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Sample records for pathogen tannerella forsythia

  1. Glycobiology Aspects of the Periodontal Pathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Gerald; Sekot, Gerhard; Friedrich, Valentin; Megson, Zoë A.; Koerdt, Andrea; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Glycobiology is important for the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, affecting the bacterium’s cellular integrity, its life-style, and virulence potential. The bacterium possesses a unique Gram-negative cell envelope with a glycosylated surface (S-) layer as outermost decoration that is proposed to be anchored via a rough lipopolysaccharide. The S-layer glycan has the structure 4‑MeO-b-ManpNAcCONH2-(1→3)-[Pse5Am7Gc-(2→4)-]-b-ManpNAcA-(1→4)-[4-MeO-a-Galp-(1→2)-]-a-Fucp-(1→4)-[-a-Xylp-(1→3)-]-b-GlcpA-(1→3)-[-b-Digp-(1→2)-]-a-Galp and is linked to distinct serine and threonine residues within the D(S/T)(A/I/L/M/T/V) amino acid motif. Also several other Tannerella proteins are modified with the S‑layer oligosaccharide, indicating the presence of a general O‑glycosylation system. Protein O‑glycosylation impacts the life-style of T. forsythia since truncated S-layer glycans present in a defined mutant favor biofilm formation. While the S‑layer has also been shown to be a virulence factor and to delay the bacterium's recognition by the innate immune system of the host, the contribution of glycosylation to modulating host immunity is currently unraveling. Recently, it was shown that Tannerella surface glycosylation has a role in restraining the Th17-mediated neutrophil infiltration in the gingival tissues. Related to its asaccharolytic physiology, T. forsythia expresses a robust enzymatic repertoire, including several glycosidases, such as sialidases, which are linked to specific growth requirements and are involved in triggering host tissue destruction. This review compiles the current knowledge on the glycobiology of T. forsythia. PMID:24970146

  2. Glycobiology Aspects of the Periodontal Pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Posch, Gerald; Sekot, Gerhard; Friedrich, Valentin; Megson, Zoë A; Koerdt, Andrea; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Glycobiology is important for the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, affecting the bacterium's cellular integrity, its life-style, and virulence potential. The bacterium possesses a unique Gram-negative cell envelope with a glycosylated surface (S-) layer as outermost decoration that is proposed to be anchored via a rough lipopolysaccharide. The S-layer glycan has the structure 4‑MeO-b-ManpNAcCONH2-(1→3)-[Pse5Am7Gc-(2→4)-]-b-ManpNAcA-(1→4)-[4-MeO-a-Galp-(1→2)-]-a-Fucp-(1→4)-[-a-Xylp-(1→3)-]-b-GlcpA-(1→3)-[-b-Digp-(1→2)-]-a-Galp and is linked to distinct serine and threonine residues within the D(S/T)(A/I/L/M/T/V) amino acid motif. Also several other Tannerella proteins are modified with the S‑layer oligosaccharide, indicating the presence of a general O‑glycosylation system. Protein O‑glycosylation impacts the life-style of T. forsythia since truncated S-layer glycans present in a defined mutant favor biofilm formation. While the S‑layer has also been shown to be a virulence factor and to delay the bacterium's recognition by the innate immune system of the host, the contribution of glycosylation to modulating host immunity is currently unraveling. Recently, it was shown that Tannerella surface glycosylation has a role in restraining the Th17-mediated neutrophil infiltration in the gingival tissues. Related to its asaccharolytic physiology, T. forsythia expresses a robust enzymatic repertoire, including several glycosidases, such as sialidases, which are linked to specific growth requirements and are involved in triggering host tissue destruction. This review compiles the current knowledge on the glycobiology of T. forsythia. PMID:24970146

  3. Sialic acid, periodontal pathogens and Tannerella forsythia: stick around and enjoy the feast!

    PubMed Central

    Roy, S; Honma, K

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal pathogens, like any other human commensal or pathogenic bacterium, must possess both the ability to acquire the necessary growth factors but also the means to adhere to surfaces or reside and survive in their environmental niche. Recent evidence has suggested that sialic acid containing host molecules may provide both of these requirements in vivo for several periodontal pathogens but most notably for the red complex organism Tannerella forsythia. Several other periodontal pathogens also possess sialic acid scavenging enzymes – sialidases, which can also expose adhesive epitopes, but might also act as adhesins in their own right. In addition recent experimental work coupled with the release of several genome sequences has revealed that periodontal bacteria have a range of sialic acid uptake and utilisation systems while others may also use sialic acid as a cloaking device on their surface to mimic host and avoid immune recognition. This review will focus on these systems in a range of periodontal bacteria with a focus on T. forsythia. PMID:22230462

  4. Characterization of an α-l-fucosidase from the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Megson, ZA; Koerdt, A; Schuster, H; Ludwig, R; Janesch, B; Frey, A; Naylor, K; Wilson, IBH; Stafford, GP; Messner, P; Schäffer, C

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia expresses several glycosidases which are linked to specific growth requirements and are involved in the invasion of host tissues. α-l-Fucosyl residues are exposed on various host glycoconjugates and, thus, the α-l-fucosidases predicted in the T. forsythia ATCC 43037 genome could potentially serve roles in host-pathogen interactions. We describe the molecular cloning and characterization of the putative fucosidase TfFuc1 (encoded by the bfo_2737 = Tffuc1 gene), previously reported to be present in an outer membrane preparation. In terms of sequence, this 51-kDa protein is a member of the glycosyl hydrolase family GH29. Using an artificial substrate, p-nitrophenyl-α-fucose (KM 670 μM), the enzyme was determined to have a pH optimum of 9.0 and to be competitively inhibited by fucose and deoxyfuconojirimycin. TfFuc1 was shown here to be a unique α(1,2)-fucosidase that also possesses α(1,6) specificity on small unbranched substrates. It is active on mucin after sialidase-catalyzed removal of terminal sialic acid residues and also removes fucose from blood group H. Following knock-out of the Tffuc1 gene and analyzing biofilm formation and cell invasion/adhesion of the mutant in comparison to the wild-type, it is most likely that the enzyme does not act extracellularly. Biochemically interesting as the first fucosidase in T. forsythia to be characterized, the biological role of TfFuc1 may well be in the metabolism of short oligosaccharides in the periplasm, thereby indirectly contributing to the virulence of this organism. TfFuc1 is the first glycosyl hydrolase in the GH29 family reported to be a specific α(1,2)-fucosidase. PMID:25831954

  5. Structure and Immunogenicity of the Rough-Type Lipopolysaccharide from the Periodontal Pathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Gerald; Andrukhov, Oleh; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Lindner, Buko; Messner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobic organism that inhabits subgingival plaque biofilms and is covered with a so far unique surface layer composed of two glycoproteins. It belongs to the so-called “red complex” of bacteria comprising species that are associated with periodontal disease. While the surface layer glycoprotein glycan structure had been elucidated recently and found to be a virulence factor, no structural data on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of this organism were available. In this study, the T. forsythia LPS structure was partially elucidated by a combined mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) approach and initial experiments to characterize its immunostimulatory potential were performed. The T. forsythia LPS is a complex, rough-type LPS with a core region composed of one 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) residue, three mannose residues, and two glucosamine residues. MS analyses of O-deacylated LPS proved that, in addition, one phosphoethanolamine residue and most likely one galactose-phosphate residue were present, however, their positions could not be identified. Stimulation of human macrophages with T. forsythia LPS resulted in the production of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha in a dose-dependent manner. The response to T. forsythia LPS was observed only upon stimulation in the presence of fetal calf serum (FCS), whereas no cytokine production was observed in the absence of FCS. This finding suggests that the presence of certain additional cofactors is crucial for the immune response induced by T. forsythia LPS. PMID:23616409

  6. Inositol-phosphodihydroceramides in the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia: Structural analysis and incorporation of exogenous myo-inositol

    PubMed Central

    Megson, Zoë Anne; Pittenauer, Ernst; Duda, Katarzyna Anna; Engel, Regina; Ortmayr, Karin; Koellensperger, Gunda; Mach, Lukas; Allmaier, Günter; Holst, Otto; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Background Unique phosphodihydroceramides containing phosphoethanolamine and glycerol have been previously described in Porphyromonas gingivalis. Importantly, they were shown to possess pro-inflammatory properties. Other common human bacteria were screened for the presence of these lipids, and they were found, amongst others, in the oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia. To date, no detailed study into the lipids of this organism has been performed. Methods Lipids were extracted, separated and purified by HPTLC, and analyzed using GC-MS, ESI–MS and NMR. Of special interest was how T. forsythia acquires the metabolic precursors for the lipids studied here. This was assayed by radioactive and stable isotope incorporation using carbon-14 and deuterium labeled myo-inositol, added to the growth medium. Results T. forsythia synthesizes two phosphodihydroceramides (Tf GL1, Tf GL2) which are constituted by phospho-myo-inositol linked to either a 17-, 18-, or 19-carbon sphinganine, N-linked to either a branched 17:0(3-OH) or a linear 16:0(3-OH) fatty acid which, in Tf GL2, is, in turn, ester-substituted with a branched 15:0 fatty acid. T. forsythia lacks the enzymatic machinery required for myo-inositol synthesis but was found to internalize inositol from the medium for the synthesis of both Tf GL1 and Tf GL2. Conclusion The study describes two novel glycolipids in T. forsythia which could be essential in this organism. Their synthesis could be reliant on an external source of myo-inositol. General significance The effects of these unique lipids on the immune system and their role in bacterial virulence could be relevant in the search for new drug targets. PMID:26277409

