance treatment, with a safety profile generally consistent with the known profile of oral olanzapine, except for injection-related events (including post-injection delirium/sedation syndrome). PMID:24850228

  12. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... at golimumab injection before injecting it. Check the expiration date printed on the auto-injection device or carton and do not use the medication if the expiration date has passed. Do not use a prefilled syringe ...

  13. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  14. The Therapeutic Efficacy and Safety of Compound Kushen Injection Combined with Transarterial Chemoembolization in Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Update Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao; Li, Rui-Sheng; Wang, Jian; Huang, Yin-Qiu; Li, Peng-Yan; Wang, Ji; Su, Hai-Bin; Wang, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Ya-Ming; Liu, Hong-Hong; Zhang, Cong-En; Ma, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Jia-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-01-01

    Background: Compound Kushen Injection (CKI) is a Chinese patent medicine approved by the China Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of various types of solid tumors. CKI, combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), is believed to increase the therapeutic efficacy of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We report an updated and extended meta-analysis with detailed outcomes of both the efficacy and adverse events (AEs) of CKI combined with TACE therapy. Materials and methods: Electronic databases, including PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Wanfang, the VIP medicine information system (VMIS) and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), were examined for relevant articles before November 13, 2015. An odds ratio (OR) was used to estimate tumor response (TR), Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) improvement, Child-Pugh (CP) improvement, survival rate (SR) and AEs. A publication bias and a subgroup analysis were also assessed. Results: Eighteen studies, with a total of 1,338 HCC patients who met the criteria for the meta-analysis, were included. TR, KPS improvement and CP improvement were significantly enhanced for the combination therapy compared to TACE alone (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: [1.46, 2.33], P < 0.00001; OR = 2.37, 95% CI: [1.76, 3.18], P < 0.00001; OR = 1.81, 95% CI: [1.08, 3.03], P = 0.02, respectively). The combination therapy was associated with an improvement in 1-year and 2-year SRs but not an improved 3-year SR (OR = 2.40; 95% CI: [1.59, 3.62], P < 0.0001; OR = 2.49, 95% CI: [1.24, 5.00], P = 0.01; OR = 2.49, 95% CI: [0.94, 6.61], P = 0.07, respectively). A safety analysis indicated that AEs (including nausea/vomiting, fever, hepatalgia, increased transaminase, increased bilirubin and leukopenia) were reduced for the combination treatment compared to TACE alone. Conclusion: The combination treatment of TACE and CKI was associated with improved TR, KPS and CP improvement and improved

  15. A Randomized Study of the Relative Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Safety of Alirocumab, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody to PCSK9, After Single Subcutaneous Administration at Three Different Injection Sites in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lunven, Catherine; Paehler, Tobias; Poitiers, Franck; Brunet, Aurélie; Rey, Jacques; Hanotin, Corinne; Sasiela, William J

    2014-01-01

    Aims We investigated the relative pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety of the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor alirocumab following injection at three different sites. Methods Sixty healthy subjects (39 male, 21 female; age 20–45 years) were randomized to receive a single subcutaneous injection of alirocumab 75 mg via 1-mL prefilled pen into the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh (NCT01785329). Subjects were followed for 85 days ± 2 days following study drug administration. Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for the systemic exposure of alirocumab were calculated, and levels of free PCSK9 were assessed. Percentage changes from baseline in LDL-C were compared between injection site groups using linear mixed-effects models. Results Alirocumab concentration–time profiles were similar, and free PCSK9 levels were reduced to approximately zero between Day 3 and Day 4 postinjection in all groups. LDL-C levels reached nadir on Day 15 postinjection in all groups with mean percentage reductions of 48.4% (abdomen), 39.5% (upper arm), and 45.6% (thigh) at this time point. A similar effect on LDL-C levels was seen across the entire time course of the study at all three injection sites. Treatment-emergent adverse events were experienced by 8/20 (abdomen), 11/20 (upper arm), and 13/20 (thigh) subjects. There were 2 mild/transient injection site reactions. There were no serious adverse events. Discussion A single subcutaneous administration of alirocumab 75 mg via prefilled pen was well tolerated with similar pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics when injected into the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh. Conclusion These results suggest that alirocumab can be interchangeably injected in the abdomen, upper arm, or thigh. PMID:25256660

  16. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  17. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information

  18. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  19. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  20. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  1. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-04-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  2. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  3. A Prospective, Comparative, Evaluator-blind Clinical Study Investigating Efficacy and Safety of Two Injection Techniques with Radiesse® for the Correction of Skin Changes in Aging Hands

    PubMed Central

    Gubanova, Elena I; Starovatova, Polina A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dermal fillers are used to correct age-related changes in hands. Aims: Assess efficacy and safety of two injection techniques to treat age-related changes in the hands using calcium hydroxylapatite filler, Radiesse®. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, comparative, evaluator-blind, single-center study. Materials and Methods: Radiesse® (0.8 mL/0.2 mL 2% lidocaine) was injected subdermally on Day (D)01, using a needle multipoint technique in one hand (N) and a fan-like cannula technique in the other (C). Assessments were made pre-injection, on D14, Month (M)02, M03 and M05 using the Merz Aesthetics Hand Grading Scale (MAS) and Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS). Participants completed questionnaires on satisfaction, pain and adverse events (AEs). Statistical Analysis Used: Data distribution was tested with the Shapiro-Wilk and Levene's tests. The Wilcoxon signed-rank and Chi-square tests were employed to evaluate quantitative and qualitative data, respectively. Results: All 10 participants completed the study, four opted for a M03 touch-up (0.8 mL Radiesse®). Evaluator-assessed mean GAIS scores were between 2 (significant improvement but not complete correction) and 3 (optimal cosmetic result) at each time point. The MAS score improved from D01 to M05 (N: 2.60 to 1.40; C: 2.20 to 1.30). Following treatment, participants reported skin was softer, more elastic, more youthful and less wrinkled. Other than less noticeable veins and tendons on the C hand, no differences in participant satisfaction were noted. All AEs were mild, with no serious AEs reported. Conclusions: Both injection techniques (needle and cannula) demonstrated equivalent clinical efficacy with a comparable safety profile for the correction of age-related changes in hands with Radiesse®. PMID:26644738

  4. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  5. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  6. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... become pregnant during your treatment, stop using mipomersen injection and call your doctor immediately. ... Mipomersen injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... and tiredness that are most likely to occur during the first 2 days ...

  7. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Levofloxacin injection is in ...

  8. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used to prevent or treat anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air. Ciprofloxacin injection is in ...

  9. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with at least one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a ... antifungals such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), and voriconazole (Vfend); cisapride (Propulsid) (not available in the U.S.); ...

  10. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  11. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  12. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  13. Daratumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... any laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ... a blood transfusion, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are receiving or received daratumumab injection. ...

  14. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need to take folic acid and vitamin B12 during your treatment with pralatrexate injection to help ... that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your ...

  15. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  16. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  17. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat infections caused by certain bacteria. Oxacillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work ...

  18. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Nafcillin injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as nafcillin injection will not work ...

  19. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  20. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ... you have been using a different method of birth control and are switching to medroxyprogesterone injection, your doctor ...

  1. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Chloramphenicol injection is used to treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  2. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  3. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  4. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palonosetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting that may occur within 24 hours after receiving ... occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal number of red blood cells) caused by uterine fibroids (noncancerous growths in the uterus). Leuprolide injection is ... Your doctor will tell you how long your treatment with leuprolide injection will last. When used in ...

  6. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  7. Posaconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Posaconazole injection is used to prevent fungal infections in people with a weakened ability to fight infection. Posaconazole injection is in a class of medications called azole antifungals. It works ...

  8. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Adrenalin® Chloride Solution ... a pre-filled automatic injection device containing a solution (liquid) to inject under the skin or into ... device when this date passes. Look at the solution in the device from time to time. If ...

  9. Trastuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Trastuzumab injection is used along with other medications or after other medications have been used to treat ... has spread to other parts of the body. Trastuzumab injection is also used during and after treatment ...

  10. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... using fondaparinux injection while you are in the hospital at least 6 to 8 hours after your ... you will continue to use fondaparinux after your hospital stay, you can inject fondaparinux yourself or have ...

  11. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxycycline injection is used to treat or prevent bacterial infections, including pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. ... certain skin, genital, intestine, and urinary system infections. Doxycycline injection may be used to treat or prevent ...

  12. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  13. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Ferumoxytol injection is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  15. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  16. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  17. Safety and biodistribution assessment of sc-rAAV2.5IL-1Ra administered via intra-articular injection in a mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gensheng; Evans, Christopher H; Benson, Janet M; Hutt, Julie A; Seagrave, JeanClare; Wilder, Julie A; Grieger, Joshua C; Samulski, R Jude; Terse, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA), and gene transfer of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) holds promise for OA treatment. A preclinical safety and biodistribution study evaluated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral vector carrying rat IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5rIL-1Ra) at 5 × 108, 5 × 109, or 5 × 1010 vg/knee, or human IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5hIL-1Ra) at 5 × 1010 vg/knee, in Wistar rats with mono-iodoacetate (MIA)–induced OA at days 7, 26, 91, 180, and 364 following intra-articular injection. The MIA-induced OA lesions were consistent with the published data on this model. The vector genomes persisted in the injected knees for up to a year with only limited vector leakage to systemic circulation and uptake in tissues outside the knee. Low levels of IL-1Ra expression and mitigation of OA lesions were observed in the vector-injected knees, albeit inconsistently. Neutralizing antibodies against the vector capsid developed in a dose-dependent manner, but only the human vector induced a small splenic T-cell immune response to the vector capsid. No local or systemic toxicity attributable to vector administration was identified in the rats as indicated by clinical signs, body weight, feed consumption, clinical pathology, and gross and microscopic pathology through day 364. Taken together, the gene therapy vector demonstrated a favorable safety profile. PMID:26817025

  18. Intratesticular injection of a zinc-based solution for contraception of domestic cats: a randomized clinical trial of efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E C S; Fagundes, A K F; Melo, C C S; Nery, L T B; Rêvoredo, R G; Andrade, T F G; Oliveira-Esquerre, K; Kastelic, J P; Silva, V A

    2013-08-01

    It has been reported that a commercial zinc gluconate preparation disrupts spermatogenesis and apparently causes permanent sterilization in male dogs, but there is little information regarding similar approaches in the male cat. The objective of this study was to evaluate zinc gluconate as a permanent contraceptive for domestic male cats. Sixteen sexually mature mixed breed cats were allocated at random, by replicate, into two groups and given a single injection into each testis of either isotonic saline or zinc gluconate, respectively. Clinical and reproductive parameters were assessed immediately before injection and after 60 and 120 days. On day 120 the testis size of treated cats was decreased (P<0.05). Azoospermia occurred in 8/11 (73%) cats, and penile spines were decreased in 6/11 (55%) and absent in 4/11 (36%) cats, and there were substantial reductions in male behavior. However, plasma testosterone concentrations (single samples collected at each assessment) were not significantly different between treated and control cats at any time point. Although additional studies are warranted, intratesticular injection of zinc gluconate might have potential as a permanent contraceptive for cats. PMID:23465750

  19. Rationale and design of the Percutaneous Stem Cell Injection Delivery Effects on Neomyogenesis in Dilated Cardiomyopathy (the POSEIDON-DCM study): a phase I/II, randomized pilot study of the comparative safety and efficacy of transendocardial injection of autologous mesenchymal stem cell vs. allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muzammil; DiFede, Darcy L; Golpanian, Samuel; Khan, Aisha; Gomes, Samirah A; Mendizabal, Adam; Heldman, Alan W; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    While accumulating clinical trials have focused on the impact of cell therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic cardiomyopathy, there are fewer efforts to examine cell-based therapy in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). We hypothesized that cell therapy could have a similar impact in NICM. The POSEIDON-DCM trial is a phase I/II trial designed to address autologous vs. allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in patients with NICM. In this study, cells will be administered transendocardially with the NOGA injection-catheter system to patients (n = 36) randomly allocated to two treatment groups: group 1 (n = 18 auto-human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC)) and group 2 (n = 18 allo-hMSCs). The primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCS vs. auto-hMSCs in patients with NICM. This study will establish safety of transendocardial injection of stem cells (TESI), compare phenotypic outcomes, and offer promising advances in the field of cell-based therapy in patients with NICM. PMID:25354998

