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Sample records for passive treatment analog

  1. Bedrock refractive-flow cells: A passive treatment analog to funnel-and-gate

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, V.; Edwards, D.

    1997-12-31

    Funnel-and-gate technology provides a mechanism to passively treat groundwater contaminant plumes, but depends on placement of a sufficient barrier ({open_quotes}funnel{close_quotes}) in the plume flow path to channel the plume to a pass-through treatment zone ({open_quotes}gate{close_quotes}). Conventional barrier technologies limit funnel-and-gate deployment to unconsolidated overburden applications. A method has been developed which allows similar passive treatment to be applied to bedrock plumes. Rather than use barriers as the funnel, the method uses engineered bedrock zones, installed via precision blasting or other means, to refract groundwater flow along a preferred path to treatment (gate). The method requires orienting the refractive cell based on the Tangent Law and extending refractive cell limbs down gradient of the gate to disperse head and control flow. A typical Refractive-Flow cell may be{open_quotes}Y{close_quotes}shaped, with each limb 3-10 ft [1-3 m] wide and several tens to a few hundred feet [10 - 100 m] in length. Treatment takes place at the center of the X. MODFLOW modeling has been used to successfully simulate desired flow. Engineered blasting has been used at full scale application to create bedrock rubble zones for active collection/flow control for several years. The method provides a previously unavailable method to passively treat contaminated groundwater in bedrock at low cost.

  2. Thermodynamic treatment of passive monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, J.C.; Moore, G.

    1985-05-01

    Previous mathematical descriptions of sampling using passive monitors have used Fick's First Law of diffusion and the assumption that the concentration of adsorbate in the vapor phase above the sorbent is zero. This paper shows that by introducing a simplified expression for the equilibrium vapor pressure, behavior more nearly resembling that observed for passive monitors is predicted. The theory can also be applied to the case of loss of sample from a diffusive monitor. Experimental evidence is also provided which demonstrates that the theory adequately describes the observed results.

  3. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  4. Recombinant DNA technology in the treatment of diabetes: insulin analogs.

    PubMed

    Vajo, Z; Fawcett, J; Duckworth, W C

    2001-10-01

    After more than half a century of treating diabetics with animal insulins, recombinant DNA technologies and advanced protein chemistry made human insulin preparations available in the early 1980s. As the next step, over the last decade, insulin analogs were constructed by changing the structure of the native protein with the goal of improving the therapeutic properties of it, because the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rapid-, intermediate-, and long-acting preparations of human insulin make it almost impossible to achieve sustained normoglycemia. The first clinically available insulin analog, lispro, confirmed the hopes by showing that improved glycemic control can be achieved without an increase in hypoglycemic events. Two new insulin analogs, insulin glargine and insulin aspart, have recently been approved for clinical use in the United States, and several other analogs are being intensively tested. Thus, it appears that a rapid acceleration of basic and clinical research in this arena will be seen, which will have direct significance to both patients and their physicians. The introduction of new short-acting analogs and the development of the first truly long-acting analogs and the development of analogs with increased stability, less variability, and perhaps selective action, will help to develop more individualized treatment strategies targeted to specific patient characteristics and to achieve further improvements in glycemic control. Data on the currently available and tested analogs, as well as data on those currently being developed, are reviewed. PMID:11588149

  5. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2006-12-12

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  6. Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater

    DOEpatents

    Phifer, Mark A.; Sappington, Frank C.; Millings, Margaret R.; Turick, Charles E.; McKinsey, Pamela C.

    2007-11-06

    A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

  7. Treatment of articular fractures with continuous passive motion.

    PubMed

    Onderko, Laura Lynn; Rehman, Saqib

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a review of the basic science and current research on the use of continuous passive motion therapy after surgery for an intra-articular fracture. This information is useful for surgeons in the postoperative management of intra-articular fractures in determining the best course of treatment to reduce complications and facilitate quicker recovery. PMID:23827837

  8. Mine Waste Technology Program. Passive Treatment for Reducing Metal Loading

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 48, Passive Treatment Technology Evaluation for Reducing Metal Loading, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Departmen...

  9. Passive treatment technology cleans up colorado mining waste

    SciTech Connect

    Morea, S.; Olsen, R. ); Wildeman, T. )

    1990-12-01

    This article describes the performance of a module designed to treat acid mine drainage from an mining tunnel. The site is one of the many abandoned mineral mines in Colorado. At optimum conditions passive treatment removed up to 98% of the zinc, 99% of the copper, 94% of the lead, and 86% of the iron in the mine drainage. It also increased pH from 3.0 to a value greater than 6.5. This treatment meets the need for a low cost operating and maintenance system. Because of the success of the pilot plant, the project team has obtained a Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program grant from the EPA to continue operating the pilot plant for two additional years and to prepare the first design manual on passive treatment technology.

  10. Passive Porous Treatment for Reducing Flap Side-Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2008-01-01

    A passive porous treatment has been proposed as a means of suppressing noise generated by the airflow around the side edges of partial-span flaps on airplane wings when the flaps are extended in a high-lift configuration. The treatment proposed here does not incur any aerodynamic penalties and could easily be retrofit to existing airplanes. The treatment could also be applied to reduce noise generated by turbomachinery, including wind turbines. Innovative aspects of the proposed treatment include a minimum treatment area and physics-based procedure for treatment design. The efficacy of the treatment was confirmed during wind-tunnel experiments at NASA Ames, wherein the porous treatment was applied to a minute surface area in the vicinity of a flap edge on a 26-percent model of Boeing 777-200 wing.

  11. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Rules Relating to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses...

  13. 26 CFR 1.1398-1 - Treatment of passive activity losses and passive activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... “ELECTION PURSUANT TO § 1.1398-1” must be placed prominently on the first page of each of the debtor's... activity credits in individuals' title 11 cases. 1.1398-1 Section 1.1398-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1398-1 Treatment of passive activity losses and passive...

  14. Application of Passive Porous Treatment to Slat Trailing Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2003-01-01

    Porous trailing-edge treatment is investigated as a passive means for slat noise reduction by using time-accurate simulations based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. For the model scale high-lift configuration used during previous experiments in the Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, application of the proposed treatment over a minute fraction of the slat surface area is shown to mitigate the noise impact of the trailing edge, with no measurable aerodynamic penalty. Assessment of the pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of the treated edge indicates a potential noise reduction in excess of 20 dB. The primary mechanism underlying this reduction is related to the reduced strength of Strouhal shedding from the finite thickness trailing edge. A secondary effect of the treatment involves an upward shift in the Strouhal-shedding frequency to a frequency band of reduced auditory sensitivity in a full-scale application.

  15. Passive mine drainage treatment: an effective low-cost alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Two prototype Passive Mine Drainage Treatment Systems have been designed and constructed in Colorado. These projects have addressed acid mine drainage from inactive coal mines. Metal removal for both systems is accomplished using simulated peat bogs composed of sphagnum moss and hypnum moss retained by loose rock check dams. Acid neutralization is accomplished using crushed limestone filled channels. Neutralization and aeration are enhanced with drop structures and waterfalls placed in the drainage channel. Preliminary water quality results show dramatic treatment effects with the PMDT system. This investigation presents cost data for design and construction of the two PMDT systems. Cost projections for periodic maintenance requirements are provided along with a suggested method for financing maintenance costs. Performance data for the first system installed are presented. 14 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  16. Passive flow regulators for drug delivery and hydrocephalus treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappel, E.; Dumont-Fillon, D.; Mefti, S.

    2014-03-01

    Passive flow regulators are usually intended to deliver or drain a fluid at a constant rate independently from pressure variations. New designs of passive flow regulators made of a stack of a silicon membrane anodically bonded to a Pyrex substrate are proposed. A first design has been built for the derivation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) towards peritoneum for hydrocephalus treatment. The device allows draining CSF at the patient production rate independently from postural changes. The flow rate is regulated at 20 ml/h in the range 10 to 40 mbar. Specific features to adjust in vivo the nominal flow rate are shown. A second design including high pressure shut-off feature has been made. The intended use is drug delivery with pressurized reservoir of typically 100 to 300 mbar. In both cases, the membrane comprises several holes facing pillars in the Pyrex substrate. These pillars are machined in a cavity which ensures a gap between the membrane and the pillars at rest. The fluid in the pressurized reservoir is directly in contact with the top surface of the membrane, inducing its deflection towards Pyrex substrate and closing progressively the fluidic pathway through each hole of the membrane. Since the membrane deflection is highly non-linear, FEM simulations have been performed to determine both radial position and diameter of the membrane holes that ensure a constant flow rate for a given range of pressure.

  17. Treatment of passively transferred experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis using papain

    PubMed Central

    Poulas, K; Tsouloufis, T; Tzartos, S J

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-mediated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) loss at the neuromuscular junction, the main cause of the symptoms of myasthenia gravis, is induced by bivalent or multivalent antibodies. Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) can be induced very efficiently in rats by administration of intact MoAbs directed against the main immunogenic region (MIR) of the AChR, but not by their monovalent Fab fragments. We tested whether papain, which has been used therapeutically in autoimmune and other diseases, is capable of preventing EAMG by in vivo cleavage of the circulating anti-AChR antibodies into Fab fragments. EAMG was induced in 4-week-old female Lewis rats by i.p. injection of anti-MIR mAb35. A total of 0·75 mg of papain was given as one or three injections 3–7 h after MoAb injection. The mAb35 + papain-treated animals developed mild weakness during the first 30 h and subsequently recovered, while all animals that received only mAb35 developed severe myasthenic symptoms and died within 24–30 h. Animals treated only with papain showed no apparent side effects for up to 2 months. Serum anti-AChR levels in mAb35 + papain-treated rats decreased within a few hours, whereas in non-papain-treated rats they remained high for at least 30 h. Muscle AChR in mAb35 + papain-treated animals was partially protected from antibody-mediated degradation. These results show that treatment of rats with papain can prevent passively transferred EAMG without any apparent harm to the animals, and suggest a potential therapeutic use for proteolytic enzymes in myasthenia gravis. PMID:10792389

  18. Two-year treatment patterns and costs in glaucoma patients initiating treatment with prostaglandin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Schmier, Jordana K; Lau, Edmund C; Covert, David W

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine treatment patterns and costs over a two-year period among new initiators of topical prostaglandin analogs in a managed care population by retrospective cohort analysis of an insurance claims database. Methods Patients who initiated therapy with a prostaglandin analog between September 2006 and March 2007 were identified. The use of monotherapy and adjunctive therapies were compared by index prostaglandin. Days to initiation of adjunctive therapy and rates of glaucoma surgical procedures were also calculated. Medical costs (antiglaucoma medications and ophthalmic visits) over the two-year period were estimated. Results The analysis identified 5018 patients with at least one prostaglandin analog prescription (bimatoprost, n = 747; latanoprost, n = 1651; benzalkonium chloride (BAK)-free travoprost, n = 203). The majority (51%–54%) had repeat prescriptions. Among those with repeat prescriptions, 52% were female (not significant) and mean age was 64 years (P < 0.01). Rates of adjunctive therapy use varied across groups (bimatoprost 51%, latanoprost 37%, and BAK- free travoprost 35%, P < 0.0001). Median and mean days to initiation of adjunctive therapy were 83 and 140 for bimatoprost, 101 and 181 for latanoprost, and 113 and 221 for BAK- free travoprost. Two-year medical costs were $3147, $2843, and $2557 for patients initiating treatment with bimatoprost, latanoprost, and BAK-free travoprost, respectively. Use of glaucoma surgical procedures across the treatment groups was similar over the two-year period. Conclusions Over a two-year period, the rate and time to initiation of adjunctive therapy use, as well as medical costs, varied between index prostaglandins. However, the rate of glaucoma surgical interventions did not vary significantly across index medications. PMID:20957061

  19. [Diagnosis and treatment strategy of diseases due to passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Michiyuki

    2013-03-01

    Passive smoking causes a wide range of diseases from membrane irritation such as sore throat or nasal symptom, to fatal diseases such as lung cancer or heart attack. Extensive epidemiological studies have revealed that passive smoking at home or at workplaces raises the all cause mortality of nonsmoking family members by 14-75%. Moreover, many people in Japan are suffered from chemical hypersensitivity due to chronic persistent passive smoking at workplaces. Most critical diagnostic clue of passive smoking caused disease is the temporal relationship of tobacco smoke exposure and disease onset. One hundred percent smoke free workplace or environment is the only effective measure for curing and preventing illnesses caused by passive smoke exposure. PMID:23631237

  20. A novel passive electric network analog to Kirchhoff-Love plate designed to efficiently damp forced vibrations by distributed piezoelectric tranducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandroni, Silvio; Andreaus, Ugo; dell'lsola, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    Recently the concept of Piezo-Electro-Mechanical (PEM) structural member has been developed. Given a structural member, a set of piezoelectric actuators if uniformly distributed on it and electrically interconnected by one of its analog circuits. In this way it is obtained a high-performances piezoelectric structural-modification aiming to multimodal mechanical vibrations control. In the present paper it is addressed the problem of synthesizing an electrically dissipative PEM Kirchhoff-Love (K-L) plate by using completely passive electric networks.

  1. Integrated Passive Biological Treatment System/ Mine Waste Technology Program Report #16

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 16, Integrated, Passive Biological Treatment System, funded by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the United States Depar...

  2. 77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The current SRP does not contain guidance on the proposed RTNSS for Passive Advance Light Water Reactors. DATES:...

  3. Correlation Between Analog Noise Measurements and the Expected Bit Error Rate of a Digital Signal Propagating Through Passive Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining the bit error rate (BER) of a digital circuit from the measurement of the analog S-parameters of the circuit has been developed. The method is based on the measurement of the noise and the standard deviation of the noise in the S-parameters. Once the standard deviation and the mean of the S-parameters are known, the BER of the circuit can be calculated using the normal Gaussian function.

  4. Hydrogen plasma treatments for passivation of amorphous-crystalline silicon-heterojunctions on surfaces promoting epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mews, Mathias; Mingirulli, Nicola; Korte, Lars; Schulze, Tim F.

    2013-03-25

    The impact of post-deposition hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) on passivation in amorphous/crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interfaces is investigated. Combining low temperature a-Si:H deposition and successive HPT, a high minority carrier lifetime >8 ms is achieved on c-Si <100>, which is otherwise prone to epitaxial growth and thus inferior passivation. It is shown that the passivation improvement stems from diffusion of hydrogen atoms to the heterointerface and subsequent dangling bond passivation. Concomitantly, the a-Si:H hydrogen density increases, leading to band gap widening and void formation, while the film disorder is not increased. Thus, HPT allows for a-Si:H band gap and a-Si:H/c-Si band offset engineering.

  5. Passive correction of quantum logical errors in a driven, dissipative system: A blueprint for an analog quantum code fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapit, Eliot; Chalker, John T.; Simon, Steven H.

    2015-06-01

    A physical realization of self-correcting quantum code would be profoundly useful for constructing a quantum computer. In this theoretical work, we provide a partial solution to major challenges preventing self-correcting quantum code from being engineered in realistic devices. We consider a variant of Kitaev's toric code coupled to propagating bosons, which induce a ranged interaction between anyonic defects. By coupling the primary quantum system to an engineered dissipation source through resonant energy transfer, we demonstrate a "rate barrier" which leads to a potentially enormous increase in the system's quantum-state lifetime through purely passive quantum error correction, even when coupled to an infinite-temperature bath. While our mechanism is not scalable to infinitely large systems, the maximum effective size can be very large, and it is fully compatible with active error-correction schemes. Our model uses only on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions and could be implemented in superconducting qubits. We sketch one such implementation at the end of this work.

  6. Standardized treatment planning methodology for passively scattered proton craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As the number of proton therapy centers increases, so does the need for studies which compare proton treatments between institutions and with photon therapy. However, results of such studies are highly dependent on target volume definition and treatment planning techniques. Thus, standardized methods of treatment planning are needed, particularly for proton treatment planning, in which special consideration is paid to the depth and sharp distal fall-off of the proton distribution. This study presents and evaluates a standardized method of proton treatment planning for craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Methods We applied our institution’s planning methodology for proton CSI, at the time of the study, to an anatomically diverse population of 18 pediatric patients. We evaluated our dosimetric results for the population as a whole and for the two subgroups having two different age-specific target volumes using the minimum, maximum, and mean dose values in 10 organs (i.e., the spinal cord, brain, eyes, lenses, esophagus, lungs, kidneys, thyroid, heart, and liver). We also report isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH) for 2 representative patients. Additionally we report population-averaged DVHs for various organs. Results The planning methodology here describes various techniques used to achieve normal tissue sparing. In particular, we found pronounced dose reductions in three radiosensitive organs (i.e., eyes, esophagus, and thyroid) which were identified for optimization. Mean doses to the thyroid, eyes, and esophagus were 0.2%, 69% and 0.2%, respectively, of the prescribed dose. In four organs not specifically identified for optimization (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, and heart) we found that organs lateral to the treatment field (lungs and kidneys) received relatively low mean doses (less than 8% of the prescribed dose), whereas the heart and liver, organs distal to the treatment field, received less than 1% of the prescribed dose

  7. An electromagnetic finite difference time domain analog treatment of small signal acoustic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, K.; Steich, D.; Lewis, K.; Landrum, C.; Barth, M.

    1994-03-01

    Hyperbolic partial differential equations encompass an extremely important set of physical phenomena including electromagnetics and acoustics. Small amplitude acoustic interactions behave much the same as electromagnetic interactions for longitudinal acoustic waves because of the similar nature of the governing hyperbolic equations. Differences appear when transverse acoustic waves are considered; nonetheless, the strong analogy between the acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena prompted the development of a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) acoustic analog to the existing electromagnetic FDTD technique. The advantages of an acoustic FDTD (AFDTD) code are as follows: (1) boundary condition-free treatment of the acoustic scatterer--only the intrinsic properties of the scatterer's material are needed, no shell treatment or other set of special equations describing the macroscopic behavior of a sheet of material or a junction, etc. are required; this allows completely general geometries and materials in the model. (2) Advanced outer radiation boundary condition analogs--in the electromagnetics arena, highly absorbing outer radiation boundary conditions were developed that can be applied with little modification to the acoustics arena with equal success. (3) A suite of preexisting capabilities related to electromagnetic modeling--this includes automated model generation and interaction visualization as its most important components and is best exemplified by the capabilities of the LLNL generated TSAR electromagnetic FDTD code.

  8. Treatment with insulin analog X10 and IGF-1 increases growth of colon cancer allografts.

    PubMed

    Hvid, Henning; Blouin, Marie-José; Birman, Elena; Damgaard, Jesper; Poulsen, Fritz; Fels, Johannes Josef; Fledelius, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Pollak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk for development of certain forms of cancer, including colon cancer. The publication of highly controversial epidemiological studies in 2009 raised the possibility that use of the insulin analog glargine increases this risk further. However, it is not clear how mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin analogs measured in vitro correlate with tumor growth-promoting effects in vivo. The aim of this study was to examine possible growth-promoting effects of native human insulin, insulin X10 and IGF-1, which are considered positive controls in vitro, in a short-term animal model of an obesity- and diabetes-relevant cancer. We characterized insulin and IGF-1 receptor expression and the response to treatment with insulin, X10 and IGF-1 in the murine colon cancer cell line (MC38 cells) in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we examined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and monitored growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity treated with human insulin, X10 and IGF-1. Treatment with X10 and IGF-1 significantly increased growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity and we can therefore conclude that supra-pharmacological doses of the insulin analog X10, which is super-mitogenic in vitro and increased the incidence of mammary tumors in female rats in a 12-month toxicity study, also increase growth of tumor allografts in a short-term animal model. PMID:24260289

  9. DEMONSTRATION OF AN INTEGRATED, PASSIVE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT PROCESS FOR AMD

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative, cost-effective, biological treatment process has been designed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. to treat acid mine drainage (AMD). A pilot-scale demonstration is being conducted under the Mine Waste Technology Program using water flowing from an abandoned mine ...

  10. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  11. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  12. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24...) Antibody functionality. Prior to licensure, the prospective licensee shall perform a neutralization...

  13. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than 24... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. 113.499 Section 113.499 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  14. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE PASSIVE TREATMENT APPROACH FOR MINING INFLUENCE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-stage passive treatment approach was assessed at bench-scale using two Colorado Mining Influenced Waters (MIWs). The first-stage was a limestone drain with the purpose of removing iron and aluminum and mitigating the potential effects of mineral acidity. The second stage w...

  15. 9 CFR 113.499 - Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.499 Products for treatment of failure of passive transfer. A... of IgG per dose and shall be recommended for use only in neonates of the same species as that of antibody origin. A product for oral administration shall not be recommended for use in animals more than...

  16. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD. PMID:26247412

  17. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... solicitation for public comment published in the Federal Register on October 12, 2012 (77 FR 62270), on the... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The NRC seeks...

  18. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Treatment of shareholders of certain passive... for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1291-0 Treatment of shareholders of certain passive....1291-1, 1.1291-9, and 1.1291-10. § 1.1291-1Taxation of U.S. persons that are shareholders of PFICs...

  19. Passive hyperimmune therapy: a viable treatment option for the patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raven, N C

    1994-01-01

    New drugs and therapies are continually emerging in an effort to delay the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive status to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). One such treatment is passive hyperimmune therapy (PHT), which was first researched and subsequently published in 1988. Passive hyperimmune therapy involves plasmapheresis of an asymptomatic HIV-positive donor with high p24 antibodies, no detectable p24 antigen, and a helper-inducer T-cell count greater than 400. The plasma is then pooled, sterilized, and administered to symptomatic HIV-positive patients as a monthly intravenous infusion in an effort to provide passive immunotherapy. In this article, an overview of PHT is provided, including benefits, adverse reactions, and other similar therapies available, so that the nurse who cares for HIV-positive patients can continue to be a significant source of information to them. PMID:7965365

  20. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage with high metal concentrations using dispersed alkaline substrate.