  7. KLIKK proteases of Tannerella forsythia: putative virulence factors with a unique domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Mizgalska, Danuta; Eick, Sigrum; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomics of virulent Tannerella forsythia ATCC 43037 and a close health-associated relative, Tannerella BU063, revealed, in the latter, the absence of an entire array of genes encoding putative secretory proteases that possess a nearly identical C-terminal domain (CTD) that ends with a -Lys-Leu-Ile-Lys-Lys motif. This observation suggests that these proteins, referred to as KLIKK proteases, may function as virulence factors. Re-sequencing of the loci of the KLIKK proteases found only six genes grouped in two clusters. All six genes were expressed by T. forsythia in routine culture conditions, although at different levels. More importantly, a transcript of each gene was detected in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) from periodontitis sites infected with T. forsythia indicating that the proteases are expressed in vivo. In each protein, a protease domain was flanked by a unique N-terminal profragment and a C-terminal extension ending with the CTD. Partially purified recombinant proteases showed variable levels of proteolytic activity in zymography gels and toward protein substrates, including collagen, gelatin, elastin, and casein. Taken together, these results indicate that the pathogenic strain of T. forsythia secretes active proteases capable of degrading an array of host proteins, which likely represents an important pathogenic feature of this bacterium. PMID:25954253

  8. A Metalloproteinase Mirolysin of Tannerella forsythia Inhibits All Pathways of the Complement System.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Mizgalska, Danuta; Bielecka, Ewa; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Riesbeck, Kristian; Garred, Peter; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2015-09-01

    Recent reports focusing on virulence factors of periodontal pathogens implicated proteinases as major determinants of remarkable pathogenicity of these species, with special emphasis on their capacity to modulate complement activity. In particular, bacteria-mediated cleavage of C5 and subsequent release of C5a seems to be an important phenomenon in the manipulation of the local inflammatory response in periodontitis. In this study, we present mirolysin, a novel metalloproteinase secreted by Tannerella forsythia, a well-recognized pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. Mirolysin exhibited a strong effect on all complement pathways. It inhibited the classical and lectin complement pathways due to efficient degradation of mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-2, ficolin-3, and C4, whereas inhibition of the alternative pathway was caused by degradation of C5. This specificity toward complement largely resembled the activity of a previously characterized metalloproteinase of T. forsythia, karilysin. Interestingly, mirolysin released the biologically active C5a peptide in human plasma and induced migration of neutrophils. Importantly, we demonstrated that combination of mirolysin with karilysin, as well as a cysteine proteinase of another periodontal pathogen, Prevotella intermedia, resulted in a strong synergistic effect on complement. Furthermore, mutant strains of T. forsythia, devoid of either mirolysin or karilysin, showed diminished survival in human serum, providing further evidence for the synergistic inactivation of complement by these metalloproteinases. Taken together, our findings on interactions of mirolysin with complement significantly add to the understanding of immune evasion strategies of T. forsythia and expand the knowledge on molecular mechanisms driving pathogenic events in the infected periodontium. PMID:26209620

  9. Mirolase, a novel subtilisin-like serine protease from the periodontopathogen Tannerella forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Karim, Abdulkarim Y.; Bryzek, Danuta; Enghild, Jan J.; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Koziel, Joanna; Potempa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Tannerella forsythia, an etiologic factor of chronic periodontitis, contains several genes encoding putative proteases. Here, we characterized a subtilisin-like serine protease of T. forsythia referred to as mirolase. Recombinant full-length latent promirolase (85 kDa, without its signal peptide) processed itself through sequential autoproteolytic cleavages into a mature enzyme of 40 kDa. Mirolase latency was driven by the N-terminal prodomain (NTP). In stark contrast to almost all known subtilases, the cleaved NTP remained non-covalently associated with mirolase, inhibiting its proteolytic, but not amidolytic, activity. Full activity was observed only after the NTP was gradually, and fully, degraded. Both activity and processing was absolutely dependent on calcium ions, which were also essential for enzyme stability. As a consequence, both serine protease inhibitors and calcium ions chelators inhibited mirolase activity. Activity assays using an array of chromogenic substrates revealed that mirolase specificity is driven not only by the substrate-binding subsite S1, but also by other subsites. Taken together mirolase is a calcium-dependent serine protease of the S8 family with the unique mechanism of activation that may contribute to T. forsythia pathogenicity by degradation of fibrinogen, hemoglobin and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. PMID:25391881

  10. Lack of a surface layer in Tannerella forsythia mutants deficient in the type IX secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Yuka; Sato, Keiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Shoji, Mikio; Nakane, Daisuke; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Naito, Mariko

    2014-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium, is an important pathogen in periodontal disease. This bacterium possesses genes encoding all known components of the type IX secretion system (T9SS). T. forsythia mutants deficient in genes orthologous to the T9SS-encoding genes porK, porT and sov were constructed. All porK, porT and sov single mutants lacked the surface layer (S-layer) and expressed less-glycosylated versions of the S-layer glycoproteins TfsA and TfsB. In addition, these mutants exhibited decreased haemagglutination and increased biofilm formation. Comparison of the proteins secreted by the porK and WT strains revealed that the secretion of several proteins containing C-terminal domain (CTD)-like sequences is dependent on the porK gene. These results indicate that the T9SS is functional in T. forsythia and contributes to the translocation of CTD proteins to the cell surface or into the extracellular milieu. PMID:25023245

  11. Characterization and Scope of S-layer Protein O-Glycosylation in Tannerella forsythia*

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Gerald; Pabst, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface glycosylation is an important element in defining the life of pathogenic bacteria. Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative, anaerobic periodontal pathogen inhabiting the subgingival plaque biofilms. It is completely covered by a two-dimensional crystalline surface layer (S-layer) composed of two glycoproteins. Although the S-layer has previously been shown to delay the bacterium's recognition by the innate immune system, we characterize here the S-layer protein O-glycosylation as a potential virulence factor. The T. forsythia S-layer glycan was elucidated by a combination of electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an oligosaccharide with the structure 4-Me-β-ManpNAcCONH2-(1→3)-[Pse5Am7Gc-(2→4)-]-β-ManpNAcA-(1→4)-[4-Me-α-Galp-(1→2)-]-α-Fucp-(1→4)-[-α-Xylp-(1→3)-]-β-GlcpA-(1→3)-[-β-Digp-(1→2)-]-α-Galp, which is O-glycosidically linked to distinct serine and threonine residues within the three-amino acid motif (D)(S/T)(A/I/L/M/T/V) on either S-layer protein. This S-layer glycan obviously impacts the life style of T. forsythia because increased biofilm formation of an UDP-N-acetylmannosaminuronic acid dehydrogenase mutant can be correlated with the presence of truncated S-layer glycans. We found that several other proteins of T. forsythia are modified with that specific oligosaccharide. Proteomics identified two of them as being among previously classified antigenic outer membrane proteins that are up-regulated under biofilm conditions, in addition to two predicted antigenic lipoproteins. Theoretical analysis of the S-layer O-glycosylation of T. forsythia indicates the involvement of a 6.8-kb gene locus that is conserved among different bacteria from the Bacteroidetes phylum. Together, these findings reveal the presence of a protein O-glycosylation system in T. forsythia that is essential for creating a rich glycoproteome pinpointing a possible relevance for the virulence of

  12. Role of a Tannerella forsythia exopolysaccharide synthesis operon in biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Inagaki, Satoru; Okuda, Katsuji; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Sharma, Ashu

    2007-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial infections which leads to tooth loss if untreated. Since biofilms formed by periodontal bacteria are considered important in disease progression and pose difficulties in treatment, we sought to investigate the underlying mechanisms of T. forsythia biofilm formation. This was carried out by screening random insertion mutants of T. forsythia for alterations in biofilm development. This approach lead to the identification of an operon involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis. An isogenic mutant of one of the genes, wecC, contained within the operon was constructed. The isogenic wecC mutant showed increased ability to form biofilms as compared to the parent strain. The wecC mutant also formed aggregated microcolonies and showed increased cell-surface associated hydrophobicity as compared to the parent strain. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the wecC mutant indicated that glycosylation of surface glycoproteins was reduced. Therefore, our results suggest that the wecC operon is associated with glycosylation of surface-glycoprotein expression and likely plays an inhibitory role in T. forsythia biofilm formation. PMID:17363213

  13. The S-layer proteins of Tannerella forsythia are secreted via a type IX secretion system that is decoupled from protein O-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Tomek, Markus B.; Neumann, Laura; Nimeth, Irene; Koerdt, Andrea; Andesner, Philipp; Messner, Paul; Mach, Lukas; Potempa, Jan S.; Schäffer, Christina

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Conserved C-terminal domains (CTD) have been shown to act as a signal for the translocation of certain proteins across the outer membrane of Bacteroidetes via a type IX secretion system (T9SS). The genome sequence of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia predicts the presence of the components for a T9SS in conjunction with a suite of CTD proteins. T. forsythia is covered with a 2-dimensional crystalline surface (S-) layer composed of the glycosylated CTD proteins TfsA and TfsB. To investigate if T9SS is functional in T. forsythia, T9SS-deficient mutants were generated by targeting either TF0955 (putative C-terminal signal peptidase) or TF2327 (PorK ortholog), and the mutants were analyzed with respect to secretion, assembly and glycosylation of the S-layer proteins as well as to proteolytic processing of the CTD and biofilm formation. In either mutant, TfsA and TfsB were incapable of translocation, as evidenced by the absence of the S-layer in transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin-sectioned bacterial cells. Despite entrapped within the periplasm, mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the S-layer proteins were modified with the complete, mature glycan found on the secreted proteins, indicating that protein translocation and glycosylation are two independent processes. Further, the T9SS mutants showed a denser biofilm with less voids compared to the wild-type. This study demonstrates the functionality of T9SS and the requirement of CTD for the outer membrane passage of extracellular proteins in T. forsythia, exemplified with the two S-layer proteins. In addition, T9SS protein translocation is decoupled from O-glycan attachment in T. forsythia. PMID:24943676

