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Sample records for pasteurella hyaluronan synthase

  1. Role of hyaluronan and hyaluronan synthase in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yabushita, Hiromitsu; Kishida, Tameko; Fusano, Kanako; Kanyama, Kouhei; Zhuo, Lisheng; Itano, Naoki; Kimata, Koji; Noguchi, Masayoshi

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the immunohistochemical expression of hyaluronan synthase (HAS) and serum levels of hyaluronan correlate with the clinicopathological manifestations of endometrial carcinoma. Sera were obtained from 59 endometrial cancer patients and 22 post-menopausal healthy women. Concentration of hyaluronan in sera was measured by an inhibitory ELISA using a hyaluronan-binding protein. Tissues obtained from 59 endometrial cancer patients were immunostained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method using anti-HAS1, anti-HAS2, anti-HAS3 and anti-CD44 antibody. A section was defined as having positive expression when >50% of the tumor cells were intensely stained. The expression of HAS1 was related to the depth of myometrial invasion, histological grade and lymph-vascular space involvement, but the expression of HAS2 and HAS3 was unrelated to these parameters. CD44 expression occurred more frequently in the HAS2- or HAS3-positive groups than in the HAS2- or HAS3-negative groups, and the expression of HAS1 was unrelated to CD44 expression. Serum levels of hyaluronan were higher in the endometrial cancer group than in the healthy control group, and increased with depth of myometrial invasion, histological grade and lymph-vascular space involvement. Serum hyaluronan levels were higher in the HAS1-positive group than in the HAS1-negative group, but the expression of HAS2 and HAS3 was unrelated to serum hyaluronan levels. HAS1 expression and an increase in serum hyaluronan in endometrial cancer may be associated with disease progression through myometrial invasion and lymph-vascular space involvement. PMID:15870928

  2. Hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Panogeorgou, T; Tserbini, E; Filou, S; Vynios, D H; Naxakis, S S; Papadas, T A; Goumas, P D; Mastronikolis, N S

    2016-07-01

    Nasal polyps (NPs) are benign lesions of nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa affecting 1-4 % of all adults. Nasal polyposis affects the quality of patient's life as it causes nasal obstruction, postnasal drainage, purulent nasal discharge, hyposmia or anosmia, chronic sinusitis, facial pain and snoring. Without treatment, the disease can alter the craniofacial skeleton in cases of extended growth of polyps. The development of NPs is caused by the hyperplasia of nasal or paranasal sinuses mucosa, and edema of extracellular matrix. This is usually the result of high concentration of high molecular mass hyaluronan (HA) which is either overproduced or accumulated from blood supply. The size of HA presents high diversity and, especially in pathologic conditions, chains of low molecular mass can be observed. In NPs, chains of about 200 kDa have been identified and considered to be responsible for the inflammation. The purpose of the present study was the investigation, in NPs and normal nasal mucosa (NM), of the expression of the wild-type and alternatively spliced forms of hyaluronidases, their immunolocalization, and the expression of HA synthases to examine the isoform(s) responsible for the increased amounts of HA in NPs. Hyaluronidases' presence was examined on mRNA (RT-PCR analysis) and protein (immunohistochemistry) levels. Hyaluronan synthases' presence was examined on mRNA levels. Hyaluronidases were localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial and inflammatory cells, as well as in the matrix. On mRNA level, it was found that hyal-1-wt was decreased in NPs compared to NM and hyal-1-v3, -v4 and -v5 were substantially increased. Moreover, HAS2 and HAS3 were the only hyaluronan synthases detected, the expression of which was almost similar in NPs and NM. Overall, the results of the present study support that hyaluronidases are the main enzymes responsible for the decreased size of hyaluronan observed in NPs; thus they behave as inflammatory agents. Therefore, they

  3. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ynishida@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion.

  4. Regulation of hyaluronan synthases in mouse uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taro; Sakuta, Tomohiro; Kanayama, Toshiji

    2005-02-18

    We examined the expression pattern of hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNAs in the uterine cervix of pregnant mice. The expression levels of HAS-1 and -2 mRNAs peaked at delivery, whereas that of HAS-3 mRNA peaked on the 15th day of pregnancy. The regulation of HAS mRNA expression was examined in pregnant mouse uterine cervical fibroblasts. The expression of HAS-1, -2, and -3 mRNAs was significantly augmented by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Progesterone significantly interfered with expression of HAS-1 and -2 mRNAs, but significantly increased the expression of HAS-3 mRNA. Low-molecular-weight hyaluronan significantly enhanced only the expression of HAS-1 mRNA. These results indicate that HAS in the uterine cervix is regulated in a complex manner by IL-1beta, progesterone, and low-molecular-weight hyaluronan, of which changes in the cervical tissue and serum closely participate in uterine cervical ripening and/or inflammation. PMID:15649434

  5. Accumulation of Extracellular Hyaluronan by Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Promotes Tumor Growth and Modulates the Pancreatic Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunmei; Singha, Netai C.; Osgood, Ryan J.; Symons, Rebecca; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiaoming; Thompson, Curtis B.; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Jacobetz, Michael A.; Tuveson, David A.; Frost, Gregory I.; Shepard, H. Michael; Huang, Zhongdong

    2014-01-01

    Extensive accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan is found in pancreatic cancer. The role of hyaluronan synthases 2 and 3 (HAS2, 3) was investigated in pancreatic cancer growth and the tumor microenvironment. Overexpression of HAS3 increased hyaluronan synthesis in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells. In vivo, overexpression of HAS3 led to faster growing xenograft tumors with abundant extracellular hyaluronan accumulation. Treatment with pegylated human recombinant hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) removed extracellular hyaluronan and dramatically decreased the growth rate of BxPC-3 HAS3 tumors compared to parental tumors. PEGPH20 had a weaker effect on HAS2-overexpressing tumors which grew more slowly and contained both extracellular and intracellular hyaluronan. Accumulation of hyaluronan was associated with loss of plasma membrane E-cadherin and accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin, suggesting disruption of adherens junctions. PEGPH20 decreased the amount of nuclear hypoxia-related proteins and induced translocation of E-cadherin and β-catenin to the plasma membrane. Translocation of E-cadherin was also seen in tumors from a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and in a human non-small cell lung cancer sample from a patient treated with PEGPH20. In conclusion, hyaluronan accumulation by HAS3 favors pancreatic cancer growth, at least in part by decreasing epithelial cell adhesion, and PEGPH20 inhibits these changes and suppresses tumor growth. PMID:25147816

  6. Accumulation of extracellular hyaluronan by hyaluronan synthase 3 promotes tumor growth and modulates the pancreatic cancer microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kultti, Anne; Zhao, Chunmei; Singha, Netai C; Zimmerman, Susan; Osgood, Ryan J; Symons, Rebecca; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiaoming; Thompson, Curtis B; Infante, Jeffrey R; Jacobetz, Michael A; Tuveson, David A; Frost, Gregory I; Shepard, H Michael; Huang, Zhongdong

    2014-01-01

    Extensive accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan is found in pancreatic cancer. The role of hyaluronan synthases 2 and 3 (HAS2, 3) was investigated in pancreatic cancer growth and the tumor microenvironment. Overexpression of HAS3 increased hyaluronan synthesis in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells. In vivo, overexpression of HAS3 led to faster growing xenograft tumors with abundant extracellular hyaluronan accumulation. Treatment with pegylated human recombinant hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) removed extracellular hyaluronan and dramatically decreased the growth rate of BxPC-3 HAS3 tumors compared to parental tumors. PEGPH20 had a weaker effect on HAS2-overexpressing tumors which grew more slowly and contained both extracellular and intracellular hyaluronan. Accumulation of hyaluronan was associated with loss of plasma membrane E-cadherin and accumulation of cytoplasmic β-catenin, suggesting disruption of adherens junctions. PEGPH20 decreased the amount of nuclear hypoxia-related proteins and induced translocation of E-cadherin and β-catenin to the plasma membrane. Translocation of E-cadherin was also seen in tumors from a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer and in a human non-small cell lung cancer sample from a patient treated with PEGPH20. In conclusion, hyaluronan accumulation by HAS3 favors pancreatic cancer growth, at least in part by decreasing epithelial cell adhesion, and PEGPH20 inhibits these changes and suppresses tumor growth. PMID:25147816

  7. Hyaluronan and hyaluronan synthases expression and localization in embryonic mouse molars.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guofeng; Jiang, Beizhan; Cai, Wenping; Liu, Shangfeng; Zhao, Shouliang

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and hyaluronan synthases (HASs) have been shown to play critical roles in embryogenesis and organ development. However, there have not been any studies examining HA and HAS expression and localization during tooth development. The present study was designed to investigate the expression of HA and three isoforms of HASs (HAS1, 2, 3) in embryonic mouse molars. The first mandibular embryonic mouse molars were examined by immunohistochemistry at E11.5, E13.5, E14.5, E16.5, and E18.5. PCR and western blot analyses were performed on RNA and proteins samples from E13.5 to E18.5 tooth germs. At the initial stage (E11.5), HA and HASs were expressed in the dental epithelium but not the underlying dental mesenchyme. HA immunostaining gradually increased in the enamel organ from the bud stage (E13.5) to the late bell stage (E18.5), and HA and HASs were highly expressed in the stellate reticulum and stratum intermedium. HA immunostaining was also enhanced in the dental mesenchyme and its derived tissues, but it was not expressed in the ameloblast and odontoblast regions. The three HAS isoforms had distinct expression patterns, and they were expressed in the dental mesenchyme and odontoblast at various levels. Furthermore, HAS1 and HAS2 expression decreased, while HAS3 expression increased from E13.5 to E18.5. These results suggested that HA synthesized by different HASs is involved in embryonic mouse molar morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. PMID:27318667

  8. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  9. 4-Methylumbelliferone inhibits hyaluronan synthesis by depletion of cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and downregulation of hyaluronan synthase 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kultti, Anne; Pasonen-Seppaenen, Sanna; Jauhiainen, Marjo; Rilla, Kirsi J.; Kaernae, Riikka; Pyoeriae, Emma; Tammi, Raija H.; Tammi, Markku I.

    2009-07-01

    Hyaluronan accumulation on cancer cells and their surrounding stroma predicts an unfavourable disease outcome, suggesting that hyaluronan enhances tumor growth and spreading. 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) inhibits hyaluronan synthesis and retards cancer spreading in experimental animals through mechanisms not fully understood. These mechanisms were studied in A2058 melanoma cells, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-361 breast, SKOV-3 ovarian and UT-SCC118 squamous carcinoma cells by analysing hyaluronan synthesis, UDP-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcUA) content, and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNA levels. The maximal inhibition in hyaluronan synthesis ranged 22-80% in the cell lines tested. Active glucuronidation of 4-MU produced large quantities of 4-MU-glucuronide, depleting the cellular UDP-GlcUA pool. The maximal reduction varied between 38 and 95%. 4-MU also downregulated HAS mRNA levels: HAS3 was 84-60% lower in MDA-MB-361, A2058 and SKOV-3 cells. HAS2 was the major isoenzyme in MCF-7 cells and lowered by 81%, similar to 88% in A2058 cells. These data indicate that both HAS substrate and HAS2 and/or HAS3 mRNA are targeted by 4-MU. Despite different target point sensitivities, the reduction of hyaluronan caused by 4-MU was associated with a significant inhibition of cell migration, proliferation and invasion, supporting the importance of hyaluronan synthesis in cancer, and the therapeutic potential of hyaluronan synthesis inhibition.

  10. The control and importance of hyaluronan synthase expression in palatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Jennifer L.; Jones, Sarah J.; Mossey, Peter A.; Ellis, Ian R.

    2013-01-01

    Development of the lip and palate involves a complex series of events that requires the close co-ordination of cell migration, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Palatal shelf elevation is considered to be driven by regional accumulation and hydration of glycosoaminoglycans, principally hyaluronan (HA), which provides an intrinsic shelf force, directed by components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). During embryogenesis, the extracellular and pericellular matrix surrounding migrating and proliferating cells is rich in HA. This would suggest that HA may be important in both shelf growth and fusion. TGFβ3 plays an important role in palatogenesis and the corresponding homozygous null (TGFβ3−/−) mouse, exhibits a defect in the fusion of the palatal shelves resulting in clefting of the secondary palate. TGFβ3 is expressed at the future medial edge epithelium (MEE) and at the actual edge epithelium during E14.5, suggesting a role for TGFβ3 in fusion. This is substantiated by experiments showing that addition of exogenous TGFβ3 can “rescue” the cleft palate phenotype in the null mouse. In addition, TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 can rescue the null mouse palate (in vitro) to near normal fusion. In vivo a TGFβ1 knock-in mouse, where the coding region of the TGFβ3 gene was replaced with the full-length TGFβ1 cDNA, displayed complete fusion at the mid portion of the secondary palate, whereas the anterior and posterior regions failed to fuse appropriately. We present experimental data indicating that the three HA synthase (Has) enzymes are differentially expressed during palatogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and embryo sections from the TGFβ3 null mouse at days E13.5 and E14.5, it was established that there was a decrease in expression of Has2 in the mesenchyme and an increase in expression of Has3 in comparison to the wild-type mouse. In vitro data indicate that HA synthesis is affected by addition of exogenous TGFβ3. Preliminary data suggests that this

  11. Analysis of human hyaluronan synthase gene transcriptional regulation and downstream hyaluronan cell surface receptor mobility in myofibroblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Midgley, Adam C; Bowen, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous extracellular glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) is a polymer composed of repeated disaccharide units of alternating D-glucuronic acid and D-N-acetylglucosamine residues linked via alternating β-1,4 and β-1,3 glycosidic bonds. Emerging data continue to reveal functions attributable to HA in a variety of physiological and pathological contexts. Defining the mechanisms regulating expression of the human hyaluronan synthase (HAS) genes that encode the corresponding HA-synthesizing HAS enzymes is therefore important in the context of HA biology in health and disease. We describe here methods to analyze transcriptional regulation of the HAS and HAS2-antisense RNA 1 genes. Elucidation of mechanisms of HA interaction with receptors such as the cell surface molecule CD44 is also key to understanding HA function. To this end, we provide protocols for fluorescent recovery after photobleaching analysis of CD44 membrane dynamics in the process of fibroblast to myofibroblast differentiation, a phenotypic transition that is common to the pathology of fibrosis of large organs such as the liver and kidney. PMID:25325984

  12. Disruption of hyaluronan synthase-2 abrogates normal cardiac morphogenesis and hyaluronan-mediated transformation of epithelium to mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Camenisch, Todd D.; Spicer, Andrew P.; Brehm-Gibson, Tammy; Biesterfeldt, Jennifer; Augustine, Mary Lou; Calabro, Anthony; Kubalak, Steven; Klewer, Scott E.; McDonald, John A.

    2000-01-01

    We identified hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) as a likely source of hyaluronan (HA) during embryonic development, and we used gene targeting to study its function in vivo. Has2–/– embryos lack HA, exhibit severe cardiac and vascular abnormalities, and die during midgestation (E9.5–10). Heart explants from Has2–/– embryos lack the characteristic transformation of cardiac endothelial cells into mesenchyme, an essential developmental event that depends on receptor-mediated intracellular signaling. This defect is reproduced by expression of a dominant-negative Ras in wild-type heart explants, and is reversed in Has2–/– explants by gene rescue, by administering exogenous HA, or by expressing activated Ras. Conversely, transformation in Has2–/– explants mediated by exogenous HA is inhibited by dominant-negative Ras. Collectively, our results demonstrate the importance of HA in mammalian embryogenesis and the pivotal role of Has2 during mammalian development. They also reveal a previously unrecognized pathway for cell migration and invasion that is HA-dependent and involves Ras activation. PMID:10930438

  13. Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Bogdani, Marika; Nagy, Nadine; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) component that is present in mouse and human islet ECM. HA is localized in peri-islet and intra-islet regions adjacent to microvessels. HA normally exists in a high molecular weight form, which is anti-inflammatory. However, under inflammatory conditions, HA is degraded into fragments that are proinflammatory. HA accumulates in islets of human subjects with recent onset type 1 diabetes (T1D), and is associated with myeloid and lymphocytic islet infiltration, suggesting a possible role for HA in insulitis. A similar accumulation of HA, in amount and location, occurs in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and DORmO mouse models of T1D. Furthermore, HA accumulates in follicular germinal centers and in T-cell areas in lymph nodes and spleen in both human and mouse models of T1D, as compared with control tissues. Whether HA accumulates in islets in type 2 diabetes (T2D) or models thereof has not been previously described. Here we show evidence that HA accumulates in a mouse model of islet amyloid deposition, a well-known component of islet pathology in T2D. In summary, islet HA accumulation is a feature of both T1D and a model of T2D, and may represent a novel inflammatory mediator of islet pathology. PMID:26216136

  14. Potential impact of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Adamia, Sophia; Treon, Steven P; Reiman, Tony; Tournilhac, Olivier; McQuarrie, Carrie; Mant, Michael J; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2005-03-01

    The hyaluronan synthase 1 (HAS1) gene encodes a plasma membrane protein that synthesizes hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix molecule. Previously, in patients with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), we detected upregulation of HAS1 transcripts and identified aberrant splice variants of this gene. Aberrant splicing of HAS1 results from activation of cryptic splice sites. In turn, activation of cryptic donor and acceptor splice sites can be promoted by mutations occurring upstream of these sites and/or at the branch point of slicing. We measured the frequency of the HAS1 833A/G polymorphism (ie, single-nucleotide polymorphism; SNP) in patients with WM and healthy donors. Additionally, HAS1 gene expression was evaluated in the same group of patients. Our observations so far suggest that HAS1 833A/G SNPs contribute to aberrant splicing of this gene; this idea is supported by the fact that 833A/G SNP is located on an exonic splicing enhancer motif. Based on the results obtained thus far, we speculate that individuals with HAS1 833G/G genotype are predisposed toward aberrant HAS1 splicing and expression of HAS1 variants, resulting in an enhanced risk of developing WM. Study of a larger group of patients and healthy donors is needed to confirm these speculations and to evaluate the prognostic significance of these findings. PMID:15794859

  15. Methods for measuring Class I membrane-bound hyaluronan synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Paul H; Padgett-McCue, Amy J; Baggenstoss, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying hyaluronan (HA) made by Class I HA synthase (HAS) and determining the level of activity of these membrane-bound enzymes is critical in studies to understand the normal biology of HA and how changes in HAS activity and HA levels or size are important in inflammatory and other diseases, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. Unlike the products made by the vast majority of glycosyltransferases, HA products are more complicated since they are made as a heterogeneous population of sizes spanning a broad mass range. Three radioactive and nonradioactive assay methods are described that can give the amount of HA made with or without information about the distribution of product sizes. PMID:23765666

  16. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  17. Molecular evolution of the hyaluronan synthase 2 gene in mammals: implications for adaptations to the subterranean niche and cancer resistance.

    PubMed

    Faulkes, Christopher G; Davies, Kalina T J; Rossiter, Stephen J; Bennett, Nigel C

    2015-05-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) Heterocephalus glaber is a unique and fascinating mammal exhibiting many unusual adaptations to a subterranean lifestyle. The recent discovery of their resistance to cancer and exceptional longevity has opened up new and important avenues of research. Part of this resistance to cancer has been attributed to the fact that NMRs produce a modified form of hyaluronan--a key constituent of the extracellular matrix--that is thought to confer increased elasticity of the skin as an adaptation for living in narrow tunnels. This so-called high molecular mass hyaluronan (HMM-HA) stems from two apparently unique substitutions in the hyaluronan synthase 2 enzyme (HAS2). To test whether other subterranean mammals with similar selection pressures also show molecular adaptation in their HAS2 gene, we sequenced the HAS2 gene for 11 subterranean mammals and closely related species, and combined these with data from 57 other mammals. Comparative screening revealed that one of the two putatively important HAS2 substitutions in the NMR predicted to have a significant effect on hyaluronan synthase function was uniquely shared by all African mole-rats. Interestingly, we also identified multiple other amino acid substitutions in key domains of the HAS2 molecule, although the biological consequences of these for hyaluronan synthesis remain to be determined. Despite these results, we found evidence of strong purifying selection acting on the HAS2 gene across all mammals, and the NMR remains unique in its particular HAS2 sequence. Our results indicate that more work is needed to determine whether the apparent cancer resistance seen in NMR is shared by other members of the African mole-rat clade. PMID:25948568

  18. Regulation of Hyaluronan (HA) Metabolism Mediated by HYBID (Hyaluronan-binding Protein Involved in HA Depolymerization, KIAA1199) and HA Synthases in Growth Factor-stimulated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Aya; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Sachiko; Morikawa, Tomohiko; Kawabata, Keigo; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sakai, Shingo; Takahashi, Yoshito; Okada, Yasunori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2015-12-25

    Regulation of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis and degradation is essential to maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. We recently reported that HYBID (HYaluronan-Binding protein Involved in hyaluronan Depolymerization), also called KIAA1199, plays a key role in HA depolymerization in skin and arthritic synovial fibroblasts. However, regulation of HA metabolism mediated by HYBID and HA synthases (HASs) under stimulation with growth factors remains obscure. Here we report that TGF-β1, basic FGF, EGF, and PDGF-BB commonly enhance total amount of HA in skin fibroblasts through up-regulation of HAS expression, but molecular size of newly produced HA is dependent on HYBID expression levels. Stimulation of HAS1/2 expression and suppression of HYBID expression by TGF-β1 were abrogated by blockade of the MAPK and/or Smad signaling and the PI3K-Akt signaling, respectively. In normal human skin, expression of the TGF-β1 receptors correlated positively with HAS2 expression and inversely with HYBID expression. On the other hand, TGF-β1 up-regulated HAS1/2 expression but exerted only a slight suppressive effect on HYBID expression in synovial fibroblasts from the patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in the production of lower molecular weight HA compared with normal skin and synovial fibroblasts. These data demonstrate that although TGF-β1, basic FGF, EGF, and PDGF-BB enhance HA production in skin fibroblasts, TGF-β1 most efficiently contributes to production of high molecular weight HA by HAS up-regulation and HYBID down-regulation and suggests that inefficient down-regulation of HYBID by TGF-β1 in arthritic synovial fibroblasts may be linked to accumulation of depolymerized HA in synovial fluids in arthritis patients. PMID:26518873

  19. Molecular evolution of the hyaluronan synthase 2 gene in mammals: implications for adaptations to the subterranean niche and cancer resistance

    PubMed Central

    Faulkes, Christopher G.; Davies, Kalina T. J.; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Bennett, Nigel C.

    2015-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR) Heterocephalus glaber is a unique and fascinating mammal exhibiting many unusual adaptations to a subterranean lifestyle. The recent discovery of their resistance to cancer and exceptional longevity has opened up new and important avenues of research. Part of this resistance to cancer has been attributed to the fact that NMRs produce a modified form of hyaluronan—a key constituent of the extracellular matrix—that is thought to confer increased elasticity of the skin as an adaptation for living in narrow tunnels. This so-called high molecular mass hyaluronan (HMM-HA) stems from two apparently unique substitutions in the hyaluronan synthase 2 enzyme (HAS2). To test whether other subterranean mammals with similar selection pressures also show molecular adaptation in their HAS2 gene, we sequenced the HAS2 gene for 11 subterranean mammals and closely related species, and combined these with data from 57 other mammals. Comparative screening revealed that one of the two putatively important HAS2 substitutions in the NMR predicted to have a significant effect on hyaluronan synthase function was uniquely shared by all African mole-rats. Interestingly, we also identified multiple other amino acid substitutions in key domains of the HAS2 molecule, although the biological consequences of these for hyaluronan synthesis remain to be determined. Despite these results, we found evidence of strong purifying selection acting on the HAS2 gene across all mammals, and the NMR remains unique in its particular HAS2 sequence. Our results indicate that more work is needed to determine whether the apparent cancer resistance seen in NMR is shared by other members of the African mole-rat clade. PMID:25948568

  20. Differential regulation and expression of hyaluronan synthases in human articular chondrocytes, synovial cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Recklies, A D; White, C; Melching, L; Roughley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Recently three isoforms of hyaluronan synthase (HAS), the enzyme responsible for hyaluronate/hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis, have been cloned, allowing us to study their expression pattern. Our objective was to determine which of the HAS isoenzymes were expressed in human articular chondrocytes, synovial fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells, whether their expression could be modulated by growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and cytokines [interleukin 1beta1 (IL-1beta)], and whether changes in the rate of HA synthesis by the cells correlated with changes in mRNA levels for one or more of the HAS isoforms. All three HAS isoforms were found to be expressed in the cultured cells analysed in this study, although the relative proportions varied for each cell type. HAS2 mRNA was usually predominant in chondrocytes, whereas synovial cells contained increased amounts of HAS1. HAS3 was always the least abundant message. The rapidly growing osteosarcoma cells contained almost exclusively HAS2 message. HAS usage in uncultured cartilage and synovial tissues was similar to that in the cultured cells, with HAS2 message being the predominant species in cartilage and HAS1 usually being the predominant species in synovium. HA synthesis was stimulated by the growth factors, but the extent of the response was cell-type specific. Synovial cells responded particularly well to IL-1beta, and showed a unique synergistic response when IL-1beta was used in combination with TGF-beta1. This response was much reduced in articular chondrocytes and absent in the osteosarcoma cells. Analysis of changes in HAS message levels indicated that there was often no correlation with the changes in HA secretion following exposure to growth factors. Although HAS-1 mRNA was increased in synovial cells after exposure to TGF-beta1/IL-1beta, the magnitude of the change was far less than the effect on HA synthesis. Our data thus

  1. Recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan by Agrobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zichao; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2007-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a sugar polymer of a repeating disaccharide, beta1-3 D-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) beta1-4 D-glucuronic acid (GlcA). It finds applications in numerous biomedical procedures such as ophthalmic surgery and osteoarthritis treatment. Until recently, the only commercial sources were extraction of rooster combs and from fermentation of pathogenic Streptococcus. In this work, we demonstrate that metabolic engineering strategies enable the recombinant synthesis of hyaluronan in a safe microorganism. Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749 is a commercial production strain for a food polymer, Curdlan. A broad host range expression vector was successfully developed to express the 3 kb HA synthase gene from Pasteurella multocida, along with a kfiD gene encoding UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli K5 strain. Coexpression of these two heterologous enzymes enables Agrobacterium to produce HA. Hyaluronan was accumulated up to 0.3 g/L in shaker flask cultivation. The molecular weight of the polymer from various Agrobacterium strains is in the range of 0.7-2 MD. To our knowledge, this is the first successful recombinant hyaluronan synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium that naturally produces a food product. The ease of genetic modifications provides future opportunities to tailor properties of polymers for specific applications. PMID:17705506

  2. Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in hyaluronan synthase 2 transcripts through an AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, Takumi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in HAS2 transcripts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin also increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pharmacological activator of AMPK increases mRNA levels of PPAR{alpha} and HAS2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression is blocked by a PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis via an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Although adipocytokines affect the functions of skin, little information is available on the effect of adiponectin on the skin. In this study, we investigated the effect of adiponectin on hyaluronan synthesis and its regulatory mechanisms in human dermal fibroblasts. Adiponectin promoted hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in the mRNA levels of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), which plays a primary role in hyaluronan synthesis. Adiponectin also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A pharmacological activator of AMPK, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1{beta}-ribofuranoside (AICAR), increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which enhances the expression of HAS2 mRNA. In addition, AICAR increased the mRNA levels of HAS2. Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression was blocked by GW6471, a PPAR{alpha} antagonist, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in HAS2 transcripts through an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts. Thus, our study suggests that adiponectin may be beneficial for retaining moisture in the skin, anti-inflammatory activity, and the treatment of a variety of cutaneous diseases.

  3. Extracellular UDP-Glucose Activates P2Y14 Receptor and Induces Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) Tyr705 Phosphorylation and Binding to Hyaluronan Synthase 2 (HAS2) Promoter, Stimulating Hyaluronan Synthesis of Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Tiina A.; Kärnä, Riikka; Makkonen, Katri M.; Laitinen, Jarmo T.; Tammi, Raija H.; Tammi, Markku I.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan, a major matrix molecule in epidermis, is often increased by stimuli that enhance keratinocyte proliferation and migration. We found that small amounts of UDP-sugars were released from keratinocytes and that UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) added into keratinocyte cultures induced a specific, rapid induction of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), and an increase of hyaluronan synthesis. The up-regulation of HAS2 was associated with JAK2 and ERK1/2 activation, and specific Tyr705 phosphorylation of transcription factor STAT3. Inhibition of JAK2, STAT3, or Gi-coupled receptors blocked the induction of HAS2 expression by UDP-Glc, the latter inhibitor suggesting that the signaling was triggered by the UDP-sugar receptor P2Y14. Chromatin immunoprecipitations demonstrated increased promoter binding of Tyr(P)705-STAT3 at the time of HAS2 induction. Interestingly, at the same time Ser(P)727-STAT3 binding to its response element regions in the HAS2 promoter was unchanged or decreased. UDP-Glc also stimulated keratinocyte migration, proliferation, and IL-8 expression, supporting a notion that UDP-Glc signals for epidermal inflammation, enhanced hyaluronan synthesis as an integral part of it. PMID:24847057

  4. Hyaluronan: A Matrix Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Louise

    2008-09-01

    The glucosaminoglycan hyaluronan is a key component of the extracellular matrix. It is a large, negatively charged molecule that can act as an ion exchange reservoir for positive ions. Hyaluronan is involved in renomedullary water handling through its water-binding capacity. In the renal medulla, the main source for hyaluronan production is the renomedullary interstitial cells. Hyaluronan synthases are found in the inner part of the plasma membrane and polymerize hyaluronan chains which are extruded into the extracellular space. Hyaluronidases are a family of enzymes involved in the degradation of hyaluronan. They have a wide range of properties, including differences in size, inhibitor sensitivities, catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificities and pH optima.

  5. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) and Proximity Ligation Assays Reveal Functionally Relevant Homo- and Heteromeric Complexes among Hyaluronan Synthases HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3*

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Geneviève; Vico, Nuria Ortega; Hassinen, Antti; Pujol, Francois M.; Deen, Ashik Jawahar; Ruusala, Aino; Tammi, Raija H.; Squire, Anthony; Heldin, Paraskevi; Kellokumpu, Sakari; Tammi, Markku I.

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hyaluronan is produced in the plasma membrane from cytosolic UDP-sugar substrates by hyaluronan synthase 1–3 (HAS1–3) isoenzymes that transfer N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucuronic acid (GlcUA) in alternative positions in the growing polysaccharide chain during its simultaneous extrusion into the extracellular space. It has been shown that HAS2 immunoprecipitates contain functional HAS2 homomers and also heteromers with HAS3 (Karousou, E., Kamiryo, M., Skandalis, S. S., Ruusala, A., Asteriou, T., Passi, A., Yamashita, H., Hellman, U., Heldin, C. H., and Heldin, P. (2010) The activity of hyaluronan synthase 2 is regulated by dimerization and ubiquitination. J. Biol. Chem. 285, 23647–23654). Here we have systematically screened in live cells, potential interactions among the HAS isoenzymes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and flow cytometric quantification. We show that all HAS isoenzymes form homomeric and also heteromeric complexes with each other. The same complexes were detected both in Golgi apparatus and plasma membrane by using FRET microscopy and the acceptor photobleaching method. Proximity ligation assays with HAS antibodies confirmed the presence of HAS1-HAS2, HAS2-HAS2, and HAS2-HAS3 complexes between endogenously expressed HASs. C-terminal deletions revealed that the enzymes interact mainly via uncharacterized N-terminal 86-amino acid domain(s), but additional binding site(s) probably exist in their C-terminal parts. Of all the homomeric complexes HAS1 had the lowest and HAS3 the highest synthetic activity. Interestingly, HAS1 transfection reduced the synthesis of hyaluronan obtained by HAS2 and HAS3, suggesting functional cooperation between the isoenzymes. These data indicate a general tendency of HAS isoenzymes to form both homomeric and heteromeric complexes with potentially important functional consequences on hyaluronan synthesis. PMID:25795779

  6. Hyaluronan Synthesis and Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Liam C.; Gorman, Chris; Kintakas, Christopher; McCulloch, Daniel R.; Mackie, Eleanor J.; White, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous hyaluronan is known to alter muscle precursor cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation, ultimately inhibiting myogenesis in vitro. The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of endogenous hyaluronan synthesis during myogenesis. In quantitative PCR studies, the genes responsible for synthesizing hyaluronan were found to be differentially regulated during muscle growth, repair, and pathology. Although all Has genes (Has1, Has2, and Has3) were differentially regulated in these models, only Has2 gene expression consistently associated with myogenic differentiation. During myogenic differentiation in vitro, Has2 was the most highly expressed of the synthases and increased after induction of differentiation. To test whether this association between Has2 expression and myogenesis relates to a role for Has2 in myoblast differentiation and fusion, C2C12 myoblasts were depleted of Has2 by siRNA and induced to differentiate. Depletion of Has2 inhibited differentiation and caused a loss of cell-associated hyaluronan and the hyaluronan-dependent pericellular matrix. The inhibition of differentiation caused by loss of hyaluronan was confirmed with the hyaluronan synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone. In hyaluronan synthesis-blocked cultures, restoration of the pericellular matrix could be achieved through the addition of exogenous hyaluronan and the proteoglycan versican, but this was not sufficient to restore differentiation to control levels. These data indicate that intrinsic hyaluronan synthesis is necessary for myoblasts to differentiate and form syncytial muscle cells, but the hyaluronan-dependent pericellular matrix is not sufficient to support differentiation alone; additional hyaluronan-dependent cell functions that are yet unknown may be required for myogenic differentiation. PMID:23493399

  7. Localisation and endocrine control of hyaluronan synthase (HAS) 2, HAS3 and CD44 expression in sheep granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Chavoshinejad, R; Marei, W F A; Hartshorne, G M; Fouladi-Nashta, A A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the hormonal regulation of hyaluronan (HA) components in sheep granulosa cells. HA components are present in the reproductive tract and have a range of physical and signalling properties related to reproductive function in several species. First, abattoir-derived ovaries of sheep were used to determine the localisation of HA synthase (HAS) 1-3 and CD44 proteins in antral follicles. Staining for HAS1-3 and CD44 proteins was most intense in the granulosa layer. Accordingly, the expression of HAS2, HAS3 and CD44 mRNA was measured in cultured granulosa cells exposed to 0-50ngmL(-1) of 17β-oestradiol and different combinations of oestradiol, gonadotropins, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and insulin for 48-96h (1ngmL(-1) FSH, 10ngmL(-1) insulin, 10ngmL(-1) IGF-1, 40ngmL(-1) E2 and 25ngmL(-1) LH.). mRNA expression was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction using a fold induction method. The results revealed that the hormones tested generally stimulated mRNA expression of the genes of interest in cultured granulosa cells. Specifically, oestradiol, when combined with IGF-1, insulin and FSH, stimulated HAS2 mRNA expression. Oestradiol and LH had synergistic effects in increasing HAS3 mRNA expression. In conclusion, we suggest that the hormones studied differentially regulate HAS2, HAS3 and CD44 in ovine granulosa cells in vitro. Further work is needed to address the signalling pathways involved. PMID:25427133

  8. Donor substrate promiscuity of the N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase activities of Pasteurella multocida heparosan synthase 2 (PmHS2) and Escherichia coli K5 KfiA.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Thon, Vireak; Chen, Yi; Muthana, Musleh M; Qu, Jingyao; Hie, Liana; Chen, Xi

    2014-02-01

    The biological activities of heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (HP) are closely related to their molecular structures. Both Pasteurella multocida heparosan synthase 2 (PmHS2) and Escherichia coli K5 KfiA have been used for enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of HS and HP oligosaccharides and their derivatives. We show here that cloning using the pET15b vector and expressing PmHS2 as an N-His6-tagged fusion protein improve its expression level in E. coli. Investigation of the donor substrate specificity of the N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase activities of P. multocida heparosan synthase 2 (PmHS2) and E. coli K5 KfiA indicates the substrate promiscuities of PmHS2 and KfiA. Overall, both PmHS2 and KfiA can use uridine 5'-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) and some of its C2'- and C6'-derivatives as donor substrates for their α1-4-GlcNAcT activities. Nevertheless, PmHS2 has a broader tolerance towards substrate modifications. Other than the UDP-sugars that can be used by KfiA, additional C6'-derivatives of UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-glucose, and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) are tolerable substrates for the α1-4-GlcNAcT activity of PmHS2. The substrate promiscuities of PmHS2 and KfiA will allow efficient chemoenzymatic synthesis of diverse HS and HP oligosaccharide derivatives which may have improved or altered activities compared to their natural counterparts. PMID:23661084

  9. Hyaluronan synthase assembles chitin oligomers with -GlcNAc(α1→)UDP at the reducing end.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Paul H; West, Christopher M; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance; Baggenstoss, Bruce A; Washburn, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    Class I hyaluronan synthases (HASs) assemble a polysaccharide containing the repeating disaccharide [GlcNAc(β1,4)GlcUA(β1,3)]n-UDP and vertebrate HASs also assemble (GlcNAc-β1,4)n homo-oligomers (chitin) in the absence of GlcUA-UDP. This multi-membrane domain CAZy GT2 family glycosyltransferase, which couples HA synthesis and translocation across the cell membrane, is atypical in that monosaccharides are incrementally assembled at the reducing, rather than the non-reducing, end of the growing polymer. Using Escherichia coli membranes containing recombinant Streptococcus equisimilis HAS, we demonstrate that a prokaryotic Class I HAS also synthesizes chitin oligomers (up to 15-mers, based on MS and MS/MS analyses of permethylated products). Furthermore, chitin oligomers were found attached at their reducing end to -4GlcNAc(α1→)UDP [i.e. (GlcNAcβ1,4)nGlcNAc(α1→)UDP]. These oligomers, which contained up to at least seven HexNAc residues, consisted of β4-linked GlcNAc residues, based on the sensitivity of the native products to jack bean β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Interestingly, these oligomers exhibited mass defects of -2, or -4 for longer oligomers, that strictly depended on conjugation to UDP, but MS/MS analyses indicate that these species result from chemical dehydrogenations occurring in the gas phase. Identification of (GlcNAc-β1,4)n-GlcNAc(α1→)UDP as HAS reaction products, made in the presence of GlcNAc(α1→)UDP only, provides strong independent confirmation for the reducing terminal addition mechanism. We conclude that chitin oligomer products made by HAS are derived from the cleavage of these novel activated oligo-chitosyl-UDP oligomers. Furthermore, it is possible that these UDP-activated chitin oligomers could serve as self-assembled primers for initiating HA synthesis and ultimately modify the non-reducing terminus of HA with a chitin cap. PMID:25583822

  10. Hyaluronan Synthase: The Mechanism of Initiation at the Reducing End and a Pendulum Model for Polysaccharide Translocation to the Cell Exterior

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis has been studied for over six decades, but our understanding of the biochemical details of how HA synthase (HAS) assembles HA is still incomplete. Class I family members include mammalian and streptococcal HASs, the focus of this review, which add new intracellular sugar-UDPs at the reducing end of growing hyaluronyl-UDP chains. HA-producing cells typically create extracellular HA coats (capsules) and also secrete HA into the surrounding space. Since HAS contains multiple transmembrane domains and is lipid-dependent, we proposed in 1999 that it creates an intraprotein HAS-lipid pore through which a growing HA-UDP chain is translocated continuously across the cell membrane to the exterior. We review here the evidence for a synthase pore-mediated polysaccharide translocation process and describe a possible mechanism (the Pendulum Model) and potential energy sources to drive this ATP-independent process. HA synthases also synthesize chitin oligosaccharides, which are created by cleavage of novel oligo-chitosyl-UDP products. The synthesis of chitin-UDP oligomers by HAS confirms the reducing end mechanism for sugar addition during HA assembly by streptococcal and mammalian Class I enzymes. These new findings indicate the possibility that HA biosynthesis is initiated by the ability of HAS to use chitin-UDP oligomers as self-primers. PMID:26472958

  11. Biology of hyaluronan: Insights from genetic disorders of hyaluronan metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Natowicz, Marvin R

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a rapidly turned over component of the vertebrate extracellular matrix. Its levels are determined, in part, by the hyaluronan synthases, HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3, and three hyaluronidases, HYAL1, HYAL2 and HYAL3. Hyaluronan binding proteins also regulate hyaluronan levels although their involvement is less well understood. To date, two genetic disorders of hyaluronan metabolism have been reported in humans: HYAL1 deficiency (Mucopolysaccharidosis IX) in four individuals with joint pathology as the predominant phenotypic finding and HAS2 deficiency in a single person having cardiac pathology. However, inherited disorders and induced mutations affecting hyaluronan metabolism have been characterized in other species. Overproduction of hyaluronan by HAS2 results in skin folding and thickening in shar-pei dogs and the naked mole rat, whereas a complete deficiency of HAS2 causes embryonic lethality in mice due to cardiac defects. Deficiencies of murine HAS1 and HAS3 result in a predisposition to seizures. Like humans, mice with HYAL1 deficiency exhibit joint pathology. Mice lacking HYAL2 have variably penetrant developmental defects, including skeletal and cardiac anomalies. Thus, based on mutant animal models, a partial deficiency of HAS2 or HYAL2 might be compatible with survival in humans, while complete deficiencies of HAS1, HAS3, and HYAL3 may yet be recognized. PMID:26322170

  12. Biology of hyaluronan: Insights from genetic disorders of hyaluronan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Natowicz, Marvin R

    2015-08-26

    Hyaluronan is a rapidly turned over component of the vertebrate extracellular matrix. Its levels are determined, in part, by the hyaluronan synthases, HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3, and three hyaluronidases, HYAL1, HYAL2 and HYAL3. Hyaluronan binding proteins also regulate hyaluronan levels although their involvement is less well understood. To date, two genetic disorders of hyaluronan metabolism have been reported in humans: HYAL1 deficiency (Mucopolysaccharidosis IX) in four individuals with joint pathology as the predominant phenotypic finding and HAS2 deficiency in a single person having cardiac pathology. However, inherited disorders and induced mutations affecting hyaluronan metabolism have been characterized in other species. Overproduction of hyaluronan by HAS2 results in skin folding and thickening in shar-pei dogs and the naked mole rat, whereas a complete deficiency of HAS2 causes embryonic lethality in mice due to cardiac defects. Deficiencies of murine HAS1 and HAS3 result in a predisposition to seizures. Like humans, mice with HYAL1 deficiency exhibit joint pathology. Mice lacking HYAL2 have variably penetrant developmental defects, including skeletal and cardiac anomalies. Thus, based on mutant animal models, a partial deficiency of HAS2 or HYAL2 might be compatible with survival in humans, while complete deficiencies of HAS1, HAS3, and HYAL3 may yet be recognized. PMID:26322170

  13. Lentiviral-mediated over-expression of hyaluronan synthase-1 (HAS-1) decreases the cellular inflammatory response and results in regenerative wound repair.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Robert C; Allukian, Myron; Lind, Robert C; Herdrich, Benjamin J; Xu, Junwang; Radu, Antoneta; Mitchell, Marc E; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2013-01-01

    Fetal wounds have been found to have increased levels of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA) compared with those of adults. The primary enzyme responsible for producing HMW-HA is hyaluronic acid synthase-1 (HAS-1). We hypothesized that over-expression of HAS-1 in adult dermal wounds would decrease inflammation and promote regenerative healing. To test this hypothesis, the flanks of adult C57Bl/6 mice were treated with a lentiviral construct containing either HAS-1-GFP or GFP transgenes. After 48 h, a 4-mm excisional wound was made at the site of treatment. Wounds were harvested at days 3, 7, or 28 after wounding. Wound phenotype was assessed by histology to examine tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry for CD45. At 7 and 28 days, lenti-HAS-1-treated wounds demonstrated the restoration of the normal dermal elements and organized collagen fiber orientation. In contrast, the lenti-GFP-treated wounds lacked normal dermal architecture and demonstrated a disorganized collagen scar. At 3 and 7 days, wounds treated with lenti-HAS-1 exhibited a significant decrease in the number of inflammatory cells when compared with wounds treated with lenti-GFP. Thus, HAS-1 over-expression promotes dermal regeneration, in part by decreasing the inflammatory response and by recapitulation of fetal extracellular matrix HMW-HA content. PMID:23149717

  14. Overexpression of hyaluronan synthase 2 and gonadotropin receptors in cumulus cells of goats subjected to one-shot eCG/FSH hormonal treatment for ovarian stimulation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana D R; Batista, Ribrio I T P; Magalhães, Livia C; Paula, Alexandre R; Souza, Samara S; Salamone, Daniel F; Bhat, Maajid H; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Freitas, Vicente J F; Melo, Luciana M

    2016-07-01

    Hormonal ovarian stimulation may affect transcripts in somatic cells of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and affect the resulting oocyte quality. Here, in parallel with morphological classification and in vitro maturation (IVM) rate analysis, we investigated the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), gonadotropic receptors (FSHR and LHR) and connexin 43 (GJA1) in cumulus cells (CCs) from goat COCs after multi-dose FSH (MD) or one-shot FSH/eCG (OS) treatments, using bovine COCs as control groups. The MD treatment produced more large follicles, and the resulting COCs had a better morphology and IVM rate than were obtained with OS. The OS treatment produced COCs with increased HAS2, FSHR, LHR and GJA1 expression. This gene expression pattern was also observed in the CCs of COCs that showed poor morphological characteristics. On the other hand, the mRNA levels were more similar between groups after IVM; FSHR and LHR were the main genes that showed decreased expression. Some events that occurred in bovine CCs during IVM, such as cell expansion, increased HAS2 expression and decreased GJA1 expression, were less evident or did not occur in goat COCs. In conclusion, increasing HAS2, FSHR, LHR and GJA1 expression in goat COCs does not confer greater meiotic competence to oocytes. Instead, it may result from poor regulation of gene expression in CCs by lower quality oocytes. Finally, cumulus expansion, together with HAS2 upregulation and GJA1 downregulation, seems to be more important for bovine COCs than for goat COCs. Additional studies are needed to investigate the importance of other HAS isoforms and connexins in goat COCs. PMID:27072623

  15. Orphan nuclear receptor HNF4G promotes bladder cancer growth and invasion through the regulation of the hyaluronan synthase 2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Okegawa, T; Ushio, K; Imai, M; Morimoto, M; Hara, T

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a class of transcription factors that are closely involved in the progression of certain types of cancer. We aimed to study the relation between bladder cancer and NRs, with special focus on orphan NRs whose ligands and functions have not been identified. First, we examined the expression levels of 22 genes encoding orphan NRs in clinical bladder cancer and found that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4γ (HNF4G; NR2A2) and NR2F6 were the genes that were upregulated most frequently in cancer tissues compared with their paired normal tissues. Knockdown and overexpression of each of these orphan NRs suppressed and stimulated the growth of bladder cancer cells in vitro, respectively. HNF4G also promoted tumor growth in bladder cancer xenograft models in vivo. Furthermore, HNF4G was both necessary and sufficient for the invasion of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Moreover, using microarray analyses, we identified hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) as one of the genes induced by HNF4G in bladder cancer cells. Transcription was activated by HNF4G in reporter assays using the promoter/enhancer region of the HAS2 gene. The endogenous expression of the HAS2 gene was suppressed by knockdown of HNF4G. In turn, knockdown of HAS2 inhibited the growth and invasion of bladder cancer cells. Taken together, our data suggest that some orphan NRs are involved in bladder cancer progression and that, among them, HNF4G promotes the growth and invasion of bladder cancer, at least in part, via the regulation of the HAS2 gene. PMID:23896584

  16. Natural Antisense Transcript for Hyaluronan Synthase 2 (HAS2-AS1) Induces Transcription of HAS2 via Protein O-GlcNAcylation*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Deleonibus, Sara; Moretto, Paola; Bowen, Timothy; Fischer, Jens W.; Grandoch, Maria; Oberhuber, Alexander; Love, Dona C.; Hanover, John A.; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Karousou, Eugenia; Viola, Manuela; D'Angelo, Maria Luisa; Hascall, Vincent C.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the microenvironment organization within vascular walls are critical events in the pathogenesis of vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Hyaluronan (HA) accumulation into artery walls supports vessel thickening and is involved in many cardiocirculatory diseases. Excessive cytosolic glucose can enter the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, increase UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) availability, and lead to modification of cytosolic proteins via O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide β-N-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) from UDP-GlcNAc by the enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase. As many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins can be glycosylated by O-GlcNAc, we studied whether the expression of the HA synthases that synthesize HA could be controlled by O-GlcNAcylation in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Among the three HAS isoenzymes, only HAS2 mRNA increased after O-GlcNAcylation induced by glucosamine treatments or by inhibiting O-GlcNAc transferase with PUGNAC (O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate). We found that the natural antisense transcript of HAS2 (HAS2-AS1) was absolutely necessary to induce the transcription of the HAS2 gene. Moreover, we found that O-GlcNAcylation modulated HAS2-AS1 promoter activation by recruiting the NF-κB subunit p65, but not the HAS2 promoter, whereas HAS2-AS1 natural antisense transcript, working in cis, regulated HAS2 transcription by altering the chromatin structure around the HAS2 proximal promoter via O-GlcNAcylation and acetylation. These results indicate that HAS2 transcription can be finely regulated not only by recruiting transcription factors to the promoter as previously described but also by modulating chromatin accessibility by epigenetic modifications. PMID:25183006

  17. Hereditary cutaneous mucinosis in shar pei dogs is associated with increased hyaluronan synthase-2 mRNA transcription by cultured dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zanna, Giordana; Docampo, María J; Fondevila, Dolors; Bardagí, Mar; Bassols, Anna; Ferrer, Lluís

    2009-10-01

    Shar pei dogs are known for the distinctive feature of thick, wrinkled skin as a consequence of high dermal mucin content. Excessive dermal deposition of mucinous substance leading to severe skin folding, and/or to the more severe vesicular form characterized by dermal vesicles or bullae, is highly prevalent in this breed and is known as idiopathic mucinosis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is the main component that accumulates in the dermis, and high levels of HA have also been detected in the serum of shar pei dogs. In this study, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cutaneous mucinosis of shar pei dogs were investigated. Thirteen shar pei dogs and four control dogs of other breeds were included. In primary dermal fibroblast cultures, transcription of the family of hyaluronan synthases (HAS) involved in HA synthesis, and of hyaluronidases (HYAL) involved in HA degradation, were studied by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The location of HA in cell cultures was studied by immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. Dermal fibroblasts transcribed HAS2, HAS3, HYAL1 and HYAL2, but no amplification for HAS1 was found. A higher transcription of HAS2 was demonstrated in shar pei dogs compared with control dogs. By confocal microscopy, HA was detected as a more diffuse and intense network-like pattern of green fluorescence in the fibroblast cells of shar pei dogs in comparison with control dogs. Together, these results provide additional evidence that hereditary cutaneous mucinosis in shar pei dogs may be a consequence of over-transcription or increased activity of HAS2. PMID:20178474

  18. Hyaluronidases and hyaluronan synthases expression is inversely correlated with malignancy in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, affecting prognosis

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, V.K.; Rocha, T.P.; Moreira, AL.; Soares, F.A.; Takagaki, T.; Carvalho, L.; Nicholson, A.G.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    We collected a series of 136 lung/bronchial and 56 matched lung parenchyma tissue samples from patients who underwent lung/bronchial biopsies and presented invasive carcinoma after lung surgery. The lung/bronchial samples included basal cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, moderate dysplasia, adenomatous hyperplasia, severe dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Matched lung parenchyma tissue samples included 25 squamous cell carcinomas and 31 adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze for the distribution of hyaluronidase (Hyal)-1 and −3, and hyaluronan synthases (HAS)-1, −2, and −3. Hyal-1 showed significantly higher expression in basal cell hyperplasia than in moderate dysplasia (P=0.01), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.0001), or severe dysplasia (P=0.03). Lower expression of Hyal-3 was found in atypical adenomatous hyperplasia than in basal cell hyperplasia (P=0.01) or moderate dysplasia (P=0.02). HAS-2 was significantly higher in severe dysplasia (P=0.002) and in squamous metaplasia (P=0.04) compared with basal cell hyperplasia. HAS-3 was significantly expressed in basal cell hyperplasia compared with atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.05) and severe dysplasia (P=0.02). Lower expression of HAS-3 was found in severe dysplasia compared with squamous metaplasia (P=0.01) and moderate dysplasia (P=0.01). Epithelial Hyal-1 and −3 and HAS-1, −2, and −3 expressions were significantly higher in pre-neoplastic lesions than in neoplastic lesions. Comparative Cox multivariate analysis controlled by N stage and histologic tumor type showed that patients with high HAS-3 expression in pre-neoplastic cells obtained by lung/bronchial biopsy presented a significantly higher risk of death (HR=1.19; P=0.04). We concluded that localization of Hyal and HAS in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions was inversely related to malignancy, which implied that visualizing these factors could be a useful diagnostic

  19. Hyaluronidases and hyaluronan synthases expression is inversely correlated with malignancy in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions, affecting prognosis.

    PubMed

    Sá, V K de; Rocha, T P; Moreira, Al; Soares, F A; Takagaki, T; Carvalho, L; Nicholson, A G; Capelozzi, V L

    2015-11-01

    We collected a series of 136 lung/bronchial and 56 matched lung parenchyma tissue samples from patients who underwent lung/bronchial biopsies and presented invasive carcinoma after lung surgery. The lung/bronchial samples included basal cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, moderate dysplasia, adenomatous hyperplasia, severe dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Matched lung parenchyma tissue samples included 25 squamous cell carcinomas and 31 adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze for the distribution of hyaluronidase (Hyal)-1 and -3, and hyaluronan synthases (HAS)-1, -2, and -3. Hyal-1 showed significantly higher expression in basal cell hyperplasia than in moderate dysplasia (P=0.01), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.0001), or severe dysplasia (P=0.03). Lower expression of Hyal-3 was found in atypical adenomatous hyperplasia than in basal cell hyperplasia (P=0.01) or moderate dysplasia (P=0.02). HAS-2 was significantly higher in severe dysplasia (P=0.002) and in squamous metaplasia (P=0.04) compared with basal cell hyperplasia. HAS-3 was significantly expressed in basal cell hyperplasia compared with atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (P=0.05) and severe dysplasia (P=0.02). Lower expression of HAS-3 was found in severe dysplasia compared with squamous metaplasia (P=0.01) and moderate dysplasia (P=0.01). Epithelial Hyal-1 and -3 and HAS-1, -2, and -3 expressions were significantly higher in pre-neoplastic lesions than in neoplastic lesions. Comparative Cox multivariate analysis controlled by N stage and histologic tumor type showed that patients with high HAS-3 expression in pre-neoplastic cells obtained by lung/bronchial biopsy presented a significantly higher risk of death (HR=1.19; P=0.04). We concluded that localization of Hyal and HAS in lung/bronchial pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions was inversely related to malignancy, which implied that visualizing these factors could be a useful diagnostic procedure for

  20. Transformation of Pasteurella novicida

    PubMed Central

    Tyeryar, Franklin J.; Lawton, William D.

    1969-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid from a streptomycin-resistant mutant of Pasteurella novicida transformed portions of P. novicida streptomycin-sensitive populations to streptomycin-resistant. Similarly, mutants auxotrophic for tryptophan or purine biosynthesis were also transformed to nutritional independence. PMID:5359612

  1. The ubiquitous hyaluronan: Functionally implicated in the oviduct?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Tienthai, P; Atikuzzaman, M; Vicente-Carrillo, A; Rubér, M; Alvarez-Rodriguez, M

    2016-07-01

    Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) is a simple, nonantigenic, nonsulfated glycosaminoglycan present everywhere in the extracellular compartments of the body. Noteworthy, it is highly conserved phylogenetically, from sauropsida to mammals; and plays a plethora of roles from embryonic/fetal development to adult physiological and pathological events, including tumor development. In reproduction, hyaluronan has proven related to initial events as sperm survival, buildup of the sperm reservoir in the oviduct, regulation of sperm capacitation, and prefertilization to later participate in embryo, fetal, and placental development. Synthesis, binding (via the CD44 membrane receptor), and degradation of hyaluronan occur in male and female genital organs, the oviduct being no exception. This review discusses our current knowledge on roles of this ubiquitous glycosaminoglycan on the survival of immunologically foreign spermatozoa in the pig oviduct, a relevant event for fertility. During preovulatory storage in the functional tubal sperm reservoir, spermatozoa are entrapped in a mucus-like tubal fluid. This fluid contains fluctuating levels of hyaluronan, which is synthesized by the lining epithelium by hyaluronan synthase 3. Both hyaluronan and its CD44 receptor are particularly evident in the deep mucosal furrows of the sperm reservoir, in which most spermatozoa are embedded in; kept alive, uncapacitated but also undetected by the immune system of the female. Hyaluronan is also present in the seminal plasma, and evidence points toward an involvement of hyaluronan and its receptor in the local (tubal and possibly uterine) production of antiinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10, pertaining maternal immune tolerance of these foreign cells. PMID:26768539

  2. Pasteurella multocida liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Cortez, J C; Shapiro, M; Awe, R J

    1986-08-01

    A previously healthy 61-year-old woman was seen with an abnormal chest roentgenogram and a 3-week history of fever, chills, malaise, and right upper quadrant pain. Blood cultures revealed Pasteurella multocida sensitive to penicillin. Liver spleen radioisotope scan and CT scan revealed space occupying lesions in the right lobe of the liver. The patient was a gardener with no pets or animal exposure. This case illustrates P. multocida septicemia and a liver abscess in a patient without animal exposure. In addition, the possibility of soil as another reservoir of infection is raised. PMID:3487981

  3. Murine abortion is associated with enhanced hyaluronan expression and abnormal localization at the fetomaternal interface.

    PubMed

    Cordo-Russo, R; Garcia, M G; Barrientos, G; Orsal, A S; Viola, M; Moschansky, P; Ringel, F; Passi, A; Alaniz, L; Hajos, S; Blois, S M

    2009-01-01

    The remodelling of the endometrial architecture is fundamental to create a suitable environment for the establishment of pregnancy. During this process, substantial alterations in the composition of maternal extracellular matrix play an important role by providing a prosperous medium for implantation as well as modulating trophoblast invasion leading to the formation of a functional placental unit. Hyaluronan is a conspicuous component of the extracellular matrix, particularly in remodelling tissues undergoing regeneration and repair. During gestation, changes in HA deposition and distribution indicate that this molecule may participate in preparation of the endometrial stroma for reception and implantation of the embryo. However, little is known about the role of hyaluronan at the fetomaternal interface, specially regarding its influence in pregnancy outcome. In the present study we show increased decidual hyaluronan levels in spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy mice on gestation day 7.5. Both in normal and pathologic pregnancies, high molecular size hyaluronan was found at the fetomaternal unit. However, hyaluronan metabolism (which results from the activity of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases) seems to be altered in spontaneous abortion as shown by a decrease in Hyal-3 expression as well as by differences in hyaluronan molecular size spectrum. This alteration in hyaluronan metabolism in spontaneous abortion could explain its increased concentration observed in decidua and the abnormal distribution of hyaluronan around the embryo implantation crypt. Thus, increased decidual hyaluronan levels resulting from abnormal deposition and turn over may contribute to the pathogenesis of pregnancy failure. PMID:19059644

  4. Mesotheliomas show higher hyaluronan positivity around tumor cells than metastatic pulmonary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Törrönen, Kari; Soini, Ylermi; Pääkkö, Paavo; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Sironen, Reijo; Rilla, Kirsi

    2016-10-01

    Hyaluronan is a unique glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix, abundant in normal connective tissues but highly increased in many pathological conditions like cancer. Mesothelioma, one of the most malignant cancer types, is associated with high content of hyaluronan, with elevated levels of hyaluronan in pleural effusions and serum of the patients. Metastatic lung adenocarcinomas are typically less aggressive and have a better prognosis as compared to mesotheliomas, a reason why it is highly important to find reliable tools to differentiate these cancer types. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of hyaluronan, hyaluronan producing synthases (HAS's) and hyaluronan receptor CD44, in mesothelioma and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we wanted to clarify the role of hyaluronan, CD44 and HAS's as putative markers for differentiating malignant mesothelioma from metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. The main finding of this study was that mesotheliomas are significantly more positive for hyaluronan staining than metastatic adenocarcinomas. Unexceptionally, a trend of CD44 positivity of stromal cells was higher in adenocarcinomas as compared to mesotheliomas. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the staining of any of the HAS isoenzymes either in tumor cells or stromal cells of different groups of cases. The results show that there are significant differences in hyaluronan content between metastatic lung adenocarcinomas and mesotheliomas. However, as previous studies have suggested, hyaluronan alone is not a sufficient independent marker for diagnostic differentiation of these cancer types, but could be utilized as a combination together with other specific markers. PMID:26912058

  5. Pasteurella multocida- and Pasteurella haemolytica-ghosts: new vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Marchart, J; Dropmann, G; Lechleitner, S; Schlapp, T; Wanner, G; Szostak, M P; Lubitz, W

    2003-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an important animal pathogen. Bacterial ghosts produced by the expression of phage PhiX174 lysis gene E are empty cells devoid of cytoplasmic and genomic material. Lysis of P. multocida 7A and P. haemolytica A1 carrying Pasteurella-specific lysis vectors (pSR2 and pSON2) occurred 140 min after induction of gene E expression induced by temperature upshift. The E-mediated cell lysis and killing activity was the same in both Pasteurella species and no viable cells could be detected after lysis of P. multocida and P. haemolytica. Pasteurella ghosts were used for immunization of rabbits and mice. Rabbits immunized subcutaneously with either P. multocida- or P. haemolytica-ghosts developed antibodies reacting with the immunizating strain, as well as with other Pasteurella strains. The number of proteins in whole cell protein extracts recognized by the sera constantly increased during the observation period of 51 days. In addition, dose-dependent protection against homologous challenge was observed in mice immunized with P. multocida-ghosts. Animals which received 1.15 x 10(8) ghosts and a challenge dose of up to 60 cfu (LD90), showed 100% protection. According to these results, we suggest ghosts of P. multocida and P. haemolytica as new vaccine candidates. PMID:12922135

  6. Serum susceptibility of bovine pasteurellas.

    PubMed Central

    Blau, K A; Ward, A C; Prieur, D J; Corbeil, L B

    1987-01-01

    In this study, the serum sensitivity of 23 P. haemolytica isolates and 18 P. multocida isolates was determined by incubating dilutions of bacteria with equal volumes of fresh or heat-inactivated bovine serum for one, two, or three hours. Clinical isolates of both Pasteurella species were resistant to serum, whereas isolates from asymptomatic cattle varied in serum susceptibility. The classical pathway of complement appeared to be the principal means of complement mediated killing as detected by incubation in the presence or absence of EGTA-MgCl2. Lyzozyme and iron saturation of serum did not greatly affect serum susceptibility with either of the Pasteurella species. PMID:3300919

  7. Comamonas testosteronan synthase, a bifunctional glycosyltransferase that produces a unique heparosan polysaccharide analog

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Nigel J; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Linhardt, Robert J; DeAngelis, Paul L

    2011-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear hexosamine-containing polysaccharides. These polysaccharides are synthesized by some pathogenic bacteria to form an extracellular coating or capsule. This strategy forms the basis of molecular camouflage since vertebrates possess naturally occurring GAGs that are essential for life. A recent sequence database search identified a putative protein from the opportunistic pathogen Comamonas testosteroni that exhibits similarity with the Pasteurella multocida GAG synthase PmHS1, which is responsible for the synthesis of a heparosan polysaccharide capsule. Initial supportive evidence included glucuronic acid (GlcUA)-containing polysaccharides extracted from C. testosteroni KF-1. We describe here the cloning and analysis of a novel Comamonas GAG synthase, CtTS. The GAG produced by CtTS in vitro consists of the sugars d-GlcUA and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, but is insensitive to digestion by GAG digesting enzymes, thus has distinct glycosidic linkages from vertebrate GAGs. The backbone structure of the polysaccharide product [-4-d-GlcUA-α1,4-d-GlcNAc-α1-]n was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance. Therefore, this novel GAG, testosteronan, consists of the same sugars as the biomedically relevant GAGs heparosan (N-acetyl-heparosan) and hyaluronan but may have distinct properties useful for future medical applications. PMID:21610195

  8. Classification of Pasteurella species B as Pasteurella oralis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Henrik; Bertelsen, Mads F; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Bisgaard, Magne

    2012-06-01

    Pasteurella species B has so far only been reported from the oral cavity of dogs, cats and a ferret. In the present study, information from 15 recent isolates from different sources, including African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), banded mongoose (Mungos mungo), Moholi bushbabies (Galago moholi) and pneumonia of a cat, were compared to five strains investigated previously from bite wounds in humans inflicted by a cat and dog and from gingiva of a cat. rpoB gene sequence comparison showed that 17 isolates, including the reference strain (CCUG 19794(T)), had identical sequences, whereas two were closely related and demonstrated 97.9 and 99.6 % similarity to strain CCUG 19794(T), respectively; the type strain of Pasteurella stomatis was the most closely related strain, with 92.3 % similarity. This is within the mean range (76-100 %) of rpoB gene sequence similarity between species of the same genus within the family Pasteurellaceae. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of four strains selected based on rpoB sequence comparison showed at least 99.7 % similarity between strains of Pasteurella species B, with 96.2 % similarity to the type strain of the closest related species (Pasteurella canis), indicating that Pasteurella species B should have separate species status. Separate species status was also documented when recN sequence comparisons were converted to a genome similarity of 93.7 % within Pasteurella species B and 59.0 % to the type strain of the closest related species (P. canis). Based on analysis of the phylogenetic and phenotypic data, and since most isolates originate from the oral cavities of a diverse group of animals, it is suggested that these bacteria be classified as Pasteurella oralis sp. nov.; the type strain is P683(T) ( = CCUG 19794(T) = CCM 7950(T) = strain 23193(T) = MCCM 00102(T)), obtained from a cat. Previous reports of the type strain have shown ubiquinone-8, demethylmenaquinone-8 and menaquinone-8 as the major quinones. Polyamines in the type

  9. Hyaluronan Hydrogels for a Biomimetic Spongiosa Layer of Tissue Engineered Heart Valve Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Puperi, Daniel S; O'Connell, Ronan W; Punske, Zoe E; Wu, Yan; West, Jennifer L; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2016-05-01

    Advanced tissue engineered heart valves must be constructed from multiple materials to better mimic the heterogeneity found in the native valve. The trilayered structure of aortic valves provides the ability to open and close consistently over a full human lifetime, with each layer performing specific mechanical functions. The middle spongiosa layer consists primarily of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans, providing lubrication and dampening functions as the valve leaflet flexes open and closed. In this study, hyaluronan hydrogels were tuned to perform the mechanical functions of the spongiosa layer, provide a biomimetic scaffold in which valve cells were encapsulated in 3D for tissue engineering applications, and gain insight into how valve cells maintain hyaluronan homeostasis within heart valves. Expression of the HAS1 isoform of hyaluronan synthase was significantly higher in hyaluronan hydrogels compared to blank-slate poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels. Hyaluronidase and matrix metalloproteinase enzyme activity was similar between hyaluronan and PEGDA hydrogels, even though these scaffold materials were each specifically susceptible to degradation by different enzyme types. KIAA1199 was expressed by valve cells and may play a role in the regulation of hyaluronan in heart valves. Cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels maintained healthy phenotype of valve cells in 3D culture and were tuned to approximate the mechanical properties of the valve spongiosa layer. Therefore, hyaluronan can be used as an appropriate material for the spongiosa layer of a proposed laminate tissue engineered heart valve scaffold. PMID:27120017

  10. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  11. Hyaluronan and Stone Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselman, Marino

    2008-09-01

    Kidney stones cannot be formed as long as crystals are passed in the urine. However, when crystals are retained it becomes possible for them to aggregate and form a stone. Crystals are expected to be formed not earlier than the distal tubules and collecting ducts. Studies both in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals do not adhere to intact distal epithelium, but only when the epithelium is proliferating or regenerating, so that it possesses dedifferentiated cells expressing hyaluronan, osteopontin (OPN) and their mutual receptor CD44 at the apical cell membrane. The polysaccharide hyaluronan is an excellent crystal binding molecule because of its negative ionic charge. We hypothesized that the risk for crystal retention in the human kidney would be increased when tubular cells express hyaluronan at their apical cell membrane. Two different patient categories in which nephrocalcinosis frequently occurs were studied to test this hypothesis (preterm neonates and kidney transplant patients). Hyaluronan (and OPN) expression at the luminal membrane of tubular cells indeed was observed, which preceded subsequent retention of crystals in the distal tubules. Tubular nephrocalcinosis has been reported to be associated with decline of renal function and thus further studies to extend our knowledge of the mechanisms of retention and accumulation of crystals in the kidney are warranted. Ultimately, this may allow the design of new strategies for the prevention and treatment of both nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis in patients.