  20. Long-Term (1-Year) Safety and Efficacy of a Single 6-mL Injection of Hylan G-F 20 in Indian Patients with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sarvajeet; Thuppal, Sreedhar; Reddy, K.J; Avasthi, Sachin; Aggarwal, Anish; Bansal, Himanshu; Mohanasundaram, Senthilnathan; Bailleul, Francois

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) among Asians ≥65 years is estimated to double by 2040. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single, 6-mL intra-articular injection of hylan G-F 20 in Indian patients with knee OA at 26 weeks through to 52 weeks. Methods: This study was an open-label, multicentre, phase 4 clinical trial. Enrolled patients (N=394) were ≥30 years old with Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1–3 OA; all patients received hylan G-F 20. WOMAC, SF-12, PTGA, and COGA scores, and OA medication use were evaluated at weeks 1, 4, 12, 26, 39, and 52 (initial treatment phase). At 26, 39, or 52 weeks, eligible patients could participate in a repeat treatment phase. McNemar-Bowkers, paired t-tests and ANOVA analyses were performed (alpha=0.05). Results: At 26 weeks, statistically significant changes from baseline were observed in all efficacy parameters, including the primary efficacy endpoint of WOMAC A1 (p<0.0001). Improvements continued for 52 weeks. No significant changes occurred in concomitant medication use. Eleven patients (2.8%) were re-injected at week 26 or 52. After repeat injection, statistically significant decreases were observed in WOMAC A1, WOMAC C and PTGA scores (p≤0.028). Twenty-three (5.8%) patients reported 26 local target knee AEs. Conclusion: Among Indian patients within this study, a 6-mL hylan G-F 20 injection was well tolerated and effective in treating symptomatic knee OA with significant long-term (1 year) improvement of outcomes. When needed, repeat treatment was safe and efficacious for 4 weeks. Trial Registration: Clinical Trial Registry of India (CTRI/2010/091/000052) www.ctri.nic.in/Clinicaltrials/login.php. PMID:25328555

  1. Safety, Biodistribution, and Efficacy of an AAV-5 Vector Encoding Human Interferon-Beta (ART-I02) Delivered via Intra-Articular Injection in Rhesus Monkeys with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bevaart, Lisette; Aalbers, Caroline J; Vierboom, Michel P M; Broekstra, Niels; Kondova, Ivanela; Breedveld, Elia; Hauck, Bernd; Wright, J Fraser; Tak, Paul Peter; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J

    2015-06-01

    Preclinical studies to assess biodistribution, safety, and initial efficacy of ART-I02, an adeno-associated type 5 (rAAV5) vector expressing human interferon β (hIFN-β), were performed in a total of 24 rhesus monkeys with collagen-induced arthritis. All monkeys were naïve or showed limited neutralizing antibody (Nab) titers to AAV5 at the start of the study. Animals were injected with a single intra-articular dose of ART-I02 or placebo, consisting of 3.2×10(13) vg (Dose A=maximum feasible dose), 4.58×10(12) vg (Dose B), or placebo in the first affected finger joint, the ipsilateral knee, and ankle joint at the same time point. Animals were monitored for clinical parameters and well-being with a maximum of 4 weeks, with the option that the severity of arthritis could necessitate an earlier time point of sacrifice. No adverse events were noted after injection of ART-I02. No abnormalities were observed after histological evaluation of all organs. At both dose levels, immunohistochemical staining indicated expression of hIFN-β. In animals injected with Dose A, we observed stabilization or a reduction in swelling in the finger joint in which vector was administered. The highest copy numbers of vector DNA were detected in synovial tissue of the injected joint and the draining lymph node of the injected knee. High titers of Nab to rAAV5 were observed at the end of the study. Five monkeys developed an rAAV5-specific T-cell response. Two monkeys developed Nab to hIFN-β. In conclusion, intra-articular injection of ART-I02 was well-tolerated and did not induce adverse events. After administration of Dose A of ART-I02, we observed a beneficial effect on joint swelling, substantiated by decreased histological inflammation and bone erosion scores. A GMP vector for clinical application has been manufactured and is currently being tested in GLP rodent studies, with the aim to move forward to a clinical trial. PMID:26086763

  2. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. ... Before using lacosamide injection,tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to lacosamide, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in lacosamide injection. Ask your pharmacist for a ...

  3. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body inappropriate happiness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep extreme ... increased appetite injection site pain or redness Some side effects can ...

  4. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... you that you will need to receive a vitamin B12 injection no more than 10 weeks before your first ... tests to check your body's response to pralatrexate injection.Ask your ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  5. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... lack of vitamin B12 or inability to absorb vitamin B12. Your doctor will not prescribe leucovorin injection to treat this type of anemia.tell your ... tests to check your body's response to leucovorin injection.It is ... such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  6. Etanercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and colorless. The liquid may contain small white particles, but should not contain large or colored particles. Do not use a syringe or dosing pen ... liquid is cloudy or contains large or colored particles.The best place to inject etanercept injection is ...

  7. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  8. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  9. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  10. Fuel injection

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyoshi, A.; Vogoshi, S.

    1983-12-01

    The Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Dept. of Electrical Engineering report on three types of pellet injectors which have different applications: injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle for magnetic confinement; injection of a pellet into a vacuum chamber for an inertial confinement experiment; and injection of a pellet into a magnetic bottle where the pellet is ionized by high-power laser irradiation for target plasma production. The requirements of pellet injectors are summarized in a table. Theoretical studies on pellet ablation in hot plasma and ablated particle diffusion are underway.

  11. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  12. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Boardman, Charles E.; Hunsbedt, Anstein; Hui, Marvin M.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  13. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved when treated with other medications, rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... continues. When certolizumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it is usually given every other week and ...

  14. Ramucirumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... dose of ramucirumab injection. Tell your doctor or nurse if you experience any of the following while you receive ramucirumab: uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body; back pain or spasms; chest pain and tightness; chills; flushing; ...

  15. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  16. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic, to help treat your infection. The drug will be either injected directly into a vein through ... catheter or added to an intravenous fluid that will drip through a needle or catheter into a ...

  17. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  18. Palivizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this medicine each month during RSV season. Your health care provider will let you know when the monthly injections are no longer needed.Your child's health care provider (doctor, nurse, or pharmacist) may measure ...

  19. Terbutaline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Terbutaline injection is used to treat wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness caused by asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Terbutaline is in a class of medications called beta ...

  20. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body and causes pain, heavy or irregular menstruation [periods], and other symptoms). Leuprolide injection (Lupron ... mention any of the following: certain medications for irregular heartbeat such as amiodarone (Cordarone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide ( ...

  1. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  2. Insulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, injections, or implants); niacin (Niacor, Niaspan, Slo-Niacin); octreotide (Sandostatin);oral ... cramps abnormal heartbeat large weight gain in a short period of time swelling of the arms, hands, ...

  3. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... had a serious allergic reaction (difficulty breathing or swallowing or swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, ... the face, throat, tongue, lips, or eyes difficulty swallowing or breathing Fondaparinux injection may cause other side ...

  4. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  5. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emotions). Haloperidol injection is also used to control motor tics (uncontrollable need to repeat certain body movements) ... people who have Tourette's disorder (condition characterized by motor or verbal tics). Haloperidol is in a class ...

  6. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes pain, swelling, and damage) including the following: Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the ... home. When certolizumab injection is used to treat Crohn's disease, it is usually given every two weeks for ...

  7. Natalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent episodes of symptoms in people who have Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the ... If you are receiving natalizumab injection to treat Crohn's disease, your symptoms should improve during the first few ...

  8. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  9. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Ciprofloxacin injection is also used to prevent or ... of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections. Antibiotics will not work for ...

  10. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  11. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  12. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  13. Ceftriaxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease), pelvic ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftriaxone injection will not work ...

  14. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria. Moxifloxacin injection is in a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections. Antibiotics will not work against ...

  15. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  16. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  17. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including skin, bone, joint, genital, blood, heart valve, ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefazolin injection will not work ...

  18. Cefotaxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefotaxime injection will not work ...

  19. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  20. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ampicillin injection will not work ...

  1. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefuroxime injection will not work ...

  2. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called glycopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as vancomycin injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  3. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  4. Telavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious skin infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Telavancin injection is in a class of medications ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or ...

  5. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection, prefilled syringes containing diluent (liquid to be mixed with teduglutide powder), needles to attach to the diluent syringe, dosing syringes with needles attached, and alcohol swab pads. Throw away needles, syringes, and vials ...

  6. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  7. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as nafcillin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  8. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  9. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as oxacillin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  10. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe allergic reactions. It is used in the management of certain types of edema (fluid retention and ... needed for normal body functioning) and in the management of certain types of shock. Dexamethasone injection is ...

  11. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  12. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  13. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attacks (sudden episodes of wheezing, shortness of breath, and trouble breathing) in people with allergic asthma ( ... receiving a dose of omalizumab injection shortness of breath coughing up blood skin sores severe pain, numbness ...

  14. Necitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest pain; shortness of breath; dizziness; loss of consciousness; or fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat.Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory.Talk to your doctor about the risks of receiving necitumumab injection.

  15. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. Dolasetron is in a class of medications called serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. ... stiff or twitching muscles seizures coma (loss of consciousness) Dolasetron injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  16. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... also used together with other medications to treat cervical cancer (cancer that begins in the opening of the ... days. When topotecan injection is used to treat cervical cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  17. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ertapenem injection is used to treat certain serious infections, including pneumonia and urinary tract, skin, diabetic foot, ... for the prevention of infections following colorectal surgery. Ertapenem is in a class of medications called carbapenem ...

  18. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediate-release injection is also used to control diarrhea and flushing caused by carcinoid tumors (slow-growing ... symptoms are severe or do not go away: diarrhea constipation pale, bulky, foul-smelling stools constantly feeling ...

  19. Infliximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for 2 hours afterward. A doctor or ... the following symptoms during or shortly after your infusion: hives; rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, ...

  20. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  1. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  2. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive tositumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  3. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  4. Temozolomide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Temozolomide is used to treat certain types of brain tumors. Temozolomide is in a class of medications called ... injected once a day. For some types of brain tumors, temozolomide is given daily for 42 to 49 ...

  5. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain serious infections including community acquired pneumonia (a lung infection that developed in a person ... Tigecycline injection should not be used to treat pneumonia that developed in people who were in a ...

  6. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  7. Dexrazoxane Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... certain side effects that may be caused by chemotherapy medications. Dexrazoxane injection (Zinecard) is used to prevent ... tissues that may be caused when an anthracycline chemotherapy medication such as daunorubicin (Daunoxome, Cerubidine), doxorubicin (Doxil), ...

  8. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual periods), who have an increased risk for fractures (broken bones) or who cannot take or did ... receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection (Xgeva) is used to reduce fractures ...

  9. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of disability in patients with certain forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mitoxantrone injection is also used together with steroid ... a class of medications called anthracenediones. Mitoxantrone treats MS by stopping certain cells of the immune system ...

  10. Dexrazoxane Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to dexrazoxane injection or any other medications.tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  11. Oritavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for at least 5 days after receiving oritavancin injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  12. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  13. Exenatide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... month. Exenatide extended-release solution is injected once weekly at any time of day without regard to ... you remember it and then continue your regular weekly schedule. However, if there are less than 3 ...

  14. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from ... by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected ...

  15. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Mipomersen injection is used to decrease levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood in people who have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH; a rare inherited condition that ...

  16. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... hearing loss, if you are being treated for meningitis Cefuroxime injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  17. Busulfan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer cells in preparation for a bone marrow transplant. Busulfan is in a class of medications called ... a total of 16 doses) before bone marrow transplant.Busulfan injection may cause seizures during therapy with ...

  18. Methylnaltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat constipation caused by opioid (narcotic) pain medications in patients with advanced illnesses ... a class of medications called peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists. It works by protecting the bowel ...

  19. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment.You may receive methylprednisolone injection in a hospital or medical facility, or you may be given ... doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with ...

  20. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... have.You may receive ampicillin injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. ... doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with ...

  1. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... bleeding fever, cough, flu-like symptoms, muscle aches, burning on urination, worsening skin problems, and other signs of infection rash blistering or peeling skin Romidepsin injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual ...