  14. Antimicrobial Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Cariogenic Bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans, and Periodontal Diseases Actinomyces naeslundii and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Baca-Castañón, Magda Lorena; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angélica; Alcázar-Pizaña, Andrea Guadalupe; Grondin, Yohann; Coronado-Mendoza, Anahí; Sánchez-Najera, Rosa Isela; Cárdenas-Estrada, Eloy; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos Eduardo; Escamilla-García, Erandi

    2015-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well known for their beneficial effects on human health in the intestine and immune system; however, there are few studies on the impact they can generate in oral health. The aim of this study was to test and compare in vitro antimicrobial activity of L. reuteri on pathogenic bacteria involved in the formation of dental caries: S. mutans, S. gordonii, and periodontal disease: A. naeslundii and T. forsythia. Also, we determined the growth kinetics of each bacterium involved in this study. Before determining the antimicrobial action of L. reuteri on cariogenic bacteria and periodontal disease, the behavior and cell development time of each pathogenic bacterium were studied. Once the conditions for good cell growth of each of selected pathogens were established according to their metabolic requirements, maximum exponential growth was determined, this being the reference point for analyzing the development or inhibition by LAB using the Kirby Bauer method. Chlorhexidine 0.12% was positive control. L. reuteri was shown to have an inhibitory effect against S. mutans, followed by T. forsythia and S. gordonii, and a less significant effect against A. naeslundii. Regarding the effect shown by L. reuteri on the two major pathogens, we consider its potential use as a possible functional food in the prevention or treatment of oral diseases. PMID:25422124

  15. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metallo­proteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule. PMID:23695557

  16. Levels of Serum Immunoglobulin G Specific to Bacterial Surface Protein A of Tannerella forsythia are Related to Periodontal Status

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Lindsay M.; Dunford, Robert G.; Genco, Robert J.; Sharma, Ashu

    2015-01-01

    Background Tannerella forsythia (Tf) is a Gram-negative anaerobe implicated in the development of periodontal disease. Bacterial surface protein A (BspA) is a surface-expressed and -secreted protein that is recognized as an important virulence factor of Tf. This study was undertaken to determine whether Tf BspA induces an antibody response in periodontal disease. We hypothesized that serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels against BspA correlate with the disease of patients. Methods Sera were obtained from 100 patients with cardiac disorders and periodontal disease and 73 patients who experienced myocardial infarction but were periodontally healthy. Sera samples were assayed for anti-BspA antibody (total IgG and IgG subtypes) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibody levels were measured in ELISA units by using an arbitrary patient as a standard. Results A negative correlation was found with BspA-specific total IgG antibody titers and the severity of disease measured as the clinical attachment level (CAL) when healthy and diseased groups were analyzed separately (healthy group: [−0.23, correlation value] Student’s t value [73 degrees of freedom] = 1.99; P = 0.05; diseased group: [−0.21] t [100 degrees of freedom] = 2.12; P = 0.03]). However, there was a positive correlation ([0.18 correlation value] Student’s t value [173 degrees of freedom] = 2.39; P = 0.017) when healthy and diseased groups were combined. A strong positive correlation ([0.338 correlation value] Student’s t value [173 degrees of freedom] = 4.69; P <0.0001) between the BspA-specific IgG titers and periodontal probing depth was observed when healthy and disease groups were combined. Conclusions Data demonstrated that antibodies to Tf BspA were elicited in patients with periodontal disease, and antibody levels were associated with the disease severity. Furthermore, data suggested that anti-BspA IgG might have a protective function in periodontal disease by minimizing the

  17. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    PubMed

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin. PMID:23119051

  18. A Phage Display Selected 7-mer Peptide Inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia Metalloprotease-Like Enzyme Karilysin can be Truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro

    PubMed Central

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin. PMID:23119051

  19. Investigate the correlation between clinical sign and symptoms and the presence of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia individually or as a “Red complex” by a multiplex PCR method

    PubMed Central

    Sanghavi, Tulsi Hasmukhrai; Shah, Nimisha; Shah, Ruchi Rani; Sanghavi, Akta

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between endodontic clinical signs and symptoms and the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia or their association by Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay. Materials and Methods: Microbial samples were taken from 30 cases with necrotic pulp tissues in primary infections. DNA was extracted from the samples, which were analyzed for the presence of three endodontic pathogens by using species-specific primers. Results: P. gingivalis, T. denticola, T. forsythia, and Red Complex were present in 11, 17, 4, and 2 canals, respectively. Clinical and statistically significant relationships were found between T. forsythia and mobility and between T. denticola and swelling. (P < 0.05). Presence of other Red complex bacteria shows clinical association with presence of signs and symptoms but no statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: The high prevalence of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia in the examined samples suggests that these bacteria are related to the etiology of symptomatic periradicular diseases. PMID:25506144

  20. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, Christina; Matias Rodrigues, João F.; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y.; Tito, Raul Y.; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars; Samaniego Castruita, José Alfredo; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian; Olsen, Jesper V.; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M.; Collins, Matthew J.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize: (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) the first evidence of ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, “red-complex” pathogens, and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity, and diet, thereby extending the direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  1. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y; Tito, Raul Y; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars H; Castruita, José Alfredo Samaniego; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M; Collins, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past. PMID:24562188

  2. Oxantel Disrupts Polymicrobial Biofilm Development of Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Dashper, Stuart; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil; Liu, Sze Wei; Paolini, Rita; Mitchell, Helen; Walsh, Katrina; D'Cruze, Tanya; Hoffmann, Brigitte; Catmull, Deanne; Zhu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens commonly associated with chronic periodontitis are the spirochete Treponema denticola and the Gram-negative, proteolytic species Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. These species rely on complex anaerobic respiration of amino acids, and the anthelmintic drug oxantel has been shown to inhibit fumarate reductase (Frd) activity in some pathogenic bacteria and inhibit P. gingivalis homotypic biofilm formation. Here, we demonstrate that oxantel inhibited P. gingivalis Frd activity with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.2 μM and planktonic growth of T. forsythia with a MIC of 295 μM, but it had no effect on the growth of T. denticola. Oxantel treatment caused the downregulation of six P. gingivalis gene products and the upregulation of 22 gene products. All of these genes are part of a regulon controlled by heme availability. There was no large-scale change in the expression of genes encoding metabolic enzymes, indicating that P. gingivalis may be unable to overcome Frd inhibition. Oxantel disrupted the development of polymicrobial biofilms composed of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and T. denticola in a concentration-dependent manner. In these biofilms, all three species were inhibited to a similar degree, demonstrating the synergistic nature of biofilm formation by these species and the dependence of T. denticola on the other two species. In a murine alveolar bone loss model of periodontitis oxantel addition to the drinking water of P. gingivalis-infected mice reduced bone loss to the same level as the uninfected control. PMID:24165189

  3. Gingipain-dependent degradation of mTOR pathway proteins by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Prachi; Higham, Jon; Pinnock, Abigail; Murdoch, Craig; Douglas, C. W. Ian; Stafford, Graham P; Lambert, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are Gram-negative pathogens strongly associated with periodontitis. Their abilities to interact, invade and persist within host cells are considered crucial to their pathogenicity, but the mechanisms by which they subvert host defences are not well understood. In this study, we set out to investigate whether P. gingivalis and T. forsythia directly target key signalling molecules which may modulate the host cell phenotype to favour invasion and persistence. Our data identify, for the first time, that P. gingivalis, but not T. forsythia, reduces levels of intracellular mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oral epithelial cells following invasion over a 4 hour time course, via the action of gingipains. The ability of cytochalasin D to abrogate P. gingivalis-mediated mTOR degradation suggests that this effect is dependent upon cellular invasion. We also show that levels of several other proteins in the mTOR signalling pathway are modulated by gingipains, either directly or as a consequence of mTOR degradation including p-4E-BP1. Taken together, our data suggests that P. gingivalis manipulates the mTOR pathway, providing evidence for a potentially novel mechanism by which P. gingivalis mediates its effects on host cell responses to infection. PMID:23714361

  4. Clinical evaluation of salivary periodontal pathogen levels by real-time polymerase chain reaction in patients before dental implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Taichi; Yasuda, Masaaki; Kaneko, Hajime; Sasaki, Hodaka; Kato, Tetsuo; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Periodontal pathogens in dental plaque are the main causative agents of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. Detection of the presence of such periodontal pathogens early would serve as a useful tool in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the periodontal pathogen levels in saliva were correlated with the periodontal status of patients receiving implant treatment. Materials and Methods A total of 291 patients visiting Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital were divided into four groups: a no-periodontitis (np) group, a mild-periodontitis (mip) group, a moderate-periodontitis (mop) group, and a severe-periodontitis (sp) group. The levels of the following five periodontal pathogens in saliva were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Prevotella intermedia. Results The levels of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly higher in mop group than in np group (P <  0.05). The levels of all periodontal pathogens tested except A. actinomycetemcomitans were significantly higher in sp group than in np group (P <  0.05). Conclusion The detection levels of the periodontal pathogens targeted in saliva samples were correlated with the periodontal status. This suggests that using saliva to screen for periodontopathic bacteria offers an easier-to-use clinical tool than the paper point method in the diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis and peri-implantitis. PMID:23745964

  5. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Jessica D; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Lenzo, Jason C; Holden, James A; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27035339

  6. Differential Responses of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Three Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lenzo, Jason C.; Holden, James A.; Chen, Yu-Yen; Singleton, William; Gause, Katelyn T.; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Highly purified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of the periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were produced using tangential flow ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and Optiprep density gradient separation. Cryo-TEM and light scattering showed OMVs to be single lipid-bilayers with modal diameters of 75 to 158 nm. Enumeration of OMVs by nanoparticle flow-cytometry at the same stage of late exponential culture indicated that P. gingivalis was the most prolific OMV producer. P. gingivalis OMVs induced strong TLR2 and TLR4-specific responses and moderate responses in TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, NOD1 and NOD2 expressing-HEK-Blue cells. Responses to T. forsythia OMVs were less than those of P. gingivalis and T. denticola OMVs induced only weak responses. Compositional analyses of OMVs from the three pathogens demonstrated differences in protein, fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan fragments and nucleic acids. Periodontal pathogen OMVs induced differential pattern recognition receptor responses that have implications for their role in chronic periodontitis. PMID:27035339