  12. The Content and Size of Hyaluronan in Biological Fluids and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Cowman, Mary K; Lee, Hong-Gee; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L; McCarthy, James B; Turley, Eva A

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a simple repeating disaccharide polymer, synthesized at the cell surface by integral membrane synthases. The repeating sequence is perfectly homogeneous, and is the same in all vertebrate tissues and fluids. The polymer molecular mass is more variable. Most commonly, hyaluronan is synthesized as a high-molecular mass polymer, with an average molecular mass of approximately 1000-8000 kDa. There are a number of studies showing increased hyaluronan content, but reduced average molecular mass with a broader range of sizes present, in tissues or fluids when inflammatory or tissue-remodeling processes occur. In parallel studies, exogenous hyaluronan fragments of low-molecular mass (generally, <200 kDa) have been shown to affect cell behavior through binding to receptor proteins such as CD44 and RHAMM (gene name HMMR), and to signal either directly or indirectly through toll-like receptors. These data suggest that receptor sensitivity to hyaluronan size provides a biosensor of the state of the microenvironment surrounding the cell. Sensitive methods for isolation and characterization of hyaluronan and its fragments have been developed and continue to improve. This review provides an overview of the methods and our current state of knowledge of hyaluronan content and size distribution in biological fluids and tissues. PMID:26082778

  13. The Content and Size of Hyaluronan in Biological Fluids and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cowman, Mary K.; Lee, Hong-Gee; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.; McCarthy, James B.; Turley, Eva A.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a simple repeating disaccharide polymer, synthesized at the cell surface by integral membrane synthases. The repeating sequence is perfectly homogeneous, and is the same in all vertebrate tissues and fluids. The polymer molecular mass is more variable. Most commonly, hyaluronan is synthesized as a high-molecular mass polymer, with an average molecular mass of approximately 1000–8000 kDa. There are a number of studies showing increased hyaluronan content, but reduced average molecular mass with a broader range of sizes present, in tissues or fluids when inflammatory or tissue-remodeling processes occur. In parallel studies, exogenous hyaluronan fragments of low-molecular mass (generally, <200 kDa) have been shown to affect cell behavior through binding to receptor proteins such as CD44 and RHAMM (gene name HMMR), and to signal either directly or indirectly through toll-like receptors. These data suggest that receptor sensitivity to hyaluronan size provides a biosensor of the state of the microenvironment surrounding the cell. Sensitive methods for isolation and characterization of hyaluronan and its fragments have been developed and continue to improve. This review provides an overview of the methods and our current state of knowledge of hyaluronan content and size distribution in biological fluids and tissues. PMID:26082778

  14. Inhibition of hyaluronan export reduces collagen degradation in interleukin-1 treated cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Deiters, Barthold; Prehm, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteoarthrosis is characterized by cartilage erosion, proteolysis of aggrecan and collagen, and disturbed rates of synthesis of aggrecan and hyaluronan by chondrocytes, with hyaluronan over-production being an early reaction. We considered that inhibition of hyaluronan export might prevent subsequent proteoglycan loss and collagen degradation. Methods To test this hypothesis, we studied a tissue culture model using bovine cartilages explants activated with IL-1α to induce osteoarthritic reactions using the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors tadalafil, zaprinast and vardenafil. Results These drugs inhibited hyaluronan export, but they did not inhibit hyaluronan synthase activity. Simultaneously, they inhibited proteoglycan loss and collagen degradation, but not their synthesis. They also reduced the release of gelatinases into the culture media and diffusion of the indicator protein horseradish peroxidase through the cartilage explants. The mechanism of action of these compounds may be through inhibition of hyaluronan exporter multidrug resistance-associated protein 5 (MRP5), because the effective drug concentrations were much higher than required for phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition and intracellular cGMP accumulation. Conclusion Inhibition of hyaluronan over-production may be an appropriate target to attenuate IL-1-induced reactions in osteoarthritic cartilage. PMID:18205921

  15. Anti-obesity potential of enzymatic fragments of hyaluronan on high-fat diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Byong-Gon; Park, Yoon-Sun; Park, Joo Woong; Shin, Eunji; Shin, Woon-Seob

    2016-04-22

    Hyaluronan has diverse biological activities depending on its molecular size. The hyaluronan fragments (50 kDa) can decrease adipogenic differentiation in vitro. However, in vivo anti-obesitic effects of hyaluronan fragments have not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the anti-obesity effects of hyaluronan fragments on high-fat diet induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice. Oral administration of hyaluronan fragments (200 mg/kg for 8 weeks) decreased body weight, adipose tissues, serum lipid (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride), and leptin level. Hyaluronan fragments decreased the hypertrophy of adipose tissue and ameliorated liver steatosis. The mRNA expression of leptin was reduced in adipocyte by treatment with hyaluronan fragments. Additionally, hyaluronan fragments enhanced the mRNA expression of PPAR-α and its target genes UCP-2 and decreased mRNA expression of PPAR- γ and fatty acid synthase in liver. In conclusions, hyaluronan fragments had marked effects on inhibiting the development of obesity in obese mice fed the high-fat diet. It suggested that enhancing PPAR-α and suppressing PPAR-γ expression are two possible mechanisms for the anti-obesitic effect of hyaluronan fragments. PMID:27012203

  16. Hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer

    2005-03-01

    Many cells surround themselves with a cushioning halo of polysaccharides that is further strengthened and organized by proteins. In fibroblasts and chrondrocytes, the primary component of this pericellular matrix is hyaluronan, a large linear polyanion. Hyaluronan production is linked to a variety of disease, developmental, and physiological processes. Cells manipulate the concentration of hyaluronan and hyaluronan receptors for numerous activities including modulation of cell adhesion, cell motility, and differentiation. Recent investigations by identify hyaluronan's role in mediating early-stage cell adhesion. An open question is how the cell removes the 0.5-10 micron thick pericellular matrix to allow for further mature adhesion events requiring nanometer scale separations. In this investigation, holographic optical tweezers are used to study the adhesion and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix. Ultimately, we aim to shed further light on the spatial and temporal details of the dramatic transition from micron to nanometer gaps between the cell and its adhesive substrate.

  17. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  18. Infective Exacerbation of Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mayumi; Elshimy, Noha; Abusriwil, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old lady presented with a one-day history of shortness of breath as well as a cough productive of brown sputum. Her medical history was significant for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). She was in severe type one respiratory failure and blood tests revealed markedly raised inflammatory markers; however her chest X-ray was clear. On examination there was bronchial breathing with widespread crepitations and wheeze. She was treated as per an infective exacerbation of COPD. Subsequent blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a common commensal in the oropharynx of domesticated animals. The patient was then asked about any contact with animals, after which she revealed she had a dog and was bitten on her left hand the day before admission. We should not forget to enquire about recent history of injuries or animal bites when patients present acutely unwell. She made a complete recovery after treatment with penicillin. PMID:26942025

  19. Infective Exacerbation of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayumi; Elshimy, Noha; Abusriwil, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old lady presented with a one-day history of shortness of breath as well as a cough productive of brown sputum. Her medical history was significant for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). She was in severe type one respiratory failure and blood tests revealed markedly raised inflammatory markers; however her chest X-ray was clear. On examination there was bronchial breathing with widespread crepitations and wheeze. She was treated as per an infective exacerbation of COPD. Subsequent blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a common commensal in the oropharynx of domesticated animals. The patient was then asked about any contact with animals, after which she revealed she had a dog and was bitten on her left hand the day before admission. We should not forget to enquire about recent history of injuries or animal bites when patients present acutely unwell. She made a complete recovery after treatment with penicillin. PMID:26942025

  20. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  1. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or...

  2. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or...

  3. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  4. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  5. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or...

  6. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or...

  7. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.68 Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture bacterial vaccine of an avirulent...

  8. Restriction of mast cell proliferation through hyaluronan synthesis by co-cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hirotsugu; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Yamashita, Kazuhito; Sakanaka, Mariko; Itano, Naoki; Gohda, Eiichi; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Kimata, Koji; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate culture models for tissue mast cells are required to determine how they are involved in regulation of local immune responses. We previously established a culture model for cutaneous mast cells, in which bone marrow-derived immature mast cells were co-cultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of stem cell factor. In this study, we focused on the roles of hyaluronan, which is produced by the feeder fibroblasts and forms the extracellular matrix during the co-culture period. Hyaluronan synthesis was found to be mediated by hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) expressed in Swiss 3T3 cells. A decreases in the amount of hyaluronan, which was achieved by retroviral expression of short hairpin RNA for Has2 or by addition of hyaluronidase, significantly enhanced the proliferation of the cultured mast cells without any obvious effects on their maturation. Although we previously demonstrated that CD44 is required for proliferation of cutaneous mast cells, the deficiency of hyaluronan did not affect the proliferation of the cultured mast cells that lack CD44. These findings suggest that the extracellular matrix containing hyaluronan may have a potential to restrict proliferation of cutaneous mast cells in a CD44-independent manner. PMID:22382329

  9. Regulation of hyaluronan expression during cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Straach, Kelly J; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James A; Hascall, Vincent C; Mahendroo, Mala S

    2005-01-01

    In preparation for birth, the uterine cervix undergoes a remarkable transformation from a closed, rigid structure to a distensible, remodeled configuration that stretches to allow passage of a fetus. Cervical ripening requires changes in the composition and structure of the extracellular matrix. These include an increase in the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) prior to parturition. We show that the increase in cervical HA with advancing gestation correlates with the temporal increase in transcription of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) in the mouse. On gestation day 18, 1 day prior to birth, HAS2 transcripts are most abundant and begin to decline after birth. The steroid 5alpha-reductase type 1 deficient mouse, which fails to undergo cervical remodeling, has decreased expression of HAS2 mRNA and decreased tissue HA. HAS2 transcripts are expressed by cervical epithelium, and HA is localized to the matrix surrounding the stroma and to a lesser extent around the epithelium. HAS2 expression is suppressed in mice treated with progesterone. The mRNA expression levels of HA metabolizing enzymes hyaluronidase 1 and 2 were unchanged during pregnancy but increased after birth. Thus the net increase in HA content at term correlates with increased transcription of HAS2. Regulation of HA content is conserved in women because HAS2 transcripts are up-regulated in cervices of women in labor as compared to pregnant women not in labor. These results provide insights into the regulation of HA biosynthesis during cervical ripening and underscore the physiological role of HA in this essential process. PMID:15317739

  10. Hyaluronan in Tubular and Interstitial Nephrocalcinosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkoelen, Carl F.

    2007-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan (GAG) component of the renal medullary interstitium. HA is extremely large (up to 104 kDa) and composed of thousands repeating disaccharides of glucuronic acid (GlcUA) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthases (HASs) and degraded by hyaluronidases (Hyals). The production of HA by renomedullary interstitial cells is mediated by local osmolality. When excess water needs to be excreted, increased interstitial HA seems to antagonize water reabsorption, while the opposite occurs during water conservation. Hence, papillary interstitial HA is low and Hyal high during anti-diuresis, whereas during diuresis HA is high and Hyal low. The polyanion HA plays a role in the reabsorption of hypotonic fluid by immobilizing cations (Na+) via the carboxylate (COO-) groups of GlcUA. The binding of Ca2+ to anionic HA is probably also responsible for the fact that the papilla does not become a stone despite the extremely high interstitial phosphate and oxalate. HA is also an excellent crystal binding molecule. The expression of HA at the luminal surface of renal tubular cells leads to tubular nephrocalcinosis (tubular NC). Calcium staining methods (Von Kossa, Yasue) demonstrated that crystallization inhibitors cannot avoid the occasional precipitation of calcium phosphate in the papillary interstitium (interstitial NC). These crystals are probably immediately immobilized by the gel-like HA matrix. After ulcerating through the pelvic wall the calcified matrix becomes a Randall's plaque. The attachment of calcium oxalate crystals from the primary urine to plaque may ultimately lead to the development of clinical stones in the renal calyces (nephrolithiasis).

  11. The first chemical synthesis of novel MeO-3-GlcUA derivative of hyaluronan-based disaccharide to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of hyaluronic acid synthases (HASs)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guohua; Kumar, Vipin; Xue, Jun; Locke, Robert D.; Matta, Khushi L.

    2009-01-01

    The first chemical synthesis of MeO-3-GlcUAβ(1→3)GlcNAc-UDP to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of hyaluronic acid synthases (HASs) is described. Construction of the desired β(1→3)-linked disaccharide 10 was achieved very efficiently by coupling MeO-3-GlcUA donor 3 with the suitable protected GlcNTroc acceptor 4 using BF3.Et2O as Lewis acid. Chemoselective removal of anomeric NAP, phosphorylation, hydrogenation, coupling with UMP-morpholidate and finally complete deprotection gave the target compound 1 in good yield. PMID:20161585

  12. Modulation of Hyaluronan Synthesis by the Interaction between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Eliane; Piccinato, Carla A.; Nader, Helena B.; Cohen, Moisés; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Ferretti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are considered a good source for cellular therapy in cartilage repair. But, their potential to repair the extracellular matrix, in an osteoarthritic environment, is still controversial. In osteoarthritis (OA), anti-inflammatory action and extracellular matrix production are important steps for cartilage healing. This study examined the interaction of BM-MSC and OA-chondrocyte on the production of hyaluronan and inflammatory cytokines in a Transwell system. We compared cocultured BM-MSCs and OA-chondrocytes with the individually cultured controls (monocultures). There was a decrease in BM-MSCs cell count in coculture with OA-chondrocytes when compared to BM-MSCs alone. In monoculture, BM-MSCs produced higher amounts of hyaluronan than OA-chondrocytes and coculture of BM-MSCs with OA-chondrocytes increased hyaluronan production per cell. Hyaluronan synthase-1 mRNA expression was upregulated in BM-MSCs after coculture with OA-chondrocytes, whereas hyaluronidase-1 was downregulated. After coculture, lower IL-6 levels were detected in BM-MSCs compared with OA-chondrocytes. These results indicate that, in response to coculture with OA-chondrocytes, BM-MSCs change their behavior by increasing production of hyaluronan and decreasing inflammatory cytokines. Our results indicate that BM-MSCs per se could be a potential tool for OA regenerative therapy, exerting short-term effects on the local microenvironment even when cell:cell contact is not occurring. PMID:26273306

  13. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  14. Hyaluronan and hyaluronidase in genitourinary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Melanie A.; Lokeshwar, Vinata B.

    2008-01-01

    Genitourinary cancers are the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men and the fifth most common in women. Management of disease through accurate and cost effective early diagnostic markers, as well as identification of valid prognostic indicators, has contributed significantly to improved treatment outcomes. In this review, we will discuss the function, regulation and clinical utility of hyaluronan (HA), genes encoding its metabolic enzymes and receptors that mediate its cellular effects. Specific HA synthase (HAS) and hyaluronidase (HAase) genes encode the enzymes that produce HA polymers and oligosaccharides, respectively. Differential effects of these enzymes in progression of genitourinary tumors are determined by the relative balance between HAS and HAase levels, as well as the distribution of receptors. The genes are regulated in a complex fashion at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, but also by epigenetic events, alternative mRNA splicing, and subcellular localization. Importantly, the major tumor-derived HAase enzyme, HYAL-1, either alone or together with HA, is an accurate diagnostic and prognostic marker for genitourinary tumors. PMID:18508614

  15. Pasteurella multocida: from Zoonosis to Cellular Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mengfei

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In a world where most emerging and reemerging infectious diseases are zoonotic in nature and our contacts with both domestic and wild animals abound, there is growing awareness of the potential for human acquisition of animal diseases. Like other Pasteurellaceae, Pasteurella species are highly prevalent among animal populations, where they are often found as part of the normal microbiota of the oral, nasopharyngeal, and upper respiratory tracts. Many Pasteurella species are opportunistic pathogens that can cause endemic disease and are associated increasingly with epizootic outbreaks. Zoonotic transmission to humans usually occurs through animal bites or contact with nasal secretions, with P. multocida being the most prevalent isolate observed in human infections. Here we review recent comparative genomics and molecular pathogenesis studies that have advanced our understanding of the multiple virulence mechanisms employed by Pasteurella species to establish acute and chronic infections. We also summarize efforts being explored to enhance our ability to rapidly and accurately identify and distinguish among clinical isolates and to control pasteurellosis by improved development of new vaccines and treatment regimens. PMID:23824375

  16. Catabolism of hyaluronan: involvement of transition metals

    PubMed Central

    Šoltés, Ladislav; Kogan, Grigorij

    2009-01-01

    One of the very complex structures in the vertebrates is the joint. The main component of the joint is the synovial fluid with its high-molar-mass glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, which turnover is approximately twelve hours. Since the synovial fluid does not contain any hyaluronidases, the fast hyaluronan catabolism is caused primarily by reductive-oxidative processes. Eight transition metals – V23, Mn25, Fe26, Co27, Ni28, Cu29, Zn30, and Mo42 – naturally occurring in living organism are essential for the control of various metabolic and signaling pathways. They are also the key elements in catabolism of hyaluronan in the joint. In this overview, the role of these metals in physiological and pathophysiological catabolism of hyaluronan is described. The participation of these metals in the initiation and propagation of the radical degradation hyaluronan is critically reviewed. PMID:21217859

  17. Pasteurella multocida pneumonia complicated by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Martyn, V; Swift, D

    1984-02-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with acute non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. She proved to have a Pasteurella multocida pneumonia, with blood stream invasion by the organism, and required positive pressure ventilation for 53 days. Penicillin G., the drug of choice for this infection, failed to reverse the steady decline in her arterial oxygen-tension, and it was only after treatment with chloramphenicol and prednisolone that she began to improve. Serological tests strongly indicated the presence of a Staphylococcus aureus infection and the delay in giving antibiotics appropriate to this second pathogen may have been the reason for the patient's initial downhill course. PMID:6709548

  18. Pasteurella multocida Toxin Manipulates T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Dagmar; Heeg, Klaus; Kubatzky, Katharina F.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida causes various diseases in a broad range of wild and domestic animals. Toxigenic strains of the serotypes A and D produce an AB protein toxin named Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT). PMT constitutively activates the heterotrimeric G protein subunits Gαq, Gα13, and Gαi through deamidation of a glutamine residue, which results in cytoskeletal rearrangements as well as increased proliferation and survival of the host cell. In human monocytes, PMT alters the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation toward a phenotype that suppresses T cell activation. Here we describe that the toxin also modulates CD4-positive T helper (Th) cells directly. PMT amplifies the expansion of Th cells through enhanced cell cycle progression and suppression of apoptosis and manipulates the differentiation of Th subclasses through activation of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) family members and induction of subtype-specific master transcription factors. A large population of toxin-treated T cells is double-positive for Foxp3 and RORγt, the transcription factors expressed by Treg and Th17 cells, respectively. This suggests that these cells could have the potential to turn into Th17 cells or suppressive Treg cells. However, in terms of function, the PMT-differentiated cells behave as inflammatory Th17 cells that produce IL-17 and trigger T cell proliferation. PMID:26635744

  19. Regulation of Synthesis and Roles of Hyaluronan in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Timothy; Meran, Soma; Williams, Aled P.; Newbury, Lucy J.; Sauter, Matthias; Sitter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan composed of repeated disaccharide units of alternating D-glucuronic acid and D-N-acetylglucosamine residues linked via alternating β-1,4 and β-1,3 glycosidic bonds. HA is synthesized in humans by HA synthase (HAS) enzymes 1, 2, and 3, which are encoded by the corresponding HAS genes. Previous in vitro studies have shown characteristic changes in HAS expression and increased HA synthesis in response to wounding and proinflammatory cytokines in human peritoneal mesothelial cells. In addition, in vivo models and human peritoneal biopsy samples have provided evidence of changes in HA metabolism in the fibrosis that at present accompanies peritoneal dialysis treatment. This review discusses these published observations and how they might contribute to improvement in peritoneal dialysis. PMID:26550568

  20. Hyaluronan-coated extracellular vesicles--a novel link between hyaluronan and cancer.

    PubMed

    Rilla, Kirsi; Siiskonen, Hanna; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of hyaluronan (HA) on the plasma membrane is a unique and still partly mysterious way of macromolecular biosynthesis. HA forms pericellular coats around many cell types and accumulates in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of growing and renewing tissues. It is secreted to high concentrations in body fluids with antifriction properties like pleural, peritoneal, and synovial fluids, but is also detectable in plasma, saliva, and urine. In pathological states, like cancer and inflammation, the amount of HA is increased around cells, in the ECM, and in the body fluids. HA is an indicator of poor prognosis for cancer patients and creates a favorable environment for cellular growth and motility. The recent finding that HA-coated extracellular vesicles act both as a product of HA synthase activity and as special vehicles for HA, and perhaps carry signals important for malignant growth, provides a novel link between HA and cancer. HA could be carried on the surface of these vesicles in tissues and body fluids, creating beneficial environments by itself, or by associated molecules, for the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. The HA-coated plasma membrane protrusions and vesicles shed from them are potential biomarkers in cancer and other HA-associated disease states. PMID:25081528

  1. Layer-by-layer films from hyaluronan and amine modified hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Aurore; Senger, Bernard; Schaaf, Pierre; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Frisch, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a polysaccharide that is increasingly investigated for its role in cellular adhesion and for the preparation of biomimetic matrices for tissue engineering. Hyaluronan gels are prepared for application as space fillers whereas hyaluronan films are usually obtained by adsorbing or grafting a single hyaluronan layer onto a biomaterial surface. Here, we examine the possibility to employ the layer-by-layer technique to deposit thin films of cationic modified hyaluronan (HA+) and hyaluronan (HA) of controlled thicknesses. The buildup conditions are investigated and growth is compared to that of other polyelectrolyte multilayer films containing either HA as polyanion or HA+ as polycation. The films could be formed in a low ionic strength medium but required to be cross-linked prior to be put in contact with physiological medium. NIH3T3 fibroblasts were perfectly viable on self-assembled hyaluronan films with however a preference for hyaluronan ending films. These findings point out the possibility to tune the thickness of thin hyaluronan films at the nanometer scale. Such architectures could be employed for investigating cell/substrate interactions or for functionalizing biomaterial surfaces. PMID:17309215

  2. Draft genome sequences of two virulent serotypes of avian Pasteurella multocida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the draft genome sequences of two virulent avian strains of Pasteurella multocida. Comparative analyses of these genomes were done with the published genome sequence of avirulent Pasteurella multocida strain Pm70....

  3. Early requirement of Hyaluronan for tail regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Esteban G; Gaete, Marcia; Sánchez, Natalia; Carrasco, Héctor; Larraín, Juan

    2009-09-01

    Tail regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles is a favorable model system to understand the molecular and cellular basis of tissue regeneration. Although turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key event during tissue injury and repair, no functional studies to evaluate its role in appendage regeneration have been performed. Studying the role of Hyaluronan (HA), an ECM component, is particularly attractive because it can activate intracellular signaling cascades after tissue injury. Here we studied the function of HA and components of the HA pathway in Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration. We found that transcripts for components of this pathway, including Hyaluronan synthase2 (HAS2), Hyaluronidase2 and its receptors CD44 and RHAMM, were transiently upregulated in the regenerative bud after tail amputation. Concomitantly, an increase in HA levels was observed. Functional experiments using 4-methylumbelliferone, a specific HAS inhibitor that blocked the increase in HA levels after tail amputation, and transgenesis demonstrated that the HA pathway is required during the early phases of tail regeneration. Proper levels of HA are required to sustain proliferation of mesenchymal cells in the regenerative bud. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of GSK3beta was sufficient to rescue proliferation and tail regeneration when HA synthesis was blocked, suggesting that GSK3beta is downstream of the HA pathway. We have demonstrated that HA is an early component of the regenerative pathway and is required for cell proliferation during the early phases of Xenopus tail regeneration. In addition, a crosstalk between HA and GSK3beta signaling during tail regeneration was demonstrated. PMID:19666825

  4. A novel role of low molecular weight hyaluronan in breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man; Cao, Manlin; He, Yiqing; Liu, Yiwen; Yang, Cuixia; Du, Yan; Wang, Wenjuan; Gao, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA), a degradation fragment of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA), has been proven to play a crucial role in cancer progression. However, no systematic clinical study of breast cancer has been performed to correlate LMW-HA levels with metastasis. In the present study, we analyzed 176 serum specimens and found for the first time that the serum LMW-HA (but not total HA) level significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, suggesting that serum LMW-HA represents a better prognostic indicator of breast cancer progression than HA. Similarly, we found that breast cancer cell lines displaying higher invasive potential had a higher LMW-HA concentration than less-invasive cell lines. This higher LMW-HA level was accompanied by the overexpression of hyaluronan synthase (HAS2) and hyaluronidase (both HYAL1 and HYAL2). Of great importance, decreasing LMW-HA production significantly inhibited breast cancer cell migration and invasion. Overall, our results suggest that during cancer progression, cancer cells may actively remodel their microenvironment via an autocrine/paracrine-like process, resulting in elevated LMW-HA levels, which in turn may facilitate cancer progression by promoting the migration and invasion of cancer cells. Therefore, cancer-associated LMW-HA may be a more promising molecular biomarker than total HA for detecting metastasis and may have further applications in breast cancer treatment. PMID:25550464

  5. Hyaluronan and phospholipid association in biolubrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Dėdinaitė, Andra

    2013-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the outstanding lubrication of synovial joints is achieved by a sophisticated hierarchical structure of cartilage combined with synergistic actions of surface-active components present in the synovial fluid. In this work we focus on the association of two components of the synovial fluid, hyaluronan and dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), in bulk solution and at interfaces. We demonstrate that hyaluronan associates with DPPC vesicles and adsorbs to supported DPPC bilayers. The association structures formed at the interface are sufficiently stable to allow sequential adsorption of DPPC and hyaluronan, whereby promoting the formation of thick composite layers of these two components. The lubricating ability of such composite layers was probed by the AFM colloidal probe technique and found to be very favorable with low friction coefficients and high load bearing capacity. With DPPC as the last adsorbed component, a friction coefficient of 0.01 was found up to pressures significantly above what is encountered in healthy synovial joints. Hyaluronan as the last added component increases the friction coefficient to 0.03 and decreases the load bearing capacity somewhat (but still above what is needed in the synovial joint). Our data demonstrate that self-assembly structures formed by hyaluronan and phospholipids at interfaces are efficient aqueous lubricants, and it seems plausible that such self-assembly structures contribute to the exceptional lubrication of synovial joints. PMID:24171653

  6. Surface motion upregulates superficial zone protein and hyaluronan production in chondrocyte-seeded three-dimensional scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Grad, Sibylle; Lee, Cynthia R; Gorna, Katarzyna; Gogolewski, Sylwester; Wimmer, Markus A; Alini, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    A cartilage engineering bioreactor has been developed that provides joint-specific kinematics. This study investigated the effect of articular motion on the gene expression of superficial zone protein (SZP) and hyaluronan synthases (HASs) and on the release of SZP and hyaluronan of chondrocytes seeded onto biodegradable scaffolds. Cylindrical (8 x 4 mm) porous polyurethane scaffolds were seeded with bovine articular chondrocytes and subjected to static or dynamic compression, with and without articulation against a ceramic hip ball. After loading, the mRNA expression of SZP and HASs was analyzed, and SZP immunoreactivity and hyaluronan concentration of conditioned media were determined. Surface motion significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of SZP and HASs. Axial compression alone had no effect on SZP and increased HAS mRNA only at high strain amplitude. SZP was immunodetected only in the media of constructs exposed to surface motion. The release of hyaluronan into the culture medium was significantly enhanced by surface motion. These results indicate that specific stimuli that mimic the kinematics of natural joints, such as articular motion, may promote the development of a functional articular surface-synovial interface. PMID:15738679

  7. Phenotypic characterization of Zimbabwean isolates of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Sadza, M; Madsen, M; Hill, F W; Pawandiwa, A

    1994-02-01

    The phenotypic characteristics of 60 Zimbabwean isolates of Pasteurella multocida sensu stricto, from disease syndromes in different host species were studied. A number of representative strains were also serotyped. Consistent results were obtained in the tests for; catalase, oxidase, urease, indole, acid in glucose, inositol, salicin and sucrose. There was no obvious relationship between serotype, host or disease and the pattern of utilization of certain substrates by an isolate. This has been discussed in the context of recent proposals to reclassify Pasteurella and P. multocida on genotypic and phenotypic studies. It is suggested that notwithstanding the relevance of genetic studies in circumscribing P. multocida, the phenotype and disease significance of the taxon should not be ignored. A case of bronchitis in a dog which was simultaneously colonized by three different strains of Pasteurella is described. Also septicaemic pasteurellosis in a Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is reported and for the first time prevalence of various serotypes in pasteurellosis of animals in Zimbabwe. PMID:8160349

  8. Plasmids for heterologous expression in Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-02-28

    New cloning and expression vectors that replicate both in Pasteurella haemolytica and in Escherichia coli were constructed based on a native sulfonamide (SuR) and streptomycin (SmR) resistant plasmid of P. haemolytica called pYFC1. Each shuttle vector includes an MCS and a selectable antibiotic resistance marker that is expressed in both organisms. Plasmid pNF2176 carries the P. haemolytica ROB-1 beta-lactamase gene (blaP, ApR) and pNF2214 carries the Tn903 aph3 kanamycin resistance (KmR) element. The expression vector, pNF2176, was created by placing the MCS downstream of the sulfonamide gene promoter (PsulII) on pYFC1; this was used to clone and express the promoterless Tn9 chloramphenicol resistance gene (cat, CmR) in P. haemolytica (pNF2200). A promoter-probe vector (pNF2283) was constructed from pNF2200 by deleting PsulII. PMID:9074498

  9. Hyaluronan as an Immune Regulator in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    NOBLE, PAUL W.; LIANG, JIURONG; JIANG, DIANHUA

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation and turnover of extracellular matrix components are the hallmarks of tissue injury. Fragmented hyaluronan stimulates the expression of inflammatory genes by a variety of immune cells at the injury site. Hyaluronan binds to a number of cell surface proteins on a variety of cell types. Hyaluronan fragments signal through both Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR2 as well as CD44 to stimulate inflammatory genes in inflammatory cells. Hyaluronan is also present on the cell surface of epithelial cells and provides protection against tissue damage by interacting with TLR2 and TLR4 on these parenchymal cells. Hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding proteins regulate inflammation, tissue injury and repair through regulating inflammatory cell recruitment, release of inflammatory cytokines, and stem cell migration. This review focuses on the role of hyaluronan as an immune regulator in human diseases. PMID:21248167

  10. A Case of Polyarticular Pasteurella multocida Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nitoslawski, Sarah; McConnell, Todd M.; Semret, Makeda; Stein, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with a history of osteoarthritis presents with right leg erythema and inability to weight-bear and pain in his right shoulder. Synovial fluid cell count of the knee and shoulder showed abundant neutrophils, and cultures of the knee showed growth of Pasteurella multocida. The patient owned four cats with which he had frequent contact, but history and physical examination elicited no evidence of scratches or bites. This case highlights the invasive potential of Pasteurella multocida in an immunocompetent individual and its capacity to cause septic arthritis in the setting of frequent animal contact. PMID:27366169

  11. A transport medium for specimens containing Pasteurella pestis

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, D. C.; Vivona, S.; Do-Van-Quy; Gibson, F. L.; Deuber, G. L.; Rust, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    A medium, originally designed by Stuart and co-workers and later modified by Cary & Blair, for the maintenance and transport, without multiplication, of pathogenic bacteria contained in bacteriological specimens was tested in the laboratory and in the field in Viet-Nam to determine its effectiveness in preserving specimens known to contain Pasteurella pestis. The results indicate that this medium should be useful in diagnostic plague studies in areas where transport facilities are inadequate. Properly collected clinical specimens, sent to a central laboratory by any means and under any climatic conditions likely to be encountered in the hot tropics, should yield viable Pasteurella pestis for at least 30 days. PMID:5301387

  12. Ingested hyaluronan moisturizes dry skin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in many tissues of the body and is essential to maintain moistness in the skin tissues, which contain approximately half the body’s HA mass. Due to its viscosity and moisturizing effect, HA is widely distributed as a medicine, cosmetic, food, and, recently marketed in Japan as a popular dietary supplement to promote skin moisture. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study it was found that ingested HA increased skin moisture and improved treatment outcomes for patients with dry skin. HA is also reported to be absorbed by the body distributed, in part, to the skin. Ingested HA contributes to the increased synthesis of HA and promotes cell proliferation in fibroblasts. These effects show that ingestion of HA moisturizes the skin and is expected to improve the quality of life for people who suffer from dry skin. This review examines the moisturizing effects of dry skin by ingested HA and summarizes the series of mechanisms from absorption to pharmacological action. PMID:25014997

  13. Differential activation of noncanonical SMAD2/SMAD3 signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins causes disproportionate induction of hyaluronan production in immortalized human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Tian, Shen; Klausen, Christian; Zhu, Hua; Liu, Ruizhi; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-06-15

    Successful fertilization depends upon proper cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) expansion. Synthesized by hyaluronan synthases (HASs), hyaluronan forms the backbone of the COC matrix and plays a critical role in COC expansion. This study investigated the effects and mechanisms of ovarian BMPs on HAS expression and hyaluronan production in human granulosa cells. Treatment with BMP4, BMP6, BMP7 or BMP15 induced differing levels of noncanonical SMAD2/3, but equal levels of canonical SMAD1/5/8, phosphorylation which were mirrored by differing levels of HAS2 up-regulation and hyaluronan production. The effects of BMP4 and BMP15 on HAS2 mRNA were partially reversed by knockdown of SMAD3, and blocked by knockdown of SMAD2+SMAD3 or SMAD4. BMP4-induced SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and HAS2 mRNA up-regulation were mediated by both BMP and activin/transforming growth factor-β type I receptors. Our results suggest differential activation of noncanonical SMAD2/SMAD3 signaling by BMPs causes disproportionate induction of HAS2 expression and hyaluronan production in immortalized human granulosa cells. PMID:26992562

  14. Hamster bite peritonitis: Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Campos, A; Taylor, J H; Campbell, M

    2000-11-01

    We report the first case of Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient. This rare infection was the result of contamination of the dialysis tubing by a pet hamster. We stress the importance of household pets as a source of infection in the peritoneal dialysis population. PMID:11095007

  15. Identification of Pasteurella multocida CHAPS-soluble outer membrane proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fowl cholera continues to be of concern to the poultry industry, especially for turkey growers. This disease costs the turkey industry millions of dollars annually. In order to gain a better understanding of Pasteurella multocida virulence factors involved in colonization and pathogenesis, the outer...

  16. The CHAPS-soluble outer membrane proteome of Pasteurella multocida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fowl cholera continues to be of major concern to the poultry industry, especially for turkey growers. This disease costs the turkey industry millions of dollars annually. Fowl cholera is caused primarily by three serotypes of Pasteurella multocida serotypes A:1, A:3, and A:4. a live attenuated vacc...

  17. 9 CFR 113.69 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Bovine. 113.69 Section 113.69 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines §...

  18. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. 113.70 Section 113.70 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines §...

  19. 9 CFR 113.68 - Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Haemolytica Vaccine, Bovine. 113.68 Section 113.68 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines §...

  20. 9 CFR 113.69 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Bovine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Bovine. 113.69 Section 113.69 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines §...

  1. Hyaluronan Synthesis, Catabolism, and Signaling in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Larry S.; Matsumoto, Steven; Su, Weiping; Srivastava, Taasin; Back, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been implicated in regulating neural differentiation, survival, proliferation, migration, and cell signaling in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). HA is found throughout the CNS as a constituent of proteoglycans, especially within perineuronal nets that have been implicated in regulating neuronal activity. HA is also found in the white matter where it is diffusely distributed around astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Insults to the CNS lead to long-term elevation of HA within damaged tissues, which is linked at least in part to increased transcription of HA synthases. HA accumulation is often accompanied by elevated expression of at least some transmembrane HA receptors including CD44. Hyaluronidases that digest high molecular weight HA into smaller fragments are also elevated following CNS insults and can generate HA digestion products that have unique biological activities. A number of studies, for example, suggest that both the removal of high molecular weight HA and the accumulation of hyaluronidase-generated HA digestion products can impact CNS injuries through mechanisms that include the regulation of progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation. These studies, reviewed here, suggest that targeting HA synthesis, catabolism, and signaling are all potential strategies to promote CNS repair. PMID:26448752

  2. Pasteurella Multocida Peritonitis After Cat Scratch in a Patient with Cirrhotic Ascites

    PubMed Central

    Gunathilake, Roshan; Verma, Ajay; Caffery, Michael; Sowden, Sowden

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic agent transmitted by canines and felines, has been very rarely reported to cause bacterial peritonitis in humans. Pasteurella multocida peritonitis is associated with high mortality even with appropriate treatment, therefore its early recognition is essential. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida peritonitis following cat scratch in a patient with Child Pugh Class C alcoholic cirrhosis, culminating in multiple organ failure and death PMID:26294953

  3. Pasteurella Multocida Peritonitis After Cat Scratch in a Patient with Cirrhotic Ascites.

    PubMed

    Gunathilake, Roshan; Verma, Ajay; Caffery, Michael; Sowden, Sowden

    2015-04-15

    Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic agent transmitted by canines and felines, has been very rarely reported to cause bacterial peritonitis in humans. Pasteurella multocida peritonitis is associated with high mortality even with appropriate treatment, therefore its early recognition is essential. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida peritonitis following cat scratch in a patient with Child Pugh Class C alcoholic cirrhosis, culminating in multiple organ failure and death. PMID:26294953

  4. Formation and properties of hyaluronan/nano Ag and hyaluronan-lecithin/nano Ag films.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, Gohar; Khachatryan, Karen; Grzyb, Jacek; Fiedorowicz, Maciej

    2016-10-20

    A facile and environmentally friendly method of the preparation of silver nanoparticles embedded in hyaluronan (Hyal/Ag) and hyaluronan-lecithin (Hyal-L/Ag) matrix was developed. Thin, elastic foils were prepared from gels by an in situ synthesis of Ag in an aqueous solution of sodium hyaluronate (Hyal), using aq. d-(+)-xylose solution as a reducing agent. The gels were applied to a clean, smooth, defatted Teflon surface and left for drying in the air. The dry foils were stored in a closed container. UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirmed formation of about 10nm ball-shaped Ag nanoparticles situated within the polysaccharide template. Thermal properties of the composites were characterized involving differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TGA) analyses, whereas molecular weights of polysaccharide chains of the matrix were estimated with the size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle laser light scattering and refractometric detectors (HPSEC-MALLS-RI). An increase in the molecular weight of the hyaluronate after generation of Ag nanoparticles was observed. The foils showed specific properties. The study confirmed that silver nanoparticles can be successfully prepared with environmentally friendly method, using hyaluronan as a stabilizing template. Hyaluronan and hyaluronan-lecithin matrices provide nanocrystals uniform in size and shape. The composites demonstrated a bacteriostatic activity. PMID:27474588

  5. Sepsis-induced purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lisa; Oliveira, Nelson; Cássio, Isabel; Costa, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was admitted with a cutaneous rash associated with septic shock and multiorganic failure, 6 days after a dog bite. He was started on empiric antibiotherapy and supportive measures. The patient's condition aggravated, with need for invasive mechanical ventilation and intermittent haemodialysis, and evolution from a petechiae-like rash to purpura and gangrene, culminating in bilateral lower limb amputation. The blood cultures revealed only Pasteurella multocida, after 10 days of incubation. P multocida infection is a rare cause of soft tissue infection that subsides with oral antibiotherapy. Infections causing sepsis are rare and appear in immunocompromised patients. Purpura fulminans induced by sepsis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. This syndrome should be recognised promptly, so early treatment is instituted. We found no case reports of purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella infections in our literature review. PMID:24554680

  6. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    PubMed Central

    López, C.; Sanchez-Rubio, P.; Betrán, A.; Terré, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion could be the gateway of the infection, although in this case the infection could also be acquired through the pig bite. The bacteria was identified as P. multocida with the biochemical test API 20E (bioMérieux). In agreement with findings in the literature, the strain was susceptible in vitro to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, imipenem and tetracycline. PMID:24294240

  7. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Melody K.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory.

  8. Sepsis-induced purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Lisa; Oliveira, Nelson; Cássio, Isabel; Costa, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was admitted with a cutaneous rash associated with septic shock and multiorganic failure, 6 days after a dog bite. He was started on empiric antibiotherapy and supportive measures. The patient's condition aggravated, with need for invasive mechanical ventilation and intermittent haemodialysis, and evolution from a petechiae-like rash to purpura and gangrene, culminating in bilateral lower limb amputation. The blood cultures revealed only Pasteurella multocida, after 10 days of incubation. P multocida infection is a rare cause of soft tissue infection that subsides with oral antibiotherapy. Infections causing sepsis are rare and appear in immunocompromised patients. Purpura fulminans induced by sepsis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. This syndrome should be recognised promptly, so early treatment is instituted. We found no case reports of purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella infections in our literature review. PMID:24554680

  9. Prolonged incubation period in neonatal Pasteurella multocida meningitis and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Takuya; Abe, Michiko; Ogiwara, Shigetoshi; Sai, Shuji; Kosugiyama, Kiyotaka; Sugihara, Akemi; Nagumo, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Seido; Kinugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida, often found as part of the human oral flora and in finger/toenails, also exists in many animals, especially cats, dogs, and pigs. Although rare, pasteurella infection in neonates can cause serious systemic disease, such as meningitis. In this article, a 23-day-old girl presented with decreased appetite and irritability for >2 days. Eighteen days previously her pet cat had jumped onto the left side of her head while she was sleeping. On laboratory data C-reactive protein was high, and on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis leukocyte count was extremely high, with low glucose and high protein. P. multocida grew out of the blood and CSF cultures, and she was successfully treated with antibiotics for 3 weeks. Although pasteurellosis rarely occurs, it can sometimes lead to life-threatening situations, so parents should exercise caution when having pets around their children. PMID:25521988

  10. A cryopreservation method for Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, M K; Shadduck, D J; Goldberg, D R; Samuel, M D

    1998-01-01

    A cryopreservation method and improved isolation techniques for detection of Pasteurella multocida from wetland samples were developed. Wetland water samples were collected in the field, diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, final concentration 10%), and frozen at -180 C in a liquid nitrogen vapor shipper. Frozen samples were transported to the laboratory where they were subsequently thawed and processed in Pasteurella multocida selective broth (PMSB) to isolate P. multocida. This method allowed for consistent isolation of 2 to 18 organisms/ml from water seeded with known concentrations of P. multocida. The method compared favorably with the standard mouse inoculation method and allowed for preservation of the samples until they could be processed in the laboratory. PMID:9476245

  11. Size Matters: Molecular Weight Specificity of Hyaluronan Effects in Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Cyphert, Jaime M.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan signaling properties are unique among other biologically active molecules, that they are apparently not influenced by postsynthetic molecular modification, but by hyaluronan fragment size. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the generation of hyaluronan fragments of different size and size-dependent differences in hyaluronan signaling as well as their downstream biological effects. PMID:26448754

  12. [Invasive Pasteurella multocida infections: Two clinical cases and literature review].

    PubMed

    Smíšková, Dita; Džupová, Olga

    2015-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a common commensal of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of animals, especially cats and dogs. It is transmitted to humans through contact with animals. Bite wound infection is the most common clinical manifestation. Systemic infections are unusual and mainly affect immunocompromised individuals. The article presents two cases of Pasteurella infection. Wound infection in a 75-year-old female following a bite from her pet cat was associated with bacteremia. The disease course was favorable with the initial clindamycin treatment despite in vitro resistance. The other patient was a 62-year-old female diagnosed with acute bacterial meningitis with multiple brain abscesses and transient expressive aphasia. She reported frequent contacts with pets and domestic animals without a recent bite. Hematogenous dissemination of the infection was suspected. Because of poor therapeutic response, cefotaxime was switched to chloramphenicol which was later switched to a combination of cefotaxime with ciprofloxacin due to anemia. Following 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and another 10 weeks of oral ciprofloxacin therapy, magnetic resonance imaging showed normal results and the neurological defect resolved. Epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of Pasteurella infection are discussed and literature is reviewed. PMID:26312375

  13. Hyaluronan Depolymerization by Megakaryocyte Hyaluronidase-2 Is Required for Thrombopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Petrey, Aaron C; Obery, Dana R; Kessler, Sean P; Flamion, Bruno; de la Motte, Carol A

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronan is the predominant glycosaminoglycan component of the extracellular matrix with an emerging role in hematopoiesis. Modulation of hyaluronan polymer size is responsible for its control over cellular functions, and the balance of hyaluronan synthesis and degradation determines its molecular size. Although two active somatic hyaluronidases are expressed in mammals, only deficiency in hyaluronidase-2 (Hyal-2) results in thrombocytopenia of unknown mechanism. Our results reveal that Hyal-2 knockout mice accumulate hyaluronan within their bone marrow and within megakaryocytes, the cells responsible for platelet generation. Proplatelet formation by Hyal-2 knockout megakaryocytes was disrupted because of abnormal formation of the demarcation membrane system, which was dilated and poorly developed. Importantly, peptide-mediated delivery of exogenous hyaluronidase rescued deficient proplatelet formation in murine and human megakaryocytes lacking Hyal-2. Together, our data uncover a previously unsuspected mechanism of how hyaluronan and Hyal-2 control platelet generation. PMID:27398974

  14. Host Response in Rabbits to Infection with Pasteurella multocida Serogroup F Strains Originating from Fowl Cholera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of two avian Pasteurella multocida serogroup F strains to induce disease in rabbits was investigated in this study. Two groups of 18 Pasteurella-free rabbits each were intranasally challenged with strains isolated from chicken and turkey, respectively. Half the animals in each challenge ...

  15. Cyclic mechanical stretch augments hyaluronan production in cultured human uterine cervical fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Maki; Itoh, Hiroaki; Sagawa, Norimasa; Yura, Shigeo; Korita, Daizo; Kakui, Kazuyo; Kawamura, Makoto; Hirota, Naoyoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Fujii, Shingo

    2005-09-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) a glycosaminoglycan with high affinity for water molecules stimulates local inflammatory reactions. Parturition causes a dramatic increase in the amount of HA fragments in the uterine cervix, thereby contributing to a rapid softening as well as opening of the cervical canal, i.e. cervical ripening. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of cyclic distension caused by labour in the augmentation of HA production during cervical ripening. Immunohistochemistry and/or RT-PCR detected hyaluronan synthase (HAS)1, 2 and 3 in samples of human cervical tissue obtained from pregnant women. Labour-like cyclic mechanical stretch for 24, 36 and 48 h significantly enhanced the secretion of HA, from cultured human uterine cervical fibroblast (CxF) cells, 128.7, 151.4 and 173.2%, respectively, concomitant with a significant augmentation of HAS1 (36, 48 h), HAS2 (24, 36 and 48 h) and HAS3 (48 h) mRNA expression. Cyclic mechanical stretch for 12, 36 and 48 h increased molecular size of the HA secreted from CxF cells. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical stretch of the uterine cervix caused by the presenting part of the fetus in labour may contribute to the increase in the secretion of HA during the process of cervical ripening. PMID:16199413

  16. Growth promoting effect of hyaluronan synthesis promoting substances on Japanese eel leptocephali.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka; Nomura, Kazuharu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronans (HAs) are glycosaminoglycans produced in the bodies of Anguilliform and Elopiform leptocephali, and play a role in metabolic energy. In mammals, HA synthesis-promoting substances (HASPS) up-regulate the expression of HA synthase (HAS) and increase the amount of HA in the body. In this study, Japanese eel leptocephali were fed a HASPS containing diet. We analyzed HAS1s and HAS2 expression, HA content, and their influence on growth. HASPS extracted from Grifola frondosa promoted HAS1s and HAS2 mRNA and HA content. Other than mammals, these results are first reported in vertebrate. Moreover, HASPS extracted from G. frondosa promoted leptocephalus growth. The relationship between growth and HA in the leptocephali is not yet clear. However, based on our results we hypothesize that HA is involved in the storage of energy, which is metabolized to sugars when needed for metabolic energy. PMID:24896609

  17. Hyaluronan and hyaluronidase, which is better for embryo development?

    PubMed

    Marei, Waleed F A; Raheem, Kabir A; Salavati, Mazdak; Tremaine, Tina; Khalid, Muhammad; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to examine size-specific effects of Hyaluronan (HA) on preimplantation embryo development. We investigated the effects of Hyalovet (HA, 500-750 kDa; the size produced by HA synthase-3, which is abundant in the oviduct), or HA treated with Hyaluronidase-2 (Hyal2; also expressed in the oviduct that breaks down HA into 20 kDa fragments). In experiment 1 (in vivo), oviducts of synchronized and superovulated ewes (n = 20) were surgically exposed on Day 2 post-mating, ligated, and infused with either Hyalovet, Hyalovet + Hyal2, Hyal2, or PBS (control). Ewes were killed 5 days later for recovery of embryos and oviductal epithelial cells (OEC). Blastocyst rates were significantly higher in Hyal2 and Hyalovet + Hyal2 oviducts. Hyaluronidase-2 infusion resulted in higher blastocyst cell numbers and hatching rates. This was associated with increased HSP70 expression in OEC. In contrast, Hyalovet resulted in the lowest development to blastocyst stage and lowest hatching rates, and decreased IGF2 and IGFBP2 expression in OEC. IGF1 and IL1α expression were not affected. In experiment 2, to rule out indirect effects of oviductal factors, ovine embryos were produced and cultured with the same treatments in vitro from Day 2 to 8. Hyaluronidase-2, but not Hyalovet, enhanced blastocyst formation and reduced inner cell mass apoptosis. Hyalovet inhibited hatching. In conclusion, the presence of large-size HA (500-750 kDa) in the vicinity of developing embryos appears to disturb the oviductal environment and embryo development in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, we show evidence that breakdown of HA into smaller fragments is required to maximize embryo development and blastocyst quality. PMID:27091071

  18. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms. PMID:25839341

  19. Single-molecule imaging of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, Joachim; Kaminski, Tim P.; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Jerosch, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Human synovial fluid contains a high concentration of hyaluronan, a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that provides viscoelasticity and contributes to joint lubrication. In osteoarthritis synovial fluid, the concentration and molecular weight of hyaluronan decrease, thus impairing shock absorption and lubrication. Consistently, substitution of hyaluronan (viscosupplementation) is a widely used treatment for osteoarthritis. So far, the organization and dynamics of hyaluronan in native human synovial fluid and its action mechanism in viscosupplementation are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we introduce highly sensitive single molecule microscopy to analyze the conformation and interactions of fluorescently labeled hyaluronan molecules in native human synovial fluid. Our findings are consistent with a random coil conformation of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid, and point to specific interactions of hyaluronan molecules with the synovial fluid matrix. Furthermore, single molecule microscopy is capable of detecting the breakdown of the synovial fluid matrix in osteoarthritis. Thus, single molecule microscopy is a useful new method to probe the structure of human synovial fluid and its changes in disease states like osteoarthritis.

  20. Cancer Microenvironment and Inflammation: Role of Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, Dragana; Tzardi, Maria; Berdiaki, Aikaterini; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Tzanakakis, George N.

    2015-01-01

    The role of inflammation in the development of cancer was described as early as the nineteenth century. Abundant evidence supports the preposition that various cancers are triggered by infection and chronic inflammatory disease whereas, evading immune destruction has been proposed as one of the new “hallmarks of cancer.” Changes of the tumor microenvironment have been closely correlated to cancer-mediated inflammation. Hyaluronan (HA), an important extracellular matrices component, has become recognized as an active participant in inflammatory, angiogenic, fibrotic, and cancer promoting processes. This review discusses how HA and specific HA-binding proteins participate in and regulate cancer-related inflammatory processes. PMID:25926834

  1. Intracellular hyaluronan in arterial smooth muscle cells: association with microtubules, RHAMM, and the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Evanko, Stephen P; Parks, W Tony; Wight, Thomas N

    2004-12-01

    Although considered a pericellular matrix component, hyaluronan was recently localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of proliferating cells, supporting earlier reports that hyaluronan was present in locations such as the nucleus, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and caveolae. This suggests that it can play roles both inside and outside the cell. Hyaluronan metabolism is coupled to mitosis and cell motility, but it is not clear if intracellular hyaluronan associates with cytoskeletal elements or plays a structural role. Here we report the distribution of intracellular hyaluronan, microtubules, and RHAMM in arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. The general distribution of intracellular hyaluronan more closely resembled microtubule staining rather than actin filaments. Hyaluronan was abundant in the perinuclear microtubule-rich areas and was present in lysosomes, other vesicular structures, and the nucleolus. Partially fragmented fluorescein-hyaluronan was preferentially translocated to the perinuclear area compared with high-molecular-weight hyaluronan. In the mitotic spindle, hyaluronan colocalized with tubulin and with the hyaladherin RHAMM, a cell surface receptor and microtubule-associated protein that interacts with dynein and maintains spindle pole stability. Internalized fluorescein-hyaluronan was also seen at the spindle. Following telophase, an abundance of hyaluronan near the midbody microtubules at the cleavage furrow was also noted. In permeabilized cells, fluorescein-hyaluronan bound to RHAMM-associated microtubules. These findings suggest novel functions for hyaluronan in cellular physiology. PMID:15557208

  2. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  3. Naturally acquired Pasteurella multocida infection in rabbits: clinicopathological aspects.

    PubMed Central

    DiGiacomo, R F; Xu, Y M; Allen, V; Hinton, M H; Pearson, G R

    1991-01-01

    A cohort of 41 New Zealand White rabbits, 35 to 60 days old, from twelve litters were followed for twelve weeks for development of pasteurellosis. Eleven of 19 rabbits in five litters acquired Pasteurella multocida infection. The incubation period was difficult to determine as P. multocida infection was detected both before and after the onset of rhinitis. The response of rabbits to infection varied from subclinical infection to death from systemic pasteurellosis. Atrophy of the maxilloturbinates of the nares was detected in rabbits with chronic rhinitis associated with P. multocida infection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1889034

  4. Haemolytic effect of Pasteurella haemolytica on blood from young mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Turner, A; Hawkey, C M

    1988-09-01

    On agar plates containing young lamb blood, Pasteurella haemolytica produces a wide outer zone of partial haemolysis in addition to the narrow zone of complete clearing seen on adult sheep blood agar. To determine whether this phenomenon was limited to lamb blood, samples from young animals of 20 mammalian species were examined. Two species--the barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia) and scimitar horned oryx (Oryx tao)--possessed blood that gave this effect provided that the samples were taken from young animals. The 18 species that gave negative results included an ovine species, the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). PMID:3194597

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide as an Effective Disinfectant for Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Jung, In-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Won-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) infections vary widely, from local infections resulting from animal bites and scratches to general infections. As of yet, no vaccine against P. multocida has been developed, and the most effective way to prevent pathogenic transmission is to clean the host environment using disinfectants. In this study, we identified which disinfectants most effectively inhibited environmental isolates of P. multocida. Three readily available disinfectants were compared: 3% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 70% isopropyl alcohol, and synthetic phenol. In suspension tests and zone inhibition tests, 3% HP was the most promising disinfectant against P. multocida. PMID:24954350

  6. Mannose reduces hyaluronan and leukocytes in wound granulation tissue and inhibits migration and hyaluronan-dependent monocyte binding.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Tiina A; Kuokkanen, Jukka; Kärnä, Riikka; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Rilla, Kirsi; Kössi, Jyrki; Laato, Matti; Tammi, Raija H; Tammi, Markku I

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a highly regulated process starting from coagulation and ending in tissue remodeling. The end result varies from perfectly restored tissue, such as in early fetal skin, to scars in adults. The balanced repair process is frequently disturbed by local or systemic factors, like infections and diabetes. A rapid increase of hyaluronan is an inherent feature of wounds and is associated with tissue swelling, epithelial and mesenchymal cell migration and proliferation, and induction of cytokine signaling. Hyaluronan extending from cell surface into structures called cables can trap leukocytes and platelets and change their functions. All these features of hyaluronan modulate inflammation. The present data show that mannose, a recently described inhibitor of hyaluronan synthesis, inhibits dermal fibroblast invasion and prevents the enhanced leukocyte binding to hyaluronan that takes place in cells treated with an inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β. Mannose also reduced hyaluronan in subcutaneous sponge granulation tissue, a model of skin wound, and suppressed its leukocyte recruitment and tissue growth. Mannose thus seems to suppress wounding-induced inflammation in skin by attenuating hyaluronan synthesis. PMID:23464634

  7. Inhibition of Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression by in vivo Targeting of Hyaluronan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oesophageal cancer is a highly aggressive tumour entity with at present poor prognosis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed. Hyaluronan (HA) is a polysaccharide present in the matrix of human oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Importantly, in vitro ESCC cells critically depend on HA synthesis to maintain the proliferative phenotype. The aim of the present study is (1) to study HA-synthase (HAS) expression and regulation in human ESCC, and (2) to translate the in vitro results into a mouse xenograft model of human ESCC to study the effects of systemic versus tumour targeted HAS inhibition on proliferation and distribution of tumour-bound and stromal hyaluronan. Methods mRNA expression was investigated in human ESCC biopsies by semiquantitative real-time RT PCR. Furthermore, human ESCC were xenografted into NMRI nu/nu mice. The effects on tumour progression and morphology of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an inhibitor of HA-synthesis, and of lentiviral knock down of HA-synthase 3 (HAS3), the main HAS isoform in the human ESCC tissues and the human ESCC cell line used in this study, were determined. Tumour progression was monitored by calliper measurements and by flat-panel detector volume computed tomography (fpVCT). HA content, cellular composition and proliferation (Ki67) were determined histologically. Results mRNA of HAS isoform 3 (HAS3) was upregulated in human ESCC biopsies and HAS3 mRNA was positively correlated to expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. EGF was also proven to be a strong inductor of HAS3 mRNA expression in vitro. During the course of seven weeks, 4-MU inhibited progression of xenograft tumours. Interestingly, remodelling of the tumour into a more differentiated phenotype and inhibition of cell proliferation were observed. Lentiviral knockdown of HAS3 in human ESCC cells prior to xenografting mimicked all effects of 4-MU treatment suggesting that hyaluronan produced by ESCC is accountable

  8. Attachment of hyaluronan to metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pitt, William G; Morris, Robert N; Mason, Mitchell L; Hall, Matthew W; Luo, Yi; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2004-01-01

    Metal implants are in general not compatible with the tissues of the human body, and in particular, blood exhibits a severe hemostatic response. Herein we present results of a technique to mask the surface of metals with a natural biopolymer, hyaluronan (HA). HA has minimal adverse interactions with blood and other tissues, but attachment of bioactive peptides can promote specific biological interactions. In this study, stainless steel was cleaned and then surface-modified by covalent attachment of an epoxy silane. The epoxy was subsequently converted to an aldehyde functional group and reacted with hyaluronan through an adipic dihydrazide linkage, thus covalently immobilizing the HA onto the steel surface. Fluorescent labeling of the HA showed that the surface had a fairly uniform covering of HA. When human platelet rich plasma was placed on the HA-coated surface, there was no observable adhesion of platelets. HA derivatized with a peptide containing the RGD peptide sequence was also bound to the stainless steel. The RGD-containing peptide was bioactive as exemplified by the attachment and spreading of platelets on this surface. Furthermore, when the RGD peptide was replaced with the nonsense RDG sequence, minimal adhesion of platelets was observed. This type of controlled biological activity on a metal surface has potential for modulating cell growth and cellular interactions with metallic implants, such as vascular stents, orthopedic implants, heart valve cages, and more. PMID:14661254

  9. Polypeptide Grafted Hyaluronan: Synthesis and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Messman, Jamie M; Mays, Jimmy; Baskaran, Durairaj

    2010-01-01

    Poly(L-leucine) grafted hyaluronan (HA-g-PLeu) has been synthesized via a Michael addition reaction between primary amine terminated poly(L-leucine) and acrylate-functionalized HA (TBAHA-acrylate). The precursor hyaluronan was first functionalized with acrylate groups by reaction with acryloyl chloride in the presence of triethylamine in N,N-dimethylformamide. 1H NMR analysis of the resulting product indicated that an increase in the concentration of acryloylchoride with respect to hydroxyl groups on HA has only a moderate effect on functionalization efficiency, f. A precise control of stoichiometry was not achieved, which could be attributed to partial solubility of intermolecular aggregates and the hygroscopic nature of HA. Michael addition at high [PLeu- NH2]/[acrylate]TBAHA ratios gave a molar grafting ratio of only 0.20 with respect to the repeat unit of HA, indicating grafting limitation due to insolubility of the grafted HA-g-PLeu. Soluble HA-g-PLeu graft copolymers were obtained for low grafting ratios (<0.039) with <8.6% by mass of PLeu and were characterized thoroughly using light scattering, 1H NMR, FT-IR, and AFM techniques. Light scattering experiments showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between PLeu chains, resulting in aggregates with segregated nongrafted HA segments. This yields local networks of aggregates, as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed a -sheet conformation for aggregates of poly(L-leucine).

  10. Virulence of raptor-origin Pasteurella multocida in domestic chickens.

    PubMed

    Aye, P P; Morishita, T Y; Angrick, E J

    1999-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belonging to somatic serotype 1 and capsular type A has been known to cause avian cholera in domestic poultry. Pasteurella multocida serotype 1 has also been isolated from raptorial birds. However, the capsular type for these raptorial isolates remains unknown. Moreover, the virulence of these raptorial isolates for domestic poultry has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine the capsular type of raptorial P. multocida serotype 1 isolates and to determine if these isolates were virulent for domestic chickens. Study chickens were inoculated with one of three P. multocida isolates. Isolate WESO-1 was obtained from a western screech owl (Otus kennicottii) and isolates RTHA-2 and RTHA-4 were isolated from two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). These isolates were given by either the oral, intravenous, or intraocular route. Control birds were given brain-heart infusion broth. The capsular serotypes of three isolates were also determined. The RTHA-2 and RTHA-4 isolates belonged to P. multocida capsular type A. The WESO-1 isolate belonged to capsular type F. Results also demonstrated that, for the isolates examined, the intraocular route did not cause mortality in chickens. There was mortality in all groups for the intravenous route. However, various mortality patterns were observed when P. multocida was given orally for the three different isolates. The RTHA-4 isolate (serotype 1:A) was the most virulent for domestic chickens. The WESO-1 isolate (serotype 1:F) was the least virulent for chickens among the raptorial isolates examined. PMID:10396641

  11. Enzymatic production of specifically distributed hyaluronan oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Panhong; Lv, Mengxian; Jin, Peng; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Kang, Zhen

    2015-09-20

    High-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA) was controllably depolymerized in pure aqueous solution with recombinant leech hyaluronidase (HAase). The HAase concentration per unit HA and hydrolysis time played important roles in molecular mass distribution. By modulating the concentrations of HAase and controlling the hydrolysis time, any molar-mass-defined HA oligomers could be efficiently and specifically produced on a large scale (40 g/L), such as HA oligosaccharides with weight-average molar mass of 4000, 10,000, and 30,000Da and end hydrolysates containing only HA6 and HA4. High performance liquid chromatography-size exclusion chromatography, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, capillary zone electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed low polydispersity of the produced molar-mass-defined HA oligosaccharides. Therefore, large-scale production of defined HA oligosaccharides with narrow molecular mass distribution will significantly promote progress in related research and its potential applications. PMID:26050905

  12. The where, when, how, and why of hyaluronan binding by immune cells.

    PubMed

    Lee-Sayer, Sally S M; Dong, Yifei; Arif, Arif A; Olsson, Mia; Brown, Kelly L; Johnson, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is made and extruded from cells to form a pericellular or extracellular matrix (ECM) and is present in virtually all tissues in the body. The size and form of hyaluronan present in tissues are indicative of a healthy or inflamed tissue, and the interactions of hyaluronan with immune cells can influence their response. Thus, in order to understand how inflammation is regulated, it is necessary to understand these interactions and their consequences. Although there is a large turnover of hyaluronan in our bodies, the large molecular mass form of hyaluronan predominates in healthy tissues. Upon tissue damage and/or infection, the ECM and hyaluronan are broken down and an inflammatory response ensues. As inflammation is resolved, the ECM is restored, and high molecular mass hyaluronan predominates again. Immune cells encounter hyaluronan in the tissues and lymphoid organs and respond differently to high and low molecular mass forms. Immune cells differ in their ability to bind hyaluronan and this can vary with the cell type and their activation state. For example, peritoneal macrophages do not bind soluble hyaluronan but can be induced to bind after exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Likewise, naïve T cells, which typically express low levels of the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, do not bind hyaluronan until they undergo antigen-stimulated T cell proliferation and upregulate CD44. Despite substantial knowledge of where and when immune cells bind hyaluronan, why immune cells bind hyaluronan remains a major outstanding question. Here, we review what is currently known about the interactions of hyaluronan with immune cells in both healthy and inflamed tissues and discuss how hyaluronan binding by immune cells influences the inflammatory response. PMID:25926830

  13. Pasteurella canis Isolation following Penetrating Eye Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Noor-Khairul; Zam, Zarifah; Mdnoor, Siti-Suraya; Siti-Raihan, Ishak; Azhany, Yaakub

    2012-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with history of trauma to the left eye after he accidentally injured his eye with a broom stick made up from coconut skewers. There was history of cats as their pets but not dogs. Ocular examination revealed left superonasal conjunctival laceration and scleral perforation with prolapsed vitreous. Fundus examination showed minimal vitreous haemorrhage and flat retina. Conjunctiva swab at the wound site was sent for gram staining, culture, and sensitivity. He underwent scleral suturing, vitreous tap, and intravitreal injection of Ceftazidime and Amikacin. Vitreous tap was sent for gram stained, culture and sensitivity. Postoperatively, he was started empirically on IV Ciprofloxacin 160 mg BD, Guttae Ciprofloxacin, and Guttae Ceftazidime. Conjunctiva swab grew Pasteurella canis which was sensitive to all Beta lactams, Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol, and Aminoglycoside. Post-operative was uneventful, absent signs of endophthalmitis or orbital cellulitis. PMID:22606491

  14. Response of the ruminant respiratory tract to Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A

    2000-07-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of loss to the sheep and cattle industry throughout the world. Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is one of the most important respiratory pathogens of domestic ruminants and causes serious outbreaks of acute pneumonia in neonatal, weaned and growing lambs, calves, and goats. M. haemolytica is also an important cause of pneumonia in adult animals. Transportation, viral infections with agents such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza-3 virus or bovine respiratory syncytial virus, overcrowding, housing of neonates and weaned animals together and other stressful conditions predispose animals to M. haemolytica infection [1, 2]. This review assimilates some of the findings key to cellular and molecular responses of the lung from a pathologist's perspective. It includes some of what is known and underscores areas that are not fully understood. PMID:10967288

  15. Septic Arthritis and Osteomyelitis Caused by Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Vranis, Neil; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Christian, Matthew; Joshi, Manjari; Pensy, Raymond A

    2015-07-01

    This report presents a case of progressive septic arthritis and osteomyelitis caused by a rare pathogen, Pasteurella multocida, thought to be provoked by the use of systemic corticosteroids. Despite initial improvement after antibiotics and surgical procedure, the patient returned with new, associated symptoms 1 month later. This concurrent set of circumstances leading to a life-threatening condition has not been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Physicians aware of such a case will be better prepared to diagnose, treat, and educate their patients. Additionally, the diagnostic challenge presented by this case report emphasizes the need for vigilance and thoroughness in obtaining histories from patients presenting with seemingly benign complaints, especially in vulnerable populations, such as infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised adults. PMID:26161771

  16. Pasteurella pestis detection in fleas by fluorescent antibody staining*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Bruce W.; Kartman, Leo; Prince, Frank M.