    PubMed

    Rötting, Tobias S; Thomas, Robert C; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Passive treatment systems based on the dissolution of coarse calcite grains are widely used to remediate acid mine drainage (AMD). Unfortunately, they tolerate only low metal concentrations or acidity loads, because they are prone to passivation (loss of reactivity due to coating) and/or clogging (loss of permeability) by precipitates. To overcome these problems, a dispersed alkaline substrate (DAS) composed of a fine-grained alkaline reagent (calcite sand) mixed with a coarse inert matrix (wood chips) was developed. The small grains provide a large reactive surface and dissolve almost completely before the growing layer of precipitates passivates the substrate, whereas the dispersion of nuclei for precipitation on the inert surfaces retards clogging. Chemical and hydraulic performance of DAS was investigated in two laboratory columns fed at different flow rates with natural AMD of pH 2.3 to 3.5 and inflow net acidity 1350 to 2300 mg/L as CaCO(3). The DAS columns removed 900 to 1600 mg/L net acidity, 3 to 4.5 times more than conventional passive treatment systems. Regardless of the flow rate employed, Al, Fe(III), Cu, and Pb were virtually eliminated. Minor Zn, Ni, and Cd were removed at low flow rates. High acidity removal is possible because these metals accumulate intentionally in DAS, and their precipitation promotes further calcite dissolution. During 15 mo, DAS operated without clogging at 120 g acidity/m(2).d, four times the loading rate recommended for conventional passive systems; DAS may therefore be capable of treating AMD at sites where influent chemistry precludes the use of other passive systems. PMID:18689735

  1. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Cendrero-Mateo, M Pilar; Moran, M Susan; Papuga, Shirley A; Thorp, K R; Alonso, L; Moreno, J; Ponce-Campos, G; Rascher, U; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  2. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  3. An application of baseflow isolation and passive wetland treatment to watershed restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, K.L.; Rightnour, T.A.; Zug, F.R. III

    1999-07-01

    The project site, located in West Virginia, is a reclaimed wood waste disposal area situated on Pennsylvanian coal strata. Following reclamation of the disposal area, flow in the adjacent stream was observed to have elevated iron and manganese concentrations. The source of the groundwater baseflow entering this portion of the stream appeared to be hydrologically related to the landfill by its close proximity. The source of the metals contamination was not determined, but may be related to percolation from the disposal area into the underlying coal strata. The observable contamination was typical of alkaline coal mine drainage and met the criteria for passive wetland treatment. However, the contaminated baseflow entered the stream along the sides and bottom of the channel at several locations over a 100-meter section and could not be collected for accurate characterization of pollutant loading. Treatment of the entire contaminated stream flow to comply with NPDES permit requirements would have been prohibitively expensive, and insufficient space was available for a treatment facility of adequate size within the narrow stream valley. Given these constraints, it was decided to isolate the contaminated baseflow from the surface flow by construction of a lined stream relocation on top of a gravity-drained collection zone in the existing stream channel. The collection zone consists of a bed of coarse aggregate with a central collection pipe discharging to a submerged outlet, which prevents air from entering the collection zone and minimizes the formation of iron precipitates. The relocated stream channel was formed in place on top of the collection zone with compacted earth, and lined with one layer of polypropylene geomembrane covered by two layers of geotextile. Gabion baskets were then placed on top of the liner for stream stabilization and shaping of the final channel. Accurate discharge characterization at the end of the collection pipe allowed the design of a

  4. Enhanced Conversion Efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells via Electrochemical Passivation Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Wei; Thomas, Stuart R; Chen, Chia-Wei; Wang, Yi-Chung; Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Yen, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chi; Wang, Zhiming M; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2016-03-30

    Defect control in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) materials, no matter what the defect type or density, is a significant issue, correlating directly to PV performance. These defects act as recombination centers and can be briefly categorized into interface recombination and Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination, both of which can lead to reduced PV performance. Here, we introduce an electrochemical passivation treatment for CIGS films that can lower the oxygen concentration at the CIGS surface as observed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis. Temperature-dependent J-V characteristics of CIGS solar cells reveal that interface recombination is suppressed and an improved rollover condition can be achieved following our electrochemical treatment. As a result, the surface defects are passivated, and the power conversion efficiency performance of the solar cell devices can be enhanced from 4.73 to 7.75%. PMID:26815164

  5. A glucagon analog chemically stabilized for immediate treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chabenne, Joseph; Chabenne, Maria Dimarchi; Zhao, Yan; Levy, Jay; Smiley, David; Gelfanov, Vasily; Dimarchi, Richard

    2014-06-01

    For more than half a century glucagon has been used as a critical care medicine in the treatment of life-threatening hypoglycemia. It is commercially supplied as a lyophilized powder intended to be solubilized in dilute aqueous hydrochloric acid immediately prior to administration. We have envisioned a "ready-to-use" glucagon as a drug of more immediate and likely use. Through a series of iterative changes in the native sequence we have identified glucagon analogs of appreciably enhanced aqueous solubility at physiological pH, and of chemical stability suitable for routine medicinal use. The superior biophysical properties were achieved in part through adjustment of the isoelectric point by use of a C-terminal Asp-Glu dipeptide. The native glutamines at positions 3, 20 and 24 as well as the methionine at 27 were substituted with amino acids of enhanced chemical stability, as directed by a full alanine scan of the native hormone. Of utmost additional importance was the dramatically enhanced stability of the peptide when Ser16 was substituted with alpha,aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), a substitution that stabilizes peptide secondary structure. The collective set of changes yield glucagon analogs of comparable in vitro and in vivo biological character to native hormone but with biophysical properties much more suitable for clinical use. PMID:24749059

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of cyclic analogs of L-carnitine as potential agents in the treatment of myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Woster, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to synthesize a number of cyclic, rigid analogs of L-carnitine, having a variety of predetermined positional and stereochemical orientations, to be used as probes into the spatial and conformational requirements of the enzyme known as carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase. The ability of these analogs to serve as substrates for this enzyme was to be determined by assessing the degree to which they initiate efflux of {sup 14}C-L-carnitine from isolated heart mitochondria. Toward this end, synthesis of several such analogs was attempted, resulting in the isolation and characterization of 9 cyclic analogs of carnitine, 5 of which are previously unreported. Bioevaluation of these synthetic carnitine analogs was conducted in a previously described assay system. Rat heart mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation and prepared for the study by incubation with {sup 14}C-L-carnitine. Efflux of radiolabeled carnitine was then monitored in the presence of the compound being evaluated. This represents the first instance in which non-naturally occurring analogs of L-carnitine have been shown to undergo transport via this mitochondrial translocase, suggesting the possibility that cyclic carnitine analogs may find utility as agents in the treatment of myocardial ischemia.

  7. Evaluation of Reactive Mixtures for Passive Treatment of Mine Drainage from a Waste Rock Storage Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeen, S. W.; Mattson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory column tests for a passive treatment system for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area was conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, flow rate, and residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone, either in layered or mixed, were set up and operated for a total of 74 days to simulate the treatment system. The key variables determined from the tests include pH and redox adjustment of the treatment system, treatment efficiency for acidity and metals, sulfate removal rates, and precipitation of secondary minerals as sinks for metals. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e., Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn) with residence time of 15 hours and greater. The organic materials used in the test provided sufficient sulfate reduction that is available for metal removal in the mine drainage. The sulfate removal rates ranged between 200 and 600 mg/L/day. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic materials and secondary precipitates. The results from the columns tests provide a basis for design of a pilot-scale field passive treatment system, such as permeable reactive barrier (PRB) or reducing and alkalinity producing system (RAPS).

  8. SITE EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE SEMI-PASSIVE ACID MINE DRAINAGE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT THE SUMMITVILLE SUPERFUND SITE, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA SITE Program is conducting a detailed sampling and evaluation of two innovative passive mine drainage treatment technologies at the Summitville Superfund Mining site in Southern Colorado. The technologies evaluated include the Aquafix automatic hydraulic lime dispensing s...

  9. Passive immunization with allergen-specific IgG antibodies for treatment and prevention of allergy

    PubMed Central

    Flicker, Sabine; Linhart, Birgit; Wild, Carmen; Wiedermann, Ursula; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    IgE antibody-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population worldwide. To investigate therapeutic and preventive effects of passive immunization with allergen-specific IgG antibodies on allergy in mouse models we used clinically relevant pollen allergens. In a treatment model, mice were sensitized to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and to the major grass pollen allergens, Phl p 1 and Phl p 5 and then received passive immunization with rabbit IgG antibodies specific for the sensitizing or an unrelated allergen. In a prevention model, mice obtained passive immunization with allergen-specific rabbit IgG before sensitization. Kinetics of the levels of administered IgG antibodies, effects of administered allergen-specific IgG on allergen-specific IgE reactivity, the development of IgE and IgG responses and on immediate allergic reactions were studied by ELISA, rat basophil leukaemia degranulation assays and skin testing, respectively. Treated mice showed an approximately 80% reduction of allergen-specific IgE binding and basophil degranulation which was associated with the levels of administered allergen-specific IgG antibodies. Preventive administration of allergen-specific IgG antibodies suppressed the development of allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 antibody responses as well as allergen-induced basophil degranulation and skin reactivity. Our results show that passive immunization with allergen-specific IgG antibodies is effective for treatment and prevention of allergy to clinically important pollen allergens in a mouse model and thus may pave the road for the clinical application of allergen-specific antibodies in humans. PMID:23182706

  10. Performance evaluation of a hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment system using multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jack; Champagne, Pascale; Monnier, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale hybrid-passive treatment system operated at the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, treats municipal landfill leachate and provides for subsequent natural attenuation. Collected leachate is directed to a hybrid-passive treatment system, followed by controlled release to a natural attenuation zone before entering the nearby Little Sturgeon River. The study presents a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the system using multivariate statistical techniques to determine the interactions between parameters, major pollutants in the leachate, and the biological and chemical processes occurring in the system. Five parameters (ammonia, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), "heavy" metals of interest, with atomic weights above calcium, and iron) were set as criteria for the evaluation of system performance based on their toxicity to aquatic ecosystems and importance in treatment with respect to discharge regulations. System data for a full range of water quality parameters over a 21-month period were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), as well as principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. PCA indicated a high degree of association for most parameters with the first PC, which explained a high percentage (>40%) of the variation in the data, suggesting strong statistical relationships among most of the parameters in the system. Regression analyses identified 8 parameters (set as independent variables) that were most frequently retained for modeling the five criteria parameters (set as dependent variables), on a statistically significant level: conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrite (NO2(-)), organic nitrogen (N), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), pH, sulfate and total volatile solids (TVS). The criteria parameters and the significant explanatory parameters were most important in modeling the dynamics of the passive treatment system during the study period. Such techniques and

  11. Insulin Analogs Versus Human Insulin in the Treatment of Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Jones, Sidney; Smiley, Dawn; Mulligan, Patrick; Keyler, Trevor; Temponi, Angel; Semakula, Crispin; Umpierrez, Denise; Peng, Limin; Cerón, Miguel; Robalino, Gonzalo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the safety and efficacy of insulin analogs and human insulins both during acute intravenous treatment and during the transition to subcutaneous insulin in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a controlled multicenter and open-label trial, we randomly assigned patients with DKA to receive intravenous treatment with regular or glulisine insulin until resolution of DKA. After resolution of ketoacidosis, patients treated with intravenous regular insulin were transitioned to subcutaneous NPH and regular insulin twice daily (n = 34). Patients treated with intravenous glulisine insulin were transitioned to subcutaneous glargine once daily and glulisine before meals (n = 34). RESULTS There were no differences in the mean duration of treatment or in the amount of insulin infusion until resolution of DKA between intravenous treatment with regular and glulisine insulin. After transition to subcutaneous insulin, there were no differences in mean daily blood glucose levels, but patients treated with NPH and regular insulin had a higher rate of hypoglycemia (blood glucose <70 mg/dl). Fourteen patients (41%) treated with NPH and regular insulin had 26 episodes of hypoglycemia and 5 patients (15%) in the glargine and glulisine group had 8 episodes of hypoglycemia (P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Regular and glulisine insulin are equally effective during the acute treatment of DKA. A transition to subcutaneous glargine and glulisine after resolution of DKA resulted in similar glycemic control but in a lower rate of hypoglycemia than with NPH and regular insulin. Thus, a basal bolus regimen with glargine and glulisine is safer and should be preferred over NPH and regular insulin after the resolution of DKA. PMID:19366972

  12. Performance evaluation of a hybrid-passive landfill leachate treatment system using multivariate statistical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Jack; Champagne, Pascale; Monnier, Anne-Charlotte

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Performance of a hybrid passive landfill leachate treatment system was evaluated. • 33 Water chemistry parameters were sampled for 21 months and statistically analyzed. • Parameters were strongly linked and explained most (>40%) of the variation in data. • Alkalinity, ammonia, COD, heavy metals, and iron were criteria for performance. • Eight other parameters were key in modeling system dynamics and criteria. - Abstract: A pilot-scale hybrid-passive treatment system operated at the Merrick Landfill in North Bay, Ontario, Canada, treats municipal landfill leachate and provides for subsequent natural attenuation. Collected leachate is directed to a hybrid-passive treatment system, followed by controlled release to a natural attenuation zone before entering the nearby Little Sturgeon River. The study presents a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of the system using multivariate statistical techniques to determine the interactions between parameters, major pollutants in the leachate, and the biological and chemical processes occurring in the system. Five parameters (ammonia, alkalinity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), “heavy” metals of interest, with atomic weights above calcium, and iron) were set as criteria for the evaluation of system performance based on their toxicity to aquatic ecosystems and importance in treatment with respect to discharge regulations. System data for a full range of water quality parameters over a 21-month period were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), as well as principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. PCA indicated a high degree of association for most parameters with the first PC, which explained a high percentage (>40%) of the variation in the data, suggesting strong statistical relationships among most of the parameters in the system. Regression analyses identified 8 parameters (set as independent variables) that were most frequently retained for modeling

  13. History of Passive Antibody Administration for Prevention and Treatment of Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.; Ambrosino, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review We describe the history of passive immunization to provide context for the series of articles to follow. The history of passive immunization with antibodies to prevent or treat infectious diseases is a story of different eras. There was an extraordinary era of discovery and clinical implementation before the chemical nature of antibodies was even known. This empirical process provided the resources and reagents used to describe and characterize humoral immunity, better define the chemical properties and structure of antibodies, and extend the clinical use of immunoglobulin products to treat or prevent multiple viral and bacterial diseases over the ensuing several decades. The next distinct era came with the discovery of processes to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and development of more specific therapies. Interestingly, mAb technology resulted in many products to treat autoimmune and allergic diseases, but only one common infectious disease, respiratory syncytial virus, and only in a restricted population of high-risk infants. Recent findings The current era began with a series of publications in 2008 demonstrating processes for rapidly producing human mAbs. Summary This technology combined with new sequencing technology, advances in structural biology, atomic-level molecular design, and increased capacity for synthetic biology, promises new opportunities to apply passive immunization to the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25760933

  14. Corticorelin, a synthetic human corticotropin-releasing factor analog, for the treatment of peritumoral brain edema.

    PubMed

    Panickar, Kiran S

    2010-12-01

    Corticorelin is a synthetic analog of the naturally occurring human peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Several studies have indicated the ability of CRF to reduce the brain edema caused by brain tumors. Peritumoral brain edema (PBE), caused by an intracerebral tumor, manifests several features of vasogenic edema, which is a type of edema characterized by disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Traditionally, PBE has been treated using corticosteroids, primarily dexamethasone. Introduced more than four decades ago, dexamethasone revolutionized the treatment of PBE, but the side effects and withdrawal symptoms associated with corticosteroids propelled the investigation of other drugs. Clinical trials with the synthetic human CRF (hCRF) corticorelin (Xerecept, NEU-3002; Celtic Pharmaceutical Holdings) have indicated that this drug has a distinct advantage over classical corticosteroids in the treatment of PBE. Fewer and/or milder side effects have been reported for corticorelin compared with dexamethasone, although at higher doses of corticorelin several side effects, including hypotension and transient flushing, have been reported. Nevertheless, corticorelin was reasonably well tolerated in patients and healthy volunteers, and may be a good candidate for reducing PBE and associated neural damage, as well as improving neurological symptoms. PMID:21154169

  15. The status of the passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Sangwoo; Kim, Sunjoon; Ko, Juin

    2008-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the operating status, evaluate the problems, and discuss possible improvement methods of passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage (AMD) in South Korea. Thirty-five passive treatment systems in 29 mines have been constructed from 1996 to 2002 using successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS) as the main treatment process. We investigated 29 systems (two for metal mines), 19 of which revealed various problems. Overflows of drainage from SAPS, wetland, or oxidation ponds were caused by the flow rate exceeding the capacities of the facilities or by the reduced permeability of the organic substance layer. Leakages occurred at various parts of the systems. In some cases, clogged and broken pipes at the mouths of the mine adits made the whole system unusable. Some systems showed very low efficiencies without apparent leakage or overflow. Even though the systems showed fairly good efficiencies in metal removal ratios (mainly iron) and pH control; sulfate removal rates were very poor except in three systems, which may indicate very poor sulfate reductions with sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) as a means.

  16. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier. PMID:26998668

  17. Analysis of substrate leachate from an innovative vertical flow AMD passive treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, M.N.; Nairn, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Although many organic substrate-based acid mine drainage (AMD) passive treatment systems have been constructed, analyses of initial leachate components has been limited. Labile organic materials, although providing an effective substrate for important bacterial processes in AMD treatment, may leach organic compounds, nutrients and other substances into receiving waters. Decreased dissolved oxygen levels, discoloration, nutrient enrichment and subsequent eutrophication may result. In this study, organic and inorganic components of substrate leachate from an innovative vertical flow acid mine drainage (AMD) passive treatment systems were determined during initial operation. A portion (approximately 17 L/minute) of an AMD discharge from an abandoned underground mine in southeastern Oklahoma was directed to a pilot-scale treatment system. The treatment system consists of four 185 m{sup 2} in-series cells and is comprised of alternating vertical flow anaerobic compost wetlands (VFs) and surface flow aerobic settling ponds (APs). the substrate in the VFs consists of spent mushroom substrate (SMS), high CaCO{sub 3} limestone gravel, and hydrated fly ash (HFA) in a 2:1:0.1 ratio by volume. HFA is a coal combustion product and has been identified as an effective alkalinity generating material in laboratory studies. Field data (pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity and alkalinity) and water samples for subsequent analyses were collected at the discharge, at the inflow to each cell, and at several locations in the receiving waters. Initial data indicate pH increase to 7.3, and generation of approximately 150 mg/L alkalinity as CaCO{sub 3} eq. by the second aerobic settling pond. Total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, color, metals, and concentrations of other significant components were measured at all sampling locations.

  18. Passivation of AlN/GaN HEMTs Using Ozone Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C. F.; Chang, C. Y.; Pearton, S. J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Dabiran, A. M.; Wowchak, A. M.; Cui, B.; Chow, P. P.; Ren, F.

    2010-01-01

    Ozone treatment of AlN on AlN/GaN heterostructures produces effective surface passivation and chemical resistance to the AZ positive photoresist developer used for subsequent device fabrication. The ozone-passivated AlN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) exhibited low gate leakage currents, high gate modulation voltage, and minimal drain current degradation during gate pulse measurements. With an additional oxygen plasma treatment on the gate area prior to the gate metal deposition, enhancement-mode AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors were realized. The gate characteristics of the HEMTs treated with the ozone and oxygen plasma behaved in a manner similar to a metal oxide semiconductor diode-like gate current-voltage characteristic instead of a Schottky diode. Drain breakdown voltages of 23 and 43V for d- and e-mode HEMT were obtained, respectively. For d-mode HEMTs, there was no reduction in drain current during the gate pulse measurements at frequencies of 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz. For the e-mode HEMT, the drain current was reduced 5% at 100 kHz.

  19. Passive treatment using coal combustion products: An innovative vertical flow constructed wetland field study

    SciTech Connect

    Nairn, R.W.; Mercer, M.N.; Everett, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    Designs of constructed wetlands for acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment have evolved substantially during the past decade. Current research focuses on the study of vertical-flow treatment systems containing labile organic substrates. Also known as successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS), these systems emphasize contact of acidic waters with the substrate, thus maximizing biological alkalinity generation, via bacterial sulfate reduction, and abiotic alkalinity generation via carbonate dissolution processes. in this study, a coal combustion product (CCP) was utilized to generate supplementary alkalinity in addition to that provided by traditional substrate materials of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and high CaCO{sub 3} content limestone. Although limestone is commonly utilized for abiotic alkalinity generation in AMC treatment wetlands, CCPs are not. The preliminary effectiveness of this innovative vertical flow passive treatment system was evaluated during the initial year of operation. The wetlands are successfully retaining iron, aluminum and manganese and are increasing pH, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen (from ,1.0 to >13 mg/L, due to biological productivity), and calcium (from 31 to 385 mg/L, presumably due to limestone and hydrated fly ash dissolution). No hydraulic conductivity problems have been encountered in the initial year of operation. CCPs may offer an attractive alternative, or supplementary, alkalinity generating source for AMD treatment wetlands.

  20. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants. PMID:20883832

  1. An orthotropic viscoelastic model for the passive myocardium: continuum basis and numerical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, Osman; Sommer, Gerhard; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-11-01

    This study deals with the viscoelastic constitutive modeling and the respective computational analysis of the human passive myocardium. We start by recapitulating the locally orthotropic inner structure of the human myocardial tissue and model the mechanical response through invariants and structure tensors associated with three orthonormal basis vectors. In accordance with recent experimental findings the ventricular myocardial tissue is assumed to be incompressible, thick-walled, orthotropic and viscoelastic. In particular, one spring element coupled with Maxwell elements in parallel endows the model with viscoelastic features such that four dashpots describe the viscous response due to matrix, fiber, sheet and fiber-sheet fragments. In order to alleviate the numerical obstacles, the strictly incompressible model is altered by decomposing the free-energy function into volumetric-isochoric elastic and isochoric-viscoelastic parts along with the multiplicative split of the deformation gradient which enables the three-field mixed finite element method. The crucial aspect of the viscoelastic formulation is linked to the rate equations of the viscous overstresses resulting from a 3-D analogy of a generalized 1-D Maxwell model. We provide algorithmic updates for second Piola-Kirchhoff stress and elasticity tensors. In the sequel, we address some numerical aspects of the constitutive model by applying it to elastic, cyclic and relaxation test data obtained from biaxial extension and triaxial shear tests whereby we assess the fitting capacity of the model. With the tissue parameters identified, we conduct (elastic and viscoelastic) finite element simulations for an ellipsoidal geometry retrieved from a human specimen. PMID:27146848

  2. Uncertainties and correction methods when modeling passive scattering proton therapy treatment heads with Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Bryan; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Engelsman, Martijn; Paganetti, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo models of proton therapy treatment heads are being used to improve beam delivery systems and to calculate the radiation field for patient dose calculations. The achievable accuracy of the model depends on the exact knowledge of the treatment head geometry and time structure, the material characteristics, and the underlying physics. This work aimed at studying the uncertainties in treatment head simulations for passive scattering proton therapy. The sensitivities of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose distributions on material densities, mean ionization potentials, initial proton beam energy spread and spot size were investigated. An improved understanding of the nature of these parameters may help to improve agreement between calculated and measured SOBP dose distributions and to ensure that the range, modulation width, and uniformity are within clinical tolerance levels. Furthermore, we present a method to make small corrections to the uniformity of spread-out Bragg peaks by utilizing the time structure of the beam delivery. In addition, we re-commissioned the models of the two proton treatment heads located at our facility using the aforementioned correction methods presented in this paper. PMID:21478569

  3. Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

    2007-12-31

    TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with

  4. Bear Creek Valley characterization area mixed wastes passive in situ treatment technology demonstration project - status report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.; Leavitt, M.; Moss, D.

    1997-03-01

    Historical waste disposal activities within the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Characterization Area (CA), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, have contaminated groundwater and surface water above human health risk levels and impacted the ecology of Bear Creek. Contaminates include nitrate, radioisotopes, metals, volatile organic chemicals (VOCS), and common ions. This paper provides a status report on a technology demonstration project that is investigating the feasibility of using passive in situ treatment systems to remove these contaminants. Although this technology may be applicable to many locations at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the project focuses on collecting the information needed to take CERCLA removal actions in 1998 at the S-3 Disposal Ponds site. Phase 1 has been completed and included site characterization, laboratory screening of treatment media (sorbents; and iron), and limited field testing of biological treatment systems. Batch tests using different Y-12 Plant waters were conducted to evaluate the removal efficiencies of most of the media. Phase 1 results suggest that the most promising treatment media are Dowex 21 k resin, peat moss, zero-valent iron, and iron oxides. Phase 2 will include in-field column testing of these media to assess loading rates, and concerns with clogging, by-products, and long-term treatment efficiency and media stability. Continued testing of wetlands and algal mats (MATs) will be conducted to determine if they can be used for in-stream polishing of surface water. Hydraulic testing of a shallow trench and horizontal well will also be completed during Phase 2. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Semi-passive, Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Frank W. Schwartz

    2005-12-13

    This research involves a combined experimental and modeling study that builds on our previous DOE-sponsored work in investigating how KMnO{sub 4} can be better used with in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated ethylenes (e.g., PCE, TCE, DCE). This study aims to provide scientific basis for developing a new long-term, semi-passive ISCO scheme that uses controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a reactive barrier component. Specific objectives of the study are (1) to construct controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a new reactive barrier component that could deliver permanganate at a controlled rate over long time periods of years, (2) to quantitatively describe release mechanisms associated with the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}, (3) to demonstrate efficacy of the new remediation scheme using proof-of-concept experiments, and (4) to design advanced forms of controlled release systems through numerical optimization. The new scheme operates in a long-term, semi-passive manner to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume with periodic replacement of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} installed in the subsurface. As a first step in developing this remedial concept, we manufactured various prototype controlled release KMnO{sub 4} forms. Then we demonstrated using column experiments that the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} could deliver small amount of permanganate into flowing water at controlled rates over long time periods of years. An analytical model was also used to estimate the diffusivities and durations of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}. Finally, proof-of-concept flow-tank experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} scheme in controlling dissolved TCE plume in a long-term, semi-passive manner. Another important thrust of our research effort involved numerical optimization of controlled release systems. This study used a numerical model that is capable of describing release patterns of active

  6. In vitro and In vivo Studies on Stilbene Analogs as Potential Treatment Agents for Colon Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based upon the potential of resveratrol as a cancer chemopreventive agent, 27 stilbenes analogs were synthesized and tested against colon cancer cell line HT-29. Among these compounds, amino derivative (Z)-4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) aniline (4), (Z)-methyl 4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) benzoate (6) and (Z)-1...