  2. Ranitidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Ranitidine injection is in a ... your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response ...

  3. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is for intravenous (into a vein) use only. Giving ganciclovir through intramuscular (into a muscle) or ... the storage of ganciclovir solution. Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand what you ...

  4. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  5. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  6. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  7. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injections (Abilify Maintena, Aristada) are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  8. Secukinumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if you need to receive any vaccinations. It is important to have all vaccines appropriate ... treatment with secukinumab injection. Do not have any vaccinations during your treatment without talking to your doctor. ...

  9. Tesamorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... fat in the stomach area in adults with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have lipodystrophy (increased body ... injection is in a class of medications called human growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) analogs. It works ...

  10. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or suspected opiate (narcotic) overdose. ... is also used after surgery to reverse the effects of opiates given during surgery. Naloxone injection is ...

  11. Methotrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Methotrexate injection is also used to treat severe psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches ... slowing the growth of cancer cells. Methotrexate treats psoriasis by slowing the growth of skin cells to ...

  12. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes are accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to ... stomach pain sudden weight loss paleness or blue color of the fingers and toes shortness of breath ...

  13. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called RANK ligand inhibitors. It works by decreasing bone breakdown ... medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. ...

  14. Omacetaxine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for CML and can no longer benefit from these medications or cannot take these medications due to side effects. Omacetaxine injection is ... side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: ...

  15. Basiliximab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used with other medications to prevent immediate transplant rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by the immune system of the person receiving the organ) in people who are receiving kidney transplants. Basiliximab injection is in a class of medications ...

  16. Metoclopramide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to relieve symptoms caused by slow stomach emptying in people who have diabetes. These symptoms include ... When metoclopramide injection is used to treat slowed stomach emptying due to diabetes, it may be given up ...

  17. Intrathymic Injection.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sugata; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Intrathymic injection is used in several T cell-associated immunological studies to deliver cells or other substances directly into the thymus. Here, we describe the intrathymic injection procedure involving surgical incision of the mouse with or without a thoracotomy. Though this procedure can result in poor recovery, postsurgical complications, and distress to the animal, it is actually a simple procedure that can be carried out relatively easily and quickly with experience. PMID:26294410

  18. [The injectables in urogynecology].

    PubMed

    Pifarotti, P; Gattei, U; Meschia, M

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of reports of injectable agents for the treatment of female urinary stress incontinence. The real indication for injectables is intrinsic shincter deficiency (ISD) but urethral hypermobility is not a controindication. Six agents were reviewed: Teflon, autologous fat, collagen, silicone microparticles, silicone microballoons and pyrolytic carbon. Collagen was the most frequently reported agent and yielded 1 year cure/ improvement rate of 60-80%, but results de-creased significantly with longer term follow-up. Teflon has been used longer for the treatment of stress incontinence but both low long and short-term success rate and the reported complications such as particles migration have resulted in its lack of widespread acceptance. Autologous fat has been suggested as the natural injectable but yielded disappointing success rate. Injection of silicone microparticles was associated with a long-term success rate of about 70% in patients with ISD. Moreover, it is now injected without urethroscopy and this makes the procedure easier. Silicone microballoons and pyrolytic carbon have been recently introduced into clinical practice with a short-term success rate of about 70%. However, longer follow-up is needed. In conclusion, long-term durability, cost effectiveness and some safety issues still have to be addressed by further clinical trials. PMID:12711996

  19. Efficacy, tolerability, and safety of aripiprazole once-monthly versus other long-acting injectable antipsychotic therapies in the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia: a mixed treatment comparison of double-blind randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Majer, Istvan M.; Gaughran, Fiona; Sapin, Christophe; Beillat, Maud; Treur, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment with long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotic medication is an important element of relapse prevention in schizophrenia. Recently, the intramuscular once-monthly formulation of aripiprazole received marketing approval in Europe and the United States for schizophrenia. Objective This study aimed to compare aripiprazole once-monthly with other LAI antipsychotics in terms of efficacy, tolerability, and safety. Data sources A systematic literature review was conducted to identify relevant double-blind randomized clinical trials of LAIs conducted in the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia. MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, conference proceedings, clinical trial registries, and the reference lists of key review articles were searched. The literature search covered studies dating from January 2002 to May 2013. Study selection Studies were required to have ≥24 weeks of follow-up. Patients had to be stable at randomization. Studies were not eligible for inclusion if efficacy of acute and maintenance phase treatment was not reported separately. Six trials were identified (0.5% of initially identified studies), allowing comparisons of aripiprazole once-monthly, risperidone LAI, paliperidone palmitate, olanzapine pamoate, haloperidol depot, and placebo. Data extraction Data extracted included study details, study duration, the total number of patients in each treatment arm, efficacy, tolerability, and safety outcomes. The efficacy outcome contained the number of patients that experienced a relapse, tolerability outcomes included the number of patients that discontinued treatment due to treatment-related adverse events (AEs), and that discontinued treatment due to reasons other than AEs (e.g., loss to follow-up). Safety outcomes included the incidence of clinically relevant weight gain and extrapyramidal symptoms. Data synthesis Data were analyzed by applying a mixed treatment comparison competing risks model

  20. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... they’ve been exposed. For example, the passive rabies immunization (rabies immune globulin) is commonly used after a certain ... of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual ...

  1. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  2. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-05-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43-77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel ) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. PMID:25524052

  3. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, a novel mutated butyrylcholinesterase treatment for cocaine addiction, after single and multiple intramuscular injections in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Barak, Orit; Wildeman, Jacqueline; van de Wetering, Jeroen; Hettinga, Judith; Schuilenga-Hut, Petra; Gross, Aviva; Clark, Shane; Bassan, Merav; Gilgun-Sherki, Yossi; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    Human plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) contributes to cocaine metabolism and has been considered for use in treating cocaine addiction and cocaine overdose. TV-1380 is a recombinant protein composed of the mature form of human serum albumin fused at its amino terminus to the carboxy-terminus of a truncated and mutated BChE. In preclinical studies, TV-1380 has been shown to rapidly eliminate cocaine in the plasma thus forestalling entry of cocaine into the brain and heart. Two randomized, blinded phase I studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TV-1380, following single and multiple administration in healthy subjects. TV-1380 was found to be safe and well tolerated with a long half-life (43–77 hours) and showed a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure. Consistent with preclinical results, the ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis, TV-1380 activity clearly increased upon treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, there was a direct relationship between ex vivo cocaine hydrolysis (kel) and TV-1380 serum concentrations. There was no evidence that TV-1380 affected heart rate, the uncorrected QT interval, or the heart-rate-corrected QTcF interval. TV-1380, therefore, offers a safe once-weekly therapy to increase cocaine hydrolysis. PMID:25524052

  4. Design process of the nanofluid injection mechanism in nuclear power plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluids, which are engineered suspensions of nanoparticles in a solvent such as water, have been found to show enhanced coolant properties such as higher critical heat flux and surface wettability at modest concentrations, which is a useful characteristic in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This study attempted to provide an example of engineering applications in NPPs using nanofluid technology. From these motivations, the conceptual designs of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) assisted by nanofluid injection mechanism were proposed after following a design framework to develop complex engineering systems. We focused on the analysis of functional requirements for integrating the conventional ECCSs and nanofluid injection mechanism without loss of performance and reliability. Three candidates of nanofluid-engineered ECCS proposed in previous researches were investigated by applying axiomatic design (AD) in the manner of reverse engineering and it enabled to identify the compatibility of functional requirements and potential design vulnerabilities. The methods to enhance such vulnerabilities were referred from TRIZ and concretized for the ECCS of the Korean nuclear power plant. The results show a method to decouple the ECCS designs with the installation of a separate nanofluids injection tank adjacent to the safety injection tanks such that a low pH environment for nanofluids can be maintained at atmospheric pressure which is favorable for their injection in passive manner. PMID:21711896

  5. Design process of the nanofluid injection mechanism in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Myoung-Suk; Jee, Changhyun; Park, Sangjun; Bang, In Choel; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2011-04-01

    Nanofluids, which are engineered suspensions of nanoparticles in a solvent such as water, have been found to show enhanced coolant properties such as higher critical heat flux and surface wettability at modest concentrations, which is a useful characteristic in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This study attempted to provide an example of engineering applications in NPPs using nanofluid technology. From these motivations, the conceptual designs of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) assisted by nanofluid injection mechanism were proposed after following a design framework to develop complex engineering systems. We focused on the analysis of functional requirements for integrating the conventional ECCSs and nanofluid injection mechanism without loss of performance and reliability. Three candidates of nanofluid-engineered ECCS proposed in previous researches were investigated by applying axiomatic design (AD) in the manner of reverse engineering and it enabled to identify the compatibility of functional requirements and potential design vulnerabilities. The methods to enhance such vulnerabilities were referred from TRIZ and concretized for the ECCS of the Korean nuclear power plant. The results show a method to decouple the ECCS designs with the installation of a separate nanofluids injection tank adjacent to the safety injection tanks such that a low pH environment for nanofluids can be maintained at atmospheric pressure which is favorable for their injection in passive manner.

  6. Design process of the nanofluid injection mechanism in nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myoung-Suk; Jee, Changhyun; Park, Sangjun; Bang, In Choel; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluids, which are engineered suspensions of nanoparticles in a solvent such as water, have been found to show enhanced coolant properties such as higher critical heat flux and surface wettability at modest concentrations, which is a useful characteristic in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This study attempted to provide an example of engineering applications in NPPs using nanofluid technology. From these motivations, the conceptual designs of the emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) assisted by nanofluid injection mechanism were proposed after following a design framework to develop complex engineering systems. We focused on the analysis of functional requirements for integrating the conventional ECCSs and nanofluid injection mechanism without loss of performance and reliability. Three candidates of nanofluid-engineered ECCS proposed in previous researches were investigated by applying axiomatic design (AD) in the manner of reverse engineering and it enabled to identify the compatibility of functional requirements and potential design vulnerabilities. The methods to enhance such vulnerabilities were referred from TRIZ and concretized for the ECCS of the Korean nuclear power plant. The results show a method to decouple the ECCS designs with the installation of a separate nanofluids injection tank adjacent to the safety injection tanks such that a low pH environment for nanofluids can be maintained at atmospheric pressure which is favorable for their injection in passive manner. PMID:21711896

  7. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening ... en gatillo See More... Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening ...

  8. Hand Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  9. Aflibercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD; an ongoing disease of the eye that causes loss of the ability to see straight ahead and may make it more ... used to treat macular edema after retinal vein occlusion (an eye disease ...

  10. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has already been treated with other medications. Cabazitaxel injection is in a class of medications called microtubule inhibitors. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells.

  11. Hydrocortisone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... purple blotches or lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme ... increased sweating muscle weakness joint pain dizziness irregular ...

  12. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... purple blotches or lines under the skin skin depressions at the injection site increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme ... increased sweating muscle weakness joint pain dizziness irregular ...

  13. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sudden wave of mild or intense body heat) decreased sexual ability or desire leg or joint pain breast pain pain, itching, swelling, or redness at the place where injection was given difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  14. Eribulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests to check your body's response to eribulin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  15. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 7 days after you receive each pegaptanib injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  16. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: allergy shots (a series of injections given regularly to prevent the body from developing ...

  17. Famotidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach or intestine) that were not successfully treated with other medications. ... Ellison syndrome (tumors in the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Famotidine injection is in a class of ...

  18. Ranitidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach or intestine) that were not successfully treated with other medications. ... Ellison syndrome (tumors in the pancreas and small intestine that caused increased production of stomach acid). Ranitidine injection is in a class of ...

  19. Oxytocin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider immediately: chest pain or difficulty breathing confusion fast or irregular heartbeat severe headache irritation at the injection site If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  20. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... will be given to you two times a day for 2 to 3 weeks, and then once a day, 5 to 7 days of each week.Your dose of ganciclovir will ... may give you several doses (enough for a day's supply) of premixed ganciclovir injection solution at one ...

  1. Dulaglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other body tissues where it is used for energy. Dulaglutide injection also works by slowing the movement ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  2. Liraglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other body tissues where it is used for energy. Liraglutide injection also slows the emptying of the ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  3. Albiglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... other body tissues where it is used for energy. Albiglutide injection also works by slowing the movement ... In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at ...