    1966-01-01

    In an effort to develop a method for the rapid field identification of plague-infected fleas, the authors have studied the feasibility of direct fluorescent antibody staining of the midgut contents of fleas fed on mice infected with Pasteurella pestis. Fluorescent antibodies prepared from antisera derived from rabbits inoculated with the water-soluble P. pestis fraction 1b antigen, the somatic antigen of heat-killed P. pestis (Bryans strain), and live avirulent (strain A1122) or virulent (Yreka strain) plague vaccines were used used in this study. This direct staining method proved to be impracticable, but encouraging results were obtained by fluorescent antibody staining of broth cultures of macerates of infected fleas after 24-48 hours' incubation. The broth enrichment technique has not yet been evaluated in the field, but it is expected to be of value since it is relatively simple to perform and requires only material that can easily be transported to remote areas. PMID:5328902

  17. Pasteurella canis Isolation following Penetrating Eye Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Noor-Khairul; Zam, Zarifah; MdNoor, Siti-Suraya; Siti-Raihan, Ishak; Azhany, Yaakub

    2012-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy presented with history of trauma to the left eye after he accidentally injured his eye with a broom stick made up from coconut skewers. There was history of cats as their pets but not dogs. Ocular examination revealed left superonasal conjunctival laceration and scleral perforation with prolapsed vitreous. Fundus examination showed minimal vitreous haemorrhage and flat retina. Conjunctiva swab at the wound site was sent for gram staining, culture, and sensitivity. He underwent scleral suturing, vitreous tap, and intravitreal injection of Ceftazidime and Amikacin. Vitreous tap was sent for gram stained, culture and sensitivity. Postoperatively, he was started empirically on IV Ciprofloxacin 160 mg BD, Guttae Ciprofloxacin, and Guttae Ceftazidime. Conjunctiva swab grew Pasteurella canis which was sensitive to all Beta lactams, Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol, and Aminoglycoside. Post-operative was uneventful, absent signs of endophthalmitis or orbital cellulitis. PMID:22606491

  18. New solid medium for enhanced growth of Pasteurella tularensis.

    PubMed

    GASPAR, A J; TRESSELT, H B; WARD, M K

    1961-10-01

    Gaspar, Andrew J. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.), Hugh B. Tresselt, and Martha K. Ward. New solid medium for enhanced growth of Pasteurella tularensis. J. Bacteriol. 82:564-569. 1961.-The purpose of this work was to develop a solid medium for more rapid growth of Pasteurella tularensis, especially from small inocula comparable to those generally encountered in clinical materials. AFTER TITRATION OF VARIOUS INGREDIENTS, SEPARATELY AND IN COMBINATION, THE OPTIMAL BASE WAS FOUND TO BE: 2.6% tryptose broth (Difco) with thiamine, 0.5% cysteine-HCl, 0.2% sodium thioglycolate, 1.0% glucose, dissolved by mixing without heat, and adjusted to pH 7.2 +/- 0.03. To this base 1.0% agar (Difco) is added and dissolved by heating in flowing steam for about 5 min prior to autoclaving at 121 C for 20 min. After sterilization and cooling, 5.0% defibrinated rabbit blood is added aseptically. Plates of the completed medium are incubated at 37 C for 24 hr prior to use. Colonies of P. tularensis approximately 1.0 mm in diameter are obtained on this medium after 26 to 29 hr incubation if conditions of high relative humidity (90 to 100% saturation) are maintained.The mechanisms involved in the growth enhancement obtained on this medium are under study. The role of thioglycolate appears to be that of keeping in solution the relatively high concentration of cysteine-HCl required. The specific methods of preparation described, the incubation of plates prior to use, and final incubation under conditions of high humidity all are important for optimal results. This developmental work has employed only pure cultures. Attempts are being made to develop a selective medium, using this new preparation as base, for the direct isolation of P. tularensis from a variety of clinical materials. PMID:13897160

  19. Hyaluronan deposition and correlation with inflammation in a murine ovalbumin model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Georgiana; Swaidani, Shadi; Sharma, Manisha; Lauer, Mark E.; Hascall, Vincent C.; Aronica, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by airway remodeling, which includes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM). However the role of the ECM in mediating these changes is poorly understood. Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the ECM, has been implicated in asthma as well as in many other biological processes. Our study investigates the processes involved in HA synthesis, deposition, localization and degradation during an acute and chronic murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic pulmonary inflammation. Mice were sensitized, challenged to OVA and sacrificed at various time points during an 8-week challenge protocol. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids, blood, and lung tissue were collected for study. RNA, HA, protein and histopathology were analyzed. Analyses of lung sections and BAL fluids revealed an early deposition and an increase in HA levels within 24 hours of antigen exposure. HA levels peaked at day 8 in BAL, while inflammatory cell recovery peaked at day 6. Hyaluronan synthase (HAS)1 and HAS2 on RNA levels peaked within 2 hours of antigen exposure, while hyaluronidase (HYAL)1 and HYAL2 on RNA levels decreased. Both inflammatory cell infiltrates and collagen deposition co-localized with HA deposition within the lungs. These data support a role for HA in the pathogenesis of inflammation and airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma. HA deposition appears largely due to up regulation of HAS1 and HAS2. In addition, HA appears to provide the scaffolding for inflammatory cell accumulation as well as for new collagen synthesis and deposition. PMID:21251977

  20. High-molecular-mass hyaluronan mediates the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao; Azpurua, Jorge; Hine, Christopher; Vaidya, Amita; Myakishev-Rempel, Max; Ablaeva, Julia; Mao, Zhiyong; Nevo, Eviatar; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2013-07-18

    The naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) displays exceptional longevity, with a maximum lifespan exceeding 30 years. This is the longest reported lifespan for a rodent species and is especially striking considering the small body mass of the naked mole rat. In comparison, a similarly sized house mouse has a maximum lifespan of 4 years. In addition to their longevity, naked mole rats show an unusual resistance to cancer. Multi-year observations of large naked mole-rat colonies did not detect a single incidence of cancer. Here we identify a mechanism responsible for the naked mole rat's cancer resistance. We found that naked mole-rat fibroblasts secrete extremely high-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA), which is over five times larger than human or mouse HA. This high-molecular-mass HA accumulates abundantly in naked mole-rat tissues owing to the decreased activity of HA-degrading enzymes and a unique sequence of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2). Furthermore, the naked mole-rat cells are more sensitive to HA signalling, as they have a higher affinity to HA compared with mouse or human cells. Perturbation of the signalling pathways sufficient for malignant transformation of mouse fibroblasts fails to transform naked mole-rat cells. However, once high-molecular-mass HA is removed by either knocking down HAS2 or overexpressing the HA-degrading enzyme, HYAL2, naked mole-rat cells become susceptible to malignant transformation and readily form tumours in mice. We speculate that naked mole rats have evolved a higher concentration of HA in the skin to provide skin elasticity needed for life in underground tunnels. This trait may have then been co-opted to provide cancer resistance and longevity to this species. PMID:23783513

  1. The porcine sperm reservoir in relation to the function of hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    TIENTHAI, Paisan

    2015-01-01

    The oviduct plays a role in successful animal reproduction not only in spermatozoa and ova transport to the fertilization site but also by affording a microenvironment for fertilization and early embryonic development. The sperm reservoir (SR) is restricted in the uterotubal junction (UTJ) and caudal isthmus. Billions of porcine spermatozoa are distributed to the female reproductive tract during/after insemination, and small amounts of them are stored for about 36–40 hours in the SR, which maintains sperm viability in the pre-ovulation period through its surface epithelium and production of fluid. The SR regulates the release of spermatozoa so that only a small population moves towards the fertilization site (ampulla) to decrease polyspermy. This review attempts to provide information about the structure and function of the porcine SR, its intraluminal content (hyaluronan, HA), and the influences of HA on porcine spermatozoa in vivo. In pigs, the spermatozoa are stored in a mucous-like fluid within the UTJ and caudal isthmus in the pre-ovulation period. The oviduct fluid contains sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and non-sulfated GAGs, i.e., HA. It is interesting to note that HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS-3), and its receptor, CD44, is found in the epithelium of the porcine SR site. Additionally, sperm capacitation does not occur in vivo in the SR during the pre- and peri-ovulation periods, but spermatozoa in the SR will attempt to capacitate if exposed to bicarbonate. However, capacitation in the SR will rise in the post-ovulation period, indicating the role of HA in modulating sperm capacitation after ovulation. All data support the understanding that the porcine SR ensures the viability of fertile spermatozoa and maintains the non-capacitated status during the pre-ovulation period. This basic knowledge about the SR is believed to be useful to advance sperm preparation procedures for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and improve the preservation

  2. The porcine sperm reservoir in relation to the function of hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Tienthai, Paisan

    2015-01-01

    The oviduct plays a role in successful animal reproduction not only in spermatozoa and ova transport to the fertilization site but also by affording a microenvironment for fertilization and early embryonic development. The sperm reservoir (SR) is restricted in the uterotubal junction (UTJ) and caudal isthmus. Billions of porcine spermatozoa are distributed to the female reproductive tract during/after insemination, and small amounts of them are stored for about 36-40 hours in the SR, which maintains sperm viability in the pre-ovulation period through its surface epithelium and production of fluid. The SR regulates the release of spermatozoa so that only a small population moves towards the fertilization site (ampulla) to decrease polyspermy. This review attempts to provide information about the structure and function of the porcine SR, its intraluminal content (hyaluronan, HA), and the influences of HA on porcine spermatozoa in vivo. In pigs, the spermatozoa are stored in a mucous-like fluid within the UTJ and caudal isthmus in the pre-ovulation period. The oviduct fluid contains sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and non-sulfated GAGs, i.e., HA. It is interesting to note that HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS-3), and its receptor, CD44, is found in the epithelium of the porcine SR site. Additionally, sperm capacitation does not occur in vivo in the SR during the pre- and peri-ovulation periods, but spermatozoa in the SR will attempt to capacitate if exposed to bicarbonate. However, capacitation in the SR will rise in the post-ovulation period, indicating the role of HA in modulating sperm capacitation after ovulation. All data support the understanding that the porcine SR ensures the viability of fertile spermatozoa and maintains the non-capacitated status during the pre-ovulation period. This basic knowledge about the SR is believed to be useful to advance sperm preparation procedures for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and improve the preservation

  3. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries. PMID:18065212

  4. Pathophysiology of the Peritoneal Membrane during Peritoneal Dialysis: The Role of Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao

    2011-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), constant exposure of mesothelial cells to bioincompatible PD solutions results in the denudation of the mesothelial monolayer and impairment of mesothelial cell function. Hyaluronan, a major component of extracellular matrices, is synthesized by mesothelial cells and contributes to remesothelialization, maintenance of cell phenotype, and tissue remodeling and provides structural support to the peritoneal membrane. Chronic peritoneal inflammation is observed in long-term PD patients and is associated with increased hyaluronan synthesis. During inflammation, depolymerization of hyaluronan may occur with the generation of hyaluronan fragments. In contrast to native hyaluronan which offers a protective role to the peritoneum, hyaluronan fragments exacerbate inflammatory and fibrotic processes and therefore assist in the destruction of the tissue. This paper will discuss the contribution of mesothelial cells to peritoneal membrane alterations that are induced by PD and the putative role of hyaluronan in these processes. PMID:22203782

  5. Hyaluronan-induced VEGF-C promotes fibrosis-induced lymphangiogenesis via Toll-like receptor 4-dependent signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yu Jin; Lee, Ae Sin; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Myung Ki; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2015-10-23

    Hyaluronan (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, modulates cellular behavior including angiogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of HA on lymphangiogenesis in fibrosis model. In this study, we investigated the roles of HA in lymphangiogenesis of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). We found that HA cooperated synergistically with vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C to stimulate capillary-like tube formation and increase migration of cells in a haptotaxis assay. Accumulation of HA in the cortical interstitial space was positively correlated with the number of lymphatic vessels after UUO. Depletion of macrophages with clodronate decreased UUO-induced HA accumulation and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, hyaluronan synthase (HAS) mRNA expression and HA production were increased in bone marrow-derived macrophages upon stimulation with TGF-β1. Transfer of mHAS2 and mHAS3 knock-down CD11b-positive macrophages to SCID mice resulted in a partial decrease in UUO-induced lymphangiogenesis. HA increased expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C in macrophages. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C expression and LYVE-1-positive lymphatic area was significantly lower in the UUO-kidney from TLR4 null mice than that from TLR4 wild-type mice. Collectively, these results suggest that HA increases lymphangiogenesis in renal fibrosis model and also stimulates vascular endothelial cell growth factor-C production from macrophages through Toll-like receptor 4-dependent signal pathway. PMID:26362177

  6. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H.; Boehm, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end. PMID:26883791

  7. Controlled Immobilization Strategies to Probe Short Hyaluronan-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Antoni, Christiane H.; Boehm, Heike

    2016-02-01

    Well-controlled grafting of small hyaluronan oligosaccharides (sHA) enables novel approaches to investigate biological processes such as angiogenesis, immune reactions and cancer metastasis. We develop two strategies for covalent attachment of sHA, a fast high-density adsorption and a two-layer system that allows tuning the density and mode of immobilization. We monitored the sHA adlayer formation and subsequent macromolecular interactions by label-free quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The modified surfaces are inert to unspecific protein adsorption, and yet retain the specific binding capacity of sHA. Thus they are an ideal tool to study the interactions of hyaluronan-binding proteins and short hyaluronan molecules as demonstrated by the specific recognition of LYVE-1 and aggrecan. Both hyaladherins recognize sHA and the binding is independent to the presence of the reducing end.

  8. Hypotheses on the evolution of hyaluronan: a highly ironic acid.

    PubMed

    Csoka, Antonei B; Stern, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Hyaluronan is a high-molecular-weight glycosaminoglycan (GAG) prominent in the extracellular matrix. Emerging relatively late in evolution, it may have evolved to evade immune recognition. Chondroitin is a more ancient GAG and a possible hyaluronan precursor. Epimerization of a 4-hydroxyl in N-acetylgalactosamine in chondroitin to N-acetylglucosamine of hyaluronan is the only structural difference other than chain length between these two polymers. The axial 4-hydroxyl group extends out perpendicular from the equatorial plane of N-acetylgalactosamine in chondroitin. We suspect that this hydroxyl is a prime target for immune recognition. Conversion of a thumbs-up hydroxyl group into a thumbs-down position in the plane of the sugar endows hyaluronan with the ability to avoid immune recognition. Chitin is another potential precursor to hyaluronan. But regardless whether of chondroitin or of chitin origin, an ancient chondroitinase enzyme sequence seems to have been commandeered to catalyze the cleavage of the new hyaluronan substrate. The evolution of six hyaluronidase-like sequences in the human genome from a single chondroitinase as found in Caenorhabditis elegans can now be traced. Confirming our previous predictions, two duplication events occurred, with three hyaluronidase-like sequences occurring in the genome of Ciona intestinalis (sea squirt), the earliest known chordate. This was probably followed by en masse duplication, with six such genes present in the genome of zebra fish onwards. These events occurred, however, much earlier than predicted. It is also apparent on an evolutionary time scale that in several species, this gene family is continuing to evolve. PMID:23315448

  9. Genome integrity, stem cells and hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Balazs, Endre A.

    2012-01-01

    Faithful preservation of genome integrity is the critical mission of stem cells as well as of germ cells. Reviewed are the following mechanisms involved in protecting DNA in these cells: (a) The efflux machinery that can pump out variety of genotoxins in ATP-dependent manner; (b) the mechanisms maintaining minimal metabolic activity which reduces generation of reactive oxidants, by-products of aerobic respiration; (c) the role of hypoxic niche of stem cells providing a gradient of variable oxygen tension; (d) (e) the presence of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors on stem cells and in the niche; (f) the role of HA in protecting DNA from oxidative damage; (g) the specific function of HA in protecting DNA in stem cells; (h) the interactions of HA with sperm cells and oocytes that also may shield their DNA from oxidative damage, and (e) mechanisms by which HA exerts the anti-oxidant activity. While HA has multitude of functions its anti-oxidant capabilities are often overlooked but may be of significance in preservation of integrity of stem and germ cells genome. PMID:22383371

  10. Hyaluronan: More than just a wrinkle filler.

    PubMed

    Maytin, Edward V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology is a field that strives not only to alleviate skin disease (therapeutics) but also to improve the perception of wellness (cosmetics). Thus, in this special issue of Glycobiology, it seems appropriate to discuss the biology of a glycosaminoglycan, called hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan, or HA), that has become the most popular agent today for intradermal injections to improve wrinkles and other cosmetic defects. HA is a simple linear polymer in which a simple disaccharide is repeated thousands of time, thereby creating a huge hydrophilic molecule that confers a large volume of hydration and contributes to the turgor and flexibility of healthy skin. Beyond cosmetic considerations, however, HA also has important biological and physiological functions that were largely under-appreciated until recently. New research has confirmed that HA is dynamically produced by most skin cells, not only fibroblasts (the cells that make most of the skin's extracellular matrix) but also by keratinocytes in the outer protective layer (epidermis). For both fibroblasts and keratinocytes, HA plays a regulatory role in controlling cell physiology through interaction of extracellular HA with a major cell-surface receptor, CD44. This interaction mediates intracellular signaling both directly and indirectly, through CD44 interactions with the cytoskeleton and with EGF and TGFβ receptors. Furthermore, degradation of HA by specific hyaluronidase enzymes produces HA fragments that can help to regulate inflammatory processes. In this review, current knowledge about the role of HA in skin inflammation and wound healing are reviewed and possible future applications of such knowledge discussed. PMID:26964566

  11. Interaction of Hyaluronan with Cationic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bano, Fouzia; Carril, Mónica; Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Richter, Ralf P

    2015-08-01

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is a main component of peri- and extracellular matrix, and an attractive molecule for materials design in tissue engineering and nanomedicine. Here, we study the morphology of complexes that form upon interaction of nanometer-sized amine-coated gold particles with this anionic, linear, and regular biopolymer in solution and grafted to a surface. We find that cationic nanoparticles (NPs) have profound effects on HA morphology on the molecular and supramolecular scale. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) shows that depending on their relative abundance, cationic NPs promote either strong compaction or swelling of films of surface-grafted HA polymers (HA brushes). Transmission electron and atomic force microscopy reveal that the NPs do also give rise to complexes of distinct morphologies-compact nanoscopic spheres and extended microscopic fibers-upon interaction with HA polymers in solution. In particular, stable and hydrated spherical complexes of single HA polymers with NPs can be prepared when balancing the ionizable groups on HA and NPs. The observed self-assembly phenomena could be useful for the design of drug delivery vehicles and a better understanding of the reorganization of HA-rich synthetic or biological matrices. PMID:26146006

  12. Removal rate of ( sup 3 H)hyaluronan injected subcutaneously in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.K.; Laurent, U.B.; Fraser, J.R.; Laurent, T.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Hyaluronan is an important constituent of the extracellular matrix in skin, and recent studies suggest that there is a pool of easily removable (free) hyaluronan drained by lymph. The removal rate of free hyaluronan in skin was measured from the elimination of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronan, injected subcutaneously in 13 rabbits. The removal of radioactivity was determined from appearance of {sup 3}H in plasma. During the first 24 h after injection, 10-87% of the tracer entered blood, less in injectates with high concentrations of hyaluronan. The removal was monoexponential with a half-life of 0.5-1 day when concentration of hyaluronan was 5 mg/ml or less. When hyaluronan concentration was 10 mg/ml or higher, the removal was slow for about 24 h and then became similar to that in experiments with low hyaluronan concentration. Free hyaluronan at physiological concentrations is thus turned over with the same rate as serum albumin, supporting the concept that hyaluronan is removed essentially by lymph flow to be degraded in lymph nodes and liver.

  13. Sepsis puerperalis caused by a genotypically proven cat-derived Pasteurella multocida strain.

    PubMed

    Voss, A; van Zwam, Y H; Meis, J F; Melchers, W; Steegers, E A

    1998-01-01

    We report a disseminated intrauterine Pasteurella multocida infection in a puerperal woman who could not remember any traumatic exposure to her cat. An oral swab taken from the cat, just 2 days after the patient's admission, grew Pasteurella multocida, with an PCR-fingerprinting pattern identical to the patient's isolate. Hand-washing after every contact with cats and dogs and if feasible separation of in-house pets from mother and infant should be applied to prevent this uncommon but serious occurrence of post-partum infections. To our knowledge this is the first case of Pasteurella multocida 'child-bed fever', with a genotypically identical strain isolated from the in-house cat. PMID:9481551

  14. Survival of toxigenic Pasteurella multocida in aerosols and aqueous liquids.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, C M; Chanter, N; Wathes, C M

    1992-01-01

    The survival of toxigenic Pasteurella multocida in air and liquids was studied to identify possible risk factors in the etiology of atrophic rhinitis. In aerosols, at low relative humidity (28%), the viability of toxigenic P. multocida 5 min after aerosolization was at least 22% of its initial value. Viability at low relative humidity declined to 8% after 45 min. Viability at high relative humidity (79%) was 69% after 5 min and declined to 2% after 45 min. Survival of toxigenic P. multocida in liquids depended on storage and constituents in the liquid. Toxigenic P. multocida became nonculturable 1 to 14 days after inoculation in water and artificial seawater, depending on the storage temperature. Toxigenic P. multocida stored at 37 degrees C could be detected for up to 6 days in pig slurry and more than 36 days in Bacto Tryptose broth and nasal lavages. However, in Bacto Tryptose broth and nasal lavages stored at 4 degrees C, P. multocida was detected for up to 14 days whereas at 15 and 37 degrees C it was detected for more than 49 days. These results suggest that aerosols and fomites can play a role in the transmission of atrophic rhinitis. PMID:1575496

  15. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis by Pasteurella multocida under treatment with rifaximin.

    PubMed

    Lutz, P; Parcina, M; Bekeredjian-Ding, I; Hoerauf, A; Strassburg, C P; Spengler, U

    2014-02-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis. Recently, rifaximin, a non-absorbable antibiotic which is used to prevent recurrent hepatic encephalopathy, has been proposed as effective prophylaxis for SBP. Here, we present an unusual case of SBP under treatment with rifaximin. A 50-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis was admitted because of tense ascites and abdominal pain. She was under long-term oral prophylaxis with rifaximin due to hepatic encephalopathy. Paracentesis revealed SBP caused by Pasteurella multocida, which was sensitive to multiple antibiotics, including rifaximin. Treatment with ceftriaxone resulted in rapid resolution of the peritonitis and restoration of the patient. Since P. multocida is usually transmitted from pets, the patient's cat was tested and could be identified as the most likely source of infection. This case should elicit our awareness that uncommon pathogens and unusual routes of transmission may lead to SBP, despite antibacterial prophylaxis with non-absorbable antibiotics. Nevertheless, such infections may still remain sensitive to systemic therapy with conventional antibiotics. PMID:23526308

  16. Pasteurella pestis detection in Fleas by fluorescent antibody staining.

    PubMed

    Hudson, B W; Kartman, L; Prince, F M

    1966-01-01

    In an effort to develop a method for the rapid field identification of plague-infected fleas, the authors have studied the feasibility of direct fluorescent antibody staining of the midgut contents of fleas fed on mice infected with Pasteurella pestis. Fluorescent antibodies prepared from antisera derived from rabbits inoculated with the water-soluble P. pestis fraction 1b antigen, the somatic antigen of heat-killed P. pestis (Bryans strain), and live avirulent (strain A1122) or virulent (Yreka strain) plague vaccines were used used in this study.This direct staining method proved to be impracticable, but encouraging results were obtained by fluorescent antibody staining of broth cultures of macerates of infected fleas after 24-48 hours' incubation.The broth enrichment technique has not yet been evaluated in the field, but it is expected to be of value since it is relatively simple to perform and requires only material that can easily be transported to remote areas. PMID:5328902

  17. Comparison of methods to detect Pasteurella multocida in carrier waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Johnson, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted laboratory challenge trials using mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) to compare methods for detecting carriers of Pasteurella multocida, the bacterium that causes avian cholera, in wild birds. Birds that survived the initial infection were euthanized at 2-4 wk intervals up to 14 wk post challenge. Isolates of P. multocida were obtained at necropsy from 23% of the birds that survived initial infection. We found that swab samples (oral, cloacal, nasal, eye, and leg joint) were most effective for detecting carrier birds up to 14 wk post infection. No detectable differences in isolation were observed for samples stored in either 10% dimethysulfoxide or brain heart infusion broth. The frequency of detecting carriers in our challenge trials appeared to be related to mortality rates observed during the trial, but was not related to a number of other factors including time after challenge, time delays in collecting tissues postmortem, and route of infection. In our trials, there was little association between antibody levels and carrier status. We concluded that swabs samples collected from recently dead birds, stored in liquid nitrogen, and processed using selective broth provide a feasible field method for detecting P. multocida carriers in wild waterfowl.

  18. Binding of Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin to bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J F; Leite, F; Czuprynski, C J

    1997-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is the principal bacterial pathogen in the bovine respiratory disease complex. This organism produces an exotoxin (referred to as leukotoxin) during logarithmic-phase growth that is a potent leukocyte-modulating agent. At low concentrations, it activates neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes to release inflammatory mediators, while at the same time making these cells destined to undergo apoptotic cell death. At higher concentrations, the toxin causes rapid swelling and loss of cell viability. In this study, we demonstrated that toxin binding can be directly evaluated by flow cytometry with biologically active biotinylated leukotoxin. Leukotoxin binding was blocked by the addition of a neutralizing anti-leukotoxin monoclonal antibody and was not detected when bovine leukocytes were incubated with culture filtrates from a mutant strain of P. haemolytica that does not produce biologically active leukotoxin. In addition, treatment of bovine leukocytes with protease K eliminated subsequent binding of leukotoxin, suggesting that there is a protein on the leukocyte surface that is either a leukotoxin binding site or is required for stabilization of leukotoxin binding. We did not detect binding of biotinylated leukotoxin to porcine or human leukocytes, which have been reported previously to be resistant to the lytic effects of the leukotoxin. These findings suggest that there may be a specific binding site for P. haemolytica leukotoxin on bovine but not on porcine or human leukocytes and that it might be involved in the activation and lytic activities of the leukotoxin. PMID:9284143

  19. Chemically Modified N-Acylated Hyaluronan Fragments Modulate Proinflammatory Cytokine Production by Stimulated Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Babasola, Oladunni; Rees-Milton, Karen J.; Bebe, Siziwe; Wang, Jiaxi; Anastassiades, Tassos P.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular mass hyaluronans are known to induce inflammation. To determine the role of the acetyl groups of low molecular mass hyaluronan in stimulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines, partial N-deacetylation was carried out by hydrazinolysis. This resulted in 19.7 ± 3.5% free NH2 functional groups, which were then acylated by reacting with an acyl anhydride, including acetic anhydride. Hydrazinolysis resulted in bond cleavage of the hyaluronan chain causing a reduction of the molecular mass to 30–214 kDa. The total NH2 and N-acetyl moieties in the reacetylated hyaluronan were 0% and 98.7 ± 1.5% respectively, whereas for butyrylated hyaluronan, the total NH2, N-acetyl, and N-butyryl moieties were 0, 82.2 ± 4.6, and 22.7 ± 3.8%, respectively, based on 1H NMR. We studied the effect of these polymers on cytokine production by cultured human macrophages (THP-1 cells). The reacetylated hyaluronan stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production to levels similar to LPS, whereas partially deacetylated hyaluronan had no stimulatory effect, indicating the critical role of the N-acetyl groups in the stimulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Butyrylated hyaluronan significantly reduced the stimulatory effect on cytokine production by the reacetylated hyaluronan or LPS but had no stimulatory effect of its own. The other partially N-acylated hyaluronan derivatives tested showed smaller stimulatory effects than reacetylated hyaluronan. Antibody and antagonist experiments suggest that the acetylated and partially butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronans exert their effects through the TLR-4 receptor system. Selectively N-butyrylated lower molecular mass hyaluronan shows promise as an example of a novel semisynthetic anti-inflammatory molecule. PMID:25053413

  20. Viscoelastic Properties of Hyaluronan in Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cowman, Mary K.; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Raghavan, Preeti; Stecco, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is particularly abundant in soft connective tissues. Solutions of HA can be highly viscous with non-Newtonian flow properties. These properties affect the movement of HA-containing fluid layers within and underlying the deep fascia. Changes in the concentration, molecular weight, or even covalent modification of HA in inflammatory conditions, as well as changes in binding interactions with other macromolecules, can have dramatic effects on the sliding movement of fascia. The high molecular weight and the semi-flexible chain of HA are key factors leading to the high viscosity of dilute solutions, and real HA solutions show additional nonideality and greatly increased viscosity due to mutual macromolecular crowding. The shear rate dependence of the viscosity, and the viscoelasticity of HA solutions, depend on the relaxation time of the molecule, which in turn depends on the HA concentration and molecular weight. Temperature can also have an effect on these properties. High viscosity can additionally affect the lubricating function of HA solutions. Immobility can increase the concentration of HA, increase the viscosity, and reduce lubrication and gliding of the layers of connective tissue and muscle. Over time, these changes can alter both muscle structure and function. Inflammation can further increase the viscosity of HA-containing fluids if the HA is modified via covalent attachment of heavy chains derived from Inter-α-Inhibitor. Hyaluronidase hydrolyzes HA, thus reducing its molecular weight, lowering the viscosity of the extracellular matrix fluid and making outflow easier. It can also disrupt any aggregates or gel-like structures that result from HA being modified. Hyaluronidase is used medically primarily as a dispersion agent, but may also be useful in conditions where altered viscosity of the fascia is desired, such as in the treatment of muscle stiffness

  1. Collagen VI and Hyaluronan: The Common Role in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karousou, Evgenia; D'Angelo, Maria Luisa; Kouvidi, Katerina; Vigetti, Davide; Viola, Manuela; Passi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI and hyaluronan are widely distributed extracellular matrix macromolecules that play a crucial role in tissue development and are highly expressed in cancers. Both hyaluronan and collagen VI are upregulated in breast cancer, generating a microenvironment that promotes tumour progression and metastasis. A growing number of studies show that these two molecules are involved in inflammation and angiogenesis by recruiting macrophages and endothelial cells, respectively. Additionally, collagen VI induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition that is correlated to increased synthesis of hyaluronan in mammary cells. Hyaluronan has also a specific role in cellular functions that depends mainly on the size of the polymer, whereas the effect of collagen VI in tumour progression may be the result of the intact molecule or the C5 peptide of α3(VI) chain, known as endotrophin. Collectively, these findings strongly support the parallel role of these molecules in tumour progression and suggest that they may be used as prognostic factors for the breast cancer treatment. PMID:25126569

  2. Layilin, a Novel Integral Membrane Protein, Is a Hyaluronan Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Petri; Rubin, Kristofer; Higgins, Jonathan M. G.; Hynes, Richard O.

    2001-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a significant role in changes of cell shape and motility, and interactions between the actin filaments and the cell membrane are crucial for a variety of cellular processes. Several adaptor proteins, including talin, maintain the cytoskeleton-membrane linkage by binding to integral membrane proteins and to the cytoskeleton. Layilin, a recently characterized transmembrane protein with homology to C-type lectins, is a membrane-binding site for talin in peripheral ruffles of spreading cells. To facilitate studies of layilin's function, we have generated a layilin-Fc fusion protein comprising the extracellular part of layilin joined to human immunoglobulin G heavy chain and used this chimera to identify layilin ligands. Here, we demonstrate that layilin-Fc fusion protein binds to hyaluronan immobilized to Sepharose. Microtiter plate-binding assays, coprecipitation experiments, and staining of sections predigested with different glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzymes and cell adhesion assays all revealed that layilin binds specifically to hyaluronan but not to other tested glycosaminoglycans. Layilin's ability to bind hyaluronan, a ubiquitous extracellular matrix component, reveals an interesting parallel between layilin and CD44, because both can bind to cytoskeleton-membrane linker proteins through their cytoplasmic domains and to hyaluronan through their extracellular domains. This parallelism suggests a role for layilin in cell adhesion and motility. PMID:11294894

  3. Diffusion of Particle in Hyaluronan Solution, a Brownian Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasu, Masako; Tomita, Jungo

    2004-04-01

    Diffusion of a particle in hyaluronan solution is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulation. The slowing down of diffusion is observed, in accordance with the experimental results. The temperature dependence of the diffusion is calculated, and a turnover is obtained when the temperature is increased.

  4. Getting a grip: hyaluronan-mediated cellular adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer E.; Spatz, Joachim P.

    2004-10-01

    Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) techniques are further developed to study hyaluronan-mediated adhesion of chondrocyte cells. We present a calibration scheme and address fundamental issues concerning the use of HOTs for quantitative force measurements. Influence of SLM pixelation on trap stiffness is observed and can be utilized to design calibrated HOTs more effectively. It is also shown that the HOTs trapping stiffness can vary significantly over short distances. Then we use HOTs cell adhesion assays investigate the viscoelastic and adhesive nature of chondrocytes' pericellular matrix (PCM) at two different time steps (30 minute and 24 hour incubation periods). Surprisingly, no physical influence of the large, presumably gel-like PCM is observed. However, a difference is discerned in the adhesiveness of the two sets of cells. The early-stage cells have reversible adhesion with negatively-charged and fibronectin-coated microspheres even after they are held at the cell surface for 10 seconds. In contrast, late stage cells stick irreversibly to all types of beads: positive, negative, fibronectin and hyaluronan-coated. Additionally, only the late stage cells produce membrane tethers. These observations suggest that the late-stage chondrocytes have less surface-associated hyaluronan and have interesting implications for the role of hyaluronan in the early stages of cell adhesion.

  5. A Chronic Respiratory Pasteurella multocida Infection Is Well-Controlled by Long-Term Macrolide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Sakata, Tomomi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Nishi, Isao; Tomono, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with severe bronchiectasis frequently received antibiotics, including penicillin, for acute exacerbations due to Pasteurella multocida. Although the bacteria showed a decrease in antibiotic susceptibility, her symptoms and X-ray findings became stable, and severe exacerbations were not observed for the last few years after a low-dose erythromycin treatment was started. The development of a respiratory infection with Pasteurella multocida is relatively uncommon, but it can be controlled by immunomodulation which is associated with long-term macrolide therapy. PMID:26831030

  6. Pasteurella haemolytica bacteriophage: identification, partial characterization, and relationship of temperate bacteriophages from isolates of Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, A.B.; Renshaw, H.W.; Sneed, L.W.

    1985-05-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) isolates (n = 15) from the upper respiratory tract of clinically normal cattle, as well as from lung lesions from cases of fatal bovine pasteurellosis, were examined for the presence of bacteriophage after irradiation with UV light. Treatment of all P haemolytica isolates with UV irradiation resulted in lysis of bacteria due to the induction of vegetative development of bacteriophages. The extent of growth inhibition and bacterial lysis in irradiated cultures was UV dose-dependent. Bacterial cultures exposed to UV light for 20 s reached peak culture density between 60 and 70 minutes after irradiation; thereafter, culture density declined rapidly, so that by 120 minutes, it was approximately 60% of the original value. When examined ultrastructurally, lytic cultures from each isolate revealed bacteriophages with an overall length of approximately 200 nm and that appeared to have a head with icosahedral symmetry and a contractile tail. Cell-free filtrate from each noninduced bacterial isolate was inoculated onto the other bacterial isolates in a cross-culture sensitivity assay for the presence of phages lytic for the host bacterial isolates. Zones of lysis (plaques) did not develop when bacterial lawns grown from the different isolates were inoculated with filtrates from the heterologous isolates.

  7. Stilbene Synthase and Chalcone Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Rolfs, Claus-Henning; Kindl, Helmut

    1984-01-01

    Cultured cells of Picea excelsa capable of forming stilbenes and flavanoids have been established. Unlike needles of intact plants containing piceatannol (3,3′,4′,5-tetrahydroxystilbene) and stilbene glycosides the cultured cells converted phenylalanine and p-coumaric acid primarily into resveratrol monomethyl ether (3,4′-dihydroxy-5-methoxystilbene) and naringenin. Partially purified enzyme preparations were assayed for chalcone synthase as well as for stilbene synthase activity converting malonyl-CoA plus p-coumaroyl-CoA into 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). Although stilbene synthase and chalcone synthase use the same substrates and exhibit similar molecular properties, i.e. molecular weight and subunit molecular weight, they are two different proteins. This difference was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis and by means of monospecific antibodies. PMID:16663649

  8. The role of hyaluronan in the pathobiology and treatment of respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Garantziotis, Stavros; Brezina, Martin; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Drago, Lorenzo

    2016-05-01

    Hyaluronan, a ubiquitous naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan, is a major component of the extracellular matrix, where it participates in biological processes that include water homeostasis, cell-matrix signaling, tissue healing, inflammation, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation and migration. There are emerging data that hyaluronan and its degradation products have an important role in the pathobiology of the respiratory tract. We review the role of hyaluronan in respiratory diseases and present evidence from published literature and from clinical practice supporting hyaluronan as a novel treatment for respiratory diseases. Preliminary data show that aerosolized exogenous hyaluronan has beneficial activity against airway inflammation, protects against bronchial hyperreactivity and remodeling, and disrupts the biofilm associated with chronic infection. This suggests a role in airway diseases with a predominant inflammatory component such as rhinosinusitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and primary ciliary dyskinesia. The potential for hyaluronan to complement conventional therapy will become clearer when data are available from controlled trials in larger patient populations. PMID:26747781

  9. Induction of hyaluronan production by oncogenic KSHV and the contribution to viral pathogenesis in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Chen, Yihan; Bonstaff, Karlie; Doyle, Lisa; Toole, Bryan; Parsons, Chris; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2015-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent for Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), malignancies arising primarily in immunocompromised patients particularly AIDS-patients, which still lack effective therapy. Hyaluronan (HA) is a large glucuronic acid and has been found closely related to multiple functions in cancer cells, although its role in viral oncogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we provide first evidence that KSHV de novo infection induces HA production from primary endothelial cells through upregulation of HA synthase gene 1 (Has1) and a multifunctional glycoprotein, CD147. Further data demonstrate that KSHV-induced HA production requires viral latent protein, LANA (in particular functional domain A) and MAPK/ERK signaling activities. In functions, HA production is necessary for KSHV/LANA-induced primary endothelial cell invasion, a hallmark feature for KS development. For clinical relevance, our data indicate that the KSHV+ group has higher levels of HA and Has1 activities in its plasma than the KSHV- group of cohort HIV-infected patients. Together, our findings provide innovative insights into the mechanisms of oncogenic virus activation of HA production and its role in virus-associated malignancy pathogenesis, which may help to develop novel therapeutic strategies by targeting HA and related signaling. PMID:25837851

  10. Adiponectin resides in mouse skin and upregulates hyaluronan synthesis in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Yumiko; Sayo, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Sato, Takashi; Akimoto, Noriko; Ito, Akira; Inoue, Shintaro

    2011-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a hormonally active tissue that produces adipokines that influence the activity of other tissues. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-specific adipokine involved in systemic metabolism. We detected the expression of adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) mRNA in cultured dermal fibroblasts. The full-length adiponectin (fAd), but not the globular adiponectin (gAd), increased hyaluronan (HA) production and upregulated HA synthase (HAS) 2 mRNA expression. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs were also expressed in keratinocytes, though neither fAd nor gAd had any effect on HA synthesis. In mouse skin, we found that adiponectin was present and decreased markedly with aging. The age-dependent pattern of adiponectin decrease in skin, correlated well with that of HA in skin. Our experiments were also the first to identify adiponectin production in cultured mouse sebocytes, a finding that suggests that skin adiponectin may derive not only from plasma and/or subcutaneous adipose tissue, but also from the sebaceous gland. These results indicated that adiponectin plays an important role in the HA metabolism of skin. PMID:21117904

  11. A novel epigenetic mechanism regulating hyaluronan production in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kohi, Shiro; Sato, Norihiro; Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Koga, Atsuhiro; Higure, Aiichiro; Hirata, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an abundant stroma enriched with hyaluronan (HA), a major component of extracellular matrix known to play a critical role in tumor progression. The mechanisms that regulate HA synthesis in PDAC are poorly understood. To investigate whether DNA methylation and HA production from PDAC cells are associated, we studied the effect of 5-aza-2'-deoxycitidine (5-aza-dC), an inhibitor of DNA methylation, or DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) knockdown by small interfering RNA, on the HA production from PDAC cells. HA production into the conditioned medium was evaluated in PDAC cells treated with 5-aza-dC or DNMT1 knockdown. mRNA expression of HA synthase (HAS) genes was investigated by real-time RT-PCR. Treatment of PDAC cells with 5-aza-dC led to a significant increase in the HA production (up to 2.5-fold increase) in all 4 cell lines tested. This enhanced HA production by 5-aza-dC treatment was accompanied by increased mRNA expression of HAS2 and HAS3. Furthermore, increased HA production and HAS2/HAS3 mRNA expression was also observed in PDAC cells by knockdown of DNMT1. These findings provide evidence, for the first time, that epigenetic mechanism is involved in the regulation of HA synthesis in PDAC cells. PMID:26589701

  12. Biotinylated hyaluronan: a versatile and highly sensitive probe capable of detecting nanogram levels of hyaluronan binding proteins (hyaladherins) on electroblots by a novel affinity detection procedure.

    PubMed

    Melrose, J; Numata, Y; Ghosh, P

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronan influences cellular proliferation and migration in developing, regenerating and remodelling tissues and in tissues undergoing malignant tumour-cell invasion. The widespread occurrence of hyaluronan-binding proteins indicates that the recognition of hyaluronan is important to tissue organisation and the control of cellular behaviour. A number of extracellular matrix and cellular proteins, which have been termed the hyaladherins, have specific affinities for hyaluronan. These include cartilage link-protein, hyaluronectin, neurocan, versican and aggrecan, which all bind to HA within the extracellular matrix. Cellular receptors for hyaluronan such as CD44 and RHAMM (receptor for hyaluronate-mediated motility) have also been identified. In the present study biotinylated hyaluronan (bHA) was prepared by reacting adipic dihydrazide with a 170 kDa hyaluronan sample using the bifunctional reagent 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide. The resultant free amine moeity of the hydrazido-hyaluronan was then reacted with biotin succinimidyl ester (sulfo-NHS-biotin) to prepare the bHA. After 4-20% gradient sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and electroblotting to nitrocellulose membranes, bHA and avidin alkaline phosphatase conjugate could be used in conjunction with nitroblue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate substrates to specifically visualise with high sensitivity (> or = 2 ng), bovine nasal cartilage link-protein, aggrecan hyaluronan binding region, and human fibroblast hyaluronan receptors such as CD-44. Conventional Western blotting using specific monoclonal antibodies to these proteins was also used to confirm the identities of these proteins. PMID:8907541

  13. Extracellular Processing of the Cartilage Proteoglycan Aggregate and Its Effect on CD44-mediated Internalization of Hyaluronan*

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Ben T.; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2015-01-01

    In many cells hyaluronan receptor CD44 mediates the endocytosis of hyaluronan and its delivery to endosomes/lysosomes. The regulation of this process remains largely unknown. In most extracellular matrices hyaluronan is not present as a free polysaccharide but often is found in complex with other small proteins and macromolecules such as proteoglycans. This is especially true in cartilage, where hyaluronan assembles into an aggregate structure with the large proteoglycan termed aggrecan. In this study when purified aggrecan was added to FITC-conjugated hyaluronan, no internalization of hyaluronan was detected. This suggested that the overall size of the aggregate prevented hyaluronan endocytosis and furthermore that proteolysis of the aggrecan was a required prerequisite for local, cell-based turnover of hyaluronan. To test this hypothesis, limited C-terminal digestion of aggrecan was performed to determine whether a size range of aggrecan exists that permits hyaluronan endocytosis. Our data demonstrate that only limited degradation of the aggrecan monomer was required to allow for hyaluronan internalization. When hyaluronan was combined with partially degraded, dansyl chloride-labeled aggrecan, blue fluorescent aggrecan was also visualized within intracellular vesicles. It was also determined that sonicated hyaluronan of smaller molecular size was internalized more readily than high molecular mass hyaluronan. However, the addition of intact aggrecan to hyaluronan chains sonicated for 5 and 10 s reblocked their endocytosis, whereas aggregates containing 15-s sonicated hyaluronan were internalized. These data suggest that hyaluronan endocytosis is regulated in large part by the extracellular proteolytic processing of hyaluronan-bound proteoglycan. PMID:25733665

  14. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Pasteurella multocida Infection

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Antonio; Dincman, Toros; Clyburn, Benjamin E.; Steed, Lisa L.; Rockey, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pasteurella multocida, a zoonotic infectious organism, has most often been described in patients after an animal bite. Here, we characterize the clinical features and outcomes of P multocida infection in a large cohort of patients according to the presence or absence of an animal bite. We retrospectively searched MUSC's laboratory information system for all patients with positive P multocida cultures from 2000 to 2014. Extensive data were abstracted, including clinical and outcome data. The Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) was used to assess comorbidities among patients. We identified 44 patients with P multocida infections, including 25 with an animal bite. The average age was 64 years and the majority of patients were women (N = 30). There was no difference in age and sex distribution among those with and without a bite (P = 0.38 and 0.75, respectively). A CCI ≥1 was significantly associated with the absence of a bite (P = 0.006). Patients presenting without a bite were more frequently bacteremic (37% vs 4%, respectively, P = 0.001), and were hospitalized more often (84% vs 44%, respectively, P = 0.012). Of the 8 patients who required intensive care unit (ICU)-based care, 7 were non-bite-related. There were 4 deaths, all occurring in patients not bitten. P multocida infections not associated with an animal bite were often associated with bacteremia, severe comorbidity(ies), immune-incompetent states, the need for ICU management, and were associated with substantial mortality. PMID:26356688

  15. Immunogenicity of Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Roier, Sandro; Fenninger, Judith C.; Leitner, Deborah R.; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is able to cause disease in humans and in a wide range of animal hosts, including fowl cholera in birds, atrophic rhinitis in pigs, and snuffles in rabbits. Together with Mannheimia haemolytica, P. multocida also represents a major bacterial causative agent of bovine respiratory disease (BRD), which is one of the most important causes for economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industry. Commercially available vaccines only partially prevent infections caused by P. multocida and M. haemolytica. Thus, this study characterized the immunogenicity of P. multocida and M. haemolytica outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) upon intranasal immunization of BALB/c mice. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) revealed that OMVs derived from P. multocida or M. haemolytica are able to induce robust humoral and mucosal immune responses against the respective donor strain. In addition, also significant cross-immunogenic potential was observed for both OMV types. Colonization studies showed that a potential protective immune response against P. multocida is not only achieved by immunization with P. multocida OMVs, but also by immunization with OMVs derived from M. haemolytica. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that M. haemolytica OMVs induce a more complex immune response compared to P. multocida OMVs. The outer membrane proteins OmpA, OmpH, and P6 were identified as the three major immunogenic proteins of P. multocida OMVs. Amongst others, the serotype 1-specific antigen, an uncharacterized outer membrane protein, as well as the outer membrane proteins P2 and OmpA were found to be the most important antigens of M. haemolytica OMVs. These findings are useful for the future development of broad-spectrum OMV based vaccines against BRD and other infections caused by P. multocida or M. haemolytica. PMID:23731905

  16. Effect of intra-articular hyaluronan on pressure-flow relation across synovium in anaesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J N; Levick, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. Hyaluronan is the major polysaccharide of synovial fluid, responsible for its high viscosity. The effect of hyaluronan on fluid transport across the synovial lining of the joint was investigated. Rate of fluid absorption from the joint cavity (Qs) was measured at intra-articular pressures (Pj) of up to 24 cmH2O in knees of anaesthetized rabbits, in the presence or absence of hyaluronan in intra-articular infusates. 2. Viscometry studies in vitro showed that the commercial hyaluronan used had a molecular weight of 549,000-774,000, a radius of gyration of 48-99 nm and a critical concentration for molecular overlap of 1.3 g l-1. 3. With intra-articular Krebs solution (control) or subnormal, subcritical concentrations of hyaluronan (0.5 g l-1), flow increased with pressure. Hyaluronan reduced the fluid escape rate by reducing slope dQs/dPj by 32-64% relative to Krebs solution. 4. At normal to high hyaluronan concentrations (3-6 g l-1) and low pressures, hyaluronan again reduced slope dQs/dPj, by 39-64%. The reduction in slope was slight, however, when compared with the reduction in bulk fluidity (1/relative viscosity). Fluidity at high shear rates was reduced to 6% of control values by 6 g l-1 hyaluronan. The effect on slope did not correlate significantly with the effect on fluidity. 5. At pressures above approximately 12 cmH2O, 3-6 g l-1 hyaluronan altered the shape of the pressure-flow relation: a flow plateau developed. In some joints raising pressure even reduced trans-synovial flow slightly. The pressure required to drive unit trans-synovial flow (an index of outflow resistance) increased 2.5-fold between 5 and 25 cmH2O in the presence of hyaluronan. By contrast, in the absence of hyaluronan the outflow resistance fell as pressure was raised. 6. It is suggested that the increasing resistance to flow in the presence of hyaluronan may be caused by partial molecular sieving of hyaluronan by the small porosities of the synovial interstitial matrix, leading to

  17. Distribution of hyaluronan in human endometrium across the menstrual cycle. Implications for implantation and menstruation.

    PubMed

    Salamonsen, L A; Shuster, S; Stern, R

    2001-11-01

    Hyaluronan is a molecule with many known roles in cellular physiology and is often associated with tissue remodeling. The human endometrium undergoes dramatic remodeling during the course of the normal menstrual cycle but its regulation is not well understood. This study examined the levels of deposition of hyaluronan in human cycling endometrium by histochemical localization, using a highly specific hyaluronan-binding peptide. This was facilitated by avoiding conventional formalin fixation, which results in serious loss of the water-soluble hyaluronan. Peaks of hyaluronan deposition were observed in the stromal compartment during the mid-proliferative (days 5-10) and the mid-secretory phase (days 19-23) of the cycle. In physiological terms, the first phase corresponds to the time of rapid cellular proliferation of undifferentiated cells, whereas the second phase coincides with the time when the implantation of the conceptus would be initiated in a fertile cycle. By the time menstruation starts, very little hyaluronan remains in the stroma. In contrast with the stromal staining, hyaluronan deposition around blood vessels was constant throughout the cycle. The dramatic changes in hyaluronan deposition and their correlation with the cyclic growth and remodeling in the human endometrium suggest a major role for hyaluronan in the physiology of this tissue. PMID:11702245

  18. Pasteurella species peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis: Household pets as a risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Poliquin, Philippe Guillaume; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Verrelli, Mauro; Allen, David W; Embil, John M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pasteurella species are Gram-negative coccobacilli that are a part of the normal oropharyngeal flora of numerous domestic animals. They have been recognized as a rare but significant cause of peritonitis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). A consensus about management strategies for PD-associated peritonitis caused by Pasteurella species currently does not exist. METHODS: The microbiological database serving the Manitoba Renal Program was searched from 1997 to 2013 for cases of Pasteurella species PD-associated peritonitis, and charts were reviewed. PubMed was searched for case reports and data were abstracted. RESULTS: Seven new local cases and 30 previously reported cases were analyzed. This infection is clinically similar to other forms of PD peritonitis, with household pet exposure appearing to be the strongest risk factor. Cats are the most commonly implicated pet. Direct contact between the pet and the equipment was commonly reported (25 of 37 patients) but was not necessary for infection to develop. The mean duration of treatment was 15 days. Complication rates were low, with only 11% of patients requiring PD catheter removal. There was no mortality reported. CONCLUSION: Pasteurella species are a rare cause of PD-associated peritonitis that can be successfully treated with a two-week course of intraperitoneal antibiotics with a high likelihood of catheter salvage. PMID:25798157

  19. Sialic Acid Uptake Is Necessary for Virulence of Pasteurella multocida in turkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many pathogenic bacteria employ systems to incorporate sialic acid into their membranes as a means of protection against host defense mechanisms. Pasteurella multocida is an opportunistic pathogen which causes diseases of economic importance in a wide range of animal species and sialic acid uptake p...

  20. Immune response in mice and swine to DNA vaccines derived from the Pasteurella multocida toxin gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA vaccines were constructed with either a 5’-truncated or full-length, genetically detoxified toxin gene from Pasteurella multocida and two different DNA vaccine vectors, distinguished by the presence or absence of a secretion signal sequence. Optimal PMT-specific antibody responses and spleen cel...

  1. Proximity-dependent inhibition of growth of mannheimia haemolytica by pasteurella multocida.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. hae...

  2. 9 CFR 113.118 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3. 113.118 Section 113.118 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS...

  3. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1. 113.117 Section 113.117 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS...

  4. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  5. A case of intravenous leiomyomatosis with high levels of hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Chizuko; Oi, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Miura, Katsutoshi; Kanayama, Naohiro

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a rare benign tumor. The clinical behavior can be life-threatening due to extension through the pelvic veins. A 70-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with IVL originating from a uterine leiomyoma and extending to the inferior vena cava. The patient was diagnosed on the basis of the results of various studies, and the tumor was resected completely through a single-stage approach. The intravascular tumor was 20 cm long, multinodular and rubbery. Microscopic findings showed benign smooth muscle that was partly hyalinized and fibrous. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that hyaluronan was expressed more prominently in IVL than in uterine leiomyomas. IVL has viscoelastic properties and contains a large amount of hyaluronan, which may promote invasion during pathogenesis. PMID:20492407

  6. Neonatal Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica Meningitis Traced to Household Cats: Molecular Linkage Analysis Using Repetitive-Sequence-Based PCR.

    PubMed

    Boyanton, Bobby L; Freij, Bishara J; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Makin, Jacob; Runge, Jessica K; Luna, Ruth Ann

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis. We describe such a case and verify two household cats as the source of infection using repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) molecular fingering. PMID:26491173

  7. Neonatal Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica Meningitis Traced to Household Cats: Molecular Linkage Analysis Using Repetitive-Sequence-Based PCR

    PubMed Central

    Freij, Bishara J.; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Makin, Jacob; Runge, Jessica K.; Luna, Ruth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis. We describe such a case and verify two household cats as the source of infection using repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) molecular fingering. PMID:26491173

  8. Hyaluronan-binding properties of human serum hemopexin.

    PubMed

    Hrkal, Z; Kuzelová, K; Muller-Eberhard, U; Stern, R

    1996-03-25

    Hemopexin, the heme-binding serum glycoprotein, exhibits a complex electrophoretic pattern on two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis on agarose gels into which hyaluronic acid is incorporated in the first and monospecific anti-hemopexin in the second dimension. This heterogeneity reflects a range of interactions of hemopexin isoforms with hyaluronic acid. Electrophoretic patterns of individual human sera greatly differ in their contents of hyaluronan-interacting hemopexin species. Hemopexin itself has no hyaluronidase activity. PMID:8612795

  9. Role of hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding proteins in lung pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Frances E; Singleton, Patrick A

    2011-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has diverse functions in normal lung homeostasis and pulmonary disease. HA constitutes the major glycosaminoglycan in lung tissue, with HA degradation products, produced by hyaluronidase enzymes and reactive oxygen species, being implicated in several lung diseases, including acute lung injury, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary hypertension. The differential activities of HA and its degradation products are due, in part, to regulation of multiple HA-binding proteins, including cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), HA-binding protein 2 (HABP2), and receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM). Recent research indicates that exogenous administration of high-molecular-weight HA can serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for lung diseases, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury, sepsis/ventilator-induced lung injury, and airway hyperreactivity. This review focuses on the regulatory role of HA and HA-binding proteins in lung pathology and discusses the capacity of HA to augment and inhibit various lung diseases. PMID:21571904

  10. The immunological effect of hyaluronan in tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Fiorella M; Vitale, Daiana L; Demarchi, Gianina; Cristina, Carolina; Alaniz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the immune system and angiogenesis has been described in several contexts, both in physiological and pathological conditions, as pregnancy and cancer. In fact, different types of immune cells, such as myeloid, macrophages and denditric cells, are able to modulate tumor neovascularization. On the other hand, tumor microenvironment also includes extracellular matrix components like hyaluronan, which has a deregulated synthesis in different tumors. Hyaluronan is a glycosaminoglycan, normally present in the extracellular matrix of tissues in continuous remodeling (embryogenesis or wound healing processes) and acts as an important modulator of cell behavior by different mechanisms, including angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss hyaluronan as a modulator of tumor angiogenesis, focusing in intracellular signaling mediated by its receptors expressed on different immune cells. Recent observations suggest that the immune system is an important component in tumoural angiogenesis. Therefore, immune modulation could have an impact in anti-angiogenic therapy as a new therapeutic strategy, which in turn might improve effectiveness of treatment in cancer patients. PMID:26719798

  11. Structural basis of hyaluronan degradation by Streptococcus pneumoniae hyaluronate lyase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songlin; Kelly, Stephen J.; Lamani, Ejvis; Ferraroni, Marta; Jedrzejas, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae hyaluronate lyase (spnHL) is a pathogenic bacterial spreading factor and cleaves hyaluronan, an important constituent of the extra– cellular matrix of connective tissues, through an enzymatic β–elimination process, different from the hyaluronan degradation by hydrolases in animals. The mechanism of hyaluronan binding and degradation was proposed based on the 1.56 Å resolution crystal structure, substrate modeling and mutagenesis studies on spnHL. Five mutants, R243V, N349A, H399A, Y408F and N580G, were constructed and their activities confirmed our mechanism hypothesis. The important roles of Tyr408, Asn349 and His399 in enzyme catalysis were proposed, explained and confirmed by mutant studies. The remaining weak enzymatic activity of the H399A mutant, the role of the free carboxylate group on the glucuronate residue, the enzymatic behavior on chondroitin and chondroitin sulfate, and the small activity increase in the N580G mutant were explained based on this mechanism. A possible function of the C–terminal β–sheet domain is to modulate enzyme activity through binding to calcium ions. PMID:10716923

  12. Hyaluronan microspheres for sustained gene delivery and site-specific targeting.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yang H; Goetz, Douglas J; Yellen, Paige; Chen, Weiliam

    2004-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a naturally occurring polymer that has enjoyed wide successes in biomedical and cosmetic applications as coatings, matrices, and hydrogels. For controlled delivery applications, formulating native hyaluronan into microspheres could be advantageous but has been difficult to process unless organic solvents are used or hyaluronan has been modified by etherification. Therefore, we present a novel method of preparing hyaluronan microspheres using adipic dihydrazide mediated crosslinking chemistry. To evaluate their potential for medical applications, hyaluronan microspheres are incorporated with DNA for gene delivery or conjugated with an antigen for cell-specific targeting. The results show that our method, originally developed for preparing hyaluronan hydrogels, generates robust microspheres with a size distribution of 5-20mum. The release of the encapsulated plasmid DNA can be sustained for months and is capable of transfection in vitro and in vivo. Hyaluronan microspheres, conjugated with monoclonal antibodies to E- and P-selectin, demonstrate selective binding to cells expressing these receptors. In conclusion, we have developed a novel microsphere preparation using native hyaluronan that delivers DNA at a controlled rate and adaptable for site-specific targeting. PMID:14580918

  13. On-line separation and characterization of hyaluronan oligosaccharides derived from radical depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue; Yang, Bo; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyl radicals are widely implicated in the oxidation of carbohydrates in biological and industrial processes and are often responsible for their structural modification resulting in functional damage. In this study, the radical depolymerization of the polysaccharide hyaluronan was studied in a reaction with hydroxyl radicals generated by Fenton Chemistry. A simple method for isolation and identification of the resulting non-sulfated oligosaccharide products of oxidative depolymerization was established. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides were analyzed using ion-pairing reversed phase high performance liquid chromotography coupled with tandem electrospray mass spectrometry. The sequence of saturated hyaluronan oligosaccharides having even- and odd-numbers of saccharide units, afforded through oxidative depolymerization, were identified. This study represents a simple, effective ‘fingerprinting’ protocol for detecting the damage done to hyaluronan by oxidative radicals. This study should help reveal the potential biological outcome of reactive-oxygen radical-mediated depolymerization of hyaluronan. PMID:23768593

  14. Candidate vaccine antigens and genes in Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Adler, B; Bulach, D; Chung, J; Doughty, S; Hunt, M; Rajakumar, K; Serrano, M; van Zanden, A; Zhang, Y; Ruffolo, C

    1999-08-20

    Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of fowl cholera and other diseases of production animals. Isolates are classified into five groups based on capsular antigens and into 16 serotypes based on LPS antigens. Strains causing fowl cholera are most frequently designated A:1, A:3 or A:4. Whole cell bacterins can provide some degree of protection, but only against the homologous LPS serotype. There is good evidence that cross-protective antigens are expressed only under in vivo conditions. Empirically derived, live, attenuated vaccines can protect against heterologous serotypes, but because the basis for attenuation is undefined, reversion to virulence is not uncommon. Work in our laboratory is aimed at using a variety of approaches to identify potential protective antigens or virulence genes to be used as candidates for attenuating mutations or as the basis for vaccine antigen delivery systems. The gene encoding an outer membrane protein, Oma87, which is a homologue of the D15 protective antigen of Haemophilus influenzae, was cloned and sequenced. Rabbit antiserum prepared against recombinant Oma87 could passively protect mice against infection. Type 4 fimbriae form the basis of vaccines against ovine footrot and bovine keratoconjunctivitis. We have identified type 4 fimbriae on the surface of P. multocida, purified the fimbrial subunit protein, PtfA, and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. Subsequent cloning of the ptfA gene and its inactivation will now be used to assess the importance of type 4 fimbriae in virulence. There has long been anecdotal evidence for the importance of capsule in virulence, but unequivocal genetic evidence for such a role is lacking. We have cloned and characterised the capsule biosynthetic locus in P. multocida A:1 and identified four bex genes involved in capsule transport and genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transfer of the N-acetyl glucosamine and glucuronic acid components of the capsule. It has

  15. Partial characterization of the leukotoxin of Pasteurella haemolytica-like bacteria isolated from swine enteritis.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, R T; Chengappa, M M; Oberst, R D; Staats, J J

    1995-08-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica-like (PHL) strains isolated from diarrheic pigs are known to produce a leukotoxin that is lethal to ruminant leukocytes. In the present study, 12 PHL strains were screened for leukotoxin production using a tetrazolium dye-reduction assay. Sterile culture supernatant from strain 6213A, the maximum leukotoxin producer, was used as the crude leukotoxin for characterization studies. The leukotoxin was inactivated by heat at 60 degrees C and by trypsin, protease, and amylase. Toxicity was retained over a pH range of 3.0-11.0. The leukotoxin was lethal to polymorphoneutrophils (PMNs) of cattle, sheep, goat, and swine. Chromosomal DNA of all 12 PHL strains hybridized with a 3.9 kb Pasteurella haemolytica A1 leukotoxin probe, indicating similarities between the leukotoxin genes of P. haemolytica and PHL strains. PMID:7483245

  16. Serological tests as indicators of immunity against Pasteurella multocida infection in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Dua, S K; PandurangaRao, C C

    1978-01-01

    Five serological tests, i.e. single tube agglutination, doubling dilution tube agglutination, agar agglutination, passive hemagglutination and passive mouse protection tests were evaluated for their efficacy in predicting the fate of vaccinated and unvaccinated sheep on challenge with an ovine strain of Pasteurella multocida. The passive hemagglutination test predicted the fate of unvaccinated sheep while the agar agglutination test indicated the immune status of vaccinated sheep. PMID:743601

  17. Cloning and expression of the dermonecrotic toxin gene of Pasteurella multocida ssp. multocida in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kamps, A M; Kamp, E M; Smits, M A

    1990-01-15

    A DNA library of Pasteurella multocida ssp. multocida strain CVI 47459 was constructed in the Lambda GEM-11 vector. Recombinant clones that encoded dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) were identified immunologically with antiserum raised against purified DNT. By comparing the DNA restriction maps of the immunoreactive recombinants, we located the DNT gene. Hybridization studies with 10 strains of P. multocida ssp. multocida suggested that strains that do not produce the DNT do not contain sequences homologous to the DNT gene. PMID:2328908

  18. A new selective enrichment procedure for isolating Pasteurella multocida from avian and environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.K.; Cicnjak-Chubbs, L.; Gates, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A selective enrichment procedure, using two new selective media, was developed to isolate Pasteurella multocida from wild birds and environmental samples. These media were developed by testing 15 selective agents with six isolates of P. multocida from wild avian origin and seven other bacteria representing genera frequently found in environmental and avian samples. The resulting media—Pasteurella multocida selective enrichment broth and Pasteurella multocida selective agar—consisted of a blood agar medium at pH 10 containing gentamicin, potassium tellurite, and amphotericin B. Media were tested to determine: 1) selectivity when attempting isolation from pond water and avian carcasses, 2) sensitivity for detection of low numbers of P. multocida from pure and mixed cultures, 3) host range specificity of the media, and 4) performance compared with standard blood agar. With the new selective enrichment procedure, P. multocida was isolated from inoculated (60 organisms/ml) pond water 84% of the time, whereas when standard blood agar was used, the recovery rate was 0%.