  7. Quantification of key periodontal pathogens in insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic patients with generalized chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Aemaimanan, Piyamas; Amimanan, Piyawan; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol

    2013-08-01

    Periodontitis is a common problem in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), however, differences in the putative periodontal pathogens in subjects with DM compared to non-DM subjects are still inconclusive. The red complex, which includes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, encompasses the most important pathogens in adult periodontal disease. The aim of the present study was to compare cell numbers of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, T. forsythia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in gingival sulcus of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis sites of non-diabetes mellitus (NDM), controlled and poorly controlled insulin-dependent DM (CDM and PDM) patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from 19 CDM, 19 PDM and 19 NDM patients. Taqman real time-PCR was used to determine bacterial cell number. At subject level, the quantity of red complex bacteria was significantly higher in PDM than those of NDM and positively correlated with HbA1c. At site level (total 342 sites), cell numbers of T. denticola and T. forsythia in healthy sites of CDM and PDM were significantly higher than those of NDM. In gingivitis sites, the numbers of P. gingivalis in CDM and PDM and T. forsythia in PDM were significantly higher than those of NDM while in periodontitis sites, higher quantity of P. gingivalis in PDM was observed. Our study indicated that poor glycemic control is associated with increasing cell numbers of red complex bacteria in subgingival biofilm. PMID:23827459

  8. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K. A. Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S.; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4–5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39–4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51–4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94–6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and

  9. Alendronate augments interleukin-1{beta} release from macrophages infected with periodontal pathogenic bacteria through activation of caspase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xue; Tamai, Riyoko; Endo, Yasuo; Kiyoura, Yusuke

    2009-02-15

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) are anti-bone-resorptive drugs with inflammatory side effects that include osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral bacteria have been considered to be a trigger for these NBP-associated jaw bone diseases. The present study examined the effects of alendronate (a typical NBP) and clodronate (a non-NBP) on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia, which are important pathogens of periodontal diseases. Pretreatment with alendronate augmented IL-1{beta}, but not TNF{alpha}, production by macrophages infected with P. gingivalis or T. forsythia. This augmentation of IL-1{beta} production was inhibited by clodronate. Furthermore, caspase-1, a promoter of IL-1{beta} production, was activated by treatment with alendronate, and caspase-1 inhibitor reduced the production of IL-1{beta} induced by alendronate and P. gingivalis. These results suggest that NBPs augment periodontal pathogenic bacteria-induced IL-1{beta} release via caspase-1 activation, and this phenomenon may contribute to the development of NBP-associated inflammatory side effects including jaw osteomyelitis. Co-treatment with clodronate may prevent and/or reduce these inflammatory effects induced by NBPs.

  10. Humoral immune responses to periodontal pathogens in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Uttom; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Chung, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Young-Joon; Kim, Ok-Su; Lim, Hoi-Jeong; Shin, Min-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elderly people are thought to be more susceptible to periodontal disease due to reduced immune function associated with aging. However, little information is available on the nature of immune responses against putative periodontal pathogens in geriatric patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serum IgG antibody responses to six periodontal pathogens in geriatric subjects. Methods The study population consisted of 85 geriatric patients and was divided into three groups: 29 mild (MCP), 27 moderate (MoCP) and 29 severe (SCP) chronic periodontitis patients. Serum levels of IgG antibody to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared among the groups. Results All three groups showed levels of serum IgG in response to P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and P. intermedia that were three to four times higher than levels of IgG to T. forsythia, T. denticola, and F. nucleatum. There were no significant differences among all three groups in IgG response to P. gingivalis (P=0.065), T. forsythia (P=0.057), T. denticola (P=0.1), and P. intermedia (P=0.167), although the IgG levels tended to be higher in patients with SCP than in those with MCP or MoCP (with the exception of those for P. intermedia). In contrast, there were significant differences among the groups in IgG levels in response to F. nucleatum (P=0.001) and A. actinomycetemcomitans (P=0.003). IgG levels to A. actinomycetemcomitans were higher in patients with MCP than in those with MoCP or SCP. Conclusions When IgG levels were compared among three periodontal disease groups, only IgG levels to F. nucleatum significantly increased with the severity of disease. On the contrary, IgG levels to A. actinomycetemcomitans decreased significantly in patients with SCP compared to those with MCP. There were no

  11. Are Putative Periodontal Pathogens Reliable Diagnostic Markers?▿

    PubMed Central

    Riep, Birgit; Edesi-Neuß, Lilian; Claessen, Friderike; Skarabis, Horst; Ehmke, Benjamin; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre; Göbel, Ulf B.; Moter, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory diseases. A number of putative bacterial pathogens have been associated with the disease and are used as diagnostic markers. In the present study, we compared the prevalence of oral bacterial species in the subgingival biofilm of generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) (n = 44) and chronic periodontitis (CP) (n = 46) patients with that of a periodontitis-resistant control group (PR) (n = 21). The control group consisted of subjects at least 65 years of age with only minimal or no periodontitis and no history of periodontal treatment. A total of 555 samples from 111 subjects were included in this study. The samples were analyzed by PCR of 16S rRNA gene fragments and subsequent dot blot hybridization using oligonucleotide probes specific for Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, a Treponema denticola-like phylogroup (Treponema phylogroup II), Treponema lecithinolyticum, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum, as well as Capnocytophaga ochracea. Our data confirm a high prevalence of the putative periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and T. forsythia in the periodontitis groups. However, these species were also frequently detected in the PR group. For most of the species tested, the prevalence was more associated with increased probing depth than with the subject group. T. lecithinolyticum was the only periodontopathogenic species showing significant differences both between GAP and CP patients and between GAP patients and PR subjects. C. ochracea was associated with the PR subjects, regardless of the probing depth. These results indicate that T. lecithinolyticum may be a diagnostic marker for GAP and C. ochracea for periodontal health. They also suggest that current presumptions of the association of specific bacteria with periodontal health and disease require further

  12. Polymicrobial Infection with Periodontal Pathogens Specifically Enhances MicroRNA miR-146a in ApoE−/− Mice during Experimental Periodontal Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Md A.; Rivera, Mercedes; Lucas, Alexandra; Chan, Edward K. L.; Kesavalu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia are periodontal pathogens associated with the etiology of adult periodontitis as polymicrobial infections. Recent studies demonstrated that oral infection with P. gingivalis induces both periodontal disease and atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic and proatherogenic ApoE−/− mice. In this study, we explored the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in maxillas (periodontium) and spleens isolated from ApoE−/− mice infected with P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia as a polymicrobial infection. miRNA expression levels, including miRNA miR-146a, and associated mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured in the maxillas and spleens from mice infected with periodontal pathogens and compared to those in the maxillas and spleens from sham-infected controls. Furthermore, in response to these periodontal pathogens (as mono- and polymicrobial heat-killed and live bacteria), human THP-1 monocytes demonstrated similar miRNA expression patterns, including that of miR-146a, in vitro. Strikingly, miR-146a had a negative correlation with TNF-α secretion in vitro, reducing levels of the adaptor kinases IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1) and TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Thus, our studies revealed a persistent association of miR-146a expression with these periodontal pathogens, suggesting that miR-146a may directly or indirectly modulate or alter the chronic periodontal pathology induced by these microorganisms. PMID:21263019

  13. Effects of forsythia fruit extracts and lignan on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hee; Rhee, Soon-Jae; Choi, Sang-Won; Choi, Youngsun

    2004-01-01

    A primary methanol extract (F-ME), secondary butanol-soluble fraction (F-BU), and lignans were prepared from forsythia fruit (Forsythia viridissima L.) and added to 0.5% (w/w) cholesterol diets for male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 121 +/- 12 g. There were six experimental groups: a control group, 0.2%, 0.4% F-ME supplemented groups, 0.1%, 0.02% F-BU groups and 0.02% lignan group. After 3 weeks of feeding, body weight gains, serum GOT and GPT levels were not different among the groups. HDL-/total cholesterol ratios increased in the 0.2% F-BU and lignan groups compared with the control groups. Liver triglyceride level lowered in most of forsythia groups. Fecal cholesterol excretions increased in the lignan group. Arctiin isolated from the forsythia fruit reduced cholesterol and triglyceride contents in cultured HepG2 cells at 0.01-0.1 microM. These results indicated that the forsythia lignan, arctiin is effective on improving blood lipid status without a significant hepatotoxicity and is to be utilized for the functional foods for lipid-lowering action. PMID:15630274

  14. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18–35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  15. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18-35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  16. Frequency of periodontal pathogens and Helicobacter pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals submitted to bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    PATARO, André Luiz; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; ABREU, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; CORTELLI, José Roberto; FRANCO, Gilson Cesar Nobre; AQUINO, Davi Romeiro; COTA, Luis Otavio Miranda; COSTA, Fernando Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This cross-sectional study compared the frequency of oral periodontopathogens and H. pylori in the mouths and stomachs of obese individuals with or without periodontitis submitted to bariatric surgery. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-four men and women aged 18-65 were conveniently distributed into four groups. Two groups were composed of individuals who underwent bariatric surgery with (BP) (n=40) and without (BNP) (n=39) periodontitis and two obese control groups with (CP) (n=35) and without (CNP) (n=40) periodontitis. The oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, and Helicobacter pylori were detected by a polymerase chain reaction technique using saliva, tongue and stomach biopsy samples. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that periodontopathogens were highly frequent in the mouth (up to 91.4%). In the bariatric surgically treated group, orally, P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia were more frequent in periodontitis, while C. rectus was more frequent in non-periodontitis subjects. Stomach biopsies also revealed the high frequency of five oral species in both candidates for bariatric surgery (91.6%) and the bariatric (83.3%) groups. H. pylori was frequently detected in the mouth (50.0%) and stomach (83.3%). In the stomach, oral species and H. pylori appeared in lower frequency in the bariatric group. Conclusions Obese individuals showed high frequencies of periodontopathogens and H. pylori in their mouths and stomachs. Bariatric surgery showed an inverse microbial effect on oral and stomach environments by revealing higher oral and lower stomach bacterial frequencies. PMID:27383704