  7. Heat treatment in 110 °C liquid water used for passivating silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tomohiko; Motoki, Takayuki; Ubukata, Junya; Sameshima, Toshiyuki; Hasumi, Masahiko; Mizuno, Tomohisa

    2016-04-01

    The simple passivation method of heat treatment in liquid water is discussed. Photo-induced effective minority carrier lifetime τ eff increased to 3.3 × 10-3 s above 110 °C for 1 h for 17-Ωcm n-type crystalline silicon. Increase in τ eff was observed ranging from 3.5 × 10-4 to 3.7 × 10-3 s for n-type silicon with resistivity ranging from 2 to 17 Ωcm. τ eff maintained high values ranging from 1.5 × 10-4 to 1.4 × 10-3 s for 1270 h. The metal-insulator-semiconductor-type diodes were formed on the top surfaces of the n-type and p-type substrates by forming Al and Au metals on the 0.7-nm-thin passivated layers. Rectified and Fowler-Nordheim current characteristics were observed in the dark field because of the difference of the work function between Al and Au. High photo-induced current density of 31.1 mA/cm2 and photovoltaic effect were observed in case of light illumination of AM 1.5 at 100 mW/cm2 to the rear surface. The recombination velocity in the regions under the metal electrode in the MIS structure was determined by lateral diffusion of photo-induced carriers. They were 1000 and 11,000 cm/s under Al and Au, respectively, in the n-type Si substrate.

  8. DEMONSTRATION OF AQUAFIX AND SAPS PASSIVE MINE WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT SUMMITVILLE MINE SITE, INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated two passive water treatment (PWT) technologies for metals removal from acid mine drainage (AMD) at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site in southern Colorado...

  9. CHALLENGES OF PASSIVE TREATMENT OF METAL MINE DRAINAGE IN THE IBERIAN PYRITE BELT (SOUTHERN SPAIN): PRELIMINARY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    AMD in the Iberian Pyrite Belt is a problem of global scale. Successful implementation of passive treatment systems could remediate at least part of this problem at reasonable costs. However, initial trials with ALD and RAPS based on gravel size limestone failed due to rapid loss...

  10. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  11. New perspectives on the passive treatment of ferruginous circumneutral mine waters in the UK.

    PubMed

    Sapsford, D J

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines major physico-chemical processes during the passive treatment of ferruginous circumneutral drainage from abandoned coal mines in the UK. Data collected over several years of studies on mine water treatment systems shed new light on the relative importance of hydraulics, settling velocity, Fe(II) oxidation rates and cascade aeration, which, in turn, informs the design of future systems. This paper demonstrates that (1) the complex settling behaviour of Fe(III) precipitates may be described by a first-order volumetric process and that settling rate is different for different mine waters; (2) the hydraulic efficiency (ratio of time to peak tracer concentration to nominal residence time) of the settling ponds studied was widely variable at low flow rates in comparison to constructed wetlands; (3) aeration cascades contribute dissolved oxygen and lead to a rise in pH due to CO2 degassing, which are very important in reducing the required time for iron oxidation and removal; (4) for at least 10 of the 30 sites examined, modelling of the rates of Fe(II) oxidation and particulate settling reveals that removal of iron is primarily dependent on settling rate; and (5) that substantial increases in pH can be brought about by forced aeration of mine water over several hours. Findings of this study apply to the majority of coal mine water treatment sites in the UK and may have broader application to other ferruginous waters with circumneutral pH or after treatment to increase pH. PMID:23636592

  12. Semi-Passive Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-Term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Frank

    2003-06-01

    In situ chemical oxidation or ISCO schemes involve the addition of a chemical oxidant, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), which destroys chlorinated solvents like TCE in a straightforward reaction. Although ISCO is now regarded as a developing technology in an industrial sense, beyond active flushing schemes, there have been relatively limited investigations in how ISCO might be better used. Our previous study showed that KMnO4 flushing approaches often would be frustrated by the inability to control the delivery of the treatment fluid due to precipitation of low-permeability reaction by-product like MnO2 and other problems. It was therefore suggested that development of a new ISCO scheme that can provide both destruction efficiencies and plugging control would be required. The goal of our current study is to develop a scientific basis for the use of new semi-passive, well-based ISCO systems for treating chlorinated ethylene in groundwater. More specifically, our work examines the possibilities of developing a slow release KMnO4 scheme. This scheme could be operated in a semi-passive manner with periodic additions of the slow-release KMnO4 solids into well-delivery systems. To our knowledge, a system of this type has not been demonstrated. Our current scientific work is then concerned with how to manufacture the slow release KMnO4 solids, how the well systems can be designed, and how they interact with the flow systems to maximize spreading. To achieve these goals, development of numerical models to simulate solute transport coupled with NAPL dissolution and chemical reaction with the oxidant is required. There is also a need for ways to control the local precipitation of MnO2 that could cause plugging near the wells, or at least remove the plugging materials. Moreover, the likely extent of spreading of KMnO4 added by the wells must be understood. Finally, the spacing of wells will depend in part how far KMnO4 ends up spreading away from the treatment zone

  13. P10: Is the OctreoScan score a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogs treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Ottaviano, Margaret; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Segreto, Sabrina; Tucci, Irene; von Arx, Claudia; Palumbo, Giuliano; Pellegrino, Sara; De Placido, Sabino; Marino, Mirella; Palmieri, Giovannella

    2015-01-01

    Background The somatostatin receptor expression in thymic neoplasms is assessed in vivo imaging by 111In-octreotide SPECT (OctreoScan). This retrospective study aimed to verify the predictive role of intensity expression of OctreoScan to somatostatin analogues treatment. Methods We evaluated 28 patients (14 male and 14 female with a median age of 54 years, range, 27–78 years) with thymic tumors candidated to somatostatine analogs therapy as second or third line of treatment or maintenance treatment. For this reason all of them performed OctreoScan of the thorax and tumor-to-background ratio was determined on the 24-h coronal sections. Thymic tumors were classified by WHO 2004 and staged according to Masaoka-Koga system. Specifically, AB three patients; B1 two patients; B2 five patients; B3 nine patients; B2/B3 three patients; thymic carcinoma five patients; B3/thymic carcinoma one patient. All the patients had a III of IV stage of disease. Lesions with pathologically increased tracer uptake were categorized according to the following 3-pointscore: equivocal, probably pathologic, and definitely pathologic. Results All patients were OctreoScan positive, four with an equivocal point score, nineteen and five with a probably and definitely pathological score respectively. Somatostatin analogs were administrated as second or third line of therapy in 10 patients, as maintenance therapy in 16 patients and as both of modality in two patients. Median time to progression was 16 months (range, 6–77 months) and it was not influenced by uptake pathological score. Conclusions The intensity of uptake of Indium-111-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide in thymic tumors is not a predictive factor of response to somatostatin analogues treatment. The OctreoScan positivity is the best rationale for treating thymic epithelial tumors (TETs) with somatostatin analogs.

  14. Hydrologic Education and Undergraduate Research in a Passive Wetland Treatment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrick, K. C.; Lohr, L.

    2012-12-01

    Legacy coal mine drainage has been found to impair surface water throughout southwestern Pennsylvania. Though few of our incoming students know what "acid mine drainage" is, nearly all have seen the orange streams and seeps that are its most obvious characteristic. On the other end of the spectrum, our geology majors are typically finding jobs in the oil and gas industry related to shale gas, or in environmental fields especially related to local and regional surface water. To take advantage of their early familiarity with local stream impacts and the likelihood they will have to deal with mine effluent during their post-academic careers, we have leveraged a local passive wetland treatment system to bring a relevant, real-life scenario into the classroom and lab. Moraine State Park, in western PA, is centered on Lake Arthur, an artificial reservoir of Muddy Creek. The park, particularly the lake, is a destination for recreational visitors, including boating and fishing enthusiasts. There is concern among visitors and park administrators about the health of the local streams and the lake. The area has been extensively undermined, with most coal mines sealed prior to the damming of the reservoir. One such instance of these sealed mine ports failed along one of the many embayments of Lake Arthur and a passive treatment system was installed. It was used as an example of the environmental impacts to the area for park guests, with an access road and signage. However, at this time, the three-pond system may be failing, five years beyond its projected life span and showing signs of stress and downstream contamination. Though the system is small, it provides a robust opportunity for hydrologic and geochemical analyses. We have used the pond system extensively for undergraduate research. Over the past five years, a Master's thesis was completed, and numerous undergraduate projects followed. Students have measured precipitate thickness and deposition rates, endeavored to

  15. Investigation of positive roles of hydrogen plasma treatment for interface passivation based on silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liping; Guo, Wanwu; Liu, Wenzhu; Bao, Jian; Liu, Jinning; Shi, Jianhua; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Zhengxin

    2016-04-01

    The positive roles of H2-plasma treatment (HPT) have been investigated by using different treatment procedures in view of the distinctly improved passivation performance of amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunctions (SHJs). It has been found that a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film and crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) interface with a high stretching mode (HSM) is detrimental to passivation. A moderate pre-HPT introduces atomic H, which plays an effective tuning role in decreasing the interfacial HSM; unfortunately, an epitaxial layer is formed. Further improvement in passivation can be achieved in terms of increasing the HSM of a-Si:H film treated by appropriate post-HPT based on the a-Si:H thickness. The minority carrier lifetime of crystalline wafers can be improved by treated films containing a certain quantity of crystallites. The microstructure factor R and the maximum intensity of the dielectric function ε 2max have been found to be critical microstructure parameters that describe high-quality a-Si:H passivation layers, which are associated with the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition phase induced by multi-step HPT. Finally, the open circuit voltage and conversion efficiency of the SHJ solar cell can be improved by implementing an effective HPT process.

  16. The Controlled Ecological Life Support System Antarctic Analog Project: Prototype Crop Production and Water Treatment System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Flynn, Michael T.; Bates, Maynard; Schlick, Greg; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP), is a joint endeavor between the National Science Foundation, Office of Polar Programs (NSF-OPP) and the NASA. The fundamental objective is to develop, deploy, and operate a testbed of advanced life support technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station that enable the objectives of both the NSF and NASA. The functions of food production, water purification, and waste treatment, recycle and reduction provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, enhance safety and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. Because of the analogous technical, scientific, and mission features with Planetary missions such as a mission to Mars, CAAP provides NASA with a method for validating technologies and overall approaches to supporting humans. Prototype systems for sewage treatment, water recycle and crop production are being evaluated at Ames Research Center. The product water from sewage treatment using a Wiped-Film Rotating Disk is suitable for input to the crop production system. The crop production system has provided an enhanced level of performance compared with projected performance for plant-based life support: an approximate 50% increase in productivity per unit area, more than a 65% decrease in power for plant lighting, and more than a 75% decrease in the total power requirement to produce an equivalent mass of edible biomass.

  17. Relapsed High-Risk Medulloblastoma: Stable Disease after Two Years of Treatment with Somatostatin Analog - Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Diego; Bonilla, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar medulloblastoma in adults is an uncommon disease. Therefore, most information comes from the pediatric population, and the treatment for relapses is based on series and case reports. The expression of somatostatin receptors has been identified in most medulloblastoma patients, and preclinical experience has shown a promissory response to somatostatin analogs. This report presents a female patient with a high-risk left cerebellar medulloblastoma diagnosed at age 16 years old who was treated with complete resection, cranial-spinal radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. She presented again at 18 years of age with a sustained progression of her tumor, despite radiosurgery and another line of chemotherapy. Octreotide scintigraphy at that time showed a moderate to high expression of somatostatin receptors; thus, the patient was started on monthly octreotide. She is now 20 and has achieved stable disease over more than two years of active treatment without any drug-related toxicity. Somatostatin analogs could be considered as a treatment option in selected cases of medulloblastoma. Review of the literature is presented for this unusual response. PMID:26918214

  18. Resveratrol and Its Analogs As Antitumoral Agents For Breast Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Saturnino, Carmela; Caruso, Anna; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-tri-hydroxystilbene) (RSV), a naturally occurring phytoalexin, readily available in the diet, has gained interest as a non-toxic agent capable of displaying cancer-preventing and anti-cancer properties. Several studies, using both in vitro and in vivo models, have illustrated RSV capacity to modulate a multitude of signaling pathways associated with cellular growth and division, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. However, its clinical application is limited because of a low oral bioavailability with high adsorption but rapid metabolism and low tissue concentrations. Several chemical modifications to the backbone structure have been made for the purpose of improving pharmacokinetic parameters. One promising strategy involves the introduction of methoxylic or hydroxylic groups on the phenylic rings of RSV. Moreover, by replacing the alkene linker between the two aromatic rings with a heterocyclic system rigid analogs such as 2,3- thiazolidin-4-ones and 3-chloro-azetidin-2-ones that displayed higher cytotoxic activity and hence higher ability to inhibit in vitro breast cancer cell growth have been synthesized. In vitro studies have demonstrated, for some of these compounds, a greater bioaccessibility than RSV and more selective inhibitory effects on breast cancer cell growth. Further investigations, particularly in vivo, are required as next step to implicate these analogs as pharmacologic agents for a possible clinical anticancer application. PMID:26996623

  19. Wetland-based passive treatment systems for gold ore processing effluents containing residual cyanide, metals and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Ordóñez, A; Loredo, J; Younger, P L

    2013-10-01

    Gold extraction operations generate a variety of wastes requiring responsible disposal in compliance with current environmental regulations. During recent decades, increased emphasis has been placed on effluent control and treatment, in order to avoid the threat to the environment posed by toxic constituents. In many modern gold mining and ore processing operations, cyanide species are of most immediate concern. Given that natural degradation processes are known to reduce the toxicity of cyanide over time, trials have been made at laboratory and field scales into the feasibility of using wetland-based passive systems as low-cost and environmentally friendly methods for long-term treatment of leachates from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. Laboratory experiments on discrete aerobic and anaerobic treatment units supported the development of design parameters for the construction of a field-scale passive system at a gold mine site in northern Spain. An in situ pilot-scale wetland treatment system was designed, constructed and monitored over a nine-month period. Overall, the results suggest that compost-based constructed wetlands are capable of detoxifying cyanidation effluents, removing about 21.6% of dissolved cyanide and 98% of Cu, as well as nitrite and nitrate. Wetland-based passive systems can therefore be considered as a viable technology for removal of residual concentrations of cyanide from leachates emanating from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. PMID:24089077

  20. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Synthetic Analogs: New Therapeutic Agents for Use in the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.; Chepurny, Oleg G.

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide (GLP-1) is a potent blood glucose-lowering hormone now under investigation for use as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 binds with high affinity to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) located on pancreatic β-cells, and it exerts insulinotropic actions that include the stimulation of insulin gene transcription, insulin biosynthesis, and insulin secretion. The beneficial therapeutic action of GLP-1 also includes its ability to act as a growth factor, stimulating formation of new pancreatic islets (neogenesis) while slowing b-cell death (apoptosis). GLP-1 belongs to a large family of structurally-related hormones and neuropeptides that include glucagon, secretin, GIP, PACAP, and VIP. Biosynthesis of GLP-1 occurs in the enteroendocrine L-cells of the distal intestine, and the release of GLP-1 into the systemic circulation accompanies ingestion of a meal. Although GLP-1 is inactivated rapidly by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DDP-IV), synthetic analogs of GLP-1 exist, and efforts have been directed at engineering these peptides so that they are resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis. Additional modifications of GLP-1 incorporate fatty acylation and drug affinity complex (DAC) technology to improve serum albumin binding, thereby slowing renal clearance of the peptides. NN2211, LY315902, LY307161, and CJC-1131 are GLP-1 synthetic analogs that reproduce many of the biological actions of GLP-1, but with a prolonged duration of action. AC2993 (Exendin-4) is a naturally occurring peptide isolated from the lizard Heloderma, and it acts as a high affinity agonist at the GLP-1 receptor. This review summarizes structural features and signal transduction properties of GLP-1 and its cognate b-cell GPCR. The usefulness of synthetic GLP-1 analogs as blood glucose-lowering agents is discussed, and the applicability of GLP-1 as a therapeutic agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes is highlighted. PMID

  1. Digital and analog communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanmugam, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The book presents an introductory treatment of digital and analog communication systems with emphasis on digital systems. Attention is given to the following topics: systems and signal analysis, random signal theory, information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, analog signal transmission, noise in analog communication systems, digital carrier modulation schemes, error control coding, and the digital transmission of analog signals.

  2. Lunar Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2009-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, a ground-based lunar analog is developed for the return of manned space flight to the Moon. The contents include: 1) Digital Astronaut; 2) Bed Design; 3) Lunar Analog Feasibility Study; 4) Preliminary Data; 5) Pre-pilot Study; 6) Selection of Stockings; 7) Lunar Analog Pilot Study; 8) Bed Design for Lunar Analog Pilot.

  3. Amylin and its analogs: a friend or foe for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei Qiao; Zhu, Haihao

    2014-01-01

    Amylin, a gut-brain axis hormone, and amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ), a major component of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, share several features, including similar β-sheet secondary structures, binding to the same receptor and being degraded by the same protease, insulin degrading enzyme (IDE). However, while amylin readily crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB) and mediates several activities including improving glucose metabolism, relaxing cerebrovascular structure, modulating inflammatory reaction and perhaps enhancing neural regeneration, Aβ has no known physiological functions. Thus, abundant Aβ in the AD brain could block or interfere with the binding of amylin to its receptor and hinder its functions. Recent studies using animal models for AD demonstrate that amylin and its analog reduce the AD pathology in the brain and improve cognitive impairment in AD. Given that, in addition to amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism and cerebrovascular damage are the hallmarks of the AD brain, we propose that giving exogenous amylin type peptides have the potential to become a new avenue for the diagnosis and therapeutic of AD. Although amylin's property of self-aggregation may be a limitation to developing it as a therapeutic for AD, its clinical analog, pramlintide containing 3 amino acid differences from amylin, does not aggregate like human amylin, but more potently mediates amylin's activities in the brain. Pramlintide is an effective drug for diabetes with a favorable profile of safety. Thus a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial should be conducted to examine the efficacy of pramlintide for AD. This review summarizes the knowledge and findings on amylin type peptides and discuss pros and cons for their potential for AD. PMID:25120481

  4. Impact of pre-treatment with somatostatin analogs on surgical management of acromegalic patients referred to a single center.

    PubMed

    Bacigaluppi, Susanna; Gatto, Federico; Anania, Pasquale; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rossi, Diego Criminelli; Benvegnu, Giulia; Nazzari, Elena; Spaziante, Renato; Giusti, Massimo; Ferone, Diego; Zona, Gianluigi

    2016-03-01

    First-line treatment of patients with growth hormone secreting adenomas is surgical resection. Disease control can be obtained by surgery (one or multiple steps), in case followed by medical treatment or adjuvant radiation therapy (radiosurgery or radiotherapy). The impact of pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) on surgical outcome is still controversial. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the impact of SSA pre-treatment on biochemical outcome and post-surgical hypopituitarism in a consecutive surgical series from a single referral centre, with data covering 17 years' experience and to investigate the possible predictive value of early postoperative insulin-like factor 1 (IGF-I) on long-term biochemical control. Data from 68 acromegalic patients were revised. Endocrinological long-term follow-up (minimum 6 months) was available for 57 patients. Eighty-eight percent of patients received a single-step surgical treatment (single surgery, with or without adjuvant medical therapy). The remaining 12% underwent a multi-step strategy: redo-surgery (three macroadenomas) and/or radiation (four macro- and two microadenomas). Pre-surgical SSA treatment was performed in 77.9% and resulted in a significant lowering of basal IGF-I values (p = 0.0001). Early post-surgical IGF-I was significantly lower in patients biochemically controlled with single surgery alone (p = 0.016) and after overall treatment strategies (p = 0.005). Normalization of GH and IGF-I was obtained in 56.1%, and normalization of either one of them in 27.8% of patients. No major surgery-related complications occurred. Post-treatment hypopituitarism occurred in 11.9% and was lower in SSA pre-treated patients. Our results well compare with other recently published series. Very early post-surgical IGF-I improvement might be a useful predictor for biochemical disease control. Moreover, our results suggest that pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogs seems to prevent

  5. Differential interference of vitamin D analogs PRI-1906, PRI-2191, and PRI-2205 with the renewal of human colon cancer cells refractory to treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Kotlarz, Agnieszka; Przybyszewska, Małgorzata; Swoboda, Paweł; Miłoszewska, Joanna; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Kutner, Andrzej; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to determine whether hypocalcemic analogs of active forms of vitamins D modulate expression of genes related to stem-like phenotype in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT-116 undergoing renewal after the treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Both lines express vitamin D receptor, but differ in differentiation stage and vitamin D sensitivity. Cells that resisted the 5-FU exposure were treated with synthetic analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (PRI-1906) and analogs of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (PRI-2191 and PRI-2205). Proliferative activity was more profoundly affected by vitamin D analogs in HT-29/5-FU than in HCT-116/5-FU cells. In HT-29/5-FU cells, analogs PRI-1906 and PRI-2191 downregulated the expression of genes related to survival, re-growth, and invasiveness during renewal, while PRI-2205 increased expression of genes related to differentiation only. In HCT-116/5-FU cells, PRI-2191 decreased the expression of stemness- and angiogenesis-related genes, whereas PRI-1906 augmented their expression. The effects in HCT-116/5-FU cells were observed at higher concentrations of the analogs than those used for HT-29/5-FU cells. Out of the series of analogs studied, PRI-2191 might be used to counteract the renewal of both moderately and poorly differentiated cancer cells following conventional treatment. PMID:26511971

  6. Characterization of the olfactory impact around a wastewater treatment plant: optimization and validation of a hydrogen sulfide determination procedure based on passive diffusion sampling.