  19. New sites of localisation of Pasteurella multocida B:2 in buffalo surviving experimental haemorrhagic septicaemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute septicaemic disease of buffalo and cattle caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 and E:2. Field outbreaks of HS are known to result in localisation of bacteria in the tonsils of surviving buffalo, confirming that animals can become carriers and the role of respiratory tract in the transmission of the disease. This report describes additional sites of localisation of P. multocida B:2 in surviving buffalo following experimental induction of HS. Results Following P. multocida B:2 infection, all calves in group 1 and one calf in group 2 that was allowed to commingle with infected calves from group 1 were euthanised within 48 h. Pasteurella multocida B:2 was detected from the nasal and rectal swab samples on days 5 and 6 from the remaining calves in group 2. The first injection of dexamethasone into the carrier animals resulted in reemergence in samples from the nose, rectum and vagina. However, subsequent dexamethasone injections failed to re-activate P. multocida B:2. When surviving carrier calves in group 2 were euthanised at the end of the experiment, P. multocida B:2 was detected in the lungs and various organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. Conclusions Commingling naive buffalo calves with calves acutely infected with P. multocida B:2 resulted in carriers among surviving buffalo. Pasteurella was found in various organs of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, suggesting their role in the pathogenesis of HS. PMID:24721163

  20. Hyaluronan Is Crucial for Stem Cell Differentiation into Smooth Muscle Lineage.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Russell M L; Hong, Xuechong; Wong, Mei Mei; Karamariti, Eirini; Bhaloo, Shirin Issa; Warren, Derek; Kong, Wei; Hu, Yanhua; Xu, Qingbo

    2016-05-01

    Deciphering the extracellular signals that regulate SMC differentiation from stem cells is vital to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular disease and for development of cell-based therapies and tissue engineering. Hyaluronan (HA) has emerged as an important component of the stem cell niche, however its role during stem cell differentiation is a complicated and inadequately defined process. This study aimed to investigate the role of HA in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation toward a SMC lineage. ESCs were seeded on collagen-IV in differentiation medium to generate ESC-derived SMCs (esSMCs). Differentiation coincided with increased HA synthase (HAS) 2 expression, accumulation of extracellular HA and its assembly into pericellular matrices. Inhibition of HA synthesis by 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU), removal of the HA coat by hyaluronidase (HYAL) or HAS2 knockdown led to abrogation of SMC gene expression. HA activates ERK1/2 and suppresses EGFR signaling pathways via its principle receptor, CD44. EGFR inactivation coincided with increased binding to CD44, which was further augmented by addition of high molecular weight (HMW)-HA either exogenously or via HAS2 overexpression through adenoviral gene transfer. HMW-HA-stimulated esSMCs displayed a functional role in vascular tissue engineering ex vivo, vasculogenesis in a matrigel plug model and SMC accumulation in neointimal lesions of vein grafts in mice. These findings demonstrate that HAS2-induced HA synthesis and organization drives ESC-SMC differentiation. Thus, remodeling of the HA microenvironment is a critical step in directing stem cell differentiation toward a vascular lineage, highlighting HA as a potential target for treatment of vascular diseases. Stem Cells 2016;34:1225-1238. PMID:26867148

  1. Relaxin regulates hyaluronan synthesis and aquaporins in the cervix of late pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Soh, Yu May; Tiwari, Anjana; Mahendroo, Mala; Conrad, Kirk P; Parry, Laura J

    2012-12-01

    Cervical ripening is associated with loss of structural integrity and tensile strength, thus enabling the cervix to dilate at term. It is characterized by changes in glycosaminoglycan composition, increased water content, and a progressive reorganization of the collagen network. The peptide hormone relaxin via interaction with its receptor, relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1), promotes tissue hydration and increases cervical hyaluronan (HA) concentrations, but the mechanisms that regulate these effects are not known. This study in relaxin mutant (Rln(-/-)) mice tested the hypothesis that relaxin regulates HA synthase and aquaporin (AQP) expression in the cervix. We also assessed expression of the RXFP1 protein by immunohistochemistry. Pregnant Rln(-/-) mice had lower Has2 and Aqp3 expression on d 18.5 of pregnancy and decreased cervical HA compared with wild-type Rln(+/+) mice. Chronic infusion of relaxin for 4 or 6 d in pregnant Rln(-/-) mice reversed these phenotypes and increased Has2 and Aqp3 compared with placebo controls. Relaxin-treated mice also had lower Has1 and Aqp5. Changes in gene expression were paralleled by increases in cervical HA and variations in AQP3 and AQP5 protein localization in epithelial cells of Rln(-/-) cervices. Our findings demonstrate that relaxin alters AQP expression in the cervix and initiates changes in glycosaminoglycan composition through increased HA synthesis. These effects are likely mediated through RXFP1 localized to subepithelial stromal cells and epithelial cells. We suggest these actions of relaxin collectively promote water recruitment into the extracellular matrix to loosen the dense collagen fiber network. PMID:23087172

  2. Regulation of the hyaluronan system in ovine endometrium by ovarian steroids.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Kabir A; Marei, Waleed F; Mifsud, Karen; Khalid, Muhammad; Wathes, D Claire; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we investigated steroid regulation of the hyaluronan (HA) system in ovine endometrium including HA synthases (HAS), hyaluronidases, and HA receptor-CD44 using 30 adult Welsh Mountain ewes. Eight ewes were kept intact and synchronized to estrous (day 0). Intact ewes were killed on day 9 (luteal phase; LUT; n=5) and day 16 (follicular phase; FOL; n=3). The remaining ewes (n=22) were ovariectomized and then treated (i.m.) with vehicle (n=6) or progesterone (n=8) for 10 days, or estrogen and progesterone for 3 days followed by 7 days of progesterone alone (n=8). Estradiol and progesterone concentrations in plasma correlated with the stage of estrous or steroid treatment. Our results showed trends (P<0.1) and statistically significant effects (P<0.05, by t-test) indicating that LUT had lower HAS1 and HAS2 and higher HAS3 and CD44 mRNA expression compared with FOL. This was reflected in immunostaining of the corresponding HAS proteins. Similarly, in ovariectomized ewes, progesterone decreased HAS1 and HAS2 and increased HAS3 and CD44, whereas estradiol tended to increase HAS2 and decrease CD44. Sometimes, HAS mRNA expression did not follow the same trend observed in the intact animals or the protein expression. HA and its associated genes and receptors were regulated by the steroids. In conclusion, these results show that the level of HA production and the molecular weight of HA in the endometrium are regulated by ovarian steroids through differential expression of different HAS both at the gene and at the protein levels. PMID:23630333

  3. Hyaluronan Is Crucial for Stem Cell Differentiation into Smooth Muscle Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Russell M.L.; Hong, Xuechong; Wong, Mei Mei; Karamariti, Eirini; Bhaloo, Shirin Issa; Warren, Derek; Kong, Wei; Hu, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deciphering the extracellular signals that regulate SMC differentiation from stem cells is vital to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular disease and for development of cell‐based therapies and tissue engineering. Hyaluronan (HA) has emerged as an important component of the stem cell niche, however its role during stem cell differentiation is a complicated and inadequately defined process. This study aimed to investigate the role of HA in embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation toward a SMC lineage. ESCs were seeded on collagen‐IV in differentiation medium to generate ESC‐derived SMCs (esSMCs). Differentiation coincided with increased HA synthase (HAS) 2 expression, accumulation of extracellular HA and its assembly into pericellular matrices. Inhibition of HA synthesis by 4‐methylumbelliferone (4MU), removal of the HA coat by hyaluronidase (HYAL) or HAS2 knockdown led to abrogation of SMC gene expression. HA activates ERK1/2 and suppresses EGFR signaling pathways via its principle receptor, CD44. EGFR inactivation coincided with increased binding to CD44, which was further augmented by addition of high molecular weight (HMW)‐HA either exogenously or via HAS2 overexpression through adenoviral gene transfer. HMW‐HA‐stimulated esSMCs displayed a functional role in vascular tissue engineering ex vivo, vasculogenesis in a matrigel plug model and SMC accumulation in neointimal lesions of vein grafts in mice. These findings demonstrate that HAS2‐induced HA synthesis and organization drives ESC‐SMC differentiation. Thus, remodeling of the HA microenvironment is a critical step in directing stem cell differentiation toward a vascular lineage, highlighting HA as a potential target for treatment of vascular diseases. Stem Cells 2016;34:1225–1238 PMID:26867148

  4. Mechanisms involved in enhancement of the expression and function of aggrecanases by hyaluronan oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Nobunori; Hida, Daisuke; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2011-01-01

    Objective Small hyaluronan (HA) oligosaccharides serve as competitive receptor antagonists to displace HA from the cell surface and induce cell signaling events. In articular chondrocytes this cell signaling is mediated by the HA receptor CD44 and induces stimulation of genes involved in matrix degradation such as matrix metalloproteinases as well as matrix repair genes including collagen type II, aggrecan and HA synthase-2. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the expression and function of aggrecanases after disruption of chondrocyte CD44-HA interactions. Methods Bovine articular chondrocytes or bovine cartilage tissue were pre-treated with a variety of inhibitors of major signaling pathways prior to the addition of HA oligosaccharides. Changes in aggrecanase were monitored by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis of ADAMTS4, ADAMTS5 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments. To test the interactions between ADAMTS4 and MT4-MMP, protein lysates purified from stimulated chondrocytes were subjected to co-immunoprecipitation. Results Disruption of chondrocyte CD44-HA interactions with HA oligosaccharides induced the transcription of ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 in time- and dose-dependent manner. The association of GPI-anchored MT4-MMP with ADAMTS4 was also induced in articular chondrocytes by HA oligosaccharides. Inhibition of the NF-κB pathway blocked HA oligosaccharides-mediated stimulation of aggrecanases. Conclusions Disruptive changes in chondrocyte-matrix interactions by HA oligosaccharides induce matrix degradation and elevate aggrecanases via the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:21905012

  5. Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells Modulate Chemokine Expression and Hyaluronan Synthesis in Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Inga; Freudenberger, Till; Twarock, Sören; Yamaguchi, Yu; Grandoch, Maria; Fischer, Jens W

    2016-02-19

    The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction of KYSE-410, an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line, and fibroblasts with respect to the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan (HA) and chemokine expression. KYSE-410 cells induced the mRNA expression of HA synthase 2 (Has2) in normal skin fibroblasts (SF) only in direct co-cultures. Parallel to Has2 mRNA, Has2 antisense RNA (Has2os2) was up-regulated in co-cultures. Knockdown of LEF1, a downstream target of Wnt signaling, abrogated Has2 and Has2os2 induction. After knockdown of Has2 in SF, significantly less α-smooth muscle actin expression was detected in co-cultures. Moreover, it was investigated whether the phenotype of KYSE-410 was affected in co-culture with SF and whether Has2 knockdown in SF had an impact on KYSE-410 cells in co-culture. However, no effects on epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, proliferation, and migration were detected. In addition to Has2 mRNA, the chemokine CCL5 was up-regulated and CCL11 was down-regulated in SF in co-culture. Furthermore, co-cultures of KYSE-410 cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) were investigated. Similar to SF, Has2 and Ccl5 were up-regulated and Ccl11 was down-regulated in CAF in co-culture. Importantly and in contrast to SF, inhibiting HA synthesis by 4-methylumbelliferone abrogated the effect of co-culture on Ccl5 in CAF. Moreover, HA was found to promote adhesion of CD4(+) but not CD8(+) cells to xenogaft tumor tissues. In conclusion, direct co-culture of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and fibroblasts induced stromal HA synthesis via Wnt/LEF1 and altered the chemokine profile of stromal fibroblasts, which in turn may affect the tumor immune response. PMID:26699196

  6. Influence of hyaluronan accumulation during cumulus expansion on in vitro porcine oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Masaki; Kimura, Naoko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sato, Eimei

    2008-11-01

    During oocyte maturation, the cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) expand dramatically. This phenomenon, which is known as cumulus expansion, is the result of the synthesis and accumulation of hyaluronan in the extracellular space between cumulus cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), an inhibitor of hyaluronan synthesis, on cumulus expansion during in vitro porcine oocyte maturation and hyaluronan accumulation within COCs. Further, this study aimed to examine the influence of hyaluronan accumulation within COCs on the rate of oocyte maturation. Cumulus expansion was observed during in vitro maturation. However, the addition of DON to the maturation medium significantly inhibited cumulus expansion. The total inhibition of hyaluronan accumulation within COCs was observed with the use of confocal microscopy. Moreover, a positive correlation between the area of cumulus expansion and the rate of oocyte maturation was observed. These results demonstrate that the hyaluronan accumulation within the COCs during oocyte maturation affects oocyte maturation. On the basis of these results, we propose that hyaluronan accumulation within the COCs during cumulus expansion is a necessary step in the porcine oocyte maturation process. PMID:18838022

  7. Anticancer Therapeutics: Targeting Macromolecules and Nanocarriers to Hyaluronan or CD44, a Hyaluronan Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Virginia M.; Szoka, Francis C.

    2009-01-01

    The complex system involved in the synthesis, degradation, and binding of the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan or HA) provides a variety of structures that can be exploited for targeted cancer therapy. In many cancers of epithelial origin there is an up-regulation of CD44, a receptor that binds HA. In other cancers, HA in the tumor matrix is over-expressed. Both CD44 on cancer cells and HA in the matrix have been targets for anti-cancer therapy. Even though CD44 is expressed in normal epithelial cells and HA is part of the matrix of normal tissues, selective targeting to cancer is possible. This is because macromolecular carriers predominantly extravasate into the tumor and not normal tissue; thus CD44-HA targeted carriers administered intravenously localize preferentially into tumors. Anti-CD44 antibodies have been used in patients to deliver radioisotopes or mertansine for treatment of CD44 expressing tumors. In early phase clinical trials, patients with breast or head and neck tumors treated with anti-CD44 conjugates experienced stabilized disease. A dose-limiting toxicity was associated with distribution of the antibody-drug conjugate to the skin, a site in the body with a high level of CD44. HA has been used as a drug carrier and a ligand on liposomes or nanoparticles to target drugs to CD44 over-expressing cells. Drugs can be attached to HA via the carboxylate on the glucuronic acid residue, the hydroxyl on the N-acetylglucosamine, or the reducing end which are located on a repeating disaccharide. Drugs delivered in HA-modified liposomes exhibited excellent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in murine tumor models. The HA matrix is also a potential target for anti-cancer therapies. By manipulating the interaction of HA with cell surface receptors, either by degrading it with hyaluronidase or by interfering with CD44-HA interactions using soluble CD44 proteins, tumor progression was blocked. Finally, cytotoxic drugs or pro

  8. A RHAMM Mimetic Peptide Blocks Hyaluronan Signaling and Reduces Inflammation and Fibrogenesis in Excisional Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Tolg, Cornelia; Hamilton, Sara R.; Zalinska, Ewa; McCulloch, Lori; Amin, Ripal; Akentieva, Natalia; Winnik, Francoise; Savani, Rashmin; Bagli, Darius J.; Luyt, Len G.; Cowman, Mary K.; McCarthy, Jim B.; Turley, Eva A.

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan is activated by fragmentation and controls inflammation and fibroplasia during wound repair and diseases (eg, cancer). Hyaluronan-binding peptides were identified that modify fibrogenesis during skin wound repair. Peptides were selected from 7- to 15mer phage display libraries by panning with hyaluronan-Sepharose beads and assayed for their ability to block fibroblast migration in response to hyaluronan oligosaccharides (10 kDa). A 15mer peptide (P15-1), with homology to receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (RHAMM) hyaluronan binding sequences, was the most effective inhibitor. P15-1 bound to 10-kDa hyaluronan with an affinity of Kd = 10−7 and appeared to specifically mimic RHAMM since it significantly reduced binding of hyaluronan oligosaccharides to recombinant RHAMM but not to recombinant CD44 or TLR2,4, and altered wound repair in wild-type but not RHAMM−/− mice. One topical application of P15-1 to full-thickness excisional rat wounds significantly reduced wound macrophage number, fibroblast number, and blood vessel density compared to scrambled, negative control peptides. Wound collagen 1, transforming growth factor β-1, and α-smooth muscle actin were reduced, whereas tenascin C was increased, suggesting that P15-1 promoted a form of scarless healing. Signaling/microarray analyses showed that P15-1 blocks RHAMM-regulated focal adhesion kinase pathways in fibroblasts. These results identify a new class of reagents that attenuate proinflammatory, fibrotic repair by blocking hyaluronan oligosaccharide signaling. PMID:22889846

  9. Concentration dependence of interstitial flow buffering by hyaluronan in synovial joints.

    PubMed

    Scott, D; Coleman, P J; Mason, R M; Levick, J R

    2000-05-01

    Hyaluronan concentration in synovial fluid spans a 20-fold range, from as low as 0.2 mg ml(-1) in synovitis to as high as 4 mg ml(-1) in healthy joints. The aim was to determine the effect of this on fluid drainage from the joint cavity. The study extends the finding of P. J. Coleman, D. Scott, R. M. Mason, and J. R. Levick (1999, J. Physiol. 514, 265-282) that dissolved hyaluronan at 3.6-4.0 mg ml(-1) (the concentration in young human and rabbit joints) causes the opposition to interstitial fluid drainage to increase with pressure. Hyaluronan was infused into rabbit knees at 0, 0.2, 2.0, and 4.0 mg ml(-1) over a range of intraarticular pressures. Hyaluronan at 2 mg ml(-1) (as in healthy elderly joints and some osteoarthritis) greatly reduced drainage rates and generated a flattening (convex) pressure-flow relation, as observed previously with 4 mg ml(-1). Drainage rates were greater at 2 mg ml(-1) than at 4 mg ml(-1) hyaluronan (P < 0.0001, ANOVA, n = 7). The opposition to outflow (pressure required to drive unit outflow) increased with pressure, but less markedly than with 4 mg ml(-1) hyaluronan. Hyaluronan at 0.2 mg ml(-1) reduced outflow by approximately 50% relative to Ringer solution (P < 0.0001, ANOVA, n = 7) but the pressure-flow relation no longer flattened out with increasing pressure, because there was no significant increase in opposition to outflow with pressure. At 0 mg ml(-1) hyaluronan, outflow opposition decreased with pressure. Viscometry showed a marked transition in the hyaluronan state at >/=1.35 mg ml(-1), indicating that this is the critical concentration for molecular domain overlap and intermolecular coupling. The results broadly supported the concentration-polarization hypothesis, which predicts significant osmotic buffering of drainage at >/=1 mg ml(-1) hyaluronan; at 0.2 mg ml(-1) other factors may predominate. It is inferred that hyaluronan at physiological concentrations can conserve synovial fluid when pressures are raised (e

  10. Characterization of Hyaluronan-Degrading Enzymes from Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Smirnou, Dzianis; Krčmář, Martin; Kulhánek, Jaromír; Hermannová, Martina; Bobková, Lenka; Franke, Lukáš; Pepeliaev, Stanislav; Velebný, Vladimír

    2015-10-01

    Hyaluronidases (HAases) from yeasts were characterized for the first time. The study elucidated that hyaluronate 4-glycanohydrolase and hyaluronan (HA) lyase can be produced by yeasts. Six yeasts producing HAases were found through express screening of activities. The extracellular HAases from two of the yeast isolates, Pseudozyma aphidis and Cryptococcus laurentii, were characterized among them. P. aphidis HAase hydrolyzed β-1,4 glycosidic bonds of HA, yielding even-numbered oligosaccharides with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine at the reducing end. C. laurentii produced hyaluronan lyase, which cleaved β-1,4 glycosidic bonds of HA in β-elimination reaction, and the products of HA degradation were different-sized even-numbered oligosaccharides. The shortest detected HA oligomer was dimer. The enzymes' pH and temperature optima were pH 3.0 and 37-45 °C (P. aphidis) and pH 6.0 and 37 °C (C. laurentii), respectively. Both HAases showed good thermostability. PMID:26239444

  11. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W; Stober, Vandy P; Trempus, Carol S; Garantziotis, Stavros; Matalon, Sadis

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca(2+), and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca(2+), blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca(2+) channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  12. Effect of Carboxymethylation on the Rheological Properties of Hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Rian J; Christensen, Amanda M; Quast, Arthur D; Atzet, Sarah K; Mann, Brenda K

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modifications made to hyaluronan to enable covalent crosslinking to form a hydrogel or to attach other molecules may alter the physical properties as well, which have physiological importance. Here we created carboxymethyl hyaluronan (CMHA) with varied degree of modification and investigated the effect on the viscosity of CMHA solutions. Viscosity decreased initially as modification increased, with a minimum viscosity for about 30-40% modification. This was followed by an increase in viscosity around 45-50% modification. The pH of the solution had a variable effect on viscosity, depending on the degree of carboxymethyl modification and buffer. The presence of phosphates in the buffer led to decreased viscosity. We also compared large-scale production lots of CMHA to lab-scale and found that large-scale required extended reaction times to achieve the same degree of modification. Finally, thiolated CMHA was disulfide crosslinked to create hydrogels with increased viscosity and shear-thinning aspects compared to CMHA solutions. PMID:27611817

  13. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  14. Interactions between CD44 and Hyaluronan in Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Braedon; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes from the bloodstream to inflamed tissues requires a carefully regulated cascade of binding interactions between adhesion molecules on leukocytes and endothelial cells. Adhesive interactions between CD44 and hyaluronan (HA) have been implicated in the regulation of immune cell trafficking within various tissues. In this review, the biology of CD44–HA interactions in cell trafficking is summarized, with special attention to neutrophil recruitment within the liver microcirculation. We describe the molecular mechanisms that regulate adhesion between neutrophil CD44 and endothelial HA, including recent evidence implicating serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein as an important co-factor in the binding of HA to CD44 under flow conditions. CD44–HA-mediated neutrophil recruitment has been shown to contribute to innate immune responses to invading microbes, as well as to the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including various liver pathologies. As a result, blockade of neutrophil recruitment by targeting CD44–HA interactions has proven beneficial as an anti-inflammatory treatment strategy in a number of animal models of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25741341

  15. An Arabidopsis callose synthase.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2002-08-01

    Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially complements a yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase mutant. AtGsl5 is developmentally expressed at highest levels in flowers, consistent with flowers having high beta-1,3-glucan synthase activities for deposition of callose in pollen. A role for AtGsl5 in callose synthesis is also indicated by AtGsl5 expression in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant. PMID:12081364

  16. Granulocyte plasma membrane damage by leukotoxic supernatant from Pasteurella haemolytica A1 and protection by immune serum.

    PubMed

    Styrt, B; Walker, R D; White, J C; Dahl, L D; Baker, J C

    1990-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease caused by Pasteurella haemolytica may be partially mediated by a leukotoxin secreted by the microorganism. We examined the effect of leukotoxic Pasteurella supernatants on leakage of the cytosol enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase from bovine granulocytes. Lactate dehydrogenase release (94%) was much higher than arylsulfatase release (38%) over 30 minutes of incubation. The Pasteurella supernatants inhibited superoxide production by stimulated granulocytes at concentrations which also caused substantial cell death as measured by failure to exclude trypan blue. Both toxic effects were prevented by serum from aerosol-immunized calves, and protection appeared to be antibody-specific by comparison with fetal bovine serum or with serum absorbed against intact P. haemolytica. These findings suggest that the leukotoxin may selectively disrupt the granulocyte plasma membrane, and that antibody directed against a surface component of the microorganism is also capable of protecting against the leukotoxin effect. PMID:2306664

  17. Hyaluronan in cancer - from the naked mole rat to nanoparticle therapy.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Kenneth S; Frankel, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Hyaluronan, a glycosaminoglycan, abundant in the tumour microenvironment, is a key player in many processes associated with cancer. Recently the cancer resistance of the naked mole rat has been attributed to the presence of an ultra-high molecular weight form of this molecule. The physical properties of this multifunctional biopolymer have been extensively studied in the context of synovial joints. However, relatively little has been reported with regard to the soft matter properties of hyaluronan in relation to cancer. In this review we examine the role of hyaluronan in cancer, paying particular attention to its mechanical interactions with malignant cells and its soft matter properties. In addition we discuss the use of hyaluronan based gels to study cancer invasion as well as nanoparticle based strategies for disease treatment. PMID:27079782

  18. Hyaluronan with dextran added to therapeutic lung surfactants improves effectiveness in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Taeusch, H William; Clements, John A

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants in current clinical use are largely ineffective in treating acute lung injury (ALI)/ acute respiratory distress syndrome. In part, this ineffectiveness is due to inactivation of surfactant by serum leakage into the alveoli. Previously, we reported that adding hyaluronan and some nonionic polymers to synthetic lipids combined with native SP-B and SP-C enhanced surface activity. In this study, we first tested two therapeutic lung surfactants and then retested after adding hyaluronan, polyethylene glycol or dextran alone or in two-polymer combinations including hyaluronan in the absence or presence of serum. Surface activities were measured in a modified bubble surfactometer. Results indicate that the inhibition threshold (defined as the amount of serum required to produce a minimum surface tension above 10 mN/m after 5 minutes of cycling) was 35 times higher with hyaluronan plus dextran added to Infasurf than with Infasurf alone, and better than all other mixtures tested. The threshold for Survanta with hyaluronan plus polyethylene glycol was 7 times higher than Survanta alone. We next tested selected surfactant mixtures in an animal model that mimicked ALI. All measurements of lung function showed significant improvement (P ≤ .05) with hyaluronan, or with hyaluronan and dextran added to Infasurf compared to Infasurf alone. Also, for these two groups, lung function was still improving at the end of the experiment. We conclude that certain polymers added to clinical surfactants can greatly increase resistance to inactivation in vitro, while in vivo, both Infasurf mixtures containing hyaluronan tended to normalize measures of lung function unlike other mixtures tested. PMID:23638643

  19. Endogenous hyaluronan: a cytokine-like factor present in rabbit uterine cervix during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Taro; Matsumoto, Tetsunori; Suzuki, Yoshiharu; Ishida, Masami; Obara, Takeo; Kanayama, Toshiji

    2004-12-01

    The effects of endogenous hyaluronan on cervical ripening during pregnancy were examined in rabbits. Hyaluronan of approximately 620 kilodalton (kDa) was detected in the uterine cervix on the 25th and 29th days of pregnancy, while it was not detected in cervix of non-pregnant animals. In addition, low-molecular-weight (less than 191 kDa) hyaluronan was present in cervix at the 29th day of pregnancy. Hyaluronan level in the cervix was lower on the 29th day than on the 25th day of pregnancy, whereas that in serum was significantly higher on the 29th day than on the 25th day of pregnancy. To clarify the physiological functions of endogenous hyaluronan, the effects of hyaluronan (HA600-700), which had approximately equal to endogenous hyaluronan, on uterine cervical tissues and uterine cervical fibroblasts were examined. Rabbits at the 23rd day of pregnancy were administered a vaginal suppository of HA600-700 (20 mg) daily for three days. Promotion of cervical ripening was observed, as well as detachment of collagen fiber bundles, and a reduced density of collagen fiber distribution. Total collagenolytic activity was increased significantly by HA600-700 (1.0 mg/ml) treatment in cultured uterine cervical explants of pregnant rabbits as compared with the untreated group. Moreover, very similar effects of HA600-700 treatment (0.1, 1.0 mg/ml) were observed in cultured uterine cervical fibroblasts. Further, in tissue cultures, but not cell cultures, of pregnant rabbit cervix, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production was enhanced by HA600-700 treatment. Therefore, it appears that endogenous hyaluronan is closely concerned with cervical ripening and dilatation in uterine cervix of pregnant rabbits. PMID:15577204

  20. Evaluation of emulsion electrospun polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor nanofibrous scaffolds for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenbei; Qian, Yuna; Li, Linhao; Pan, Lianhong; Njunge, Lucy W; Dong, Lili; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing scaffolds provide cells with structural integrity and can also deliver biological agents to establish a skin tissue-specific microenvironment to regulate cell functions and to accelerate the healing process. In this study, we fabricated biodegradable nanofibrous scaffolds with an emulsion electrospinning technique. The scaffolds were composed of polycaprolactone, hyaluronan and encapsulating epidermal growth factor. The morphology and core-sheath structure of the nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scaffolds were also characterized for chemical composition and hydrophilicity with a Fourier-transform infrared analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy and the water contact angle. An in vitro model protein bovine serum albumin and epidermal growth factor release study was conducted to evaluate the sustained release potential of the core-sheath structured nanofibers with and without the hyaluronan component. Additionally, an in vitro cultivation of human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and fibroblasts on polycaprolactone/hyaluronan and polycaprolactone/hyaluronan-epidermal growth factor scaffolds showed a significant synergistic effect of hyaluronan and epidermal growth factor on cell proliferation and infiltration. Furthermore, there was an up-regulation of the wound-healing-related genes collagen I, collagen III and TGF-β in polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor scaffolds compared with control groups. In the full-thickness wound model, the enhanced regeneration of fully functional skin was facilitated by epidermal regeneration in the polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor treatment group. Our findings suggest that bioactivity and hemostasis of the hyaluronan-based nanofibrous scaffolds have the capability to encapsulate and control the release of growth factors that can serve as skin tissue engineering scaffolds for wound healing. PMID:26012354

  1. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  2. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  3. A hyaluronan-based scaffold for the in vitro construction of dental pulp-like tissue.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Berengo, Mario; Piattelli, Adriano; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue supports the vitality of the tooth, but it is particularly vulnerable to external insults, such as mechanical trauma, chemical irritation or microbial invasion, which can lead to tissue necrosis. In the present work, we present an endodontic regeneration method based on the use of a tridimensional (3D) hyaluronan scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to produce a functional dental pulp-like tissue in vitro. An enriched population of DPSCs was seeded onto hyaluronan-based non-woven meshes in the presence of differentiation factors to induce the commitment of stem cells to neuronal, glial, endothelial and osteogenic phenotypes. In vitro experiments, among which were gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence (IF) staining, proved the commitment of DPSCs to the main components of dental pulp tissue. In particular, the hyaluronan-DPSCs construct showed a dental pulp-like morphology consisting of several specialized cells growing inside the hyaluronan fibers. Furthermore, these constructs were implanted into rat calvarial critical-size defects. Histological analyses and gene expression profiling performed on hyaluronan-DPSCs grafts showed the regeneration of osteodentin-like tissue. Altogether, these data suggest the regenerative potential of the hyaluronan-DPSC engineered tissue. PMID:25739081

  4. Cellular Uptake and Internalization of Hyaluronan-based Doxorubicin and Cisplatin Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuang; Alhowyan, Adel Ali B; Yang, Qiuhong; Forrest, W.C. Melanie; Shnayder, Yelizaveta; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyaluronan (HA) is a ligand for the CD44 receptor which is crucial to cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. High levels of CD44 expression in many cancers have encouraged the development of HA-based carriers for anti-cancer therapeutics. Purpose The objective of this study was to determine whether HA conjugation of anticancer drugs impacts CD44-specific HA-drug uptake and disposition by human head and neck cancer cells. Methods The internalization and cellular disposition of hyaluronan-doxorubicin (HA-DOX), hyaluronan-cisplatin (HA-Pt), and hyaluronan-cyanine7 (HA-Cy7) conjugates were investigated by inhibiting endocytosis pathways, and by inhibiting the CD44–mediated internalization pathways that are known to mediate hyaluronan uptake in vitro. Results Cellular internalization of HA was regulated by CD44 receptors. In mouse xenografts, HA conjugation significantly enhanced tumor cell uptake compared to unconjugated drug. Discussion The results suggested that the main mechanism of HA-based conjugate uptake may be active transport via CD44 in conjunction with a clathrin–dependent endocytic pathway. Other HA receptors, hyaluronan–mediated motility receptor (RHAMM) and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1), did not play a significant role in conjugate uptake. Conclusions HA conjugation significantly increased CD44 mediated drug uptake and extended the residence time of drugs in tumor cells. PMID:24892741

  5. Regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and urokinase by hyaluronan fragments in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Horton, M R; Olman, M A; Bao, C; White, K E; Choi, A M; Chin, B Y; Noble, P W; Lowenstein, C J

    2000-10-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis are characterized by increased turnover and production of the extracellular matrix as well as an impairment of lung fibrinolytic activity. Although fragments of the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan induce macrophage production of inflammatory mediators, the effect of hyaluronan on the fibrinolytic mediators plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is unknown. This study demonstrates that hyaluronan fragments augment steady-state mRNA, protein, and inhibitory activity of PAI-1 as well as diminish the baseline levels of uPA mRNA and inhibit uPA activity in an alveolar macrophage cell line. Hyaluronan fragments alter macrophage expression of PAI-1 and uPA at the level of gene transcription. Similarly, hyaluronan fragments augment PAI-1 and diminish uPA mRNA levels in freshly isolated inflammatory alveolar macrophages from bleomycin-treated rats. These data suggest that hyaluronan fragments influence alveolar macrophage expression of PAI-1 and uPA and may be a mechanism for regulating fibrinolytic activity during lung inflammation. PMID:11000131

  6. A Hyaluronan-Based Scaffold for the in Vitro Construction of Dental Pulp-Like Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Berengo, Mario; Piattelli, Adriano; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue supports the vitality of the tooth, but it is particularly vulnerable to external insults, such as mechanical trauma, chemical irritation or microbial invasion, which can lead to tissue necrosis. In the present work, we present an endodontic regeneration method based on the use of a tridimensional (3D) hyaluronan scaffold and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) to produce a functional dental pulp-like tissue in vitro. An enriched population of DPSCs was seeded onto hyaluronan-based non-woven meshes in the presence of differentiation factors to induce the commitment of stem cells to neuronal, glial, endothelial and osteogenic phenotypes. In vitro experiments, among which were gene expression profiling and immunofluorescence (IF) staining, proved the commitment of DPSCs to the main components of dental pulp tissue. In particular, the hyaluronan-DPSCs construct showed a dental pulp-like morphology consisting of several specialized cells growing inside the hyaluronan fibers. Furthermore, these constructs were implanted into rat calvarial critical-size defects. Histological analyses and gene expression profiling performed on hyaluronan-DPSCs grafts showed the regeneration of osteodentin-like tissue. Altogether, these data suggest the regenerative potential of the hyaluronan-DPSC engineered tissue. PMID:25739081

  7. The effects of hyaluronan and its fragments on lipid models exposed to UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Trommer, Hagen; Wartewig, Siegfried; Böttcher, Rolf; Pöppl, Andreas; Hoentsch, Joachim; Ozegowski, Jörg H; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2003-03-26

    The effects of hyaluronan and its degradation products on irradiation-induced lipid peroxidation were investigated. Liposomal skin lipid models with increasing complexity were used. Hyaluronan and its fragments were able to reduce the amount of lipid peroxidation secondary products quantified by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay. The qualitative changes were studied by mass spectrometry. To elucidate the nature of free radical involvement electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out. The influence of hyaluronan and its fragments on the concentration of hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fenton system was examined using the spin trapping technique. Moreover, the mucopolysaccharide's ability to react with stable radicals was checked. The quantification assay of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) showed no concentration changes of the stable radical caused by hyaluronan. Hyaluronan was found to exhibit prooxidative effects in the Fenton assay in a concentration dependent manner. A transition metal chelation was proposed as a mechanism of this behavior. Considering human skin and its constant exposure to UV light and oxygen and an increased pool of iron in irradiated skin the administration of hyaluronan or its fragments in cosmetic formulations or sunscreens could be helpful for the protection of the human skin. PMID:12623198

  8. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Succar, Peter; Medynskyj, Michael; Breen, Edmond J; Batterham, Tony; Molloy, Mark P; Herbert, Benjamin R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL). At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA. PMID:26981136

  9. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Succar, Peter; Medynskyj, Michael; Breen, Edmond J.; Batterham, Tony; Molloy, Mark P.; Herbert, Benjamin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA) treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL). At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA. PMID:26981136

  10. Overexpression and immunogenicity of the Oma87 outer membrane protein of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, M; Wei, L; Kwang, J; Wilkie, I; Adler, B

    2000-03-01

    The outer membrane protein of Oma87 from Pasteurella multocida A:1 has significant similarity to the D15 protective antigen of Haemophilus influenzae (Ruffolo and Adler, 1996). Four fragments of Oma87 from a P. multocida serotype D strain were cloned into a pGEX expression vector and transformed into E. coli JM105. Western blot analysis revealed that convalescent chicken sera reacted with only GST-F1 fusion protein which contained amino acids 18 through to 130 of Oma87 fused to the GST protein. Vaccination with the GST-F1 protein failed to protect chickens against challenge with a virulent P. multocida serotype A. PMID:10699506

  11. Preparation of biologically intact radioiodinated hyaluronan of high specific radioactivity: coupling of /sup 125/I-tyramine-cellobiose to amino groups after partial N-deacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, L.B.; Laurent, T.C.; Smedsrod, B.

    1988-12-01

    Hyaluronan was substituted with tyramine-cellobiose on amino residues exposed after hydrazinolytic N-deacetylation of the polysaccharide. Nonsubstituted amino groups were reacetylated, and the carboxylic hydrazides were removed by treatment with HIO/sub 3/. The adduct was labeled with /sup 125/I before or after coupling to hyaluronan. N-deacetylation increased with prolonged pretreatment with hydrazine, which also reduced the chain length of hyaluronan. Hydrazinolysis for 30 min produced hyaluronan with Mr 2.2-2.9 x 10(5). This material was substituted with varying amounts of tyramine-cellobiose (from 1 per 20 to 1 per 130 disaccharides). Hyaluronan labeled in this way was recognized by Streptomyces hyaluronidase, hyaluronan affinity protein of cartilage proteoglycan, and receptors for specific endocytosis of hyaluronan in liver endothelial cells. Since tyramine-cellobiose is nondegradable and therefore is arrested intralysosomally at the site of uptake, turnover studies of hyaluronan can be easily carried out with this ligand.

  12. Microbial synthesis of hyaluronan and chitin: New approaches.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Kawasaki, Takeru

    2005-06-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an important structural element in the vitreous humor of the eye, synovial fluid, and skin of vertebrates. Moreover, HA interacts with proteins such as CD44, RHAMM, and fibrinogen, thereby influencing many natural processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, cell motility, wound healing, and cell adhesion. Reflecting such a variety of functions, HA has attracted attention from a wide range of application fields such as medicine (including surgery), cosmetics, and health foods. Traditionally HA was extracted from rooster combs, but nowadays is produced by the fermentation of streptococci. At present, quality issues such as purity and molecular weight distribution, rather than quantity, have been the focus of strain and process development in HA production. To meet ever-increasing public demand, novel systems that can yield sufficient amounts of high-quality of HA and related materials are required. PMID:16233827

  13. Rheological properties of aqueous solutions of biopolymeric hyaluronan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwajczak, Elzbieta

    2004-09-01

    Aqueous solutions of hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan, HA) were studied. The HA compound is a natural polysaccharide, bipolymer. It plays an important role in numerous biological processes as a component of the extracellular matrix, connective tissues and, especially, human and animal synovial joints. Natural and artificial solutions of the HA have demonstrated the viscoelastic nature. These properties are shown to be related to the microstructure parameters (bulk concentration, molecular weight) and external parameters (temperature, stress, shear rate). We emphasize the role of the flow properties of polymeric systems. It is found a liquid crystalline "order" can be "induced" during the material flow. The dynamic properties, such as the elastic shear modulus and viscous shear modulus, are given. These results are discussed in relation to the postulated function of hyaluronic acid in synovial joint and with respect to possibilities o their application in medicine and pharmacology.

  14. Human milk hyaluronan enhances innate defense of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Rho, Hyunjin K; Kessler, Sean P; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K; de la Motte, Carol A

    2013-10-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  15. Human Milk Hyaluronan Enhances Innate Defense of the Intestinal Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David R.; Rho, Hyunjin K.; Kessler, Sean P.; Amin, Ripal; Homer, Craig R.; McDonald, Christine; Cowman, Mary K.; de la Motte, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast-feeding is associated with enhanced protection from gastrointestinal disease in infants, mediated in part by an array of bioactive glycan components in milk that act through molecular mechanisms to inhibit enteric pathogen infection. Human milk contains hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan polymer found in virtually all mammalian tissues. We have shown that synthetic HA of a specific size range promotes expression of antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelium. We hypothesize that hyaluronan from human milk also enhances innate antimicrobial defense. Here we define the concentration of HA in human milk during the first 6 months postpartum. Importantly, HA isolated from milk has a biological function. Treatment of HT-29 colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA at physiologic concentrations results in time- and dose-dependent induction of the antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin 2 and is abrogated by digestion of milk HA with a specific hyaluronidase. Milk HA induction of human β-defensin 2 expression is also reduced in the presence of a CD44-blocking antibody and is associated with a specific increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a role for the HA receptor CD44. Furthermore, oral administration of human milk-derived HA to adult, wild-type mice results in induction of the murine Hβ D2 ortholog in intestinal mucosa and is dependent upon both TLR4 and CD44 in vivo. Finally, treatment of cultured colonic epithelial cells with human milk HA enhances resistance to infection by the enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Together, our observations suggest that maternally provided HA stimulates protective antimicrobial defense in the newborn. PMID:23950179

  16. Identification of clinical Pasteurella isolates by MALDI-TOF -- a comparison with VITEK 2 and conventional microbiological methods.

    PubMed

    Zangenah, Salah; Güleryüz, Gülay; Boräng, Stina; Ullberg, Måns; Bergman, Peter; Ozenci, Volkan

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of four methods that are widely used in the clinical microbiology laboratory for identification of Pasteurella species. The 4 methods evaluated were VITEK2, VITEK MS (BioMerieux), and Bruker Biotyper MS (Bruker) as well as traditional biochemical tests. Sequencing of the sodA gene was used as the reference method. Sixty-five isolates of Pasteurella spp. from 65 patients were analyzed. One Pasteurella multocida isolate from American Type Culture Collection (Manassas, VA, USA) was used as a reference. Traditional biochemical tests accurately identified 62/66 (94%) isolates. Both Bruker and Vitek matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) identified 59/66 (89%) strains, but VITEK2 could only identify 32/66 (48.5%) isolates correctly. The mean time to identification using biochemical tests was 20 hours; VITEK2 took 6 hours and MALDI-TOF approximately 10 minutes. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF is a quick method, which accurately identified most isolates of Pasteurella to the species level. Thus, MALDI-TOF constitutes a valuable diagnostic tool in the clinical laboratory. PMID:23886788

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Pasteurella multocida Strains Isolated from Buffaloes in India with Hemorrhagic Septicemia Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abrahante, J. E.; Veeregowda, B. M.; Hogtapur, S. S.; Briggs, R. E.; Maheswaran, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida serotype B:2 is the causative agent of hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle and buffaloes in Asia. It is an acute fatal disease and is considered one of the most economically important diseases in this region of the world. We present here the draft genome sequences of strains 2213 and 3213 of P. multocida. PMID:25103770

  18. First High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Pasteurella multocida Sequence Type 128 Isolated from Infected Bone.

    PubMed

    Kavousi, Niloofar; Eng, Wilhelm Wei Han; Lee, Yin Peng; Tan, Lian Huat; Thuraisingham, Ravindran; Yule, Catherine M; Gan, Han Ming

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first high-quality draft genome sequence of Pasteurella multocida sequence type 128, which was isolated from the infected finger bone of an adult female who was bitten by a domestic dog. The draft genome will be a valuable addition to the scarce genomic resources available for P. multocida. PMID:26941132

  19. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  20. The effect of hypovitaminosis A on the pathogenesis of Pasteurella multocida in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Aye, P P; Morishita, T Y; Saif, Y M; Jonas, M

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that Pasteurella multocida can invade the host tissues via the mucous membrane. Vitamin A (VitA) deficiency has been associated with mucous membrane damage, such as squamous metaplasia. The objective of this study was to determine the early stages in the pathogenesis of P. multocida in VitA-deficient turkeys and clinically healthy turkeys. Fifteen-week-old VitA-deficient and clinically healthy turkeys were inoculated with P. multocida P-1059, a virulent strain, and the portal of entry, invasion, and localization of P. multocida were studied by microbial examination of the trachea, liver, and lung and histologic examinations of internal organs. Higher mortality was found in VitA-deficient turkeys. Pasteurella multocida was first reisolated from the trachea, secondarily from the liver and blood, and finally from the lung in both groups. Invasion of P. multocida into tissues occurred between 3 hr and 24 hr postinoculation in both groups. Our findings suggest that altered membrane integrity in VitA-deficient birds did not appear to change the time course of the systemic spread of P. multocida infection in turkeys and that the increased mortality seen in the VitA-deficient turkeys may be associated with immune system impairment. PMID:11195636

  1. Ceftaroline versus isolates from animal bite wounds: comparative in vitro activities against 243 isolates, including 156 Pasteurella species isolates.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Tyrrell, Kerin L

    2012-12-01

    More than 5 million Americans are bitten by animals, usually dogs, annually. Bite patients comprise ∼1% of all patients who visit emergency departments (300,000/year), and approximately 10,000 require hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. Ceftaroline is the bioactive component of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, which is FDA approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), including those containing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There are no in vitro data about the activity of ceftaroline against Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida and Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica, other Pasteurella spp., or other bite wound isolates. We therefore studied the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against 243 animal bite isolates. MICs were determined using the broth microdilution method according to CLSI guidelines. Comparator drugs included cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, ampicillin-sulbactam, azithromycin, doxycycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP). Ceftaroline was the most active agent against all 5 Pasteurella species, including P. multocida subsp. multocida and P. multocida subsp. septica, with a maximum MIC of ≤0.008 μg/ml; more active than ceftriaxone and ertapenem (MIC(90)s, ≤0.015 μg/ml); and more active than cefazolin (MIC(90), 0.5 μg/ml) doxycycline (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml), azithromycin (MIC(90), 0.5 μg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml), and SMX-TMP (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml). Ceftaroline was also very active against all S. aureus isolates (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml) and other Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species, with a maximum MIC of 0.125 μg/ml against all bite isolates tested. Ceftaroline has potential clinical utility against infections involving P. multocida, other Pasteurella species, and aerobic Gram-positive isolates, including S. aureus. PMID:23027193

  2. Ceftaroline versus Isolates from Animal Bite Wounds: Comparative In Vitro Activities against 243 Isolates, Including 156 Pasteurella Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Tyrrell, Kerin L.

    2012-01-01

    More than 5 million Americans are bitten by animals, usually dogs, annually. Bite patients comprise ∼1% of all patients who visit emergency departments (300,000/year), and approximately 10,000 require hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. Ceftaroline is the bioactive component of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, which is FDA approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), including those containing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There are no in vitro data about the activity of ceftaroline against Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida and Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica, other Pasteurella spp., or other bite wound isolates. We therefore studied the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against 243 animal bite isolates. MICs were determined using the broth microdilution method according to CLSI guidelines. Comparator drugs included cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, ampicillin-sulbactam, azithromycin, doxycycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP). Ceftaroline was the most active agent against all 5 Pasteurella species, including P. multocida subsp. multocida and P. multocida subsp. septica, with a maximum MIC of ≤0.008 μg/ml; more active than ceftriaxone and ertapenem (MIC90s, ≤0.015 μg/ml); and more active than cefazolin (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) doxycycline (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml), azithromycin (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml), and SMX-TMP (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml). Ceftaroline was also very active against all S. aureus isolates (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml) and other Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species, with a maximum MIC of 0.125 μg/ml against all bite isolates tested. Ceftaroline has potential clinical utility against infections involving P. multocida, other Pasteurella species, and aerobic Gram-positive isolates, including S. aureus. PMID:23027193

  3. PP2B and ERK1/2 regulate hyaluronan synthesis of HT168 and WM35 human melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Katona, Éva; Juhász, Tamás; Somogyi, Csilla Szűcs; Hajdú, Tibor; Szász, Csaba; Rácz, Kálmán; Kókai, Endre; Gergely, Pál; Zákány, Róza

    2016-03-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan component of the extracellular matrix in either normal or malignant tissues and it may affect proliferation, motility and differentiation of various cell types. Three isoforms of plasma membrane-bound hyaluronan synthases (HAS 1, 2 and 3) secrete and simultaneously bind pericellular HA. HAS enzymes are subjects of post-translational protein phosphorylation which is believed to regulate their enzymatic activity. In this study, we investigated the HA homeostasis of normal human epidermal melanocytes, HT168 and WM35 human melanoma cell lines and melanoma metastases. HAS2 and HAS3 were detected in all the samples, while the expression of HAS1 was not detectable in any case. Malignant tissue samples and melanoma cell lines contained extra- and intracellular HA abundantly but not normal melanocytes. Applying HA as a chemoattractant facilitated the migration of melanoma cells in Boyden chamber. The amount of HA was reduced upon the inhibition of calcineurin with cyclosporine A (CsA), while the inhibition of ERK1/2 with PD098059 elevated it in both cell lines. The signals of Ser/Thr phosphoproteins at 57 kD were stronger after CsA treatment, while a markedly weaker signal was detected upon inhibition of the MAPK pathway. Our results suggest opposing effects of the two investigated enzymes on the HA homeostasis of melanoma cells. We propose that the dephosphorylation of HAS enzymes targeted by PP2B augments HA production, while their phosphorylation by the activity of MAPK pathway reduces HA synthesis. As the expression of the HA receptor RHAMM was also significantly enhanced by PD098059, the MAPK pathway exerted a complex attenuating effect on HA signalling in the investigated melanoma cells. This observation suggests that the application of MAPK-ERK pathway inhibitors requires a careful therapeutic design in melanoma treatment. PMID:26717964

  4. PP2B and ERK1/2 regulate hyaluronan synthesis of HT168 and WM35 human melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    KATONA, ÉVA; JUHÁSZ, TAMÁS; SOMOGYI, CSILLA SZŰCS; HAJDÚ, TIBOR; SZÁSZ, CSABA; RÁCZ, KÁLMÁN; KÓKAI, ENDRE; GERGELY, PÁL; ZÁKÁNY, RÓZA

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan component of the extracellular matrix in either normal or malignant tissues and it may affect proliferation, motility and differentiation of various cell types. Three isoforms of plasma membrane-bound hyaluronan synthases (HAS 1, 2 and 3) secrete and simultaneously bind pericellular HA. HAS enzymes are subjects of post-translational protein phosphorylation which is believed to regulate their enzymatic activity. In this study, we investigated the HA homeostasis of normal human epidermal melanocytes, HT168 and WM35 human melanoma cell lines and melanoma metastases. HAS2 and HAS3 were detected in all the samples, while the expression of HAS1 was not detectable in any case. Malignant tissue samples and melanoma cell lines contained extra- and intracellular HA abundantly but not normal melanocytes. Applying HA as a chemoattractant facilitated the migration of melanoma cells in Boyden chamber. The amount of HA was reduced upon the inhibition of calcineurin with cyclosporine A (CsA), while the inhibition of ERK1/2 with PD098059 elevated it in both cell lines. The signals of Ser/Thr phosphoproteins at 57 kD were stronger after CsA treatment, while a markedly weaker signal was detected upon inhibition of the MAPK pathway. Our results suggest opposing effects of the two investigated enzymes on the HA homeostasis of melanoma cells. We propose that the dephosphorylation of HAS enzymes targeted by PP2B augments HA production, while their phosphorylation by the activity of MAPK pathway reduces HA synthesis. As the expression of the HA receptor RHAMM was also significantly enhanced by PD098059, the MAPK pathway exerted a complex attenuating effect on HA signalling in the investigated melanoma cells. This observation suggests that the application of MAPK-ERK pathway inhibitors requires a careful therapeutic design in melanoma treatment. PMID:26717964

  5. Interaction of Hyaluronan Binding Peptides with Glycosaminoglycans in Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide–hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  6. Interaction of hyaluronan binding peptides with glycosaminoglycans in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justine J; Elder, Robert M; Neumann, Alexander J; Jayaraman, Arthi; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2014-04-14

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide-hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  7. Characterization of esterified hyaluronan-gelatin polymer composites suitable for chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells*

    PubMed Central

    Angele, Peter; Müller, Rainer; Schumann, Detlef; Englert, Carsten; Zellner, Johannes; Johnstone, Brian; Yoo, Jung; Hammer, Joachim; Fierlbeck, Johann; Angele, Martin K.; Nerlich, Michael; Kujat, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Composite scaffolds of homogeneously mixed esterified hyaluronan (HY) and gelatin (G) were manufactured with variable component compositions (HY100%; HY95%/G5%; HY70%/G30%). The goals of this study were to analyze the produced composite scaffolds using physical and chemical methods, e.g., scanning electron microscopy, IR-spectroscopy, water contact angle, protein assay, and tensile testing as well as to assess the effects of adding gelatin to the composite scaffolds on attachment, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Numbers of attached cells were significantly higher on the composite material compared to pure hyaluronan at different time points of two-dimensional or three-dimensional cell culture (p < 0.02). In composite scaffolds, a significantly greater amount of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components was deposited after 28 days in culture (glycosaminoglycan: p < 0.001; collagen: p < 0.001) as compared with 100% hyaluronan scaffolds. Additionally, gelatin containing composite scaffolds displayed stronger promotion of collagen type II expression than pure hyaluronan scaffolds. The mechanism, by which gelatin influences cell adhesion, was examined. The effect was inhibited by collagenase treatment of the composites or by addition of α5β1-integrin blocking antibodies to the cell suspension. In summary, the results describe the establishment of a class of composite polymer scaffolds, consisting of esterified hyaluronan and gelatin, which are potentially useful for cell-based tissue engineering approaches using mesenchymal stem cells for chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:18985778

  8. Characterization of esterified hyaluronan-gelatin polymer composites suitable for chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Angele, Peter; Müller, Rainer; Schumann, Detlef; Englert, Carsten; Zellner, Johannes; Johnstone, Brian; Yoo, Jung; Hammer, Joachim; Fierlbeck, Johann; Angele, Martin K; Nerlich, Michael; Kujat, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Composite scaffolds of homogeneously mixed esterified hyaluronan (HY) and gelatin (G) were manufactured with variable component compositions (HY100%; HY95%/G5%; HY70%/G30%). The goals of this study were to analyze the produced composite scaffolds using physical and chemical methods, for example, scanning electron microscopy, IR-spectroscopy, water contact angle, protein assay, and tensile testing as well as to assess the effects of adding gelatin to the composite scaffolds on attachment, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Numbers of attached cells were significantly higher on the composite material compared to pure hyaluronan at different time points of two-dimensional or three-dimensional cell culture (p< 0.02). In composite scaffolds, a significantly greater amount of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components was deposited after 28 days in culture (glycosaminoglycan: p < 0.001; collagen: p < 0.001) as compared with 100% hyaluronan scaffolds. Additionally, gelatin-containing composite scaffolds displayed stronger promotion of collagen type II expression than pure hyaluronan scaffolds. The mechanism, based on which gelatin influences cell adhesion, was examined. The effect was inhibited by collagenase treatment of the composites or by addition of alpha5beta1-integrin blocking antibodies to the cell suspension. In summary, the results describe the establishment of a class of composite polymer scaffolds, consisting of esterified hyaluronan and gelatin, which are potentially useful for cell-based tissue engineering approaches using mesenchymal stem cells for chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:18985778

  9. Intra-articular hyaluronan injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled multicentre trial. Hyaluronan Multicentre Trial Group.

    PubMed Central

    Lohmander, L S; Dalén, N; Englund, G; Hämäläinen, M; Jensen, E M; Karlsson, K; Odensten, M; Ryd, L; Sernbo, I; Suomalainen, O; Tegnander, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of intra-articular injections of hyaluronan on symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Two hundred and forty patients with symptomatic, radiological knee OA were randomly assigned to treatment with weekly injections for five weeks with either 25 mg of high molecular weight hyaluronan or vehicle. Results were evaluated at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 13, and 20 by visual analogue scales (pain, function, motion, activity), algofunctional index, and global evaluation by patient and investigator. Analysis was by "intention to treat', "per protocol', and area under the curve principles on unstratified patient groups and for patients stratified into four groups of equal size by age and baseline algofunctional index. RESULTS: No serious side effects were reported. At 20 weeks both treatment groups were improved compared with baseline, with no difference between unstratified groups treated with placebo or hyaluronan. Comparison of treatment groups stratified by age and baseline algofunctional index revealed a significant difference in favour of hyaluronan over placebo (pain, activity, algofunctional index, global evaluations by patient and investigator) for patients older than 60 years and with a baseline algofunctional index greater than 10. There was no clinically relevant difference between the two treatments for the other three stratified subgroups of younger age or fewer symptoms. Similar results were obtained by area under the curve, intention to treat, and per protocol analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Patients older than 60 years with knee osteoarthritis and with significant symptoms corresponding to an index of severity of knee disease of 10 or more, comprise the group most likely to benefit from treatment with intra-articular hyaluronan injections. PMID:8774159

  10. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  11. A Case of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection with Canine-associated Pasteurella canis in a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Preetam R.; Biranthabail, Dhanashree; Rangnekar, Aseem; Shiragavi, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    This is the report of lower respiratory tract infection with Pasteurella canis in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient with history of casual exposure to cats. Pasteurella species are part of the oral and gastrointestinal flora in the canine animals. These organisms are usually implicated in wound infection following animal bites, but can also be associated with a variety of infections including respiratory tract infections. PMID:26435948

  12. Wear effects on microscopic morphology and hyaluronan uptake in siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Tavazzi, Silvia; Tonveronachi, Martina; Fagnola, Matteo; Cozza, Federica; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Borghesi, Alessandro; Ascagni, Miriam; Farris, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was a comparison between new and worn siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses in terms of microscopic structure, surface morphology, and loading of hyaluronan. The analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy, with the support of the freeze-drying technique, and by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Along the depth profile of new lenses, a thin porous top layer was observed, which corresponds to the region of hyaluronan penetration inside well-defined channels. The time evolution was followed from one day to two weeks of daily wear, when a completely different scenario was found. Clear experimental evidence of a buggy surface was observed with several crests and regions of swelling, which could be filled by the hyaluronan solution. The modifications are attributed to the progressive relaxation of the structure of the polymeric network. PMID:25251841

  13. Exposure of human lung fibroblasts to ozone: cell mortality and hyaluronan metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.; Branscheid, D. )

    1992-04-01

    Exposure of cultures of human lung fibroblasts to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h resulted in a significant increase in cellular mortality by 29%; after exposure to 2.5 ppm ozone for 4 h, the increase amounted to 74%. A marked difference in sensitivity to ozone was observed between fibroblast lines from different individuals. This variability in resistance to ozone was more evident after exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h, when compared with 2.5 ppm ozone for 4 h. In one fibroblast line, synthesis of hyaluronan was enhanced by exposure to 0.5 ppm ozone for 20 h. The concentrations of hyaluronan in culture media increased in experiments using different fibroblast cell lines, a phenomenon that was obvious both if cell numbers and combined protein concentrations of cells and media are selected as references for hyaluronan concentrations.

  14. Optimization of hyaluronan-based eye drop formulations.

    PubMed

    Salzillo, Rosanna; Schiraldi, Chiara; Corsuto, Luisana; D'Agostino, Antonella; Filosa, Rosanna; De Rosa, Mario; La Gatta, Annalisa

    2016-11-20

    Hyaluronan (HA) is frequently incorporated in eye drops to extend the pre-corneal residence time, due to its viscosifying and mucoadhesive properties. Hydrodynamic and rheological evaluations of commercial products are first accomplished revealing molecular weights varying from about 360 to about 1200kDa and viscosity values in the range 3.7-24.2mPa s. The latter suggest that most products could be optimized towards resistance to drainage from the ocular surface. Then, a study aiming to maximize the viscosity and mucoadhesiveness of HA-based preparations is performed. The effect of polymer chain length and concentration is investigated. For the whole range of molecular weights encountered in commercial products, the concentration maximizing performance is identified. Such concentration varies from 0.3 (wt%) for a 1100kDa HA up to 1.0 (wt%) for a 250kDa HA, which is 3-fold higher than the highest concentration on the market. The viscosity and mucoadhesion profiles of optimized formulations are superior than commercial products, especially under conditions simulating in vivo blinking. Thus longer retention on the corneal epithelium can be predicted. An enhanced capacity to protect corneal porcine epithelial cells from dehydration is also demonstrated in vitro. Overall, the results predict formulations with improved efficacy. PMID:27561497

  15. Characterization of Hyaluronan-Protein Microstructures and Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, J. E.; McLane, L.; Bedoya, M.; Beatty, R.; Kramer, A.; Boehm, H.; Scrimgeour, J.

    2010-03-01

    Evidence is mounting that mechanical and topographical features of biomaterials can be as critical for cellular behavior as chemical properties. A case in point is hyaluronan (HA), a large polysaccharide with unique mechanical and hydrodynamic properties, found in many tissues and bodily fluids. Thanks to a large variety of accessible conformations and aggregation states, this remarkable polymer can impart on its biological environment a diverse range of structural and viscoelastic properties with far-reaching consequences for cell physiology (migration, inflammation, cancer). Supramolecular assembly of HA is typically mediated by HA-binding proteins. These specialized molecules are known to assist the formation of organized structures, such as cross-linked bundles, gels, or the all-important pericellular coat, a polymer network anchored to many cell surfaces. Precisely how the material properties of HA-rich matrices and aggregates are modified by the associated proteins, however, is largely a matter of speculation. We will present new insights concerning the cell coat and HA-protein solutions characterized using passive microrheology, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and optical force probe microscopy.

  16. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins. PMID:27358127

  17. Investigating triazine-based modification of hyaluronan using statistical designs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jue; Cheng, Lulu; Struckhoff, Jessica J; Ravi, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and its derivatives have been extensively researched for many biomedical applications. To precisely tailor the property of HA by derivatizing it to a pre-determined extent is challenging, yet critical. In this paper, we used 2-chloro-4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazine (CDMT) and N-methylmorpholine (NMM) to derivatize HA via a triazine-based coupling reaction. Using a fractional factorial (FF) design, we observed that water content in the solvent, and molar ratios of CDMT and NaHCO3 to the carboxylate were the significant factors controlling the derivatization. We investigated how the effect of each factor changes as reaction conditions change. Moreover, by altering the amount of CDMT and NaHCO3, we developed a cubic regression model for precise control of the extent of derivatization using a response surface methodology (RSM) with a D-optimal design. No spurious peaks were detected by (1)H NMR spectrum and only 10% decrease of molecular weight of the derivatized HA was determined by GPC. The HA with 6% modification was relatively biocompatible up to 15 mg/mL. PMID:26256372

  18. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A; Dorsam, Glenn P; Schuh, Jane M

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  19. Determination of hyaluronan molecular mass distribution in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; de la Motte, Carol A; Cowman, Mary K

    2015-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low-M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from 20 unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employing ion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive enzyme-linked sorbent assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M⩽20 kDa, M∼20 to 60 kDa, and M∼60 to 110 kDa comprised averages of 1.5, 1.4, and 2.0% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M⩾110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from 13 samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of approximately 440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low-M HA components. PMID:25579786

  20. Hyaluronan fragments as mediators of inflammation in allergic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sumit; Hoselton, Scott A.; Dorsam, Glenn P.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is frequently caused and/or exacerbated by sensitization to allergens, which are ubiquitous in many indoor and outdoor environments. Severe asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and bronchial constriction in response to an inhaled allergen, leading to a disease course that is often very difficult to treat with standard asthma therapies. As a result of interactions among inflammatory cells, structural cells, and the intercellular matrix of the allergic lung, patients with sensitization to allergens may experience a greater degree of tissue injury followed by airway wall remodeling and progressive, accumulated pulmonary dysfunction as part of the disease sequela. In addition, turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a hallmark of tissue injury and repair. This review focuses on the role of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA), a component of the ECM, in pulmonary injury and repair with an emphasis on allergic asthma. Both the synthesis and degradation of the ECM are critical contributors to tissue repair and remodeling. Fragmented HA accumulates during tissue injury and functions in ways distinct from the larger native polymer. There is gathering evidence that HA degradation products are active participants in stimulating the expression of inflammatory genes in a variety of immune cells at the injury site. In this review, we will consider recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that are associated with HA accumulation and inflammatory cell recruitment in the asthmatic lung. PMID:25582403

  1. The Rise and Fall of Hyaluronan in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Mark E.; Dweik, Raed A.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Aronica, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In normal airways, hyaluronan (HA) matrices are primarily located within the airway submucosa, pulmonary vasculature walls, and, to a lesser extent, the alveoli. Following pulmonary injury, elevated levels of HA matrices accumulate in these regions, and in respiratory secretions, correlating with the extent of injury. Animal models have provided important insight into the role of HA in the onset of pulmonary injury and repair, generally indicating that the induction of HA synthesis is an early event typically preceding fibrosis. The HA that accumulates in inflamed airways is of a high molecular weight (>1600 kDa) but can be broken down into smaller fragments (<150 kDa) by inflammatory and disease-related mechanisms that have profound effects on HA pathobiology. During inflammation in the airways, HA is often covalently modified with heavy chains from inter-alpha-inhibitor via the enzyme tumor-necrosis-factor-stimulated-gene-6 (TSG-6) and this modification promotes the interaction of leukocytes with HA matrices at sites of inflammation. The clearance of HA and its return to normal levels is essential for the proper resolution of inflammation. These data portray HA matrices as an important component of normal airway physiology and illustrate its integral roles during tissue injury and repair among a variety of respiratory diseases. PMID:26448757

  2. Hydration of hyaluronan: effects on structural and thermodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Albèr, Cathrine; Engblom, Johan; Falkman, Peter; Kocherbitov, Vitaly

    2015-03-19

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a frequently occurring biopolymer with a large variety of functions in nature. During the past 60 years, there have been numerous reports on structural and dynamic behavior of HA in water. Nevertheless, studies covering a wider concentration range are still lacking. In this work, we use isothermal scanning sorption calorimetry for the first time to investigate hydration-induced transitions in HA (sodium hyaluronate, 17 kDa). From this method, we obtain the sorption isotherm and the enthalpy and the entropy of hydration. Thermotropic events are evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and structure analysis is performed with X-ray scattering (SWAXS) and light and scanning electron microscopy. During isothermal hydration, HA exhibits a glass transition, followed by crystallization and subsequent dissolution of HA crystals and formation of a one-phase solution. Structural analysis reveals that the crystal may be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with space group P212121. Crystallization of HA was found to occur either through endothermic or exothermic processes, depending on the temperature and water content. We propose a mechanism of crystallization that explains this phenomenon based on the interplay between the hydrophobic effect and strengthening of hydrogen bonds during formation of crystals. The combined results were used to construct a binary phase diagram for the HA-water system. PMID:25719495

  3. In situ crosslinkable hyaluronan hydrogels for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zheng Shu, Xiao; Liu, Yanchun; Palumbo, Fabio S; Luo, Yi; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of an injectable, cell-containing hydrogel that supports cell proliferation and growth to permit in vivo engineering of new tissues. Two thiolated hyaluronan (HA) derivatives were coupled to four alpha,beta-unsaturated ester and amide derivatives of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 3400. The relative chemical reactivity with cysteine decreased in the order PEG-diacrylate (PEGDA)>PEG-dimethacrylate>PEG-diacrylamide>PEG-dimethacrylamide. The 3-thiopropanoyl hydrazide derivative (HA-DTPH) was more reactive than the 4-thiobutanoyl hydrazide, HA-DTBH. The crosslinking of HA-DTPH with PEGDA in a molar ratio of 2:1 occurred in approximately 9 min, suitable for an in situ crosslinking applications. The in vitro cytocompatibility and in vivo biocompatibility were evaluated using T31 human tracheal scar fibroblasts, which were suspended in medium in HA-DTPH prior to addition of the PEGDA solution. The majority of cells survived crosslinking and the cell density increased tenfold during the 4-week culture period in vitro. Cell-loaded hydrogels were also implanted subcutaneously in the flanks of nude mice, and after immunohistochemistry showed that the encapsulated cells retained the fibroblast phenotype and secreted extracellular matrix in vivo. These results confirm the potential utility of the HA-DTPH-PEGDA hydrogel as an in situ crosslinkable, injectable material for tissue engineering. PMID:14643608

  4. Determination of Hyaluronan Molecular Mass Distribution in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; De La Motte, Carol A.; Cowman, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection, via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size-specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from twenty unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employingion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size, and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive Enzyme Linked Sorbent Assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M ≤ 20 kDa, M ≈20-60 kDa, and M ≈ 60-110 kDa comprised an average of 1.5%, 1.4% and 2% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M≥110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from thirteen samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of ∼440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low M HA components. PMID:25579786

  5. Characterization of DNA-hyaluronan matrix for sustained gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Angela; Checkla, Daniel M; Dehazya, Philip; Chen, Weiliam

    2003-06-01

    DNA-Hyaluronan (DNA-HA) matrix formulations intended for use as gene delivery systems have been developed and their potential for delivering DNA encoding a model therapeutic cytokine, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), has been evaluated. The results of enzyme-mediated release kinetics studies suggested that the rate of DNA release from the DNA-HA matrices could be modulated by changing the DNA loading or the degree of crosslinking. SEM imaging of the DNA-HA matrix showed that it was gradually eroded by enzymatic action. The results of gel electrophoresis suggested that there was some degree of interaction between DNA and native HA and that portions of the DNA released from the DNA-HA matrices were associated with crosslinked HA fragments. Only fractions of the DNA released from the DNA-HA matrices were free and the rest was entrapped by HA fragments, which could serve as a mechanism for DNA protection. The results from cell transfection studies using DNA samples collected during the course of release studies confirmed this hypothesis. The PDGF produced by transfection of the DNA released from DNA-HA matrices induced human dermal fibroblast cells to proliferate. PMID:12767709

  6. Expression of 4 truncated fragments of Pasteurella multocida toxin and their immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jayoung; Pyo, Hyoju; Lee, Semi; Lee, Jaeil; Kim, Taejung

    2009-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a poor antigen that becomes more immunogenic after its native structure has been destroyed. In contrast, partially truncated PMT proteins, which are predicted to be good antigens when used as a vaccine, might be used to improve the control of atrophic rhinitis in pigs. In this study, 4 truncated PMT fragments were expressed in Escherichia coli, and those 4 fragments were inoculated into mice to produce the polyclonal antibodies. The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that #1 and #4 fragments were the most immunogenic. Immunized mice were subsequently challenged intraperitoneally with P. multocida type D. Five of the eight #1 fragment-immunized mice showed some protection against death and bacterial clearance. Pigs immunized with #1 fragment produced no or mild atrophic rhinitis (turbinate conchal score) after challenge, suggesting that this #1 fragment could be a good candidate for a subunit recombinant-type vaccine. PMID:19794890

  7. Deadly case of Pasteurella multocida aortitis and mycotic aneurysm following a cat bite.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dennis Dane; Berliner, Yaniv; Carr, David

    2016-06-16

    Animal bites are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). Aortitis leading to mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare and potentially deadly complication of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) following an animal bite. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who presented to the ED after falling at home. He complained of weakness and abdominal pain. He was in septic shock and was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous fluids. He reported previous antibiotic treatment of a cellulitis secondary to a cat bite injury to his right thumb four weeks prior. Abdominal ultrasound and subsequent computed tomography scan revealed a leaking mycotic abdominal aneurysm that was surgically repaired. Blood cultures and aortic wall tissue cultures grew P. multocida. Given how common animal bite presentations are in the ED, this case highlights the need to consider aortitis and mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm in an unwell patient with an animal bite. PMID:27326399

  8. RSF1010-based shuttle vectors for cloning and expression in Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Lee, M D; Henk, A D

    1997-03-01

    The broad host-range cloning vectors, pJRD215 and pMMB67EH, were evaluated for stability and cloning efficiency in Pasteurella multocida. Transformation of P. multocida by electroporation was unreliable and poorly efficient regardless of whether the transforming DNA was isolated from E. coli or P. multocida. Both vectors contain a mob site that enabled transfer by conjugation from E. coli to P. multocida with high efficiency. Kanamycin, streptomycin, and ampicillin resistance encoded by the vectors were expressed in P. multocida. LacZ was cloned in pMMB67EH, an expression vector, and was transferred to P. multocida by conjugation. The transconjugants expressed a functional beta-galactosidase as determined by o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) test. We propose the use of these cosmid and expression vectors as a shuttle vectors for cloning in P. multocida. PMID:9100336

  9. The airborne survival of Pasteurella haemolytica and its deposition in and clearance from the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, M I; Wathes, C M; Taylor, F G

    1990-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was aerosolised by a Collison nebuliser in a Henderson apparatus and its survival in air was measured. The organism was fragile in aerosol and survived best at high humidity and warm temperature. Mice were exposed to the aerosol and clearance from the lung measured. Deposition in the mouse lung showed a good linear correlation with bacterial concentration in the spray suspension fluid. Clearance from the lung was rapid over 24 h although some bacteria could be detected 2 and 4 days after exposure. Mice which received a second exposure 2 weeks later exhibited accelerated clearance from the lung whereby no bacteria could be detected after 12 h. This was associated with serum IgG antibody production, and local and splenic lymphocyte responses to bacterial antigen in vitro. PMID:2138372

  10. Nasal isolation of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida as predictors of respiratory disease in shipped calves.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J D; Holland, B P; Step, D L; Payton, M E; Confer, A W

    2015-04-01

    Three hundred ninety five calves were purchased from sale barns and delivered to the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center. Nasal swabs were collected to determine if presence of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract (URT) can facilitate diagnosis of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Samples were collected at arrival and at treatment for BRD. Clinically healthy control calves were sampled at time of treatment of sick calves. M. haemolytica was more commonly isolated from calves at treatment than at time of arrival or from control calves. M. haemolytica was more common in calves requiring treatment than in those never treated. Need for treatment and number of treatments were negatively associated with average daily gain, supporting the accuracy of diagnosis. These results suggest that URT sampling, when combined with clinical diagnosis, may assist in providing greater diagnostic accuracy, improving ability to evaluate risk factors, interventions, and treatments. PMID:25599936

  11. Treatment of pigs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae with various antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Stipkovits, L; Miller, D; Glavits, R; Fodor, L; Burch, D

    2001-01-01

    The authors have performed a comparative study of the efficacy of various in-feed medications for the treatment of 5- to 6-week-old specific pathogen-free (SPF) piglets experimentally infected on day 1 with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, on day 8 with Pasteurella multocida (serotype A), and on day 15 with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (serotype 2). The treatment started on day 9 and continued for 12 consecutive days, then the piglets were euthanized for examination of macroscopic, histologic, and pathologic lesions and for the presence of mycoplasmas and bacteria in the lungs. Based on the results of clinical observations (respiratory signs, rectal temperature, body weight gain, and feed conversion efficiency), macroscopic and histologic lesions of the lungs, and microbiologic findings, the best results were obtained by treatment of pigs with Econor + chlortetracycline, followed by Tetramutin, Pulmotil, Cyfac, and lincomycin + chlortetracycline. PMID:11768127

  12. Identification, purification, and characterization of the type 4 fimbriae of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Ruffolo, C G; Tennent, J M; Michalski, W P; Adler, B

    1997-01-01

    The presence of fimbriae on Pasteurella multocida has been reported, but there have been no prior studies aimed at conclusively characterizing these structures. We now report on the identification and characterization of type 4 fimbriae on serogroup A, B, and D strains of P. multocida. Under microaerophilic conditions P. multocida showed an increased expression of the fimbriae, which were observed to form bundles. Fimbriae purified by high-performance reverse-phase liquid chromatography constituted a single 18-kDa subunit, the first 21 amino acids of which shared very high similarity with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of other type 4 fimbrial subunits. Antiserum against the P. multocida 18-kDa protein immunostained the type 4 fimbrial subunit of Moraxella bovis and Dichelobacter nodosus. Based on these observations we conclude that P. multocida possesses type 4 fimbriae and have designated the P. multocida fimbrial subunit PtfA. PMID:8975936

  13. Purpura fulminans and severe sepsis due to Pasteurella multocida infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Konda, Monoj Kumar; Chang, Stephanie; Zaccheo, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman was admitted into the intensive care unit, with severe sepsis and renal failure. She developed purpura fulminans (PF) of bilateral upper and lower extremities along with gangrene on the tips of her fingers and toes. Blood cultures confirmed Pasteurella multocida as the causative organism. Despite aggressive supportive measures, the patient remained dependent on high doses of vasopressors and the gangrene progressed. She ultimately succumbed to her underlying severe sepsis. PF is a rare and fatal dermatological emergency commonly seen in children, but it also occurs in adults. Acute infectious PF occurs secondary to severe sepsis and P. multocida is a rare cause of PF. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of PF due to P. multocida in an adult. PMID:27298290

  14. Deadly case of Pasteurella multocida aortitis and mycotic aneurysm following a cat bite

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Dennis Dane; Berliner, Yaniv; Carr, David

    2016-01-01

    Animal bites are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). Aortitis leading to mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare and potentially deadly complication of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) following an animal bite. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who presented to the ED after falling at home. He complained of weakness and abdominal pain. He was in septic shock and was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous fluids. He reported previous antibiotic treatment of a cellulitis secondary to a cat bite injury to his right thumb four weeks prior. Abdominal ultrasound and subsequent computed tomography scan revealed a leaking mycotic abdominal aneurysm that was surgically repaired. Blood cultures and aortic wall tissue cultures grew P. multocida. Given how common animal bite presentations are in the ED, this case highlights the need to consider aortitis and mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm in an unwell patient with an animal bite. PMID:27326399

  15. Infected total knee arthroplasty due to postoperative wound contamination with Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Bala; Holloway, Edward; Townsend, Robert; Sutton, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a small Gram-negative bacterium comprising part of the normal gastrointestinal and nasopharyngeal flora of domestic pets, such as dogs and cats. It rarely causes infection in humans. Previous reports of P multocida causing prosthetic joint infection have described either haematogenous spread of infection from a distant site through a scratch or bite, or reactivation of infection from a previous injury. We report a case of acute total knee arthroplasty joint infection becoming acutely infected by P multocida. We postulate that the mechanism of infection was direct contamination of the wound as a consequence of the patient being licked by his pet dog. We discuss the potential role played by thromboprophylaxis as a factor contributing to prolonged wound leak. PMID:24108765

  16. Persistence of Pasteurella multocida in Nebraska (USA) wetlands under epizootic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, J.I.; Brand, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    Gleason Basin, a marsh located in the western part of the Rainwater Basin in Nebraska, was selected during the 1980 spring waterfowl migration as a study site to determine the presence and persistence of virulent Pasteurella multocida. Avian cholera mortality in migratory waterfowl using the Basin increased during a 2-wk period of a die-off beginning the first week of March when 2,409 carcasses were collected from the marsh. Study sites within the marsh were established for sampling water associated with and not associated with intact and scavenged carcasses. Isolations of virulent P. multocida were made from five of six study sites associated with either intact or scavenged carcasses for 3 days and from three of five non-carcass-associated study sites for 2 days. Recovery of these bacteria from this environment suggested a possible source of infection for susceptible waterfowl using the contaminated site.