  17. TLR4, NOD1 and NOD2 mediate immune recognition of putative newly identified periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marchesan, J; Jiao, Y Z; Schaff, R A; Hao, J; Morelli, T; Kinney, J S; Gerow, E; Sheridan, R; Rodrigues, V; Paster, B J; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V

    2016-06-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that results from the interaction between the oral microbiota and the host immunity. Although the innate immune response is important for disease initiation and progression, the innate immune receptors that recognize both classical and putative periodontal pathogens that elicit an immune response have not been elucidated. By using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM), we identified multiple predominant oral bacterial species in human plaque biofilm that strongly associate with severe periodontitis. Ten of the identified species were evaluated in greater depth, six being classical pathogens and four putative novel pathogens. Using human peripheral blood monocytes (HPBM) and murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific and MyD88 knockouts (KOs), we demonstrated that heat-killed Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, Selenomonas infelix, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia mediate high immunostimulatory activity. Campylobacter concisus, C. rectus, and S. infelix exhibited robust TLR4 stimulatory activity. Studies using mesothelial cells from WT and NOD1-specific KOs and NOD2-expressing human embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that Eubacterium saphenum, Eubacterium nodatum and Filifactor alocis exhibit robust NOD1 stimulatory activity, and that Porphyromonas endodontalis and Parvimonas micra have the highest NOD2 stimulatory activity. These studies allowed us to provide important evidence on newly identified putative pathogens in periodontal disease pathogenesis showing that these bacteria exhibit different immunostimulatory activity via TLR4, NOD1, and NOD2 (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01154855). PMID:26177212

  18. Identification and evaluation of Forsythia germplasm using molecular markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study identified Forsythia germplasm and evaluated the genetic relationships of F. ×intermedia hybrids, cultivars and their putative parental species. Leaf samples of F. ×intermedia cultivars and species, such as F. koreana and F. suspensa, were collected in the Netherlands, Korea, and USA. T...

  19. Levels of Candidate Periodontal Pathogens in Subgingival Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R R D S; Fermiano, D; Feres, M; Figueiredo, L C; Teles, F R F; Soares, G M S; Faveri, M

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, several new periodontal taxa have been associated with the etiology of periodontitis. A recent systematic review provides further support for the pathogenic role of 17 species/phylotypes. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and levels of these species in subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis (GChP; n = 30), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP; n = 30), and periodontal health (PH; n = 30). All subjects underwent clinical and microbiological assessment. Nine subgingival plaque samples were collected from each subject and analyzed for their content of 20 bacterial species/phylotypes through the RNA-oligonucleotide quantification technique. Subjects from the GChP and GAgP groups presented the highest mean values for all clinical parameters in comparison with the PH group (P < 0.05). Subjects with GChP and GAgP showed significantly higher mean levels of Bacteroidetes sp. human oral taxon (HOT) 274, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, as well as higher mean levels of Filifactor alocis, Fretibacterium fastidiosum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Selenomonas sputigena species than PH subjects (P < 0.05). GAgP subjects presented higher mean levels of TM7 sp. HOT 356 and F. alocis than GChP subjects (P < 0.05). A significantly higher mean prevalence of Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362 was found in subjects with GChP and GAgP than in PH subjects. Mean levels of P. gingivalis (r = 0.68), T. forsythia (r = 0.62), F. alocis (r = 0.51, P = 0.001), and Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360 (r = 0.41) were correlated with pocket depth (P < 0.001). In conclusion, Bacteroidales sp. HOT 274, Desulfobulbus sp. HOT 041, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 360, Fretibacterium sp. HOT 362, and TM7 sp. HOT 356 phylotypes, in addition to F. alocis, F. fastidiosum, and S. sputigena, seem to be associated with periodontitis, and their role

  20. Novel PDE4 Inhibitors Derived from Chinese Medicine Forsythia

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Tiffany A.; McKelvey, Alison C.; Weathington, Nate M.; Birru, Rahel L.; Lear, Travis; Leikauf, George D.; Chen, Bill B.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a crucial intracellular second messenger molecule that converts extracellular molecules to intracellular signal transduction pathways generating cell- and stimulus-specific effects. Importantly, specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) subtypes control the amplitude and duration of cAMP-induced physiological processes and are therefore a prominent pharmacological target currently used in a variety of fields. Here we tested the extracts from traditional Chinese medicine, Forsythia suspense seeds, which have been used for more than 2000 years to relieve respiratory symptoms. Using structural-functional analysis we found its major lignin, Forsynthin, acted as an immunosuppressant by inhibiting PDE4 in inflammatory and immune cell. Moreover, several novel, selective small molecule derivatives of Forsythin were tested in vitro and in murine models of viral and bacterial pneumonia, sepsis and cytokine-driven systemic inflammation. Thus, pharmacological targeting of PDE4 may be a promising strategy for immune-related disorders characterized by amplified host inflammatory response. PMID:25549252

  1. Isolation and identification of an endophytic fungus Pezicula sp. in Forsythia viridissima and its secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaying; Wang, Guoping; Zhang, Yalei; Zheng, Biqiang; Zhang, Chulong; Wang, Liwei

    2014-10-01

    In a survey of endophytic fungal biodiversity, an antimicrobial endophytic isolate zjwcf069 was obtained from twigs of Forsythia viridissima, Zhejiang Province, Southeast China. Zjwcf069 was then identified as Pezicula sp. through combination of morphological and phylogenetic analysis based on ITS-rDNA. Zjwcf069 here represented the first endophytic fungus in Pezicula isolated from host F. viridissima. From the fermentation broth, four compounds were obtained through silica gel column chromatography and Sephadex LH-20 under the guide of bioassay. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis as mellein (1), ramulosin (2), butanedioic acid (3), and 4-methoxy-1(3H)-isobenzofuranone (4). Compound 4 here stood for the very first time as natural product from microbes. In vitro antifungal assay showed that compound 1 displayed growth inhibition against 9 plant pathogenic fungi, especially Botrytis cinerea and Fulvia fulva with EC50 values below 50 μg/mL. Endophytic fungi in medicinal plants were good resources for bioactive secondary metabolites. PMID:24928260

  2. Effect of repeated adjunctive antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on subgingival periodontal pathogens in the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Petelin, Milan; Perkič, Katja; Seme, Katja; Gašpirc, Boris

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of subgingival ultrasonic scaling followed by repeated (three times) antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), ultrasonic scaling alone (US), and scaling and root planing with hand instruments (SRP) for initial periodontal treatment. Twenty-seven non-smoking systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients were included. Residual pockets ≥4 mm deep and bleeding on probing were debrided either with SRP, US alone, or US followed by a single episode of PDT during supportive periodontal treatment. Probing pocket depth (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were monitored over 12 months. The presence of five periodontal pathogens in the pockets was determined by a commercially available micro-IDent test. Intergroup and intragroup statistical analysis was performed. All three treatments resulted in a significant clinical improvement. Additional application of PDT to US failed to result in further improvement in terms of PPD reduction and CAL gain. However, it resulted in a higher reduction of BOP at 3 and 12 months comparing to US alone or SRP (PDT from 25 to 13 and to 9%, US from 23 to 16 and to 12%, and SRP from 17 to 10 and to 9%, respectively). PDT reduced the proportion of positive sites after 6 months for Treponema denticola (TD) significantly more effectively than US or SRP (p < 0.0001). Additionally, PDT resulted in a greater reduction of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (AA), Tannerella forsythia (TF), and TD in medium pockets (4-6 mm) (p < 0.02) and of TD in deep pockets (>6 mm) compared to mechanical debridement alone (p < 0.05). PMID:25056413

  3. Periodontal pathogens invade gingiva and aortic adventitia and elicit inflammasome activation in αvβ6 integrin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Velsko, Irina M; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Zheng, Donghang; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Lucas, Alexandra R; Larjava, Hannu; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-12-01

    The American Heart Association supports an association between periodontal diseases and atherosclerosis but not a causal association. This study explores the use of the integrin β6(-/-) mouse model to study the causality. We investigated the ability of a polymicrobial consortium of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum to colonize the periodontium and induce local and systemic inflammatory responses. Polymicrobially infected Itgβ6(-/-) mice demonstrate greater susceptibility to gingival colonization/infection, with severe gingival inflammation, apical migration of the junctional epithelium, periodontal pocket formation, alveolar bone resorption, osteoclast activation, bacterial invasion of the gingiva, a greater propensity for the bacteria to disseminate hematogenously, and a strong splenic T cell cytokine response. Levels of atherosclerosis risk factors, including serum nitric oxide, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, serum amyloid A, and lipid peroxidation, were significantly altered by polybacterial infection, demonstrating an enhanced potential for atherosclerotic plaque progression. Aortic gene expression revealed significant alterations in specific Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide-binding domain- and leucine-rich-repeat-containing receptor (NLR) pathway genes in response to periodontal bacterial infection. Histomorphometry of the aorta demonstrated larger atherosclerotic plaques in Itgβ6(-/-) mice than in wild-type (WT) mice but no significant difference in atherosclerotic plaque size between mice with polybacterial infection and mice with sham infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated active invasion of the aortic adventitial layer by P. gingivalis. Our observations suggest that polybacterial infection elicits distinct aortic TLR and inflammasome signaling and significantly increases local aortic oxidative stress. These results are the first to demonstrate the mechanism of