    PubMed

    Colomer, Fernando Llavador; Espinós-Morató, Héctor; Iglesias, Enrique Mantilla; Pérez, Tatiana Gómez; Campos-Candel, Andreu; Lozano, Caterina Coll

    2012-08-01

    A monitoring program based on an indirect method was conducted to assess the approximation of the olfactory impact in several wastewater treatment plants (in the present work, only one is shown). The method uses H2S passive sampling using Palmes-type diffusion tubes impregnated with silver nitrate and fluorometric analysis employing fluorescein mercuric acetate. The analytical procedure was validated in the exposure chamber. Exposure periods ofat least 4 days are recommended. The quantification limit of the procedure is 0.61 ppb for a 5-day sampling, which allows the H2S immission (ground concentration) level to be measured within its low odor threshold, from 0.5 to 300 ppb. Experimental results suggest an exposure time greater than 4 days, while recovery efficiency of the procedure, 93.0+/-1.8%, seems not to depend on the amount of H2S collected by the samplers within their application range. The repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, is lower than 7%, which is within the limits normally accepted for this type of sampler. Statistical comparison showed that this procedure and the reference method provide analogous accuracy. The proposed procedure was applied in two experimental campaigns, one intensive and the other extensive, and concentrations within the H2S low odor threshold were quantified at each sampling point. From these results, it can be concluded that the procedure shows good potential for monitoring the olfactory impact around facilities where H2S emissions are dominant. PMID:22916433

  7. Protective effect of in ovo treatment with the chicken cathelicidin analog D-CATH-2 against avian pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Matthijs, Mieke G R; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and ever stricter control on antibiotic use are a driving force to develop alternatives to antibiotics. One such strategy is the use of multifunctional Host Defense Peptides. Here we examined the protective effect of prophylactic treatment with the D analog of chicken cathelicidin-2 (D-CATH-2) against a respiratory E. coli infection. Chickens were treated with D-CATH-2 in ovo at day 18 of embryonic development or intramuscularly at days 1 and 4 after hatch. At 7 days of age, birds were challenged intratracheally with avian pathogenic E. coli. Protection was evaluated by recording mortality, morbidity (Mean Lesion Score) and bacterial swabs of air sacs at 7 days post-infection. In ovo D-CATH-2 treatment significantly reduced morbidity (63%) and respiratory bacterial load (>90%), while intramuscular treatment was less effective. D-CATH-2 increased the percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes and heterophils by both administration routes. E. coli specific IgM levels were lower in in ovo treated animals compared to intramuscular D-CATH-2 treatment. In short, in ovo treatment with the Host Defense Peptide derived D-CATH-2 can partially protect chickens from E. coli infection, making this peptide an interesting starting point to develop alternatives to antibiotics for use in the poultry sector. PMID:27229866

  8. Protective effect of in ovo treatment with the chicken cathelicidin analog D-CATH-2 against avian pathogenic E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Matthijs, Mieke G. R.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and ever stricter control on antibiotic use are a driving force to develop alternatives to antibiotics. One such strategy is the use of multifunctional Host Defense Peptides. Here we examined the protective effect of prophylactic treatment with the D analog of chicken cathelicidin-2 (D-CATH-2) against a respiratory E. coli infection. Chickens were treated with D-CATH-2 in ovo at day 18 of embryonic development or intramuscularly at days 1 and 4 after hatch. At 7 days of age, birds were challenged intratracheally with avian pathogenic E. coli. Protection was evaluated by recording mortality, morbidity (Mean Lesion Score) and bacterial swabs of air sacs at 7 days post-infection. In ovo D-CATH-2 treatment significantly reduced morbidity (63%) and respiratory bacterial load (>90%), while intramuscular treatment was less effective. D-CATH-2 increased the percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes and heterophils by both administration routes. E. coli specific IgM levels were lower in in ovo treated animals compared to intramuscular D-CATH-2 treatment. In short, in ovo treatment with the Host Defense Peptide derived D-CATH-2 can partially protect chickens from E. coli infection, making this peptide an interesting starting point to develop alternatives to antibiotics for use in the poultry sector. PMID:27229866

  9. Coupled-channel treatment of Isobaric Analog Resonances in (p,p') Capture Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Arbanas, Goran

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nuclear reactions on unstable isotopes, there has been a renewed interest in using isobaric analogue resonances (IAR) as a tool for probing the nuclear structure. The position and width of isobaric analogue resonances in nucleon-nucleus scattering are accurate and detailed indicators of the positions of resonances and bound states with good single-particle characters. We report on implementation within our coupled-channels code FRESCO of the charge-exchange interaction term that transforms an incident proton into a neutron. Isobaric analog resonances are seen as peaks in gamma-ray spectrum when the proton is transformed into a neutron at an energy near a neutron bound state. The Lane coupled-channels formalism was extended to follow the nonorthogonality of this neutron channel with that configuration of an inelastic outgoing proton, and the target being left in a particle-hole excited state. This is tested for 208Pb, for which good (p,p g)

  10. Coupled-channel Treatment of Isobaric Analog Resonances in (p,p‧) Capture Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.

    2014-04-01

    With the advent of nuclear reactions on unstable isotopes, there has been a renewed interest in using isobaric analogue resonances (IAR) as a tool for probing the nuclear structure. The position and width of isobaric analogue resonances in nucleon-nucleus scattering are accurate and detailed indicators of the positions of resonances and bound states with good single-particle characters. We report on implementation within our coupled-channels code FRESCO of the charge-exchange interaction term that transforms an incident proton into a neutron. Isobaric analog resonances are seen as peaks in γ-ray spectrum when the proton is transformed into a neutron at an energy near a neutron bound state. The Lane coupled-channels formalism was extended to follow the non-orthogonality of this neutron channel with that configuration of an inelastic outgoing proton, and the target being left in a particle-hole excited state. This is tested for 208Pb, for which good (p,p'γ) coincidence data exists.

  11. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in down-flow limestone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.

    1997-12-31

    Passive down-flow systems, consisting of compost and/or limestone layers, may be well suited for treatment of acidic mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. Two columns were constructed and operated in the laboratory. The first column simulated a downward, vertical-flow anaerobic wetland, also referred to as successive alkalinity-producing systems (SAPS), and has received mine drainage for 97 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column was vertically oriented and (from bottom to top) consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 0.91 m of free standing water. Water flowed vertically downward through the system. A second column, filled with only limestone, received water from the same source as the first column. This limestone column contained a 1.06-m thick layer of limestone and 0.91 m of free standing water and has received water for 55 weeks. Actual acid mine drainage (pH = 3.1, acidity = 200 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 600 mg/L, Total Fe = 10 mg/L, Mn = 14 mg/L, and Al = 18 mg/L) was collected every two weeks from a nearby abandoned deep mine and applied to these columns at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. For the compost/limestone column, effluent pH remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9); however, pH at a depth of 0.38 m in the compost (halfway) dropped to < 4 after 28 weeks (net acidic). At the bottom of the compost pH remained > 4.5 for all 97 weeks. Alkalinity was generated by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. Over the 97 week period, the column generated an average of 330 mg/L of alkalinity, mostly due to limestone dissolution. Bacterial sulfate reduction displayed an ever decreasing trend, initially accounting for more than 200 mg/L of alkalinity and after 40 weeks only accounting for about 50 mg/L.

  12. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage in systems containing compost and limestone: Laboratory and field results

    SciTech Connect

    Watzlaf, G.R.; Pappas, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Passive, down-flow systems, consisting of compost and limestone layers, termed successive alkalinity producing systems (SAPS), may be well suited for treatment of mine drainage containing ferric iron and/or aluminum. A column, simulating a SAPS, has been operated in the laboratory for 52 weeks. The 0.16-m diameter column consisted of a 0.30-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost thick layer of limestone, a 0.76-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost and 0.91 m of free standing water. Actual AMD (pH = 3.02, acidity = 218 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4} = 600 mg/L, Fe = 16.0 mg/L, Mn = 12.1 mg/L, and Al = 17.1 mg/L) was applied to the column at a rate of 3.8 mL/min. Effluent pH has remained above 6.2 (6.2-7.9) in the column system. A SAPS located in Jefferson County, PA has been monitored for the past 4.5 years. The SAPS has an approximate area of 1000 m{sup 2} and contains a 0.4-m thick layer of limestone, a 0.2-m thick layer of spent mushroom compost, and 1.5 m of free standing water. Mine water (acidity = 335 mg/L (as CaCO{sub 3}), SO{sub 4} = 1270 mg/L, Fe = 246 mg/L, Mn = 38.4 mg/L, and Al = <0.2 mg/L) flowed into the SAPS at a rate of 140 L/min. Water samples from the field and laboratory systems have been collected at strategic locations on a regular basis and analyzed for pH, alkalinity, acidity, Fe{sup 2+}, total Fe, Mn, Al, SO{sub 4}, Ca, Mg, Na, Co, Ni, and Zn. Alkalinity has been generated in both field and laboratory systems by a combination of limestone dissolution and sulfate reduction. The column generated an average of 378 mg/L of alkalinity; 74% due to limestone dissolution and 26% due to bacterial reduction of sulfate. The field SAPS generated an average of 231 mg/L of alkalinity and exhibited seasonal trends.

  13. Differential gene expression in response to juvenile hormone analog treatment in the damp-wood termite Hodotermopsis sjostedti (Isoptera, Archotermopsidae).

    PubMed

    Cornette, Richard; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Koshikawa, Shigeyuki; Miura, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Termite societies are characterized by a highly organized division of labor among conspicuous castes, groups of individuals with various morphological specializations. Termite caste differentiation is under control of juvenile hormone (JH), but the molecular mechanism underlying the response to JH and early events triggering caste differentiation are still poorly understood. In order to profile candidate gene expression during early soldier caste differentiation of the damp-wood termite, Hodotermopsis sjostedti, we treated pseudergates (workers) with a juvenile hormone analog (JHA) to induce soldier caste differentiation. We then used Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization to create two cDNA libraries enriched for transcripts that were either up- or downregulated at 24h after treatment. Finally, we used quantitative PCR to confirm temporal expression patterns. Hexamerins represent a large proportion of the genes upregulated following JHA treatment and have an expression pattern that shows roughly an inverse correlation to intrinsic JH titers. This data is consistent with the role of a JH "sink", which was demonstrated for hexamerins in another termite, Reticulitermes flavipes. A putative nuclear protein was also upregulated a few hours after JHA treatment, which suggests a role in the early response to JH and subsequent regulation of transcriptional events associated with soldier caste differentiation. Some digestive enzymes, such as endogenous beta-endoglucanase and chymotrypsin, as well as a protein associated to digestion were identified among genes downregulated after JHA treatment. This suggests that JH may directly influence the pseudergate-specific digestive system. PMID:23481672

  14. Antireflection/Passivation Step For Silicon Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotty, Gerald T.; Kachare, Akaram H.; Daud, Taher

    1988-01-01

    New process excludes usual silicon oxide passivation. Changes in principal electrical parameters during two kinds of processing suggest antireflection treatment almost as effective as oxide treatment in passivating cells. Does so without disadvantages of SiOx passivation.

  15. Passive immunotherapy in the treatment of advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J M; Colman, N; Ostrow, N A; Simson, R W; Tomesch, D; Marlin, L; Rao, M; Mills, J L; Clemens, J; Prince, A M

    1993-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of passive immunotherapy for advanced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of human anti-HIV hyperimmune plasma was conducted. Sixty-three subjects with stage IV HIV disease (AIDS) were randomized to received 250 mL of either HIV-immune plasma or HIV antibody-negative plasma every 4 weeks. Although nonsignificant trends toward improved survival and delayed occurrence of a new opportunistic infection were noted, no significant effects on absolute CD4 lymphocyte counts or quantitative HIV viremia were seen. The only notable toxicity was the allergenicity to be expected from infusing plasma products, usually manifesting as urticaria. Thus, results do not rule out the potential usefulness of passive immunization with different preparations, but did fail to demonstrate clinical benefit of the product studied. PMID:8101550

  16. [Rectal temperature in active and passive rats during desynchronosis and under melatonin treatment ].

    PubMed

    Pertsov, S S

    2005-03-01

    Effects of phase shifts in circadian rhythms and of melatonin administration on rectal temperature in rats with different activity were studied in the open-field test on 176 Wistar rats kept under conditions of natural or shifted light-darkness period. Under normal light-darkness conditions, the amplitude of diurnal variation in rectal temperature was higher in active rats as compared with passive ones. A shift in the light-darkness conditions inverted the circadian rhythm of rectal temperature and augmented the difference between daytime and night time temperatures in passive and, particularly, in active rats. Melatonin effect depended on dose and time of administration. 1 mg/kg Melatonin enhanced the amplitude of diurnal rhythms of energy metabolism in behaviourally active rats. These changes seem to contribute to adaptive reconstruction in the organism during desynchronosis. PMID:15881881

  17. Real-time computer treatment of THz passive device images with the high image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate real-time computer code improving significantly the quality of images captured by the passive THz imaging system. The code is not only designed for a THz passive device: it can be applied to any kind of such devices and active THz imaging systems as well. We applied our code for computer processing of images captured by four passive THz imaging devices manufactured by different companies. It should be stressed that computer processing of images produced by different companies requires using the different spatial filters usually. The performance of current version of the computer code is greater than one image per second for a THz image having more than 5000 pixels and 24 bit number representation. Processing of THz single image produces about 20 images simultaneously corresponding to various spatial filters. The computer code allows increasing the number of pixels for processed images without noticeable reduction of image quality. The performance of the computer code can be increased many times using parallel algorithms for processing the image. We develop original spatial filters which allow one to see objects with sizes less than 2 cm. The imagery is produced by passive THz imaging devices which captured the images of objects hidden under opaque clothes. For images with high noise we develop an approach which results in suppression of the noise after using the computer processing and we obtain the good quality image. With the aim of illustrating the efficiency of the developed approach we demonstrate the detection of the liquid explosive, ordinary explosive, knife, pistol, metal plate, CD, ceramics, chocolate and other objects hidden under opaque clothes. The results demonstrate the high efficiency of our approach for the detection of hidden objects and they are a very promising solution for the security problem.

  18. Synergistic Nanomedicine: Passive, Active, and Ultrasound-Triggered Drug Delivery in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Elkhodiry, Mohamed A; Momah, Christian C; Suwaidi, Shaima R; Gadalla, Dina; Martins, Ana M; Vitor, Rute F; Husseini, Ghaleb A

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers are heavily researched as drug delivery vehicles capable of sequestering antineoplastic agents and then releasing their contents at the desired location. The feasibility of using such carriers stems from their ability to produce a multimodel delivery system whereby passive, ligand and triggered targeting can be applied in the fight against cancer. Passive targeting capitalizes on the leaky nature of tumor tissue which allows for the extravasation of particles with a size smaller than 0.5 µm into the tumors. Ligand targeting utilizes the concept of receptor-mediated endocytosis and involves the conjugation of ligands onto the surface of nanoparticles, while triggered targeting involves the use of external and internal stimuli to release the carriers contents upon reaching the diseased location. In this review, micelles and liposomes have been considered due to the promising results they have shown in vivo and in vitro and their potential for advancements into clinical trials. Thus, this review focuses on the most recent advancements in the field of micellar and liposomal drug delivery and considers the synergistic effect of passive- and ligand-targeting strategies, and the use of ultrasound in triggering drug release at the tumor site. PMID:27398430

  19. Water-Mediated Photochemical Treatments for Low-Temperature Passivation of Metal-Oxide Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jae Sang; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kang, Jingu; Jeong, Chan-Yong; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Kwanpyo; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Gil; Park, Sung Kyu

    2016-04-27

    The low-temperature electrical passivation of an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistor (TFT) is achieved by a deep ultraviolet (DUV) light irradiation-water treatment-DUV irradiation (DWD) method. The water treatment of the first DUV-annealed amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin film is likely to induce the preferred adsorption of water molecules at the oxygen vacancies and leads to subsequent hydroxide formation in the bulk a-IGZO films. Although the water treatment initially degraded the electrical performance of the a-IGZO TFTs, the second DUV irradiation on the water-treated devices may enable a more complete metal-oxygen-metal lattice formation while maintaining low oxygen vacancies in the oxide films. Overall, the stable and dense metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) network formation could be easily achieved at low temperatures (below 150 °C). The successful passivation of structural imperfections in the a-IGZO TFTs, such as hydroxyl group (OH-) and oxygen vacancies, mainly results in the enhanced electrical performances of the DWD-processed a-IGZO TFTs (on/off current ratio of 8.65 × 10(9), subthreshold slope of 0.16 V/decade, an average mobility of >6.94 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and a bias stability of ΔVTH < 2.5 V), which show more than a 30% improvement over the simple DUV-treated a-IGZO TFTs. PMID:27035796

  20. Passive adoptive transfer of antitumor immunity induced by laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment in a rat metastatic breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    The ideal cancer treatment modalities should not only cause tumor regression and eradication but also induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity. This is essential for control of metastatic tumors and for long-term tumor resistance. Laser immunotherapy using a laser, a laser-absorbing dye and an immunoadjuvant has induced such a long-term immunity in treatment of a mammary metastatic tumor. The successfully treated rats established total resistance to multiple subsequent tumor challenges. For further mechanistic studies of the antitumor immunity induced by this novel treatment modality, passive adoptive transfer was performed using splenocytes as immune cells. The spleen cells harvested from successfully treated tumor-bearing rats provided 100% immunity in the naive recipients. The passively protected first cohort rats were immune to tumor challenge with an increased tumor dose; their splenocytes also prevented the establishment of tumor in the second cohort of naive recipient rats. This immunity transfer was accomplished without the usually required T-cell suppression in recipients.

  1. An in vivo OctreoScan-negative adrenal pheochromocytoma expresses somatostatin receptors and responds to somatostatin analogs treatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, M C; Piccin, D; Bondanelli, M; Tagliati, F; De Carlo, E; Culler, M D; Uberti, E C degli

    2003-06-01

    A 52-yr-old woman presented with hypertension, elevated urinary vanillylmandelic acid, metanephrines, normetanephrines, and plasma chromogranin A (CgA), but normal urinary catecholamine levels. Abdominal ultrasonography and subsequent MRI imaging showed a 3 cm nodular lesion of the right adrenal gland also visualized by 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy consistent with a pheochromocytoma (PC). Her OctreoScan was negative. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy and histological examination showed a PC. The adrenal medulla tissue was examined for somatostatin (SRIH) receptor subtypes 1 to 5 (SSTR1 to 5) expression by RT-PCR. Cultured tumor cells were treated with either SRIH, Lanreotide (Lan), or an SSTR2 (BIM-23 120) or SSTR5 (BIM-23 206) selective agonist. CgA secretion was measured in the medium by ELISA and catecholamine levels by HPLC after 6h. Cell viability was assessed after 48h. RT-PCR analysis showed that SSTR1, 2, 3 and 4 were expressed. CgA secretion was significantly reduced by SRIH (- 80 %), Lan (- 35 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 65 %). Norepinephrine secretion was reduced by SRIH (- 66 %), Lan (- 40 %), and BIM-23 120 (- 70 %). Epinephrine and dopamine secretion was also inhibited by treatment with SRIH (- 90 % and - 93 %, respectively) and BIM-23 120 (- 33 % and - 75 %, respectively) but not by Lan. Cell viability was also significantly reduced by SRIH (- 30 %), Lan (- 10 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 20 %). The SSTR5 selective agonist did not modify either CgA and catecholamine secretion or cell viability. Our data show that SSTRs may be present in a PC although OctreoScan is negative in vivo, and that SRIH and its analogs may reduce both differentiated and proliferative functions in chromaffin cells in vitro. These findings suggest that SRIH analogs with enhanced SSTR2 affinity might be useful in the medical therapy of PC, even when an OctreoScan is negative. PMID:12920656

  2. Rapidly Progressive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in an Infant with Noonan syndrome with multiple Lentigines. Palliative Treatment with a Rapamycin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Lauriol, Jessica; Thul, Josef; Behnke-Hall, Kachina; Logeswaran, Tushiha; Schänzer, Anne; Böğürcü, Nuray; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; von Gerlach, Susanne; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Schranz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) frequently manifests with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recently, it was demonstrated that mTOR inhibition reverses HCM in NSML mice. We report for the first time on the effects of treatment with a rapamycin analog in an infant with LS and a malignant form of HCM. In the boy, progressive HCM was diagnosed during the first week of life and diagnosis of NSML was established at age 20 weeks by showing a heterozygous Q510E mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Immunoblotting with antibodies against pERK, pAkt, and pS6RP in fibroblasts demonstrated reduced RAS/MAPK and enhanced Akt/mTOR pathway activities. Because of the patient’s critical condition, everolimus therapy was started at age 24 weeks and continued until heart transplantation at age 36 weeks. Prior to surgery, heart failure improved from NYHA stage IV to II and brain natriuretic peptide values decreased from 9600 to <1000 pg/ml, but no reversal of cardiac hypertrophy was observed. Examination of the explanted heart revealed severe hypertrophy and myofiber disarray with extensive perivascular fibrosis. These findings provide evidence that Akt/mTOR activity is enhanced in NSML with HCM and suggest that rapamycin treatment could be principally feasible for infantile NSML. But the preliminary experiences made in this single patient indicate that therapy should start early to prevent irreversible cardiac remodelling. PMID:25708222

  3. Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 analog for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of an expanding number of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome (SBS). Teduglutide, being developed by NPS Allelix and licensee Nycomed, is a protease-resistant analog of GLP-2 for the potential treatment of gastrointestinal disease. Teduglutide has prolonged biological activity compared with native GLP-2, and preclinical studies demonstrated significant intestinotrophic activity in models of SBS, experimental colitis and chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. Patients with SBS rely on parenteral nutrition (PN) following bowel resection, and in a phase III clinical trial with teduglutide, > 20% reduction in PN was observed in patients with SBS receiving teduglutide. A phase II clinical trial for teduglutide in Crohn's disease observed remission rates of 55.6% in patients. At the time of publication, phase III clinical trials for SBS were ongoing, as were preclinical studies for chemotherapy-induced mucositis and pediatric indications. Teduglutide represents a novel, efficacious drug capable of increasing intestinal growth and improving intestinal function, and may change clinical management of intestinal disease and damage. PMID:21154171

  4. [Current concept of insulin therapy intensification, and the role of human regular insulin and rapid-acting insulin analogs in insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Sadahiro, Katsuhiko; Satoh, Tomomi

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of insulin therapy from animal insulin to recombinant human regular insulin has improved diabetes treatment. Generating of rapid-acting insulin analogs, mimicking physiologic insulin action enables us to provide better control of post-prandial glucose level and lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with human regular insulin. These rapid-acting insulin analogs show lower susceptibility of insulin precipitation and catheter occlusions, and are suitable for insulin pump therapy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Insulin lispro and insulin aspart are also applicable for diabetic patients with pregnancy, requiring excellent glycemic control. In some studies, stepwise addition of prandial insulin, as well as full basal-bolus regimen can improve glycemic control with less hypoglycemia. Treatment intensification with rapid-acting insulin analogs may offer a proper method to reach glycemic goals. PMID:25812371

  5. Distinction between interfacial layer effect and trap passivation effect of N2 plasma treatment on LTPS-TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, William Cheng-Yu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, N2 plasma surface treatment on high performance low-temperature poly-Si thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs) with HfO2 gate dielectric is demonstrated. A significant performance improvement by N2 plasma surface treatment is observed, including the threshold voltage VTH reduction ∼ -0.94 V, subthreshold swing S.S. improvement from 0.227 V/dec. to 0.188 V/dec., field effect mobility μFE enhancement ∼ +61% and driving current Idrv enhancement ∼ +95%. The individual impacts of interfacial layer growth effect and trap passivation effect of poly-Si channel film are investigated by the plasma induced interfacial layer (PIL) removal process. The results show that the PIL growth effect has more contribution to the improvement of VTH reduction and Idrv enhancement than the trap passivation effect of poly-Si channel film. Consequently, the interfacial layer engineering would be very important for the development of high performance LTPS-TFTs.