  17. Occurrence of virulence-associated genes in Pasteurella multocida isolates obtained from different hosts.

    PubMed

    Shirzad Aski, Hesamaddin; Tabatabaei, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Pasteurella multocida infects a wide range of animals and the infection may spread to human through animal bites and scratches. Pasteurella multocida isolates, obtained from several clinically healthy and diseased animals (bovine, sheep, goat, poultry, dog and cat), were investigated for capsule biosynthesis (capA, B, D, E and F) and expression of 22 virulence-associated genes using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Multiplex PCR results revealed expression of capA, capD and capB genes in 81 (61.83%), 30 (22.90%) and 10 isolates (7.29%), respectively. However, neither of the isolates harbored capE or capF genes and ten isolates (7.29%) were negative for all cap genes. The expression of the capB gene was observed in small ruminant isolates. The occurrence of the ompA, ompH, oma87, sodA and sodC genes was noticed in all of the samples. More than 90% of the isolates harbored hgbA (96.18%), ptfA (95.41%), exbBD-tonB (93.12%), nanB (93.12%) and plbB genes (90.83%). The transferrin binding protein encoding gene tbpA was exclusively detected in the ruminant isolates. The limited number of isolates (25.95%) harbored dermonecrotoxin gene (toxA) and the highest occurrence was noted in the small ruminants, and the capsular type D isolates. This study highlights that the toxA, tbpA, and pfhA genes can be considered as important epidemiological markers for the characterization of P. multocida isolates. PMID:27057674

  18. Characterization of a Pasteurella multocida plasmid and its use to express recombinant proteins in P. multocida.

    PubMed

    Wright, C L; Strugnell, R A; Hodgson, A L

    1997-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a naturally occurring 5.36-kb streptomycin and sulphonamide resistance plasmid, designated pIG1, isolated from type D Pasteurella multocida was determined. A 1.6-kb noncoding region and a 1.4-kb region encoding three putative proteins were shown by sequence homologies and functional characterizations to be involved in the replication and mobilization of pIG1, respectively. The remaining sequence carried an unusual arrangement of streptomycin- and sulphonamide-resistant genes when compared to various other plasmids. It appears that the antibiotic resistance region of pIG1 may have evolved by recombination between three different short direct repeat DNA sequences. A 4.5-kb recombinant plasmid was constructed by replacing the antibiotic resistance genes of pIG1 with a kanamycin resistance gene and seven unique restriction sites. The resulting plasmid, designated pIG112, stably replicates in P. multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and Escherichia coli and can be introduced into these organisms by either transformation or conjugation. This vector exists at approximately 70 copies per cell in P. multocida and approximately 20 copies per cell in E. coli. To demonstrate plasmid-borne gene expression in P. multocida, the P. multocida dermonecrotic toxin gene, toxA, and a genetically modified form of this gene were cloned into pIG112 and expressed in high amounts in a nontoxigenic P. multocida strain. Cell culture assays demonstrated that nontoxigenic P. multocida expressing toxA was cytopathic, whereas a strain expressing the modified toxA derivative was not. PMID:9073583

  19. Toll-like receptor 4-positive macrophages protect mice from Pasteurella pneumotropica-induced pneumonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Marcia L.; Mosier, Derek A.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-positive macrophages in early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacteria. TLR4 is a trans-membrane receptor that is the primary recognition molecule for lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria. The TLR4(Lps-del) mouse strains C57BL10/ScN (B10) and STOCK Abb(tm1) TLR4(Lps-del) Slc11a1(s)(B10 x C2D) are susceptible to pulmonary infections and develop pneumonia when naturally or experimentally infected by the opportunistic bacterium Pasteurella pneumotropica. Since these mice have the TLR4(Lps-del) genotype, we hypothesized that reconstitution of mice with TLR4-positive macrophages would provide resistance to this bacterium. A cultured macrophage cell line (C2D macrophages) and bone marrow cells from C2D mice were adoptively transferred to B10 and B10 x C2D mice by intraperitoneal injection. C2D macrophages increased B10 and B10 x C2D mouse resistance to P. pneumotropica. In C2D-recipient mice there was earlier transcription of tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemokines JE and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) in the lungs of B10 and B10 x C2D mice, and there was earlier transcription of KC and MIP-1alpha in B10 x C2D mice. In addition, the course of inflammation following experimental Pasteurella challenge was altered in C2D recipients. C2D macrophages also protected B10 x C2D mice, which lack CD4(+) T cells. These data indicate that macrophages are critical for pulmonary immunity and can provide host resistance to P. pneumotropica. This study indicates that TLR4-positive macrophages are important for early recognition and clearance of pulmonary bacterial infections.

  20. [Problems in the use of radioactively marked bacteria in animal experiments. 1. Labeling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica and Salmonella dublin with eH, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, 125J1].

    PubMed

    Flossmann, K D; Rohrmann, B; Hubald, J; Finsterbusch, L

    1977-01-01

    Several methods are suggested by which to use the radionuclides 3H, 14C, 32P, 59Fe, 99mTc, and 125J for labelling or doublelabelling of Pasteurella multocida, Pasteurella haemolytica, and Salmonella dublin, with particular reference being made to labelling ofr animal experiments. Suitable radioactive substrates for internal labelling in chemically defined or partially defined nutritive media include 3H-thymin, 3H-thymidine, 14C-glucose, 14C-mannose, 14C-aspartic acid, as well as 3H-uracil, 3H-uridine, 3H-orotic acid, 14C-orotic acid, 59Fe-III-citrate or chloride, and Na2H32PO4. The choise of the nuclide and substrate should by governed by the problem at hand. PMID:849104

  1. Beta-arrestin 1 is involved in the catabolic response stimulated by hyaluronan degradation in mouse chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; D'Ascola, Angela; Scuruchi, Michele; Calatroni, Alberto; Campo, Salvatore

    2015-08-01

    Beta-arrestin-1 (β-arrestin-1) is an adaptor protein that functions in the termination of G-protein activation and seems to be involved in the mediation of the inflammatory response. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) elicits the expression of inflammatory mediators through a mechanism involving hyaluronan (HA) degradation, thereby contributing to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and CD44 activation. Stimulation of both receptors induces nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kB) activation that, through transforming-growth-factor-activated-kinase-1 (TAK-1), in turn stimulates the inflammatory mediators of transcription. As β-arrestin-1 seems to play an inflammatory role in arthritis, we have investigated the involvement of β-arrestin-1 in a model of IL-1β-induced inflammatory response in mouse chondrocytes. IL-1β treatment significantly increases chondrocytes TLR-4, CD44, β-arrestin-1, TAK-1, and serine/threonine kinase (AKT) mRNA expression and related protein levels. NF-kB is also markedly activated with consequent tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and inducible-nitric-oxide-synthase up-regulation. Treatment of IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes with β-arrestin-1 and/or AKT and/or TAK-1-specific inhibitors significantly reduces all parameters, although the inhibitory effect exerted by TAK-1-mediated pathways is more effective than that of β-arrestin-1. β-Arrestin-1-induced NF-kB activation is mediated by the AKT pathway as shown by IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes treated with AKT inhibitor. Finally, a specific HA-blocking peptide (Pep-1) has confirmed the inflammatory role of degraded HA as a mediator of the IL-1β-induced activation of β-arrestin-1. PMID:25673209

  2. Hyaluronan degrading silica nanoparticles for skin cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scodeller, P.; Catalano, P. N.; Salguero, N.; Duran, H.; Wolosiuk, A.; Soler-Illia, G. J. A. A.

    2013-09-01

    We report the first nanoformulation of Hyaluronidase (Hyal) and its enhanced adjuvant effect over the free enzyme. Hyaluronic acid (HA) degrading enzyme Hyal was immobilized on 250 nm silica nanoparticles (SiNP) maintaining specific activity of the enzyme via the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. This process was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and enzymatic activity measurements. The nanoparticles were tested in vivo as adjuvants of carboplatin (CP), peritumorally injected in A375 human melanoma bearing mice and compared with the non-immobilized enzyme, on the basis of equal enzymatic activity. Alcian Blue staining of A375 tumors indicated large overexpression of hyaluronan. At the end of the experiment, tumor volume reduction with SiNP-immobilized Hyal was significantly enhanced compared to non-immobilized Hyal. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images together with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) spectra confirmed the presence of SiNP on the tumor. We mean a proof of concept: this extracellular matrix (ECM) degrading enzyme, immobilized on SiNP, is a more effective local adjuvant of cancer drugs than the non-immobilized enzyme. This could prove useful in future therapies using other or a combination of ECM degrading enzymes.We report the first nanoformulation of Hyaluronidase (Hyal) and its enhanced adjuvant effect over the free enzyme. Hyaluronic acid (HA) degrading enzyme Hyal was immobilized on 250 nm silica nanoparticles (SiNP) maintaining specific activity of the enzyme via the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. This process was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, infrared and UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and enzymatic activity measurements. The nanoparticles were tested in vivo as adjuvants of carboplatin (CP), peritumorally injected in A375 human

  3. Hyaluronan: A Simple Polysaccharide with Diverse Biological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Kevin T.; Gurski, Lisa A.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Witt, Robert L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a linear polysaccharide with disaccharide repeats of D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. It is evolutionary conserved and abundantly expressed in the extracellular matrix (ECM), on the cell surface and even inside cells. Being a simple polysaccharide, HA exhibits an astonishing array of biological functions. HA interacts with various proteins or proteoglycans to organize the ECM and to maintain tissue homeostasis. The unique physical and mechanical properties of HA contribute to the maintenance of tissue hydration, the mediation of solute diffusion through the extracellular space and the lubrication of certain tissues. The diverse biological functions of HA are manifested through its complex interactions with matrix components and resident cells. Binding of HA with cell surface receptors activates various signaling pathways that regulate cell function, tissue development, inflammation, wound healing and tumor progression and metastasis. Taking advantage of the inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability of HA, as well as its susceptibility to chemical modification, researchers have developed various HA-based biomaterials and tissue constructs with promising and broad clinical potential. In this article, we illustrate the properties of HA from a matrix biology perspective by first introducing principles underlying the biosynthesis and biodegradation of HA, as well as the interactions of HA with various proteins and proteoglycans. We next highlight the roles of HA in physiological and pathological states, including morphogenesis, wound healing and tumor metastasis. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying the roles of HA in various physiological processes can provide new insights and tools for the engineering of complex tissues and tissue models. PMID:24361428

  4. Tumor-associated hyaluronan limits efficacy of monoclonal antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Singha, Netai C; Nekoroski, Tara; Zhao, Chunmei; Symons, Rebecca; Jiang, Ping; Frost, Gregory I; Huang, Zhongdong; Shepard, H Michael

    2015-02-01

    Despite tremendous progress in cancer immunotherapy for solid tumors, clinical success of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy is often limited by poorly understood mechanisms associated with the tumor microenvironment (TME). Accumulation of hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the TME, occurs in many solid tumor types, and is associated with poor prognosis and treatment resistance in multiple malignancies. In this study, we describe that a physical barrier associated with high levels of HA (HA(high)) in the TME restricts antibody and immune cell access to tumors, suggesting a novel mechanism of in vivo resistance to mAb therapy. We determined that approximately 60% of HER2(3+) primary breast tumors and approximately 40% of EGFR(+) head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are HA(high), and hypothesized that HA(high) tumors may be refractory to mAb therapy. We found that the pericellular matrix produced by HA(high) tumor cells inhibited both natural killer (NK) immune cell access to tumor cells and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Depletion of HA by PEGPH20, a pegylated recombinant human PH20 hyaluronidase, resulted in increased NK cell access to HA(high) tumor cells, and greatly enhanced trastuzumab- or cetuximab-dependent ADCC in vitro. Furthermore, PEGPH20 treatment enhanced trastuzumab and NK cell access to HA(high) tumors, resulting in enhanced trastuzumab- and NK cell-mediated tumor growth inhibition in vivo. These results suggest that HA(high) matrix in vivo may form a barrier inhibiting access of both mAb and NK cells, and that PEGPH20 treatment in combination with anticancer mAbs may be an effective adjunctive therapy for HA(high) tumors. PMID:25512619

  5. Intracervical application of hyaluronan improves cervical relaxation in the ewe.

    PubMed

    Perry, K; Haresign, W; Wathes, D C; Khalid, M

    2010-12-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) using frozen semen is a key method to enable rapid genetic improvement but its use in the sheep industry is currently limited by poor fertility. Laparoscropic AI is most effective but has not gained popularity due to cost and welfare considerations. Transcervical intrauterine AI (TCAI) may offer a practical alternative but the complex anatomy of the ovine cervix limits adequate penetration of the inseminating pipette. Hyaluronan (HA) is a glycoaminoglycan whose content in the cervix increases at oestrus and which may contribute to the degree of natural relaxation observed at this time. This study investigated the effect of intracervical application of HA on the depth of cervical penetration in sheep. Oestrus was synchronised on three occasions in 48 Welsh mountain ewes with progesterone sponges and PMSG. Each animal initially served as its own untreated control. Ewes were subsequently treated intracervically with 25 mg of: (2i) low molecular weight (MW) HA; (2ii) high MW HA or (2iii) both low and high MW HA (n = 16/group) at 52 h after sponge removal or with low MW HA at: (3i) 50 h; (3ii) 52 h or (3iii) both 50 h and 52 h. Depth of cervical penetration measured at 54 h was increased from 1.22 cm to 3.66 cm by treatment with low MW HA (P ≤ 0.001), with no differences between the number of treatments (1 or 2) or the time at which the HA was administered (50 or 52 h). High MW HA alone or together with low MW HA had no effect. In conclusion, intracervical application of low MW HA 52 h after sponge removal increases cervical penetration up to 3.4cm to allow TCAI in sheep. PMID:20833422

  6. Hyaluronan in aged collagen matrix increases prostate epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Vernon, Robert B.; Chan, Christina K.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the prostate, which is comprised primarily of collagen, becomes increasingly disorganized with age, a property that may influence the development of hyperplasia and cancer. Collageous ECM extracted from the tails of aged mice exhibits many characteristics of collagen in aged tissues, including the prostate. When polymerized into a 3-dimensional (3D) gel, these collagen extracts can serve as models for the study of specific cell-ECM interactions. In the present study, we examined the behaviors of human prostatic epithelial cell lines representing normal prostate epithelial cells (PEC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-1), and adenocarcinoma (LNCaP) cultured in contact with 3D gels made from collagen extracts of young and aged mice. We found that proliferation of PEC, BPH-1, and LNCaP cells were all increased by culture on aged collagen gels relative to young collagen gels. In examining age-associated differences in the composition of the collagen extracts, we found that aged and young collagen had a similar amount of several collagen-associated ECM components, but aged collagen had a much greater content of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) than young collagen. The addition of HA (of similar size and concentration to that found in aged collagen extracts) to cells placed in young collagen elicited significantly increased proliferation in BPH-1 cells, but not in PEC or LNCaP cells, relative to controls not exposed to HA. Of note, histochemical analyses of human prostatic tissues showed significantly higher expression of HA in BPH and prostate cancer stroma relative to stroma of normal prostate. Collectively, these results suggest that changes in ECM involving increased levels of HA contribute to the growth of prostatic epithelium with aging. PMID:25124870

  7. Carboxymethyl Hyaluronan-Stabilized Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Woodman, Jessica L.; Suh, Min Sung; Zhang, Jianxing; Kondaveeti, Yuvabharath; Burgess, Diane J.; White, Bruce A.; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Kuhn, Liisa T.

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl hyaluronic acid (CMHA) is a semisynthetic derivative of HA that is recognized by HA binding proteins but contains an additional carboxylic acid on some of the 6-hydroxyl groups of the N-acetyl glucosamine sugar units. These studies tested the ability of CMHA to stabilize the formation of calcium phosphate nanoparticles and evaluated their potential to target therapy resistant, CD44+/CD24−/low human breast cancer cells (BT-474EMT). CMHA stabilized particles (nCaPCMHA) were loaded with the chemotherapy drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) to form nCaPCMHACDDP. nCaPCMHACDDP was determined to be poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite, 200 nm in diameter with a −43 mV zeta potential. nCaPCMHACDDP exhibited a two-day burst release of CDDP that tapered resulting in 86% release by 7 days. Surface plasmon resonance showed that nCaPCMHACDDP binds to CD44, but less effectively than CMHA or hyaluronan. nCaPCMHA-AF488 was taken up by CD44+/CD24− BT-474EMT breast cancer cells within 18 hours. nCaPCMHACDDP was as cytotoxic as free CDDP against the BT-474EMT cells. Subcutaneous BT-474EMT tumors were more reproducibly inhibited by a near tumor dose of 2.8 mg/kg CDDP than a 7 mg/kg dose nCaPCMHACDDP. This was likely due to a lack of distribution of nCaPCMHACDDP throughout the dense tumor tissue that limited drug diffusion. PMID:26448751

  8. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline . E-mail: pauline@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-08-26

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding.

  9. Effect of Fetal Size on Fetal Placental Hyaluronan and Hyaluronoglucosaminidases Throughout Gestation in the Pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous results indicated that the trophoblast-endometrial epithelial cell bilayer of porcine placenta undergoes microscopic folding during gestation, and the folded bilayer is embedded in placental stroma. We hypothesized that hyaluronan was a component of placental stroma, and that hyaluronidases...

  10. Densitometry and ultrasound velocimetry of hyaluronan solutions in water and in sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Kargerová, A; Pekař, M

    2014-06-15

    The densities of hyaluronan solutions in water and 0.15M NaCl were measured in the temperature range from 25 to 50°C for the hyaluronan molecular weights from 10 to 1,750 kDa. The density increased linearly with concentration and decreased with temperature. The data were fitted by the equation describing the density as a linear function of concentration and a quadratic function of temperature. The effect of molecular weight was negligible and thus single equation was sufficient to describe all data. The apparent and partial specific volumes were calculated from the density data including their extrapolated values to infinite dilutions. The measurement of ultrasound speed in the same solutions under the same conditions enabled to calculate the compressibility and its dependence on concentration and temperature. The compressibility decreased with both the concentration and the temperature but the effect of the concentration was only slight mild. The compressibility was used to estimate the hydration numbers which slightly decreased with increasing temperature and concentration. The addition of NaCl changed only the numerical values of density and ultrasound velocity while not changing the character of their dependence on temperature and concentration. Measured and calculated data indicate that hyaluronan does not disturb the specific water structure in the studied concentration range and support the idea of the existence of water clusters or nanodroplets hydrating the hyaluronan chains in solution. PMID:24721101

  11. Lubrication and wear properties of grafted polyelectrolytes, hyaluronan and hylan, measured in the surface forces apparatus.

    PubMed

    Benz, Marcel; Chen, Nianhuan; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2004-10-01

    Hyaluronan is believed to have an important function in the boundary biolubrication of articular cartilage. Using a Surface Forces Apparatus, we tested the tribological properties of surface bound, rather than "free" hyaluronan. The grafting process of the polyelectrolyte included either a biological route via an HA-binding protein or a chemical reaction to covalently bind the polymer to a lipid bilayer coated surface. In another reaction, we constructed a surface with covalently grafted hylan (crosslinked hyaluronan). We studied the normal and shear forces between these surfaces. None of the systems demonstrated comparable lubrication to that found between cartilage surfaces except at very low loads. Both grafted hyaluronan and hylan generated coefficients of friction between 0.15 and 0.3. Thus, the polysaccharide, which is a constituent of the lamina splendens (outermost cartilage layer), is not expected to be the responsible molecule for the great lubricity of cartilage; however, it may contribute to the load bearing and wear protection of these surfaces. This was concluded from the results with hylan, where a thin gel layer was sufficient to shield the underlying surfaces from damage even at applied pressures of over 200 atmospheres during shear. Our study shows that a low coefficient of friction is not a requirement for, or necessarily a measure of, wear protection. PMID:15368250

  12. Pyrene-conjugated hyaluronan facilitated exfoliation and stabilisation of low dimensional nanomaterials in water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Chen, Xianjue; Boulos, Ramiz A; Yasin, Faizah Md; Lu, Haibo; Raston, Colin; Zhang, Hongbin

    2013-05-25

    Pyrene-conjugated hyaluronan (Py-HA) facilitates the exfoliation of low-dimensional nanomaterials including graphite, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and the dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nano-onions (CNOs) in water (and PBS solutions), with the assistance of sonication. PMID:23598776

  13. Assay of synovial fluid parameters: hyaluronan concentration as a potential marker for joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Praest, B M; Greiling, H; Kock, R

    1997-10-31

    Synovial fluids from the knees of patients with degenerative joint disease (n = 29), osteoarthritis (n = 16), diabetic arthropathy (n = 12), gout (n = 7) and acute inflammatory joint disease (n = 7) were investigated by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle laser light scattering detection and differential refractometry. These data were compared with the viscosities of the same samples measured by rotation viscometry with one low shear rate, as well as with C reactive protein. The median value of the weight-average molecular weight of hyaluronan in synovial fluids, which differed less than the viscosity of these groups, varied between 1.09 x 10(6) g/mol (range 0.849-1.63 x 10(6) g/mol) (acute-inflammatory joint disease) and 1.91 x 10(6) g/mol (range 1.06-3.48 x 10(6) g/mol) (degenerative joint disease). The correlation between viscosity and hyaluronan concentration was much better than between viscosity and weight-average molecular weight. Changes in C reactive protein concentration were correlated with the disease activity. The concentration of hyaluronan was significantly higher in the cases of degenerative joint disease and diabetic arthropathy. These results suggest that synovial fluid concentration of hyaluronan is appropriate as a prognostic value in the evaluation of different kinds of joint diseases. PMID:9437540

  14. Development and characterization of chitosan/hyaluronan film for transdermal delivery of thiocolchicoside.

    PubMed

    Bigucci, Federica; Abruzzo, Angela; Saladini, Bruno; Gallucci, Maria Caterina; Cerchiara, Teresa; Luppi, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was the development of chitosan/hyaluronan transdermal films to improve bioavailability of thiocolchicoside. This approach offers the possibility to elude the first-pass metabolism and at the same time it is able to provide a predictable and extended duration of activity. Films were prepared by casting and drying of aqueous solutions containing different weight ratios of chitosan and hyaluronan and characterized for their physico-chemical and functional properties. In accordance with polymeric composition of films and, therefore, with the amount of the net charge after the complexation, films containing the same weight ratio of chitosan and hyaluronan showed lower water uptake ability with respect to films containing only one polymeric species or an excess of chitosan or hyaluronan. Moreover, the lower the hydration of the polymeric network, the lower is the drug diffusion through the films and its permeation through the skin. This study clearly confirmed that the selection of a suitable polymeric weight ratio and appropriate preparative conditions allows the modulation of film functional properties, suggesting that these formulations could be used as a novel technological platform for transdermal drug delivery. PMID:26076598

  15. Stabilin-1 and -2 constitute a novel family of fasciclin-like hyaluronan receptor homologues.

    PubMed Central

    Politz, Oliver; Gratchev, Alexei; McCourt, Peter A G; Schledzewski, Kai; Guillot, Pierre; Johansson, Sophie; Svineng, Gunbjorg; Franke, Peter; Kannicht, Christoph; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Longati, Paola; Velten, Florian W; Johansson, Staffan; Goerdt, Sergij

    2002-01-01

    MS-1, a high-molecular-mass protein expressed by non-continuous and angiogenic endothelial cells and by alternatively activated macrophages (Mphi2), and the hepatic sinusoidal endothelial hyaluronan clearance receptor are similar with respect to tissue distribution and biochemical characteristics. In the present study we purified these proteins by immuno- and hyaluronan-affinity chromatography respectively, sequenced tryptic peptides and generated full-length cDNA sequences in both mouse and human. The novel genes, i.e. stabilin-1 and stabilin-2, code for homologous transmembrane proteins featuring seven fasciclin-like adhesion domains, 18-20 epidermal-growth-factor domains, one X-link domain and three to six B-(X(7))-B hyaluronan-binding motifs. Northern-blotting experiments revealed the presence of both stabilins in organs with predominant endothelial sinuses such as liver, spleen and lymph node: stabilin-1 mRNA was also detected in organs with predominant Mphi2 cells, such as placenta, and in interleukin-4/glucocorticoid-stimulated Mphi2 cells in vitro. A polyclonal antibody made against human recombinant stabilin-1 confirmed the expression of stabilin-1 protein in splenic sinus endothelial cells in vivo and in Mphi2 in vitro. On the basis of high similarity at the protein level and the unique domain composition, which differs from that of all other known fasciclin-like proteins and hyaluronan receptors, stabilin-1 and stabilin-2 define a novel family of fasciclin-like hyaluronan receptor homologues that might play a role in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in vascular function and inflammatory processes. PMID:11829752

  16. Molecular mass dependence of hyaluronan detection by sandwich ELISA-like assay and membrane blotting using biotinylated hyaluronan binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Tank, Mihir; Alsofyani, Abeer; Shah, Naman; Talati, Nishant; LoBello, Jaclyn C; Kim, Jin Ryoun; Oonuki, Yoji; de la Motte, Carol A; Cowman, Mary K

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is widely detected in biological samples and its concentration is most commonly determined by the use of a labeled specific HA binding protein (aggrecan G1-IGD-G2, HABP), employing membrane blotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-like methods. However, the detected signal intensity or the quantified value obtained by using these surface-based methods is related to the molecular mass (M) of HA, especially for HA in the low M range below ∼150 kDa. At the same mass or mass concentration, higher M HA gives a higher signal than lower M HA. We have experimentally determined the quantitative relationship between the M of HA (in the range 20–150 kDa) and the relative signal intensity in comparison with a standard HA, in a sandwich ELISA-like assay. An M-dependent signal correction factor (SCF) was calculated and used to correct the signal intensity, so that the corrected concentration value would more accurately reflect the true HA concentration in solution. The SCF for polydisperse low M HA was also calculated and compared with experimental results. When the molecular mass distribution of an HA sample is determined by a method such as gel electrophoresis, then its appropriately averaged SCF can be calculated and used to correct the signal in sandwich ELISA to obtain a more accurate concentration estimation. The correction method works for HA with M between ∼150 and 20 kDa, but lower M HA is too poorly detected for useful analysis. The physical basis of the M-dependent detection is proposed to be the increase in detector-accessible fraction of each surface-bound molecule as M increases. PMID:23964097

  17. High performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) for the sensitive determination of hyaluronan oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Rothenhöfer, Martin; Grundmann, Marco; Bernhardt, Günther; Matysik, Frank-Michael; Buschauer, Armin

    2015-04-15

    High performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) was optimized for the analysis of oligosaccharides derived from the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan. Using this sensitive approach, the separation of oligosaccharides consisting of two (molecular weight ca. 0.8 kDa) up to 25-30 (molecular weight: ca. 9.5-11.4 kDa) disaccharide moieties was possible. Standard oligosaccharides (comprising 2-4 repetitive disaccharides) were detectable at very low amounts of 0.2-0.3 pmol (20-30 nM). Including 10 min of column equilibration, a complex mixture of low molecular weight hyaluronan can be analyzed within 40 min. The HPAEC method was successfully applied to the study of the size-dependency of both the action of bovine testicular hyaluronidase (BTH) and the precipitation of hyaluronan by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), a physicochemical reaction often used for the determination of hyaluronan and hyaluronidase activity. PMID:25768984

  18. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  19. Hyaluronidase and Hyaluronan Oligosaccharides Promote Neurological Recovery after Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Dohare, Preeti; Arshad, Arslan; Zia, Muhammad T.; Panda, Sanjeet; Korumilli, Ritesh; Kayton, Robert; Hascall, Vincent C.; Lauer, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in premature infants results in inflammation, arrested oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) maturation, and reduced myelination of the white matter. Hyaluronan (HA) inhibits OPC maturation and complexes with the heavy chain (HC) of glycoprotein inter-α-inhibitor to form pathological HA (HC–HA complex), which exacerbates inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVH would result in accumulation of HA, and that either degradation of HA by hyaluronidase treatment or elimination of HCs from pathological HA by HA oligosaccharide administration would restore OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological function in survivors with IVH. To test these hypotheses, we used the preterm rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and analyzed autopsy samples from premature infants. We found that total HA levels were comparable in both preterm rabbit pups and human infants with and without IVH, but HA receptors—CD44, TLR2, TLR4—were elevated in the forebrain of both humans and rabbits with IVH. Hyaluronidase treatment of rabbits with IVH reduced CD44 and TLR4 expression, proinflammatory cytokine levels, and microglia infiltration. It also promoted OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological recovery. HC–HA and tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 were elevated in newborns with IVH; and depletion of HC–HA levels by HA oligosaccharide treatment reduced inflammation and enhanced myelination and neurological recovery in rabbits with IVH. Hence, hyaluronidase or HA oligosaccharide treatment represses inflammation, promotes OPC maturation, and restores myelination and neurological function in rabbits with IVH. These therapeutic strategies might improve the neurological outcome of premature infants with IVH. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Approximately 12,000 premature infants develop IVH every year in the United States, and a large number of survivors with IVH develop cerebral palsy and cognitive deficits. The onset of IVH induces inflammation

  20. Hyaluronidase and Hyaluronan Oligosaccharides Promote Neurological Recovery after Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Dohare, Preeti; Arshad, Arslan; Zia, Muhammad T; Panda, Sanjeet; Korumilli, Ritesh; Kayton, Robert; Hascall, Vincent C; Lauer, Mark E; Ballabh, Praveen

    2016-01-20

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in premature infants results in inflammation, arrested oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) maturation, and reduced myelination of the white matter. Hyaluronan (HA) inhibits OPC maturation and complexes with the heavy chain (HC) of glycoprotein inter-α-inhibitor to form pathological HA (HC-HA complex), which exacerbates inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that IVH would result in accumulation of HA, and that either degradation of HA by hyaluronidase treatment or elimination of HCs from pathological HA by HA oligosaccharide administration would restore OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological function in survivors with IVH. To test these hypotheses, we used the preterm rabbit model of glycerol-induced IVH and analyzed autopsy samples from premature infants. We found that total HA levels were comparable in both preterm rabbit pups and human infants with and without IVH, but HA receptors--CD44, TLR2, TLR4--were elevated in the forebrain of both humans and rabbits with IVH. Hyaluronidase treatment of rabbits with IVH reduced CD44 and TLR4 expression, proinflammatory cytokine levels, and microglia infiltration. It also promoted OPC maturation, myelination, and neurological recovery. HC-HA and tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 were elevated in newborns with IVH; and depletion of HC-HA levels by HA oligosaccharide treatment reduced inflammation and enhanced myelination and neurological recovery in rabbits with IVH. Hence, hyaluronidase or HA oligosaccharide treatment represses inflammation, promotes OPC maturation, and restores myelination and neurological function in rabbits with IVH. These therapeutic strategies might improve the neurological outcome of premature infants with IVH. Significance statement: Approximately 12,000 premature infants develop IVH every year in the United States, and a large number of survivors with IVH develop cerebral palsy and cognitive deficits. The onset of IVH induces inflammation of the

  1. Associations between water quality, Pasteurella multocida, and avian cholera at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehr, M.A.; Botzler, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied patterns in avian cholera mortality, the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the water or sediment, and water chemistry characteristics in 10 wetlands at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (California, USA), an area of recurrent avian cholera epizootics, during the winters of 1997 and 1998. Avian cholera outbreaks (a?Y50 dead birds) occurred on two wetlands during the winter of 1997, but no P. multocida were recovered from 390 water and 390 sediment samples from any of the 10 wetlands. No mortality events were observed on study wetlands during the winter of 1998; however, P. multocida was recovered from water and sediment samples in six of the 10 study wetlands. The pH levels were higher for wetlands experiencing outbreaks during the winter of 1997 than for nonoutbreak wetlands, and aluminum concentrations were higher in wetlands from which P. multocida were recovered during the winter of 1998. Water chemistry parameters (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and dissolved protein) previously linked with P. multocida and avian cholera mortality were not associated with the occurrence of avian cholera outbreaks or the presence of P. multocida in our study wetlands. Overall, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that wetland characteristics facilitate the presence of P. multocida and, thereby, allow some wetlands to serve as long-term sources (reservoirs) for P. multocida.

  2. Partial Characterization of R-Plasmids from Pasteurella multocida Isolated from Turkeys

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Stephen M.; Hirsh, Dwight C.

    1978-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, isolated from turkeys during an outbreak of septicemic disease (“fowl cholera”), was found to be resistant to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfonamides. Agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of DNA from these isolates indicated the presence of extrachromosomal elements. Plasmid DNA was isolated by cesium chloride-ethidium bromide density centrifugation. Escherichia coli was transformed to antimicrobic resistance with this DNA. Two plasmids were isolated. One of these plasmids had a buoyant density of 1.7158 g/cm3 (56.9 mol% guanine plus cytosine) and a molecular weight of 4.4 × 106 and conferred resistance to tetracycline, streptomycin, and sulfonamides. The other, having a buoyant density of 1.7198 g/cm3 (61 mol% guanine plus cytosine) and a molecular weight of 3.44 × 106, conferred resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamides. Streptomycin resistance was mediated by streptomycin phosphotransferase. Compatibility group testing indicated that neither plasmid belonged to any of 13 compatibility groups (of conjugal plasmids). Both plasmids were also found to be compatible with three small, nonconjugative resistance plasmids. Images PMID:708012

  3. Virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance profiles of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from rabbits in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Felizardo, Maria Roberta; Sena de Gobbi, Débora Dirani; Gomes, Cleise Ribeiro; Nogueira Filsner, Pedro Henrique de Lima; Moreno, Marina; Paixão, Renata; Pereira, Jucélia de Jesus; Micke Moreno, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is responsible for a wide range of diseases in domestic animals. In rabbits, the agent is related to nasal discharge, pneumonia, otitis media, pyometra, orchitis, abscess, and septicemia. One hundred and forty rabbits with respiratory diseases from four rabbitries in São Paulo State, Brazil were evaluated for the detection of P. multocida in their nasal cavities. A total of twenty-nine animals were positive to P. multocida isolation, and 46 strains were selected and characterized by means of biochemical tests and PCR. P. multocida strains were tested for capsular type, virulence genes, and resistance profile. A total of 45.6% (21/46) of isolates belonged to capsular type A, and 54.34% (25/46) of the isolates were untypeable. None of the strains harboured toxA or pfhA genes. The frequency of the other twenty genes tested was variable, and the data generated was used to build a dendrogram, showing the relatedness of strains, which were clustered according to origin. Resistance revealed to be more common against sulfonamides and cotrimoxazole, followed by erythromycin, penicillin, and amoxicillin. PMID:22919347

  4. Selective Membrane Redistribution and Depletion of Gαq-Protein by Pasteurella multocida Toxin.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Nathan C; Luo, Shuhong; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), the major virulence factor responsible for zoonotic atrophic rhinitis, is a protein deamidase that activates the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Initial activation of G alpha-q-coupled phospholipase C-beta-1 signaling by PMT is followed by uncoupling of G alpha-q-dependent signaling, causing downregulation of downstream calcium and mitogenic signaling pathways. Here, we show that PMT decreases endogenous and exogenously expressed G alpha-q protein content in host cell plasma membranes and in detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fractions. This membrane depletion of G alpha-q protein was dependent upon the catalytic activity of PMT. Results indicate that PMT-modified G alpha-q redistributes within the host cell membrane from the DRM fraction into the soluble membrane and cytosolic fractions. In contrast, PMT had no affect on G alpha-s or G beta protein levels, which are not substrate targets of PMT. PMT also had no affect on G alpha-11 levels, even though G alpha-11 can serve as a substrate for deamidation by PMT, suggesting that membrane depletion of PMT-modified G-alpha-q has specificity. PMID:27490568

  5. Ultrastructural Comparison of the Nasal Epithelia of Healthy and Naturally Affected Rabbits with Pasteurella multocida A

    PubMed Central

    Esquinas, Paula; Botero, Lucía; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An ultrastructural comparison between the nasal cavities of healthy rabbits and those suffering from two forms of spontaneous infection with Pasteurella multocida was undertaken. Twelve commercially produced rabbits of different ages and respiratory health status were divided into four groups: healthy from 0 to 21 days (G1, n = 2); healthy from 23 to 49 days (G2, n = 2); healthy from 51 to 69 days (G3, n = 2); diseased rabbits with septicemia and the rhinitic form of P. multocida infection (G4, n = 3). The main ultrastructural changes observed were a widening of the interepithelial spaces, increased activity and number of goblet cells, the formation of two types of vacuoles in epithelial cells, the degranulation and migration of heterophils between the epithelial cells, and the association of this migration with some of the other changes. No bacteria were observed adhering to the epithelium, and very few were observed free in the mucus. Scant inter-epithelial spaces were found in healthy rabbits, but they were not as large and numerous as those found in diseased animals. We discuss the origin and meaning of these changes but, we focus on the significance of the inter-epithelial spaces and goblet cells for the defense of the upper respiratory airways against the bacterium and its lipopolysaccharide. PMID:23577280

  6. Development of OMP based indirect ELISA to gauge the antibody titers in bovines against Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, V; Verma, S; Singh, G; Wani, A. H; Chahota, R; Dhar, P; Verma, L; Sharma, M

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) is an important pathogen of various domestic animals. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a major role in pathogenesis and immunogenicity of P. multocida. The aim of the study was to develop indirect enzyme linked immuno sorbant assay (ELISA) based on OMPs to ascertain the antibody titers in animals post-infection or to gauge the potency of vaccine. The OMPs were extracted and purified from P. multocida P:52 (vaccine strain) and P. multocida B:2 isolated from natural outbreak of Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) and analyzed on SDS PAGE and through western blot. The OMPs profile of the vaccine strain and the isolate from the natural outbreak of HS were found to be similar. Optimization of various components viz. coating antigens, anti-species conjugate, etc. were carried out against both anti-P. multocida hyper immune and pre immune serum. Validation of OMP based indirect ELISA assay to measure immune response against P. multocida in bovine revealed 91% diagnostic sensitivity (DSN) and about 100% diagnostic specificity (DSP) at 25% cut off. OMP based indirect ELISA was found to be more specific, but less sensitive as compared to WCL based assay. PMID:27175202

  7. Virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance of Pasteurella multocida isolated from poultry and swine

    PubMed Central

    Furian, Thales Quedi; Borges, Karen Apellanis; Laviniki, Vanessa; da Silveira Rocha, Silvio Luis; de Almeida, Camila Neves; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; de Souza Moraes, Hamilton Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida causes atrophic rhinitis in swine and fowl cholera in birds, and is a secondary agent in respiratory syndromes. Pathogenesis and virulence factors involved are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to detect 22 virulence-associated genes by PCR, including capsular serogroups A, B and D genes and to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of P. multocida strains from poultry and swine. ompH, oma87, plpB, psl, exbD-tonB, fur, hgbA, nanB, sodA, sodC, ptfA were detected in more than 90% of the strains of both hosts. 91% and 92% of avian and swine strains, respectively, were classified in serogroup A. toxA and hsf-1 showed a significant association to serogroup D; pmHAS and pfhA to serogroup A. Gentamicin and amoxicillin were the most effective drugs with susceptibility higher than 97%; however, 76.79% of poultry strains and 85% of swine strains were resistant to sulphonamides. Furthermore, 19.64% and 36.58% of avian and swine strains, respectively, were multi-resistant. Virulence genes studied were not specific to a host and may be the result of horizontal transmission throughout evolution. High multidrug resistance demonstrates the need for responsible use of antimicrobials in animals intended for human consumption, in addition to antimicrobial susceptibility testing to P. multocida. PMID:26887247

  8. Exposure of calves to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, P D; Maxie, M G; Wilkie, B N; Savan, M; Valli, V E; Johnson, J A

    1983-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether sequential exposure to aerosols of parainfluenza-3 virus followed by Pasteurella haemolytica, or P. haemolytica followed by parainfluenza-3 virus, could lead to the production of pulmonary lesions in conventionally-raised calves. Twenty male calves with low serum antibody titres to both organisms were placed in five equal groups. Synergism of parainfluenza-3 virus and P. haemolytica was not demonstrated in any of the sequentially infected groups and pulmonary lesions were mild in all challenged calves. Clinical signs of disease were not present after exposure to parainfluenza-3 virus although the virus was repeatedly isolated from nasal secretions of all inoculated calves. Exposure to P. haemolytica produced a transient response which consisted of increased rectal temperatures and respiratory rates, with a mild neutrophilic leukocytosis and a mild left shift present six hours postinoculation and returning to normal within 24 hours. Results from this study suggest, although do not confirm, that reduced pulmonary clearance of inhaled P. haemolytica in parainfluenza-3 virus infected calves does not necessarily lead to production of severe pulmonary lesions and that previous exposure to aerosols of P. haemolytica may not enhance secondary parainfluenza-3 virus infection. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:6320999

  9. Selective Membrane Redistribution and Depletion of Gαq-Protein by Pasteurella multocida Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, Nathan C.; Luo, Shuhong; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2016-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), the major virulence factor responsible for zoonotic atrophic rhinitis, is a protein deamidase that activates the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Initial activation of G alpha-q-coupled phospholipase C-beta-1 signaling by PMT is followed by uncoupling of G alpha-q-dependent signaling, causing downregulation of downstream calcium and mitogenic signaling pathways. Here, we show that PMT decreases endogenous and exogenously expressed G alpha-q protein content in host cell plasma membranes and in detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fractions. This membrane depletion of G alpha-q protein was dependent upon the catalytic activity of PMT. Results indicate that PMT-modified G alpha-q redistributes within the host cell membrane from the DRM fraction into the soluble membrane and cytosolic fractions. In contrast, PMT had no affect on G alpha-s or G beta protein levels, which are not substrate targets of PMT. PMT also had no affect on G alpha-11 levels, even though G alpha-11 can serve as a substrate for deamidation by PMT, suggesting that membrane depletion of PMT-modified G-alpha-q has specificity. PMID:27490568

  10. Canine adenovirus type 1 and Pasteurella pneumotropica co‑infection in a puppy.

    PubMed

    Pintore, Maria Domenica; Corbellini, Debora; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Florio, Caterina Lucia; Varello, Katia; Bozzetta, Elena; Adriano, Daniela; Decaro, Nicola; Casalone, Cristina; Iulini, Barbara

    2016-03-31

    In 2008, a 2 months-old male German shepherd was presented with fever, depression, and evident organic wasting. The puppy died within 48 hours after the onset of clinical signs. A complete necropsy was performed. Bacteriological examination of samples from the brain, lung, liver, spleen, and bone marrow tested positive for Pasteurella pneumotropica. Histopathology demonstrated in ammatory and vascular lesions in the central nervous system and internal organs. Canine adenovirus type 1 nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the frozen brain but not in the formalin- xed, para n-embedded liver and lung samples. The positive PCR was subsequently con rmed by indirect uorescent antibody testing of the para n-embedded brain and liver sections. Although the liver is the primary site of viral damage, these laboratory ndings suggest that Canine adenovirus type 1 infection should be included in the di erential diagnosis of neuropathological diseases in dogs and that adenoviral infections could promote septicaemia caused by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:27033531

  11. In vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue cage model in calves.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changfu; Qu, Ying; Sun, Meizhen; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Huang, Xianhui; Huai, Binbin; Lu, Yan; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone specially developed for use in veterinary medicine with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. The objective of our study was to re-evaluate in vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida using subcutaneously implanted tissue cages in calves. Calves were infected by direct injection into tissue cages with P. multocida(type B, serotype 2), then intramuscularly received a range of marbofloxacin doses 24 h after inoculation. The ratio of 24 h area under the concentration-time curve divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration or the mutant prevention concentration (AUC24 h/MIC or AUC24 h/MPC) was the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best described the effectiveness of marbofloxacin against P. multocida (R (2) = 0.8514) by non-linear regression analysis. Marbofloxacin exhibited a good antimicrobial activity in vivo. The levels of AUC24 h/MIC and AUC24 h/MPC that produced 50% (1.5log10 CFU/mL reduction) and 90% (3log10 CFU/mL reduction) of maximum response were 18.60 and 50.65 h, 4.67 and 12.89 h by using sigmoid Emax model WINNONLIN software, respectively. The in vivo PK/PD integrated methods by tissue cage model display the advantage of the evaluation of antimicrobial activity and the optimization of the dosage regimen for antibiotics in the presence of the host defenses, especially in target animal of veterinary interest. PMID:26257726

  12. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic integration and modelling of marbofloxacin in calves for Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Potter, T; Illambas, J; Pelligand, L; Rycroft, A; Lees, P

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of marbofloxacin were established in calves for six strains of each of the pneumonia pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. The distribution of marbofloxacin into inflamed (exudate) and non-inflamed (transudate) tissue cage fluids allowed comparison with the serum concentration-time profile. To establish the PD profile, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and calf serum. Moderately higher MICs were obtained for serum compared to MHB. An initial integration of PK-PD data established C(max)/MIC ratios of 45.0 and AUC(24h)/MIC values of 174.7 h, based on serum MICs, for both bacterial species. Using bacterial time-kill curves, generated ex vivo for serum marbofloxacin concentrations, PK-PD modelling established three levels of growth inhibition: AUC(24 h)/MIC ratios for no reduction, 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count from the initial inoculum count were 41.9, 59.5 and 68.0 h for M. haemolytica and 48.6, 64.9 and 74.8 h for P. multocida, on average respectively. Inter-strain variability for 3 log(10) and 4 log(10) reductions in bacterial count was smaller for P. multocida than for M. haemolytica. In conjunction with literature data on MIC(90) values, the present results allowed prediction of dosages for efficacy for each organism for the three levels of growth inhibition. PMID:23084327

  13. Plasmid and restriction endonuclease patterns in Pasteurella multocida isolated from a swine pyramid.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Xavier; Casal, Jordi; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and plasmid profile were used to study the epidemiology of Pasteurella multocida in a swine pyramid structure. The studied pyramid was comprised of a group of 12 swine farrow-to-finish farms related by unidirectional animal movement. P. multocida isolates were obtained from the lungs of 275 slaughtered pigs. Serotyping was performed by hyaluronidase sensitivity test and toxicity was investigated by the ELISA test. HpaII was used to cleave the P. multocida extracted DNA. REA patterns relationships were studied using the Sokal-Michener coefficients, and the dendrogram was built using the UPGMA system. The 218 P. multocida isolates obtained were distributed in 17 REA patterns. In 9 of the 12 farms studied only 2-3 REA patterns were detected, with one clearly predominant pattern. The 81 strains with plasmids were assigned to six plasmid profiles. REA and plasmid profiles proved to be good epidemiological tools for identifying different strains of P. multocida with the same phenotype. PMID:11731160

  14. Development of OMP based indirect ELISA to gauge the antibody titers in bovines against Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Dogra, V; Verma, S; Singh, G; Wani, A H; Chahota, R; Dhar, P; Verma, L; Sharma, M

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) is an important pathogen of various domestic animals. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) play a major role in pathogenesis and immunogenicity of P. multocida. The aim of the study was to develop indirect enzyme linked immuno sorbant assay (ELISA) based on OMPs to ascertain the antibody titers in animals post-infection or to gauge the potency of vaccine. The OMPs were extracted and purified from P. multocida P:52 (vaccine strain) and P. multocida B:2 isolated from natural outbreak of Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) and analyzed on SDS PAGE and through western blot. The OMPs profile of the vaccine strain and the isolate from the natural outbreak of HS were found to be similar. Optimization of various components viz. coating antigens, anti-species conjugate, etc. were carried out against both anti-P. multocida hyper immune and pre immune serum. Validation of OMP based indirect ELISA assay to measure immune response against P. multocida in bovine revealed 91% diagnostic sensitivity (DSN) and about 100% diagnostic specificity (DSP) at 25% cut off. OMP based indirect ELISA was found to be more specific, but less sensitive as compared to WCL based assay. PMID:27175202

  15. Differentiation of toxigenic from nontoxigenic isolates of Pasteurella multocida by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, S; Someno, S; Yagihashi, T

    1994-01-01

    A PCR assay was developed for the differentiation of toxigenic Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida strains, the major etiologic agent for progressive atrophic rhinitis in pigs, from nontoxigenic strains. The PCR targeted a toxA gene encoding a 143-kDa dermonecrotic toxin that is considered to be the central etiologic factor in progressive atrophic rhinitis. toxA fragments were amplified from toxigenic P. multocida isolates but not from nontoxigenic isolates or other bacteria isolated from pigs. The sensitivity of the reaction was as low as 10 pg of chromosomal DNA from a toxigenic strain. The results obtained by PCR of the DNAs of 187 field isolates of P. multocida were consistent with those obtained by the guinea pig skin test and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. Restriction fragment analysis of the PCR-amplified fragments from 67 field isolates and comparison of the DNA sequences of fragments from capsular serotype A and D strains suggest that the PCR-amplified region, which is considered to encode the major immunologic determinants of the toxin, would be the same among P. multocida strains. The PCR that we describe should be useful for the diagnosis and the etiologic survey of progressive atrophic rhinitis. Images PMID:8027302

  16. Inhibition of Pasteurella multocida Adhesion to Rabbit Respiratory Epithelium Using Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Magda Patricia; Martinez, Nhora María; Patiño, María del Pilar; Iregui, Carlos Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of a panel of lectins to inhibit the ability of Pasteurella multocida to adhere to and affect the rabbit respiratory epithelium. Nasal septa from rabbit fetuses were cultured with various lectins before the addition of P. multocida. The percentage of bacteria adhering to the epithelium was evaluated semiquantitatively by indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP) staining. The goblet cells (GCs) were counted in semithin sections stained with toluidine blue and served as the main morphological criterion to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the lectins. The lectins PNA, WGA, RCA120, and DBA significantly inhibited the adhesion of P. multocida to the ciliated epithelium (P < 0.05) and prevented the pathogen-induced increase in the number of GCs (P < 0.05) compared with those of positive control tissues. In addition, VVA, SJA, UEA I, DSL, SBA, and ECL significantly inhibited the increase in GCs compared with that of the control tissues. The results suggest that less aggressive therapeutic strategies, such as treatment with lectins, may represent alternative approaches to control bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25810949

  17. Antibodies against Pasteurella multocida in snow geese in the western arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Baranyuk, V.; Sileo, L.; Price, J.I.

    1999-01-01

    To determine if lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) are a potential reservoir for the Pasteurella multocida bacterium that causes avian cholera, serum samples and/or pharyngeal swabs were collected from > 3,400 adult geese breeding on Wrangel Island (Russia) and Banks Island (Canada) during 1993-1996. Pharyngeal swab sampling rarely (> 0.1%) detected birds that were exposed to P. multocida in these populations. Geese with serum antibody levels indicating recent infection with P. multocida were found at both breeding colonies. Prevalence of seropositive birds was 3.5% at Wrangel Island, an area that has no recorded history of avian cholera epizootics. Prevalence of seropositive birds was 2.8% at Banks Island in 1994, but increased to 8.2% during 1995 and 1996 when an estimated 40,000-60,000 snow geese were infected. Approximately 50% of the infected birds died during the epizootic and a portion of the surviving birds may have become carriers of the disease. This pattern of prevalence indicated that enzootic levels of infection with P. multocida occurred at both breeding colonies. When no avian cholera epizootics occurred (Wrangel Island, Banks Island in 1994), female snow geese (4.7%) had higher antibody prevalence than males (2.0%).

  18. Genomic characterization of Pasteurella multocida HB01, a serotype A bovine isolate from China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhong; Liang, Wan; Liu, Wenjing; Wu, Bin; Tang, Biao; Tan, Chen; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-04-25

    Pasteurella multocida infects various domestic and feral animals, generally causing clinical disease. To investigate P. multocida disease in cattle, we sequenced the complete genome of P. multocida HB01 (GenBank accession CP006976), a serotype A organism isolated from a cow in China. The genome is composed of a single circular chromosome of 2,416,068 base pairs containing 2212 protein-coding sequences, 6 ribosomal rRNA operons, and 56 tRNA genes. The present study confirms that P. multocida HB01 possesses a more complete metabolic pathway with an intact trichloroacetic acid cycle for anabolism compared with A. pleuropneumoniae and Haemophilus parasuis. This is the first time that this metabolic mechanism of P. multocida has been described. We also identified a full spectrum of genes related to known virulence factors of P. multocida. The differences in virulence factors between strains of different serotypes and origins were also compared. This comprehensive comparative genome analysis will help in further studies of the metabolic pathways, genetic basis of serotype, and virulence of P. multocida. PMID:26827796

  19. Comparative analysis of Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from bovine respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Sellyei, Boglárka; Rónai, Zsuzsanna; Jánosi, Szilárd; Makrai, László

    2015-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of significant economic losses in the intensive beef industry worldwide. Beside numerous risk factors Pasteurella multocida, which is regarded as a secondary pathogen, may play a role in the development of the disease. Previous studies of strains from swine pneumonia revealed that there are a few clones associated with clinical disease, suggesting that some strains may be more virulent than others. This linkage may be true in the BRD, however composition of P. multocida populations in the herds are slightly characterized. Thus, we decided to perform phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of strains isolated from calves with respiratory infection at 31 different herds in Hungary. The results demonstrated the presence of two dominant strain types. At the identical taxonomic background (P. multocida subsp. multocida) with slight phenotypic variability they could be separated by trehalose fermentation capacity, α-glucosidase activity and molecular fingerprint patterns of ERIC- and M13-PCR. Independent prevalence and geographical origin of the strain types may refer to their significance in the illness, but their comparison with strains isolated from healthy individuals is taken into consideration. PMID:26689880

  20. In vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue cage model in calves

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Changfu; Qu, Ying; Sun, Meizhen; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Huang, Xianhui; Huai, Binbin; Lu, Yan; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Marbofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone specially developed for use in veterinary medicine with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. The objective of our study was to re-evaluate in vivo antimicrobial activity of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida using subcutaneously implanted tissue cages in calves. Calves were infected by direct injection into tissue cages with P. multocida(type B, serotype 2), then intramuscularly received a range of marbofloxacin doses 24 h after inoculation. The ratio of 24 h area under the concentration-time curve divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration or the mutant prevention concentration (AUC24 h/MIC or AUC24 h/MPC) was the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) index that best described the effectiveness of marbofloxacin against P. multocida (R2 = 0.8514) by non-linear regression analysis. Marbofloxacin exhibited a good antimicrobial activity in vivo. The levels of AUC24 h/MIC and AUC24 h/MPC that produced 50% (1.5log10 CFU/mL reduction) and 90% (3log10 CFU/mL reduction) of maximum response were 18.60 and 50.65 h, 4.67 and 12.89 h by using sigmoid Emax model WINNONLIN software, respectively. The in vivo PK/PD integrated methods by tissue cage model display the advantage of the evaluation of antimicrobial activity and the optimization of the dosage regimen for antibiotics in the presence of the host defenses, especially in target animal of veterinary interest. PMID:26257726

  1. Serotypes and DNA fingerprint profiles of Pasteurella multocida isolated from raptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, M.A.; Duncan, R.M.; Nordholm, G.E.; Berlowski, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida isolates from 21 raptors were examined by DNA fingerprint profile and serotyping methods. Isolates were obtained from noncaptive birds of prey found in 11 states from November 28, 1979, through February 10, 1993. Nine isolates were from bald eagles, and the remaining isolates were from hawks, falcons, and owls. Seven isolates were members of capsule group A, and 14 were nonencapsulated. One isolate was identified as somatic type 3, and another was type 3,4,7; both had unique HhaI DNA fingerprint profiles. Nineteen isolates expressed somatic type 1 antigen; HhaI profiles of all type 1 isolates were identical to each other and to the HhaI profile of the reference somatic type 1, strain X-73. The 19 type 1 isolates were differentiated by sequential digestion of DNA with HpaII; four HpaII fingerprint profiles were obtained. The HpaII profile of one isolate was identical to the HpaII profile of strain X-73. Incidence of P. multocida somatic type 1 in raptors suggests that this type may be prevalent in other wildlife or wildlife environments.

  2. Aerosol survival of Pasteurella tularensis and the influence of relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Cox, C S; Goldberg, L J

    1972-01-01

    The aerosol survival in air was determined for Pasteurella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) as a function of relative humidity (RH). Three different preparations of bacteria were used: (i) liquid suspension of P. tularensis LVS in spent culture medium; (ii) powders of P. tularensis LVS freeze-dried in spent culture fluid; (iii) P. tularensis LVS freeze-dried in spent culture fluid and then reconstituted with distilled water and disseminated as a liquid suspension. Preparation (i) gave greatest survival at high RH and lowest survival at intermediate RH. Preparation (ii), in contrast, gave greatest survival at low RH and minimum survival at 81% RH. Preparation (iii) was the same as preparation (i), i.e., the process of freeze-drying and reconstituting with distilled water before aerosol formation had little or no effect upon aerosol survival as a function of RH. Hence, control of aerosol survival appears to be through the water content of P. tularensis LVS at the moment of aerosol generation rather than the water content of the bacteria in the aerosol phase. PMID:4551041

  3. Characterization of epitopes involved in the neutralization of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lainson, F A; Murray, J; Davies, R C; Donachie, W

    1996-09-01

    Defined segments of the leukotoxin A gene (lktA) from an A1 serotype of Pasteurella haemolytica were cloned into a plasmid vector and expressed as LacZ alpha fusion proteins. These fusion proteins were electrophoresed in SDS-PAGE gels and their immunoblotting reactivities with several monoclonal antibodies characterized. The epitope recognized by a strongly neutralizing monoclonal antibody was localized to a 32 amino acid region near the C terminus of the leukotoxin A (LktA) molecule. The epitope recognized by a non-neutralizing antibody was localized to a 33 amino acid region immediately adjacent. Smaller recombinant peptides containing these epitopes were not antigenic, but a polypeptide encompassing 229 amino acids at the C terminus evoked neutralizing antibodies when used to immunize specific-pathogen-free lambs. The distributions of linear epitopes recognized by this antiserum and by antisera raised to full-length recombinant LktA and to native LktA produced by P. haemolytica serotype A1 were determined by their reactivities with a set of overlapping 10 amino acid synthetic peptides. This revealed a complex distribution of linear epitopes at the C-terminal end of LktA. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies in convalescent sheep serum were shown to be directed against conformational epitopes by selective absorption of antibodies directed against linear epitopes. PMID:8828217

  4. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satparkash; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Sandey, Maninder; Ranjan, Rajeev; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS), an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA) has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS. PMID:24031690

  5. Cloning and expression of two Pasteurella multocida genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Manoha, F; Chevalier, G; Wróblewski, H; Delamarche, C

    1994-01-01

    A library of cloned Pasteurella multocida (toxigenic strain 9222, serotype D2) genomic sequences was constructed in Escherichia coli by incorporating TaqI digestion fragments into the plasmid vector pUC19. Immunological screening with antibodies directed against porin H, the major protein of the P multocida outer membrane, allowed the identification of a recombinant plasmid containing a 2.9-kbp DNA insert. This plasmid encoded the synthesis of two polypeptides, p25 (25 kDa) and p28 (28 kDa) which were detected in the different compartments of the E coli transformant. The peptide p25 was more abundant in the periplasm whereas p28 was mainly found in the cell envelope and in the cytosol. Immunological analysis indicates that p25, in contrast to p28, is antigenically related to porin H of P multocida. The expression in E coli of the gene encoding p28 was enhanced by induction of the lac promoter. PMID:8031908

  6. Characterization of Pasteurella multocida isolates from wetland ecosystems during 1996 to 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.; Goldberg, D.R.; Wilson, M.A.; Joly, D.O.; Lehr, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We cultured 126 Pasteurella multocida isolates, 92 from water and 34 from sediment samples collected from wetlands in the Pacific and Central flyways of the United States between 1996 and 1999. Most (121) of the isolates were P. multocida serotype 1, but serotypes 3, 3/4, 10, and 11 were also found. Many (82) of the isolates were further characterized by DNA fingerprinting procedures and tested in Pekin ducks for virulence. Almost all the serotype 1 isolates we tested caused mortality in Pekin ducks. Serotype 1 isolates varied in virulence, but the most consistent pattern was higher mortality in male ducks than in females. We found no evidence that isolates found in sediment vs. water, between Pacific and Central flyways, or during El Nino years had consistently different virulence. We also found a number of non-serotype 1 isolates that were avirulent in Pekin ducks. Isolates had DNA fingerprint profiles similar to those found in birds that died during avian cholera outbreaks.

  7. Field study of pneumonia in vaccinated cattle associated with incorrect vaccination and Pasteurella multocida infection.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, W M; Caldow, G L

    2015-04-25

    This field study used data on the vaccine courses against bovine respiratory disease sold by one pharmaceutical company in conjunction with pharmacovigilance data to explore reported suspected lack of expected efficacy and the reasons for this. The study ran from May 1, 2007, to April 30, 2010, and covered vaccines sold in Scotland and part of Northumberland. In total, 83 groups of cattle reported suspected lack of expected efficacy, representing 1.6 per cent of the 804,618 vaccine courses sold. It was possible to investigate 45 of these outbreaks in depth using a standard questionnaire and diagnostic protocol. Vaccine usage outwith the specific product characteristics (SPC) occurred in 47 per cent of cases (21/45). The proportion of vaccination courses used where a pathogen contained in the vaccine was detected in the diseased cattle and vaccine use was consistent with the SPC was estimated at 0.12 per cent of the courses sold. Pasteurella multocida was the most common pathogen detected and was found in 21 of the outbreaks. For outbreaks where a pathogen contained in the vaccine was detected, P. multocida was found at a significantly greater frequency (P=0.03) where vaccine use was compliant with the SPC (five of six outbreaks) compared with outbreaks where vaccine use had not been compliant with the SPC (one of seven outbreaks). The limitations of the study, including the diagnostic tests employed and definition of vaccination outwith the SPC, are discussed. PMID:25724544

  8. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype; msr(E), which encodes a macrolide efflux pump; and mph(E), which encodes a macrolide-inactivating phosphotransferase. Here, we describe a multiplex PCR assay that detects the presence of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) and differentiates between these genes. In addition, the assay distinguishes P. multocida from M. haemolytica by amplifying distinctive fragments of the 23S rRNA (rrl) genes. One rrl fragment acts as a general indicator of gammaproteobacterial species and confirms whether the PCR assay has functioned as intended on strains that are negative for erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E). The multiplex system has been tested on more than 40 selected isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica and correlated with MICs for the veterinary macrolides tulathromycin and tilmicosin, and the newer compounds gamithromycin and tildipirosin. The multiplex PCR system gives a rapid and robustly accurate determination of macrolide resistance genotypes and bacterial genus, matching results from microbiological methods and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:22564832

  9. A 5-year retrospective report of Gallibacterium anatis and Pasteurella multocida isolates from chickens in Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Jones, K H; Thornton, J K; Zhang, Y; Mauel, M J

    2013-12-01

    A 5-yr retrospective study (November 2006-December 2011) was conducted to determine the isolation frequency of Pasteurella multocida and Gallibacterium anatis and their antibiograms from chickens submitted to the Mississippi Poultry Research and Diagnostic Laboratory. The number of isolations of G. anatis increased over the last 5 yr in broiler and broiler breeder type chickens. For P. multocida, the number of isolations increased from 2006 to 2010, but decreased through 2011 with all isolations being from boiler breeder type chickens. Gallibacterium anatis demonstrated almost complete resistance to novobiocin, tylosin, lincosamide, and tetracycline antimicrobials with moderate to high sensitivity to sulfonamides, fluoroquinolones, and florfenicol. There was intermediate sensitivity for spectinomycin and erythromycin and variable resistance to β-lactam and aminoglycoside antimicrobials. In sharp contrast, P. multocida showed moderate to high sensitivity to β-lactam, novobiocin, and tetracycline antimicrobials, but had antibiograms similar to G. anatis for the other antimicrobials. Sensitivities were determined using minimum inhibitory concentration. This study examines the trends over a 5-yr period of the number of isolates of P. multocida and G. anatis and their sensitivities. These 2 pathogens produce very similar clinical signs and lesions (fowl cholera-like) in breeders despite having extremely antagonistic sensitivity patterns. This study shows the necessity for producers to attempt culture and sensitivity in suspect fowl cholera-like flocks before initiating antimicrobial treatment commonly used with P. multocida for fear that the culprit may actually be the more antimicrobial-resistant G. anatis. PMID:24235226

  10. A hexadecylamide derivative of hyaluronan (HYMOVIS®) has superior beneficial effects on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and synoviocytes than unmodified hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-articular hyaluronan (HA) injection provides symptomatic benefit in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Previously we found superior beneficial effects in a large animal OA model of a hexadecylamide derivative compared with unmodified HA of the same initial molecular weight. The current study sought to define possible molecular mechanisms whereby this enhanced relief of symptoms was occurring. Methods Chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts were isolated from tissues of patients undergoing arthroplasty for knee OA. Monolayer cultures of cells were treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/mL of unmodified HA (500–730 kDa) or a hexadecylamide derivative of HA of the same initial molecular weight (HYADD4®-G; HYMOVIS®) simultaneously or 1 hour before incubation with interleukin (IL)-1beta (2 ng/mL). Cultures were terminated 15 or 30 minutes later (chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts, respectively) for quantitation of phosphorylated-(p)-JNK, p-NFkappaB, p-p38, or at 24 hours for quantitation of gene expression (MMP1 &13, ADAMTS4 &5, TIMP1 &3, CD44, COL1A1 &2A1, ACAN, PTGS2, IL6, TNF) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 activity. Results The hexadecylamide derivative of HA had significantly better amelioration of IL-1beta-induced gene expression of key matrix degrading enzymes (MMP1, MMP13, ADAMTS5), and inflammatory mediators (IL6, PTGS2) by human OA chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Pre-incubation of cells with the derivatized HA for 1 hour prior to IL-1beta exposure significantly augmented the inhibition of MMP1, MMP13, ADAMTS4 and IL6 expression by chondrocytes. The reduction in MMP13 mRNA by the amide derivative of HA was mirrored in reduced MMP-13 protein and enzyme activity in IL-1beta-stimulated chondrocytes. This was associated in part with a greater inhibition of phosphorylation of the cell signalling molecules JNK, p38 and NF-kappaB. Conclusions The present studies have demonstrated several potential key mechanisms whereby the

  11. Characterization of polyelectrolyte behavior of the polysaccharides chitosan, heparin, and hyaluronan, by light scattering and viscometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddohi, Soheil; Yonemura, Susan; Kipper, Matt

    2008-03-01

    This study on the polyelectrolyte behavior of polysaccharides in solution is motivated by our recent work in development of nanostructured polysaccharide-based surface coatings. Chitosan behaves as a weak polycation, and hyaluronan behaves as a weak polyanion, while heparin behaves as a strong polyanion. The ability to control the conformation of these polysaccharides in solution, by changing the solution ionic strength and pH may offer the opportunity to further tune the nanoscale features of polysaccharide-based surface coatings assembled from solution. In the work reported here, the solution conformation of these polymers is determined from gel permeation chromatography coupled to differential refractive index, light scattering, and viscometry detection. These results are related to the nanostructure of chitosan-heparin and chitosan-hyaluronan surface coatings based on polyelectrolyte multilayers.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide generation by the Weissberger biogenic oxidative system during hyaluronan degradation.