  4. Efficacy and safety of second-generation antipsychotic long-acting injections (SGA LAIs) in maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Asta R; Wilson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bipolar disorder requires long-term treatment but non-adherence is a common problem. Antipsychotic long-acting injections (LAIs) have been suggested to improve adherence but none are licensed in the UK for bipolar. However, the use of second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) LAIs in bipolar is not uncommon albeit there is a lack of systematic review in this area. This study aims to systematically review safety and efficacy of SGA LAIs in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. Methods and analysis The protocol is based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and will include only randomised controlled trials comparing SGA LAIs in bipolar. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), PsychINFO, LiLACS, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov will be searched, with no language restriction, from 2000 to January 2016 as first SGA LAIs came to the market after 2000. Manufacturers of SGA LAIs will also be contacted. Primary efficacy outcome is relapse rate or delayed time to relapse or reduction in hospitalisation and primary safety outcomes are drop-out rates, all-cause discontinuation and discontinuation due to adverse events. Qualitative reporting of evidence will be based on 21 items listed on standards for reporting qualitative research (SRQR) focusing on study quality (assessed using the Jadad score, allocation concealment and data analysis), risk of bias and effect size. Publication bias will be assessed using funnel plots. If sufficient data are available meta-analysis will be performed with primary effect size as relative risk presented with 95% CI. Sensitivity analysis, conditional on number of studies and sample size, will be carried out on manic versus depressive symptoms and monotherapy versus adjunctive therapy. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. The results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication, conference presentation and

  5. Passive protective strategy for ultra-precision dual-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhenyu; Fu, Zhenxian

    2015-02-01

    In order to improve the throughput of lithography machine, a new type of lithography machine began to adopt double wafer stages which make the exposure and measurement work simultaneously. But at the same time, this structure also increases the risk greatly, the wafer stage collision for instance. Therefore, a corresponding safety protection system is necessary to protect the whole double wafer stages system and to improve the throughput on the premise of safety. In this paper, a passive safety protection strategy for double-stages lithography machine is proposed based on analysis of its working conditions. The design principle of safety needle is elaborated, and then needle distribution is determined correspondingly. The simulation results show that, the proposed passive protection method carried out by safety needles could avoid damages of sensitive apparatus.

  6. Synchronization of active/passive mode-locked erbium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaechele, Walter; Haus, Joseph W.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Teegarden, Kenneth J.

    1997-07-01

    Injection seeding of a passively mode-locked fiber laser by an actively mode-locked fiber laser source is described. The passively mode-locked laser employs a multiple quantum well saturable absorber to establish pulsed operation. Mode-locked synchronized operation was maintained with average injection powers as low as 1.3 mW. Stable synchronized pulses were observed with pulse widths as narrow as 10 ps.

  7. Hydromorphone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may cause breathing problems); low blood pressure; hypothyroidism (condition in which the thyroid gland produces less ... effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug ... online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  8. Enoxaparin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or feet If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  9. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  10. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  11. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  12. Epidemiological approaches to safety investigations.

    PubMed

    Wood, J L N; Adams, V J

    2006-10-01

    This paper considers the different approaches to post-authorisation safety monitoring of veterinary medicinal products that is essential to ensure confidence in their safety. Most safety testing is undertaken prior to granting of a marketing authorisation and is generally on a small scale. Field trials are usually much larger, but still involve relatively low numbers of animals compared to the number to which authorised products are administered. Safety testing is generally aimed at detecting common events; the numbers of animals used in the tests are too small for detection of all but the most common reactions. The efficiency of the tests depends on the frequency and severity of the adverse reaction and the ability to associate the adverse event with the product. The latter is affected by the period of time between administration and the event, as well as by its underlying frequency. Adverse reaction surveillance is critical in monitoring the safety of a marketed product. Most is entirely passive and so reporting rates are likely to underestimate true incidence. It is relatively efficient for rare, serious adverse effects and for those with a low underlying frequency in the population, but it is less useful when there is long period between administration and the event, or where the event has a relatively high underlying frequency. Greater emphasis should be placed on active surveillance after production registration. Detailed epidemiological investigations, including cohort, case control and cross-sectional designs, offer the only approaches that provide more information on the association between a product and events that have a high underlying frequency in the population or where there is a long period between administration and the adverse event. The relative merits of different approaches are discussed, with particular reference to our recently published study of the temporal association between canine vaccination and non-specific signs of ill health and

  13. Passive Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic bearing for limited rotation devices requires no feedback control system to sense and correct shaft position. Passive Magnetic Torsion Bearing requires no power supply and has no rubbing parts. Torsion wire restrains against axial instability. Magnetic flux geometry chosen to assure lateral stability with radial restoring force that maintains alignment.

  14. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  15. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  16. A Phase IIb, Multicenter, Open-Label, Safety, and Efficacy Study of High-Dose, Propylene Glycol-Free Melphalan Hydrochloride for Injection (EVOMELA) for Myeloablative Conditioning in Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hari, Parameswaran; Aljitawi, Omar S; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Nath, Rajneesh; Callander, Natalie; Bhat, Gajanan; Allen, Lee F; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith

    2015-12-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after high-dose melphalan conditioning is considered a standard of care procedure for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Current formulations of melphalan (eg, Alkeran for Injection [melphalan hydrochloride]; GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA) have marginal solubility and limited chemical stability upon reconstitution. Alkeran requires the use of propylene glycol as a co-solvent, which itself has been reported to cause such complications as metabolic/renal dysfunction and arrhythmias. EVOMELA (propylene glycol-free melphalan HCl; Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) is a new i.v. melphalan formulation that incorporates Captisol (Ligand Pharmaceuticals, Inc., La Jolla, CA, USA), a specially modified cyclodextrin that improves the solubility and stability of melphalan and eliminates the need for propylene glycol. This new formulation has been shown to be bioequivalent to Alkeran. EVOMELA (200 mg/m(2)) was administered as 2 doses of 100 mg/m(2) each in a phase IIb, open-label, multicenter study to confirm its safety and efficacy as a high-dose conditioning regimen for patients with MM undergoing ASCT. At 5 centers, 61 patients (26 women) with a median age of 62 years (range, 32-73) were enrolled. All patients achieved myeloablation with a median time of 5 days post-ASCT, and all successfully achieved neutrophil and platelet engraftment with median times of 12 days post-ASCT and 13 days post-ASCT, respectively; treatment-related mortality on day 100 was 0%. Overall response rate (according to independent, blinded review) was high (100%), with an overall complete response rate of 21% (13% stringent complete response; 8% complete response) and overall partial response rate of 79% (61% very good partial response; 18% partial response). The incidence of grade 3 mucositis and stomatitis was low (10% and 5%, respectively) with no grade 4 mucositis or stomatitis reported (graded according to National

  17. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  18. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  19. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  20. Correction of magnetization sextupole and decapole in a 5 centimeter bore SSC dipole using passive superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    Higher multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor in four and five centimeter bore Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) superconducting dipole magnets have been observed. The use of passive superconductor to correct out the magnetization sextupole has been demonstrated on two dipoles built by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This reports shows how passive correction can be applied to the five centimeter SSC dipoles to remove sextupole and decapole caused by magnetization of the dipole superconductor. Two passive superconductor corrector options will be presented. The change in magnetization sextupole and decapole due to flux creep decay of the superconductor during injection can be partially compensated for using the passive superconductor. 9 refs; 5 figs.

  1. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  2. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  3. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  4. Passive bioventing driven by natural air exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Foor, D.C.; Zwick, T.C.; Hinchee, R.E.; Hoeppel, R.E.; Kyburg, C.; Bowling, L.

    1995-12-31

    Bioventing wells installed in the vadose zone of petroleum-contaminated sites at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) in Twentynine Palms, California, naturally inhale and exhale air. This natural air exchange appears to be driven primarily by barometric pressure changes. The natural air exchange was utilized to engineer a passive bioventing system in which a valve allows only air injection and prevents soil gas extraction. The system is effective in aerating petroleum-contaminated, oxygen-limited subsurface soils. This aeration resulted in enhanced biological activity and site remediation. The bioventing wells (vent wells) were fitted with a passive valve mechanism that opens when the atmospheric pressure overcomes the internal vent well pressure. When the valve is open it permits atmospheric air to enter the vent well and infiltrate into the soil, thereby stimulating bioremediation. When the vent well pressure overcomes atmospheric pressure, the valve is closed and inhibits soil gas extraction. The vent wells are installed in a coarse sand where the depth to groundwater is approximately 220 ft (67 m). Generally, deeper vent wells produce greater flowrates. Passive airflow rates of up to 7 cfm (12 m{sup 3}/h) have been achieved at the bioventing wells.

  5. Passive immunization of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus with anti-Flavobacterium columnare sera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive immunization of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), was conducted to determine if anti-Flavobacterium columnare serum was protective when injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into channel catfish. The anti-F. columnare serum was produced by actively immunizing (i.p. injection) ch...

  6. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  7. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  8. Passive Wireless SAW Sensors for IVHM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Perey, Daniel F.; Atkinson, Gary M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    2008-01-01

    NASA aeronautical programs require integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM) to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicles. Future IVHM sensors need to be small, light weight, inexpensive, and wireless. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology meets all of these constraints. In addition it operates in harsh environments and over wide temperature ranges, and it is inherently radiation hardened. This paper presents a survey of research opportunities for universities and industry to develop new sensors that address anticipated IVHM needs for aerospace vehicles. Potential applications of passive wireless SAW sensors from ground testing to high altitude aircraft operations are presented, along with some of the challenges and issues of the technology.

  9. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  10. Injection Locking Techniques for Spectrum Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gathma, Timothy D.; Buckwalter, James F.

    2011-04-19

    Wideband spectrum analysis supports future communication systems that reconfigure and adapt to the capacity of the spectral environment. While test equipment manufacturers offer wideband spectrum analyzers with excellent sensitivity and resolution, these spectrum analyzers typically cannot offer acceptable size, weight, and power (SWAP). CMOS integrated circuits offer the potential to fully integrate spectrum analysis capability with analog front-end circuitry and digital signal processing on a single chip. Unfortunately, CMOS lacks high-Q passives and wideband resonator tunability that is necessary for heterodyne implementations of spectrum analyzers. As an alternative to the heterodyne receiver architectures, two nonlinear methods for performing wideband, low-power spectrum analysis are presented. The first method involves injecting the spectrum of interest into an array of injection-locked oscillators. The second method employs the closed loop dynamics of both injection locking and phase locking to independently estimate the injected frequency and power.

  11. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  12. Passive propellant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, D. A.; Regnier, W. W.; Jacobs, V. L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A passive propellant acquisition and feed system is disclosed which acquires and feeds gas-free propellant in low or zero-g environments during orbital maneuvers and retains this propellant under high axially directed acceleration such as may be experienced during launch of a space vehicle and orbit-to-orbit transfer is described. The propellant system includes a dual compartment propellant tank with independent surface tension acquisition channels in each compartment to provide gas-free flow of pressurized liquid propellant from one compartment to the other in one direction only.