  6. Teduglutide, a novel glucagon-like peptide 2 analog, in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome results from surgical resection, congenital defect or disease-associated loss of absorption. Parenteral support (PS) is lifesaving in patients with short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Together, the symptoms of short bowel syndrome and the inconvenience and complications in relation to PS (e.g. catheter-related blood steam infections, central thrombosis and intestinal failure associated liver disease) may impair the quality of life of patients. The aim of treatment is to maximize intestinal absorption, minimize the inconvenience of diarrhea, and avoid, reduce or eliminate the need for PS to achieve the best possible quality of life for the patient. Conventional treatments include dietary manipulations, oral rehydration solutions, and antidiarrheal and antisecretory treatments. However, the evidence base for these interventions is limited and treatments that improve the structural and functional integrity of the remaining intestine are needed. Teduglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide 2, improves intestinal rehabilitation by promoting mucosal growth and possibly by restoring gastric emptying and secretion, thereby reducing intestinal losses and promoting intestinal absorption. In a 3-week, phase II balance study, teduglutide reduced diarrhea by around 700 g/day and fecal energy losses by around 0.8 MJ/day. In two randomized, placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase III studies, similar findings were obtained when evaluating the fluid composite effect, which is the sum of the beneficial effects of teduglutide – reduction in the need for PS, increase in urine production and reduction in oral fluid intake. The fluid composite effect reflects the increase in intestinal fluid absorption (and the concomitant reduction in diarrhea) and may be used in studies in which metabolic balance assessments are not performed. In studies of up to 24 weeks

  7. Teduglutide, a novel glucagon-like peptide 2 analog, in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2012-05-01

    Short bowel syndrome results from surgical resection, congenital defect or disease-associated loss of absorption. Parenteral support (PS) is lifesaving in patients with short bowel syndrome and intestinal failure who are unable to compensate for their malabsorption by metabolic or pharmacologic adaptation. Together, the symptoms of short bowel syndrome and the inconvenience and complications in relation to PS (e.g. catheter-related blood steam infections, central thrombosis and intestinal failure associated liver disease) may impair the quality of life of patients. The aim of treatment is to maximize intestinal absorption, minimize the inconvenience of diarrhea, and avoid, reduce or eliminate the need for PS to achieve the best possible quality of life for the patient. Conventional treatments include dietary manipulations, oral rehydration solutions, and antidiarrheal and antisecretory treatments. However, the evidence base for these interventions is limited and treatments that improve the structural and functional integrity of the remaining intestine are needed. Teduglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide 2, improves intestinal rehabilitation by promoting mucosal growth and possibly by restoring gastric emptying and secretion, thereby reducing intestinal losses and promoting intestinal absorption. In a 3-week, phase II balance study, teduglutide reduced diarrhea by around 700 g/day and fecal energy losses by around 0.8 MJ/day. In two randomized, placebo-controlled, 24-week, phase III studies, similar findings were obtained when evaluating the fluid composite effect, which is the sum of the beneficial effects of teduglutide - reduction in the need for PS, increase in urine production and reduction in oral fluid intake. The fluid composite effect reflects the increase in intestinal fluid absorption (and the concomitant reduction in diarrhea) and may be used in studies in which metabolic balance assessments are not performed. In studies of up to 24 weeks

  8. Analogs of the sea anemone potassium channel blocker ShK for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Beeton, Christine; Pennington, Michael W; Norton, Raymond S

    2011-10-01

    CCR7- effector memory T (TEM) lymphocytes are involved in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. These cells express Kv1.3 potassium channels that play a major role in their activation. Blocking these channels preferentially inhibits the activation of CCR7- TEM cells, with little or no effects on CCR7+ naïve and central memory T cells. Blockers of lymphocyte Kv1.3 channels therefore show considerable potential as therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. ShK, a 35-residue polypeptide isolated from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, blocks Kv1.3 channels at picomolar concentrations. Although ShK was effective in treating rats with delayed type hypersensitivity and a model of multiple sclerosis, it lacks selectivity for Kv1.3 channels over closely-related Kv1 channels. Extensive mutagenesis studies combined with elucidation of the structure of ShK led to models of ShK docked with the channel. This knowledge was valuable in the development of new ShK analogs with improved selectivity and increasing stability, which have proven efficacious in preventing and/or treating animal models of delayed type hypersensitivity, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis without inducing generalized immunosuppression. They are currently undergoing further evaluation as potential immunomodulators for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21824083

  9. BCX4430 - A broad-spectrum antiviral adenosine nucleoside analog under development for the treatment of Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Raymond; Kotian, Pravin; Warren, Travis; Panchal, Rekha; Bavari, Sina; Julander, Justin; Dobo, Sylvia; Rose, Angela; El-Kattan, Yahya; Taubenheim, Brian; Babu, Yarlagadda; Sheridan, William P

    2016-01-01

    The adenosine nucleoside analog BCX4430 is a direct-acting antiviral drug under investigation for the treatment of serious and life-threatening infections from highly pathogenic viruses, such as the Ebola virus. Cellular kinases phosphorylate BCX4430 to a triphosphate that mimics ATP; viral RNA polymerases incorporate the drug's monophosphate nucleotide into the growing RNA chain, causing premature chain termination. BCX4430 is active in vitro against many RNA viral pathogens, including the filoviruses and emerging infectious agents such as MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. In vivo, BCX4430 is active after intramuscular, intraperitoneal, and oral administration in a variety of experimental infections. In nonclinical studies involving lethal infections with Ebola virus, Marburg virus, Rift Valley fever virus, and Yellow Fever virus, BCX4430 has demonstrated pronounced efficacy. In experiments conducted in several models, both a reduction in the viral load and an improvement in survival were found to be related to the dose of BCX4430. A Phase 1 clinical trial of intramuscular administration of BCX4430 in healthy subjects is currently ongoing. PMID:27095300

  10. Continuous passive motion as an alternative treatment for iatrogenic hallux limitus.

    PubMed

    Connor, J C; Berk, D M

    1994-01-01

    The use and effect of continuous passive motion (CPM) was evaluated for 10 patients suffering from iatrogenic hallux limitus. All patients had previous hallux valgus corrective surgery. After their initial evaluation, patients were instructed to begin CPM therapy at home for a minimum of 4 hr. a day and were instructed to increase range of motion (ROM) as tolerated. CPM was used for 4 weeks. ROM was measured on day 0, 28, 48, 90. There were significant increases in mean extension (p < 0.025) and mean flexion (p < 0.05). All patients reported a decrease in pain and stiffness of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Seven of the 10 patients treated with CPM had increases in ROM. Three patients, all of whom had first metatarsal elevatus, required an additional surgical procedure. Patients suffering from iatrogenic hallux limitus with no associated first metatarsal elevatus can utilize CPM as a viable alternative to return to functional ROM. PMID:8019541

  11. An orthotropic viscoelastic material model for passive myocardium: theory and algorithmic treatment.

    PubMed

    Cansız, F Barış Can; Dal, Hüsnü; Kaliske, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This contribution presents a novel constitutive model in order to simulate an orthotropic rate-dependent behaviour of the passive myocardium at finite strains. The motivation for the consideration of orthotropic viscous effects in a constitutive level lies in the disagreement between theoretical predictions and experimentally observed results. In view of experimental observations, the material is deemed as nearly incompressible, hyperelastic, orthotropic and viscous. The viscoelastic response is formulated by means of a rheological model consisting of a spring coupled with a Maxwell element in parallel. In this context, the isochoric free energy function is decomposed into elastic equilibrium and viscous non-equilibrium parts. The baseline elastic response is modelled by the orthotropic model of Holzapfel and Ogden [Holzapfel GA, Ogden RW. 2009. Constitutive modelling of passive myocardium: a structurally based framework for material characterization. Philos Trans Roy Soc A Math Phys Eng Sci. 367:3445-3475]. The essential aspect of the proposed model is the account of distinct relaxation mechanisms for each orientation direction. To this end, the non-equilibrium response of the free energy function is constructed in the logarithmic strain space and additively decomposed into three anisotropic parts, denoting fibre, sheet and normal directions each accompanied by a distinct dissipation potential governing the evolution of viscous strains associated with each orientation direction. The evolution equations governing the viscous flow have an energy-activated nonlinear form. The energy storage in the Maxwell branches has a quadratic form leading to a linear stress-strain response in the logarithmic strain space. On the numerical side, the algorithmic aspects suitable for the implicit finite element method are discussed in a Lagrangian setting. The model shows excellent agreement compared to experimental data obtained from the literature. Furthermore, the finite element

  12. Combination of Successive Alkalinity Producing System (SAPS) and Aeration for Passive Treatment of Highly Acidic Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, C.; Ji, S.

    2015-12-01

    Passive treatment system has been widely used for remediation of mine drainage since its advantage of low installation and maintenance cost. The system, however, has also a disadvantage in assuring remediation and management efficiency if the drainage is highly acidic mine drainage. To remediate acid mine drainage (AMD) especially showing high acidity, passive treatment system which consists of successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS) and subsequent aeration pond was proposed and its mechanisms and efficiency was evaluated in this research. Target AMD was obtained from Waryong coal mine and showed typical characteristics of AMD having high metal concentration and low pH (acidity > 300 mg/L as CaCO3). Four experimental cases were conducted; untreated, treated with SAPS, treated with aeration, treated with SAPS and aeration to compare role and mechanism of each unit. Between organic matter and limestone layer which constitute SAPS, the former eliminated most of Fe(III) and Al in the AMD so that the latter was kept from being clogged by precipitates. Net acidity of the AMD rapidly decreased by supplement of alkalinity at the limestone layer. A primary function of SAPS, producing alkalinity constantly without clogging, was attained due to addition a portion of limestone particle into the organic matter layer. The discharge from SAPS had low ORP and DO values because of an anaerobic environment formed at the organic matter layer although its alkalinity was increased. This water quality was unfavorable for Fe(II) to be oxidized. Installation of aeration pond after SAPS, therefore, could be effective way of enhancing oxidation rate of Fe(II). Among the experimental cases, the combination of SAPS and aeration pond was only able to remediate the AMD. This concluded that to remediate highly acidic mine drainage with passive treatment system, three critical conditions were required; pre-precipitation of Fe(III) and Al at organic matter layer in SAPS, constant alkalinity

  13. Treatment with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, associates with better renal function and higher hemoglobin levels in Type 1 diabetic patients with impaired kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Hasslacher, Christoph; Kulozik, Felix; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The influence of type of insulin treatment - insulin analogs versus human insulin - on the development of diabetes related vascular complications has been sparsely investigated. We examine here possible differences regarding kidney function and hemoglobin levels. Methods: Multiple linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the following characteristics measured in 509 type 1 diabetic patients who were recruited in an outpatient practice: current clinical status and treatment modalities, type of injected insulin and the routine laboratory parameters hemoglobin, HbA1c, serum creatinine, eGFR, hs CRP and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Results: Compared with human insulin, multiple regression analysis taking into account possible confounders revealed that treatment with insulin analogs was associated with increased eGFR (+7.1 ml/min; P=0.0002), lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ratio logarithm -0.4; P=0.003) and higher hemoglobin concentration (+0.31 g/dl; P=0.04). Stratification by type of insulin showed the best renal status for treatment with insulins Glargine and Lispro. Differences were consistent both for patients with normal (eGFR → 90 ml/min) and with an impaired (eGFR ← 90 ml/min) kidney function. Conclusions: Present results suggest that treatment of type 1 diabetic patients with normal and impaired renal function with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, is associated with better kidney function, lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and lower hemoglobin concentration compared to therapy with human insulin. If confirmed by other studies, treatment with insulin analogs may be a further possibility in delaying progression of nephropathy and in preventing early hemoglobin decline. PMID:27540462

  14. Laboratory studies and model simulations of sorbent material behavior for an in-situ passive treatment barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Aloysius, D.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a study combining laboratory experiments and model simulations in support of the design and construction of a passive treatment barrier (or filter wall) for retarding the migration of Sr-90 within a water-bearing surficial sand and gravel layer. Preliminary evaluation was used to select materials for column testing. A one-dimensional finite-difference model was used to simulate the laboratory column results and extrapolation of the calibrated model was then used to assess barrier performance over extended time frames with respect to Sr-90 breakthrough and loading on the filter media. The final results of the study showed that 20 by 50 mesh clinoptilolite will attenuate Sr-90 with a maximum life expentancy of approximately 10 years. This time period is based on allowable limits of Sr-90 activity on the filter media and is also a function of site-specific conditions.

  15. Analogies and "Modeling Analogies" in Teaching: Some Examples in Basic Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupin, J. J.; Johsua, S.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates the effect of modeling analogy on learning of the concepts of electricity in grade 6, 8, and 10. Describes 2 analogies (train analogy and thermal analogy) with diagrams and examples. Discusses the accessibility, transferability, and difficulty of each analogy. Reports treatment effect and some further implications. (YP)

  16. The Effects of Acid Passivation, Tricresyl Phosphate Presoak, and UV/Ozone Treatment on the Tribology of Perfluoropolyether-Lubricated 440C Stainless Steel Couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jansen, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The boundary-lubrication performance of two perfluoropolyether (PFPE) thin films in the presence of passivated 440C stainless steel is presented. The study used a standard ball on disk (BoD) tribometer in dry nitrogen and a vacuum spiral orbit tribometer (SOT). Stainless steel surfaces were passivated with one of four techniques: high and low temperature chromic acid bath, a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) soak, or UV/Ozone treated for 15 min. After passivation, each BoD disk had a 400A film of Krytox 16256 (PFPE) applied to it. The lifetimes of these films were quantified by measuring the number of sliding cycles before an increase in friction occurred. The lubricated lifetime of the 440C couple was not altered as a result of the various passivation techniques. The resulting surface chemistry of each passivation technique was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SOT was used to examine the effects of the TCP treatment on the lubricated lifetime of another PFPE, Brayco 815Z, under rolling conditions. None of the passivation techniques were found to dramatically increase the oxide film thickness or lubricated lifetimes.

  17. A Phase II Multicenter Trial With Rivaroxaban in the Treatment of Livedoid Vasculopathy Assessing Pain on a Visual Analog Scale

    PubMed Central

    Drabik, Attyla; Hillgruber, Carina

    2014-01-01

    Background Livedoid vasculopathy is an orphan skin disease characterized by recurrent thrombosis of the cutaneous microcirculation. It manifests itself almost exclusively in the ankles, the back of the feet, and the distal part of the lower legs. Because of the vascular occlusion, patients suffer from intense local ischemic pain. Incidence of livedoid vasculopathy is estimated to be around 1:100,000. There are currently no approved treatments for livedoid vasculopathy, making off-label therapy the only option. In Europe, thromboprophylactic treatment with low-molecular-weight heparins has become widely accepted. Objective The aim of this trial is the statistical verification of the therapeutic effects of the anticoagulant rivaroxaban in patients suffering from livedoid vasculopathy. Methods We performed a therapeutic phase IIa trial designed as a prospective, one-armed, multicenter, interventional series of cases with a calculated sample size of 20 patients. The primary outcome is the assessment of local pain on the visual analog scale (VAS) as an intraindividual difference of 2 values between baseline and 12 weeks. Results Enrollment started in December 2012 and was still open at the date of submission. The study is expected to finish in November 2014. Conclusions Livedoid vasculopathy is associated with increased thrombophilia in the cutaneous microcirculation and the continuous use of anticoagulants helps improve the symptoms. The causes of cutaneous infarctions are heterogenous, but ultimately follow the known mechanisms of the coagulation cascade. Rivaroxaban affects the coagulation cascade and inhibits the factor Xa–dependent conversion of prothrombin to thrombin, thereby considerably reducing the risk of thrombosis. Trial Registration Trial Registration EudraCT Number: 2012-000108-13-DE; https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=eudract_number:2012-000108-13 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6UCktWVCA); German Clinical

  18. Iron-mineral accretion from acid mine drainage and its application in passive treatment.

    PubMed

    Florence, K; Sapsford, D J; Johnson, D B; Kay, C M; Wolkersdorfer, C

    2016-06-01

    This study demonstrates substantial removal of iron (Fe) from acid mine drainage (pH ≈3) in a passive vertical flow reactor (VFR) with an equivalent footprint of 154 m(2) per L/s mine water and residence times of >23 h. Average Fe removal rate was 67% with a high of 85% over the 10-month trial. The fraction of Fe passing a 0.22 µm filter (referred to here as Fe-filt) was seen to be removed in the VFR even when Fe(II) was absent, indicating that the contribution of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation was not the dominant removal mechanism in the VFR. Removal rates of Fe-filt in the VFR were up to 70% in residence times as low as 8 h compared with laboratory experiments where much smaller changes in Fe-filt were observed over 60 h. Centrifugation indicated that 80-90% of the influent Fe had particle sizes <35 nm. Together with analyses and geochemical modelling, this suggests that the Fe-filt fraction exists as either truly aqueous (but oversaturated) Fe(III) or nanoparticulate Fe(III) and that this metastability persists. When the water was contacted with VFR sludge, the Fe-filt fraction was destabilized, leading to an appreciably higher removal of this fraction. Heterogeneous precipitation and/or aggregation of nanoparticulate Fe(III) precipitates are considered predominant removal mechanisms. Microbial analyses of the mine water revealed the abundance of extracellular polymeric substance-generating Fe-oxidizing bacterium 'Ferrovum myxofaciens', which may aid the removal of iron and explain the unusual appearance and physical properties of the sludge. PMID:26675674

  19. Iron-mineral accretion from acid mine drainage and its application in passive treatment

    PubMed Central

    Florence, K.; Sapsford, D.J.; Johnson, D.B.; Kay, C.M.; Wolkersdorfer, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study demonstrates substantial removal of iron (Fe) from acid mine drainage (pH ≈3) in a passive vertical flow reactor (VFR) with an equivalent footprint of 154 m2 per L/s mine water and residence times of >23 h. Average Fe removal rate was 67% with a high of 85% over the 10-month trial. The fraction of Fe passing a 0.22 µm filter (referred to here as Fe-filt) was seen to be removed in the VFR even when Fe(II) was absent, indicating that the contribution of microbial Fe(II) oxidation and precipitation was not the dominant removal mechanism in the VFR. Removal rates of Fe-filt in the VFR were up to 70% in residence times as low as 8 h compared with laboratory experiments where much smaller changes in Fe-filt were observed over 60 h. Centrifugation indicated that 80–90% of the influent Fe had particle sizes <35 nm. Together with analyses and geochemical modelling, this suggests that the Fe-filt fraction exists as either truly aqueous (but oversaturated) Fe(III) or nanoparticulate Fe(III) and that this metastability persists. When the water was contacted with VFR sludge, the Fe-filt fraction was destabilized, leading to an appreciably higher removal of this fraction. Heterogeneous precipitation and/or aggregation of nanoparticulate Fe(III) precipitates are considered predominant removal mechanisms. Microbial analyses of the mine water revealed the abundance of extracellular polymeric substance-generating Fe-oxidizing bacterium ‘Ferrovum myxofaciens’, which may aid the removal of iron and explain the unusual appearance and physical properties of the sludge. PMID:26675674

  20. Effective spatially fractionated GRID radiation treatment planning for a passive grid block

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, M; Devic, S; Moftah, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To commission a grid block for spatially fractionated grid radiation therapy (SFGRT) treatments and describe its clinical implementation and verification through the record and verify (R&V) system. Methods: SFGRT was developed as a treatment modality for bulky tumours that cannot be easily controlled with conventionally fractionated radiation. Treatment is delivered in the form of open–closed areas. Currently, SFGRT is performed by either using a commercially available grid block or a multileaf collimator (MLC) of a linear accelerator. In this work, 6-MV photon beam was used to study dosimetric characteristics of the grid block. We inserted the grid block into a commercially available treatment planning system (TPS), and the feasibility of delivering such treatment plans on a linear accelerator using a R&V system was verified. Dose measurements were performed using a miniature PinPointTM ion chamber (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) in a water phantom and radiochromic film within solid water slabs. PinPoint ion chamber was used to measure the output factors, percentage depth dose (PDD) curves and beam profiles at two depths, depth of maximum dose (zmax) and 10 cm. Film sheets were used to measure dose profiles at zmax and 10-cm depth. Results: The largest observed percentage difference between output factors for the grid block technique calculated by the TPS and measured with the PinPoint ion chamber was 3.6% for the 5 × 5-cm2 field size. Relatively significant discrepancies between measured and calculated PDD values appear only in the build-up region, which was found to amount to <4%, while a good agreement (differences <2%) at depths beyond zmax was observed. Dose verification comparisons performed between calculated and measured dose distributions were in clinically acceptable agreements. When comparing the MLC-based with the grid block technique, the advantage of treating large tumours with a single field reduces treatment time by at least 3–5

  1. Analog earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  2. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... they’ve been exposed. For example, the passive rabies immunization (rabies immune globulin) is commonly used after a certain ... of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual ...

  3. Development and Operation of a Passive-Flow Treatment System for (Sup 90)Sr-Contaminated Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, P.S.; Taylor, P.A.

    1999-02-28

    Seep C was a free-flowing stream of groundwater that emerged in a narrow valley below the old low-level waste (LLW) disposal trenches in Solid Waste Storage Area 5 (SWSA 5) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The flow rate of the seep water was strongly influenced by rainfall, and typically ranged from 0.5 to 8 L/min. The seep water entered Melton Branch, a small stream that joins White Oak Creek before exiting the ORNL boundary. The seep water contained high concentrations of {sup 90}Sr (10,000 to 20,000 Bq/L) and, before the full-scale treatment system was installed, contributed about 25% of all the {sup 90}Sr leaving ORNL. Seep C was identified as a primary source of off-site contaminant transport and was designated for an early removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA). A passive flow treatment system was chosen as the most cost-effective method for treating the water.

  4. Prazosin treatment suppresses increased vascular permeability in both acute and passively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the lewis rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmuntz, E.A.; Brosnan, C.F.; Norton, W.T.

    1986-12-01

    Prazosin, an antagonist of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenoceptor, has been found to suppress the clinical and histologic expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. This effect appears to be specific for the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor. To determine the effect of this drug on vascular permeability to serum proteins and inflammatory cells, leakage of serum proteins into the central nervous system (CNS) was measured with (/sup 125/I)albumin, and quantitation of cellular inflammation was determined by an estimation of total DNA. The results show that in both actively induced and passively transferred models of the disease, treatment with prazosin significantly suppresses leakage of serum proteins into the CNS but does not significantly suppress the increase of DNA. The results of the (/sup 125/I)albumin studies additionally support the conclusion that the extent of vascular permeability to serum proteins in the spinal cord is a significant correlate of clinical disease. The results of the DNA estimation were at variance with the histologic evidence of cellular infiltration. The authors conclude that treatment with prazosin has a significant effect on the development of vascular edema in EAE. These results additionally validate a role for the adrenergic receptor in the development of EAE, and support the hypothesis that the primary site of action of prazosin is on the vascular ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenoceptor.

  5. Treatment of high myopia using a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabu, Razvan V.; Carstocea, Benone D.; Burcea, M.

    1992-08-01

    A method of lens extraction after Nd:YAG laser capsulonucleolysis in the eyes with high myopia is described. The scheme and performance specifications of the Nd:YAG laser used for preparing the extracapsular lens extraction are presented. The treatment begins a few months before lens extraction by scleroplasty associated with cryoprofilaxy or Argon laser endocerclage. Twenty-four to forty-eight hours before the operation Nd:YAG laser pulses are applied on the exterior capsule, first in the periphery and then just in the middle of the pupila. A capsulonucleolysis is obtained and the extraction of the transparent lens is performed in extracapsular extraction of the cataract.

  6. Promotion of Mn(II) Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment Systems by Diverse Fungal and Bacterial Communities ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Santelli, Cara M.; Pfister, Donald H.; Lazarus, Dana; Sun, Lu; Burgos, William D.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Biologically active, passive treatment systems are commonly employed for removing high concentrations of dissolved Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Studies of microbial communities contributing to Mn attenuation through the oxidation of Mn(II) to sparingly soluble Mn(III/IV) oxide minerals, however, have been sparse to date. This study reveals a diverse community of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi and bacteria existing in several CMD treatment systems. PMID:20495049

  7. Semi-Passive Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-Term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Frank

    2004-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation or ISCO schemes involve the addition of a chemical oxidant, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), which destroys chlorinated solvents like TCE in a straightforward reaction. Although ISCO is now regarded as a developing technology in an industrial sense, beyond active flushing schemes, there have been relatively limited investigations in how ISCO might be better used. Our previous study showed that KMnO4 flushing approaches often would be frustrated by the inability to control the delivery of the treatment fluid due to precipitation of low-permeability reaction by-product like MnO2 and other problems. It was therefore suggested that development of a new ISCO scheme that can provide both destruction efficiencies and plugging control would be required.

  8. Passive microrheology of normal and cancer cells after ML7 treatment by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapunova, Elena; Nikituk, Alexander; Bayandin, Yuriy; Naimark, Oleg; Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical properties of living cancer and normal thyroidal cells were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cell mechanics was compared before and after treatment with ML7, which is known to reduce myosin activity and induce softening of cell structures. We recorded force curves with extended dwell time of 6 seconds in contact at maximum forces from 500 pN to 1 nN. Data were analyzed within different frameworks: Hertz fit was applied in order to evaluate differences in Young's moduli among cell types and conditions, while the fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with cells were analyzed with both conventional algorithms (probability density function and power spectral density) and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We found that cancer cells were softer than normal cells and ML7 had a substantial softening effect on normal cells, but only a marginal one on cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that all recorded signals for normal and cancer cells were monofractal with small differences between their scaling parameters. Finally, the applicability of wavelet-based methods of data analysis for the discrimination of different cell types is discussed.