    PubMed

    Valachová, Katarina; Topoľská, Dominika; Mendichi, Raniero; Collins, Maurice N; Sasinková, Vlasta; Šoltés, Ladislav

    2016-09-01

    By applying the enzyme catalase, our study on hyaluronan degradation confirms the generation of hydrogen peroxide using the Weissberger biogenic oxidative system (WBOS), which is composed of ascorbate and cupric ions. Dynamic viscosities of hyaluronan (HA) solutions influenced by WBOS in the absence and presence of catalase were analysed by rotational viscometry. Molar masses of HAs were determined by size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser-light scattering. Our results show that catalase dose-dependently inhibited the degradation of HA macromolecules, which presumably confirms the generation of H2O2 in the reaction system. This has implications in range of biomedical applications such as arthritic joint treatment, tissue engineering, ocular and cosmetic surgery. PMID:27185130

  13. Gelatin/chitosan/hyaluronan scaffold integrated with PLGA microspheres for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huaping; Wu, Jindan; Lao, Lihong; Gao, Changyou

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycotide) (PLGA) microspheres integrated into gelatin/chitosan/hyaluronan scaffolds were fabricated by freeze-drying and crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl)carbodiimide. The effects of the microspheres on porosity, density, compressive modulus, phosphate-buffered saline uptake ratio and weight loss of the scaffolds were evaluated. Generally, a scaffold with a higher PLGA content had a lower porosity and weight loss, and a medium uptake ratio, but a larger apparent density and compressive modulus. When the PLGA content was lower than 50%, the PLGA-integrated scaffolds had a similar pore size (approximately 200microm) as that of the control, and as much as 90% of their porosity could be preserved. In vitro chondrocyte culture in the 50% PLGA-integrated scaffold demonstrated that the cells could proliferate and secrete extracellular matrix at the same level as in the control gelatin/chitosan/hyaluronan scaffold. PMID:18723417

  14. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  15. An occurrence of equine transport pneumonia caused by mixed infection with Pasteurella caballi, Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Y; Komae, H; Ide, H; Nakagawa, H; Yoshida, Y; Kamada, M; Kataoka, Y; Nakazawa, M

    1993-06-01

    An acute death occurred in a racehorse with pneumonia after long-distance transportation in December, 1990. Pasteurella caballi, Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus zooepidemicus were isolated from the lung at high rate. Specific antigens of these bacteria were also demonstrated immunohistologically in the pneumonic lesion. These findings indicated that the disease is equine transport pneumonia caused by a mixed infection of the three bacterial species. This is the first report on the isolation of P. caballi and S. suis from a racehorse in Japan. PMID:8357920

  16. Lack of in vitro efficacy of oral forms of certain cephalosporins, erythromycin, and oxacillin against Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Richwald, G A

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of human isolates of Pasteurella multocida to oral antimicrobial agents from our current study and from a review of the literature suggests that dicloxacillin (oxacillin), erythromycin, clindamycin, cephalexin, cefaclor, and cefadroxil should not be used for empiric therapy of animal bite wounds. Agents that were consistently active against P. multocida were penicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, tetracycline, minocycline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and cefuroxime. Possible reasons for the confusion regarding the activity of oral cephalosporins are addressed. PMID:3364944

  17. X-ray ablation of hyaluronan hydrogels: Fabrication of three-dimensional microchannel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, B. M.; Chang, S.; Yeom, J.; Hahn, S. K.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.; Margaritondo, G.

    2009-09-01

    We present a simple and highly versatile protocol for polymer ablation: hard x-ray irradiation makes it possible to rapidly depolymerize hyaluronan hydrogels and fabricate three-dimensional network of microchannels. Photodynamic and photochemical analyses show that x-ray irradiation directly cleaves the polymer backbone and the total dose controls the degradation kinetics. This nonthermal ablation protocol may offer opportunities for processing organic polymers and biological materials.

  18. Freeze-dried eudragit-hyaluronan multicompartment liposomes to improve the intestinal bioavailability of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Catalan-Latorre, Ana; Ravaghi, Maryam; Manca, Maria Letizia; Caddeo, Carla; Marongiu, Francesca; Ennas, Guido; Escribano-Ferrer, Elvira; Peris, José Esteban; Diez-Sales, Octavio; Fadda, Anna Maria; Manconi, Maria

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed at finding an innovative vesicle-type formulation able to improve the bioavailability of curcumin upon oral administration. To this purpose, phospholipid, Eudragit® S100 and hyaluronan sodium salt were combined to obtain eudragit-hyaluronan immobilized vesicles using an easy and environmentally-friendly method. For the first time, the two polymers were combined in a system intended for oral delivery, to enhance curcumin stability when facing the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Four different formulations were prepared, keeping constant the amount of the phospholipid and varying the eudragit-hyaluronan ratio. The freeze-drying of the samples, performed to increase their stability, led to a reduction of vesicle size and a good homogeneity of the systems, after simple rehydration with water. X-ray diffraction study demonstrated that after the freeze-drying process, curcumin remained successfully incorporated within the vesicles. All the vesicles displayed similar features: size ranging from 220 to 287nm, spherical or oval shape, multilamellar or large unilamellar morphology with a peculiar multicompartment organization involving 1-4 smaller vesicles inside. In vitro studies demonstrated the ability of the combined polymers to protect the vesicles from the harsh conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract (i.e., ionic strength and pH variation), which was confirmed in vivo by the greater deposition of curcumin in the intestinal region, as compared to the free drug in dispersion. This enhanced accumulation of curcumin provided by the eudragit-hyaluronan immobilized vesicles, together with an increase in Caco-2 cell viability exposed to hydrogen peroxide, indicated that vesicles can ensure a local protection against oxidative stress and an increase in its intestinal absorption. PMID:27349806

  19. Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro by inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Soo A; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (LAs) is a common procedure for therapeutic purposes. However, LAs have been found toxic to articular cartilage, and hyaluronan may attenuate this toxicity. In this study we investigated whether hyaluronan attenuated lidocaine-induced chondrotoxicity, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and newly isolated murine chondrocytes were incubated in culture medium containing hyaluronan and/or lidocaine for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected with DAPI staining, caspase 3/7 activity assay and flow cytometry. Cell cycle distributions, ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of p53 and p53-regulated gene products was measured with Western blotting. Results: Lidocaine (0.005%−0.03%) dose-dependently decreased the viability of SW1353 cells. This local anesthetic (0.015%, 0.025%) induced apoptosis, G2/M phase arrest and loss of ΔΨm, and markedly increased ROS production in SW1353 cells. Hyaluronan (50−800 μg/mL) alone did not affect the cell viability, but co-treatment with hyaluronan (200 μg/mL) significantly attenuated lidocaine-induced apoptosis and other abnormalities in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with lidocaine and hyaluronan significantly decreased the levels of p53 and its transcription targets Bax and p21 in SW1353 cells, although treatment with lidocaine alone did not significantly change these proteins. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured murine chondrocytes. Conclusion: Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro through inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27041463

  20. Mycocerosic acid synthase exemplifies the architecture of reducing polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Dominik A; Jakob, Roman P; Zähringer, Franziska; Maier, Timm

    2016-03-24

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are biosynthetic factories that produce natural products with important biological and pharmacological activities. Their exceptional product diversity is encoded in a modular architecture. Modular PKSs (modPKSs) catalyse reactions colinear to the order of modules in an assembly line, whereas iterative PKSs (iPKSs) use a single module iteratively as exemplified by fungal iPKSs (fiPKSs). However, in some cases non-colinear iterative action is also observed for modPKSs modules and is controlled by the assembly line environment. PKSs feature a structural and functional separation into a condensing and a modifying region as observed for fatty acid synthases. Despite the outstanding relevance of PKSs, the detailed organization of PKSs with complete fully reducing modifying regions remains elusive. Here we report a hybrid crystal structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis mycocerosic acid synthase based on structures of its condensing and modifying regions. Mycocerosic acid synthase is a fully reducing iPKS, closely related to modPKSs, and the prototype of mycobacterial mycocerosic acid synthase-like PKSs. It is involved in the biosynthesis of C20-C28 branched-chain fatty acids, which are important virulence factors of mycobacteria. Our structural data reveal a dimeric linker-based organization of the modifying region and visualize dynamics and conformational coupling in PKSs. On the basis of comparative small-angle X-ray scattering, the observed modifying region architecture may be common also in modPKSs. The linker-based organization provides a rationale for the characteristic variability of PKS modules as a main contributor to product diversity. The comprehensive architectural model enables functional dissection and re-engineering of PKSs. PMID:26976449

  1. Hyalograft C: hyaluronan-based scaffolds in tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tognana, Enrico; Borrione, Anna; De Luca, Claudio; Pavesio, Alessandra

    2007-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor reparative capability and, if left untreated, may progress to osteo-arthritis. Unsatisfactory results with conventional treatment methods have prompted the development of innovative solutions including the use of cell transplantations, with or without a supporting scaffold. Tissue engineering combines cells, scaffolds and bio-active factors, which represents one of the most promising approaches for the restoration of damaged tissues. Available today, hyaluronan, also known as hyaluronic acid, is a natural glycosaminoglycan present in all soft tissues of higher organisms and in particularly high concentrations in the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage and in the mesenchyme during embryonic development in which it plays a number of biological functions, not only as a structural component but as an informational molecule as well. Moreover, hyaluronan can be manufactured in a variety of physical forms including hydrogels, sponges, fibres and fabrics allowing to develop a variety of hyaluronan-based scaffolds. This review will present both theoretical and experimental evidences that led to the development of Hyalograft C, an exploitation of hyaluronic acid technology and a tissue engineering approach for the resolution of articular cartilage defects. PMID:17489021

  2. Bimodal Tumor-Targeting from Microenvironment Responsive Hyaluronan Layer-by-Layer (LbL) Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Active targeting of nanoscale drug carriers can improve tumor-specific delivery; however, cellular heterogeneity both within and among tumor sites is a fundamental barrier to their success. Here, we describe a tumor microenvironment-responsive layer-by-layer (LbL) polymer drug carrier that actively targets tumors based on two independent mechanisms: pH-dependent cellular uptake at hypoxic tumor pH and hyaluronan-directed targeting of cell-surface CD44 receptor, a well-characterized biomarker for breast and ovarian cancer stem cells. Hypoxic pH-induced structural reorganization of hyaluronan-LbL nanoparticles was a direct result of the nature of the LbL electrostatic complex, and led to targeted cellular delivery in vitro and in vivo, with effective tumor penetration and uptake. The nanoscale drug carriers selectively bound CD44 and diminished cancer cell migration in vitro, while co-localizing with the CD44 receptor in vivo. Multimodal targeting of LbL nanoparticles is a powerful strategy for tumor-specific cancer diagnostics and therapy that can be accomplished using a single bilayer of polyamine and hyaluronan that, when assembled, produce a dynamic and responsive cell–particle interface. PMID:25100313

  3. Characterisation of separated end hyaluronan oligosaccharides from leech hyaluronidase and evaluation of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mengxian; Wang, Miao; Cai, Weiwei; Hao, Wenxing; Yuan, Panhong; Kang, Zhen

    2016-05-20

    Hyaluronan oligosaccharides (o-HAs), especially saturated o-HAs, have attracted intensive attention due to their potential applications in medical treatments. In this study, the hydrolysis process of leech hyaluronidase (LHase) towards the hyaluronan was investigated by HPLC and HPLC/ESI-MS. The proportions of hyaluronan tetrasaccharide (HA4) with hexasaccharide (HA6), end products, were illustrated to have a relationship with the amount of LHase. Higher yield of HA4 was achieved with higher activity of LHase. After optimisation of the packing resin and operation parameters (balanced pH, elution concentration, elution volume and elution flow rate), the highly pure HA4 and HA6 were efficiently separated and prepared by combining ion exchange Q-Sepharose Fast Flow and size exclusion column chromatography. Compared with o-HAs (average Mr of 4000 Da), HA4 and HA6 were demonstrated to show higher activity for promoting angiogenesis, which was similar with the corresponding HA4 and HA6 produced by bovine testicular hyaluronidase. The pure HA4 and HA6 that prepared from LHase will attract intensive studies and be used in potential applications in near future. PMID:26917404

  4. Basic FGF and PDGF-BB synergistically stimulate hyaluronan and IL-6 production by orbital fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Virakul, Sita; Heutz, Judith W; Dalm, Virgil A S H; Peeters, Robin P; Paridaens, Dion; van den Bosch, Willem A; Hirankarn, Nattiya; van Hagen, P Martin; Dik, Willem A

    2016-09-15

    Orbital fibroblast activation is a central pathologic feature of Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been proposed to contribute to GO, but their effects on orbital fibroblasts are largely unknown. We found that bFGF stimulated proliferation and hyaluronan production, but not IL-6 production by orbital fibroblasts, while VEGF hardly affected orbital fibroblast activity. Remarkably, co-stimulation of orbital fibroblasts with bFGF and PDGF-BB synergistically enhanced IL-6 and hyaluronan production and displayed an additive effect on proliferation compared to either bFGF or PDGF-BB stimulation. Nintedanib, a FGF- and PDGF-receptor targeting drug, more efficiently blocked bFGF + PDGF-BB-induced IL-6 and hyaluronan production than dasatinib that only targets PDGF-receptor. In conclusion, bFGF may contribute to orbital inflammation and tissue remodeling in GO, especially through synergistic interaction with PDGF-BB. Multi-target therapy directed at the bFGF and PDGF pathways may potentially be of interest for the treatment of GO. PMID:27267669

  5. Free radical depolymerization of hyaluronan by Maillard reaction products: role in liquefaction of aging vitreous.

    PubMed

    Deguine, V; Menasche, M; Ferrari, P; Fraisse, L; Pouliquen, Y; Robert, L

    1998-02-01

    The degradation of hyaluronan was followed by viscosimetry and by HPLC in order to study the possible role of Maillard products (lysine-glucose) on the alteration of the vitreous gel in aging and diabetes. Lysine-glucose generated Maillard products produced a decrease of viscosity and of the number average molecular weight (Mn) of hyaluronan during a 1 h incubation at 37 degrees C. This effect was comparable to that produced by 1 U/ml of testicular hyaluronidase but was weaker than the effect of a Fenton-type reagent (Udenfriend's reagent). The polydispersity of hyaluronan incubated with Maillard products appeared higher than with hyaluronidase suggesting a more random reaction. Antioxydant enzymes (SOD, catalase), the iron chelators (desferrioxamine, transferrin) and the free radical scavengers (uric acid, carnosine) inhibited the degradation by Maillard products confirming its free radical nature and the intervention of trace metals. Maillard products have been detected in diabetic vitreous and may play a role in its accelerated modifications (liquefaction) in diabetes as compared to normal aging. PMID:9513812

  6. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  7. Purification of dermonecrotic toxin from a sonic extract of Pasteurella multocida SP-72 serotype D.

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, T; Sawata, A; Tsuji, M; Samejima, Y; Kume, K

    1984-01-01

    A procedure was developed to purify dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) from a sonic extract of a serotype D strain of Pasteurella multocida. Sonic extract containing DNT was applied to a DEAE-Sephacel column and eluted by a linear gradient of NaCl. Upon rechromatographing, fractions with dermonecrotic activity for guinea pigs were applied on a second Sephacel column, and a pooled fraction with the toxic activity was filtered through a Sephadex G-200 column. Pooled fractions with the toxic activity were subjected to polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and the toxic substance was eluted from each sliced gel. Eluted fractions with the toxic activity were rechromatographed on a second Sephadex G-200 column, and a pooled fraction with high dermonecrotic activity was referred to as a purified DNT. The activity of purified DNT was increased by 1,000 times, and the average yield was about 1.8%. The purified DNT was homogeneous as determined by Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and thin-layer isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gels and gave a single band on PAGE and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The molecular weight of the toxin was ca. 160,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The isoelectric point of the toxin was ca. 4.7 to 4.8. Amino acid analysis of the purified DNT revealed that the toxin was composed of characteristically high proportions of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine, proline, alanine, and leucine. The minimal necrotizing dose of the toxin was about 1 ng of protein, and the 50% lethal dose per mouse was 0.2 micrograms. The purified DNT was heat labile and sensitive to inactivation by trypsin, Formalin, and glutaraldehyde. Images PMID:6542070

  8. Inhibition of growth and alteration of host cell interactions of Pasteurella multocida with natural byproducts.

    PubMed

    Salaheen, S; Almario, J A; Biswas, D

    2014-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a leading cause of fowl cholera in both free-range pasture and conventional/commercially raised poultry. Its infection is a serious threat to poultry health and overall flock viability. Organic poultry is comparatively more vulnerable to this pathogen. It is a significant cause of production loss and price increase of poultry products, specifically organic poultry products. Some plant products are well documented as sources of natural antimicrobials such as polyphenols found in different berry pomaces and citrus oil. Pomace, a byproduct (primarily of seeds and skins) of fruits used for juice and wine production, and citrus oil, the byproduct of citrus juice production, show promising antimicrobial activity against various pathogens. Here, we showed for the first time that blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts and citrus oil inhibited P. multocida growth. Minimum bactericidal concentrations were determined as 0.3 and 0.4 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent for blackberry and blueberry pomace extracts, respectively. Similarly, only 0.05% citrus oil (vol/vol) completely inhibited P. multocida growth. Under shaking conditions, the antimicrobial activity of both pomace extracts and citrus oil was more intensive. Even citrus oil vapor also significantly reduced the growth of P. multocida. In addition, cell surface hydrophobicity of P. multocida was increased by 2- to 3-fold and its adherence to chicken fibroblast (DF1) and bovine mammary gland (MacT) cells was reduced significantly in the presence of pomace extracts only. This study indicates that these natural products might be good alternatives to conventional antimicrobial agents, and hence, may be used as feed or water supplements to control fowl cholera and reduce production loss caused by P. multocida. PMID:24879687

  9. The Capsule Is a Virulence Determinant in the Pathogenesis of Pasteurella multocida M1404 (B:2)

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, John D.; Adler, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Capsules from a range of pathogenic bacteria are key virulence determinants, and the capsule has been implicated in virulence in Pasteurella multocida. We have previously identified and determined the nucleotide sequence of the P. multocida M1404 (B:2) capsule biosynthetic locus (J. D. Boyce, J. Y. Chung, and B. Adler, Vet. Microbiol. 72:121–134, 2000). The cap locus consists of 15 genes, which can be grouped into three functional regions. Regions 1 and 3 contain genes proposed to encode proteins involved in capsule export, and region 2 contains genes proposed to encode proteins involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. In order to construct a mutant impaired in capsule export, the final gene of region 1, cexA, was disrupted by insertion of a tetracycline resistance cassette by allelic replacement. The genotype of the tet(M) ΩcexA mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization and PCR. The acapsular phenotype was confirmed by immunofluorescence, and the strain could be complemented and returned to capsule production by the presence of a cloned uninterrupted copy of cexA. Wild-type, mutant, and complemented strains were tested for virulence by intraperitoneal challenge of mice; the presence of the capsule was shown to be a crucial virulence determinant. Following intraperitoneal challenge of mice, the acapsular bacteria were removed efficiently from the blood, spleen, and liver, while wild-type bacteria multiplied rapidly. Acapsular bacteria were readily taken up by murine peritoneal macrophages, but wild-type bacteria were significantly resistant to phagocytosis. Both wild-type and acapsular bacteria were resistant to complement in bovine and murine serum. PMID:10816499

  10. Specificity of bovine serum antibody to capsular carbohydrate antigens from Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, D S; Loan, R W; Purdy, C W; Shuman, W J

    1990-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the bovine immune response to antigens of Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A, serotype 1, will improve control of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Sera were obtained from blood samples of calves as they transited the market system of eastern Tennessee and were transported to a feedlot in Texas. The clinical histories and performance data were recorded and compared with serologic findings. The calves underwent a natural challenge of BRD. Serologic and bacteriologic evaluation indicated that P. haemolytica A1 was a significant component of the challenge. Serum antibody titers against P. haemolytica A1 capsular antigens (in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hemolysin-in-gel test) increased by day 15 and continued at high levels through day 56. The animals that remained free of BRD had higher initial serum antibody concentrations than those that succumbed to BRD. The specificity of the immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) anticapsular antibody to P. haemolytica A1 increased from day 8 to day 29 as evidenced by a decrease in P. haemolytica A2 absorption inhibition from 60% (day 8) to 15% (day 29). However, IgA, IgG2, and IgM were more serotype specific on both days 8 and 29. There were no significant changes in anti-P. haemolytica A2 antibody titers. Both in vitro complement-dependent bacteriolysis and C3 deposition on the surface of the bacteria increased significantly (P less than 0.01) in a serotype-specific fashion from day 8 to day 29. These calves showed a humoral immune response to capsular polysaccharide antigens of P. haemolytica A1. Such a response may be an important component of immunity to BRD. PMID:2199487

  11. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Smith, Susan R.; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 × 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  12. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Miyamoto, A.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 ?? 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  13. Florfenicol As a Modulator Enhancing Antimicrobial Activity: Example Using Combination with Thiamphenicol against Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chia-Fong; Shien, Jui-Hung; Chang, Shao-Kuang; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Synergistic effects between the same class of antibiotics are rarely reported. Our previous study found synergistic-like interaction between florfenicol (FFC) and thiamphenicol (TAP) against Staphylococcus aureus. Here, the enhanced antimicrobial activity was evaluated in 97 clinical isolates of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Susceptible strains were initially identified by checkerboard microdilution assay (fractional inhibitory concentration index [FICI] ≤ 0.625), followed by confirmation of synergism using the time-kill methodology (≥2 log10 CFU/ml reduction). In all, 43% of Pasteurella multocida tested were susceptible to the enhanced bactericidal effect. In chicken fowl cholera models, FFC and TAP combination at much lower dosage that is correspondent to their MIC deduction provided maximum protection in vivo. Furthermore, synergistic combination of FFC with oxytetracycline (OTC) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro was also demonstrated. Based on the enhanced uptake of TAP and OTC, FFC presumably elicits enhanced antimicrobial activity in an orderly manner through alteration of bacterial membrane permeability or efflux systems and subsequent increase of intracellular concentration of the antibiotics used in combination. Results of ethidium bromide accumulation assay and RNA-seq showed little evidence for the involvement of efflux pumps in the synergy but further investigation is required. This study suggests the potentiality of a novel combination regimen involving FFC as an initiating modulator effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria depending on the antibiotics that are combined. The observed improvement of bacteriostatic effect to bactericidal, and the extended effectiveness against FFC-resistant bacterial strains warrant further studies. PMID:27065961

  14. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  15. Alterations in bovine platelet function and acute phase proteins induced by Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheryk, L A; Hooper-McGrevy, K E; Gentry, P A

    1998-01-01

    Platelet function was assessed by aggregometry in 10 Holstein calves before and after exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) by intrabronchial challenge. At 24 h after exposure the platelets had become more reactive to stimulation with known platelet agonists such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) and the platelet aggregates that formed were more resistant to disaggregation. The activation of platelets was an early response in the challenged calves as platelet function had returned to pretreatment levels 72 h after exposure to the bacteria while the acute phase reactant proteins, haptoglobin and fibrinogen, were approaching their peak values and alpha 2-macroglobulin levels had also risen significantly (P < 0.05) at this time. The plasma levels of these proteins were still elevated and albumin levels were depressed 6 d post-treatment. At post-mortem all calves exhibited pneumonic tissue damage. When P. haemolytica leukotoxin was added directly to bovine platelet suspensions both spontaneous aggregation and an increase in the aggregation response to ADP and PAF stimulation were observed. The morphological appearance of the platelet aggregates exhibited the typical pattern for bovine platelets with 2 distinct zones of cells being visible within each aggregate. One zone contained platelets in which the cytoplasmic granules were still evident and the other zone contained irregularly shaped platelets devoid of granular content. In the latter zone, discrete gaps, or pores, were evident in the plasma membrane of numerous platelets. This pore formation is characteristic of leukotoxin action and is not observed in ADP or PAF induced aggregates. Images Figure 2. PMID:9442932

  16. Induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine alveolar macrophages following stimulation with Pasteurella haemolytica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, H S; Maheswaran, S K; Lin, G; Townsend, E L; Ames, T R

    1995-01-01

    Bovine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) cDNAs were generated by reverse transcription and then by PCR amplification from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated alveolar macrophage RNA. The amplified cDNAs were cloned into pPow and expressed in Escherichia coli DH5 alpha. The expressed proteins were confirmed as TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and bioassays. We then used the cloned genes as probes in Northern (RNA) blots and investigated the kinetics of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression in bovine alveolar macrophages stimulated with purified LPS from Pasteurella haemolytica 12296. The effect of LPS on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression was dose dependent, and induction was observed at a concentration of 0.01 microgram/ml. Both TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA expression were detectable within 0.5 h after stimulation with 1 microgram of LPS per ml, peaked at 1 to 2 h, steadily declined up to 16 h, and were undetectable by 24 h. Secreted TNF-alpha measured by bioassay peaked at 4 h and accumulated at a lesser concentration in conditioned medium throughout the 24 h. By contrast, secreted IL-1 beta was induced at 8 h and reached a maximal concentration at 24 h after stimulation. The ability of LPS to induce TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta gene expression and secretion of bioactive proteins were suppressed by polymyxin B. Our findings support a role for LPS from P. haemolytica in the induction of inflammatory cytokines in bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis. PMID:7822000

  17. Combinations of Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Field Isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida▿

    PubMed Central

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product of the erm(42) gene. The second class shows no lincosamide resistance and lacks erm(42) and concomitant 23S rRNA methylation. Sequencing of the genome of a representative strain from this class, P. multocida 3361, revealed macrolide efflux and phosphotransferase genes [respectively termed msr(E) and mph(E)] that are arranged in tandem and presumably expressed from the same promoter. The third class exhibits the most marked drug phenotype, with high resistance to all of the macrolides tested, and possesses all three resistance determinants. The combinations of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) are chromosomally encoded and intermingled with other exogenous genes, many of which appear to have been transferred from other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The presence of some of the exogenous genes explains recent reports of resistance to additional drug classes. We have expressed recombinant versions of the erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) genes within an isogenic Escherichia coli background to assess their individually contributions to resistance. Our findings indicate what types of compounds might have driven the selection for these resistance determinants. PMID:21709086

  18. High Sensitivity Method to Estimate Distribution of Hyaluronan Molecular Sizes in Small Biological Samples Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Do, Lan; Dahl, Christen P.; Kerje, Susanne; Hansell, Peter; Mörner, Stellan; Lindqvist, Ulla; Engström-Laurent, Anna; Larsson, Göran; Hellman, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a negatively charged polydisperse polysaccharide where both its size and tissue concentration play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. The various functions of hyaluronan depend on its molecular size. Up to now, it has been difficult to study the role of hyaluronan in diseases with pathological changes in the extracellular matrix where availability is low or tissue samples are small. Difficulty to obtain large enough biopsies from human diseased tissue or tissue from animal models has also restricted the study of hyaluronan. In this paper, we demonstrate that gas-phase electrophoretic molecular mobility analyzer (GEMMA) can be used to estimate the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes in biological samples with a limited amount of hyaluronan. The low detection level of the GEMMA method allows for estimation of hyaluronan molecular sizes from different parts of small organs. Hence, the GEMMA method opens opportunity to attain a profile over the distribution of hyaluronan molecular sizes and estimate changes caused by disease or experimental conditions that has not been possible to obtain before. PMID:26448761

  19. Collagen and hyaluronan at wound sites influence early polymicrobial biofilm adhesive events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wounds can easily become chronically infected, leading to secondary health complications, which occur more frequently in individuals with diabetes, compromised immune systems, and those that have suffered severe burns. When wounds become chronically infected, biofilm producing microbes are often isolated from these sites. The presence of a biofilm at a wound site has significant negative impact on the treatment outcomes, as biofilms are characteristically recalcitrant to removal, in part due to the formation of a protective matrix that shield residents organisms from inimical forces. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are two of the organisms most prevalently isolated from wound sites, and are of particular concern due to their elevated levels of antibiotic resistance, rapid growth, and exotoxin production. In order to understand the biofilm forming abilities of these microbes in a simulated wound environment we used a microtiter plate assay to assess the ability of these two organisms to bind to proteins that are typically found at wound sites: collagen and hyaluronan. Results Collagen and hyaluronan were used to coat the wells of 96-well plates in collagen:hyaluronan ratios of 0:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 1:0 . P. aeruginosa and MRSA were inoculated as mono- and co-cultures (1:1 and a 3:1 MRSA: P. aeruginosa). We determined that coating the wells with collagen and/or hyaluronan significantly increased the biofilm biomass of attached cells compared to an uncoated control, although no one coating formulation showed a significant increase compared to any other combination. We also noted that the fold-change increase for MRSA upon coating was greater than for P. aeruginosa. Conclusions Our study suggests that the presence of collagen and/or hyaluronan at wound sites may be an important factor that influences the attachment and subsequent biofilm formation of notorious biofilm-formers, such as MRSA and P. aeruginosa

  20. Serum haptoglobin concentration in growing swine after intranasal challenge with Bordetella bronchiseptica and toxigenic Pasteurella multocida type D.

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C J; Shryock, T R; Bane, D P; Unverzagt, L

    1996-01-01

    The acute phase reaction, in association with progressive atrophic rhinitis (AR), was monitored for 3 wk using serum haptoglobin (HPT) quantification in thirty-six, 15 kg swine after intranasal challenge with varying doses of Pasteurella multocida type D (toxigenic strain) and Bordetella bronchiseptica. The challenge doses were administered alone or in combination with pigs divided into 9 isolated treatment groups. Increasing doses of B. bronchiseptica were associated with lower serum HPT (P < 0.05), whereas increasing doses of P. multocida tended to increase serum HPT (0.05 < P < 0.10). Significant and positive correlation of mean HPT and AR score was found in these pigs; increased AR scores were associated with elevated mean HPT concentration (r = 0.41, P < 0.01). A significant interaction between P. multocida and B. bronchiseptica dose indicated that increasing the dose of B. bronchiseptica, for a fixed P. multocida dose, was associated with less AR (P < 0.05). The AR scores were greater in pigs given P. multocida, than B. bronchiseptica alone. These results indicate that a complex interaction between Pasteurella multocida and Bordetella bronchiseptica causes progressive atrophic rhinitis and alters serum HPT concentration in swine. Images Figure I. Figure II. Figure III. Figure IV. PMID:8809387

  1. Adhesion of type A Pasteurella mulocida to rabbit pharyngeal cells and its possible role in rabbit respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, J C; Jones, G W; Rush, H G; Pentler, L J; Darif, C A; Coward, J E

    1982-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida serotype A was found in association with the mucosal epithelium of the nasopharynges of rabbits with respiratory tract infections. The bacteria specifically attached to squamous epithelial cells of the pharyngeal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro and to some tissue culture cell lines such as HeLa. All strains with serotype A capsules were adhesive. With the exception of one serotype D strain, strains with capsular serotypes B, D, and E were at least 10-fold less adhesive. Bacterial adhesiveness was much reduced after pronase digestion, heat treatment, and homogenization, but removal of the hyaluronic acid capsule increased adhesion. Electron microscopy revealed that fimbriae were produced by an adhesive pasteurella strain, but not by two nonadherent strains. The attachment of the former strain to pharyngeal and HeLa cells was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Together, these findings suggest that this amino sugar may be a component of the receptor on both animal cell surfaces and that the fimbriae may be the adhesions. It is proposed that bacterial attachment has a role in colonization and infection of rabbit upper respiratory mucosae. Images PMID:7068213

  2. A rare case of neonatal sepsis/meningitis caused by Pasteurella multocida complicated with status epilepticus and focal cerebritis.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, R; Pomero, G; Delogu, A; Gozzoli, L; Gancia, P

    2011-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is normally present in respiratory and digestive tract of many domestic and wild animals, but is a rare pathogen in neonatal infection. Here we describe for the first time a case of meningitis complicated by status epilepticus and right parietal lobe cerebritis. The patient showed a dramatic clinical onset characterized by septic appearance and prolonged seizures. Multidrug anticonvulsivant therapy was used to control the status epilepticus, but despite the aggressive treatment electrical crises were still evident 24 hours after the admission. Furthermore, a brain MRI, performed to investigate a persistent intermittent fever even if CSF became sterile, showed a focus cerebritis in the right parietal lobe, early stage of the cerebral abscess. Prolonged antibiotic therapy with steroids was requested to solve the cerebritis area. Interestingly, direct contact between the patient and domestic animals was denied by the family, but the father reported a contact with a rooster, killed and cooked few days before, suggesting, as previously described, that Pasteurella may also be transmitted through asymptomatic human carrier. The patient had a favourable outcome with no medium-term sequelae one month after discharge, but the severity of the clinical course and the unpredictable way of transmission highlight the importance of hygiene measures approaching infants. PMID:22423481

  3. Evaluation of immunopathologic effects of aqueous extract of Echinacea purpurea in mice after experimental challenge with Pasteurella multocida serotype A

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, A; Gharibi, D; Ghorbanpoor, M; Anbari, S; Pourmahdi Broojeni, M

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the immunopathological effects of aqueous Echinacea purpurea extract (EPE) on mice experimentally challenged with Pasteurella multocida serotype A, forty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups. The groups included a control group (received sterile distilled water 2 times/week for 2 weeks, intraperitoneally and then 100 µl sterile saline intranasally), a PMA group (received sterile distilled water as the control group and after 2 weeks, 5.6 × 103 CFU/ml of P. multocida serotype A, intranasally), an EPE+PMA group (received E. purpurea extract intraperitoneally 2 times/week for 2 weeks and then challenged as the PMA group) and an EPE group (received E. purpurea extract as EPE+PMA group and then 100 µl sterile saline intranasally). After 24 and 48 h post challenge, half of the animals in each group were sacrificed and analyzed for bacterial counts in their lungs and livers, TNFα serum levels and histapathological changes. The results showed significant differences in lung bacterial counts between PMA and EPE+PMA groups. TNFα serum level was significantly higher in the PMA group. Histopathological examination revealed infiltration of neutrophils in alveolar septa and hyperemia in the PMA group. In addition, the criteria of bronchopneumonia were partially recovered in the EPE+PMA compared to the PMA group. According to the results, it seems that E. purpurea extract has an immunomodulatory effect and can be used to prevent or control of pneumonia caused by Pasteurella. PMID:27175135

  4. Isoprene synthase genes form a monophyletic clade of acyclic terpene synthases in the TPS-B terpene synthase family.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Gray, Dennis W; Pell, Heather K; Breneman, Steven R; Topper, Lauren

    2013-04-01

    Many plants emit significant amounts of isoprene, which is hypothesized to help leaves tolerate short episodes of high temperature. Isoprene emission is found in all major groups of land plants including mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms; however, within these groups isoprene emission is variable. The patchy distribution of isoprene emission implies an evolutionary pattern characterized by many origins or many losses. To better understand the evolution of isoprene emission, we examine the phylogenetic relationships among isoprene synthase and monoterpene synthase genes in the angiosperms. In this study we identify nine new isoprene synthases within the rosid angiosperms. We also document the capacity of a myrcene synthase in Humulus lupulus to produce isoprene. Isoprene synthases and (E)-β-ocimene synthases form a monophyletic group within the Tps-b clade of terpene synthases. No asterid genes fall within this clade. The chemistry of isoprene synthase and ocimene synthase is similar and likely affects the apparent relationships among Tps-b enzymes. The chronology of rosid evolution suggests a Cretaceous origin followed by many losses of isoprene synthase over the course of evolutionary history. The phylogenetic pattern of Tps-b genes indicates that isoprene emission from non-rosid angiosperms likely arose independently. PMID:23550753

  5. Classification of fungal chitin synthases.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, A R; Chen-Wu, J L; Momany, M; Young, R; Szaniszlo, P J; Robbins, P W

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of the chitin synthase genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHS1 and CHS2 with the Candida albicans CHS1 gene (UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine:chitin 4-beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.16) revealed two small regions of complete amino acid sequence conservation that were used to design PCR primers. Fragments homologous to chitin synthase (approximately 600 base pairs) were amplified from the genomic DNA of 14 fungal species. These fragments were sequenced, and their deduced amino acid sequences were aligned. With the exception of S. cerevisiae CHS1, the sequences fell into three distinct classes, which could represent separate functional groups. Within each class phylogenetic analysis was performed. Although not the major purpose of the investigation, this analysis tends to confirm some relationships consistent with current taxonomic groupings. Images PMID:1731323

  6. Synergistic role of gaseous ammonia in etiology of Pasteurella multocida-induced atrophic rhinitis in swine.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T D; Roe, J M; Webster, A J

    1996-01-01

    One-week-old Large White piglets were weaned and allocated to 14 experimental groups, each composed of five animals. Each group was housed in a separate Rochester exposure chamber and exposed continuously to gaseous ammonia at either 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 35, or 50 ppm (two groups per exposure level). One week after ammonia exposure commenced, the pigs from one group at each exposure level were inoculated intranasally with 9 x 10(7) CFU of Pasteurella multocida type D. After a further 4 weeks of exposure, all the pigs were euthanized and the extent of turbinate degeneration was assessed by using a morphometric index (J.T. Done, D. H. Upcott, D. C. Frewin, and C. N. Hebert, Vet. Rec. 114:33-35, 1984) and a subjective scoring system (Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Atrophic Rhinitis: a System of Snout Grading, 1978). Exposure to ammonia at a concentration of 5 ppm or greater resulted in a significant increase in the severity of turbinate atrophy induced by P. multocida compared with that occurring in pigs kept in 0 ppm of ammonia. This effect was maximal at 10 ppm but decreased progressively at concentrations above 25 ppm. Regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the severity of turbinate degeneration and the number of P. multocida organisms isolated from the nasal epithelium at the end of the experiment (R2 = 0.86). These findings suggest that exposure to ammonia facilitates the growth and/or survival of P. multocida within the upper respiratory tract of the pig, thereby contributing to the severity of the clinical disease atrophic rhinitis. Furthermore, exposure of pigs to ammonia at 10 ppm or greater, in the absence of either P. multocida or Bordetella bronchiseptica, induced a mild but statistically significant degree of turbinate atrophy. The findings of this study demonstrate that exposure to ammonia, at concentrations within the range encountered commonly in commercial piggeries, contributes to the severity of clinical lesions

  7. Invasive Pasteurella multocida Infections - Report of Five Cases at a Minnesota Hospital, 2014.

    PubMed

    Talley, P; Snippes-Vagnone, P; Smith, K

    2016-09-01

    During October 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health was notified of five Hospital A patients with Pasteurella multocida bacteraemia; three had died. Human soft tissue infection with P. multocida typically results from cat or dog bites or scratches. Invasive infection, defined as a P. multocida isolate from a usually sterile site, is rare. We evaluated P. multocida isolations at Hospital A, compared with other Minnesota hospitals to understand invasive infection trends. A case was defined as clinically confirmed P. multocida in a Minnesota resident during 2012-2014. All hospital laboratories were queried; Fisher's exact test was used for comparison. Medical charts were reviewed for 2014 Hospital A patients with P. multocida infections. The Minnesota clinical laboratories survey response rate was 79% (63/80). At Hospital A, proportion of P. multocida isolates from usually sterile sites increased from 0% (0/2) during 2012 to 11% (1/9) during 2013, and to 86% (5/6) during 2014. The proportion of patients with P. multocida isolated from sterile sites was 35% (6/17) at Hospital A compared with 10% (58/583) statewide during 2012-2014 combined (P < 0.05). Among 2014 Hospital A patients with invasive P. multocida infection, all five were men; median age was 70 (range: 44-78) years. Four were temporally clustered within a 33-day period; three of those had bacteraemia on admission, making hospital acquisition possible in only one. Among five bacteraemia patients, four had cirrhosis and/or skin ulcerations, and three died. The proportion of invasive P. multocida cases was substantially higher at Hospital A during 2014. No epidemiologic links between patients were found. Three had known pet exposure. Collaborative educational efforts of chronically ill pet owners by physicians and veterinarians can acknowledge the health benefits of pet ownership, while minimizing risk for serious invasive zoonotic infections, including those caused by P. multocida. PMID

  8. Induction of CD18-mediated passage of neutrophils by Pasteurella haemolytica in pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Brogden, K A; Florance, A F; Kehrli, M E

    1999-02-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica is an important respiratory pathogen of cattle that incites extensive infiltrates of neutrophils into the lung. In addition to the parenchymal damage caused by factors released by P. haemolytica, neutrophils contribute to the pathologic changes in the lungs. Molecules which mediate neutrophil infiltration into the lungs during P. haemolytica pneumonia are poorly characterized. To determine whether the CD18 family (beta2-integrin) of leukocyte adhesion molecules mediates initial passage of neutrophils into the pulmonary bronchi and bronchioles of lungs infected with P. haemolytica, three Holstein calves homozygous for bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) (CD18-deficient neutrophils), and three age- and breed-matched control calves (normal CD18 expression) were inoculated with P. haemolytica A1 via a fiberoptic bronchoscope and euthanized at 2 h postinoculation. Sections of lung were stained for neutrophils, and the intensity of neutrophilic infiltration was determined by computerized image analysis. Significantly fewer (P < 0.05) neutrophils infiltrated the lumen, epithelium, and adventitia of bronchioles and bronchi in lungs of calves with BLAD compared to normal calves, which had dense infiltrates within these sites at 2 h postinoculation. The reduced infiltration in calves with BLAD occurred despite the presence of an extremely large number of neutrophils in peripheral blood that is typical for these calves. The large number of neutrophils in the blood of calves with BLAD is probably a physiologic response that can occur without microbial colonization, since one calf with BLAD that was raised under germ-free conditions had large numbers of neutrophils in the blood that were similar to those in a calf with BLAD that was raised conventionally. Neutrophil counts in the germ-free and conventionally reared calves with BLAD were much higher than those in the three normal calves raised under germ-free conditions. The work in this study

  9. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 is a receptor for Pasteurella haemolytica leukotoxin in bovine leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeyaseelan, S; Hsuan, S L; Kannan, M S; Walcheck, B; Wang, J F; Kehrli, M E; Lally, E T; Sieck, G C; Maheswaran, S K

    2000-01-01

    Pasteurella (Mannheimia) haemolytica leukotoxin (Lkt) causes cell type- and species-specific effects in ruminant leukocytes. Recent studies indicate that P. haemolytica Lkt binds to bovine CD18, the common subunit of all beta2 integrins. We designed experiments with the following objectives: to identify which member of the beta2 integrins is a receptor for Lkt; to determine whether Lkt binding to the receptor is target cell (bovine leukocytes) specific; to define the relationships between Lkt binding to the receptor, calcium elevation, and cytolysis; and to determine whether a correlation exists between Lkt receptor expression and the magnitude of target cell cytolysis. We compared Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils from control calves and from calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD), because neutrophils from BLAD-homozygous calves exhibit reduced beta2 integrin expression. The results demonstrate for the first time that Lkt binds to bovine CD11a and CD18 (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1]). The binding was abolished by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (MAb). Lkt-induced calcium elevation in bovine alveolar macrophages (BAMs) was inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb (65 to 94% and 37 to 98%, respectively, at 5 and 50 Lkt units per ml; P < 0.05). Lkt-induced cytolysis in neutrophils and BAMs was also inhibited by anti-CD11a or anti-CD18 MAb in a concentration-dependent manner. Lkt bound to porcine LFA-1 but did not induce calcium elevation or cytolysis. In neutrophils from BLAD calves, Lkt-induced cytolysis was decreased by 44% compared to that of neutrophils from control calves (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LFA-1 is a Lkt receptor, Lkt binding to LFA-1 is not target cell specific, Lkt binding to bovine LFA-1 correlates with calcium elevation and cytolysis, and bovine LFA-1 expression correlates with the magnitude of Lkt-induced target cell cytolysis. PMID:10603370

  10. Purification and characterization of protein H, the major porin of Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, G; Duclohier, H; Thomas, D; Shechter, E; Wróblewski, H

    1993-01-01

    Protein H (B. Lugtenberg, R. van Boxtel, D. Evenberg, M. de Jong, P. Storm, and J. Frik, Infect. Immun. 52:175-182, 1986) is the major polypeptide of the outer membrane of Pasteurella multocida, a bacterium pathogenic for humans and animals. We have purified this protein to homogeneity by size exclusion chromatography after selective extraction with surfactants and demonstrated its pore-forming ability after reincorporation into planar lipid bilayers. In these experiments, the current through the pores was a linear function of the applied voltage in the range of -50 to +50 mV. Voltages beyond +/- 50 mV tended to partially close the channels, giving rise to apparent negative resistances. These observations suggest that protein H channels are probably not voltage regulated in vivo. With the patch clamp technique, single-channel conductance fluctuations of 0.33 nS were recorded in 1 M KCl. Electrophoretic and circular dichroism analyses showed that protein H forms homotrimers stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate at room temperature, with a high content of beta-sheet secondary structure. Upon boiling, the trimers were fully dissociated into monomers with an increase of alpha helix and irregular structure, at the expense of beta sheets. The apparent molecular mass of fully denatured monomers ranged between 37 and 41.8 kDa, depending on the electrophoretic system used for analysis. The trimeric arrangement of protein H was confirmed by image analysis of negatively stained, two-dimensional crystal arrays. This morphological study revealed, in agreement with electrophoretical data, a trimeric structure with an overall diameter of 7.7 nm. Each monomer appeared to contain a pore with an average diameter of 1 nm. Quantitative comparisons revealed that the amino acid composition (hydropathy index of -0.40) and the N-terminal sequence (determined over 36 residues) of protein H are similar to those of bacterial general porins, notably porin P2 of Haemophilus influenzae. We conclude

  11. A role for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan in kidney dysfunction during ACE-inhibitor fetopathy.

    PubMed

    Hansell, P; Palm, F

    2015-04-01

    Despite data showing that inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system increase the risks of fetal morbidity and dysfunctionality later in life, their use during pregnancy has increased. The fetopathy induced by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is characterized by anuria, hypotension and growth restriction, but can also be associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. In the kidney, this fetopathy includes atrophy of the medulla, reduced number of glomeruli, developmental lesions of tubules and vessels, tubulointerstitial inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) inhibition during nephrogenesis interferes with normal growth and development, this review will focus on effects of the heavily accumulated matrix component hyaluronan (HA). An important mechanism of HA accumulation during nephrogenesis is disruption of its normal reduction as a consequence of lack of Ang II activation of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan has very large water-attracting properties and is pro-inflammatory when fragmented. The ensuing inflammation and interstitial oedema affect kidney function. Hyaluronan is colocalized with CD44 overexpression and infiltrating immune cells. These properties make HA a plausible contributor to the observed structural and functional kidney defects associated with the fetopathy. Available data support an involvement of HA in kidney dysfunction of the foetus and during adulthood due to the physico-chemical characteristics of HA. No clinical treatment for HA accumulation exists. Treatment with the HA-degrading enzyme hyaluronidase and an HA synthesis inhibitor has been tested successfully in experimental models in the kidney, heart and pancreas. Reduced HA accumulation to reduce interstitial oedema and inflammation may improve organ function, but this concept needs to be tested in a controlled study before causal relationships can be established. PMID:25600777

  12. Cleavage of Hyaluronan and CD44 Adhesion Molecule Regulate Astrocyte Morphology via Rac1 Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Anna; Zeug, Andre; Skupien, Anna; Kaza, Beata; Mueller, Franziska; Chwedorowicz, Agnieszka; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Dzwonek, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Communication of cells with their extracellular environment is crucial to fulfill their function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The literature data provide evidence that such a communication is also important in case of astrocytes. Mechanisms that contribute to the interaction between astrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are still poorly understood. Hyaluronan is the main component of ECM in the brain, where its major receptor protein CD44 is expressed by a subset of astrocytes. Considering the fact that functions of astrocytes are tightly coupled with changes in their morphology (e.g.: glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft, migration, astrogliosis), we investigated the influence of hyaluronan cleavage by hyaluronidase, knockdown of CD44 by specific shRNA and CD44 overexpression on astrocyte morphology. Our results show that hyaluronidase treatment, as well as knockdown of CD44, in astrocytes result in a “stellate”-like morphology, whereas overexpression of CD44 causes an increase in cell body size and changes the shape of astrocytes into flattened cells. Moreover, as a dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is supposed to be responsible for morphological changes of cells, and this reorganization is controlled by small GTPases of the Rho family, we hypothesized that GTPase Rac1 acts as a downstream effector for hyaluronan and CD44 in astrocytes. We used FRET-based biosensor and a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 to investigate the involvement of Rac1 activity in hyaluronidase- and CD44-dependent morphological changes of astrocytes. Both, hyaluronidase treatment and knockdown of CD44, enhances Rac1 activity while overexpression of CD44 reduces the activity state in astrocytes. Furthermore, morphological changes were blocked by specific inhibition of Rac1 activity. These findings indicate for the first time that regulation of Rac1 activity is responsible for hyaluronidase and CD44-driven morphological changes of

  13. Hyaluronan-based pericellular matrix: substrate electrostatic charges and early cell adhesion events.

    PubMed

    Fotia, Caterina; Messina, Grazia M L; Marletta, Giovanni; Baldini, Nicola; Ciapetti, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Cells are surrounded by a hyaluronan-rich coat called 'pericellular matrix' (PCM), mainly constituted by hyaluronan, a long-chain linear polysaccharide which is secreted and resorbed by the cell, depending on its activity. Cell attachment to a surface is mediated by PCM before integrins and focal adhesions are involved. As hyaluronan is known to bear a negative charge at physiological pH, the relevance of its electrical properties in driving the early cell adhesion steps has been studied, exploring how PCM mediates cell adhesion to charged surfaces, such as polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films. Poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) and poly(sodium 4-styrene sulphonate) (PSS), assembled as PEI/PSS and PEI/PSS/PEI layers, were used. The nanoscale morphology of such layers was analysed by atomic force microscopy, and the detailed surface structure was analysed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. PCM-coated and PCM-depleted MG63 osteoblast-like cells were used, and cell density, morphology and adhesive structures were analysed during early steps of cell attachment to the PEM surfaces (1-6 h). The present study demonstrates that the pericellular matrix is involved in cell adhesion to material surfaces, and its arrangement depends on the cell interaction with the surface. Moreover, the PCM/surface interaction is not simply driven by electrostatic effects, as the cell response may be affected by specific chemical groups at the material surface. In the development of biomimetic surfaces promoting cell adhesion and function, the role of this unrecognised outer cell structure has to be taken into account. PMID:24052426

  14. IgG-loaded hyaluronan-based dissolving microneedles for intradermal protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Juha; Reza Nejadnik, M; Baccouche, Khalil; Romeijn, Stefan; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-11-28

    Dissolving microneedles are an attractive approach for non-invasive delivery of drugs via the skin, particularly when the doses are in the microgram or low-milligram range. The aim of the study was to develop hyaluronan-based, monoclonal IgG-loaded microneedles for intradermal delivery enabling efficient penetration and rapid dissolution in the skin while preserving protein stability. Microscopic analysis showed successful preparation of sharp microneedles with the tip length of ~280 μm and with up to 10% (w/w) of IgG content. The water content of the microneedles was ~12% and was not affected by the protein content. The protein distribution was uniform within microneedle tips and individual arrays but some array-to-array variation of IgG level within a single preparation batch was detected. After dissolution of microneedle arrays in PBS, N80% of protein was recovered and no conformational changes were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. At submicron level, only weak and reversible interaction between HA and IgG was found by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation analysis after the dissolution of prepared microneedles. Although, the formation of insoluble micron-size particles was detected by flow imaging microscopy the IgG amount incorporated into these particles was negligible (b5%). Finally, microneedles were able to penetrate into the epidermis of ex vivo human skin followed by the rapid dissolution of the microneedle tips in the skin. After 10 min of application, the majority of the original tip length was dissolved and IgG and hyaluronan were co-deposited until a depth of 150-200 μm in the skin. In conclusion, developed hyaluronan-based dissolving microneedles allow rapid noninvasive intradermal protein delivery. PMID:26437262

  15. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  16. A functional cellulose synthase from ascidian epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Matthysse, Ann G.; Deschet, Karine; Williams, Melanie; Marry, Mazz; White, Alan R.; Smith, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Among animals, urochordates (e.g., ascidians) are unique in their ability to biosynthesize cellulose. In ascidians cellulose is synthesized in the epidermis and incorporated into a protective coat know as the tunic. A putative cellulose synthase-like gene was first identified in the genome sequences of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. We describe here a cellulose synthase gene from the ascidian Ciona savignyi that is expressed in the epidermis. The predicted C. savignyi cellulose synthase amino acid sequence showed conserved features found in all cellulose synthases, including plants, but was most similar to cellulose synthases from bacteria, fungi, and Dictyostelium discoidium. However, unlike other known cellulose synthases, the predicted C. savignyi polypeptide has a degenerate cellulase-like region near the carboxyl-terminal end. An expression construct carrying the C. savignyi cDNA was found to restore cellulose biosynthesis to a cellulose synthase (CelA) minus mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, showing that the predicted protein has cellulose synthase activity. The lack of cellulose biosynthesis in all other groups of metazoans and the similarity of the C. savignyi cellulose synthase to enzymes from cellulose-producing organisms support the hypothesis that the urochordates acquired the cellulose biosynthetic pathway by horizontal transfer. PMID:14722352

  17. Efficient heterocyclisation by (di)terpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Mafu, S; Potter, K C; Hillwig, M L; Schulte, S; Criswell, J; Peters, R J

    2015-09-11

    While cyclic ether forming terpene synthases are known, the basis for such heterocyclisation is unclear. Here it is reported that numerous (di)terpene synthases, particularly including the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase, efficiently produce isomers of manoyl oxide from the stereochemically appropriate substrate. Accordingly, such heterocyclisation is easily accomplished by terpene synthases. Indeed, the use of single residue changes to induce production of the appropriate substrate in the upstream active site leads to efficient bifunctional enzymes producing isomers of manoyl oxide, representing novel enzymatic activity. PMID:26214384

  18. Analysis of haemorrhagic septicaemia-causing isolates of Pasteurella multocida by ribotyping and field alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE).

    PubMed

    Townsend, K M; Dawkins, H J; Papadimitriou, J M

    1997-10-16

    Ribotyping and field alternation gel electrophoresis (FAGE) were used to examine 19 Pasteurella multocida isolates, and to assess the ability of these techniques to differentiate P. multocida strains that cause haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS). Reproducible patterns were obtained from both methods, with FAGE demonstrating greater discriminatory power than ribotyping. FAGE analysis was particularly useful in distinguishing North American cultures originating from the 1922 Yellowstone National Park Buffalo 'B' strain, demonstrating the ability to detect genetic alterations induced by repeated subculture. A remarkable homogeneity was observed among Asian HS strains following ribotyping and FAGE analysis, with a clear distinction observed between virulent and avirulent HS isolates. This study has illustrated the value of genomic fingerprinting methods in distinguishing strains of similar serotype, and the capability of these methods to produce detailed characterisation of P. multocida isolates. PMID:9444075

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum antibodies to Pasteurella haemolytica cytotoxin (leukotoxin) in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Confer, A W; Hall, S M; Gentry, M J; Panciera, R J

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detection of bovine serum antibodies to the cytotoxin (leukotoxin) of Pasteurella haemolytica. A partially purified, cytotoxic, and immunogenic protein obtained from supernatants of logarithmic-phase P. haemolytica was used as the ELISA antigen. Preadsorption of sera with various cytotoxic, somatic, and capsular antigen preparations demonstrated that the assay was specific for anticytotoxin antibodies. ELISA anticytotoxin titers had a strong, significant correlation to cytotoxin-neutralizing-antibody titers. The ELISA, however, was more rapid and allowed for greater numbers of samples to be run than did the neutralization technique. ELISA anticytotoxin titers were high in cattle vaccinated with a live P. haemolytica vaccine, whereas unvaccinated cattle and cattle receiving a P. haemolytica bacterin had low ELISA anticytotoxin titers. A significant positive correlation between ELISA titers and resistance to experimental bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis was present. PMID:3745419

  20. Computational Prediction of Immunodominant Epitopes on Outer Membrane Protein (Omp) H of Pasteurella multocida Toward Designing of a Peptide Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary vaccine design necessitates discrimination between the immunogenic and non-immunogenic components within a pathogen. To successfully target a humoral immune response, the vaccine antigen should contain not only B-cell epitopes but abounding Th-cell agretopes and MHC-II binding regions as well. No single computational method is available that allows the identification of such regions on antigens with good reliability. A consensus approach based on several prediction methods can be adopted to overcome this problem.Targeting the outer membrane protein (Omp) H as a candidate, a comprehensive work flow is described for the computational identification of immunodominant epitopes toward the designing of a peptide vaccine against Pasteurella multocida. PMID:27076289

  1. Expression, purification and immunologic analysis of three Pasteurella haemolytica A1 28-30 kDa lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dabo, S M; Confer, A W; Styre, D; Murphy, G L

    1994-09-01

    Three genes, tandemly arranged on the Pasteurella haemolytica A1 chromosome and encoding similar 28-30 kDa proteins, were previously cloned and sequenced by our laboratory. In this study, we demonstrate that the cloned genes encode lipoproteins, as previously suggested by DNA sequence analysis. To further analyze the bovine immune response to these proteins, the individual genes were cloned separately into an expression vector and recombinant forms of the three proteins were purified after expression in Escherichia coli. Sera from cattle vaccinated with live P. haemolytica or P. haemolytica bacterins and from cattle naturally exposed to P. haemolytica recognized each of the recombinant proteins. Vaccination with live or killed whole bacteria did not elicit an immune response of the same quality as that which developed in response to natural infection. A statistically significant correlation existed between resistance to challenge and a high antibody response to one of these three proteins. PMID:7700132

  2. A semi-multifunctional sialyltransferase from Bibersteinia trehalosi and its comparison to the Pasteurella multocida ST1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Talafová, Klaudia; Hrabárová, Eva; Nahálka, Jozef

    2015-12-20

    Sialic acids are well known for their crucial roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Improvement in the efficacy of protein drugs, an increase in the anti-inflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin, preparation of infant milk and the diagnosis of diseases are examples of why there is a need for efficient in vitro sialylation. Sialyltransferases are crucial enzymes for the synthesis of sialo-oligosaccharides. Here, we introduce a new α2,3-sialyltransferase from bacteria Bibersteinia trehalosi (BtST1), which is homological to sialyltransferase from Pasteurella multocida (PmST1), Pasteurella dagmatis (PdST1) and Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd0053). BtST1 is active in a wide pH range and shows considerable acceptor flexibility. Very good specific activities have been detected with lactose and LacNAc as acceptors, and these activities were comparable to those of efficient multifunctional PmST1 and higher than PdST1, Hd0053 and also PmST1 M144D which was constructed to decrease the high sialidase activity of PmST1. Testing of PmST1 mutant forms revealed that mutations that included S143 caused only the restriction of sialyltransferase activity, whereas mutations including G142 resulted in the loss of activity with lactose. BtST1 possesses only low sialidase and trans-sialidase activities that are comparable to mutant PmST1 M144D, which are detected only in the presence of CMP. The combination of large acceptor flexibility, high activity for lactose and LacNAc and naturally low sialidase activity make BtST1 an attractive enzyme for biotechnological applications. PMID:26477829

  3. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  4. Polyester synthases: natural catalysts for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolyesters composed of hydroxy fatty acids, which represent a complex class of storage polyesters. They are synthesized by a wide range of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as by some Archaea, and are deposited as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions. Polyester synthases are the key enzymes of polyester biosynthesis and catalyse the conversion of (R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters to polyesters with the concomitant release of CoA. These soluble enzymes turn into amphipathic enzymes upon covalent catalysis of polyester-chain formation. A self-assembly process is initiated resulting in the formation of insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions with a phospholipid monolayer and covalently attached polyester synthases at the surface. Surface-attached polyester synthases show a marked increase in enzyme activity. These polyester synthases have only recently been biochemically characterized. An overview of these recent findings is provided. At present, 59 polyester synthase structural genes from 45 different bacteria have been cloned and the nucleotide sequences have been obtained. The multiple alignment of the primary structures of these polyester synthases show an overall identity of 8-96% with only eight strictly conserved amino acid residues. Polyester synthases can been assigned to four classes based on their substrate specificity and subunit composition. The current knowledge on the organization of the polyester synthase genes, and other genes encoding proteins related to PHA metabolism, is compiled. In addition, the primary structures of the 59 PHA synthases are aligned and analysed with respect to highly conserved amino acids, and biochemical features of polyester synthases are described. The proposed catalytic mechanism based on similarities to alpha/beta-hydrolases and mutational analysis is discussed. Different threading algorithms suggest that polyester synthases belong to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, with

  5. Functional role of R462 in the degradation of hyaluronan catalyzed by hyaluronate lyase from Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengxue; Xu, Dingguo

    2015-08-01

    Hyaluronan lyase from Streptococcus pneumoniae can degrade hyaluronic acid, which is one of the major components in the extracellular matrix. Hyaluronan can regulate water balance, osmotic pressure, and act as an ion exchange resin. Followed by our recent work on the catalytic reaction mechanism and substrate binding mode, we in this work further investigate the functional role of active site arginine residue, R462, in the degradation of hyaluronan. The site directed mutagenesis simulation of R462A and R462Q were modeled using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. The overall substrate binding features upon mutations do not have significant changes. The energetic profiles for the reaction processes are essentially the same as that in wild type enzyme, but significant activation barrier height changes can be observed. Both mutants were shown to accelerate the overall enzymatic activity, e.g., R462A can reduce the barrier height by about 2.8 kcal mol(-1), while R462Q reduces the activation energy by about 2.9 kcal mol(-1). Consistent with the active site model calculated using density functional theory, our results can support that the positive charge on R462 guanidino side chain group plays a negative role in the catalysis. Finally, the functional role of R462 was proposed to facilitate the formation of initial enzyme-substrate complex, but not in the subsequent catalytic degradation reaction. Graphical Abstract Degradation of hyaluronan catalyzed by hyaluronate lyase from Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26169310

  6. Type III TGFβ receptor and Src direct hyaluronan-mediated invasive cell motility.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patrick; Espiritu, Daniella; Barnett, Joey V; Camenisch, Todd D

    2015-03-01

    During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. This process requires epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and directed cellular invasion. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and coronary vessel development. Using primary epicardial cells derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, high-molecular weight hyaluronan (HMWHA) stimulated cellular invasion and filamentous (f-actin) polymerization are detected in Tgfbr3(+/+) cells, but not in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. Furthermore, HMWHA-stimulated cellular invasion and f-actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(+/+) epicardial cells are dependent on Src kinase. Src activation in HMWHA-stimulated Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells is not detected in response to HMWHA. RhoA and Rac1 also fail to activate in response to HMWHA in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. These events coincide with defective f-actin formation and deficient cellular invasion. Finally, a T841A activating substitution in TGFβR3 drives ligand-independent Src activation. Collectively, these data define a TGFβR3-Src-RhoA/Rac1 pathway that is essential for hyaluronan-directed cell invasion in epicardial cells. PMID:25499979

  7. Extracellular Vesicles from Caveolin-Enriched Microdomains Regulate Hyaluronan-Mediated Sustained Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Lennon, Frances E.; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Allen, Michael; Riehm, Jacob; Poroyko, Valeriy A.; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in vascular integrity are an initiating factor in several disease processes. We have previously reported that high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA), a major glycosaminoglycan in the body, promotes rapid signal transduction in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMVEC) leading to barrier enhancement. In contrast, low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA), produced in disease states by hyaluronidases and reactive oxygen species (ROS), induces HPMVEC barrier disruption. However, the mechanism(s) of sustained barrier regulation by HA are poorly defined. Our results indicate that long-term (6–24 hours) exposure of HMW-HA induced release of a novel type of extracellular vesicle from HLMVEC called enlargeosomes (characterized by AHNAK expression) while LMW-HA long-term exposure promoted release of exosomes (characterized by CD9, CD63, and CD81 expression). These effects were blocked by inhibiting caveolin-enriched microdomain (CEM) formation. Further, inhibiting enlargeosome release by annexin II siRNA attenuated the sustained barrier enhancing effects of HMW-HA. Finally, exposure of isolated enlargeosomes to HPMVEC monolayers generated barrier enhancement while exosomes led to barrier disruption. Taken together, these results suggest that differential release of extracellular vesicles from CEM modulate the sustained HPMVEC barrier regulation by HMW-HA and LMW-HA. HMW-HA-induced specialized enlargeosomes can be a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases involving impaired vascular integrity. PMID:26447809

  8. Hyaluronan, neural stem cells and tissue reconstruction after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Moshayedi, Pouria; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Focal stroke is a disabling disease with lifelong sensory, motor and cognitive impairments. Given the paucity of effective clinical treatments, basic scientists are developing novel options for protection of the affected brain and regeneration of lost tissue. Tissue bioengineering and stem/progenitor cell treatments have both been individually pursued for stroke neural repair therapies, with some benefit in tissue recovery. Emerging directions in stroke neural repair approaches combine these two therapies to use biopolymers with stem/progenitor transplants to promote greater cell survival in the transplant and directed delivery of bioactive molecules to the transplanted cells and the adjacent injured tissue. In this review the background literature on a combined use of neural stem/progenitor cells encapsulated in hyaluronan gels is discussed and the way this therapeutic approach can affect the important processes involved in brain tissue reconstruction, such as angiogenesis, axon regeneration, neural differentiation and inflammation is clarified. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan can optimize those processes and be employed in a successful neural tissue engineering approach. PMID:23507922

  9. Detection of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 in the bovine oviductal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, Ann-Sofi; Yokoo, Masaki; Båge, Renée; Sato, Eimei; Rodríguez-Martínez, Heriberto

    2005-08-01

    Hyaluronan is involved in fundamental reproductive events such as sperm storage in the female reproductive tract, fertilization, and early embryo development, these functions are presumably mediated by its major cell surface receptor, CD44. The present study was conducted to investigate the presence and localization of CD44 in the bovine oviductal epithelium, using immunohistochemical and Western blot methods on tissue sections and epithelial cell extracts collected from the uterotubal junction (UTJ), isthmus, and ampulla of animals in the oestrus or luteal phase of the oestrous cycle. While positive immunolabelling for CD44 was found on the ad-luminal surface and supra-nuclear region of epithelial cells in all tubal segments investigated, in the UTJ, there were epithelial cells in which the entire cytoplasm positively stained. We found no differences in terms of CD44-positive staining between the different stages of the oestrous cycle. Presence of CD44 was detected by Western blotting in the tubal epithelium as a single band at 200 kDa. Although it appeared in all tubal segments, the expression of CD44 protein was more accentuated in the sperm reservoir (UTJ) than in the other segments. This is the first time CD44 has been detected in the epithelium of the tubal sperm reservoir in cattle, suggesting a pathway for the action of hyaluronan in this segment. PMID:15846044

  10. Immunolocalization of the hyaluronan receptor CD44 in the reproductive tract of the mare.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Hurtado, I; Stewart, A J; Wolfe, D F; Caldwell, F J; Harrie, M; Whitley, E M

    2011-01-15

    Hyaluronan (HA), a glycosaminoglycan, is a major component of the pericellular matrix which envelopes mammalian cells. Binding of hyaluronan to one of its specific receptors, CD44, modulates transduction of intracellular signals which direct a variety of processes, including embryogenesis, wound healing, inflammation, and neoplasia. Since regulation of these processes is critical to equine reproductive success, localization of constitutive CD44 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemical methods in ovarian, oviductal, and uterine tissues from healthy mares. Ovarian stroma contained thecal cells with varying CD44 immunopositivity. Follicular and granulosa cells of some antral and atretic follicles were positive for CD44. In the oviduct, the luminal epithelium was variably positive for CD44, with overall decreasing intensity of immunostaining from the infundibulum to the isthmus. The CD44 molecule was expressed strongly by surface epithelial cells of the uterine endometrium, but was present only rarely among cells of uterine glands. In addition, CD44 was expressed by smooth muscle cells of vascular walls, oviduct, and uterus. Since CD44 is known to modulate cell movement and differentiation, and was present at multiple sites in the reproductive tract of normal mares, we inferred there may be an important role for the HA-CD44 signaling pathway in reproductive function and inflammation. PMID:20932561

  11. Improving the distribution of Doxil® in the tumor matrix by depletion of tumor hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Aditya G; Kivimäe, Saul; Tiffany, Matthew R; Szoka, Francis C

    2014-10-10

    Liposomes improve the pharmacokinetics and safety of rapidly cleared drugs, but have not yet improved the clinical efficacy compared to the non-encapsulated drug. This inability to improve efficacy may be partially due to the non-uniform distribution of liposomes in solid tumors. The tumor extra-cellular matrix is a barrier to distribution and includes the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA). Strategies to remove HA or block its synthesis may improve drug delivery into solid tumors. Orally administered methylumbelliferone (MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis, but it is limited by low potency and limited solubility. In this study, we encapsulate a water-soluble phosphorylated prodrug of MU (MU-P) in a liposome (L-MU-P). We demonstrate that L-MU-P is a more potent inhibitor of HA synthesis than oral MU in the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model using both a quantitative ELISA and histochemistry. We show that HA depletion improves the tumor distribution of liposomes computed using Mander's colocalization analysis of liposomes with the tumor vasculature. Hyaluronan depletion also increases the fraction of the tumor area positive for liposomes. This improved distribution extends the overall survival of mice treated with Doxil®. PMID:24852095

  12. Treatment of partial thickness burns with Zn-hyaluronan: lessons of a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, I.; Zoltán, P.; Erdei, I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A clinical investigation to determine the effectiveness of Zn-hyaluronan gel for the treatment of partial thickness burns was carried out. 60 patients were enrolled in the study with an average of 3% TBSA burn. Exudation lasted 3 days, no infectious complications were observed. By day 14 the wounds of 52 patients have healed, average complete healing time was 10,5 days. An overall 93,3% healing rate was achieved within the planned observation period. Reduction of spontaneous and movementrelated pain was reduced to less than half of the initial values by day 5,5 and 6,3 respectively. Development of a thin, elastic, well tolerable and protective membrane-like layer was noted. This kept the wounds moist while clean during wound-healing, and was spontaneously shed as epithelisation proceeded. Zn-hyaluronan gel is a novel topical wound care product that has proven to be suitable for the treatment of partial thickness burns. PMID:23233826

  13. Wound dressing based on chitosan/hyaluronan/nonwoven fabrics: Preparation, characterization and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Rasha M; Abdel-Mohsen, A M; Hrdina, R; Burgert, L; Fohlerova, Z; Pavliňák, D; Sayed, O N; Jancar, J

    2016-08-01

    Thin layers of chitosan (positively charged)/sodium hyaluronate (negatively charged)/nonwoven fabrics were constructed by polyelectrolyte multilayer pad-dry-cure technique. Pure chitosan (CS) was isolated from shrimp shell and immobilized onto nonwoven fabrics (NWFs) using citric acid (CTA) as cross linker and solvent agents through a pad-dry-cure method. The prepared thin layer of chitosan citrate/nonwoven fabrics (CSCTA/NWFs) were consequently impregnated with hyaluronan (CSCTA/HA/NWFs) in the second path through a pad-dry-cure method. Chitosan/hyaluronan/nonwoven fabrics wound dressing was characterized by different techniques such as FTIR-ATR, TGA and SEM. The antibacterial activity and the cytotoxicity of the dressing sheets were evaluated against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Streptococcus aureus (S. aureus), mouse fibroblast (NIH-3T3) and keratinocytes (HaCaT) cell lines, respectively. The cell-fabrics interaction was also investigated using fluorescence microscope, based on live/dead staining assay of 3T3 cells. The healing properties of the new wound dressing were evaluated and compared with the control sample. PMID:27151671

  14. Sulfated hyaluronan improves bone regeneration of diabetic rats by binding sclerostin and enhancing osteoblast function.