  13. Passive Immunization Against Poliomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has gone from being one of the worst scourges of the 20th century to nearing eradication in the 21st. This success is well known to be attributable to the Salk inactivated and Sabin attenuated poliovirus vaccines. However, before introduction of these vaccines, William McDowall Hammon of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health led the first major breakthrough in prevention of the disease by using passive immunization in one of the earliest double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. This study provided the first evidence that antibodies to poliovirus could prevent the disease in humans. PMID:15855454

  14. Efficacy, patient-reported outcomes and safety profile of ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid), an injectable drug for the reduction of unwanted submental fat: results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, B; Hoffmann, K; Walker, P; Lippert, S; Wollina, U; Havlickova, B

    2014-01-01

    Background Unwanted submental fat (SMF) may result in an unattractive chin profile and dissatisfaction with appearance. An approved and rigorously tested non-surgical method for SMF reduction is lacking. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for the pharmacological reduction of unwanted SMF in a phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Methods Patients (n = 360) with moderate or severe SMF were randomized to receive ATX-101 1 or 2 mg/cm2 or placebo injected into their SMF for up to four treatments ∼28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up. Coprimary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of treatment responders, defined as a ≥1-point reduction in SMF on the Clinician-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS), and those satisfied with their appearance in association with their face and chin after treatment on the Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS score ≥4). Secondary efficacy endpoints included a ≥1-point improvement in SMF on the Patient-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (PR-SMFRS) and changes in the Patient-Reported Submental Fat Impact Scale (PR-SMFIS). Additional patient-reported outcomes and changes in the Skin Laxity Rating Scale were recorded. Adverse events (AEs) and laboratory test results were monitored. Results Compared with placebo, a greater proportion of patients treated with ATX-101 1 and 2 mg/cm2 showed a ≥1-point improvement in CR-SMFRS (58.3% and 62.3%, respectively, vs. 34.5% with placebo; P < 0.001) and patient satisfaction (SSRS score ≥4) with the appearance of their face and chin (68.3% and 64.8%, respectively, vs. 29.3%; P < 0.001). Patient-reported secondary efficacy endpoints showed significant improvements in SMF severity (PR-SMFRS; P = 0.009 for ATX-101 1 mg/cm2, P < 0.001 for ATX-101 2 mg/cm2 vs. placebo) and emotions and perceived self-image (PR-SMFIS; P < 0.001). No overall worsening of skin laxity was observed. AEs were mostly transient, mild to moderate in

  15. Passive field reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian; Schinca, Daniel C.; Tocho, Jorge O.; Videla, Fabian

    2008-10-01

    The results of reflectance measurements performed with a three-band passive radiometer with independent channels for solar irradiance reference are presented. Comparative operation between the traditional method that uses downward-looking field and reference white panel measurements and the new approach involving duplicated downward- and upward-looking spectral channels (each latter one with its own diffuser) is analyzed. The results indicate that the latter method performs in very good agreement with the standard method and is more suitable for passive sensors under rapidly changing atmospheric conditions (such as clouds, dust, mist, smog and other scatterers), since a more reliable synchronous recording of reference and incident light is achieved. Besides, having separate channels for the reference and the signal allows a better balancing of gains in the amplifiers for each spectral channel. We show the results obtained in the determination of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) corresponding to the period 2004-2007 field experiments concerning weed detection in soybean stubbles and fertilizer level assessment in wheat. The method may be used to refine sensor-based nitrogen fertilizer rate recommendations and to determine suitable zones for herbicide applications.

  16. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  17. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  18. Mechanical passive logic module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay; Caulfield, H. John

    2015-02-01

    Nothing from nothing gives simple simile, but something from nothing is an interesting and challenging task. Adolf Lohmann once proposed 'do nothing machine' in optics, which only copies input to output. Passive logic module (PALM) is a special type of 'do nothing machine' which can converts inputs into one of 16 possible binary outputs. This logic module is not like the conventional irreversible one. It is a simple type of reversible Turing machine. In this manuscript we discussed and demonstrated PALM using mechanical movement of plane mirrors. Also we discussed the theoretical model of micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) based PALM in this manuscript. It may have several valuable properties such as passive operation (no need for nonlinear elements as other logic device require) and modular logic (one device implementing any Boolean logic function with simple internal changes). The result is obtained from the demonstration by only looking up the output. No calculation is required to get the result. Not only that, PALM is a simple type of the famous 'billiard ball machine', which also discussed in this manuscript.

  19. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  20. Passive-solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  1. System code requirements for safety analysis of SBWR

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.G.M.; Shiralkar, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    The simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) being developed by General Electric Nuclear Energy is an advanced boiling water reactor relying on natural circulation during normal operation and passive safety features. The major elements of the passive safety features are the automatic depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) through safety/relief valves and depressurization valves, the gravity-driven coolant system (GDCS), and the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) for residual heat removal. These passive safety systems, although based on existing technology, have generated new requirements for the computer codes used in safety and design analysis. TRACG is the computer code used for safety and design analysis for the SBWR.

  2. Reliability Evaluation of Passive Systems Through Functional Reliability Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgazzi, Luciano

    2003-11-15

    A methodology, to quantify the reliability of passive safety systems, proposed for use in advanced reactor design, is developed. Passive systems are identified as systems that do not need any external input or energy to operate and rely only upon natural physical laws (e.g., gravity, natural circulation, heat conduction, internally stored energy, etc.) and/or intelligent use of the energy inherently available in the system (e.g., chemical reaction, decay heat, etc.). The reliability of a passive system refers to the ability of the system to carry out the required function under the prevailing condition when required: The passive system may fail its mission, in addition to the classical mechanical failure of its components, for deviation from the expected behavior, due to physical phenomena or to different boundary and initial conditions. The present research activity is finalized at the reliability estimation of passive B systems (i.e., implementing moving working fluids, see IAEA); the selected system is a loop operating in natural circulation including a heat source and a heat sink.The functional reliability concept, defined as the probability to perform the required mission, is introduced, and the R-S (Resistance-Stress) model taken from fracture mechanics is adopted. R and S are coined as expressions of functional Requirement and system State. Water mass flow circulating through the system is accounted as a parameter defining the passive system performance, and probability distribution functions (pdf's) are assigned to both R and S quantities; thus, the mission of the passive system defines which parameter values are considered a failure by comparing the corresponding pdfs according to a defined safety criteria. The methodology, its application, and results of the analysis are presented and discussed.

  3. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  4. The next generation of power reactors - safety characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The next generation of commercial nuclear power reactors is characterized by a new approach to achieving reliability of their safety systems. In contrast to current generation reactors, these designs apply passive safety features that rely on gravity-driven transfer processes or stored energy, such as gas-pressurized accumulators or electric batteries. This paper discusses the passive safety system of the AP600 and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designs.

  5. Commentary on "Capturing the Evasive Passive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William

    2009-01-01

    Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…

  6. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  7. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  8. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  9. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  10. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  11. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  12. The use of Permacol® injections for the treatment of faecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zeiad I; Lim, Michael; Mussa, Haider; Abbas, Kazim; Stojkovic, Stevan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the safety and efficacy of Permacol(®) implant for the treatment of idiopathic faecal incontinence using a novel injection technique. Patients with idiopathic passive faecal incontinence were selected for trans-submucosal injection of Permacol(®) after assessment by anorectal physiology and endoanal ultrasonography. Clinical assessment and St. Mark's Incontinence Score were used to evaluate efficacy before and at two time points (1 and 2 years) after treatment. Rockwood Score were also used to determine quality of life before and after treatment. The Friedman and Chi-square tests were used to compare continuous and categorical data, respectively. A p value of <0.05 was deemed significant. Thirty-eight patients (24 female), median age 66 years, were recruited. At maximum clinical follow-up (median of 9 months), response to Permacol(®) injections was categorised as excellent, good, fair and poor in 12, 5, 4 and 17 patients, respectively. St. Mark's Score improved in 72 and 63 % of patients at 1 and 2 years, respectively. However, a smaller proportion of patients (39 and 27 %, respectively) achieved a 50 %, or more, improvement in Mark's Score. All four domains of Rockwood Quality of Life Score improved on first and second year follow-up, however, only two domains, coping and embarrassment, were statistically significant. Permacol(®) injection improved symptoms by >50 % in 39 and 27 % of patients on short and medium-term follow-ups, respectively. The trans-submucosal technique for injection of Permacol(®) in this study was safe with no significant adverse outcomes. PMID:22948797

  13. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  14. Coherent and passive one dimensional quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuting; Jefferson, John H.; Lovett, Brendon W.

    2014-10-01

    We show that the state of a flying qubit may be transferred to a chain of identical, (near) ferromagnetically polarized, but non-interacting, static spin-\\frac{1}{2} particles in a passive way. During this process the flying qubit is coherently polarized, emerging in the direction of the majority static spins. We conjecture that this process is reversible for any number of flying qubits injected sequentially in an arbitrary superposition state, proving this explicitly for an arbitrary state of one and two flying qubits. We also find a special case in which we are able to prove the conjecture for an arbitrary number of qubits. Our architecture thus has the potential to be exploited as a passive quantum memory to encode the flying qubits without the necessity of resetting between successive encoding operations. We also illustrate that the quantum information may be spread over many static spins in the memory chain, making the mechanism resistant to spin decoherence and other imperfections. We discuss implementing the memory system with trapped bosonic atoms, controlled by a spatial light modulator.

  15. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  16. Transient analysis of ”2 inch Direct Vessel Injection line break” in SPES-2 facility by using TRACE code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, S.; Lombardo, C.; Moscato, I.; Polidori, M.; Vella, G.

    2015-11-01

    In the past few decades a lot of theoretical and experimental researches have been done to understand the physical phenomena characterizing nuclear accidents. In particular, after the Three Miles Island accident, several reactors have been designed to handle successfully LOCA events. This paper presents a comparison between experimental and numerical results obtained for the “2 inch Direct Vessel Injection line break” in SPES-2. This facility is an integral test facility built in Piacenza at the SIET laboratories and simulating the primary circuit, the relevant parts of the secondary circuits and the passive safety systems typical of the AP600 nuclear power plant. The numerical analysis here presented was performed by using TRACE and CATHARE thermal-hydraulic codes with the purpose of evaluating their prediction capability. The main results show that the TRACE model well predicts the overall behaviour of the plant during the transient, in particular it is able to simulate the principal thermal-hydraulic phenomena related to all passive safety systems. The performance of the presented CATHARE noding has suggested some possible improvements of the model.

  17. RAMONA-4B development for SBWR safety studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Aronson, A.L.; Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Mallen, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is a revolutionary design of a boiling-water reactor. The reactor is based on passive safety systems such as natural circulation, gravity flow, pressurized gas, and condensation. SBWR has no active systems, and the flow in the vessel is by natural circulation. There is a large chimney section above the core to provide a buoyancy head for natural circulation. The reactor can be shut down by either of four systems; namely, scram, Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Alternate Rod Insertion (ARI), and Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS). The safety injection is by gravity drain from the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS) and Suppression Pool (SP). The heat sink is through two types of heat exchangers submerged in the tank of water. These heat exchangers are the Isolation Condenser (IC) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The RAMONA-4B code has been developed to simulate the normal operation, reactivity transients, and to address the instability issues for SBWR. The code has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics coupled to multiple parallel-channel thermal-hydraulics. The two-phase thermal hydraulics is based on a nonhomogeneous nonequilibrium drift-flux formulation. It employs an explicit integration to solve all state equations (except for neutron kinetics) in order to predict the instability without numerical damping. The objective of this project is to develop a Sun SPARC and IBM RISC 6000 based RAMONA-4B code for applications to SBWR safety analyses, in particular for stability and ATWS studies.

  18. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  19. Passive-solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Our project objective was to design, construct, and operate a commercialized (16' x 50') passive, solar greenhouse. The structure was originally intended as a vegetable forcing facility to produce vegetable crops in the off-season. Building and size constraints and economic considerations convinced us to use the greenhouse for producing bedding plants and vegetable starts in the spring, high value vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers) in the fall and forced bulbs in the winter. This crop sequence allows us to use the greenhouse all year without additional heat as the crops are adopted to the temperature regime of the greenhouse during each particular season. In our first season, the greenhouse performed beautifully. The lowest temperature recorded was 38/sup 0/F after 4 cold, cloudy days in February. The production of bedding plants has allowed us to diversify our products and the early transplants we produced were a great asset to our vegetable farming operation. Although construction cost (4.57 sq. ft.) is higher than that of a conventional polyethylene-covered, quonset-type greenhouse (approx. $1.92 sq. ft.), our annual operating cost is cheaper than that of a conventional greenhouse (0.49 cents sq. ft. versus 0.67 cents sq. ft.) due to a longer usable lifetime of the structure and the elimination of heating costs. Our structure has been toured by interested individuals, school and farm groups. We plan to publicize the structure and its advantages by promoting more visits to the site.

  20. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  1. Passive Solar Is Common Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Rita

    1979-01-01

    A checklist of concepts concerning passive solar energy techniques. Many can be applied immediately to existing buildings, while others should be brought into the initial planning of buildings. (Author/MLF)

  2. Orion Passive Thermal: Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hermandez, Angel; Miller, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Orion Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) is presented. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; and 3) Orion PTCS Overview.