  9. In Alzheimer’s Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B.; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  10. Triptycene analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy (Inventor); Perchellet, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention provides analogs of triptycene which are useful as anticancer drugs, as well as for other uses. The potency of these compounds is in a similar magnitude as daunomycin, a currently used anticancer drug. Each compound of the invention produces one or more desired effects (blocking nucleoside transport, inhibiting nucleic acid or protein syntheses, decreasing the proliferation and viability of cancer cells, inducing DNA fragmentation or retaining their effectiveness against multidrug-resistant tumor cells).

  11. Impact on Thai psychiatrists of passive dissemination of a clinical practice guideline on prescribing attitudes in treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Udomratn, Pichet; Srisurapanont, Manit

    2002-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of a particular clinical practice guideline (CPG) following its passive dissemination on Thai psychiatrists' prescribing attitudes towards treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Two surveys were conducted before and after the dissemination of the CPG. Ninety-four questionnaires from the first survey and 84 from the second were analysed. Over 70% of the respondents were male. The mean age and duration of practice were 42.3 and 15.3 years, respectively. The respondents' characteristics were not significantly different in sex, age, years of practice, specialty, or clinical setting. In the first survey, the first three favoured interventions for TRS were switching to risperidone alone, switching to another conventional antipsychotic (CA), and adding carbamazepine to the on-going CA. In the second round, the first three interventions were switching to risperidone alone, switching to another CA, and switching to clozapine alone. Although there was a trend in the direction suggested by the CPG, there was no significant difference between the two surveys. The interventions chosen as first, second-, and third-line treatments were also not significantly different. Of 80 respondents who expressed their opinions on the CPG, 55, 15, and 10 stated that they knew, did not know, and were uncertain about the availability of a guideline, respectively. Of 55 respondents who knew about the availability of the guideline, 40 had read it. The mean (SDs) of the guideline acceptance and the impact of the guideline on the practice obtained from those 40 respondents were 70.9 (13.7) and 58.9 (19.6), respectively. PMID:12097807

  12. Treatment with proteolytic enzymes decreases glomerular immune complex deposits in passive serum sickness in rats and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Emancipator, S.N.; Nakazawa, M.; Lamm, M.E.

    1986-03-05

    This study assessed the effect of protease treatment on glomerular immune complex (IC) deposition in passive serum sickness. IC containing 2.2 mg of specific rabbit antibovine gammaglobulin (Ab) and cationic bovine gammaglobulin (CBGG) at 5-fold antigen excess were given via tail vein to 140 g Sprague-Dawley rats; some rats received IC containing /sup 125/I-Ab. After maximal glomerular IC deposition (1h) a single intravenous dose of either 4 mg chymopapain plus 2 mg subtilisin (T), or saline (C) was given. By immunofluorescence (IF) 1 h later, 1/13 T rats had bright capillary wall deposits of CBGG vs 10/11 C rats (x/sup 2/ = 13.4, p < .001); 6/13 T rats had Ab vs. 10/11 C rats (x/sup 2/ = 4.05, p < .05). Isolated glomeruli from T rats given /sup 125/I-IC had 25% less Ab (3267 +/- 293 cpm/mg glomerular protein) than C rats (4327 +/- 530, p < .005). 20 g BALB/c mice given IC with CBGG and 0.3 mg Ab, or IC with native BGG (nBGG) and 1 mg Ab via tail vein received 0.5 mg chymopapain and 0.25 mg subtilisin in 5 divided intraperitoneal doses q 10 min beginning 1 h later. 20 min after the last dose, 2/15 T mice given CBGG-IC had capillary wall Ab deposits by IF vs 13/16 C mice (x/sup 2/ = 11.7, p < .001). 1/16 T mice given nBGG-IC had mesangial Ab deposits vs. 11/15 C mice (x/sup 2/ = 10.8, p < .001). The authors conclude that protease treatment can remove glomerular IC deposits.

  13. Regulation of glucose and insulin release following acute and repeated treatment with the synthetic galanin analog NAX-5055.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Sean P; White, H Steve

    2015-04-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However there is limited understanding of how individual galanin receptor (GalR1, 2, and 3) subtypes mediate the physiological activity of galanin in vivo. To address this issue we utilized NAX-5055, a systemically available, metabolically stable galanin analog. NAX-5055 displays a preference for GalR1 receptors and possesses potent anticonvulsant activity in vivo, suggesting that NAX-5055 engages central galanin receptors. To determine if NAX-5055 also modulates the activity of peripheral galanin receptors, we evaluated the effect of NAX-5055 on blood glucose and insulin levels in mice. Acute and repeated (once daily for four days) systemic administration of NAX-5055 (4 mg/kg) significantly increased blood glucose levels compared to vehicle treated mice. However, a hyperglycemic response was not observed following systemic administration of NAX-805-1, a scrambled analog of NAX-5055, with critical receptor binding residues, Trp(2) and Tyr(9), reversed. These results suggest that chemical modifications independent of the galanin backbone of NAX-5055 are not responsible for the hyperglycemic response. The effect of NAX-5055 on glucose homeostasis was further evaluated with a glucose tolerance test (GTT). Mice administered either acute or repeated (once daily for four days) injections of NAX-5055 (4 mg/kg) displayed impaired glucose handling and reduced insulin response to an acute glucose (1g/kg) challenge. Here we have shown that systemic administration of a centrally active GalR1-preferring galanin analog produces acute hyperglycemia and an inhibition of insulin release in vivo and that these effects are not attenuated with repeated administration. NAX-5055 thus provides a new pharmacological tool to further the understanding of function of both central and peripheral GalR1 receptors in vivo. PMID:25690510

  14. REGULATION OF GLUCOSE AND INSULIN RELEASE FOLLOWING ACUTE AND REPEATED TREATMENT WITH THE SYNTHETIC GALANIN ANALOG NAX-5055

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sean P.; White, H. Steve

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However there is limited understanding of how individual galanin receptor (GalR1, 2, and 3) subtypes mediate the physiological activity of galanin in vivo. To address this issue we utilized NAX-5055 a systemically available, metabolically stable galanin analog. NAX-5055 displays a preference for GalR1 receptors and possesses potent anticonvulsant activity in vivo, suggesting that NAX-5055 engages central galanin receptors. To determine if NAX-5055 also modulates the activity of peripheral galanin receptors, we evaluated the effect of NAX-5055 on blood glucose and insulin levels in mice. Acute and repeated (once daily for four days) systemic administration of NAX-5055 (4 mg/kg) significantly increased blood glucose levels compared to vehicle treated mice. However, a hyperglycemic response was not observed following systemic administration of NAX-805-1 a scrambled analog of NAX-5055, with critical receptor binding residues, Trp2 and Tyr9, reversed. These results suggest chemical modifications independent of the galanin backbone of NAX-5055 are not responsible for the hyperglycemic response. The effect of NAX-5055 on glucose homeostasis was further evaluated with a glucose tolerance test (GTT). Mice administered either acute or repeated (once daily for four days) injections of NAX-5055 (4mg/kg) displayed impaired glucose handling and reduced insulin response to an acute glucose (1g/kg) challenge. Here we have shown that systemic administration of a centrally active GalR1-preferring galanin analog produces acute hyperglycemia and an inhibition of insulin release in vivo and that these effects are not attenuated with repeated administration. NAX-5055 thus provides a new pharmacological tool to further the understanding of function of both central and peripheral GalR1 receptors in vivo. PMID:25690510

  15. An update on the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: focus on insulin detemir, a long-acting human insulin analog

    PubMed Central

    Raslova, Katarina

    2010-01-01

    Basal insulin analogs are used to minimize unpredictable processes of NPH insulin. Modification of the human insulin molecule results in a slower distribution to peripheral target tissues, a longer duration of action with stable concentrations and thus a lower rate of hypoglycemia. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that provides effective therapeutic options for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. For glycemic control, no significant differences were found in HbA1c levels compared with NPH and insulin glargine. It is comparable with insulin glargine in significantly reducing rates of all types of hypoglycemia. Clinical studies have demonstrated that detemir is responsible for significantly lower within-subject variability and no or less weight gain than NPH insulin and glargine. Recent pharmacodynamic studies have shown that detemir can be used once daily in many patients with diabetes. Together with patient-friendly injection devices and dose adjustments, it provides a treatment option with the potential to lower the key barriers of adherence to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Recent guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes suggest starting intensive therapy of hyperglycemia at an early stage of diabetes and recommend therapeutic options that provide the possibility of reaching HbA1c goals individually, with a low risk of hypoglycemia or other adverse effects of treatment. The properties of insulin detemir match these requirements. PMID:20539842

  16. An analysis of manganese as an indicator for heavy metal removal in passive treatment using laboratory spent mushroom compost columns

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, B.A.; Unz, R.F.; Dempsey, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    The National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) dictates removal of manganese in mine drainage to less than 4 mg/1 daily or less than 2 mg/1 on a monthly average. Owing to its high solubility at low and circumneutral pH, removal of manganese is often the most difficult of the NPDES discharge standards. This has lead to the use of Mn(II) as a surrogate for metal removal. However, recent studies concluded that zinc or nickel may be more appropriate indicators for removal of other metals. Previous field studies showed zinc removal to be highly correlated to the removal of copper, cobalt, and nickel in a sulfate reducing subsurface loaded wetland, whereas manganese removal was poorly correlated. The objective of this study was to evaluate zinc and manganese retention under sulfate reducing conditions in bench scale columns containing fresh spent mushroom compost. Column effluent data were analyzed using an EPA geochemical computer model (MINTEQ) over the pH range of 6.0 to 6.8. Under these conditions, zinc and manganese displayed distinctly reactivities. Zn(II) was supersaturated with respect to ZnS{sub s} and the Zn(HS){sub 2}{degree} and Zn(HS){sub 3}{sup minus} complexes dominated solubility. Soluble zinc concentrations were inversely correlated to sulfide. Mn(II) remained as soluble Mn{sup +2}. During early column operation at pH > 7, MnCO{sup 3(s)} was supersaturated. Manganese concentrations did not correlate with pH or sulfide. Given these fundamental differences in removal mechanisms between Zn and Mn under sulfate reducing conditions, the use of manganese removal as a surrogate for heavy metal removal in passive treatment of mine drainage seems unjustified.

  17. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, C.A., III

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and <0.2 mg/L, respectively). In 2001, the laboratory aeration experiment demonstrated rapid oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe 2+) without supplemental alkalinity; the initial Fe2+ concentration of 16.4 mg/L decreased to less than 0.5 mg/L within 24 h; pH values increased rapidly from 5.8 to 7.2, ultimately attaining a steady-state value of 7.5. The increased pH coincided with a rapid decrease in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) from an initial value of 10 -1.1atm to a steady-state value of 10-3.1atm. From these results, a staged aerobic treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent

  18. Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in kidney disease: what we know and do not know about use of calcimimetics and vitamin D analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, James B; Quarles, L Darryl

    2008-01-01

    There is a growing understanding of the pathophysiology of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and a recent emergence of new agents for SHPT treatment in patients with advanced kidney disease. At the same time, appreciation that mineral metabolic derangements promote vascular calcification and contribute to excess mortality, along with recognition of potentially important “non-classical” actions of vitamin D, have prompted the nephrology community to reexamine the use of various SHPT treatments, such as activated vitamin D sterols, phosphate binders, and calcimimetics. In this review, the evidence for treatment of SHPT with calcimimetics and vitamin D analogs is evaluated, with particular consideration given to recent clinical trials that have reported encouraging findings with cinacalcet use. Additionally, several controversies in the pathogenesis and treatment of SHPT are explored. The proposition that calcitriol deficiency is a true pathological state is challenged, the relative importance of the vitamin D receptor and the calcium sensing receptor in parathyroid gland function is summarized, and the potential relevance of non-classical actions of vitamin D for patients with advanced renal disease is examined. Taken collectively, the balance of evidence now supports a treatment paradigm in which calcimimetics are the most appropriate primary treatment for SHPT in the majority of end stage renal disease patients, but which nevertheless acknowledges an important role for modest doses of activated vitamin D sterols. PMID:21694914

  19. Passivation of phosphorus diffused silicon surfaces with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Influence of surface doping concentration and thermal activation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Armin Benick, Jan; Kimmerle, Achim; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2014-12-28

    Thin layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are well known for the excellent passivation of p-type c-Si surfaces including highly doped p{sup +} emitters, due to a high density of fixed negative charges. Recent results indicate that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can also provide a good passivation of certain phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si surfaces. In this work, we studied the recombination at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivated n{sup +} surfaces theoretically with device simulations and experimentally for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited with atomic layer deposition. The simulation results indicate that there is a certain surface doping concentration, where the recombination is maximal due to depletion or weak inversion of the charge carriers at the c-Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. This pronounced maximum was also observed experimentally for n{sup +} surfaces passivated either with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single layers or stacks of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped by SiN{sub x}, when activated with a low temperature anneal (425 °C). In contrast, for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks activated with a short high-temperature firing process (800 °C) a significant lower surface recombination was observed for most n{sup +} diffusion profiles without such a pronounced maximum. Based on experimentally determined interface properties and simulation results, we attribute this superior passivation quality after firing to a better chemical surface passivation, quantified by a lower interface defect density, in combination with a lower density of negative fixed charges. These experimental results reveal that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks can provide not only excellent passivation on p{sup +} surfaces but also on n{sup +} surfaces for a wide range of surface doping concentrations when activated with short high-temperature treatments.

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of curcumin analogs as anti-inflammatory agents for prevention and treatment of sepsis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengguang; Zhang, Yali; Zou, Peng; Wang, Jian; He, Wenfei; Shi, Dengjian; Li, Huameng; Liang, Guang; Yang, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of asymmetric mono-carbonyl analogs of curcumin (AMACs) were synthesized and screened for anti-inflammatory activity. These analogs are chemically stable as characterized by UV absorption spectra. In vitro, compounds 3f, 3m, 4b, and 4d markedly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values in low micromolar range. In vivo, compound 3f demonstrated potent preventive and therapeutic effects on LPS-induced sepsis in mouse model. Compound 3f downregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 MAPK and suppressed IκBα degradation, which suggests that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of compound 3f may be through downregulating nuclear factor kappa binding (NF-κB) and ERK pathways. Also, we solved the crystal structure of compound 3e to confirm the asymmetrical structure. The quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis reveals that the electron-withdrawing substituents on aromatic ring of lead structures could improve activity. These active AMACs represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents with improved stability, bioavailability, and potency compared to curcumin. Our results suggest that 3f may be further developed as a potential agent for prevention and treatment of sepsis or other inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25834403

  1. Long-term treatment of somatostatin analog-refractory growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors with pegvisomant alone or combined with long-acting somatostatin analogs: a retrospective analysis of clinical practice and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pegvisomant (PEGV) is widely used, alone or with somatostatin analogs (SSA), for GH-secreting pituitary tumors poorly controlled by SSAs alone. No information is available on specific indications for or relative efficacies of PEGV?+?SSA versus PEGV monotherapy. Aim of our study was to characterize real-life clinical use of PEGV vs. PEGV?+?SSA for SSA-resistant acromegaly (patient selection, long-term outcomes, adverse event rates, doses required to achieve control). Methods A retrospective analysis of data collected in 2005–2010 in five hospital-based endocrinology centers in Rome was performed. Sixty-two adult acromegaly patients treated ≥6 months with PEGV (Group 1, n?=?35) or PEGV?+?SSA (Group 2, n?=?27) after unsuccessful maximal-dose SSA monotherapy (≥12 months) were enroled. Groups were compared in terms of clinical/biochemical characteristics at diagnosis and before PEGV or PEGV?+?SSA was started (baseline) and end-of-follow-up outcomes (IGF-I levels, adverse event rates, final PEGV doses). Results Group 2 showed higher IGF-I and GH levels and sleep apnea rates, higher rates residual tumor tissue at baseline, more substantial responses to SSA monotherapy and worse outcomes (IGF-I normalization rates, final IGF-I levels). Tumor growth and hepatotoxicity events were rare in both groups. Final daily PEGV doses were similar and significantly increased with treatment duration in both groups. Conclusions PEGV and PEGV?+?SSA are safe, effective solutions for managing SSA-refractory acromegaly. PEGV?+?SSA tends to be used for more aggressive disease associated with detectable tumor tissue. With both regimens, ongoing monitoring of responses is important since PEGV doses needed to maintain IGF-I control are likely to increase over time. PMID:23799893

  2. Diphtheria Toxin- and GFP-Based Mouse Models of Acquired Hypoparathyroidism and Treatment With a Long-Acting Parathyroid Hormone Analog.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ruiye; Fan, Yi; Lauter, Kelly; Hu, Jing; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Cradock, Jim; Yuan, Quan; Gardella, Thomas; Mannstadt, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Hypoparathyroidism (HP) arises most commonly from parathyroid (PT) gland damage associated with neck surgery, and is typically treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D. Such treatment effectively increases levels of serum calcium (sCa), but also brings risk of hypercalciuria and renal damage. There is thus considerable interest in using PTH or PTH analogs to treat HP. To facilitate study of this disease and the assessment of new treatment options, we developed two mouse models of acquired HP, and used them to assess efficacy of PTH(1-34) as well as a long-acting PTH analog (LA-PTH) in regulating blood calcium levels. In one model, we used PTHcre-iDTR mice in which the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor (DTR) is selectively expressed in PT glands, such that systemic DT administration selectively ablates parathyroid cells. For the second model, we generated GFP-PT mice in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) is selectively expressed in PT cells, such that parathyroidectomy (PTX) is facilitated by green fluorescence of the PT glands. In the PTHcre-iDTR mice, DT injection (2 × 5 μg/kg, i.p.) resulted in moderate yet consistent reductions in serum PTH and sCa levels. The more severe hypoparathyroid phenotype was observed in GFP-PT mice following GFP-guided PTX surgery. In each model, a single subcutaneous injection of LA-PTH increased sCa levels more effectively and for a longer duration (>24 hours) than did a 10-fold higher dose of PTH(1-34), without causing excessive urinary calcium excretion. These new mouse models thus faithfully replicate two degrees of acquired HP, moderate and severe, and may be useful for assessing potential new modes of therapy. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26678919

  3. Removal of As, Mn, Mo, Se, U, V and Zn from groundwater by zero-valent iron in a passive treatment cell: reaction progress modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Stan J.; Metzler, Donald R.; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2002-05-01

    Three treatment cells were operated at a site near Durango, CO. One treatment cell operated for more than 3 years. The treatment cells were used for passive removal of contamination from groundwater at a uranium mill tailings repository site. Zero-valent iron [Fe(0)] that had been powdered, bound with aluminosilicate and molded into plates was used as a reactive material in one treatment cell. The others used granular Fe(0) and steel wool. The treatment cells significantly reduced concentrations of As, Mn, Mo, Se, U, V and Zn in groundwater that flowed through it. Zero-valent iron [Fe(0)], magnetite (Fe 3O 4), calcite (CaCO 3), goethite (FeOOH) and mixtures of contaminant-bearing phases were identified in the solid fraction of one treatment cell. A reaction progress approach was used to model chemical evolution of water chemistry as it reacted with the Fe(0). Precipitation of calcite, ferrous hydroxide [Fe(OH) 2] and ferrous sulfide (FeS) were used to simulate observed changes in major-ion aqueous chemistry. The amount of reaction progress differed for each treatment cell. Changes in contaminant concentrations were consistent with precipitation of reduced oxides (UO 2, V 2O 3), sulfides (As 2S 3, ZnS), iron minerals (FeSe 2, FeMoO 4) and carbonate (MnCO 3). Formation of a free gas phase and precipitation of minerals contributed to loss of hydraulic conductivity in one treatment cell.

  4. Gliptin and GLP-1 analog treatment improves survival and vascular inflammation/dysfunction in animals with lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Steven, Sebastian; Hausding, Michael; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Mader, Michael; Mikhed, Yuliya; Stamm, Paul; Zinßius, Elena; Pfeffer, Amanda; Welschof, Philipp; Agdauletova, Saule; Sudowe, Stephan; Li, Huige; Oelze, Matthias; Schulz, Eberhard; Klein, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are used to treat hyperglycemia by increasing the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Previous studies showed anti-inflammatory and antiatherosclerotic effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Here, we compared the effects of linagliptin versus sitagliptin and liraglutide on survival and vascular function in animal models of endotoxic shock by prophylactic therapy and treatment after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Gliptins were administered either orally or subcutaneously: linagliptin (5 mg/kg/day), sitagliptin (50 mg/kg/day) or liraglutide (200 µg/kg/day). Endotoxic shock was induced by LPS injection (mice 17.5-20 mg/kg i.p., rats 10 mg/kg/day). Linagliptin and liraglutide treatment or DPP-4 knockout improved the survival of endotoxemic mice, while sitagliptin was ineffective. Linagliptin, liraglutide and sitagliptin ameliorated LPS-induced hypotension and vascular dysfunction in endotoxemic rats, suppressed inflammatory parameters such as whole blood nitrosyl-iron hemoglobin (leukocyte-inducible nitric oxide synthase activity) or aortic mRNA expression of markers of inflammation as well as whole blood and aortic reactive oxygen species formation. Hemostasis (tail bleeding time, activated partial thromboplastin time) was impaired in endotoxemic rats and recovered under cotreatment with linagliptin and liraglutide. Finally, the beneficial effects of linagliptin on vascular function and inflammatory parameters in endotoxemic mice were impaired in AMP-activated kinase (alpha1) knockout mice. The improved survival of endotoxemic animals and other data shown here may warrant further clinical evaluation of these drugs in patients with septic shock beyond the potential improvement of inflammatory complications in diabetic individuals with special emphasis on the role of AMP-activated kinase (alpha1) in the DPP-4/GLP-1 cascade. PMID:25600227

  5. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  6. Blasting and Passivation Treatments for ASTM F139 Stainless Steel for Biomedical Applications: Effects on Surface Roughness, Hardening, and Localized Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Adriana L. Lemos; Kang, Kyung Won; Bonetto, Rita D.; Llorente, Carlos L.; Bilmes, Pablo D.; Gervasi, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the combination of good biofunctionality and biocompatibility at low cost, AISI 316 low carbon vacuum melting (LVM) stainless steel, as considered in ASTM F139 standard, is often the first choice for medical implants, particularly for use in orthopedic surgery. Proper surface finish must be provided to ensure adequate interactions of the alloy with human body tissues that in turn allows the material to deliver the desired performance. Preliminary studies performed in our laboratory on AISI 316LVM stainless steel surfaces modified by glass bead blasting (from industrial supplier) followed by different nitric acid passivation conditions disclosed the necessity to extend parameters of the surface treatments and to further consider roughness, pitting corrosion resistance, and surface and subsurface hardening measurements, all in one, as the most effective characterization strategy. This was the approach adopted in the present work. Roughness assessment was performed by means of amplitude parameters, functional parameters, and an estimator of the fractal dimension that characterizes surface topography. We clearly demonstrate that the blasting treatment should be carried out under controlled conditions in order to obtain similar surface and subsurface properties. Otherwise, a variation in one of the parameters could modify the surface properties, exerting a profound impact on its application as biomaterial. A passivation step is necessary to offset the detrimental effect of blasting on pitting corrosion resistance.