    PubMed

    Picke, Ann-Kristin; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Hintze, Vera; Rother, Sandra; Rauner, Martina; Kascholke, Christian; Möller, Stephanie; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Rammelt, Stefan; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C; Scharnweber, Dieter; Hofbauer, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2016-07-01

    Bone fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus heal poorly and require innovative therapies to support bone regeneration. Here, we assessed whether sulfated hyaluronan included in collagen-based scaffold coatings can improve fracture healing in diabetic rats. Macroporous thermopolymerized lactide-based scaffolds were coated with collagen including non-sulfated or sulfated hyaluronan (HA/sHA3) and inserted into 3 mm femoral defects of non-diabetic and diabetic ZDF rats. After 12 weeks, scaffolds coated with collagen/HA or collagen/sHA3 accelerated bone defect regeneration in diabetic, but not in non-diabetic rats as compared to their non-coated controls. At the tissue level, collagen/sHA3 promoted bone mineralization and decreased the amount of non-mineralized bone matrix. Moreover, collagen/sHA3-coated scaffolds from diabetic rats bound more sclerostin in vivo than the respective controls. Binding assays confirmed a high binding affinity of sHA3 to sclerostin. In vitro, sHA3 induced BMP-2 and lowered the RANKL/OPG expression ratio, regardless of the glucose concentration in osteoblastic cells. Both sHA3 and high glucose concentrations decreased the differentiation of osteoclastic cells. In summary, scaffolds coated with collagen/sHA3 represent a potentially suitable biomaterial to improve bone defect regeneration in diabetic conditions. The underlying mechanism involves improved osteoblast function and binding sclerostin, a potent inhibitor of Wnt signaling and osteoblast function. PMID:27131598

  15. Respective roles of hyaluronidases 1 and 2 in endogenous hyaluronan turnover.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Virginie; Flamion, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    We studied the physiologic roles of the hyaluronidase (HYAL) 1 and HYAL2 in hyaluronan (HA) turnover. HA was localized and quantified using HA binding proteins in various tissues of Hyal1(-/-) and Hyal2(-/-) mice (knockout mice) as well as control mice. HA MW was determined using gel filtration chromatography. HA endocytosis in liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) was quantified in vivo Both Hyal1 and Hyal2 knockout mice showed HA accumulation in peripheral tissues without changes in HA MW distribution. HYAL2 deficiency induced buildup of very high MW (>3.10(6) Da) HA in lymph and serum with severe lymph node distortion. The lack of HYAL2 also impaired high MW HA endocytosis by liver NPCs. HYAL1 deficiency led to a moderate increase in serum HA concentration without changes in HA MW distribution and to HA overload of liver NPCs. Wild-type C57BL/6 mice served as controls. In HA injection experiments, saline-injected mice served as additional controls. We conclude that: 1) HYAL1 and HYAL2 are both needed for tissue HA catabolism; 2) HYAL2 is required for high MW HA clearance in lymph nodes and plasma and for HA endocytosis by liver NPCs; and 3) the main role of HYAL1 is HA degradation within liver NPCs.-Bourguignon, V., Flamion, B. Respective roles of hyaluronidases 1 and 2 in endogenous hyaluronan turnover. PMID:26887442

  16. Hyaluronan distribution in the normal epithelium of esophagus, stomach, and colon and their cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Tammi, M.; Guo, H.; Tammi, R.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of hyaluronan (HA) in normal gastrointestinal wall and in tumors originating from their epithelium was studied using a specific probe prepared from cartilage proteoglycan (bHABC, biotinylated hyaluronan binding complex). The normal stratified squamous epithelium of esophagus showed an intense HA staining in the basal and lower intermediate layers, whereas the simple epithelia in the stomach and large intestine were HA negative. Esophageal in situ carcinomas expressed HA also in the cell layers close to the luminal surface, in regions normally negative. Most of the invasive squamous cell carcinomas maintained their HA expression, but in very poorly differentiated types the tumor parenchyma was devoid of HA. In both gastric and colonic adenocarcinomas the tumor parenchyma showed no HA. The stromal tissue was intensely HA positive in all tumors. Cancer cells invading the intestinal smooth muscle were surrounded by copious amounts of HA, whereas the muscular layer was otherwise very poor in HA staining. These results show that relatively well differentiated carcinoma cells themselves retain the high or low HA expression pattern of their original epithelium, whereas tumors stimulate HA deposition in the surrounding stroma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8669472

  17. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. PMID:22473677

  18. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time. PMID:24849013

  19. Effect of molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ningbo Wang, Xin Qin, Lei Guo, Zhengze Li, Dehua

    2015-09-25

    Hyaluronan (HA), the simplest glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix, exists in various tissues. It is involved in some critical biological procedures, including cellular signaling, cell adhesion and proliferation, and cell differentiation. The effect of molecular weight (MW) and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation was controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of MW and concentration of HA on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived stem cells in vitro. Results showed that high MW HA decreased the cell adhesion rate in a concentration-dependant manner. The cell adhesion rate was decreased by increasing MW of HA. Cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by low MW HA (P < 0.05). The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on the cell adhesion rate and cell proliferation (P < 0.05). High MW HA increased the mRNA expressions of ALP, RUNX-2 and OCN. The higher the MW was, the higher the mRNA expressions were. The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on ALP mRNA expression (P < 0.05). HA of higher MW and higher concentration promoted bone formation. These findings provide some useful information in understanding the mechanism underlying the effect of MW and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation. - Highlights: • Effect of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and differentiation is evaluated in vitro. • Hyaluronan of low molecular weight increases cell proliferation. • Hyaluronan of high molecular weight promotes cell osteogenic differentiation. • Molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan show interactive effect.

  20. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis protects against central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and increases CXCL12 expression in the inflamed CNS.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andre Michael; Yoon, Bo Hyung; Sadiq, Saud Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) may have proinflammatory roles in the context of CNS autoimmunity. It accumulates in demyelinated multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, promotes antigen presentation, and enhances T-cell activation and proliferation. HA facilitates lymphocyte binding to vessels and CNS infiltration at the CNS vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HA signals through Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 to stimulate inflammatory gene expression. We assessed the role of HA in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS by administration of 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU), a well established inhibitor of HA synthesis. 4MU decreased hyaluronan synthesis in vitro and in vivo. It was protective in active EAE of C57Bl/6 mice, decreased spinal inflammatory infiltrates and spinal infiltration of Th1 cells, and increased differentiation of regulatory T-cells. In adoptive transfer EAE, feeding of 4MU to donor mice significantly decreased the encephalitogenicity of lymph node cells. The transfer of proteolipid protein (PLP)-stimulated lymph node cells to 4MU-fed mice resulted in a delayed EAE onset and delayed spinal T-cell infiltration. Expression of CXCL12, an anti-inflammatory chemokine, is reduced in MS patients in CSF cells and in spinal cord tissue during EAE. Hyaluronan suppressed production of CXCL12, whereas 4MU increased spinal CXCL12 in naive animals and during neuroinflammation. Neutralization of CXCR4, the most prominent receptor of CXCL12, by administration of AMD3100 diminished the protective impact of 4MU in adoptive transfer EAE. In conclusion, hyaluronan exacerbates CNS autoimmunity, enhances encephalitogenic T-cell responses, and suppresses the protective chemokine CXCL12 in CNS tissue. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis with 4MU protects against an animal model of MS and may represent an important therapeutic option in MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:24973214

  1. Variation in Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) and Mannheimia spp. following transport and antibiotic treatment in free-ranging and captive Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Weiser, Glen C; Miller, David S; Drew, Mark L; Rhyan, Jack C; Ward, Alton C S

    2009-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality associated with respiratory disease following capture and translocation of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) is a significant concern, particularly when establishing new or augmenting existing bighorn populations. Administration of prophylactic antibiotics at the time of capture is often done to minimize the risk of respiratory disease, but the efficacy of this practice is unknown. The effects of oxytetracycline and florfenicol on the Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) and Mannheimia spp. isolated from samples collected from the oropharynx at the time of capture and 3 or 42 day later were evaluated in two groups of bighorn sheep. The most evident change in the isolation rates or types of Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) spp., Mannheimia spp., or both was an increase of beta-hemolytic strains isolated from bighorn sheep 3 day following oxytetracycline treatment. Both groups of bighorn sheep carried Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) trehalosi identified as the same biovariants, but they did not share biovariants of Mannheimia spp. No animals had signs of respiratory disease. Isolates representative of all biovariants present in cultures from the two bighorn sheep groups were sensitive to in vitro tests to both oxytetracycline and florfenicol and the majority were also sensitive to seven other antibiotics tested. The administration of neither oxytetracycline nor florfenicol eliminated Pasteurella (Bibersteinia) or Mannheimia from the oropharyngeal mucosa. Resistance to either antibiotic used in these animals was not noted. Although the prophylactic benefits of these drugs in preventing disease are uncertain, therapeutic levels of antibiotics in lung tissue during times of stress may reduce the risk of disease. Representative sampling of the oropharyngeal microflora of bighorn sheep source and recipient populations prior to being intermingled should be considered as one of the tools to minimize exposure of naive populations to potentially pathogenic

  2. Cloning of the gene and characterization of the enzymatic properties of the monomeric alkaline phosphatase (PhoX) from Pasteurella multocida strain X-73.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ru; Shien, Jui-Hung; Shieh, Happy K; Hu, Chung-Chi; Gong, Shuen-Rong; Chen, Ling-Yun; Chang, Poa-Chun

    2007-02-01

    We have identified a new phoX gene encoding the monomeric alkaline phosphatase from Pasteurella multocida X-73. This gene was not found in the published genome sequence of Pasteurella multocida pm70. Characterization of the recombinant PhoX of Pasteurella multocida X-73 showed that it is a monomeric enzyme, activated by Ca(2+) and possibly secreted by the Tat pathway. These features distinguish phosphatases of the PhoX family from those of the PhoA family. All proteins of the PhoX family were found to contain a conserved motif that shares significant sequence homology with the calcium-binding site of a phosphotriesterase known as diisopropylfluorophosphatase. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that D527 of PhoX might be the ligand bound to the catalytic calcium. This is the first report on identification of homologous sequences between PhoX and the phosphotriesterase and on the potential calcium-binding site of PhoX. PMID:17156125

  3. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  4. Hyaluronan and Hyaluronan-Binding Proteins Accumulate in Both Human Type 1 Diabetic Islets and Lymphoid Tissues and Associate With Inflammatory Cells in Insulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bogdani, Marika; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Nagy, Nadine; Day, Anthony J.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan that is present in pancreatic islets, but little is known about its involvement in the development of human type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have evaluated whether pancreatic islets and lymphoid tissues of T1D and nondiabetic organ donors differ in the amount and distribution of HA and HA-binding proteins (hyaladherins), such as inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), versican, and tumor necrosis factor–stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6). HA was dramatically increased both within the islet and outside the islet endocrine cells, juxtaposed to islet microvessels in T1D. In addition, HA was prominent surrounding immune cells in areas of insulitis. IαI and versican were present in HA-rich areas of islets, and both molecules accumulated in diabetic islets and regions exhibiting insulitis. TSG-6 was observed within the islet endocrine cells and in inflammatory infiltrates. These patterns were only observed in tissues from younger donors with disease duration of <10 years. Furthermore, HA and IαI amassed in follicular germinal centers and in T-cell areas in lymph nodes and spleens in T1D patients compared with control subjects. Our observations highlight potential roles for HA and hyaladherins in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24677718

  5. Hyaluronan (HA) and serum-derived hyaluronan-associated protein (SHAP)-HA complex as predictive markers of cervical ripening in premature labor.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Tameko; Yabushita, Hiromitsu; Wakatsuki, Akihiko; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether serum hyaluronan (HA) and serum-derived HA-associated proteins (SHAP)-HA complex predict cervical ripening and premature delivery. Sera were obtained from 64 women with normal pregnancies, 20 with full term delivery, and 13 with threatened premature labor. Concentrations of HA and SHAP-HA complex in serum were measured by sandwich ELISA. Serum concentrations of HA and SHAP-HA complex did not differ within first, second, and third trimester groups. The serum SHAP-HA complex was elevated in the full term labor group more than in the third trimester group; however, the concentrations of serum HA did not differ between both groups. The HA and SHAP-HA complex levels in sera were higher in the premature labor group than in the second trimester group. In the premature labor group, the SHAP-HA complex levels were higher in the cases with Bishop scores more than 4 points when compared with the cases with Bishop scores of 4 points or less. Increased levels of SHAP-HA complex in sera are possible predictive markers for cervical ripening in premature labor. PMID:18382897

  6. Characteristic Formation of Hyaluronan-Cartilage Link Protein-Proteoglycan Complex in Salivary Gland Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Hiroko; Nishikado, Akira; Hayasaki, Hana; Isogai, Zenzo; Yoneda, Masahiko; Kawata, Ryo; Hirose, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) and its binding molecules, cartilage link protein (LP) and proteoglycan (PG), are structural components of the hydrated extracellular matrix. Because these molecules play important roles in the tumor microenvironment, we examined the distribution of HA, LP, versican, and aggrecan in salivary gland tumors using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, including double staining. LP was present in pleomorphic adenoma (PA) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) tissues, and aggrecan was absent in the malignant tumors that we investigated. LP colocalized with both HA and aggrecan in the chondromyxoid matrix of PA, suggesting the presence of a HA-LP-aggrecan complex. Furthermore, the HA-LP-versican complex could be observed in the pseudocystic space of the cribriform structures in ACC. The characteristic HA-LP-PG complex in PA and ACC might play a role in the behavior of tumors, and immunohistochemical analysis of these molecules could represent a diagnostic adjunct for salivary gland tumors. PMID:26067139

  7. Role of hyaluronan in pancreatic cancer biology and therapy: Once again in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Kohi, Shiro; Hirata, Keiji; Goggins, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains the most deadly disease worldwide, with the lowest survival rate among all cancer types. Recent evidence suggests that hyaluronan (HA), a major component of ECM, provides a favorable microenvironment for cancer progression. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is typically characterized by a dense desmoplastic stroma containing a large amount of HA. Accumulation of HA promotes tumor growth in mice and correlates with poor prognosis in patients with PDAC. Because HA is involved in various malignant behaviors of cancer (such as increased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and chemoresistance), inhibiting HA synthesis/signaling or depleting HA in tumor stroma could represent a promising therapeutic strategy against PDAC. In this review article, we summarize our current understanding of the role of HA in the progression of PDAC and discuss possible therapeutic approaches targeting HA. PMID:26918382

  8. Effect of hyaluronan supplementation on boar sperm motility and membrane lipid architecture status after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Peña, F J; Johannisson, A; Wallgren, M; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of supplementing extended boar semen with different amounts of hyaluronan (HA) prior to freezing on post-thaw sperm characteristics. Using a split sample design, the effect of HA at a final concentration of 500 or 1000 microg/ml semen on post-thaw motility parameters, and membrane lipid architecture status assessed by merocyanine-540/YOPRO-1 and flow cytometry were evaluated. HA-supplementation improved motility parameters (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001) and decreased the percentage of hyperactivated spermatozoa (P < 0.05). HA-supplemented samples had more spermatozoa showing high lipid membrane stability as assessed with merocyanine-540. In conclusion, HA appeared to preserve post-thaw spermatozoa viability in vitro and maintained membrane stability after cryopreservation. PMID:14643862

  9. Hyaluronan Inhibits Tlr-4-Dependent RANKL Expression in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is activated in synovial fibroblast cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL, are key molecules involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts and joint destruction in RA. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major extracellular component and an important immune regulator. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increases RANKL expression via a TLR-4 signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that HA suppresses LPS-induced RANKL expression, which is dependent on CD44, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our study provides evidence for HA-mediated suppression of TLR-4-dependent RANKL expression. This could present an alternative target for the treatment of destructed joint bones and cartilages in RA. PMID:27054952

  10. Hyaluronan coated cerium oxide nanoparticles modulate CD44 and reactive oxygen species expression in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lord, Megan S; Farrugia, Brooke L; Yan, Claudia M Y; Vassie, James A; Whitelock, John M

    2016-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles are being widely explored for cell therapies. In this study, nanoceria was functionalized with hyaluronan (HA) using the organosilane linker, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. HA-nanoceria was found to be cytocompatible and to reduce intracellular reactive oxygen species in human fibroblasts. The HA-nanoceria was found to colocalize with CD44 on the surface of the cells and once internalized traffic to the lysosomes, be degraded and induce markers of autophagy. These particles were also effective in reducing the cell surface expression of CD44. Together these data suggest that HA-nanoceria is a promising drug delivery material to target CD44-expressing cells through a variety of mechanisms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1736-1746, 2016. PMID:26946213

  11. Hyaluronan in cervical epithelia protects against infection-mediated preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Akgul, Yucel; Word, R Ann; Ensign, Laura M; Yamaguchi, Yu; Lydon, John; Hanes, Justin; Mahendroo, Mala

    2014-12-01

    Increased synthesis of cervical hyaluronan (HA) from early to late pregnancy has long been proposed to play an essential role in disorganization of the collagen-rich extracellular matrix to allow for maximal compliance and dilation of the cervix during the birth process. Here, we show that HA is not essential for increased cervical distensibility during late pregnancy. Rather, cervicovaginal HA plays an unanticipated important role in epithelial barrier protection of the lower reproductive tract. Specifically, HA depletion in the cervix and vagina resulted in inappropriate differentiation of epithelial cells, increased epithelial and mucosal permeability, and strikingly increased preterm birth rates in a mouse model of ascending vaginal infection. Collectively, these findings revealed that although HA is not obligatory for cervical compliance, it is crucial for maintaining an epithelial and mucosal barrier to limit pathogen infiltration of the lower reproductive tract during pregnancy and thereby is protective against infection-mediated preterm birth. PMID:25384213

  12. Hyaluronan in cervical epithelia protects against infection-mediated preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Yucel; Word, R. Ann; Ensign, Laura M.; Yamaguchi, Yu; Lydon, John; Hanes, Justin; Mahendroo, Mala

    2014-01-01

    Increased synthesis of cervical hyaluronan (HA) from early to late pregnancy has long been proposed to play an essential role in disorganization of the collagen-rich extracellular matrix to allow for maximal compliance and dilation of the cervix during the birth process. Here, we show that HA is not essential for increased cervical distensibility during late pregnancy. Rather, cervicovaginal HA plays an unanticipated important role in epithelial barrier protection of the lower reproductive tract. Specifically, HA depletion in the cervix and vagina resulted in inappropriate differentiation of epithelial cells, increased epithelial and mucosal permeability, and strikingly increased preterm birth rates in a mouse model of ascending vaginal infection. Collectively, these findings revealed that although HA is not obligatory for cervical compliance, it is crucial for maintaining an epithelial and mucosal barrier to limit pathogen infiltration of the lower reproductive tract during pregnancy and thereby is protective against infection-mediated preterm birth. PMID:25384213

  13. Synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronan containing-aromatic fatty acids for fabrication of polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Matelová, Alena; Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Šmejkalová, Daniela; Brůnová, Zdislava; Dušek, Jan; Vícha, Robert; Velebný, Vladimír

    2016-10-20

    Novel hydrophobized hyaluronan (HA) derivatives, containing ω-phenylalkanoic acids (ω-PAA, 4-phenylbutyric acid, 6-phenylhexanoic, 8-phenyloctanoic or 11-tolylundecanoic acids) were prepared by esterification. Mixed anhydrides obtained after reaction of the carboxyl acid moiety and benzoyl chloride were found to be active acylating agents, affording hydrophobized HA in good yield and under mild conditions. The reactivity of the aromatic fatty acids towards esterification has decreased with the increasing length of the aliphatic spacer between the aromatic substituent and carboxylic acid moiety. The novel HA derivatives self-assembled from very low concentrations and were found to be non-cytotoxic. The potential use of ω-phenylalkanoic acids grafted-HA towards drug delivery applications was demonstrated by hydrophobic drugs (resveratrol and retinyl palmitate) encapsulation. The drug loading capacity of the novel HA derivatives was significantly improved most likely because of π⋯π interactions between the micelle core and loaded hydrophobic aromatic compound. PMID:27474668

  14. Microfabrication of Photo-Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Hydrogels by Single- and Two-Photon Tyramine Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Claudia; Broguiere, Nicolas; Alini, Mauro; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Eglin, David

    2015-09-14

    Photo-cross-linking of tyramine-substituted hyaluronan (HA-Tyr) hydrogels is demonstrated for the first time. HA-Tyr hydrogels are fabricated via a rapid photosensitized process using visible light illumination. Nontoxic conditions offer photoencapsulation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) with high viability. Macroscopic gels can be formed in less than 10 s, and one- and two-photon photopatterning enable 2D and 3D microfabrication. Different degrees of cross-linking induce different swelling/shrinking, allowing for light-induced microactuation. These new tools are complementary to the previously reported horseradish peroxidase/hydrogen peroxide cross-linking and allow sequential cross-linking of HA-Tyr matrices. PMID:26222128

  15. Novel types of carborane-carrier hyaluronan derivatives via "click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Chiara; Panza, Luigi; Campo, Federica; Capitani, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Banzato, Alessandra; Rondina, Maria; Rosato, Antonio; Crescenzi, Vittorio

    2008-07-01

    Two new HA derivatives bearing carborane rings were synthesized by click chemistry. The optimal conditions were assessed for the preparation of biocompatible boron carriers, potentially suitable for application in BNCT and capable of targeting the CD44 antigen. The new polymeric samples were characterized by means of NMR-spectroscopy techniques that gave degrees of 17 and 8% for HAAACB and HapACB, respectively. Both HAAACB and HApACB turned out to be nontoxic for colorectal, ovarian and bladder tumor cell lines, to disclose a specific interaction with the CD44 antigen as the native hyaluronan moiety, and to deliver boron-atom concentrations largely sufficient for BNCT therapy when accumulated in cancer cells. PMID:18412288

  16. 4-Methylumbelliferone Treatment and Hyaluronan Inhibition as a Therapeutic Strategy in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Nadine; Kuipers, Hedwich F.; Frymoyer, Adam R.; Ishak, Heather D.; Bollyky, Jennifer B.; Wight, Thomas N.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a prominent component of the extracellular matrix at many sites of chronic inflammation, including type 1 diabetes (T1D), multiple sclerosis, and numerous malignancies. Recent publications have demonstrated that when HA synthesis is inhibited using 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), beneficial effects are observed in several animal models of these diseases. Notably, 4-MU is an already approved drug in Europe and Asia called “hymecromone” where it is used to treat biliary spasm. However, there is uncertainty regarding how 4-MU treatment provides benefit in these animal models and the potential long-term consequences of HA inhibition. Here, we review what is known about how HA contributes to immune dysregulation and tumor progression. Then, we review what is known about 4-MU and hymecromone in terms of mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and safety. Finally, we review recent studies detailing the use of 4-MU to treat animal models of cancer and autoimmunity. PMID:25852691

  17. Studies on the formation and characterization of macroporous electron-beam generated hyaluronan cryogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Senta; Naumov, Sergej; Knolle, Wolfgang; Prager, Andrea; Decker, Ulrich; Becher, Jana; Weisser, Jürgen; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Macroporous cryogels from methacrylated hyaluronan were synthesized at sub-zero temperatures using a novel electron-beam based approach with and without the use of tetra(ethylene glycol) diacrylate as additional cross-linker. Mechanically stable materials possessing a spongy morphology with pore diameters ranging from 50 μm to 70 μm were obtained and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The excellent cytocompatibility was proven by seeding and cultivation of 3T3 mouse cells on top of the gels. The primary reaction and the chain growth radicals were investigated by quantum chemical calculation and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and experimentally verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The additional cross-linker enhances the reaction efficiency of the cryogel formation.

  18. The Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth of Neurons on Poly(D-lysine)/Hyaluronan Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haifei; Sheng, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    Poly(D-lysine)/hyaluronan (PDL/HA) films were prepared using layer-by-layer assembly technique and chemically cross-linked with a water soluble carbodiimide (EDC) in combination with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) through formation of amide bonds. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to follow the cross-linking reaction. Atomic force measurement, ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were performed to study the chemical structure, topography, thickness and mechanical properties of the cross-linked films. QCM-D and Frictional force study were used to reveal the viscoelasticity of the films after cross-linking treatment. The stability of the films was studied via incubating the films in physiological environment. Finally, the neurons were used to evaluate the interaction between films and cells. The results indicated that the neurons were preferably proliferating and outgrowth neurite on cross-linked films while uncross-linked films are highly cell resistant. PMID:27427590

  19. Poly(ethylene glycol)-or silicone-modified hyaluronan for contact lens wetting agent applications.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Stefan M; Liu, Lina; Brook, Michael A; Sheardown, Heather

    2015-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a hydrophilic biopolymer that has been explored as a wetting agent in contact lens applications. In this study, HA was modified with siloxy or polyethylene glycol moieties using click chemistry to make it more soluble in monomer solutions used to synthesize model contact lens materials; unmodified HA was not soluble in the same monomer solutions. The water contents of the silicone hydrogels were not increased by the presence of modified HA, nor was there a decrease in the surface contact angle. However, modified HA did lead to a reduction in lysozyme adsorption in some cases. The leaching rate of HA modified with polyethylene glycol from a 78:22 DMA:TRIS(OH) hydrogel was significantly slower than for unmodified HA. PMID:25504586

  20. Nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan assembled layer-by-layer: An antibacterial surface for Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Nascimento, Vicente F; Murillo, Duber; Taketa, Thiago B; Sahoo, Prasana; de Souza, Alessandra A; Beppu, Marisa M; Cotta, Monica A

    2016-01-20

    In this work, nanofilms of hyaluronan/chitosan (HA/CHI) assembled layer by layer were synthesized; their application as a potential antimicrobial material was demonstrated for the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium, here used as a model. For the synthesis, the influence of pH and ionic strength of these natural polymer stem-solutions on final characteristics of the HA/CHI nanofilms was studied in detail. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using widefield fluorescence microscopy. These results were correlated with the chemical properties of the nanofilms, studied by FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, as well as with their morphology and surface properties characterized using SEM and AFM. The present findings can be extended to design and optimize HA/CHI nanofilms with enhanced antimicrobial behavior for other type of phytopathogenic gram-negative bacteria species, such as Xanthomonas citri, Xanthomas campestri and Ralstonia solanacearum. PMID:26572322

  1. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry analysis of hyaluronan oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Shinobu; Hirano, Kana; Toyoda, Hidenao; Linhardt, Robert J.; Toida, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    A new method is presented for the identification of oligosaccharides obtained by enzymatic digestion of hyaluronan (HA) with bacterial hyaluronidase (E.C. 4.2.2.1, from Streptomyces hyalurolyticus) using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). Mixtures containing HA oligosaccharides of tetrasaccharide (4-mer)–34-mer were analyzed using this method. The carboxyl groups of the glucuronate residues in the prepared HA oligomers, were modified as the acidic form (—COOH), sodium salts (—COONa), organic ammonium salts, or methylesters before MALDI-TOFMS measurement. Among these samples, the methylester form of glucuronate residues in HA oligosaccharides, prepared by methylation using trimethylsilyl diazomethane, afforded high sensitivity for spectra. This simple modification method for carboxyl group methylation of acidic polysaccharides [Hirano et al., Carbohydr. Res., 340, (2005) 2297–2304] provides samples suitable for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis throughout a significantly enhanced range of masses. PMID:17543609

  2. Precise tailoring of tyramine-based hyaluronan hydrogel properties using DMTMM conjugation.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Claudia; D'Este, Matteo; Alini, Mauro; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Eglin, David

    2015-01-22

    Injectable tyramine modified hyaluronic acid (HA-Tyr) hydrogels which are bio-orthogonally cross-linked with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are excellent candidate biomaterials for drug delivery, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Ligation of tyramine to HA has been reported using the very well established N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry. Here we demonstrate the applicability of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMTMM) as an alternative coupling agent to synthesize HA-Tyr conjugates. The optimized derivatization process allows accurate control of the degree of substituted Tyr on hyaluronan (DSmol). Hence, viscoelastic properties, in vitro swelling and enzymatic digestion profiles of the crosslinked hydrogels can be precisely tuned via DSmol. Our study demonstrates the advantages of DMTMM conjugation as a powerful tool to synthesize HA-Tyr hydrogels with properties exactly tailored for biomedical applications. PMID:25439901

  3. Evaluation of an injectable thermoresponsive hyaluronan hydrogel in a rabbit osteochondral defect model.

    PubMed

    D'Este, Matteo; Sprecher, Christoph Martin; Milz, Stefan; Nehrbass, Dirk; Dresing, Iska; Zeiter, Stephan; Alini, Mauro; Eglin, David

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage displays very little self-healing capabilities, generating a major clinical need. Here, we introduce a thermoresponsive hyaluronan hydrogel for cartilage repair obtained by covalently grafting poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) to hyaluronan, to give a brush co-polymer HpN. The gel is fluid at room temperature and becomes gel at body temperature. In this pilot study HpN safety and repair response were evaluated in an osteochondral defect model in rabbit. Follow-up was of 1 week and 12 weeks and the empty defect served as a control, for a total of four experimental groups. At 12 weeks the defect sites were evaluated macroscopically and histologically. Local lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and kidneys were analyzed for histopathological evaluation. HpN could be easily injected and remained into the defect throughout the study. The macroscopic score was statistically superior for HpN versus empty. Histological score gave opposite trend but not statistically significant. A slight tissue reaction was observed around HpN, however, vascularization and subchondral bone formation were not impeded. An upper proteoglycans rich fibro-cartilaginous tissue with fairly good continuity and lateral integration into the existing articular cartilage was observed in all cases. No signs of local or systemic acute or subacute toxicity were observed. In conclusion, HpN is easily injectable, remains into an osteochondral defect within a moving synovial joint, is biocompatible and does not interfere with the intrinsic healing response of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1469-1478, 2016. PMID:26833870

  4. New amphiphilic lactic acid oligomer-hyaluronan conjugates: synthesis and physicochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Pravata, Laurent; Braud, Christian; Boustta, Mahfoud; El Ghzaoui, Abdelsalam; Tømmeraas, Kristoffer; Guillaumie, Fanny; Schwach-Abdellaoui, Khadija; Vert, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The "grafting onto" strategy was used to conjugate DL-lactic acid oligomers (OLA) to hyaluronan (HA) for the sake of developing novel degradable HA-based self-assembling polymeric systems. Grafting was achieved by reacting COCl-terminated OLA with cetyltrimethylammonium hyaluronate (CTA-HA) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The resulting CTA-HAOLA conjugates were purified and turned to sodium form (Na-HAOLA) by dissolution in a phosphate buffer-DMSO mixture and successive dialyses against DMSO, ethanol, and water. In contrast, when the same protocol was applied to CTA-HAOLA, phase separation with gel formation was observed. The solution phase was composed of Na-HAOLA whereas the gel phase was made of mixed CTA-Na-HAOLA salt with ca. 25% of the carboxyl groups neutralized by CTA. Gelation was assigned to intramolecular hydrophobic associations between OLA and cetyl alkyl chains that complemented electrostatic interactions between CTA and HA COO- groups synergistically. Therefore, the corresponding stabilized CTA ions required more drastic conditions to be released. Under the selected dialysis conditions, the CTA-Na-HAOLA gels formed tiny tubes. Na-HAOLA and CTA-Na-HAOLA were characterized by FTIR, one-dimensional 1H and two-dimensional 1H NMR. The extent of grafting was ca. 5% per disaccharidic repeating unit, regardless of the molecular weight, as determined by NMR and capillary zone electrophoresis. Amphiphilic Na-HAOLA molecules were aggregated and formed spherical species in water according to size exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle laser light scattering detection. The critical aggregation concentration ranged between 0.2 and 0.35% (w/v), depending of the molecular weight of the parent hyaluronan. PMID:18047288

  5. Ratiometric fluorescent biosensor for hyaluronidase with hyaluronan as both nanoparticle scaffold and substrate for enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huafei; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu

    2014-09-01

    Hyaluronidases (HAase) are involved in various physiological and pathological processes and have been reported as urinary marker for bladder cancer. In this study, a novel ratiometric fluorescent sensing system based on both aggregation-induced emission (AIE) and aggregation-induced quenching (ACQ) was developed to quantitatively assess hyaluronidase level. First, a tetraphenylethylene derivative with positive charges (TPE-2N(+), typical AIE molecule) at both ends and an anthracene derivative with positive charge at one end (AN-N(+), typical ACQ molecule) was synthesized. These two positively charged compounds were then mixed with a negatively charged hyaluronan (HA), which induced the aggregation of the compounds as well as the nanoparticles formation as a result of electrostatic complexation, with TPE-2N(+) acting as cross-linking agent. The aggregation also caused the efficient quenching of the emission of AN-N(+) due to ACQ effect, as well as the fluorescence enhancement of TPE-2N(+) due to AIE effect. In the presence of HAase, the enzymatic reaction led to the degradation of HA and triggered disassembly of the nanoparticles; as a result, the emission of AN-N(+) was restored and that of TPE-2N(+) was suppressed. This fluorescence variation affords the system a robust ratiometric biosensor for HAase, and the ratio of fluorescence intensity for AN-N(+) (I414) to that for TPE-2N(+) (I474) can be used as the sensing signal for detecting HAase activity. In this system, hyaluronan serves not only as the scaffold for nanoparticle formation but also as the substrate for enzymatic reaction. This assay system is operable in aqueous media with very low detection limit of 0.0017 U/mL and is capable of detecting HAase in biological fluids such as serum and urine. This strategy may provide a new and effective approach for developing other enzyme assays. PMID:25068551

  6. Surface modification of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene with hyaluronan for total joint replacement application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min

    Hyaluronan (HA), a natural lubricant molecule present in mammalian synovial fluid, was introduced into the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) surface to improve its hydrophilicity, lubricity and wear resistance for orthopedic applications. Two novel hyaluronan derivatives were created so that micro-composites of hydrophilic HA and hydrophobic UHMWPE could be made by either a solvent infiltration or melt blending process. The silylated HA was hydrophobic and soluble in organic solvents, and thus was used in the solvent infiltration process. Preforms with interconnected micro-pores were used as the UHMWPE starting material to form a micro-composite with HA. With appropriate process parameters, a uniform HA film layer was produced on the micro-composite surface, which quickly hydrated in water, forming a lubricious surface film. The HA surface on the micro-composite was stable and resistant to enzymatic degradation. The effect of HA on the mechanical properties of UHMWPE was significant, but within ASTM guidelines for implant-grade UHMWPE. Compared with the control, the micro-composite had a decreased strength and increased elongation to failure. The HA-UHMWPE micro-composites significantly reduced wear and wear rates of UHMWPE, and the decreases were more significant for some sample treatments than others. A series of HA esters that could be used to create the microcomposites via melt blending was also developed by acylating silylated HA-CTA. HA esters with an acyl chain length greater than 10 carbon atoms melted before degrading. Thus, HA caprinate and higher esters are melt-processable. Future work will investigate the melt blending approach to manufacture microcomposites with hot-processed HA esters and UHMWPE powder.

  7. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 {+-} 3mm (mean {+-} SD) and 10 {+-} 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 {+-} 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 {+-} 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, D; Marino, M H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is involved in acute and chronic inflammatory events. In view of the complexity associated with the inflammatory response, the dissection of possible mechanisms by which NO modulates this response will be profitable in designing novel and more efficacious NOS inhibitors. In this review we describe the consequences associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and its therapeutic implications. PMID:15991919

  9. Glucose regulated proteins 78 and 75 bind to the receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility in interphase microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Hiroko . E-mail: pa2020@art.osaka-med.ac.jp; Yoneda, Masahiko; Hayasaki, Hana; Nakamura, Toshiya; Mori, Hiroshi

    2006-01-20

    The receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (RHAMM), which is a hyaluronan-binding protein, is a centrosomal and microtubal protein. Here, we have identified two RHAMM-binding proteins, glucose regulated protein (GRP) 78 and GRP75, using co-immunoprecipitation analysis. These two proteins directly bound to glutathione-S-transferase-RHAMM fusion proteins. By double immunostaining, GRP78 and GRP75 colocalized with RHAMM in interphase microtubules, but were separated in mitotic spindles. Prevention of microtubule polymerization by TN-16 and vincristine sulfate induced RHAMM overexpression without a significant change in GRP78/75. Taken together, GRP78/75 and RHAMM complexes may stabilize microtubules in the interphase, associated with a downregulation of RHAMM. These results reveal a new biochemical activity of RHAMM.

  10. Unique animal prenyltransferase with monoterpene synthase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, Anna B.; Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2009-06-01

    Monoterpenes are structurally diverse natural compounds that play an essential role in the chemical ecology of a wide array of organisms. A key enzyme in monoterpene biosynthesis is geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS). GPPS is an isoprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes a single electrophilic condensation reaction between dimethylallyl diphosphate (C5) and isopentenyl diphosphate (C5) to produce geranyl diphosphate (GDP; C10). GDP is the universal precursor to all monoterpenes. Subsequently, monoterpene synthases are responsible for the transformation of GDP to a variety of acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic monoterpene products. In pheromone-producing male Ips pini bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), the acyclic monoterpene myrcene is required for the production of the major aggregation pheromone component, ipsdienol. Here, we report monoterpene synthase activity associated with GPPS of I. pini. Enzyme assays were performed on recombinant GPPS to determine the presence of monoterpene synthase activity, and the reaction products were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The functionally expressed recombinant enzyme produced both GDP and myrcene, making GPPS of I. pini a bifunctional enzyme. This unique insect isoprenyl diphosphate synthase possesses the functional plasticity that is characteristic of terpene biosynthetic enzymes of plants, contributing toward the current understanding of product specificity of the isoprenoid pathway.

  11. Effect of viral dose on experimental pneumonia caused by aerosol exposure of calves to bovine herpesvirus 1 and Pasteurella haemolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, W D; Jericho, K W; Doige, C E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of various aerosol doses of bovine herpesvirus 1, followed four days later by aerosol exposure to a constant level of Pasteurella haemolytica, was studied in 16 crossbred Hereford range calves. A Collision nebulizer was used to generate aerosols from virus suspensions with concentrations of 10(8.2) (high), 10(5.2) (moderate) or 10(2.2) (low) TCID50/mL. The bacterial suspension contained 10(7) colony forming units/mL. Control calves exposed only to P. haemolytica developed no pulmonary lesions. Calves in the low, moderate and high virus exposure groups developed lobular areas of atelectasis; in addition, one calf in the moderate and all four in the high virus exposure group developed fibrinous pneumonia. One of the latter calves died. The 50% effective dose for fibrinous pneumonia under these experimental conditions was 10(6.0) TCID50 bovine herpesvirus 1/mL of suspension in the nebulizer reservoir, and approximately 10(4.0) infectious units inhaled per calf. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6299485

  12. Pasteurella pneumotropica Evades the Human Complement System by Acquisition of the Complement Regulators Factor H and C4BP

    PubMed Central

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Granados Martinez, Adriana Patricia; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Castiblanco Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella pneumotropica is an opportunist Gram negative bacterium responsible for rodent pasteurellosis that affects upper respiratory, reproductive and digestive tracts of mammals. In animal care facilities the presence of P. pneumotropica causes severe to lethal infection in immunodeficient mice, being also a potential source for human contamination. Indeed, occupational exposure is one of the main causes of human infection by P. pneumotropica. The clinical presentation of the disease includes subcutaneous abscesses, respiratory tract colonization and systemic infections. Given the ability of P. pneumotropica to fully disseminate in the organism, it is quite relevant to study the role of the complement system to control the infection as well as the possible evasion mechanisms involved in bacterial survival. Here, we show for the first time that P. pneumotropica is able to survive the bactericidal activity of the human complement system. We observed that host regulatory complement C4BP and Factor H bind to the surface of P. pneumotropica, controlling the activation pathways regulating the formation and maintenance of C3-convertases. These results show that P. pneumotropica has evolved mechanisms to evade the human complement system that may increase the efficiency by which this pathogen is able to gain access to and colonize inner tissues where it may cause severe infections. PMID:25347183

  13. Identification of genes transcribed by Pasteurella multocida in rabbit livers through the selective capture of transcribed sequences.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongchun; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Aiqin; Liu, Jiasen; Yuan, Dongwei; Jiang, Qian; Lin, Huan; Si, Changde; Qu, Liandong

    2012-06-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative nonmotile coccobacillus, is the causative agent of fowl cholera in poultry, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, atropic rhinitis in swine, and snuffles in rabbits. The differentially expressed gene profile of P. multocida in infected rabbit livers was identified and compared with that from in vitro culture by selective capture of transcribed sequences. A total of 31 genes were identified, of which 28 encoded enzymes for amino acid biosynthesis and metabolism, intermediary metabolism, and energy metabolism, or proteins for regulatory adaptive responses, general microbial stress response, transport proteins, and secreted proteinases. Three were unknown, novel genes. Five genes representing different categories were chosen randomly and verified by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. All were upregulated by P. multocida in infected rabbit livers, with changes ranging from 1.61- to 13.55-fold when compared with in vitro cultures. This study has identified genes of P. multocida that are upregulated during infection of rabbit livers when compared with in vitro growth conditions. The genes will provide a molecular basis for further study of the pathogenesis of P. multocida. PMID:22448890

  14. Detection of Antibodies to Pasteurella multocida by capture enzyme immunoassay using a monoclonal antibody against P37 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, R R; Deeb, B J; DiGiacomo, R F

    1997-01-01

    As infection with Pasteurella multocida is common in rabbits, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for its detection. A murine immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody was used to capture a 37-kDa polypeptide of P. multocida serotype A:12 in an EIA to detect antibodies to P. multocida. The 37-kDa antigen was selected since it was previously shown to be a major immunogen during P. multocida infection in rabbits. The sensitivity of the P37 EIA, determined with sera from 56 rabbits infected with P. multocida, was 98%. Specificity, evaluated with sera from 62 rabbits from colonies free of P. multocida, was 92%. Titration curves of sera from rabbits immunized with P. multocida serotype A:3 or A:12 coincided, indicating that the P37 EIA was equally efficient in detecting antibodies to the two major serotypes of the organism. Comparison of the P37 EIA with the current serodiagnostic test, a bacterial lysate EIA, revealed relatively good correlation (r = 0.68). However, specificity was greatly improved, as 34% of uninfected rabbits were falsely positive by the lysate EIA whereas only 3% of uninfected rabbits were falsely positive by the P37 EIA. The coefficient of variation for same-day tests was 10%, and that for interday tests was 15%, indicating good reproducibility. The greater sensitivity and specificity of the P37 EIA should significantly enhance diagnostic capability to identify rabbits infected with P. multocida. PMID:8968909

  15. Influence of Pasteurella multocida and high and low environmental temperatures on adrenals and bursa of Fabricius in turkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Simensen, E.; Olson, L.D.; Hahn, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The morphologic changes in the adrenals and bursa of Fabricius were evaluated from turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida either in the palatine air spaces or via drinking water and maintained at high (33.4-37.4 C), low (2.6-5.3 C), and moderate (19.8-22.4 C) temperatures in temperature-controlled chambers. There was a slight hyperplasia of the adrenal cortical cells and a hypertrophy of the nuclei in the uninoculated turkeys maintained at both high and low temperatures, but these changes were more marked in turkeys maintained at low temperatures. Regardless of the temperature to which the turkeys were exposed, there was an increase in adrenal weight, hyperplasia of the cortical cells, hypertrophy of the nuclei of the cortical cells, and depletion of lipid in the cortical cells in the turkeys that became depressed after inoculation with P. multocida. In the uninoculated turkeys exposed to high temperatures there was a reduction in the weight of the bursa of Fabricius, atrophy of the follicles, and a reduction in the number of lymphocytes within the follicle, which did not occur in the bursae from uninoculated turkeys maintained at low temperatures. In the turkeys inoculated with P. multocida, there was a marked reduction in bursal weight, atrophy of the follicles, and reduction in the number of lymphocytes within the follicles.

  16. Wetland environmental conditions associated with the risk of avian cholera outbreaks and the abundance of Pasteurella multocida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Samuel, Michael D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Shadduck, Daniel J.; Creekmore, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Avian cholera is a significant infectious disease affecting waterfowl across North America and occurs worldwide among various avian species. Despite the importance of this disease, little is known about the factors that cause avian cholera outbreaks and what management strategies might be used to reduce disease mortality. Previous studies indicated that wetland water conditions may affect survival and transmission of Pasteurella multocida, the agent that causes avian cholera. These studies hypothesized that water conditions affect the likelihood that avian cholera outbreaks will occur in specific wetlands. To test these predictions, we collected data from avian cholera outbreak and non-outbreak (control) wetlands throughout North America (wintera??spring 1995a??1996 to 1998a??1999) to evaluate whether water conditions were associated with outbreaks. Conditional logistic regression analysis on paired outbreak and non-outbreak wetlands indicated no significant association between water conditions and the risk of avian cholera outbreaks. For wetlands where avian cholera outbreaks occurred, linear regression showed that increased eutrophic nutrient concentrations (Potassium [K], nitrate [NO3], phosphorus [P], and phosphate [PO3]) were positively related to the abundance of P. multocida recovered from water and sediment samples. Wetland protein concentration and an El Ni??o event were also associated with P. multocida abundance. Our results indicate that wetland water conditions are not strongly associated with the risk of avian cholera outbreaks; however, some variables may play a role in the abundance of P. multocida bacteria and might be important in reducing the severity of avian cholera outbreaks.

  17. Molecular gene cloning and nucleotide sequencing and construction of an aroA mutant of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1.

    PubMed Central

    Tatum, F M; Briggs, R E; Halling, S M

    1994-01-01

    The aroA gene of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 was cloned by complementation of the aroA mutation in Escherichia coli K-12 strain AB2829. The nucleotide sequence of a 2.2-kb fragment encoding aroA predicted an open reading frame product 434 amino acids long that shows homology to other bacterial AroA proteins. Several strategies to inactivate aroA were unsuccessful. Gene replacement was finally achieved by constructing a replacement plasmid with aroA inactivated by insertion of a P. haemolytica ampicillin resistance fragment into a unique NdeI site in aroA. A hybrid plasmid was constructed by joining the aroA replacement plasmid with a 4.2-kb P. haemolytica plasmid which encodes streptomycin resistance. Following PhaI methylation, the replacement plasmid was introduced by electroporation into P. haemolytica NADC-D60, a plasmidless strain of serotype 1A. Allelic exchange between the replacement plasmid and the chromosome of P. haemolytica gave rise to an ampicillin-resistant mutant which grew on chemically defined P. haemolytica medium supplemented with aromatic amino acids but failed to grow on the same medium lacking tryptophan. Southern blot analysis confirmed that aroA of the mutant was inactivated and that the mutant was without a plasmid. Images PMID:8031095

  18. Immunogenicity and efficacy of three recombinant subunit Pasteurella multocida toxin vaccines against progressive atrophic rhinitis in pigs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chienjin; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chen, Zeng-Weng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Liu, Cheng-I; Winton, James R.; Chien, Maw-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Three short fragments of recombinant subunit Pasteurella multocida toxin (rsPMT) were constructed for evaluation as candidate vaccines against progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) of swine. PMT-specific antibody secreting cells and evidence of cellular immunity were detected in rsPMT-immunized pigs following authentic PMT challenge or homologous antigen booster. Piglets immunized with rsPMT fragments containing either the N-terminal or the C-terminal portions of PMT developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Pregnant sows immunized with rsPMT had higher levels of maternal antibodies in their colostrum than did those immunized with a conventional PAR-toxoid vaccine. Offspring from rsPMT vaccinated sows had better survival after challenge with a five-fold lethal dose of authentic PMT and had better growth performance after challenge with a sublethal dose of toxin. Our findings indicate these non-toxic rsPMT proteins are attractive candidates for development of a subunit vaccine against PAR in pigs.

  19. Modification of heterotrimeric G-proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells stimulated with Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    PubMed

    Babb, Rebecca C; Homer, Karen A; Robbins, Jon; Lax, Alistair J

    2012-01-01

    Many bacterial toxins covalently modify components of eukaryotic signalling pathways in a highly specific manner, and can be used as powerful tools to decipher the function of their molecular target(s). The Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) mediates its cellular effects through the activation of members of three of the four heterotrimeric G-protein families, G(q), G(12) and G(i). PMT has been shown by others to lead to the deamidation of recombinant Gα(i) at Gln-205 to inhibit its intrinsic GTPase activity. We have investigated modification of native Gα subunits mediated by PMT in Swiss 3T3 cells using 2-D gel electrophoresis and antibody detection. An acidic change in the isoelectric point was observed for the Gα subunit of the G(q) and G(i) families following PMT treatment of Swiss 3T3 cells, which is consistent with the deamidation of these Gα subunits. Surprisingly, PMT also induced a similar modification of Gα(11), a member of the G(q) family of G-proteins that is not activated by PMT. Furthermore, an alkaline change in the isoelectric point of Gα(13) was observed following PMT treatment of cells, suggesting differential modification of this Gα subunit by PMT. G(s) was not affected by PMT treatment. Prolonged treatment with PMT led to a reduction in membrane-associated Gα(i), but not Gα(q). We also show that PMT inhibits the GTPase activity of G(q). PMID:23144805

  20. Identification of a virulence determinant that is conserved in the Jawetz and Heyl biotypes of [Pasteurella] pneumotropica.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiraku; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Terayama, Hayato; Asano, Ryoki; Kawamoto, Eiichi; Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Boot, Ron

    2016-08-01

    [Pasteurella] pneumotropica is a ubiquitous bacterium frequently isolated from laboratory rodents. Although this bacterium causes various diseases in immunosuppressed animals, little is known about major virulence factors and their roles in pathogenicity. To identify virulence factors, we sequenced the genome of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl strain ATCC 12555, and compared the resulting non-contiguous draft genome sequence with the genome of biotype Jawetz strain ATCC 35149. Among a large number of genes encoding virulence-associated factors in both strains, four genes encoding for YadA-like proteins, which are known virulence factors that function in host cell adherence and invasion in many pathogens. In this study, we assessed YadA distribution and biological activity as an example of one of virulence-associated factor shared, with biotype Jawetz and Heyl. More than half of mouse isolates were found to have at least one of these genes; whereas, the majority of rat isolates did not. Autoagglutination activity, and ability to bind to mouse collagen type IV and mouse fibroblast cells, was significantly higher in YadA-positive than YadA-negative strains. To conclude, we identified a large number of candidate genes predicted to influence [P.] pneumotropica pathogenesis. PMID:27402782

  1. An ST11 clone of Pasteurella multocida, widely spread among farmed rabbits in the Iberian Peninsula, demonstrates respiratory niche association.

    PubMed

    García-Alvarez, Andrés; Chaves, Fernando; Fernández, Ana; Sanz, Celia; Borobia, Marta; Cid, Dolores

    2015-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a veterinary pathogen causing diseases with considerable economic repercussions in a wide range of animal hosts. In rabbits, P. multocida infections cause a variety of clinical manifestations including rhinitis, pneumonia, septicemia, abscesses, mastitis, and pyometra. In this study, 100 P. multocida isolates from different commercial rabbit farms located throughout the Iberian Peninsula were molecularly characterized by capsular typing, detection of four virulence-associated genes (tbpA, toxA, hgbB, and pfhA), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Rabbit P. multocida isolates belonged to three different capsular types: A (47.0%), D (28.0%), and F (25.0%). One group of P. multocida isolates of capsular type D and positive for the hgbB gene was significantly associated with the clinical presentation of respiratory disease (OR 5.91; 95%CI, 1.63-21.38). These isolates belonged to same sequence type, ST11, in the P. multocida Multi-host MLST database. The ST11 clone also includes isolates from porcine and avian pneumonia. This clonal group of epidemiologically unrelated P. multocida isolates could be a virulent clone with some degree of specificity for respiratory disease. These findings could be relevant in the development of vaccines for pasteurellosis prevention, especially respiratory disease. PMID:26192377

  2. Genome sequencing of a virulent avian Pasteurella multocida strain GX-Pm reveals the candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chengjie; Sizhu, Suolang; Luo, Qingping; Xu, Xuewen; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Anding

    2016-04-01

    Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) was first shown to be the causative agent of fowl cholera by Louis Pasteur in 1881. First genomic study was performed on an avirulent avian strain Pm70, and until 2013, two genomes of virulent avian strains X73 and P1059 were sequenced. Comparative genome study supplied important information for further study on the pathogenesis of fowl cholera. In the previous study, a capsular serotype A strain GX-Pm was isolated from the liver of a chicken, which died during an outbreak of fowl cholera in 2011. The strain showed multiple drug resistance and was highly virulent to chickens. Therefore, the present study performed the genome sequencing and a comparative genomic analysis to reveal the candidate genes involved in virulence of P. multocida. Sequenced draft genome sequence of GX-Pm was 2,292,886 bp, contained 2941 protein-coding genes, 5 genomic islands, 4 IS elements and 2 prophage regions. Notability, all the predicted drug-resistance genes were included in predicted genomic islands. A comparative genome study on virulent avian strains P1059, X73 and GX-Pm with the avirulent avian strain Pm 70 indicated that 475 unique genes were only identified in either of virulent strains but absent in the avirulent strain. Among these genes, 20 genes were contained within genomes of all three virulent strains, including a few of putative virulence genes. Further characterization of the pathogenic functions of these genes would benefit the understanding of pathogenesis of fowl cholera. PMID:27033902

  3. Influence of systemic fluoroquinolone administration on the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract of clinically healthy calves.

    PubMed

    Catry, Boudewijn; Croubels, Siska; Schwarz, Stefan; Deprez, Piet; Cox, Bianca; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Opsomer, Geert; Decostere, Annemie; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2008-01-01

    The influence of enrofloxacin administration (5 mg/kg) for five consecutive days on the occurrence of Pasteurella multocida in the upper respiratory tract of two healthy calves was monitored over a 10-day period. From nasal swabs of two additional healthy control calves, which received a placebo saline administration, P. multocida was isolated throughout the study period. In the enrofloxacin treated calves, P. multocida was not demonstrated in the nasopharynx from 48 h after the first injection until two days after the last administration, when P. multocida reappeared and proved to be clonal in nature to the original isolates. During the experiment, no change in minimal inhibitory concentration for enrofloxacin of the P. multocida isolates was detected (MIC < or = 0.015 microg/mL). Enrofloxacin concentrations were determined in the plasma by a high-performance liquid chromatography method with fluorescence detection. The PK/PD indices AUC/MIC and Cmax/MIC ratio were calculated and found to be 1157.7 and 129.8, respectively. Remarkably, the respiratory pathogen Arcanobacterium pyogenes became the predominant recovered organism in the nasopharynx of one animal following enrofloxacin therapy throughout the remaining of the experiment. PMID:18808692

  4. Ceramide synthases in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Futerman, Anthony H; Casas, Josefina

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism consists of multiple metabolic pathways that converge upon ceramide, one of the key molecules among sphingolipids (SLs). In mammals, ceramide synthesis occurs via N-acylation of sphingoid backbones, dihydrosphingosine (dhSo) or sphingosine (So). The reaction is catalyzed by ceramide synthases (CerS), a family of enzymes with six different isoforms, with each one showing specificity towards a restricted group of acyl-CoAs, thus producing ceramides (Cer) and dihydroceramides (dhCer) with different fatty acid chain lengths. A large body of evidence documents the role of both So and dhSo as bioactive molecules, as well as the involvement of dhCer and Cer in physiological and pathological processes. In particular, the fatty acid composition of Cer has different effects in cell biology and in the onset and progression of different diseases. Therefore, modulation of CerS activity represents an attractive target in biomedical research and in finding new treatment modalities. In this review, we discuss functional, structural and biochemical features of CerS and examine CerS inhibitors that are currently available. PMID:26248326

  5. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm2/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm2/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis. PMID:26868769

  6. Practical determination of hyaluronan by a new noncompetitive fluorescence-based assay on serum of normal and cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Martins, João R M; Passerotti, Carlo C; Maciel, Rui M B; Sampaio, Lucia O; Dietrich, Carl P; Nader, Helena B

    2003-08-01

    A practical fluorescence-based assay method for determination of hyaluronan (HA) was developed. Plates were coated with hyaluronan-binding proteins (HABP) obtained from bovine cartilage and successively incubated with samples containing standard solutions of hyaluronan or serum from normal and cyrrhotic patients, biotin-conjugated HABP, and europium-labeled streptavidin. After release of europium from streptavidin with enhancement solution the final fluorescence is measured in a fluorometer. The method is specific for HA even in the presence of substantial amounts of other glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate, and heparin) or proteins. It is possible to quantify HA between 0.2 and 500.0 microg/L. Analyses of HA concentration in 545 normal subjects and 40 cirrhotic patients gave average values of 14.5 and 542.0 microg/L, respectively. It was also shown that older subjects (> or =51 years old) have more HA (28.0 microg/L) than younger subjects (12.0 to 14.0 microg/L). This new sandwich technique has shown high precision and sensitivity similar to those of a recently described fluorescence-based assay method, being able to measure HA in amounts as small as 0.2 microg/L. In addition, this noncompetitive assay avoids preincubation, consumes less time (<5 h) than the previous competitive fluorescence-based assay (>72 h), and avoids the use of radioactive materials. PMID:12842108

  7. Hyaluronan and Fibrin Biomaterial as Scaffolds for Neuronal Differentiation of Adult Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Bressan, Eriberto; Ferroni, Letizia; Nalesso, Elisa; Puppa, Alessandro Della; D’Avella, Domenico; Lops, Diego; Pinton, Paolo; Zavan, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we have described a simple protocol to obtain an enriched culture of adult stem cells organized in neurospheres from two post-natal tissues: skin and adipose tissue. Due to their possible application in neuronal tissue regeneration, here we tested two kinds of scaffold well known in tissue engineering application: hyaluronan based membranes and fibrin-glue meshes. Neurospheres from skin and adipose tissue were seeded onto two scaffold types: hyaluronan based membrane and fibrin-glue meshes. Neurospheres were then induced to acquire a glial and neuronal-like phenotype. Gene expression, morphological feature and chromosomal imbalance (kariotype) were analyzed and compared. Adipose and skin derived neurospheres are able to grow well and to differentiate into glial/neuron cells without any chromosomal imbalance in both scaffolds. Adult cells are able to express typical cell surface markers such as S100; GFAP; nestin; βIII tubulin; CNPase. In summary, we have demonstrated that neurospheres isolated from skin and adipose tissues are able to differentiate in glial/neuron-like cells, without any chromosomal imbalance in two scaffold types, useful for tissue engineering application: hyaluronan based membrane and fibrin-glue meshes. PMID:22072917

  8. Hyaluronan Polymer Length, Grafting Density, and Surface Poly(ethylene glycol) Coating Influence in Vivo Circulation and Tumor Targeting of Hyaluronan-Grafted Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan-grafted liposomes (HA-liposomes) preferentially target CD44-overexpressing tumor cells in vitro via receptor-mediated endocytosis. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of HA-liposomes with various sizes of HA (MW 5–8, 50–60, and 175–350 kDa) in mice. Incorporation of negatively charged HA on the liposome surface compromised its blood circulation time, which led to decreased tumor accumulation in CD44+ human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenografts compared to PEGylated liposomes (PEG-5000). Clearance of HA-liposomes was HA polymer length-dependent; high MW (175–350 kDa, highest ligand binding affinity) HA-liposomes displayed faster clearance compared to low MW (5–8, 50–60 kDa) HA-liposomes or PEGylated liposomes. Surface HA ligand density can also affect clearance of HA-liposomes. Thus, HA is not an effective stealth coating material. When dual coating of PEG and HA was used, the PEG-HA-liposomes displayed similar blood circulation time and tumor accumulation to that of the PEGylated liposomes; however, the PEG-HA-liposomes displayed better cellular internalization capability in vivo. Tumor histology showed that PEG-HA-liposomes had a more direct association with CD44+ cancer cells, while PEGylated liposomes located predominantly in the tumor periphery, with less association with CD44+ cells. Flow cytometry analysis of ex vivo tumor cells showed that PEG-HA-liposomes had significantly higher tumor cell internalization compared to PEGylated liposomes. This study demonstrates that a long blood circulation time is critical for active tumor targeting. Furthermore, the use of the tumor-targeting ligand HA does not increase total tumor accumulation of actively targeted liposomes in solid tumors; however, it can enhance intracellular delivery. PMID:24806526

  9. Binding of Hyaluronan to the Native Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor LYVE-1 Is Critically Dependent on Receptor Clustering and Hyaluronan Organization*

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, William; Banerji, Suneale; Day, Anthony J.; Bhattacharjee, Shaumick; Jackson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic endothelial receptor LYVE-1 has been implicated in both uptake of hyaluronan (HA) from tissue matrix and in facilitating transit of leukocytes and tumor cells through lymphatic vessels based largely on in vitro studies with recombinant receptor in transfected fibroblasts. Curiously, however, LYVE-1 in lymphatic endothelium displays little if any binding to HA in vitro, and this has led to the conclusion that the native receptor is functionally silenced, a feature that is difficult to reconcile with its proposed in vivo functions. Nonetheless, as we reported recently, LYVE-1 can function as a receptor for HA-encapsulated Group A streptococci and mediate lymphatic dissemination in mice. Here we resolve these paradoxical findings and show that the capacity of LYVE-1 to bind HA is strictly dependent on avidity, demanding appropriate receptor self-association and/or HA multimerization. In particular, we demonstrate the prerequisite of a critical LYVE-1 threshold density and show that HA binding may be elicited in lymphatic endothelium by surface clustering with divalent LYVE-1 mAbs. In addition, we show that cross-linking of biotinylated HA in streptavidin multimers or supramolecular complexes with the inflammation-induced protein TSG-6 enables binding even in the absence of LYVE-1 cross-linking. Finally, we show that endogenous HA on the surface of macrophages can engage LYVE-1, facilitating their adhesion and transit across lymphatic endothelium. These results reveal LYVE-1 as a low affinity receptor tuned to discriminate between different HA configurations through avidity and establish a new mechanistic basis for the functions ascribed to LYVE-1 in matrix HA binding and leukocyte trafficking in vivo. PMID:26823460

  10. Hyaluronan polymer length, grafting density, and surface poly(ethylene glycol) coating influence in vivo circulation and tumor targeting of hyaluronan-grafted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qhattal, Hussaini Syed Sha; Hye, Tanvirul; Alali, Amer; Liu, Xinli

    2014-06-24

    Hyaluronan-grafted liposomes (HA-liposomes) preferentially target CD44-overexpressing tumor cells in vitro via receptor-mediated endocytosis. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of HA-liposomes with various sizes of HA (MW 5-8, 50-60, and 175-350 kDa) in mice. Incorporation of negatively charged HA on the liposome surface compromised its blood circulation time, which led to decreased tumor accumulation in CD44+ human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenografts compared to PEGylated liposomes (PEG-5000). Clearance of HA-liposomes was HA polymer length-dependent; high MW (175-350 kDa, highest ligand binding affinity) HA-liposomes displayed faster clearance compared to low MW (5-8, 50-60 kDa) HA-liposomes or PEGylated liposomes. Surface HA ligand density can also affect clearance of HA-liposomes. Thus, HA is not an effective stealth coating material. When dual coating of PEG and HA was used, the PEG-HA-liposomes displayed similar blood circulation time and tumor accumulation to that of the PEGylated liposomes; however, the PEG-HA-liposomes displayed better cellular internalization capability in vivo. Tumor histology showed that PEG-HA-liposomes had a more direct association with CD44+ cancer cells, while PEGylated liposomes located predominantly in the tumor periphery, with less association with CD44+ cells. Flow cytometry analysis of ex vivo tumor cells showed that PEG-HA-liposomes had significantly higher tumor cell internalization compared to PEGylated liposomes. This study demonstrates that a long blood circulation time is critical for active tumor targeting. Furthermore, the use of the tumor-targeting ligand HA does not increase total tumor accumulation of actively targeted liposomes in solid tumors; however, it can enhance intracellular delivery. PMID:24806526

  11. Binding of Hyaluronan to the Native Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor LYVE-1 Is Critically Dependent on Receptor Clustering and Hyaluronan Organization.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, William; Banerji, Suneale; Day, Anthony J; Bhattacharjee, Shaumick; Jackson, David G

    2016-04-01

    The lymphatic endothelial receptor LYVE-1 has been implicated in both uptake of hyaluronan (HA) from tissue matrix and in facilitating transit of leukocytes and tumor cells through lymphatic vessels based largely onin vitrostudies with recombinant receptor in transfected fibroblasts. Curiously, however, LYVE-1 in lymphatic endothelium displays little if any binding to HAin vitro, and this has led to the conclusion that the native receptor is functionally silenced, a feature that is difficult to reconcile with its proposedin vivofunctions. Nonetheless, as we reported recently, LYVE-1 can function as a receptor for HA-encapsulated Group A streptococci and mediate lymphatic dissemination in mice. Here we resolve these paradoxical findings and show that the capacity of LYVE-1 to bind HA is strictly dependent on avidity, demanding appropriate receptor self-association and/or HA multimerization. In particular, we demonstrate the prerequisite of a critical LYVE-1 threshold density and show that HA binding may be elicited in lymphatic endothelium by surface clustering with divalent LYVE-1 mAbs. In addition, we show that cross-linking of biotinylated HA in streptavidin multimers or supramolecular complexes with the inflammation-induced protein TSG-6 enables binding even in the absence of LYVE-1 cross-linking. Finally, we show that endogenous HA on the surface of macrophages can engage LYVE-1, facilitating their adhesion and transit across lymphatic endothelium. These results reveal LYVE-1 as a low affinity receptor tuned to discriminate between different HA configurations through avidity and establish a new mechanistic basis for the functions ascribed to LYVE-1 in matrix HA binding and leukocyte traffickingin vivo. PMID:26823460

  12. MicroRNA-7 inhibition rescues age-associated loss of epidermal growth factor receptor and hyaluronan-dependent differentiation in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Midgley, Adam C; Bowen, Timothy; Phillips, Aled O; Steadman, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Age-related defects in fibroblast differentiation were previously shown to be associated with impaired hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) function, with both required for normal fibroblast functionality. In fibroblasts, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1)-dependent phenotypic activation uses two distinct but co-operating pathways that involve TGF-β receptor (TGF-βR)/Smad2 activation and HA-mediated CD44-EGFR co-localization and signalling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). The HA-mediated CD44-EGFR pathway was found to be compromised with in vitro aging, through loss of EGFR expression and a reduced movement of CD44 throughout the cellular membrane. Here, we also investigate the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in age-related loss of differentiation, through investigation of miRNA-7 (miR-7) regulation of the HA-mediated EGFR-signalling pathway. The transcription of miR-7 was found to be upregulated in aged cells. In young cells, age-related loss of differentiation could be mimicked through transfection of pre-miR-7, and in aged cells, could be reversed through transfection of locked nucleic acids (LNA) targeting miR-7. Additionally, miR-7 was found to be involved in the regulation of CD44 membrane motility, which was downregulated in instances of miR-7 upregulation, and partially restorable through either miR-7 inhibition or HAS2 overexpression. The altered dynamics of CD44 in the cell membrane demonstrated a further action of miR-7 in regulating the HA-dependent CD44/EGFR pathway. We explain this novel mechanism of age-associated functional consequence due to miR-7 upregulation and demonstrate that it is reversible; highlighting miR-7 as a potential target for restoring the healing capabilities in chronic wounds in the elderly. PMID:24134702

  13. The tomato terpene synthase gene family.

    PubMed

    Falara, Vasiliki; Akhtar, Tariq A; Nguyen, Thuong T H; Spyropoulou, Eleni A; Bleeker, Petra M; Schauvinhold, Ines; Matsuba, Yuki; Bonini, Megan E; Schilmiller, Anthony L; Last, Robert L; Schuurink, Robert C; Pichersky, Eran

    2011-10-01

    Compounds of the terpenoid class play numerous roles in the interactions of plants with their environment, such as attracting pollinators and defending the plant against pests. We show here that the genome of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains 44 terpene synthase (TPS) genes, including 29 that are functional or potentially functional. Of these 29 TPS genes, 26 were expressed in at least some organs or tissues of the plant. The enzymatic functions of eight of the TPS proteins were previously reported, and here we report the specific in vitro catalytic activity of 10 additional tomato terpene synthases. Many of the tomato TPS genes are found in clusters, notably on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10. All TPS family clades previously identified in angiosperms are also present in tomato. The largest clade of functional TPS genes found in tomato, with 12 members, is the TPS-a clade, and it appears to encode only sesquiterpene synthases, one of which is localized to the mitochondria, while the rest are likely cytosolic. A few additional sesquiterpene synthases are encoded by TPS-b clade genes. Some of the tomato sesquiterpene synthases use z,z-farnesyl diphosphate in vitro as well, or more efficiently than, the e,e-farnesyl diphosphate substrate. Genes encoding monoterpene synthases are also prevalent, and they fall into three clades: TPS-b, TPS-g, and TPS-e/f. With the exception of two enzymes involved in the synthesis of ent-kaurene, the precursor of gibberellins, no other tomato TPS genes could be demonstrated to encode diterpene synthases so far. PMID:21813655

  14. Terpene synthases are widely distributed in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuuki; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Komatsu, Mamoru; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Omura, Satoshi; Cane, David E.; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Odoriferous terpene metabolites of bacterial origin have been known for many years. In genome-sequenced Streptomycetaceae microorganisms, the vast majority produces the degraded sesquiterpene alcohol geosmin. Two minor groups of bacteria do not produce geosmin, with one of these groups instead producing other sesquiterpene alcohols, whereas members of the remaining group do not produce any detectable terpenoid metabolites. Because bacterial terpene synthases typically show no significant overall sequence similarity to any other known fungal or plant terpene synthases and usually exhibit relatively low levels of mutual sequence similarity with other bacterial synthases, simple correlation of protein sequence data with the structure of the cyclized terpene product has been precluded. We have previously described a powerful search method based on the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and protein families database (Pfam) search that has allowed the discovery of monoterpene synthases of bacterial origin. Using an enhanced set of HMM parameters generated using a training set of 140 previously identified bacterial terpene synthase sequences, a Pfam search of 8,759,463 predicted bacterial proteins from public databases and in-house draft genome data has now revealed 262 presumptive terpene synthases. The biochemical function of a considerable number of these presumptive terpene synthase genes could be determined by expression in a specially engineered heterologous Streptomyces host and spectroscopic identification of the resulting terpene products. In addition to a wide variety of terpenes that had been previously reported from fungal or plant sources, we have isolated and determined the complete structures of 13 previously unidentified cyclic sesquiterpenes and diterpenes. PMID:25535391

  15. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  16. Diversity of Mannheimia haemolytica and pasteurella trehalosi serotypes from apparently healthy sheep and abattoir specimens in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sisay, T; Zerihun, A

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence and serotypic diversity of Mannheimia [Pasteurella] haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi from nasal swabs, sera and abattoir specimens from sheep in the highlands of Wollo, North East Ethiopia was investigated. Prevalence rates of 83% and 75% of these microorganisms were found in the serum samples and nasal swabs, respectively, from apparently healthy sheep. In a local abattoir, 205 lungs were investigated, 34% of which showed pneumonia, from which samples were collected from 51 lungs and the same number of corresponding tonsils. Mannheimia and Pasteurella species were isolated from 59% of these pneumonic lungs and 69% of the respective tonsils. M. haemolytica serotypes accounted for 41 (59%) and P. trehalosi for 11 (32%) of the isolates from the abattoir specimens. The majority (67%) of isolates from nasal swabs were P. trehalosi, M. haemolytica being isolated f rom 4 (13%) of the swabs. M. glucosida was isolated only from the tonsils. The predominant serotypes of the isolates from both the nasal swabs and the abattoir specimens were M. haemolytica A1 (17%) and P. trehalosi T4 (16%) and T3 (13%). P. trehalosi T15 was less commonly encountered, while M. haemolytica A9 and A13 were not isolated. Studies on sera from 100 sheep indicated that antibodies against M. haemolytica serotype A1 (14%) were most common, followed by A5 and A8 (each 10%) and A9 and P. trehalosi T3 (each 9%) and T4 (8%). Antibodies against M. glucosida or serotype All occurred in 2% of the sera. Multiple serotypes were common in all types of samples. The importance of including in vaccines the most prevalent serotypes involved in the pneumonia of sheep in the area is discussed. PMID:12625399

  17. Aromatic Polyketide Synthases (Purification, Characterization, and Antibody Development to Benzalacetone Synthase from Raspberry Fruits).