  4. The content of lignan glycosides in Forsythia flowers and leaves.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Magdalena; Klimek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative determination of lignan glucosides in flowers and leaves of three taxons of Forsythia Vahl was performed using the HPLC method. The main lignan compound in the flowers of F. suspensa appeared to be (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside, whereas in the leaves of this species phillyrin was the predominant lignan. The content of (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside in F. suspensa flowers amounted to 4.3-7% and that of phillyrin did not reach 1%. The inverse ratio of (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside to phillyrin occurred in the leaves of F. suspensa, which contained up to 4.3% of phillyrin and 1.6% and less (+)-pinoresinol beta-D-glucopyranoside. The flowers of F. viridissima and F. x intermedia were rich in arctiin: 5.5-10.2% and up to 11.5%, respectively. The leaves of these two species contained less arctiin: up to 4.3% in F. viridissima and up to 2.3% in F. x intermedia. The flowers showed the highest level of lignans at the phase of buds, it decreased during the blooming time. PMID:15575593

  5. Isolation and identification of biologically active compounds from Forsythia viridissima flowers.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Magdalena; Klimek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Flavonol glycosides, rutin and isoquercitrin, lignan glycosides, arctiin and matairesinoside, as well as phenylethanoid verbascoside (= acteoside), ursolic acid and beta-sitosterol have been isolated from the flowers of Forsythia viridissima. Two other isolated substances were characterized respectively as a wax and a hydrocoloidal polysaccharide consisting of galactose, galacturonic acid, arabinose, glucose, xylose, and rhamnose. PMID:15481244

  6. Comparison of Fruits of Forsythia suspensa at Two Different Maturation Stages by NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jinping; Zhang, Fusheng; Li, Zhenyu; Qin, Xuemei; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Forsythiae Fructus (FF), the dried fruit of Forsythia suspensa, has been widely used as a heat-clearing and detoxifying herbal medicine in China. Green FF (GF) and ripe FF (RF) are fruits of Forsythia suspensa at different maturity stages collected about a month apart. FF undergoes a complex series of physical and biochemical changes during fruit ripening. However, the clinical uses of GF and RF have not been distinguished to date. In order to comprehensively compare the chemical compositions of GF and RF, NMR-based metabolomics coupled with HPLC and UV spectrophotometry methods were adopted in this study. Furthermore, the in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activities of 50% methanol extracts of GF and RF were also evaluated. A total of 27 metabolites were identified based on NMR data, and eight of them were found to be different between the GF and RF groups. The GF group contained higher levels of forsythoside A, forsythoside C, cornoside, rutin, phillyrin and gallic acid and lower levels of rengyol and β-glucose compared with the RF group. The antioxidant activity of GF was higher than that of RF, but no significant difference was observed between the antibacterial activities of GF and RF. Given our results showing their distinct chemical compositions, we propose that NMR-based metabolic profiling can be used to discriminate between GF and RF. Differences in the chemical and biological activities of GF and RF, as well as their clinical efficacies in traditional Chinese medicine should be systematically investigated in future studies. PMID:26035103

  7. Polybacterial Periodontal Pathogens Alter Vascular and Gut BH4/nNOS/NRF2-Phase II Enzyme Expression.

    PubMed

    Gangula, Pandu; Ravella, Kalpana; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera, Mercedes; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Hale, Ashley; Channon, Keith; Southerland, Janet; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent chronic inflammatory disease and is associated with complex microbial infection in the subgingival cavity. Recently, American Heart Association supported a century old association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. We have recently shown that polybacterial periodontal infection led to aortic atherosclerosis and modulation of lipid profiles; however the underlying mechanism(s) has not been yet demonstrated. Altered nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for nitric oxide synthases (NOS) has long been shown to be associated with vascular dysfunction and gastrointestinal motility disorders. We sought to examine the mechanism of periodontal infection leading to altered vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxation, focusing on the BH4/nNOS pathways. In addition, we also have investigated how the antioxidant system (NRF2-Phase II enzyme expression) in vascular and GI specimens is altered by oral infection. Eight week old male ApoEnull mice were either sham-infected or infected orally for 16 weeks with a mixture of major periodontal bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia to induce experimental periodontitis. Serum, vascular (mesenteric), stomach, and colon specimens were collected at the end of periodontal pathogen infection. Bacterial infection induced significant (p<0.05) reductions in the levels of BH4,in ratio of BH4:BH2+B and also in nitric oxide levels compared to sham-infected controls. In addition, we identified a significant (p<0.05) reduction in eNOS dimerization, nNOS dimerization and protein expression of BH4 biosynthesis enzymes; GCH-1, DHFR and NRF2 & Phase II enzymes in infected mice versus controls in both mesenteric artery and colon tissues. However, we found no differences in nNOS/BH4 protein expression in stomach tissues of infected and sham-infected mice. This suggests that a polybacterial infection

  8. Bacterial interactions in pathogenic subgingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Min; Kin, Lin Xin; Dashper, Stuart G; Slakeski, Nada; Butler, Catherine A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology. Polymicrobial biofilms are complex, dynamic microbial communities formed by two or more bacterial species that are important for the persistence and proliferation of participating microbes in the environment. Interspecies adherence, which often involves bacterial surface-associated molecules, and communications are essential in the spatial and temporal development of a polymicrobial biofilm, which in turn is necessary for the overall fitness of a well-organized multispecies biofilm community. In the oral cavity, interactions between key oral bacterial species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, are essential for the progression of chronic periodontitis. In vivo, P. gingivalis and T. denticola are frequently found to co-exist in deep periodontal pockets and have been co-localized to the superficial layers of subgingival plaque as microcolony blooms adjacent to the pocket epithelium, suggesting possible interbacterial interactions that contribute towards disease. The motility and chemotactic ability of T. denticola, although not considered as classic virulence factors, are likely to be important in the synergistic biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. In vitro, P. gingivalis and T. denticola display a symbiotic relationship in nutrient utilization and growth promotion. Together these data suggest there is an intimate relationship between these two species that has evolved to enhance their survival and virulence. PMID:26541672

  9. Qat Chewing and Periodontal Pathogens in Health and Disease: Further Evidence for a Prebiotic-Like Effect

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alimi, Abdulrahman; Taiyeb-Ali, Tara; Jaafar, Nasruddin; Al-hebshi, Nezar Noor

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Qat chewing has been reported to induce subgingival microbial shifts suggestive of prebiotic-like properties. The objective here was to assess the effect of qat chewing on a panel of classical and new putative periopathogens in health and periodontitis. Materials and Methods. 40 qat chewers and 40 nonchewers, equally stratified by periodontal health status, were recruited. Taqman, real-time PCR was used to quantify total bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Synergistetes, and TM7s in pooled subgingival biofilm samples. Differences in microbial parameters between the study groups were analysed using ordinal regression. Results. In health, the qat chewers harboured significantly lower relative counts of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, Synergistetes, and TM7s after adjustment for multiple comparisons (P ≤ 0.007). At nominal significance level, they also carried lower counts of TM7s and P. micra (P ≤ 0.05). In periodontitis, the chewers had lower counts of all taxa; however, only T. denticola withstood correction for multiple comparisons (P ≤ 0.0063). Conclusions. Qat chewing is associated with lower proportions of periopathogens, particularly in subjects with healthy periodontium, which supports previous reports of its prebiotic-like properties. This potentially beneficial biological effect can be exploited by attempting to isolate the active fraction. PMID:26351631

  10. Polymicrobial Infection with Major Periodontal Pathogens Induced Periodontal Disease and Aortic Atherosclerosis in Hyperlipidemic ApoEnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Mercedes F.; Lee, Ju-Youn; Aneja, Monika; Goswami, Vishalkant; Liu, Liying; Velsko, Irina M.; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Chen, Hao; Lucas, Alexandra R.; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya N.

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerosis are both polymicrobial and multifactorial and although observational studies supported the association, the causative relationship between these two diseases is not yet established. Polymicrobial infection-induced periodontal disease is postulated to accelerate atherosclerotic plaque growth by enhancing atherosclerotic risk factors of orally infected Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoEnull) mice. At 16 weeks of infection, samples of blood, mandible, maxilla, aorta, heart, spleen, and liver were collected, analyzed for bacterial genomic DNA, immune response, inflammation, alveolar bone loss, serum inflammatory marker, atherosclerosis risk factors, and aortic atherosclerosis. PCR analysis of polymicrobial-infected (Porphyromonas gingivalis [P. gingivalis], Treponema denticola [T. denticola], and Tannerella forsythia [T. forsythia]) mice resulted in detection of bacterial genomic DNA in oral plaque samples indicating colonization of the oral cavity by all three species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected P. gingivalis and T. denticola within gingival tissues of infected mice and morphometric analysis showed an increase in palatal alveolar bone loss (p<0.0001) and intrabony defects suggesting development of periodontal disease in this model. Polymicrobial-infected mice also showed an increase in aortic plaque area (p<0.05) with macrophage accumulation, enhanced serum amyloid A, and increased serum cholesterol and triglycerides. A systemic infection was indicated by the detection of bacterial genomic DNA in the aorta and liver of infected mice and elevated levels of bacterial specific IgG antibodies (p<0.0001). This study was a unique effort to understand the effects of a polymicrobial infection with P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia on periodontal disease and associated atherosclerosis in ApoEnull mice. PMID:23451182

  11. On the Stereoselective Synthesis of (+)-Pinoresinol in Forsythia Suspensa from its Achiral Precursor, Coniferyl Alcohol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davin, Laurence B.; Bedgar, Diana L.; Katayama, Takeshi; Lewis, Norman G.