  3. Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

  4. Active and Passive Immunotherapy for Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brody, David L.; Holtzman, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies to combat neurodegenerative disorders have galvanized the scientific community since the first dramatic successes in mouse models recreating aspects of Alzheimer disease (AD) were reported. However, initial human trials of active amyloid-beta (Aβ) vaccination were halted early because of a serious safety issue: meningoencephalitis in 6% of subjects. Nonetheless, some encouraging preliminary data were obtained, and rapid progress has been made toward developing alternative, possibly safer active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches for several neurodegenerative conditions. Many of these are currently in human trials for AD. Despite these advances, our understanding of the essential mechanisms underlying the effects seen in preclinical models and human subjects is still incomplete. Antibody-induced phagocytosis of pathological protein deposits, direct antibody-mediated disruption of aggregates, neutralization of toxic soluble proteins, a shift in equilibrium toward efflux of specific proteins from the brain, cell-mediated immune responses, and other mechanisms may all play roles depending on the specific immunotherapeutic scenario. PMID:18352830

  5. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  6. The RHIC Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.; Tuozzolo, J. E.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <95 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave solution. The required vertical kick of 0.186 T.m is provided by 4 units, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4× 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a ``C'' cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity ( ~ 100) dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 Ohm characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding >50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Tests indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 Ohm terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the four kicker units for the ``Sextant Test'' and the results from various single-unit tests and operation in beam are reported.

  7. The RHIC injection kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <90 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave structure. The required vertical kick of 0.186 t{center_dot}m is provided by 4 magnets, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4 x 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 {Omega} characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding {approximately} 50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 {Omega} terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the production units and the results from various single-unit tests and operation of four kickers with beam in the {open_quotes}Sextant Test{close_quotes} are reported.

  8. Assistive Device for Efficient Intravitreal Injections.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Franziska; Michels, Stephan; Lehmann, Daniel; Pieters, Roel S; Becker, Matthias; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-08-01

    Intravitreal therapy is the most common treatment for many chronic ophthalmic diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration. Due to the increasing worldwide demand for intravitreal injections, there exists a need to render this medical procedure more time- and cost-efficient while increasing patient safety. The authors propose a medical assistive device that injects medication intravitreally. Compared to the manual intravitreal injection procedure, an automated device has the potential to increase safety for patients, decrease procedure times, allow for integrated data storage and documentation, and reduce costs for medical staff and expensive operating rooms. This work demonstrates the development of an assistive injection system that is coarsely positioned over the patient's head by the human operator, followed by automatic fine positioning and intravitreal injection through the pars plana. Several safety features, such as continuous eye tracking and iris recognition, have been implemented. The functioning system is demonstrated through ex vivo experiments with porcine eyes. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:752-762.]. PMID:27548453

  9. Influence of Passive Stiffness of Hamstrings on Postural Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kuszewski, Michał; Gnat, Rafał; Sobota, Grzegorz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore whether passive stiffness of the hamstrings influences the strategy of maintaining postural stability. A sample of 50 subjects was selected; the final analyses were based on data of 41 individuals (33 men, 8 women) aged 21 to 29 (mean = 23.3, SD = 1.1) years. A quasi- experimental ex post facto design with repeated measures was used. Categories of independent variables were obtained directly prior to the measurement of the dependent variables. In stage one of the study, passive knee extension was measured in the supine position to assess hamstring stiffness. In stage two, the magnitude of postural sway in antero-posterior direction was measured, while varying the body position on a stabilometric platform, both with and without visual control. The margin of safety was used as a measure of postural control. The magnitude of the margin of safety increased significantly between the open-eye and closed-eye trials. However, although we registered a visible tendency for a larger increase of the margin of safety associated with lower levels of passive hamstrings stiffness, no significant differences were found. Therefore, this study demonstrated that hamstring stiffness did not influence the strategy used to maintain postural stability. PMID:25964809

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro®) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX®) by intramuscular or subcutaneous routes at separate injection sites: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Yves; Habermehl, Pirmin; Thomas, Stéphane; Eymin, Cécile; Fiquet, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background When this trial was initiated, the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine was licensed for subcutaneous administration in all European countries and for intramuscular administration in some countries, whereas varicella vaccine was licensed only for subcutaneous administration. This study evaluated the intramuscular administration of an MMR vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro®) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX®) compared with the subcutaneous route. Methods An open-label randomised trial was performed in France and Germany. Healthy children, aged 12 to18 months, received single injections of M-M-RvaxPro and VARIVAX concomitantly at separate injection sites. Both vaccines were administered either intramuscularly (IM group, n = 374) or subcutaneously (SC group, n = 378). Immunogenicity was assessed before vaccination and 42 days after vaccination. Injection-site erythema, swelling and pain were recorded from days 0 to 4 after vaccination. Body temperature was monitored daily between 0 and 42 days after vaccination. Other adverse events were recorded up to 42 days after vaccination and serious adverse events until the second study visit. Results Antibody response rates at day 42 in the per-protocol set of children initially seronegative to measles, mumps, rubella or varicella were similar between the IM and SC groups for all four antigens. Response rates were 94 to 96% for measles, 98% for both mumps and rubella and 86 to 88% for varicella. For children initially seronegative to varicella, 99% achieved the seroconversion threshold (antibody concentrations of ≥ 1.25 gpELISA units/ml). Erythema and swelling were the most frequently reported injection-site reactions for both vaccines. Most injection-site reactions were of mild intensity or small size (≤ 2.5 cm). There was a trend for lower rates of injection-site erythema and swelling in the IM group. The incidence and nature of systemic adverse events were comparable for the two routes of administration

  11. Microgravity Passive Phase Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paragano, Matthew; Indoe, William; Darmetko, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A new invention disclosure discusses a structure and process for separating gas from liquids in microgravity. The Microgravity Passive Phase Separator consists of two concentric, pleated, woven stainless- steel screens (25-micrometer nominal pore) with an axial inlet, and an annular outlet between both screens (see figure). Water enters at one end of the center screen at high velocity, eventually passing through the inner screen and out through the annular exit. As gas is introduced into the flow stream, the drag force exerted on the bubble pushes it downstream until flow stagnation or until it reaches an equilibrium point between the surface tension holding bubble to the screen and the drag force. Gas bubbles of a given size will form a front that is moved further down the length of the inner screen with increasing velocity. As more bubbles are added, the front location will remain fixed, but additional bubbles will move to the end of the unit, eventually coming to rest in the large cavity between the unit housing and the outer screen (storage area). Owing to the small size of the pores and the hydrophilic nature of the screen material, gas does not pass through the screen and is retained within the unit for emptying during ground processing. If debris is picked up on the screen, the area closest to the inlet will become clogged, so high-velocity flow will persist farther down the length of the center screen, pushing the bubble front further from the inlet of the inner screen. It is desired to keep the velocity high enough so that, for any bubble size, an area of clean screen exists between the bubbles and the debris. The primary benefits of this innovation are the lack of any need for additional power, strip gas, or location for venting the separated gas. As the unit contains no membrane, the transport fluid will not be lost due to evaporation in the process of gas separation. Separation is performed with relatively low pressure drop based on the large surface

  12. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    works by placing shape memory alloy (SMA) control surfaces on the submarine's diving planes and periodically oscillating them. The modulated control vortices generated by these surfaces interact with the tip vortices on the diving planes, causing an instability to rapidly occur. Though several numerical simulations have been presented, experimental verification does not appear to be available in the open literature. The authors address this problem through a concept called passive wake vortex control (PWVC), which has been demonstrated to rapidly break apart a trailing vortex wake and render it incoherent. PWVC functions by introducing unequal strength, counter-rotating control vortices next to the tip vortices. The presence of these control vortices destabilizes the vortex wake and produces a rapidly growing wake instability.

  13. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotipalli, R.; Delamare, R.; Poncelet, O.; Tang, X.; Francis, L. A.; Flandre, D.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012-1013 cm-2) in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit). This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm) Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD). Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) (20 nm), SiO2 (20 nm) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) (20 nm) also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G) measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV). The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit) on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn), and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  14. Emerging Needs for Pervasive Passive Wireless Sensor Networks on Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is investigating passive wireless sensor technology to reduce instrumentation mass and volume in ground testing, air flight, and space exploration applications. Vehicle health monitoring systems (VHMS) are desired on all aerospace programs to ensure the safety of the crew and the vehicles. Pervasive passive wireless sensor networks facilitate VHMS on aerospace vehicles. Future wireless sensor networks on board aerospace vehicles will be heterogeneous and will require active and passive network systems. Since much has been published on active wireless sensor networks, this work will focus on the need for passive wireless sensor networks on aerospace vehicles. Several passive wireless technologies such as microelectromechanical systems MEMS, SAW, backscatter, and chipless RFID techniques, have all shown potential to meet the pervasive sensing needs for aerospace VHMS applications. A SAW VHMS application will be presented. In addition, application areas including ground testing, hypersonic aircraft and spacecraft will be explored along with some of the harsh environments found in aerospace applications.

  15. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... age; episodes of symptoms in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which the nerves do ... When corticotropin repository injection is used to treat multiple sclerosis, it is usually injected once a day for ...

  16. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  17. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to treat Paget's disease ...

  18. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Botox® Cosmetic ... OnabotulinumtoxinA injection (Botox, Botox Cosmetic) is used to treat a number of conditions.OnabotulinumtoxinA injection (Botox) is used to relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia ( ...

  19. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  20. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a ... as a liquid to be injected subcutaneously (just under the skin) by a doctor. Your doctor will ...

  1. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  2. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  3. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  4. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  5. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis; uncontrollable tightening of the neck ... is injected into a muscle, it blocks the nerve signals that cause uncontrollable tightening and movements of ...

  6. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  7. Summertime Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Summertime Safety Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature ...

  8. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  9. Safety Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, James H.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Five articles in this issue focus on safety education in agricultural laboratories. Topics discussed include teacher liability; elements of a safety instruction program; state and federal safety standards; ground fault current protection; and eye protection requirements and equipment. (SK)

  10. Injection practices in Nepal: health policymakers’ perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The unnecessary and unsafe use of injections is common in developing countries like Nepal. Policymakers have an important role in promoting rational and safe injection use. Hence, the present study was carried out to explore the perception of health policymakers regarding safe injection practice in Nepal. Methods An exploratory qualitative study design was used in this study. Key policymakers from both the central and regional level were selected using purposive sampling. A semi-structured questionnaire advocated by the World Health Organization (WHO) was used after modifying the context. Interviews were conducted to clarify doubts and obtain additional information. The data was analyzed manually using deductive content analysis technique. Results In total, eleven policymakers participated. All unanimously agreed that injection safety is a problem and seven participants reported that injections are overused. They shared the opinion that injections are administered by various providers, including formal and informal health providers, and also quacks. Almost half the respondents reported that the National Drug Policy discourages injection overuse, while others reported that the policy contains no provisions regarding injection overuse. Most policymakers stated that only single-use disposable injection equipment is used to provide injection, while others thought that sterilizable glass syringe is also used. More than half of the participants believed that the quality of injection equipment available in the Nepalese market is not regulated by any government institution. Almost two-third of the policymakers stated that syringes and needles are not reused, while the rest thought syringes might be reused without sterilization in some parts of the country. Almost half of the respondents stated that illegal commercialization of used syringes exists in Nepal. Almost all respondents thought that health care institutions have a waste management plan, while more than

  11. Passive solar design: final evaluation, the Passive Studio

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Duncan S.; Rose, Stuart

    1980-08-01

    The further evaluation of the workshops in passive design for practicing architects and engineers through delayed interviews with a sample of the participants is reported with particular emphasis on the extent to which the participants have practiced passive design in the three-four months since attending. Also discussed is an unsuccessful attempt to conduct a lower-cost version of the program outside of normal office hours. Finally, the follow-on programs and improvements that the interviews indicated are needed are identified. (MHR)

  12. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  13. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  14. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-07-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ∼83 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ∼10 nm thick BP flake was used. PMID:27283027

  15. Comparative evaluation of passive, active, and passive-active distraction techniques on pain perception during local anesthesia administration in children

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmoniem, Soad A.; Mahmoud, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthesia forms the backbone of pain control techniques and is necessary for a painless dental procedure. Nevertheless, administering a local anesthetic injection is among the most anxiety-provoking procedures to children. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of different distraction techniques (passive, active, and passive-active) on children’s pain perception during local anesthesia administration. A total of 90 children aged four to nine years, requiring inferior alveolar nerve block for primary molar extraction, were included in this study and randomly divided into three groups according to the distraction technique employed during local anesthesia administration. Passive distraction group: the children were instructed to listen to a song on headphones; Active distraction group: the children were instructed to move their legs up and down alternatively; and Passive-active distraction group: this was a combination between both techniques. Pain perception during local anesthesia administration was evaluated by the Sounds, Eyes, and Motor (SEM) scale and Wong Baker FACES® Pain Rating Scale. There was an insignificant difference between the three groups for SEM scale and Wong Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale at P = 0.743 and P = 0.112 respectively. The examined distraction techniques showed comparable results in reducing pain perception during local anesthesia administration. PMID:27222759

  16. Solution-processed amorphous silicon surface passivation layers

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias Sontheimer, Tobias; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Mader, Christoph; Traut, Stephan; Wunnicke, Odo

    2014-09-22

    Amorphous silicon thin films, fabricated by thermal conversion of neopentasilane, were used to passivate crystalline silicon surfaces. The conversion is investigated using X-ray and constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, and minority charge carrier lifetime spectroscopy. Liquid processed amorphous silicon exhibits high Urbach energies from 90 to 120 meV and 200 meV lower optical band gaps than material prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Applying a hydrogen plasma treatment, a minority charge carrier lifetime of 1.37 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 3} enabling an implied open circuit voltage of 724 mV was achieved, demonstrating excellent silicon surface passivation.