  7. Biochemical passive reactors for treatment of acid mine drainage: Effect of hydraulic retention time on changes in efficiency, composition of reactive mixture, and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Yaneth; Escobar, Maria C; Neculita, Carmen M; Arbeli, Ziv; Roldan, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical passive treatment represents a promising option for the remediation of acid mine drainage. This study determined the effect of three hydraulic retention times (1, 2, and 4 days) on changes in system efficiency, reactive mixture, and microbial activity in bioreactors under upward flow conditions. Bioreactors were sacrificed in the weeks 8, 17 and 36, and the reactive mixture was sampled at the bottom, middle, and top layers. Physicochemical analyses were performed on reactive mixture post-treatment and correlated with sulfate-reducing bacteria and cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity. All hydraulic retention times were efficient at increasing pH and alkalinity and removing sulfate (>60%) and metals (85-99% for Fe(2+) and 70-100% for Zn(2+)), except for Mn(2+). The longest hydraulic retention time (4 days) increased residual sulfides, deteriorated the quality of treated effluent and negatively impacted sulfate-reducing bacteria. Shortest hydraulic retention time (1 day) washed out biomass and increased input of dissolved oxygen in the reactors, leading to higher redox potential and decreasing metal removal efficiency. Concentrations of iron, zinc and metal sulfides were high in the bottom layer, especially with 2 day of hydraulic retention time. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, cellulolytic and dehydrogenase activity were higher in the middle layer at 4 days of hydraulic retention time. Hydraulic retention time had a strong influence on overall performance of passive reactors. PMID:27016821

  8. Effective surface treatment for GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors using HF plus N2 plasma prior to SiN passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shih-Chien; Trinh, Hai-Dang; Dai, Gu-Ming; Huang, Chung-Kai; Dee, Chang-Fu; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin; Biswas, Dhrubes; Chang, Edward Yi

    2016-01-01

    An effective surface cleaning technique is demonstrated for the GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) passivation process. In this study, dilute HF solution and in situ N2 plasma treatments were adopted to remove the native oxide and recover the nitrogen-vacancy defects at the GaN surface before device passivation. To investigate the correlation between the properties of the SiN/GaN interface and the device performance, the GaN MIS-HEMTs were characterized using current-voltage (I-V) measurement, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. With the application of this surface treatment technique, the device exhibits improved I-V characteristics with low leakage current, low dynamic ON-resistance, and good C-V response with a steep slope. Overall, the results reveal that the oxide-related bonds and nitrogen-vacancy defects at the SiN/GaN interface are the root cause of the GaN MIS-HEMTs performance degradation.

  9. Cost-effectiveness comparison of lamivudine plus adefovir combination treatment and nucleos(t)ide analog monotherapies in Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Ke, Weixia; Liu, Li; Gao, Yanhui; Yao, Zhenjiang; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhou, Shudong; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Lamivudine (LAM) plus adefovir (ADV) combination therapy is clinically efficacious for treating chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in China, but no pharmacoeconomic evaluations of this strategy are available. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of LAM plus ADV combination treatment compared with five other nucleos(t)ide analog monotherapies (LAM, ADV, telbivudine [TBV], entecavir [ETV], and tenofovir [TDF]). Methods To simulate the lifetime (40-year time span) costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for different therapy options, a Markov model that included five initial monotherapies and LAM plus ADV combination as an initial treatment was developed. Two kinds of rescue combination strategies (base-case: LAM + ADV then ETV + ADV; alternative: direct use of ETV + ADV) were considered separately for treating patients refractory to initial therapy. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to explore model uncertainties. Results In base-case analysis, ETV had the lowest lifetime cost and served as the reference therapy. Compared to the reference, LAM, ADV, and TBV had higher costs and lower efficacy, and were completely dominated by ETV. LAM plus ADV combination therapy or TDF was more efficacious than ETV, but also more expensive. Although the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of combination therapy or TDF were both higher than the willingness-to-pay threshold of $20,466/QALY gained for the reference treatment, in an alternative scenario analysis LAM plus ADV combination therapy would be the preferable treatment option. Conclusion ETV and LAM plus ADV combination therapy are both cost-effective strategies for treating Chinese CHB patients. PMID:27041994

  10. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  11. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of treatment-refractory metastatic thyroid cancer using 90Yttrium and 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs: toxicity, response and survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Budiawan, Hendra; Salavati, Ali; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    The overall survival rate of non-radioiodine avid differentiated (follicular, papillary, medullary) thyroid carcinoma is significantly lower than for patients with iodine-avid lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate toxicity and efficacy (response and survival) of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in non-radioiodine-avid or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients. Sixteen non-radioiodine-avid and/or radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, including follicular thyroid carcinoma (n = 4), medullary thyroid carcinoma (n = 8), Hürthle cell thyroid carcinoma (n = 3), and mixed carcinoma (n = 1) were treated with PRRT by using 90Yttrium and/or 177Lutetium labeled somatostatin analogs. 68Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT was used to determine the somatostatin receptor density in the residual tumor/metastatic lesions and to assess the treatment response. Hematological profiles and renal function were periodically examined after treatment. By using fractionated regimen, only mild, reversible hematological toxicity (grade 1) or nephrotoxicity (grade 1) were seen. Response assessment (using EORTC criteria) was performed in 11 patients treated with 2 or more (maximum 5) cycles of PRRT and showed disease stabilization in 4 (36.4%) patients. Two patients (18.2%) showed partial remission, in the remaining 5 patients (45.5%) disease remained progressive. Kaplan-Meier analysis resulted in a mean survival after the first PRRT of 4.2 years (95% CI, range 2.9-5.5) and median progression free survival of 25 months (inter-quartiles: 12-43). In non-radioiodine-avid/radioiodine therapy refractory thyroid cancer patients, PRRT is a promising therapeutic option with minimal toxicity, good response rate and excellent survival benefits. PMID:24380044

  12. Influence of BAK-Preserved Prostaglandin Analog Treatment on the Ocular Surface Health in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomić, Martina; Kaštelan, Snježana; Metež Soldo, Kata; Salopek-Rabatić, Jasminka

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), a chronic, degenerative optic neuropathy, requires persistent decrease of intraocular pressure so as to prevent visual impairment and blindness. However, long-term use of topical ocular medications may affect ocular surface health. Purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of BAK-preserved prostaglandin analog treatment on the ocular surface health in patients with newly diagnosed POAG. Methods. 40 newly diagnosed POAG patients were included in this prospective study. Intraocular pressure (IOP), tear break-up time (TBUT), and ocular surface disease index (OSDI) were assessed at baseline and 3-month after starting treatment with BAK-preserved travoprost 0.004%. Results. IOP decreased in all patients from baseline to 3-month final visit (23.80 ± 1.73 mmHg versus 16.78 ± 1.27 mmHg; P < 0.001). Mean TBUT decreased from 11.70 ± 1.86 seconds at baseline to 8.30 ± 1.29 seconds at 3-month final visit (<0.001). Mean OSDI score increased from 31.63 ± 18.48 to 44.41 ± 16.48 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. This study showed that BAK-preserved travoprost 0.004% is an effective medication in newly diagnosed POAG patients, but its long-term use may negatively influence ocular surface health by disrupting the tear film stability. Further studies are needed to better understand the clinical effects of different preservative types and concentrations on the ocular surface. PMID:23971041

  13. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  14. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. To compare the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50–150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6–12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  15. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. This study compared the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50-150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6-12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  16. Radioactive Decay - An Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGeachy, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Presents an analog of radioactive decay that allows the student to grasp the concept of half life and the exponential nature of the decay process. The analog is devised to use small, colored, plastic poker chips or counters. Provides the typical data and a graph which supports the analog. (YP)

  17. TU-C-17A-12: Towards a Passively Optimized Phase-Space Monte Carlo (POPMC) Treatment Planning Method: A Proof of Principle

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y M; Bednarz, B; Zankowski, C; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of on-line/off-line adaptive, and biologically-conformal radiation therapy has led to a need for treatment planning solutions that utilize voxel-specific penalties, requiring optimization over a large solution space that is performed quickly, and the dose in each voxel calculated accurately. This work proposes a “passive” optimization framework, which is executed concurrently during Monte Carlo dose calculation, evaluating the cost/benefit of each history during transport, and creates a passively optimized fluence map. Methods: The Monte Carlo code Geant4 v9.6 was used for this study. The standard voxel geometry implementation was modified to support the passive optimization framework, with voxel-specific optimization parameters. Dose-benefit functions, which will increase a particle history’s weight upon dose deposition, were defined in a central collection of voxels to effectively create target structures. Histories that deposit energy to voxels are reweighted based on a voxel’s dose multiplied by its cost/benefit value. Upon full termination of each history, the dose contributions of that history are reweighted to reflect a contribution proportional to the history’s final weight. A parallel-planar 1.25 MeV photon fluence is transported through the geometry, and re-weighted at each dose deposition step. The resulting weight is tallied with the incident spatial and directional coordinates in a phase-space distribution. Results: A uniform incident fluence was reweighted during MC dose calculations to create an optimized fluence map which would generate dose profiles in target volumes that exhibit the same dose characteristics as the prescribed optimization parameters. An optimized dose profile, calculated concurrently with the phase-space, reflects the resulting dose distribution. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of passively optimizing an incident fluence map during Monte Carlo dose calculations. The flexibility of

  18. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Background Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Objectives 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Methods Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Results Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Conclusions Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin

  19. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  20. Passivated niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  1. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... foreign investment companies; table of contents. 1.1291-0 Section 1.1291-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1291-0 Treatment of shareholders of certain... for §§ 1.1291-1, 1.1291-9, and 1.1291-10. § 1.1291-1Taxation of U.S. persons that are shareholders...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1291-0 - Treatment of shareholders of certain passive foreign investment companies; table of contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... foreign investment companies; table of contents. 1.1291-0 Section 1.1291-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Special Rules for Determining Capital Gains and Losses § 1.1291-0 Treatment of shareholders of certain... for §§ 1.1291-1, 1.1291-9, and 1.1291-10. § 1.1291-1Taxation of U.S. persons that are shareholders...

  3. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-09-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave-matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices

  4. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave–matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices PMID:26414528

  5. Treatment of osteoporosis with eldecalcitol, a new vitamin D analog: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixing; Fan, Changchun; Zhao, Xuechun; Tao, Hairong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Eldecalcitol (ELD) is an active form of vitamin D analog that has been approved for the treatment of osteoporosis in Japan. Over recent years, a number of multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted. Our goal is to comprehensively summarize the results from these studies. Methods We searched the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to February 28, 2015. Each database was searched using search terms “Eldecalcitol” and “ED-71” and the results were combined. The retrieved data from three independent clinical trials included a total of 1,332 patients with osteoporosis. After the data were pooled from three trials, RevMan software was used to conduct meta-analyses to determine the effects of ELD on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover marker (BTM) type I collagen amino-terminal telopeptide (NTX). Effects of ELD on some of the bone formation and bone resorption parameters, incidence of vertebral fractures at the lower spine, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with osteoporosis were also summarized. Results With a test for overall effectZ=6.35, ELD could increase lumbar BMD (P<0.00001). In comparison with alphacalcidol, ELD suppressed the NTX level to a greater degree (test for overall effectZ=3.82,P<0.0001). ELD was also found to suppress bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP) by 19% (P<0.01) and osteocalcin by 19% (P<0.01) at the dose of 0.75 μg/day. Compared to alfacalcidol, ELD showed higher potency in suppressing serum BALP (26±9 vs 32±11 U/L,P<0.05) and amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen I (PINP) (42±15 vs 59±23 ng/mL,P<0.05). In addition, ELD was found to be more effective in reducing the incidence of vertebral fractures at the lower spine (P=0.029). Conclusion Our meta-analysis showed that ELD was more potent than alphacalcidol in reducing BTM (NTX). Clinical data together suggest that ELD is efficient in treating osteoporosis by increasing

  6. Unpowered wireless analog resistance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andringa, Matthew M.; Neikirk, Dean P.; Wood, Sharon L.

    2004-07-01

    Our society depends heavily on a network of buildings, bridges and roadways. In order to properly maintain this civil infrastructure and avoid damage and costly repairs due to structural failure, it is necessary to monitor the health of these structures. Sensors must frequently be placed in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions and should ideally last the lifetime of the structure the sensors are monitoring. This paper presents the development of a low cost, passive, un-powered wireless analog resistance sensor. The sensor was originally designed for monitoring corrosion in concrete, but there are many other potential applications including remote temperature monitoring, embedded accelerometers, and embedded strain gauges. The passive wireless nature makes the sensor ideally suited for embedding in inaccessible locations under harsh conditions. The sensor consists of a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit containing a resistive transducer. The sensor is interrogated by measuring the impedance through a remote, magnetically coupled reader loop. The width of the resonance is directly related to the resistance of the transducer. The sensor has been simulated under a variety of conditions using a circuit model and compared to actual test sensors built and evaluated in the laboratory.

  7. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  8. Trends in biomass and metal sequestration associated with reeds and algae at Wheal Jane Biorem pilot passive treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Barley, R W; Hutton, C; Brown, M M E; Cusworth, J E; Hamilton, T J

    2005-02-01

    An assessment of the rate of biomass production both of the reeds in the aerobic cells and the algae in the rock filters, which form the final stage in the series of treatment cells, has been undertaken. The biomass production for the reeds was found to be highest for the lime-dosed anoxic limestone drain system, but even this was very low in comparison to values reported for natural and constructed wetlands. The algal coverage of each lagoon was relatively homogeneous, with no significant difference between the three systems studied. However, too many unknown factors suggest that further study is required. The metal uptake was higher in the roots than the stems, although no variation between cells of systems was detectable, and the difference was not as marked as reported by other workers. The metal concentrations in the debris samples were markedly higher than the roots of the reeds. The values for Fe, Al and As were several orders of magnitude larger than the influent minewater. Further study is required here, but this appears to be a key component in the function of the reeds. The lime-dosed system rock filter showed the highest Fe removal rate but the lowest Mn removal rate. Some possible mechanisms are discussed in the paper, but further investigation would be required to test these hypotheses. PMID:15680631

  9. Trends in biomass and metal sequestration associated with reeds and algae at Wheal Jane Biorem pilot passive treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Barley, R W; Hutton, C; Brown, M M E; Cusworth, J E; Hamilton, T J

    2005-06-01

    An assessment of the rate of biomass production both of the reeds in the aerobic cells and the algae in the rock filters, which form the final stage in the series of treatment cells, has been undertaken. The biomass production for the reeds was found to be highest for the lime-dosed anoxic limestone drain system, but even this was very low in comparison to values reported for natural and constructed wetlands. The algal coverage of each lagoon was relatively homogeneous, with no significant difference between the three systems studied. However, too many unknown factors suggest that further study is required. The metal uptake was higher in the roots than the stems, although no variation between cells of systems was detectable, and the difference was not as marked as reported by other workers. The metal concentrations in the debris samples were markedly higher than the roots of the reeds. The values for Fe, Al and As were several orders of magnitude larger than the influent minewater. Further study is required here, but this appears to be a key component in the function of the reeds. The lime-dosed system rock filter showed the highest Fe removal rate but the lowest Mn removal rate. Some possible mechanisms are discussed in the paper, but further investigation would be required to test these hypotheses. PMID:16086448

  10. Haneş and Valea Vinului (Romania) closed mines Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs)--actual condition and passive treatment remediation proposal.

    PubMed

    Măicăneanu, Andrada; Bedelean, Horea; Ardelean, Marius; Burcă, Silvia; Stanca, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Acid Mine Drainages (AMDs) from Haneş and Valea Vinului (Romania) closed mines were considered for characterization and treatment using a local zeolitic volcanic tuff, ZVT, (Măcicaş, Cluj County, Romania). Water samples were collected from two locations, before and after discharging point in case of Haneş mine, and on three horizons in case of Valea Vinului mine. Physico-chemical (pH, total solid, heavy metal ions concentration) analyses showed that the environment is strongly affected by these AMD discharges even if the mines were closed years ago. Iron, manganese and zinc were the main pollutants identified in Haneş mine AMD, while zinc is the one mainly present in case of Valea Vinului AMD. A batch technique (no stirring) in which the ZVT was put in contact with the AMD sample was proposed as a passive remediation technique. ZVT successfully remove heavy metal ion from AMD. According to heavy metal ion concentrations, removal efficiencies are reaching 100%, varying as follows, Fe(2+)>Zn(2+)>Mn(2+). When the ZVT was compared with two cationic resins (strong, SAR and weak acid, WAR) the following series was depicted, SAR>ZVT>WAR. PMID:23899925

  11. Analog synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  12. Nonvolatile Analog Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A nonvolatile analog memory uses pairs of ferroelectric field effect transistors (FFETs). Each pair is defined by a first FFET and a second FFET. When an analog value is to be stored in one of the pairs, the first FFET has a saturation voltage applied thereto, and the second FFET has a storage voltage applied thereto that is indicative of the analog value. The saturation and storage voltages decay over time in accordance with a known decay function that is used to recover the original analog value when the pair of FFETs is read.

  13. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  14. Passive treatment of acid mine drainage using coal combustion by-products and spent mushroom substrate: Results of column study

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, T.E.; Nairn, R.W.; Strevett, K.A.; Everett, J.

    1998-12-31

    A column study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using of coal combustion by-products (CCB) as alkaline materials in a field scale downflow constructed wetlands for acid mine drainage treatment. Five columns (15.24 cm in diameter and 91.44 cm high) were constructed and filled with a combination of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) and one of three alkaline materials (limestone, hydrated fly ash, or fluidized bed ash). The five mixtures utilized were 10% fluidized bed ash/40% limestone (FBA/LS), 10% fluidized bed ash (FBA), 50% limestone (LS), 50% hydrated fly ash (HFA),m and 50% sieved (>1.5 cm) hydrated fly ash (S. HFA) with the remainder as SMS on a w/w basis. Column received synthetic acid mine drainage containing: 400 mg/L iron, 59 mg/L aluminum, 11 mg/L manganese, 50% mg/L magnesium, 40 mg/L calcium, and 1200 mg/L sulfate for 5 months. Anoxic conditions in the influent reservoirs were maintained by a positive nitrogen pressure head. Flow rates of 2.0 mL/minute to each column were maintained by a multichannel peristaltic pump. For all columns, effluent acidity concentrations were less than influent acidity concentration (877{sup {minus}}30, n = 75f). Mean effluent acidity concentrations were 241 mg/L (FBA/LS), 186 mg/L (FBA), 419 mg/L (LS), {minus}28.5 mg/L (HFA), and 351 mg/L (S. HFA), respectively. While all column produced measurable alkalinity, only the HFA column produced a net alkaline discharge. The results of these column studies are applicable to the design and sizing of innovative field scale systems using alkaline-rich CCB`s.

  15. Passive solar technology

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D

    1981-04-01

    The present status of passive solar technology is summarized, including passive solar heating, cooling and daylighting. The key roles of the passive solar system designer and of innovation in the building industry are described. After definitions of passive design and a summary of passive design principles are given, performance and costs of passive solar technology are discussed. Passive energy design concepts or methods are then considered in the context of the overall process by which building decisions are made to achieve the integration of new techniques into conventional design. (LEW).

  16. Analog pulse processor

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  17. Analog synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Sarpeshkar, R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog–digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA–protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  18. Challenges in Using Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2011-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same…

  19. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  20. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 μM to 88 μM. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  1. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  2. Meat analog: a review.

    PubMed

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers. PMID:24915320

  3. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  4. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  5. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  6. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  7. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-04-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  8. Passive storage technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in storage technology and how passive techniques could be applied to the storage of propellants at the space station are described. The devices considered are passive orbital disconnect struts, cooled shield optimization, liftweight shields and catalytic converters.

  9. Somatostatin Analog Therapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tartarone, Alfredo; Lerose, Rosa; Aieta, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy represents the cornerstone of treatment for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC); however, standard therapy has reached a plateau in improving patient survival with overall disappointing results. The demonstration that SCLC expresses neuroendocrine markers, such as somatostatin (SST) receptors, has led to use SST analogs or radiolabeled SST analogs in the treatment of SCLC patients. In the current review, we would focus on the possible role of SST analogs in SCLC. PMID:27067504

  10. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  11. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  12. Application of activated nucleoside analogs for the treatment of drug-resistant tumors by oral delivery of nanogel-drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, Thulani H.; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin; Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2013-01-01

    A majority of nanoencapsulated drugs that have shown promise in cancer chemotherapy are administered intravenously. Development of effective oral nanoformulations presents a very challenging medical goal. Here, we describe successful applications of innovative polymeric nanogels in the form of conjugates with activated nucleoside analogs for oral administration in cancer chemotherapy. Previously, we reported the synthesis of amphiphilic polyvinyl alcohol and dextrin-based nanogel conjugates with the phosphorylated 5-FU nucleoside Floxuridine and demonstrated their enhanced activity against regular and drug-resistant cancers[1]. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated oral applications of nanogel conjugates of a protected Gemcitabine, the drug never used in oral therapies. These conjugates were able to quickly release an active form of the drug (Gemcitabine 5′-mono-, di- and triphosphates) by specific enzymatic activities, or slowly during hydrolysis. Gemcitabine conjugates demonstrated up to 127 times higher in vitro efficacy than the free drug against various cancer cells, including the lines resistant to nucleoside analogs. Surprisingly, these nanogel-drug conjugates were relatively stable in gastric conditions and able to actively penetrate through the gastrointestinal barrier based on permeability studies in Caco-2 cell model. In tumor xenograft models of several drug-resistant human cancers, we observed an efficient inhibition of tumor growth and extended the life-span of the animals by 4 times that of the control with orally treated Gemcitabine- or Floxuridine-nanogel conjugates. Thus, we have demonstrated a potential of therapeutic nanogel conjugates with the activated and stabilized Gemcitabine as a successful oral drug form against Gemcitabine-resistant and other drug-resistant tumors. PMID:23385032

  13. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  14. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  15. An Interesting Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacheco, Jose M.; Fernandez, Isabel

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this note is to give some insight into the formal unity of a very applicable area of mathematics by showing an interesting analogy between the weak part of the Rouche-Frobenius theorem and the existence result for the initial value problem for the general first-order linear two-dimensional PDE.

  16. How Analogy Drives Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstadter, Doug

    2004-05-05

    Many new ideas in theoretical physics come from analogies to older ideas in physics. For instance, the abstract notion of 'isospin' (or isotopic spin) originated in the prior concept of 'spin' (quantized angular momentum); likewise, the concept of 'phonon' (quantum of sound, or quantized collective excitation of a crystal) was based on the prior concept of 'photon' (quantum of light, or quantized element of the electromagnetic field). But these two examples, far from being exceptions, in fact represent the bread and butter of inventive thinking in physics. In a nutshell, intraphysics analogy-making -- borrowing by analogy with something already known in another area of physics -- is central to the progress of physics. The aim of this talk is to reveal the pervasiveness -- indeed, the indispensability -- of this kind of semi-irrational, wholly intuitive type of thinking (as opposed to more deductive mathematical inference) in the mental activity known as 'doing physics'. Speculations as to why wild analogical leaps are so crucial to the act of discovery in physics (as opposed to other disciplines) will be offered.

  17. Reasoning through Instructional Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, Shulamit; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to account for students' assessments of the plausibility and applicability of analogical explanations, and individual differences in these assessments, by analyzing properties of students' underlying knowledge systems. We developed a model of explanation and change in explanation focusing on knowledge elements that provide a…

  18. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  19. Learning by Analogical Bootstrapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miao, Chun-Hui; Kurtz, Kenneth J.; Gentner, Dedre

    2001-01-01

    Reports on research into whether mutual alignment of partially known situations can be an effective strategy when compared to the common procedure of drawing analogies from a well understood situation to one that is poorly understood. Results suggest that such mutual alignment is an effective means of promoting insight. (MM)

  20. Analogy, explanation, and proof

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, John E.; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence. PMID:25414655

  1. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) Long-Term Follow-up Clinical Evaluation in 202 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia Medrano, Joaquin; Blas, Ignacio de; Urtiaga, Ignacio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Gregorio, Miguel A. de

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the clinical outcome and patients' satisfaction after a 5 year follow-up period for pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) coil embolization in patients who suffered from chronic pelvic pain that initially consulted for lower limb venous insufficiency.MethodsA total of 202 patients suffering from chronic pelvic pain were recruited prospectively in a single center (mean age 43.5 years; range 27-57) where they were being treated for lower limb varices. Inclusion criteria were: lower limb varices and chronic pelvic pain (>6 months), >6 mm pelvic venous caliber in ultrasonography, and venous reflux or presence of communicating veins. Both ovarian and hypogastric veins were targeted for embolization. Pain level was assessed before and after embolotherapy and during follow-up using a visual analog scale (VAS). Technical and clinical success and recurrence of leg varices were studied. Patients completed a quality questionnaire. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1, 3, and 6 months and every year for 5 years.ResultsTechnical success was 100 %. Clinical success was achieved in 168 patients (93.85 %), with complete disappearance of symptoms in 60 patients (33.52 %). Pain score (VAS) was 7.34 {+-} 0.7 preprocedural versus 0.78 {+-} 1.2 at the end of follow-up (P < 0.0001). Complications were: groin hematoma (n = 6), coil migration (n = 4), and reaction to contrast media (n = 1). Twenty-three cases presented abdominal pain after procedure. In 24 patients (12.5 %), there was recurrence of their leg varices within the follow-up. The mean degree of patients' satisfaction was 7.4/9.ConclusionsCoil embolization of PCS is an effective and safe procedure, with high clinical success rate and degree of satisfaction.