    1992-01-01

    The residue from Forsythia suspensa stems, upon removal of soluble enzymes, has provided the first evidence for a stereoselective coupling enzyme in lignan biosynthesis. This preparation catalyses the preferred formation (ca 65%) of (+)-[8,8'- C-14] pinoresinol from [8-C-14]coniferyl alcohol in the absence of exogenously provided cofactors; addition of H2O2 had little effect on enantiomeric composition. However, when NAD and malate were supplied, the stereoselectivity of the coupling reaction was significantly enhanced and pinoresinol consisting of ca 80% of the (+)-antipode was obtained. Clearly, the insoluble residue contains a specific coupling enzyme which catalyses (+)-pinoresinol formation from coniferyl alcohol. By contrast, when [8- C-14] sinapyl alcohol was employed as substrate, only racemic syringaresinols were formed: this non-stereoselective peroxidase-catalysed coupling reaction presumably accounts for the low levels of (-)-pinoresinol encountered in this system when coniferyl alcohol is used as a substrate.

  12. Chemical Constituents from the Fruits of Forsythia suspensa and Their Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guo-Feng; Yang, Mei-Lin; Lin, Ya-Hua; Peng, Chi-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Lignans and phenylethanoid glycosides purified from Forsythia suspensa were reported to display various bioactivities in the previous literature, including the antimicrobial activity. Therefore, the present research is aimed to purify and identify the chemical constituents of the methanol extracts of fruits of F. suspensa. The methanol extracts of fruits of F. suspensa were fractionated and further purified with the assistance of column chromatography to afford totally thirty-four compounds. Among these isolates, 3β-acetoxy-20α-hydroxyursan-28-oic acid (1) was reported from the natural sources for the first time. Some of the purified principles were subjected to the antimicrobial activity examinations against Escherichia coli to explore new natural lead compounds. PMID:24745011

  13. Ethanol extract of Forsythia suspensa root induces apoptosis of esophageal carcinoma cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LIANMEI; YAN, XI; SHI, JUAN; REN, FENGZHI; LIU, LIHUA; SUN, SHIPING; SHAN, BAOEN

    2015-01-01

    Forsythia suspensa root is used in the treatment of fever and jaundice in Traditional Chinese Medicine. In the present study, the anti-tumor activity of the ethanolic extract of Forsythia suspensa root (FSREE) against esophageal carcinoma cells was investigated in vitro and in vivo and its anti-cancer mechanism was examined. The results revealed that FSREE, rather than Forsythia suspensa ethanolic extracts from the leaf (FSLEE) and fruit (FSFEE) exhibited marked anti-tumor activity towards human esophageal cancer cells. FSREE induced cancer cell apoptosis and growth arrest by downregulating B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, Bcl-extra large and myeloid cell leukemia 1, while upregulating Bcl-2-associated X protein, Bcl-2 antagonist of cell death and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1. This led to the activation of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, caspase-3 and caspase-9, but not caspase-8. Furthermore, the anti-cancer activity of FSREE was associated with a decreased level of phosphorylated Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase signaling activity. It was also observed that the levels of cytochrome c were elevated in the cytoplasm, accounting for the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in the TE-13 cells upon treatment with FSEER. In addition, FSEER inhibited the growth of esophageal cancer cells in xenograft models and no detectable toxicity was present in the lung or liver tissues. These observations provided further evidence of the anti-tumor effect of FSEER and may be of importance to further examine the potential role of Forsythia suspensa root as a therapeutic agent in esophageal carcinoma therapy. PMID:25373392

  14. Formation of Lignans(-)-Secoisolariciresinol and (-)-Matairesinol with Forsythia intermedia Cell-Free Extracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umezawa, Toshiaki; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1991-01-01

    In vivo labeling experiments of Forsythia intermedia plant tissue with [8-(C-14)]- and [9,9-(2)H2,OC(2)H3]coniferyl alcohols revealed that the lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol and (-)-matairesinol, were derived from two coniferyl alcohol molecules; no evidence for the formation of the corresponding (+)-enantiomers was found. Administration of (+/-)-[Ar-(H-3)] secoisolariciresinols to excised shoots of F.intermedia resulted in a significant conversion into (-)-matairesinol; again, the (+)-antipode was not detected. Experiments using cell-free extracts of F.intermedia confirmed and extended these findings. In the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2, the cell-free extracts catalyzed the formation of (-)- secoisolariciresinol, with either [8-(C-14)]- or [9,9-(2)H2,OC(2)H3]coniferyl alcohols as substrates. The (+)- enantiomer was not formed. Finally, when either (-)-[Ar-(H-3)] or (+/-)-[Ar-(H-2)]secoisolariciresinols were used as substrates, in the presence of NAD(P), only (-)- and not (+)-matairesinol formation occurred. The other antipode, (+)-secoisolariciresinol, did not serve as a substrate for the formation of either (+)- or (-)-matairesinol. Thus, in F.intermedia, the formation of the lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, occurs under strict stereochemical control, in a reaction or reactions requiring NAD(P)H and H2O2 as cofactors. This stereoselectivity is retained in the subsequent conversion into (-)-matairesinol, since (+)-secoisolariciresinol is not a substrate. These are the first two enzymes to be discovered in lignan formation.

  15. An Extraordinary Accumulation of (-)-Pinoresinol in Cell-Free Extracts of Forsythia intermedia: Evidence for Enantiospecific Reduction of (+)-Pinoresinol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, Takeshi; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselective and enantiospecific transformation mechanisms in lignan biogenesis are only now yielding to scientific inquiry: it has been shown that soluble cell-free preparations from Forsythia intermedia catalysis the formation of the enantiomerically pure lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, when incubated with coniferyl alcohol in the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2. Surprisingly, (-)-pinoresinol also accumulates in this soluble cell-free assay mixture in greater than 96% enantiomeric excess, even though it is not the naturally occurring antipode present in Forsythia sp. But these soluble cell-free preparations do not engender stereoselective coupling; instead, racemic pinoresinols are first formed, catalysed by an H2O2-dependent peroxidase reaction. An enantiospecific NAD(P)H reductase then converts (+)- pinoresinol, and not the (-)-antipode, into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. Stereoselective syntheis of(+)-pinoresinol from E-coniferyl alcohol is, however, catalysed by an insoluble enzyme preparation in F. suspensa, obtained following removal of readily soluble and ionically bound enzymes; no exogenously supplied cofactors were required other than oxygen, although the reaction was stimulated by NAD-malate addition. Thus, the overall biochemical pathway to enantiomerically pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol has been delineated.

  16. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene in flower organs of Forsythia x intermedia.

    PubMed

    Rosati, C; Cadic, A; Duron, M; Renou, J P; Simoneau, P

    1997-10-01

    The expression, during flower development, of the gene encoding the anthocyanin pathway key enzyme dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) was investigated in floral organs of Forsythia x intermedia cv. 'Spring Glory'. Full-length DFR and partial chalcone synthase (CHS) cDNAs, the gene of interest and a flavonoid pathway control gene respectively, were obtained from petal RNA by reverse transcription PCR. Whereas for CHS northern blot analysis enabled the study of its expression pattern, competitive PCR assays were necessary to quantify DFR mRNA levels in wild-type plants and in petals of 2 transgenic clones containing a CaMV 35S promoter-driven DFR gene of Antirrhinum majus. Results indicated a peak of CHS and DFR transcript levels in petals at the very early stages of anthesis, and different expression patterns in anthers and sepals. In comparison to wild-type plants, transformants showed a more intense anthocyanin pigmentation of some vegetative organs, and a dramatic increase in DFR transcript concentration and enzymatic activity in petals. However, petals of transformed plants did not accumulate any anthocyanins. These results indicate that other genes and/or regulatory factors should be considered responsible for the lack of anthocyanin production in Forsythia petals. PMID:9349254

  17. Seasonal alteration in amounts of lignans and their glucosides and gene expression of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes in the Forsythia suspense leaf.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kinuyo; Satake, Honoo

    2013-01-01

    Lignans of Forsythia spp. are essential components of various Chinese medicines and health diets. However, the seasonal alteration in lignan amounts and the gene expression profile of lignan-biosynthetic enzymes has yet to be investigated. In this study, we have assessed seasonal alteration in amounts of major lignans, such as pinoresinol, matairesinol, and arctigenin, and examined the gene expression profile of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR), pinoresinol-glucosylating enzyme (UGT71A18), and secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (SIRD) in the leaf of Forsythia suspense from April to November. All of the lignans in the leaf continuously increased from April to June, reached the maximal level in June, and then decreased. Ninety percent of pinoresinol and matairesinol was converted into glucosides, while approximately 50% of arctigenin was aglycone. PLR was stably expressed from April to August, whereas the PLR expression was not detected from September to November. In contrast, the UGT71A18 expression was found from August to November, but not from April to July. The SIRD expression was prominent from April to May, not detected in June to July, and then increased again from September to November. These expression profiles of the lignan-synthetic enzymes are largely compatible with the alteration in lignan contents. Furthermore, such seasonal lignan profiles are in good agreement with the fact that the Forsythia leaves for Chinese medicinal tea are harvested in June. This is the first report on seasonal alteration in lignans and the relevant biosynthetic enzyme genes in the leaf of Forsythia species. PMID:23832493

  18. Induction of caspase-8 and death receptors by a new dammarane skeleton from the dried fruits of Forsythia koreana.

    PubMed

    Hawas, Usama W; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; El-Desouky, Samy K; Kim, Young-Kyoon; Huefner, Antje; Saf, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A new naturally occurring compound based on the dammarane skeleton, i.e. cabralealactone 3-acetate-24-methyl ether, was isolated from the aqueous methanolic extract of Forsythia koreana fruits, along with eight known compounds: cabralealactone 3-acetate, ursolic acid, arctigenin, arctiin, phillyrin, rutin, caffeic acid, and rosmarinic acid. The identification of the isolated compounds was based on their spectral analysis including: HREI-MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The selected compounds and the aqueous methanolic extract were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against human solid tumour cell lines. Cabralealactone 3-acetate-24-methyl ether and ursolic acid were found to be active against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). The cytotoxicity was associated with the activation of caspase-8, the induction of the death receptors DR4 and DR5, as well as DNA fragmentation, and was thus due to apoptosis rather than necrosis. PMID:23659170