  17. Thermodynamic treatment of passive monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, J.C.; Moore, G.

    1985-05-01

    Previous mathematical descriptions of sampling using passive monitors have used Fick's First Law of diffusion and the assumption that the concentration of adsorbate in the vapor phase above the sorbent is zero. This paper shows that by introducing a simplified expression for the equilibrium vapor pressure, behavior more nearly resembling that observed for passive monitors is predicted. The theory can also be applied to the case of loss of sample from a diffusive monitor. Experimental evidence is also provided which demonstrates that the theory adequately describes the observed results.

  18. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  19. Passive millimeter-wave cross polarization imaging and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse P.; Wilson, John P.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Murakowski, Janusz A.; Murakowski, Maciej; Prather, Dennis W.

    2009-05-01

    Passive millimeter-wave (mmW) imaging has many specific defense, security and safety applications, due to the fact that all terrestrial bodies above absolute zero are emissive, and these wavelengths are not scattered by normal obscurants such as haze, fog, smoke, dust, sandstorms, clouds, or fabrics. We have previously demonstrated results from the construction of a 94 GHz passive mmW far-field imaging system utilizing optical upconversion, which imaged in only horizontal polarization. The effective radiometric temperature of an object is a combination of the object's surface and scattered radiometric temperatures. The surface radiometric temperature is a function of the object's emissivity, which is polarization dependent. Imaging with radiometric temperature data from both polarizations will allow a greater identification of the scene being imaged, and allow the recognition of subtle features which were not previously observable. This additional functionality is accomplished through the installation of added equipment and programming on our system, thus allowing the simultaneous data collection of imagery in both polarizations. Herein, we present our experimental procedures, results and passive mmW images obtained by using our far-field imaging system, a brief discussion of the phenomenology observed through the application of these techniques, as well as the preliminary details regarding our work on a 3-D passive mmW simulator capable of true physical polarization dependent effective emissivity and reflectivity rendering, based on the open-source Blender engine.

  20. Safety and Quality Training Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scobby, Pete T.

    2009-01-01

    A portable system of electromechanical and electronic hardware and documentation has been developed as an automated means of instructing technicians in matters of safety and quality. The system enables elimination of most of the administrative tasks associated with traditional training. Customized, performance-based, hands-on training with integral testing is substituted for the traditional instructional approach of passive attendance in class followed by written examination.

  1. Passive maser development at NRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. D.; Frank, A.; Folen, V.

    1981-01-01

    The application of passive hydrogen masers to satellites was investigated. The NRL maser is of compact design suitable for the space environment. It is based on a dielectrically loaded sapphire cavity and uses a computer optimized set of four shields. The servo design is a phase sensitive method which directly measures the phase dispersion of the interrogating signal as it passes through the cavity.

  2. The Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle (PACC) helps observers to be able to look beyond behavior and better understand what is occurring beneath the surface. This article presents a real-life example of a seemingly minor conflict between a teacher and child that elicited an apparent major overreaction by the adult. Also provided is a…

  3. Orion Passive Thermal Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    An viewgraph presentation of Orion's passive thermal control system is shown. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; 3) Module Descriptions and Images; 4) Orion PTCS Overview; 5) Requirements/Interfaces; 6) Design Reference Missions; 7) Natural Environments; 8) Thermal Models; 9) Challenges/Issues; and 10) Testing

  4. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-06-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used.We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Transfer characteristics of BP field effect transistors (BV1-BV4) (Fig. S1 and S2 and Table S1); output characteristics of BP field effect transistors in different directions (Fig. S3

  5. An unfortunate injection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik Sandip; Yarbrough, Chase; Price, Amy; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injection has been used to administer medications for more than a hundred years. However, despite our profession's long experience with intramuscular administration, preventable complications such as injection nerve palsies are still prevalent in developing countries. Injections account for one-fifth of all traumatic nerve injuries. These injuries largely occur due to indiscriminate use of intramuscular injections for treating common illnesses, frequently by unlicensed or undertrained practitioners administering unnecessary treatment to impoverished patients. The sciatic nerve is the most commonly injured, and frequently the resulting muscle weakness and associated disability are irreversible. This case report includes a video of a patient with foot drop 6 weeks after gluteal intramuscular injection. Such injuries can be prevented by proper awareness and training, the implementation of safer injection techniques, and quality assurance methods. PMID:26931130

  6. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  7. The efficacy and safety of intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid in the knee and physical therapy agents to treat Kashin-Beck disease: A prospective interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinglin; Guo, Xiong; He, Xijing; Zang, Quanjin; Wang, Guoyu; Xu, Peng; Wang, Weizhuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether hyaluronic acid (HA) or physical therapy agents (PTA) can improve functional parameters in patients with knee Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). For 2 years, patients (n=55) were treated with HA weekly for 5 weeks, then received 6th and 7th injections on the 3rd and 6th month, respectively, for 7 injections in total. Patients (n=53) were treated with PTA five times a week for 3 weeks every month for 6 months. The patients were evaluated with the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Trial registration, ChiCTR-TRC-12002189 (http://www.chictr.org/). During the study, following treatment interruption, pain increased in the PTA group (from a mean value of 85.7±83.8 mm at month 12 to 145.2±128.8 mm at month 18 and 201.3±150.5 mm at month 24), while it remained stable in the HA group (from a mean value of 80.7±70.6 mm at month 12 to 90.1±95.2 mm at month 18 and 82.6±85.3 mm at month 24), with a statistically significant difference in favor of HA at month 18 (P<0.05) and month 24 (P<0.05). Joint stiffness, physical function and total WOMAC showed the same trend as pain. The global efficacy judgments by the patients and the investigators showed a statistically significant difference in favor of HA at month 18 (P<0.05) and month 24 (P<0.05). In conclusion, although all the patients improved in terms of pain and function, HA was superior to PTA alone for pain relief and lasting effect. PMID:27446269

  8. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  9. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  10. A randomised, double-masked phase III/IV study of the efficacy and safety of Avastin® (Bevacizumab) intravitreal injections compared to standard therapy in subjects with choroidal neovascularisation secondary to age-related macular degeneration: clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Praveen J; Bunce, Catey; Tufail, Adnan

    2008-01-01

    Background The management of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) has been transformed by the introduction of agents delivered by intravitreal injection which block the action of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (anti-VEGF agents). One such agent in widespread use is bevacizumab which was initially developed for use in oncology. Most of the evidence supporting the use of bevacizumab for nAMD has come from interventional case series and this clinical trial was initiated because of the increasing and widespread use of this agent in the treatment of nAMD (an off-label indication) despite a lack of definitive unbiased safety and efficacy data. Methods and design The Avastin® (bevacizumab) for choroidal neovascularisation (ABC) trial is a double-masked randomised controlled trial comparing intravitreal bevacizumab injections to standard therapy in the treatment of nAMD. Patients are randomised to intravitreal bevacizumab or standard therapy available at the time of trial initiation (verteporfin photodynamic therapy, intravitreal pegaptanib or sham treatment). Ranibizumab treatment was not included in the control arm as it had not been licensed for use at the start of recruitment for this trial. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients gaining ≥ 15 letters of visual acuity at 1 year and secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients with stable vision and mean visual acuity change. Discussion The ABC Trial is the first double-masked randomised control trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab in the treatment of nAMD. This trial fully recruited in November 2007 and results should be available in early 2009. Important design issues for this clinical trial include (a) defining the control group (b) use of gain in vision as primary efficacy end-point and (c) use of pro re nata treatment using intravitreal bevacizumab rather than continuous therapy. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN

  11. Passive solar design handbook. Volume 3: Passive solar design analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.; Bascomb, J. D.; Kosiewicz, C. E.; Lazarus, G. S.; McFarland, R. D.; Wray, W. O.

    1982-07-01

    Simple analytical methods concerning the design of passive solar heating systems are presented with an emphasis on the average annual heating energy consumption. Key terminology and methods are reviewed. The solar load ratio (SLR) is defined, and its relationship to analysis methods is reviewed. The annual calculation, or Load Collector Ratio (LCR) method, is outlined. Sensitivity data are discussed. Information is presented on balancing conservation and passive solar strategies in building design. Detailed analysis data are presented for direct gain and sunspace systems, and details of the systems are described. Key design parameters are discussed in terms of their impact on annual heating performance of the building. These are the sensitivity data. The SLR correlations for the respective system types are described. The monthly calculation, or SLR method, based on the SLR correlations, is reviewed. Performance data are given for 9 direct gain systems and 15 water wall and 42 Trombe wall systems.

  12. Passive System Reliability Analysis: A Study on the Isolation Condenser

    SciTech Connect

    Burgazzi, Luciano

    2002-07-15

    This paper deals with the reliability assessment of passive systems that have been developed in recent years by suppliers, industries, utilities, and research organizations, aimed at plant safety improvement and substantial simplification in its implementation. The present study concerns the passive decay heat removal systems that use, for the most part, a condenser immersed in a cooling pool. The focus of the paper is a reliability study of the isolation condenser system foreseen for advanced boiling water reactors (BWRs) for the removal of the excess sensible and core decay heat from the BWR by natural circulation. Furthermore, an approach aimed at the thermal-hydraulic performance assessment (i.e., the natural circulation failure evaluation) from the probability point of view is given. The study is not plant-specific-related but pertains to the conceptual design of the foregoing system.

  13. Rationale and design of the Transendocardial Injection of Autologous Human Cells (bone marrow or mesenchymal) in Chronic Ischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Heart Failure Secondary to Myocardial Infarction (TAC-HFT) trial: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, Barry; Velazquez, Darcy L; Williams, Adam R; McNiece, Ian; Fishman, Joel; Nguyen, Kim; Rouy, Didier; Altman, Peter; Schwarz, Richard; Mendizabal, Adam; Oskouei, Behzad; Byrnes, John; Soto, Victor; Tracy, Melissa; Zambrano, Juan Pablo; Heldman, Alan W; Hare, Joshua M

    2011-03-01

    Although there is tremendous interest in stem cell (SC)-based therapies for cardiomyopathy caused by chronic myocardial infarction, many unanswered questions regarding the best approach remain. The TAC-HFT study is a phase I/II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to address several of these questions, including the optimal cell type, delivery technique, and population. This trial compares autologous mesenchymal SCs (MSCs) and whole bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs). In addition, the study will use a novel helical catheter to deliver cells transendocardially. Although most trials have used intracoronary delivery, the optimal method is unknown and data suggest that the transendocardial approach may have important advantages. Several trials support the benefit of SCs in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICMP), although the sample sizes have been small and the number of trials sparse. After a pilot phase of 8 patients, 60 patients with ICMP (left ventricular ejection fraction 15%-50%) will be randomized to group A (30 patients further randomized to receive MSC injection or placebo in a 2:1 fashion) or group B (30 patients further randomized to BMCs or placebo in a 2:1 fashion). All patients will undergo bone marrow aspiration and transendocardial injection of SCs or placebo. The primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy (determined primarily by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging) of BMCs and MSCs administered transendocardially in patients with ICMP. PMID:21392602

  14. Complications of polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) injection in facial augmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, H L; Cheung, W Y

    2010-01-01

    Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) has been used as an injectable filler for soft tissue augmentation for more than a decade. In recent years, PAAG has been advocated as a safe soft tissue filler for facial augmentation. However, the complications associated with PAAG injection in facial augmentation have not been widely covered in the literature. We present two cases of severe complications associated with PAAG injection in facial augmentation, including bony erosion and facial ulcer. Further studies are required to support the safety of PAAG in facial injection. PMID:19540824

  15. Development of Verbal Passive in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perovic, Alexandra; Wexler, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To experimentally investigate knowledge of passives of actional ("hold") and psychological ("love") verbs in children with Williams syndrome (WS). Passives are usually reported to be in line with mental age in WS. However, studies usually focus on passives of actional verbs only. Method: Twenty-six children with WS, ages 6-16, and 3…

  16. User evaluation study of passive solar residences

    SciTech Connect

    Towle, S.