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, W.; Hrazdina, G.

    1996-01-01

    p-Hydroxyphenylbutan-2-one, the characteristic aroma compound of raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.), is synthesized from p-coumaryl-coenzyme A and malonyl-coenzyme A in a two-step reaction sequence that is catalyzed by benzalacetone synthase and benzalacetone reductase (W. Borejsza-Wysocki and G. Hrazdina [1994] Phytochemistry 35: 623-628). Benzalacetone synthase condenses one malonate with p-coumarate to form the pathway intermediate p-hydroxyphenylbut-3-ene-2-one (p-hydroxybenzalacetone) in a reaction that is similar to those catalyzed by chalcone and stilbene synthases. We have obtained an enzyme preparation from ripe raspberries that was preferentially enriched in benzalacetone synthase (approximately 170-fold) over chalcone synthase (approximately 14-fold) activity. This preparation was used to characterize benzalacetone synthase and to develop polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Benzalacetone synthase showed similarity in its molecular properties to chalcone synthase but differed distinctly in its substrate specificity, response to 2-mercaptoethanol and ethylene glycol, and induction in cell-suspension cultures. The product of the enzyme, p-hydroxybenzalacetone, inhibited mycelial growth of the raspberry pathogen Phytophthora fragariae var rubi at 250 [mu]M. We do not know whether the dual activity in the benzalacetone synthase preparation is the result of a bifunctional enzyme or is caused by contamination with chalcone synthase that was also present. The rapid induction of the enzyme in cell-suspension cultures upon addition of yeast extract and the toxicity of its product, p-hydroxybenzalacetone, to phytopathogenic fungi also suggest that the pathway may be part of a plant defense response. PMID:12226219

  18. Gait patterns after intraarticular treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the Knee - Hyaluronan versus triamcinolone: a prospective, randomized, doubleblind, monocentric study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of gait performance and muscle activity patterns as well as clinical efficacy and safety after single intraarticular injection with hyaluronan compared with triamcinolone in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods This trial evaluated the influence of a single injection of hyaluronan or triamcinolone on gait pattern and muscle activity. For clinical evaluation a visual analogue scale for pain, Lequesne index, and Knee Society Score were used. Quality of life was assessed with the SF-36. Results The complete analysis was performed in 50 of 60 patients. 26 patients were treated with triamcinolone and 24 with hyaluronan. Hyaluronan treatment led to significant improvement of range of motion at hip and knee. Significant improvement could be either demonstrated for the pain scale, Lequesne and Knee Society score in both groups. Quality of life showed greater improvement in the triamcinolone group. Conclusion Single application of high-viscosity hyaluronan shows superior range of motion and pain reduction as well as improvement in clinical results. Even if there was a lack of significant differences compared to triamcinolone, this therapy classified as safe and effective in the short follow up. PMID:19380288

  19. Sonic hedgehog signaling directly targets Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2, an essential regulator of phalangeal joint patterning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Li, Qiang; Kuehn, Michael R; Litingtung, Ying; Vokes, Steven A; Chiang, Chin

    2013-03-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal, mediated by the Gli family of transcription factors, plays an essential role in the growth and patterning of the limb. Through analysis of the early limb bud transcriptome, we identified a posteriorly-enriched gene, Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (Has2), which encodes a key enzyme for the synthesis of hyaluronan (HA), as a direct target of Gli transcriptional regulation during early mouse limb development. Has2 expression in the limb bud is lost in Shh null and expanded anteriorly in Gli3 mutants. We identified an ∼3kb Has2 promoter fragment that contains two strong Gli-binding consensus sequences, and mutation of either site abrogated the ability of Gli1 to activate Has2 promoter in a cell-based assay. Additionally, this promoter fragment is sufficient to direct expression of a reporter gene in the posterior limb mesenchyme. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of DNA-Gli3 protein complexes from limb buds indicated that Gli3 strongly binds to the Has2 promoter region, suggesting that Has2 is a direct transcriptional target of the Shh signaling pathway. We also showed that Has2 conditional mutant (Has2cko) hindlimbs display digit-specific patterning defects with longitudinally shifted phalangeal joints and impaired chondrogenesis. Has2cko limbs show less capacity for mesenchymal condensation with mislocalized distributions of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), aggrecan and link protein. Has2cko limb phenotype displays striking resemblance to mutants with defective chondroitin sulfation suggesting tight developmental control of HA on CSPG function. Together, our study identifies Has2 as a novel downstream target of Shh signaling required for joint patterning and chondrogenesis. PMID:23313125

  20. Distribution of Callose Synthase, Cellulose Synthase, and Sucrose Synthase in Tobacco Pollen Tube Is Controlled in Dissimilar Ways by Actin Filaments and Microtubules1[W

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Giampiero; Faleri, Claudia; Del Casino, Cecilia; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Callose and cellulose are fundamental components of the cell wall of pollen tubes and are probably synthesized by distinct enzymes, callose synthase and cellulose synthase, respectively. We examined the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes in relation to the dynamics of actin filaments, microtubules, and the endomembrane system using specific antibodies to highly conserved peptide sequences. The role of the cytoskeleton and membrane flow was investigated using specific inhibitors (latrunculin B, 2,3-butanedione monoxime, taxol, oryzalin, and brefeldin A). Both enzymes are associated with the plasma membrane, but cellulose synthase is present along the entire length of pollen tubes (with a higher concentration at the apex) while callose synthase is located in the apex and in distal regions. In longer pollen tubes, callose synthase accumulates consistently around callose plugs, indicating its involvement in plug synthesis. Actin filaments and endomembrane dynamics are critical for the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase, showing that enzymes are transported through Golgi bodies and/or vesicles moving along actin filaments. Conversely, microtubules appear to be critical in the positioning of callose synthase in distal regions and around callose plugs. In contrast, cellulose synthases are only partially coaligned with cortical microtubules and unrelated to callose plugs. Callose synthase also comigrates with tubulin by Blue Native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Membrane sucrose synthase, which expectedly provides UDP-glucose to callose synthase and cellulose synthase, binds to actin filaments depending on sucrose concentration; its distribution is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system but not on microtubules. PMID:21205616

  1. An investigation into eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Lu, Chuan

    2014-08-01

    A common post-transcriptional modification of RNA is the conversion of uridine to its isomer pseudouridine. We investigated the biological significance of eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conducted a comprehensive statistical analysis on growth data from automated perturbation (gene deletion) experiments, and used bi-logistic curve analysis to characterise the yeast phenotypes. The deletant strains displayed different alteration in growth properties, including in some cases enhanced growth and/or biphasic growth curves not seen in wild-type strains under matched conditions. These results demonstrate that disrupting pseudouridine synthases can have a significant qualitative effect on growth. We further investigated the significance of post-transcriptional pseudouridine modification through investigation of the scientific literature. We found that (1) In Toxoplasma gondii, a pseudouridine synthase gene is critical in cellular differentiation between the two asexual forms: Tachyzoites and bradyzoites; (2) Mutation of pseudouridine synthase genes has also been implicated in human diseases (mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA); dyskeratosis congenita). Taken together, these results are consistent with pseudouridine synthases having a Gene Ontology function of "biological regulation". PMID:25152040

  2. Hyaluronan Based Heparin Free Coated Open and Closed Extracorporeal Circuits for High Risk Coronary Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Serdar; Ucar, Halil Ibrahim; Serter, Tanzer; McCusker, Kevin; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Salman, Nevriye; Yorgancioglu, Ali Cem

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: This prospective randomized study compares the inflammatory response and fibrinolytic activation of fully coated/uncoated and open/closed extracorporeal circuits (ECC) in high risk patients. Over a 2-month period, 48 patients with EuroSCOREs 6 or greater undergoing coronary revascularization were pro spectively randomized to one of the four perfusion protocols: Group 1: Closed and totally hyaluronan based heparin free coated (Vision HFO-GBS-HF™, Gish Biomedical, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA) ECC with a soft-shell coated venous reservoir (SVR11S2-HFC™, Gish Biomedical) and a hard-shell cardiotomy (CAPVRF44, Gish Biomedical) (n = 12); Group 2: Closed and totally uncoated identical ECC with soft-shell uncoated venous reservoir and a hard-shell cardiotomy (n = 12); Group 3: Open, totally hyaluronan based heparin free coated ECC (n = 12); and Group 4: Control-open, uncoated ECC (n = 12). Blood samples were collected at T1: Baseline; T2: 15 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) initiation; T3: before cessation of CPB; T4: 15 minutes after protamine reversal, and T5: in the intensive care unit. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower at T2 in all study groups, at T3 for coated groups, and T4 for closed+coated group (p < .05 versus control). Creatine kinase M-band (MB) levels in coronary sinus blood demonstrated well preserved myocardium after CPB in both coated groups versus Control (p < .05). Neutrophil CD11b/CD18 levels were significantly lower for all study groups versus control at T2, for both coated groups at T3 and only for closed+coated group at T4 (p < .05). Postoperative hemorrhage (mL) was 510 ± 40 in closed+coated and 536 ± 40 in open+coated groups (control: 784 ± 48, p ≤ .05). No significant differences in thrombin-antithrombin complex and free plasma hemoglobin were observed. Desorbed protein amount on ECC (mg/dL) was 1.7 ± .01 in closed+coated, 2.01 ± .01 in open+coated, and 3.3 ± .015 in control groups (p ≤ .05). Use of a

  3. Green synthesis, characterization, and anticancer activity of hyaluronan/zinc oxide nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Farideh; Azizi, Susan; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Rasedee, Abdullah; Soltani, Mozhgan; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The study describes an in situ green biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanocomposite using the seaweed Sargassum muticum water extract and hyaluronan biopolymer. The morphology and optical properties of the hyaluronan/zinc oxide (HA/ZnO) nanocomposite were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet–vis analysis. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the zinc oxide nanoparticles were polydispersed with a mean size of 10.2±1.5 nm. The nanoparticles were mostly hexagonal in crystalline form. The HA/ZnO nanocomposite showed the absorption properties in the ultraviolet zone that is ascribed to the band gap of zinc oxide nanocomposite. In the cytotoxicity study, cancer cells, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PANC-1), ovarian adenocarcinoma (CaOV-3), colonic adenocarcinoma (COLO205), and acute promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells were treated with HA/ZnO nanocomposite. At 72 hours of treatment, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value via the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was 10.8±0.3 μg/mL, 15.4±1.2 μg/mL, 12.1±0.9 μg/mL, and 6.25±0.5 μg/mL for the PANC-1, CaOV-3, COLO-205, and HL-60 cells, respectively, showing that the composite is most toxic to the HL-60 cells. On the other hand, HA/ZnO nanocomposite treatment for 72 hours did not cause toxicity to the normal human lung fibroblast (MRC-5) cell line. Using fluorescent dyes and flow cytometry analysis, HA/ZnO nanocomposite caused G2/M cell cycle arrest and stimulated apoptosis-related increase in caspase-3 and -7 activities of the HL-60 cells. Thus, the study shows that the HA/ZnO nanocomposite produced through green synthesis has great potential to be developed into an efficacious therapeutic agent for cancers. PMID:27555781

  4. Green synthesis, characterization, and anticancer activity of hyaluronan/zinc oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Namvar, Farideh; Azizi, Susan; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Rasedee, Abdullah; Soltani, Mozhgan; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The study describes an in situ green biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanocomposite using the seaweed Sargassum muticum water extract and hyaluronan biopolymer. The morphology and optical properties of the hyaluronan/zinc oxide (HA/ZnO) nanocomposite were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet-vis analysis. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the zinc oxide nanoparticles were polydispersed with a mean size of 10.2±1.5 nm. The nanoparticles were mostly hexagonal in crystalline form. The HA/ZnO nanocomposite showed the absorption properties in the ultraviolet zone that is ascribed to the band gap of zinc oxide nanocomposite. In the cytotoxicity study, cancer cells, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PANC-1), ovarian adenocarcinoma (CaOV-3), colonic adenocarcinoma (COLO205), and acute promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells were treated with HA/ZnO nanocomposite. At 72 hours of treatment, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value via the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was 10.8±0.3 μg/mL, 15.4±1.2 μg/mL, 12.1±0.9 μg/mL, and 6.25±0.5 μg/mL for the PANC-1, CaOV-3, COLO-205, and HL-60 cells, respectively, showing that the composite is most toxic to the HL-60 cells. On the other hand, HA/ZnO nanocomposite treatment for 72 hours did not cause toxicity to the normal human lung fibroblast (MRC-5) cell line. Using fluorescent dyes and flow cytometry analysis, HA/ZnO nanocomposite caused G2/M cell cycle arrest and stimulated apoptosis-related increase in caspase-3 and -7 activities of the HL-60 cells. Thus, the study shows that the HA/ZnO nanocomposite produced through green synthesis has great potential to be developed into an efficacious therapeutic agent for cancers. PMID:27555781

  5. Chitin synthase homologs in three ectomycorrhizal truffles.

    PubMed

    Lanfranco, L; Garnero, L; Delpero, M; Bonfante, P

    1995-12-01

    Degenerate PCR primers were used to amplify a conserved gene portion coding chitin synthase from genomic DNA of six species of ectomycorrhizal truffles. DNA was extracted from both hypogeous fruitbodies and in vitro growing mycelium of Tuber borchii. A single fragment of about 600 bp was amplified for each species. The amplification products from Tuber magnatum, T. borchii and T. ferrugineum were cloned and sequenced, revealing a high degree of identity (91.5%) at the nucleotide level. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequences these clones were assigned to class II chitin synthase. Southern blot experiments performed on genomic DNA showed that the amplification products derive from a single copy gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of class II chitin synthase genes confirmed the current taxonomic position of the genus Tuber, and suggested a close relationship between T. magnatum and T. uncinatum. PMID:8593947

  6. Interacting Factors That Influence Long-term Storage of Live Pasteurella tularensis Vaccine and Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Frederick; Walker, Jerry S.; Mahlandt, Bill G.; Carter, Richard C.; Orlando, Michael D.; Weirether, Francis J.; Lincoln, Ralph E.

    1969-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the interaction of various parameters which affect the storage stability and growth potential of liquid cultures of Pasteurella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) and Rift Valley fever virus Van Wyk strain (RVFV). Storage variables studied with LVS included four storage temperatures (4, -20, -65, -175 C), single and multiple freeze-thaw cycles, two freezing and two thawing rates (slow and fast), various inoculum levels (1, 3, 5, and 10%) for the determination of growth potential, and the retention of immunizing potential (mice and guinea pig) after storage. Neither the freezing rate nor the number of freeze-thaw cycles seriously affected the growth of LVS after storage at -175C; however, the slow rate of thaw proved deleterious as were all temperatures of storage except -175 C after 1 year of storage, as shown by both criteria of evaluation. RVFV produced in two combinations of cell lines and media (LM cell line-199 peptone medium and LDR cell line-Eagle's minimum essential medium) was stored at three serum levels (10, 20, 40%), three pH values (6.2., 7.0, 7.8), and three temperatures (-20, -65, -175 C). These studies indicated: (i) virus produced in the LDR cell line and Eagle's medium was more stable than that produced in the LM cell line and 199 peptone medium for either short- or long-term storage; (ii) serum levels did not affect stability; and (iii) low pH resulted in losses during long-term storage under all conditions tested. Thus, cryogenic storage is advantageous for stock culture maintenance of bacteria and viruses and for other similar applications. PMID:5780399

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship of marbofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida in a tissue-cage model in yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Shan, Q; Wang, J; Yang, F; Ding, H; Liang, C; Lv, Z; Li, Z; Zeng, Z

    2014-06-01

    The fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug marbofloxacin was administered to yellow cattle intravenously and intramuscularly at a dose of 2 mg/kg of body weight in a two-period crossover study. The pharmacokinetic properties of marbofloxacin in serum, inflamed tissue-cage fluid (exudate), and noninflamed tissue-cage fluid (transudate) were studied by using a tissue-cage model. The in vitro and ex vivo activities of marbofloxacin in serum, exudate, and transudate against a pathogenic strain of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) were determined. Integration of in vivo pharmacokinetic data with the in vitro MIC provided mean values for the area under the curve (AUC)/MIC for serum, exudate, and transudate of 155.75, 153.00, and 138.88, respectively, after intravenous dosing and 160.50, 151.00, and 137.63, respectively, after intramuscular dosing. After intramuscular dosing, the maximum concentration/MIC ratios for serum, exudate, and transudate were 21.13, 9.13, and 8.38, respectively. The ex vivo growth inhibition data after intramuscular dosing were fitted to the inhibitory sigmoid Emax equation to provide the values of AUC/MIC required to produce bacteriostasis, bactericidal activity, and elimination of bacteria. The respective values for serum were 17.25, 31.29, and 109.62, and slightly lower values were obtained for transudate and exudate. It is proposed that these findings might be used with MIC50 or MIC90 data to provide a rational approach to the design of dosage schedules which optimize efficacy in respect of bacteriological as well as clinical cures. PMID:24033339

  8. Plasma corticosterone concentrations in turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida and maintained at high and low environmental temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Simensen, E.; Olson, L.D.; Ryan, M.P.; Vanjonack, W.J.; Johnson, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay was used to determine plasma corticosterone concentration (PCC) in turkeys inoculated with Pasteurella multocida via either the palatine air spaces or the drinking water and maintained at high (33.4-37.4 C), low (2.6-5.3 C) and moderate )19.8-22.4 C) temperatures in temperature-controlled chambers. In uninoculated turkeys maintained at high temperatures, the PCC was generally lower than in turkeys maintained at moderate temperatures, whereas the opposite occurred in turkeys maintained at low temperatures. After inoculation with P. multocida, all groups of inoculated turkeys showed an increase in the average PCC, which attained a level in some turkeys of over 40 ng/ml, in relation to the average in the uninoculated turkeys, which ranged from 1.8 to 27.3 ng/ml. This increase was proportional to the severity of the infection that developed. The PCC was found to be a sensitive indicator of an incubating infection of P. multocida, since it was markedly increased in turkeys that were bled one day before the onset of depression. In turkeys that were inoculated via the palatine air spaces and maintained at 20 C, the PCC on the day of inoculation was significantly (P less than 0.05) lower in the turkeys that later died than in those that survived. Generally, the PCC was higher in the turkeys that either died between 5 and 10 days after inoculation or were depressed aa the end of the experiment on day 10, relative to the turkeys that were alert at the end of the experiment.

  9. Capsular polysaccharide vaccine for Group B Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel; Xie, Guilin; Hanson, Lars Å.; Miller, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed the literature that is the basis for our proposal that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac conjugates will be safe and effective vaccines for Group B meningococci (GBMs), Escherichia coli K1, and Pasteurella haemolytica A2. Although (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is a virulence factor and a protective antigen of these three pathogens, it is also a component of normal tissues (neural cell adhesion molecule). Natural, anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac present in most adults, vaccine-induced antibodies, and even high levels of spontaneously appearing monoclonal anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac did not cause autoimmunity. Although it is not possible to prove a null hypothesis, there are no epidemiologic, serologic, immunologic, or clinical data to indicate that (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac antibodies will induce pathology or an autoimmune disease. No increased pathology caused by these antibodies was found, even in neonates and infants of mothers recovered from GBM meningitis. The lack of pathology mediated by anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac may be explained by different presentations of (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac on bacterial and mammalian cells and by the unusual physicochemical properties of anti–(2→8)-α-Neu5Ac. Based on clinical and experimental data collected over 30 y and because (2→8)-α-Neu5Ac is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen for GBM, E. coli K1, and P. haemolytica A2, protein conjugates of it are easy to prepare using inexpensive and plentiful ingredients, and they would be compatible with routinely administered infant vaccines, clinical studies of these conjugates should proceed. PMID:22025709

  10. Arf6-Dependent Intracellular Trafficking of Pasteurella multocida Toxin and pH-Dependent Translocation from Late Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Repella, Tana L.; Ho, Mengfei; Chong, Tracy P. M.; Bannai, Yuka; Wilson, Brenda A.

    2011-01-01

    The potent mitogenic toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT) is the major virulence factor associated with a number of epizootic and zoonotic diseases caused by infection with this respiratory pathogen. PMT is a glutamine-specific protein deamidase that acts on its intracellular G-protein targets to increase intracellular calcium, cytoskeletal, and mitogenic signaling. PMT enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and then translocates into the cytosol through a pH-dependent process that is inhibited by NH4Cl or bafilomycin A1. However, the detailed mechanisms that govern cellular entry, trafficking, and translocation of PMT remain unclear. Co-localization studies described herein revealed that while PMT shares an initial entry pathway with transferrin (Tfn) and cholera toxin (CT), the trafficking pathways of Tfn, CT, and PMT subsequently diverge, as Tfn is trafficked to recycling endosomes, CT is trafficked retrograde to the ER, and PMT is trafficked to late endosomes. Our studies implicate the small regulatory GTPase Arf6 in the endocytic trafficking of PMT. Translocation of PMT from the endocytic vesicle occurs through a pH-dependent process that is also dependent on both microtubule and actin dynamics, as evidenced by inhibition of PMT activity in our SRE-based reporter assay, with nocodazole and cytochalasin D, respectively, suggesting that membrane translocation and cytotoxicity of PMT is dependent on its transfer to late endosomal compartments. In contrast, disruption of Golgi-ER trafficking with brefeldin A increased PMT activity, suggesting that inhibiting PMT trafficking to non-productive compartments that do not lead to translocation, while promoting formation of an acidic tubulovesicle system more conducive to translocation, enhances PMT translocation and activity. PMID:22053287

  11. Bronchoalveolar lavage is an ideal tool in evaluation of local immune response of pigs vaccinated with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine

    PubMed Central

    George, Shiney; Barman, Nagendra Nath; Nath, Anjan Jyoti; Sarma, Bhupen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to study the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) technique in evaluating the local immune response of pig immunized with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine. Materials and Methods: Weaned piglets were immunized with formalin-inactivated P52 strain of P. multocida bacterin and evaluated for pulmonary immune response in BAL fluid. BAL was performed before vaccination and at different post vaccination days. The BAL fluid was assayed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study the development of P. multocida specific antibody isotypes and also evaluated for different cell populations using standard protocol. Results: The average recovery percentage of BAL fluid varies from 58.33 to 61.33 in vaccinated and control group of piglets. The BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs showed increase in antibody titer up to 60th days post vaccination (8.98±0.33), IgG being the predominant isotype reached maximum titer of 6.12±0.20 on 45th days post vaccination, followed by IgM and a meager concentration of IgA could be detected. An increased concentration of the lymphocyte population and induction of plasma cells was detected in the BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs. Conclusion: Though intranasal vaccination with P. multocida plain bacterin vaccine could not provoke a strong immune response, but is promising as lymphocyte population was increased and plasma cells were detected. BAL can be performed repeatedly up to 3/4 months of age in pigs to study pulmonary immune response without affecting their health. PMID:27047111

  12. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Lo, R Y; Shewen, P E; Strathdee, C A; Greer, C N

    1985-12-01

    A clone bank of Pasteurella haemolytica A1 was constructed by partial digestion of the genomic DNA with Sau3A and ligation of 5- to 10-kilobase-pair fragments into the BamHI site of the plasmid vector pBR322. After transformation into Escherichia coli K-12, a total of 4 X 10(3) recombinant clones was obtained. These were screened for the production of P. haemolytica soluble antigens by a colony enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay blot method with a rabbit antiserum raised against the soluble antigens. The clones producing P. haemolytica soluble antigens were then analyzed for the production of the leukotoxin by a cytotoxicity assay with cells from a bovine leukemia-derived B-lymphocyte cell line as the target cells. Positive clones were identified, and subsequent restriction analysis of the recombinant plasmids showed that the same 6.3 kilobase pairs of insert DNA was cloned in either of the two orientations into the plasmid vector pBR322. One of the clones was selected for further characterization of the leukotoxin as produced in E. coli. Tests for heat lability and target cell species specificity with canine, porcine, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes indicated that the activity of the cloned leukotoxin was identical to that of the P. haemolytica leukotoxin. Furthermore, the E. coli-produced leukotoxin was also neutralized by bovine or rabbit antiserum known to have antitoxic activity. When cellular proteins from the E. coli clones were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, a 100,000-dalton protein was identified which corresponded to one of the soluble antigens found in the leukotoxic culture supernatant of P. haemolytica. These results demonstrated that the gene(s) for the P. haemolytica leukotoxin have been cloned and that the leukotoxin was expressed in E. coli. PMID:3905610

  13. Passage of CD18- and CD18+ bovine neutrophils into pulmonary alveoli during acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A

    1996-11-01

    CD18 is a subunit for three beta 2 integrin molecules (Mac-1, p150, 95, LFA-1), which are expressed on the plasma membrane of neutrophils. These molecules mediate passage of neutrophils into sites of infection. In children and animals that lack CD18 expression, neutrophil infiltration is impaired in most tissues. However, in lung, CD18- neutrophils have been identified in the airway spaces during spontaneous episodes of pneumonia. To determine whether CD18 is vital for passage through the pulmonary alveolar wall, lung lobes of cattle with neutrophils that were deficient in CD18 expression (CD18-) and cattle with normal CD18 expression (CD18+) were inoculated with Pasteurella haemolytica by fiberoptic bronchoscopy; control lobes were inoculated with pyrogen-free saline (PFS). Neutrophil passage into alveolar lumina at 4 and 6 hours postinoculation was measured by computerized image analysis. Blood levels of neutrophils for CD18- cattle ranged from 12- to 26-fold higher than for CD18+ cattle prior to inoculation, and counts in both groups rose slightly postinoculation. In P. haemolytica-inoculated lobes, total numbers of neutrophils in alveolar lumina of the two groups were similar. An increase in the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was fourfold greater in CD18- cattle than in CD18+ cattle. In PFS-inoculated lobes, the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was sixfold higher in CD18 cattle than in CD18+ cattle. This work shows that by 4 and 6 hours, CD18- neutrophils enter the alveolar lumen at a rate similar to that in CD18+ cattle. Higher numbers of CD18- neutrophils are present in the alveolar wall of control (PFS) and bacteria-inoculated lobes. Thus, the CD18- cells are increased in the walls of alveoli and numbers of neutrophils that enter the alveolar lumen are similar in CD18+ and CD18- cattle. PMID:8952022

  14. Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) upregulates CTGF which leads to mTORC1 activation in Swiss 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Oubrahim, Hammou; Wong, Allison; Wilson, Brenda A; Chock, P Boon

    2013-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a mitogenic protein that hijacks cellular signal transduction pathways via deamidation of heterotrimeric G proteins. We previously showed that rPMT activates mTOR signaling via a Gαq/11/PLCβ/PKC mediated pathway, leading in part to cell proliferation and migration. Herein, we show that mTOR and MAPK, but not membrane-associated tyrosine kinases, are activated in serum-starved 3T3 cells by an autocrine/paracrine substance(s) secreted into the conditioned medium following rPMT treatment. Surprisingly, this diffusible factor(s) is capable of activating mTOR and MAPK pathways even in MEF Gαq/11 double knockout cells. Microarray analysis identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA as the most upregulated gene in rPMT-treated serum-starved 3T3 cells relative to untreated cells. These results were further confirmed using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. In accord with rPMT-induced mTOR activation, upregulation of CTGF protein was observed in WT MEF, but not in Gαq/11 double knockout MEF cells. Although CTGF expression is regulated by TGFβ, rPMT did not activate TGFβ pathway. In addition, MEK inhibitors U0126 or PD98059, but not mTOR specific inhibitors, rapamycin and Torin 1, inhibited rPMT-induced upregulation of CTGF. Importantly, CTGF overexpression in serum-starved 3T3 cells using adenovirus led to phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a downstream target of mTOR. However, despite the ability of CTGF to activate the mTOR pathway, upregulation of CTGF alone could not induce morphological changes as those observed in rPMT-treated cells. Our findings reveal that CTGF plays an important role, but there are additional factors involved in the mitogenic action of PMT. PMID:23415771

  15. Involvement of the nervous system following experimental infection with Pasteurella multocida B:2 in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis): A clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Jesse, Faez Firdaus Abdullah; Ahmed, Ihsan Muneer; Teik Chung, Eric Lim; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Saharee, Abdul Aziz; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Alwan, Mohammed Jwaid; Mohd Lila, Mohd Azmi

    2016-04-01

    Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is an acute, fatal, septicaemic disease of cattle and buffaloes caused by one of two specific serotypes of Pasteurella multocida B:2 and E:2 in Asian and African, respectively. It is well known that HS affect mainly the respiratory and digestive tracts. However, involvement of the nervous system in pathogenesis of HS has been reported in previous studies without details. In this study, nine buffalo calves of 8 months old were distributed into three groups. Animals of Group 1 and 2 were inoculated orally and subcutaneously with 10 ml of 1 × 10(12) cfu/ml of P. multocida B:2, respectively, while animals of Group 3 were inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline as a control. All calves in Group 1 and Group 3 were euthanised after 504 h (21 day) post-infection, while calves in Group 2 had to euthanise after 12 h post-infection as they develop sever clinical signs of HS. Significant differences were found in Group 2 in the mean scores of clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes which mainly affect different anatomic regions of the nervous system. In addition, successful bacterial isolation of P. multocida B:2 were obtained from different sites of the nervous system. On the other hand, less sever, clinical, gross and histopathological changes were found in Group 1. These results provide for the first time strong evidence of involving of the nervous system in pathogenesis of HS, especially in the peracute stage of the disease. PMID:26850845

  16. Loop‑mediated Isothermal Amplification assay (LAMP) based detection of Pasteurella multocida in cases of haemorrhagic septicaemia and fowl cholera.

    PubMed

    Bhimani, Mayurkumar; Bhanderi, Bharat; Roy, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Twenty two isolates of Pasteurella multocida were obtained from different tissues of dead birds and animals (cattle, buffalo, sheep, and goat) suspected of fowl cholera and haemorrhagic septicaemia. The isolates were confirmed as P. multocida by various biochemical tests and PM PCR. An attempt was made to standardize Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) using newly designed primer sequences of KMT1 gene. Loop mediated isothermal amplification was conducted using 6 sets of primers at 65°C for 30 minutes and the result was confirmed by visual observation using SYBR green fluorescence dye as marker of positive reaction under UV transilluminator. On electrophoretic analysis of the products on 2% agarose gel, a ladder like pattern was observed, which suggested a positive amplification, whereas no amplification was observed in negative controls. Additionally, product of positive reaction yielded a green fluorescence following addition of SYBR green under UV transilluminator. It was observed that LAMP is a more sensitive test than polymerase chain reaction (PCR), as the former could detect DNA to lower limit of 22.8 pg/µl, while the latter could detect DNA to lower limit of 2.28 ng/ µl, thus LAMP could detect 100 times lesser concentration of DNA in comparison to PCR. Loop mediated isothermal amplification is a rather newer molecular technique, which can be used for rapid detection of infectious agent at field level and which does not require sophisticated instrument, i.e. thermal cycler. Furthermore, unlike the conventional PCR technique, LAMP requires lesser time to perform and result can be read visually. PMID:26129662

  17. Clinico-pathology, hematology, and biochemistry responses toward Pasteurella multocida Type B: 2 via oral and subcutaneous route of infections

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Adamu, Lawan; Marza, Ali Dhiaa; Ibrahim, Hayder Hamzah; Zamri-Saad, Mohd; Haron, Abdul Wahid; Saharee, Abdul Aziz; Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Bakar, Md Zuki Abu; Norsidin, Mohd Jefri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pasteurella multocida a Gram-negative bacterium has been identified as the causative agent of many economically important diseases in a wide range of hosts. Hemorrhagic septicemia is a disease caused by P. multocida serotype B:2 and E:2. The organism causes acute, a highly fatal septicemic disease with high morbidity and mortality in cattle and more susceptible in buffaloes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs, blood parameters, post mortem and histopathology changes caused by P. multocida Type B:2 infections initiated through the oral and subcutaneous routes. Methods: Nine buffalo heifers were divided equally into 3 treatment groups. Group 1 was inoculated orally with 10 ml of phosphate buffer saline; Groups 2 and 3 were inoculated with 10 ml of 1012 colony forming unit of P. multocida Type B:2 subcutaneously and orally respectively. Results: There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in temperature between the subcutaneous and the control group. The results revealed significant differences (p<0.05) in erythrocytes, hemoglobin, packed cell volume, leukocytes, monocytes, and A: G ratio between the subcutaneous and the control group. Furthermore, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in leukocytes, band neutrophils, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils, basophils, thrombocytes, plasma protein, icterus index, gamma glutamyl tranferase and A: G ratio between the oral and the control group. The post mortem lesions of the subcutaneous group buffaloes showed generalized hyperemia, congestion and hemorrhage of the immune organs, gastro-intestinal tract organs and vital organs. The oral group buffaloes showed mild lesions in the lung and liver. Histologically, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in hemorrhage and congestion; necrosis and degeneration; inflammatory cells infiltration; and edema in between the groups. Conclusion: This study was a proof that oral route infection of P. multocida Type B:2

  18. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge. PMID:26892738

  19. Homology study of two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Umeda, F; Nishikawa, T; Miyasaka, H; Maeda, I; Kawase, M; Yagi, K

    2001-11-01

    Recently, we have cloned and analyzed two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes (phaC1 and phaC2 in the pha cluster) from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. In this report, the deduced amino acid (AA) sequences of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 from P. aureofaciens are compared with those from three other bacterial strains (Pseudomonas sp. 61-3, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa) containing the homologous pha cluster. The level of homology of either PHA synthase 1 or PHA synthase 2 was high with each enzyme from these three bacterial strains. Furthermore, multialignment of PHA synthase AA sequences implied that both enzymes of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 were highly conserved in the four strains including P. aureofaciens. PMID:11916262

  20. The hyaluronan receptors CD44 and RHAMM (CD168) form complexeswith ERK1,2, which sustain high basal motility in breast cancercells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sara R.; Fard, Shireen F.; Paiwand, Frouz F.; Tolg,Cornelia; Veiseh, Mandana; Wang, Chao; McCarthy, James B.; Bissell, MinaJ.; Koropatnick, James; Turley, Eva A.

    2007-03-28

    CD44 is an integral hyaluronan receptor that can promote or inhibit motogenic signaling in tumor cells. Rhamm is a non-integral cell surface hyaluronan receptor (CD168) and intracellular protein that promotes cell motility in culture and its expression is strongly upregulated in diseases like arthritis and aggressive cancers. Here we describe an autocrine mechanism utilizing cell surface Rhamm/CD44 interactions to sustain rapid basal motility in invasive breast cancer cell lines. This mechanism requires endogenous hyaluronan synthesis and the formation of Rhamm/CD44/ERK1, 2 complexes. Motile/ invasive MDA-MB-231 and Ras-MCF10A cells produce more endogenous hyaluronan, cell surface CD44 and Rhamm, an oncogenic Rhamm isoform, and exhibit elevated basal activation of ERK1, 2 than less invasive MCF7 and MCF10A breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CD44, Rhamm and ERK1, 2 uniquely co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize in MDA-MB-231 and Ras-MCF10A cells. Rapid motility of the invasive cell lines requires interaction of hyaluronan with cells, activation of ERK1, 2 and the participation of both cell surface CD44 and Rhamm. Combinations of anti-CD44, anti-Rhamm antibodies and a MEK1 inhibitor (PD098059) have less-than-additive blocking effects, suggesting action of all three proteins on a common motogenic signaling pathway. Collectively, these results show that cell surface Rhamm and CD44 act together in a hyaluronan-dependent, autocrine mechanism to coordinate sustained signaling through ERK1, 2 leading to high basal motility of invasive breast cancer cells. Since CD44/Rhamm complexes are not evident in less motile cells, an effect of CD44 on tumor cell motility may depend in part on its ability to partner with additional proteins, in this case cell surface Rhamm.

  1. Studies of the binding of ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 from the complement lectin pathway to Leptospira biflexa, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Valencia, Mónica Marcela Castiblanco; Elias, Waldir P; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Garred, Peter; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Ficolins recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns and activate the lectin pathway of complement system. However, our knowledge regarding pathogen recognition of human ficolins is still limited. We therefore set out to explore and investigate the possible interactions of the two main serum ficolins, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 with different Gram-negative bacteria. We used recombinant ficolin molecules and normal human serum, which were detected with anti-ficolin monoclonal antibodies. In addition we investigated the capacity of these pathogens to activate the lectin pathway of complement system. We show for the first time that human ficolin-2 recognizes the nonpathogenic spirochete Leptospira biflexa serovar Patoc, but not the pathogenic Leptospira interrogans serovar Kennewicki strain Fromm. Additionally, human ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 recognize pathogenic Pasteurella pneumotropica, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) serotype O111ab:H2 and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) serogroup O71 but not four enterohemorrhagic E. coli, three EPEC, three EAEC and two nonpathogenic E. coli strains (DH5α and HB101). The lectin pathway was activated by Pasteurella pneumotropica, EPEC O111ab:H2 and EAEC O71 after incubation with C1q depleted human serum. In conclusion, this study provide novel insight in the binding and complement activating capacity of the lectin pathway initiation molecules ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 towards relevant Gram-negative pathogens of pathophysiological relevance. PMID:26074063

  2. Generation of targeted nonpolar gene insertions and operon fusions in Pasteurella haemolytica and creation of a strain that produces and secretes inactive leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, N D; Highlander, S K

    1997-07-01

    An efficient method for targeted gene inactivation and generation of chromosomal gene fusions in Pasteurella haemolytica has been devised and used to create an lktC::cat operon fusion by allelic exchange at the leukotoxin gene cluster (lktCABD). A copy of the lktC gene was insertionally inactivated by using a nonpolar, promoterless cat cassette and then delivered into P. haemolytica on a shuttle vector. Plasmid incompatibility was used to detect clones where double recombination events had occurred at the chromosomal locus. The insertion in lktC did not affect expression of the downstream genes, and the mutant strain secreted an antigenic proleukotoxin that was neither leukotoxic nor hemolytic. Expression of the lktC gene in trans restored the wild-type phenotype, confirming that LktC is required for activation of the proleukotoxin to the mature leukotoxin. Construction of the lktC::cat operon fusion allowed us to quantitate leukotoxin promoter activity in P. haemolytica and to demonstrate that transcription was maximal during early logarithmic growth phase but was reduced following entry into late logarithmic phase. This allelic exchange system should be useful for future genetic studies in P. haemolytica and could potentially be applied to other members of Haemophilus-Actinobacillus-Pasteurella family, where genetic manipulation is limited. PMID:9199425

  3. Study on mutual interactions and electronic structures of hyaluronan with Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid and Arginine.

    PubMed

    Chytil, Martin; Trojan, Martin; Kovalenko, Alexander

    2016-05-20

    Interactions between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants have been in a great interest for several decades, yet the conventional surfactants may cause a problem in medical applications. Interactivity between polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) and amino acids Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid (6-AcA), and Arginine as an alternative system is reported. The interactions were investigated by means of rheology and electric conductance and the electronic structures were explored by the density functional theory (DFT). Lysine exhibits the strongest interaction of all, which was manifested, e.g. by nearly 6-time drop of the initial viscosity comparing with only 1.3-time lower value in the case of 6-AcA. Arginine interaction with HA was surprisingly weaker in terms of viscosity than that of Lysine due to a lower and delocalized charge density on its guanidine group. According to the DFT calculations, the binding of Lysine to HA was found to be more flexible, while Arginine creates more rigid structure with HA. PMID:26917367

  4. Hyaluronan-phosphatidylethanolamine polymers form pericellular coats on keratinocytes and promote basal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Symonette, Caitlin J; Kaur Mann, Aman; Tan, Xiao Cherie; Tolg, Cornelia; Ma, Jenny; Perera, Francisco; Yazdani, Arjang; Turley, Eva A

    2014-01-01

    Aged keratinocytes have diminished proliferative capacity and hyaluronan (HA) cell coats, which are losses that contribute to atrophic skin characterized by reduced barrier and repair functions. We formulated HA-phospholipid (phosphatidylethanolamine, HA-PE) polymers that form pericellular coats around cultured dermal fibroblasts independently of CD44 or RHAMM display. We investigated the ability of these HA-PE polymers to penetrate into aged mouse skin and restore epidermal function in vivo. Topically applied Alexa(647)-HA-PE penetrated into the epidermis and dermis, where it associated with both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In contrast, Alexa(647)-HA was largely retained in the outer cornified layer of the epidermis and quantification of fluorescence confirmed that significantly more Alexa(647)-HA-PE penetrated into and was retained within the epidermis than Alexa(647)-HA. Multiple topical applications of HA-PE to shaved mouse skin significantly stimulated basal keratinocyte proliferation and epidermal thickness compared to HA or vehicle cream alone. HA-PE had no detectable effect on keratinocyte differentiation and did not promote local or systemic inflammation. These effects of HA-PE polymers are similar to those reported for endogenous epidermal HA in youthful skin and show that topical application of HA-PE polymers can restore some of the impaired functions of aged epidermis. PMID:25276814

  5. Hyaluronan-Phosphatidylethanolamine Polymers Form Pericellular Coats on Keratinocytes and Promote Basal Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Symonette, Caitlin J.; Tan, Xiao Cherie; Tolg, Cornelia; Ma, Jenny; Perera, Francisco; Turley, Eva A.

    2014-01-01

    Aged keratinocytes have diminished proliferative capacity and hyaluronan (HA) cell coats, which are losses that contribute to atrophic skin characterized by reduced barrier and repair functions. We formulated HA-phospholipid (phosphatidylethanolamine, HA-PE) polymers that form pericellular coats around cultured dermal fibroblasts independently of CD44 or RHAMM display. We investigated the ability of these HA-PE polymers to penetrate into aged mouse skin and restore epidermal function in vivo. Topically applied Alexa647-HA-PE penetrated into the epidermis and dermis, where it associated with both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. In contrast, Alexa647-HA was largely retained in the outer cornified layer of the epidermis and quantification of fluorescence confirmed that significantly more Alexa647-HA-PE penetrated into and was retained within the epidermis than Alexa647-HA. Multiple topical applications of HA-PE to shaved mouse skin significantly stimulated basal keratinocyte proliferation and epidermal thickness compared to HA or vehicle cream alone. HA-PE had no detectable effect on keratinocyte differentiation and did not promote local or systemic inflammation. These effects of HA-PE polymers are similar to those reported for endogenous epidermal HA in youthful skin and show that topical application of HA-PE polymers can restore some of the impaired functions of aged epidermis. PMID:25276814

  6. Elasticity, biodegradability and cell adhesive properties of chitosan/hyaluronan multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Aurore; Richert, Ludovic; Francius, Gregory; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Picart, Catherine

    2007-03-01

    In the bioengineering field, a recent and promising approach to modifying biomaterial surfaces is the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique used to build thin polyelectrolyte multilayer films. In this work, we focused on polyelectrolyte multilayer films made of two polysaccharides, chitosan (CHI) and hyaluronan (HA), and on the control of their physico-chemical and cell adhesive properties by chemical cross-linking. CHI/HA films were cross-linked using a water soluble carbodiimide and observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with a fluorescently labeled CHI. Film thicknesses were similar for native and cross-linked films. The film nanometer roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy and was found to be higher for cross-linked films. Cross-linking the films also leads to a drastic change in film stiffness. The elastic modulus of the films (Young's modulus) as measured by AFM nano-indentation was about tenfold increased for cross-linked films as compared to native ones. From a biological point of view, cross-liked films are more resistant to enzymatic degradation by hyaluronidase. Furthermore, the increase in film stiffness has a favorable effect on the adhesion and spreading of chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, the CHI/HA cross-linked films could be used for various applications due to their adhesive properties and to their mechanical properties (including stability in enzymatic media).

  7. Matrix Hyaluronan Promotes Specific MicroRNA Upregulation Leading to Drug Resistance and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y. W.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor invasion, metastasis and therapeutic drug resistance are the common causes for serious morbidity and cancer recurrence in patients. A number of research studies have searched for malignancy-related biomarkers and drug targets that are closely linked to tumor cell properties. One of the candidates is matrix hyaluronan (HA), which is known as one of the major extracellular matrix (ECM) components. HA serves as a physiological ligand for surface CD44 molecule and also functions as a bio-regulator. The binding of HA to CD44 has been shown to stimulate concomitant activation of a number of oncogenic pathways and abnormal cellular processes in cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of small RNAs containing ~20–25 nucleotides and are known to promote aberrant cellular functions in cancer cells. In this article, I have focused on the role of HA interaction with CD44 and several important signaling molecules in the regulation of unique miRNAs (e.g., miR-21, miR-302 and miR-10b) and their downstream targets leading to multiple tumor cell-specific functions (e.g., tumor cell growth, drug resistance and metastasis) and cancer progression. This new knowledge could provide the groundwork necessary for establishing new tumor markers and developing important, novel drugs targeted against HA/CD44-associated tumor progression, which can be utilized in the therapeutic treatment of metastatic cancer patients. PMID:27070574

  8. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain

    PubMed Central

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J.; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A.; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  9. Hyaluronan Accumulates With High-Fat Feeding and Contributes to Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Li; Lantier, Louise; Kennedy, Arion; Bonner, Jeffrey S.; Mayes, Wesley H.; Bracy, Deanna P.; Bookbinder, Louis H.; Hasty, Alyssa H.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Wasserman, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a characteristic of insulin-resistant skeletal muscle. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major constituent of the ECM. The hypotheses that 1) HA content is increased in the ECM of insulin-resistant skeletal muscle and 2) reduction of HA in the muscle ECM by long-acting pegylated human recombinant PH20 hyaluronidase (PEGPH20) reverses high-fat (HF) diet–induced muscle insulin resistance were tested. We show that muscle HA was increased in HF diet–induced obese (DIO) mice and that treatment of PEGPH20, which dose-dependently reduced HA in muscle ECM, decreased fat mass, adipocyte size, and hepatic and muscle insulin resistance in DIO mice at 10 mg/kg. Reduced muscle insulin resistance was associated with increased insulin signaling, muscle vascularization, and percent cardiac output to muscle rather than insulin sensitization of muscle per se. Dose-response studies revealed that PEGPH20 dose-dependently increased insulin sensitivity in DIO mice with a minimally effective dose of 0.01 mg/kg. PEGPH20 at doses of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg reduced muscle HA to levels seen in chow-fed mice, decreased fat mass, and increased muscle glucose uptake. These findings suggest that ECM HA is a target for treatment of insulin resistance. PMID:23349492

  10. Repair of chronic tympanic membrane perforations using applications of hyaluronan or rice paper prostheses.

    PubMed

    Laurent, C; Söderberg, O; Anniko, M; Hartwig, S

    1991-01-01

    A controlled randomized study was performed in 60 patients with 64 chronic, dry tympanic membrane (TM) perforations. The perforations were randomly allocated to either resection of the perforation rim and instillation of 1% hyaluronan (Healon; HYA) in the perforation gap once daily for 7 days (33 ears) or resection of the perforation margin and application of a sterile rice paper prosthesis (31 ears). The treatment effect was documented by TM photography and morphometric measurements of the perforation area. The hearing was assessed with puretone and high-frequency audiometry. After 2 months, 5 of the HYA-treated perforations (15%) and 4 of the rice-paper-treated TMs (13%) were healed. After 1 year, 18 perforations (9 in each treatment group) were healed. In neither group were there any persistent adverse effects on hearing. It is noteworthy that 28% (18/64) of the chronic, long-standing TM perforations could be repaired by these technically simple and time-saving methods. Both procedures should be considered as easy first-choice alternatives to myringoplasty in selected cases. PMID:2008293

  11. Layilin, a cell surface hyaluronan receptor, interacts with merlin and radixin

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, Petri; Cordero, Etchell; Johnson, Kristen; Borowsky, Mark; Ramesh, Vijaya; Jacks, Tyler; Hynes, Richard O. . E-mail: rohynes@mit.edu

    2005-08-01

    Layilin is a widely expressed integral membrane hyaluronan receptor, originally identified as a binding partner of talin located in membrane ruffles. We have identified merlin, the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein and radixin, as other interactors with the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin. We show that the carboxy-terminal domain of layilin is capable of binding to the amino-terminal domain of radixin. An interdomain interaction between the amino- and the carboxy-terminal domains of radixin inhibits its ability to bind to layilin. In the presence of acidic phospholipids, the interdomain interaction of radixin is inhibited and layilin can bind to full-length radixin. In contrast, layilin binds both full-length and amino-terminal merlin-GST fusion proteins without a requirement for phospholipids. Furthermore, layilin antibody can immunoprecipitate merlin, confirming association in vivo between these two proteins, which also display similar subcellular localizations in ruffling membranes. No interaction was observed between layilin and ezrin or layilin and moesin. These findings expand the known binding partners of layilin to include other members of the talin/band 4.1/ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) family of cytoskeletal-membrane linker molecules. This in turn suggests that layilin may mediate signals from extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton via interaction with different intracellular binding partners and thereby be involved in the modulation of cortical structures in the cell.

  12. Linolenic acid grafted hyaluronan: Process development, structural characterization, biological assessing, and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Brandejsová, Martina; Kulhánek, Jaromír; Pavlík, Vojtěch; Šmejkalová, Daniela; Vágnerová, Hana; Velebný, Vladimír

    2016-11-01

    In this study, hyaluronan (HA) was grafted with alpha-linolenic acid (αLNA) by benzoyl mixed anhydrides methodology, which allowed the derivatization of HA under mild reaction conditions. The reaction was optimized and transferred from laboratory to semi-scale production. The derivative revealed an unexpected cytotoxicity after oven drying and storage at 40°C. For this reason, the storage conditions of sodium linolenyl hyaluronate (αLNA-HA) were optimized in order to preserve the beneficial effect of the derivative. Oven, spray dried and lyophilized samples were prepared and stored at -20°C, 4°C and 25°C up to 6 months. A comprehensive material characterization including stability study of the derivative, as well as evaluation of possible changes on chemical structure and presence of peroxidation products were studied by Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and complemented with assessment of in vitro viability on mouse fibroblasts NIH-3T3. The most stable αLNA-HA derivative was obtained after spray drying and storage at ambient temperature under inert atmosphere. The choice of inert atmosphere is recommended to suppress oxidation of αLNA supporting the positive influence of the derivative on cell viability. The encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs of αLNA-HA were also demonstrated. PMID:27516333

  13. Distribution of versican and hyaluronan in the mouse uterus during decidualization.

    PubMed

    San Martin, S; Soto-Suazo, M; Zorn, T M T

    2003-08-01

    Preparation for embryo implantation requires extensive adaptation of the uterine microenvironment. This process consists of cell proliferation and cell differentiation resulting in the transformation of endometrial fibroblasts into a new type of cell called decidual cell. In the present study, we followed the space-time distribution of versican and hyaluronan (HA) in different tissues of the uterus before and after embryo implantation. Fragments of mouse uteri obtained on the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh days of pregnancy were fixed in Methacarn, embedded in Paraplast and cut into 5-microm thick sections. HA was detected using a biotinylated fragment of the proteoglycan aggrecan, which binds to this glycosaminoglycan with high affinity and specificity. Versican was detected by a polyclonal antibody. Both reactions were developed by peroxidase methods. Before embryo implantation, both HA and versican were present in the endometrial stroma. However, after embryo implantation, HA disappeared from the decidual region immediately surrounding the implantation chamber, whereas versican accumulated in the same region. The differences observed in the expression of HA and versican suggest that both molecules may participate in the process of endometrial decidualization and/or embryo implantation. PMID:12886461

  14. Hyaluronan Participates in the Epidermal Response to Disruption of the Permeability Barrier in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maytin, Edward V.; Chung, Helen H.; Seetharaman, V. Mani

    2004-01-01

    Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid, HA) is a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix of tissues that plays a role in cellular migration, proliferation and differentiation. Injury to the stratum corneum elicits an epidermal hyperproliferative response, a pathogenic feature in many cutaneous diseases including eczema and psoriasis. Because HA is abundant in the matrix between keratinocytes, we asked whether the presence of HA is required for epidermal hyperplasia to occur in response to barrier injury. Disruption of the stratum corneum, by acetone application on the skin of hairless mice, led to a marked accumulation of HA in the matrix between epidermal basal and spinous keratinocytes, and also within keratinocytes of the upper epidermis. To test whether HA may have a functional role in epidermal hyperplasia, we used Streptomyces hyaluronidase (StrepH), delivered topically, to degrade epidermal HA and blunt the accumulation of epidermal HA after acetone. StrepH signficantly reduced epidermal HA levels, and also significantly inhibited the development of epidermal hyperplasia. This reduction in epidermal thickness was not attributable to any decrease in keratinocyte proliferation, but rather to an apparent acceleration in terminal differentiation (ie, increased keratin 10 and filaggrin expression). Overall, the data show that HA is a significant participant in the epidermal response to barrier injury. PMID:15466397

  15. The effect of hyaluronan on the motility of skin dermal fibroblasts in nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuna; Li, Linhao; Jiang, Chao; Xu, Wei; Lv, Yonggang; Zhong, Li; Cai, Kaiyong; Yang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Nanofibrous scaffolds that use the native extracellular matrix are promising developments in skin tissue regeneration because they provide the proper environment for the adhesion, migration and growth of skin dermal fibroblasts, important during wound healing. In this study, we focus on hyaluronan as a native ECM that regulates cellular motility in nanofibrous scaffolds. PCL/HA nanofibrous scaffolds were generated by electrospinning and assessed for various physicochemical properties. HA-based scaffolds significantly enhanced cell infiltration in vitro and in vivo. The observation of movements in living cells revealed that HA-based scaffolds regulated cell migration speed and direction. This phenomenon may influences by the variation in cell adhesion receptors-integrin β1, and vinculin formation and distribution. Furthermore, we confirmed that HA/CD44 interactions can activate the TGF-β/MMP-2 signaling pathway that promotes cell motility. These findings suggest HA functions in the cell motility of nanofibrous scaffolds and have potential implications for the use of HA-based scaffolds in skin tissue regeneration applications. PMID:25940528

  16. Quantification of hyaluronan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfates in the tissue sections on glass slides.

    PubMed

    Koshiishi, I; Horikoshi, E; Imanari, T

    1999-02-01

    The method for the determination of hyaluronan and chondroitin/dermatan sulfates in the tissue sections on a glass slide, which were prepared by histological technique, was established by applying to porcine skin. The degradation of these glycosaminoglycans to the unsaturated disaccharides in porcine skin sections on a glass slide was achieved by chondroitinase ABC and ACII in the presence of highly purified bacterial collagenase. Subsequently, the resulting unsaturated disaccharides were determined by HPLC with fluorometric postcolumn derivatization using 2-cyanoacetamide as a reagent. So far, the determination of the glycosaminoglycans in the tissues has taken up more than 5 days, whereas the determination of the glycosaminoglycans in the frozen sections by the present method was completed within a day. In addition, applications of the present method to the serial polyester wax sections processed with a small surgical knife made it possible to determine the glycosaminoglycans in a local part in the tissue section. The present method should open a way for the clinical analysis of glycosaminoglycans in the pathological tissue samples. PMID:9918675

  17. Novel enzymatically cross-linked hyaluronan hydrogels support the formation of 3D neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Broguiere, Nicolas; Isenmann, Luca; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2016-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an essential component of the central nervous system's extracellular matrix and its high molecular weight (MW) form has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties relevant for regenerative medicine. Here, we introduce a new hydrogel based on high MW HA which is cross-linked using the transglutaminase (TG) activity of the activated blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIIIa). These HA-TG gels have significant advantages for neural tissue engineering compared to previous HA gels. Due to their chemical inertness in the absence of FXIIIa, the material can be stored long-term, is stable in solution, and shows no cytotoxicity. The gelation is completely cell-friendly due to the specificity of the enzyme and the gelation rate can be tuned from seconds to hours at physiological pH and independently of stiffness. The gels are injectable, and attach covalently to fibrinogen and fibrin, two common bioactive components in in vitro tissue engineering, as well as proteins present in vivo, allowing the gels to covalently bind to brain or spinal cord defects. These optimal chemical and bioactive properties of HA-TG gels enabled the formation of 3D neuronal cultures of unprecedented performance, showing fast neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic speciation, strong synaptic connectivity in 3D networks, and rapidly-occurring and long-lasting coordinated electrical activity. PMID:27209262

  18. Effect of molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ningbo; Wang, Xin; Qin, Lei; Guo, Zhengze; Li, Dehua

    2015-09-25

    Hyaluronan (HA), the simplest glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix, exists in various tissues. It is involved in some critical biological procedures, including cellular signaling, cell adhesion and proliferation, and cell differentiation. The effect of molecular weight (MW) and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation was controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of MW and concentration of HA on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived stem cells in vitro. Results showed that high MW HA decreased the cell adhesion rate in a concentration-dependant manner. The cell adhesion rate was decreased by increasing MW of HA. Cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by low MW HA (P < 0.05). The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on the cell adhesion rate and cell proliferation (P < 0.05). High MW HA increased the mRNA expressions of ALP, RUNX-2 and OCN. The higher the MW was, the higher the mRNA expressions were. The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on ALP mRNA expression (P < 0.05). HA of higher MW and higher concentration promoted bone formation. These findings provide some useful information in understanding the mechanism underlying the effect of MW and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26284973

  19. Visible Light Crosslinking of Methacrylated Hyaluronan Hydrogels for Injectable Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Spencer L.; Oldinski, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering hydrogels are primarily cured in situ using ultraviolet (UV) radiation which limits the use of hydrogels as drug or cell carriers. Visible green light activated crosslinking systems are presented as a safe alternative to UV photocrosslinked hydrogels, without compromising material properties such as viscosity and stiffness. The objective of this study was to fabricate and characterize photocrosslinked hydrogels with well-regulated gelation kinetics and mechanical properties for the repair or replacement of soft tissue. An anhydrous methacrylation of hyaluronan (HA) was performed to control the degree of modification (DOM) of HA, verified by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. UV activated crosslinking was compared to visible green light activated crosslinking. While the different photocrosslinking techniques resulted in varied crosslinking times, comparable mechanical properties of UV and green light activated crosslinked hydrogels were achieved using each photocrosslinking method by adjusting time of light exposure. Methacrylated HA (HA-MA) hydrogels of varying molecular weight, DOM and concentration exhibited compressive moduli ranging from 1 kPa to 116 kPa, for UV crosslinking, and 3 kPa to 146 kPa, for green light crosslinking. HA-MA molecular weight and concentration were found to significantly influence moduli values. HA-MA hydrogels did not exhibit any significant cytotoxic affects towards human mesenchymal stem cells. Green light activated crosslinking systems are presented as a viable method to form natural-based hydrogels in situ. PMID:26097172

  20. Hydrogels of collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hyaluronan interpenetrating polymer network for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Yuan, Tun; Xiao, Zhanwen; Tang, Pingping; Xiao, Yumei; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-09-01

    The network structure of a three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold dominates its performance such as mechanical strength, mass transport capacity, degradation rate and subsequent cellular behavior. The hydrogels scaffolds with interpenetrating polymeric network (IPN) structure have an advantage over the individual component gels and could simulate partly the structure of native extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. In this study, to develop perfect cartilage tissue engineering scaffolds, IPN hydrogels of collagen/chondroitin sulfate/hyaluronan were prepared via two simultaneous processes of collagen self-assembly and cross linking polymerization of chondroitin sulfate-methacrylate (CSMA) and hyaluronic acid-methacrylate. The degradation rate, swelling performance and compressive modulus of IPN hydrogels could be adjusted by varying the degree of methacrylation of CSMA. The results of proliferation and fluorescence staining of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro culture demonstrated that the IPN hydrogels possessed good cytocompatibility. Furthermore, the IPN hydrogels could upregulate cartilage-specific gene expression and promote the chondrocytes secreting glycosaminoglycan and collagen II. These results suggested that IPN hydrogels might serve as promising hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:22639153