  3. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  4. Successful use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog for the treatment of tertiary hypogonadism (GnRH deficiency) in a 5-year-old Belgian Blue bull.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Wegher, Laura; Carluccio, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    A bull was referred for a progressive oligoasthenotheratozoospermia that resulted in a unsuitable seminal quality for the cryopreservation. Breeding soundness evaluation results suggested gonadal dysfunction. Because of the lack of normal ranges for these hormones in the bull, in this study, the hypogonadism and the site of the dysfunction (hypothalamus) were diagnosed by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test. The evaluation of pituitary and testicular responsiveness by a GnRH stimulating test revealed a responsiveness of the pituitary and testis, thus a secondary hypogonadism (hypothalamic hypogonadism) was postulated and a therapeutic approach based on the subcutaneous administration of GnRH analog was attempted. An increase in semen volume, concentration and sperm characteristics were detected 9 weeks after the start of the treatment, corroborating the hypothalamic origin of the disease and the useful of the GnRH therapy. PMID:22493993

  5. Efficacy of induction of luteolysis in superovulated cows is dependent on time of prostaglandin F2alpha analog treatment: effects on plasma progesterone and luteinizing hormone profiles.

    PubMed

    Viana, J H M; Vargas, M S B; Siqueira, L G B; Camargo, L S A; Figueiredo, A C S; Fernandes, C A C; Palhao, M P

    2016-09-01

    The objectives were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of induction of luteolysis in superovulated (SOV) cows at two distinct time points after embryo flushing; and (2) compare the pattern of LH release after treatment with PGF in cows with single vs. multiple ovulations. In the first experiment, Holstein cows were SOV with 400 IU of FSH following standard procedures. Uterine flushing for embryo recovery was performed 7 days after artificial insemination (Day 0), and cows were randomly allocated into two groups to receive PGF (0.5-mg sodium cloprostenol, intramascular) either immediately after flushing (Day 7 group, N = 19) or 4 days later (Day 11 group, N = 20). Time of luteolysis was determined on the basis of plasma progesterone (P4) concentrations. There was no difference (P > 0.05) in plasma P4 before treatment between Day 7 and Day 11 groups. A decline in plasma P4 was observed 48 hours after PGF treatment in both the groups (P < 0.0001). In Day 11 cows, P4 continued to decrease thereafter, whereas Day 7 animals had no further reduction in plasma P4. Luteolysis (P4 < 1 ng/mL) occurred in all Day 11 cows. In the Day 7 group, however, luteolysis failure was observed for 11 of 19 cows (57.9%). In cows without luteolysis, plasma P4 increased after the initial PGF-induced decline. The second experiment compared luteolysis in (SOV, N = 6) vs. non-SOV (control, N = 8) cows. Both groups received a single PGF treatment on Day 11 after estrus, and luteolysis was monitored daily by ovarian ultrasonography and plasma P4 measurements. In addition, plasma LH was measured in blood samples taken every 20 minutes for 1 hour during five consecutive days after treatment. A similar percentage of reduction in P4 was observed in both groups 24 hours after treatment; however, SOV cows only reached plasma P4 values similar (P > 0.05) to controls 96 hours after treatment. There was no difference in initial LH values between SOV and controls (P > 0.05). The

  6. Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

  7. Analogy Construction versus Analogy Solution, and Their Influence on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz-Itay, Yifat; Kaniel, Shlomo; Ben-Amram, Einat

    2006-01-01

    This study compares transfer performed by subjects trained to solve verbal analogies, with transfer by subjects trained to construct them. The first group (n = 57) received instruction in a strategy to solve verbal analogies and the second group (n = 66) was trained in strategies for constructing such analogies. Before and after intervention, all…

  8. Synergy Between Gαz Deficiency and GLP-1 Analog Treatment in Preserving Functional β-Cell Mass in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Brill, Allison L; Wisinski, Jaclyn A; Cadena, Mark T; Thompson, Mary F; Fenske, Rachel J; Brar, Harpreet K; Schaid, Michael D; Pasker, Renee L; Kimple, Michelle E

    2016-05-01

    A defining characteristic of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) pathophysiology is pancreatic β-cell death and dysfunction, resulting in insufficient insulin secretion to properly control blood glucose levels. Treatments that promote β-cell replication and survival, thus reversing the loss of β-cell mass, while also preserving β-cell function, could lead to a real cure for T1DM. The α-subunit of the heterotrimeric Gz protein, Gαz, is a tonic negative regulator of adenylate cyclase and downstream cAMP production. cAMP is one of a few identified signaling molecules that can simultaneously have a positive impact on pancreatic islet β-cell proliferation, survival, and function. The purpose of our study was to determine whether mice lacking Gαz might be protected, at least partially, from β-cell loss and dysfunction after streptozotocin treatment. We also aimed to determine whether Gαz might act in concert with an activator of the cAMP-stimulatory glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor, exendin-4 (Ex4). Without Ex4 treatment, Gαz-null mice still developed hyperglycemia, albeit delayed. The same finding held true for wild-type mice treated with Ex4. With Ex4 treatment, Gαz-null mice were protected from developing severe hyperglycemia. Immunohistological studies performed on pancreas sections and in vitro apoptosis, cytotoxicity, and survival assays demonstrated a clear effect of Gαz signaling on pancreatic β-cell replication and death; β-cell function was also improved in Gαz-null islets. These data support our hypothesis that a combination of therapies targeting both stimulatory and inhibitory pathways will be more effective than either alone at protecting, preserving, and possibly regenerating β-cell mass and function in T1DM. PMID:27049466

  9. Remating behavior in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) females is affected by male juvenile hormone analog treatment but not by male sterilization.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S; Liendo, M C; Devescovi, F; Peralta, P A; Yusef, V; Ruiz, J; Cladera, J L; Vera, M T; Segura, D F

    2013-06-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) has been proposed as an area-wide method to control the South American fruit fly, Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann). This technique requires sterilization, a procedure that affects, along with other factors, the ability of males to modulate female sexual receptivity after copulation. Numerous pre-release treatments have been proposed to counteract the detrimental effects of irradiation, rearing and handling and increase SIT effectiveness. These include treating newly emerged males with a juvenile hormone mimic (methoprene) or supplying protein to the male's diet to accelerate sexual maturation prior to release. Here, we examine how male irradiation, methoprene treatment and protein intake affect remating behavior and the amount of sperm stored in inseminated females. In field cage experiments, we found that irradiated laboratory males were equally able to modulate female remating behavior as fertile wild males. However, females mated with 6-day-old, methoprene-treated males remated more and sooner than females mated with naturally matured males, either sterile or wild. Protein intake by males was not sufficient to overcome reduced ability of methoprene-treated males to induce refractory periods in females as lengthy as those induced by wild and naturally matured males. The amount of sperm stored by females was not affected by male irradiation, methoprene treatment or protein intake. This finding revealed that factors in addition to sperm volume intervene in regulating female receptivity after copulation. Implications for SIT are discussed. PMID:23340454

  10. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J. T.; Larsen, R. S.; Shapiro, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

  11. Analog storage integrated circuit

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1989-03-07

    A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

  12. Antarctic analogs for Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. E.; Andersen, D. T.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Enceladus is a new world for Astrobiology. The Cassini discovery of the icy plume emanating from the South Polar region indicates an active world, where detection of water, organics, sodium, and nano-particle silica in the plume strongly suggests that the source is a subsurface salty ocean reservoir. Recent gravity data from Cassini confirms the presence of a regional sea extending north to 50°S. An ocean habitat under a thick ice cover is perhaps a recurring theme in the Outer Solar System, but what makes Enceladus unique is that the plume jetting out into space is carrying samples of this ocean. Therefore, through the study of Enceladus' plumes we can gain new insights not only of a possible habitable world in the Solar Systems, but also about the formation and evolution of other icy-satellites. Cassini has been able to fly through this plume - effectively sampling the ocean. It is time to plan for future missions that do more detailed analyses, possibly return samples back to Earth and search for evidence of life. To help prepare for such missions, the need for earth-based analog environments is essential for logistical, methodological (life detection) and theoretical development. We have undertaken studies of two terrestrial environments that are close analogs to Enceladus' ocean: Lake Vida and Lake Untersee - two ice-sealed Antarctic lakes that represent physical, chemical and possibly biological analogs for Enceladus. By studying the diverse biology and physical and chemical constraints to life in these two unique lakes we will begin to understand the potential habitability of Enceladus and other icy moons, including possible sources of nutrients and energy, which together with liquid water are the key ingredients for life. Analog research such as this will also enable us to develop and test new strategies to search for evidence of life on Enceladus.

  13. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  14. Promoting Learning through the Use of Analogies in High School Biology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, David L.

    A model for developing instructional analogies was used to produce experimental treatments that included text from a high school biology textbook to which was added extended verbal analogies written by the researcher linking each of two biology concepts to analogous familiar concepts. The control treatment was text from the biology textbook…

  15. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  16. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  17. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Maria; D’Agostino, Paul M.; Mihali, Troco K.; Moffitt, Michelle C.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes) and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes), which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids. PMID:20714432

  18. Neural Analog Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    1982-07-01

    Neural Analog Information Processing (NAIP) is an effort to develop general purpose pattern classification architectures based upon biological information processing principles. This paper gives an overview of NAIP and its relationship to the previous work in neural modeling from which its fundamental principles are derived. It also presents a theorem concerning the stability of response of a slab (a two dimensional array of identical simple processing units) to time-invariant (spatial) patterns. An experiment (via computer emulation) demonstrating classification of a spatial pattern by a simple, but complete NAIP architecture is described. A concept for hardware implementation of NAIP architectures is briefly discussed.

  19. Antarctic Space Analog Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A; Gunderson, E. K. Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Holland, Albert W.

    1998-01-01

    The primary aim of this project was to examine group dynamics and individual performance in extreme, isolated environments and identify human factors requirements for long-duration space missions using data collected in an analog environment. Specifically, we wished to determine: 1) the characteristics of social relations in small groups of individuals living and working together in extreme, isolated environments, and 2) the environmental, social and psychological determinants of performance effectiveness in such groups. These two issues were examined in six interrelated studies using data collected in small, isolated research stations in Antarctica from 1963 to the present. Results from these six studies indicated that behavior and performance on long-duration space flights is likely to be seasonal or cyclical, situational, social, and salutogenic in nature. The project responded to two NASA program emphases for FY 1997 as described in the NRA: 1) the primary emphasis of the Behavior and Performance Program on determining long-term individual and group performance responses to space, identifying critical factors affecting those responses and understanding underlying mechanisms involved in behavior and performance, and developing and using ground-based models and analogs for studying space-related behavior and performance; and 2) the emphasis of the Data Analysis Program on extended data analysis. Results from the study were used to develop recommendations for the design and development of pre-flight crew training and in-flight psychological countermeasures for long-duration manned space missions.

  20. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  1. Vorticity in analog gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose–Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

  2. Analog and digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baher, H.

    The techniques of signal processing in both the analog and digital domains are addressed in a fashion suitable for undergraduate courses in modern electrical engineering. The topics considered include: spectral analysis of continuous and discrete signals, analysis of continuous and discrete systems and networks using transform methods, design of analog and digital filters, digitization of analog signals, power spectrum estimation of stochastic signals, FFT algorithms, finite word-length effects in digital signal processes, linear estimation, and adaptive filtering.

  3. A Novel cooked extruded lentils analog: physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghoush, Mahmoud; Alavi, Sajid; Al-Shathri, Abdulaziz

    2015-07-01

    Developing an extruded lentil analog is our aim. Lentil analog with six formulations were produced using a pilot-scale single (SS) and twin screw (TS) extruders. Texture analysis of lentil analogs prepared for consumption revealed that the products formulated with 60:40 and 70:30 soy: wheat ratios exhibited a significantly higher hardness, adhesiveness and lower springiness as compared to all other treatments. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) results indicated that all starches in dry blend are completely 100 % gelatinized by extrusion for all treatments at 100 °C. The maximum peak of viscosity for TS was formed after 5.58 min. from the run at 89.9 °C for the best treatment. However, this lentil analog product can provide a high quality lentil which can be used as a substitute for regular lentils. PMID:26139886

  4. Pictorial Analogies XII: Stoichiometric Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Pictorial analogies that demonstrate concepts of amounts allow instructors to teach that in stoichiometric problems, the number--or moles--of molecules of a chemical is what matters, even though it must be measured in masses or volumes. Analogies to stoichiometric relationships include the ratio of four wheels to one body in making wagons and…

  5. Isolated transfer of analog signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, T.

    1974-01-01

    Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

  6. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

  7. Conjecturing via Reconceived Classical Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kyeong-Hwa; Sriraman, Bharath

    2011-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is believed to be an efficient means of problem solving and construction of knowledge during the search for and the analysis of new mathematical objects. However, there is growing concern that despite everyday usage, learners are unable to transfer analogical reasoning to learning situations. This study aims at facilitating…

  8. Drawing Analogies in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affifi, Ramsey

    2014-01-01

    Reconsidering the origin, process, and outcomes of analogy-making suggests practices for environmental educators who strive to disengage humans from the isolating illusions of dichotomizing frameworks. We can view analogies as outcomes of developmental processes within which human subjectivity is but an element, threading our sense of self back…

  9. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  10. Effect of Heat-treatment on Quality and Microbiology of Colostrum and on Passive Transfer of Immunoglobulin G in Newborn Calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to describe the effect of heat-treatment on microbial counts and IgG levels in colostrum and describe serum IgG concentrations in newborn calves fed heat-treated vs raw colostrum. Six farms, ranging from 1,200 to 2,500 cows, enrolled in the study. First milking ...

  11. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  12. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  13. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  14. [Passive immunization in dogs and cats].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Michèle; Friedl, Yvonne; Hartmann, Katrin

    2016-08-17

    Antibodies play an important role in the defense against infectious diseases. Passive immunization provides immediate protection through transfer of exogenous antibodies to a recipient. It is mainly used for prophylaxis in dogs and cats that failed to receive maternal antibodies through the colostrum or when there is an acute risk to acquire infectious diseases. Only a small number of placebo-controlled studies have been published regarding the therapeutic use of passive immunization in small animals. While positive effects were reported in cats with acute virus infections of the upper respiratory tract and in dogs with distemper, no statistically significant influence could be demonstrated in the treatment of canine parvovirosis. Prospective, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled studies using adequate numbers of patients are warranted for a definitive statement regarding the therapeutic and prophylactic use of passive immunization in dogs and cats. PMID:27410719

  15. Passive Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic bearing for limited rotation devices requires no feedback control system to sense and correct shaft position. Passive Magnetic Torsion Bearing requires no power supply and has no rubbing parts. Torsion wire restrains against axial instability. Magnetic flux geometry chosen to assure lateral stability with radial restoring force that maintains alignment.

  16. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  17. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  18. Treatment With the Human Once-Weekly Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog Taspoglutide in Combination With Metformin Improves Glycemic Control and Lowers Body Weight in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled With Metformin Alone

    PubMed Central

    Nauck, Michael A.; Ratner, Robert E.; Kapitza, Christoph; Berria, Rachele; Boldrin, Mark; Balena, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy and safety of taspoglutide (R1583/BIM51077), a human once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Type 2 diabetic (n = 306) patients who failed to obtain glycemic control (A1C 7–9.5%) despite 1,500 mg metformin daily were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of double-blind subcutaneous treatment with placebo or taspoglutide, either 5, 10, or 20 mg once weekly or 10 or 20 mg once every 2 weeks, and followed for 4 additional weeks. All patients received their previously established dose of metformin throughout the study. Glycemic control was assessed by change in A1C (percent) from baseline. RESULTS Significantly greater (P < 0.0001) reductions in A1C from a mean ± SD baseline of 7.9 ± 0.7% were observed in all taspoglutide groups compared with placebo after 8 weeks of treatment: –1.0 ± 0.1% (5 mg once weekly), –1.2 ± 0.1% (10 mg once weekly), –1.2 ± 0.1% (20 mg once weekly), –0.9 ± 0.1% (10 mg Q2W), and –1.0 ± 0.1% (20 mg Q2W) vs. –0.2 ± 0.1% with placebo. After 8 weeks, body weight loss was significantly greater in the 10 mg (–2.1 ± 0.3 kg, P = 0.0035 vs. placebo) and 20 mg (–2.8 ± 0.3 kg, P < 0.0001) once-weekly groups and the 20 mg once every 2 weeks (–1.9 ± 0.3 kg, P = 0.0083) group than with placebo (–0.8 ± 0.3 kg). The most common adverse event was dose-dependent, transient, mild-to-moderate nausea; the incidence of hypoglycemia was very low. CONCLUSIONS Taspoglutide used in combination with metformin significantly improves fasting and postprandial glucose control and induces weight loss, with a favorable tolerability profile. PMID:19366970

  19. Comparison of Nootropic and Neuroprotective Features of Aryl-Substituted Analogs of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Borodkina, L E; Bagmetova, V V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2016-02-01

    GABA analogs containing phenyl (phenibut) or para-chlorophenyl (baclofen) substituents demonstrated nootropic activity in a dose of 20 mg/kg: they improved passive avoidance conditioning, decelerated its natural extinction, and exerted antiamnestic effect on the models of amnesia provoked by scopolamine or electroshock. Tolyl-containing GABA analog (tolibut, 20 mg/kg) exhibited antiamnestic activity only on the model of electroshock-induced amnesia. Baclofen and, to a lesser extent, tolibut alleviated seizures provoked by electroshock, i.e. both agents exerted anticonvulsant effect. All examined GABA aryl derivatives demonstrated neuroprotective properties on the maximum electroshock model: they shortened the duration of coma and shortened the period of spontaneous motor activity recovery. In addition, these agents decreased the severity of passive avoidance amnesia and behavioral deficit in the open field test in rats exposed to electroshock. The greatest neuroprotective properties were exhibited by phenyl-containing GABA analog phenibut. PMID:26906198

  20. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  1. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  2. Evaluating countermeasures in spaceflight analogs.

    PubMed

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2016-04-15

    Countermeasures are defined as solutions to prevent the undesirable physiologic outcomes associated with spaceflight. Spaceflight analogs provide a valuable opportunity for the evaluation of countermeasures because they allow for the evaluation of more subjects, more experimental control, and are considerably less expensive than actual spaceflight. The various human analogs have differing strengths and weaknesses with respect to the development and evaluation of countermeasures. The human analogs are briefly reviewed with a focus on their suitability for countermeasure evaluation. Bed rest is the most commonly used analog for evaluating countermeasures. While countermeasures are typically developed to target one or maybe two particular physiologic issues, it is increasingly important to evaluate all of the organ systems to discern whether they might be unintended consequences on nontargeted tissues. In preparation for Mars exploration it will be necessary to fully integrate countermeasures to protect all organ systems. The synergistic and antagonistic effects of multiple countermeasures needs to be the focus of future work. PMID:26662054

  3. Solving a problem by analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Don

    1999-03-01

    This note is a description of a student solution to a problem. I found the solution exciting because it exemplifies the kind of solution by analogy that Feynman describes in The Feynman Lectures on Physics.

  4. The Robustness of Acoustic Analogies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Lele, S. K.; Wei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic analogies for the prediction of flow noise are exact rearrangements of the flow equations N(right arrow q) = 0 into a nominal sound source S(right arrow q) and sound propagation operator L such that L(right arrow q) = S(right arrow q). In practice, the sound source is typically modeled and the propagation operator inverted to make predictions. Since the rearrangement is exact, any sufficiently accurate model of the source will yield the correct sound, so other factors must determine the merits of any particular formulation. Using data from a two-dimensional mixing layer direct numerical simulation (DNS), we evaluate the robustness of two analogy formulations to different errors intentionally introduced into the source. The motivation is that since S can not be perfectly modeled, analogies that are less sensitive to errors in S are preferable. Our assessment is made within the framework of Goldstein's generalized acoustic analogy, in which different choices of a base flow used in constructing L give different sources S and thus different analogies. A uniform base flow yields a Lighthill-like analogy, which we evaluate against a formulation in which the base flow is the actual mean flow of the DNS. The more complex mean flow formulation is found to be significantly more robust to errors in the energetic turbulent fluctuations, but its advantage is less pronounced when errors are made in the smaller scales.

  5. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  6. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  7. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  8. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  9. Biomedical sensor design using analog compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2015-05-01

    The main drawback of current healthcare systems is the location-specific nature of the system due to the use of fixed/wired biomedical sensors. Since biomedical sensors are usually driven by a battery, power consumption is the most important factor determining the life of a biomedical sensor. They are also restricted by size, cost, and transmission capacity. Therefore, it is important to reduce the load of sampling by merging the sampling and compression steps to reduce the storage usage, transmission times, and power consumption in order to expand the current healthcare systems to Wireless Healthcare Systems (WHSs). In this work, we present an implementation of a low-power biomedical sensor using analog Compressed Sensing (CS) framework for sparse biomedical signals that addresses both the energy and telemetry bandwidth constraints of wearable and wireless Body-Area Networks (BANs). This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of biomedical signals that are suitable for a variety of diagnostic and treatment purposes. At the transmitter side, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) in order to generate the compressed version of the input analog bio-signal. At the receiver side, a reconstruction algorithm based on Restricted Isometry Property (RIP) condition is applied in order to reconstruct the original bio-signals form the compressed bio-signals with high probability and enough accuracy. We examine the proposed algorithm with healthy and neuropathy surface Electromyography (sEMG) signals. The proposed algorithm achieves a good level for Average Recognition Rate (ARR) at 93% and reconstruction accuracy at 98.9%. In addition, The proposed architecture reduces total computation time from 32 to 11.5 seconds at sampling-rate=29 % of Nyquist rate, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD)=26 %, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE)=3 %.

  10. Producing and recognizing analogical relations.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, Regina; Hayes, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is an important component of intelligent behavior, and a key test of any approach to human language and cognition. Only a limited amount of empirical work has been conducted from a behavior analytic point of view, most of that within Relational Frame Theory (RFT), which views analogy as a matter of deriving relations among relations. The present series of four studies expands previous work by exploring the applicability of this model of analogy to topography-based rather than merely selection-based responses and by extending the work into additional relations, including nonsymmetrical ones. In each of the four studies participants pretrained in contextual control over nonarbitrary stimulus relations of sameness and opposition, or of sameness, smaller than, and larger than, learned arbitrary stimulus relations in the presence of these relational cues and derived analogies involving directly trained relations and derived relations of mutual and combinatorial entailment, measured using a variety of productive and selection-based measures. In Experiment 1 participants successfully recognized analogies among stimulus networks containing same and opposite relations; in Experiment 2 analogy was successfully used to extend derived relations to pairs of novel stimuli; in Experiment 3 the procedure used in Experiment 1 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations; in Experiment 4 the procedure used in Experiment 2 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations. Although not every participant showed the effects predicted, overall the procedures occasioned relational responses consistent with an RFT account that have not yet been demonstrated in a behavior-analytic laboratory setting, including productive responding on the basis of analogies. PMID:19230515