    1980-03-01

    Speculation exists regarding the readiness of various passive techniques for commercialization and the market potential for residential applications. This paper discusses the preliminary findings of a market assessment study designed to document user experiences with passive solar energy. Owners and builders of passive solar homes were interviewed and asked to comment on personal experiences with their homes.

  17. The Development of the Full Passive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Dianne

    Spontaneous full passives and related constructions from 234 children aged 2;0 to 13;11 and elicited passives from 262 college students were analyzed. Full passives were classified as reversible (The dog was chased by the girl), instrumental non-reversible (The lamp was broken by [or with] the ball), or agentive non-reversible (The lamp was broken…

  18. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  19. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  20. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Duracillin A-S ® ... Pfizerpen A-S® ... injection should not be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease) or early in the treatment ... serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by ...

  1. Tolerability of hypertonic injectables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei

    2015-07-25

    Injectable drug products are ideally developed as isotonic solutions. Often, hypertonic injectables may have to be marketed for a variety of reasons such as product solubilization and stabilization. A key concern during product formulation development is the local and systemic tolerability of hypertonic products upon injection. This report reviews and discusses the tolerability in terms of local discomfort, irritation, sensation of heat and pain, along with other observed side effects of hypertonicity in both in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal and human models. These side effects clearly depend on the degree of hypertonicity. The sensation of pain among different injection routes seems to follow this order: intramuscular>subcutaneous>intravenous or intravascular. It is recommended that the upper osmolality limit should be generally controlled under 600 mOsm/kg for drug products intended for intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. For drug products intended for intravenous or intravascular injection, the recommended upper limit should be generally controlled under 1,000 mOsm/kg for small-volume injections (≤ 100 mL) and 500 mOsm/kg for large-volume injections (>100mL). Several options are available for minimization of hypertonicity-induced pain upon product administration. PMID:26027488

  2. Tevatron reverse injection

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-25

    In the new injection scenario antiprotons are injected onto a helical orbit in the Tevatron in order to avoid the detrimental effects of the beam-beam interaction at 150 GeV. The new scenario required changes in the tuning procedure. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning, therefore the antiproton injection line has to be tuned with protons by reverse injecting them from the Tevatron into the Main Pang (MR). Previously, the reverse injection was performed in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS dock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus marking it possible to inject 6 proton batches and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR.

  3. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and gauge…

  4. Spin injection into semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreich, M.; Hübner, J.; Hägele, D.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Ashenford, D. E.; Lunn, B.

    1999-03-01

    The injection of spin-polarized electrons is presently one of the major challenges in semiconductor spin electronics. We propose and demonstrate a most efficient spin injection using diluted magnetic semiconductors as spin aligners. Time-resolved photoluminescence with a Cd0.98Mn0.02Te/CdTe structure proves the feasibility of the spin-alignment mechanism.

  5. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave–matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices PMID:26414528

  6. New England style passive solar

    SciTech Connect

    Kriescher, P.

    2000-06-01

    There are homeowners throughout New England who planned for and built homes that allow them to avoid the sting of winter's high heating bills. These climate-responsive homes rely on passive solar heating, cooling and lighting. An example of such a climate-responsive/passive solar house is the home that Arthur and Terry Becker build on 6 beautiful acres (2.4 hectares) of rolling farm and woodland southeast of Andover, Connecticut, in 1981. They worked very closely with their designer, Al Eggan of K.T. Lear and Associates, to ensure that they would never have to pay for home heating oil, and that they would enjoy a level of year-round comfort that they had not experienced in conventionally built homes.

  7. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-09-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave-matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices

  8. Simulation of selective passive compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Spikings, C.R.; Putley, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Compulsators have attracted a great deal of interest over the last few years as a way of providing repetitive high current millisecond pulses. The compulsator stores energy in a rotational form and works on a similar principle to a conventional alternator except that its internal impedance is reduced through compensating currents allowing greater currents to be drawn. This paper presents the theory behind selective passive compensation and presents some results from the computer simulation of a railgun powered by a selective passive compulsator. These results show that compulsator can be configured to produce flat topped current pulses into a railgun load. A test compulsator with active compensation has previously been designed and built by Culham Laboratory.

  9. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  10. Effect of the length of ligands passivating quantum dots on the electrooptical characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkin, N. S.; Vashchenko, A. A. Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Tananaev, P. N.

    2015-07-15

    The electrooptical characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes with quantum dots passivated with organic ligands of different lengths as emitting centers are investigated. It is established that the thickness of the ligand coating covering the quantum dots has little effect on the Förster energy transfer in the diodes, but significantly affects the direct injection of charge carriers into the quantum-dot layer. It is shown that the thickness of the passivation coating covering the quantum dots in a close-packed nanoparticle layer is deter- mined both by the length of passivating ligands and the degree of quantum-dot coverage with ligands.

  11. Neglect mars passive solar progress

    SciTech Connect

    Holzman, D.

    1984-02-01

    The development of solar technology in the United States was reviewed at the annual Passive Solar Update Conference held in Washington D.C. in Sept. 1983. Though it lacked the technological breakthroughs of some past conferences, this conference was notable because the mood was definitely upbeat. The promise of many solar approaches is as great as ever and they now seem to be reliazable.

  12. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  13. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  14. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety.

  15. Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Safety policies, procedures, and related information are presented in this manual to assist school personnel in a continuing program of accident prevention. Chapter 1 discusses safety education and accident prevention in general. Chapter 2 covers traffic regulations relating to school safety patrols, school bus transportation, bicycles, and…

  16. An update on passive correctors for the SSC dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    The concept of correction of the magnetization sextupole became a topic of discussion as soon as it was realized that superconductor magnetization could have a serious effect on the SSC beam during injection. Several methods of correction were proposed. These included (1) correction with active bore tube windings like those on the HERA machine which correct out magnetization sextupole and the sextupole due to iron saturation, (2) correction with persistent sextupole windings mounted on the bore tube (3) correction using passive superconductor (4) correction using ferromagnetic material, and (5) correction using oriented magnetized materials. This report deals with the use of passive superconductor to correct the magnetization sextupole. Two basic methods are explored in this report: (1) One can correct the magnetization sextupole by changing the diameter of the superconductor filaments in one or more blocks of the SSC dipole. (2) One can correct the magnetization sextupole and decapole by mounting passive superconducting wires on the inside of the SSC dipole coil bore. In addition, an assessment of the contribution of each conductor in the dipole to the magnetization sextupole and decapole is shown. 38 refs, 25 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Characterization of the passive state on zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Ismail, K.M.; Sikora, E.

    1998-09-01

    Despite intensive investigations, the nature of the passive state is one of the most complex and unresolved subjects in the electrochemistry of zinc in alkaline solutions. In this paper, the authors explore the electrochemistry of the passive state on zinc in 0.1 M sodium borate/1 M sodium hydroxide solution of pH 10.5. During the course of passivation, several characteristic features in the anodic region are observed, including a wide passive range extending over >2 V and a secondary passivation phenomenon that occurs at high anodic potentials. the steady-state current in the passive state is found to be independent of the applied voltage, which is consistent with the barrier layer being an interstitial zinc conductor or an oxygen vacancy conductor (or both) with interstitial zinc being the most likely defect. This model is also consistent with the well-known n-type character of the passive film on zinc.

  18. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  19. [Computer-aided implantology: Contribution of the Robodent(®) passive robotic system.

    PubMed

    Armand, S; Legac, O; Galibourg, A

    2013-08-01

    The use of the Robodent(®) passive robotic system improves the accuracy of implant placement and thus allows extending the field of indications for flapless surgical technique. Surgery can be performed with a greater operative safety and peroperative modification of the surgical protocol is possible. PMID:23916311

  20. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  1. SAFETY AT FLUOR HANFORD (B) CASE STUDY - PREPARED BY THE THUNDERBIRD SCHOOL OF GLOBAL MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    ARNOLD LD

    2009-09-25

    One year into the Hanford contract, Fluor had learned a number of hard lessons very quickly. Although the Hanford remediation contract was in many ways a new endeavor for Fluor and a different kind of contract, the organization moved quickly to increase communication with all employees, attack head-on what it considered unsafe and inappropriate safety practices, and strongly inject its own corporate cultural beliefs into the Hanford organization. It wasn't easy, and it didn't happen overnight. From the beginning, Fluor established processes and programs to drive down injury rates. For example, whereas the previous contractor's approach to injuries had been passive, Fluor took a much more aggressive approach to worker injuries. The previous contractor had established a practice of sending injured workers home with the basic directive 'to come back when you are well'. Instead of using outsourced medical assessment, Fluor internalized it and evaluated all claims aggressively. Legitimate claims were quickly settled, and management moved to identify 'repeat offenders' when it came to reportable safety incidents. In the first year of Fluor's management, reportable injuries dropped from 5.37 to 2.99 per 200,000 man-hours. Despite the drop in injury rates, the safety record at Fluor Hanford was not at a level that met either Fluor or the Department of Energy's expectations. Earlier in 1997, Fluor Hanford's proposed safety program was rejected by the DOE. The DOE was not satisfied with Fluor Hanford's proposal for various reasons, including insufficient worker involvement and a lack of accountability. With the need for change clearly established, Fluor Hanford management embarked on a decade-long mission to change the safety culture and improve safety performance. This case describes the key changes and their impact on Fluor Hanford.

  2. Penicillin G Benzathine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine injection is in a class of antibiotics called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  3. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G procaine injection should not be used ... of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  4. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy-guided botulinum toxin Treatment; ...

  5. Giving an insulin injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... One Type of Insulin Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ... syringe before injecting it. Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin ...

  6. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. If you experience a severe reaction, ...

  7. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... on dialysis. Ferric carboxymaltose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... rapid, weak pulse; chest pain; or loss of consciousness. If you experience a severe reaction, your doctor ...

  8. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's body) ... wheezing difficulty breathing or swallowing hoarseness lack of energy dizziness fainting Epoetin alfa injection may cause other ...

  9. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. It is usually given once every 2 ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for about 30 minutes afterwards. A doctor ...

  10. Quinupristin and Dalfopristin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a class of medications called streptogramin antibiotics. They work by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as quinupristin and dalfopristin injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking ...

  11. Amphotericin B Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called antifungals. It works by slowing the growth of fungi ... amikacin, gentamicin, or tobramycin (Bethkis, Kitabis Pak, Tobi); antifungals such as clotrimazole, fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Onmel, Sporanox), ...

  12. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's ... injection is used to decrease the risk that blood transfusions will be required due to surgery, it is ...

  13. Darbepoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may tell you not to use darbepoetin alfa injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  14. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in people with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  15. Insulin Lispro Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to inject subcutaneously ( ... if it is colored, cloudy, or contains solid particles. If you are using insulin lispro suspension, the ...

  16. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  17. Ceftazidime and Avibactam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... may receive ceftazidime and avibactam injection in a hospital or you may administer the medication at home. ... doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with ...

  18. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure you are not having a serious reaction to the medication. You will be given other medications 30 minutes before your infusion to prevent reactions to sipuleucel-T injection. Tell your doctor or ...

  19. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  20. AbobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also used to temporarily smooth frown lines (wrinkles between the eyebrows). AbobotulinumtoxinA injection is in a ... to treat excessive sweating, many types of facial wrinkles, anal fissures, and to prevent headaches in patients ...