  19. Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy immunocytochemistry and antigen retrieval of surface layer proteins from Tannerella forsythensis using microwave or autoclave heating with citraconic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, K; Mitamura, Y; Iwami, J; Hasegawa, Y; Higuchi, N; Murakami, Y; Maeda, H; Yoshimura, F; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2012-11-01

    Tannerella forsythensis (Bacteroides forsythus), an anaerobic Gram-negative species of bacteria that plays a role in the progression of periodontal disease, has a unique bacterial protein profile. It is characterized by two unique protein bands with molecular weights of more than 200 kDa. It also is known to have a typical surface layer (S-layer) consisting of regularly arrayed subunits outside the outer membrane. We examined the relationship between high molecular weight proteins and the S-layer using electron microscopic immunolabeling with chemical fixation and an antigen retrieval procedure consisting of heating in a microwave oven or autoclave with citraconic anhydride. Immunogold particles were localized clearly at the outermost cell surface. We also used energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) to visualize 3, 3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) reaction products after microwave antigen retrieval with 1% citraconic anhydride. The three-window method for electron spectroscopic images (ESI) of nitrogen by the EFTEM reflected the presence of moieties demonstrated by the DAB reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibodies instead of immunogold particles. The mapping patterns of net nitrogen were restricted to the outermost cell surface. PMID:22984898

  20. Generation of Triple-Transgenic Forsythia Cell Cultures as a Platform for the Efficient, Stable, and Sustainable Production of Lignans

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Jun; Matsumoto, Erika; Morimoto, Kinuyo; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Satake, Honoo

    2015-01-01

    Sesamin is a furofuran lignan biosynthesized from the precursor lignan pinoresinol specifically in sesame seeds. This lignan is shown to exhibit anti-hypertensive activity, protect the liver from damages by ethanol and lipid oxidation, and reduce lung tumor growth. Despite rapidly elevating demand, plant sources of lignans are frequently limited because of the high cost of locating and collecting plants. Indeed, the acquisition of sesamin exclusively depends on the conventional extraction of particular Sesamum seeds. In this study, we have created the efficient, stable and sustainable sesamin production system using triple-transgenic Forsythia koreana cell suspension cultures, U18i-CPi-Fk. These transgenic cell cultures were generated by stably introducing an RNAi sequence against the pinoresinol-glucosylating enzyme, UGT71A18, into existing CPi-Fk cells, which had been created by introducing Sesamum indicum sesamin synthase (CYP81Q1) and an RNA interference (RNAi) sequence against pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR) into F. koreanna cells. Compared to its transgenic prototype, U18i-CPi-Fk displayed 5-fold higher production of pinoresinol aglycone and 1.4-fold higher production of sesamin, respectively, while the wildtype cannot produce sesamin due to a lack of any intrinsic sesamin synthase. Moreover, red LED irradiation of U18i-CPi-Fk specifically resulted in 3.0-fold greater production in both pinoresinol aglycone and sesamin than production of these lignans under the dark condition, whereas pinoresinol production was decreased in the wildtype under red LED. Moreover, we developed a procedure for sodium alginate-based long-term storage of U18i-CPi-Fk in liquid nitrogen. Production of sesamin in U18i-CPi-Fk re-thawed after six-month cryopreservation was equivalent to that of non-cryopreserved U18i-CPi-Fk. These data warrant on-demand production of sesamin anytime and anywhere. Collectively, the present study provides evidence that U18i-CP-Fk is an

  1. Study on the Main Components Interaction from Flos Lonicerae and Fructus Forsythiae and Their Dissolution In Vitro and Intestinal Absorption in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Tan, Xiaobin; Shan, Jinjun; Wang, Shouchuan; Yin, Ailing; Cai, Baochang; Di, Liuqing

    2014-01-01

    The Flos Lonicerae-Fructus Forsythiae herb couple is the basic components of Chinese herbal preparations (Shuang-Huang-Lian tablet, Yin-Qiao-Jie-Du tablet and Fufang Qin-Lan oral liquid), and its pharmacological effects were significantly higher than that in Flos Lonicerae or Fructus Forsythiae, but the reasons remained unknown. In the present study, pattern recognition analysis (hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA)) combined with UHPLC-ESI/LTQ-Orbitrap MS system were performed to study the chemical constitution difference between co-decoction and mixed decoction in the term of chemistry. Besides, the pharmacokinetics in vivo and intestinal absorption in vitro combined with pattern recognition analysis were used to reveal the discrepancy between herb couple and single herbs in the view of biology. The observation from the chemical view in vitro showed that there was significant difference in quantity between co-decoction and mixed decoction by HCA, and the exposure level of isoforsythoside and 3, 5-dicaffeoylquinic acid in co-decoction, higher than that in mixed decoction, directly resulted in the discrepancy between co-decoction and mixed decoction using both PCA and HCA. The observation from the pharmacokinetics displayed that the exposure level in vivo of neochlorogenic acid, 3, 4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, isoforsythoside and forsythoside A, higher than that in single herbs, was the main factor contributing to the difference by both PCA and HCA, interestingly consistent with the results obtained from Caco-2 cells in vitro, which indicated that it was because of intestinal absorption improvement of neochlorogenic acid, 3, 4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, isoforsythoside and forsythoside A that resulted in a better efficacy of herb couple than that of single herbs from the perspective of biology. The results above illustrated that caffeic acid derivatives in Flos Lonicerae-Fructus Forsythiae herb couple could be considered as chemical

  2. Protective effects of Forsythia suspense extract with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in a model of rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Shao, Si-Yuan; Song, Xiu-Yun; Xia, Cong-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of Forsythia suspense extract in a rotenone-induced neurotoxic model. FS8, one of the herbal extracts, markedly protected PC12 cells against rotenone toxicity and was selected for the in vivo study. Gavage administration of FS8 (50 and 200mg/kg, but not 10mg/kg) for 25 days significantly improved the behavior function, decreased the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra (SN), and maintained the level of dopamine in striatum after unilateral infusion of rotenone in SN. Wherein, the protective effects of FS8 at the dose of 200mg/kg were better than selegiline. Further study indicated the excellent antioxidant activity of FS8 on the 5th and 21st days after intranigral injection of rotenone. Moreover, FS8 could inhibit microglia activity and accumulation in SN, and obviously decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules (IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2), which indicated the anti-inflammatory effects of FS8. In the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB and MAPK pathways, FS8 significantly down-regulated the protein expression of p-PI3K, p-Akt, p-IκB, p-P65, cleaved Caspase 8, p-p38 and p-JNK but not p-mTOR, cleaved Caspase 3 and p-ERK. Therefore, FS8 protected dopamine neurons against rotenone toxicity via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, which suggested the promising application of FS8 in the prevention and treatment of Parkinson disease. PMID:26408940

  3. The Inhibitory Effects of Forsythia Koreana Extracts on the Metastatic Ability of Breast Cancer Cells and Bone Resorption by Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Li; Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women. The patients with advanced breast cancer develop metastasis to bone. Bone metastasis and skeletal-related events by breast cancer are frequently associated with the invasiveness of breast cancer cells and osteoclasts-mediated bone resorption. Forsythia koreana is used in oriental traditional medicine to treat asthma, atopy, and allergic diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of F. koreana extracts on the invasion of breast cancer cells and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Methods: Cell viability was measured by an MTT assay and the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells were detected by a Boyden chamber assay. The formation of osteoclasts and pit was detected using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and calcium phosphate-coated plates, respectively. The activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsin K were evaluated by gelatin zymography and a cathepsin K detection kit. Results: The fruit and leaf extracts of F. koreana significantly inhibited the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells at noncytotoxic concentrations. The fruit extract of F. koreana reduced the transforming growth factor β1-induced migration, invasion and MMPs activities of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the fruit, branch, and leaf extracts of F. koreana also inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand-induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast-mediated bone-resorbing activity by reducing the activities of MMPs and cathepsin K. Conclusions: The extracts of F. koreana may possess the potential to inhibit the breast cancer-induced bone destruction through blocking invasion of breast cancer cells, osteoclastogenesis, and the activity of mature osteoclasts. PMID:27390737

  4. Serum antibodies to periodontal pathogens are a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Pamela Sparks; Steffen, Michelle J.; Smith, Charles; Jicha, Gregory; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Abner, Erin; Dawson, Dolph

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation in periodontal disease has been suggested as a potential risk factor in Alzheimer’s disease. The purpose of this study was to examine serum antibody levels to bacteria of periodontal disease in participants who eventually converted to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) compared to the antibody levels in control subjects. Methods Serum from 158 participants in the BRAINS (Biologically Resilient Adults in Neurological Studies) research program at the University of Kentucky were analyzed for IgG antibody levels to 7 oral bacteria associated with periodontitis including: Aggregati-bacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Campylobacter rectus, Tre-ponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia. All 158 participants were cognitively intact at baseline venous blood draw. Eighty one of the participants developed either mild-cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alz-heimer’s disease (AD) or both, and 77 controls remained cognitively intact in the years of follow up. Antibody levels were compared between controls and AD subjects at baseline draw and after conversion and controls and MCI subjects at baseline draw and after conversion using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. AD and MCI participants were not directly compared. Linear regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding. Results Antibody levels to F. nucleatum and P. intermedia, were significantly increased (α = 0.05) at baseline serum draw in the AD patients compared to controls. These results remained significant when controlling for baseline age, Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) score and apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE ε4) status. Conclusions This study provides initial data that demonstrate elevated antibodies to periodontal disease bacteria in subjects years prior cognitive impairment and suggests that periodontal disease could potentially contribute to the risk of AD onset/progression. Additional cohort studies profiling oral

  5. Optimization of simultaneous ultrasonic-assisted extraction of water-soluble and fat-soluble characteristic constituents from Forsythiae Fructus Using response surface methodology and high-performance liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Yang, Bing-You; Liang, Jun; Wang, Di; Yang, Qi; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2014-01-01

    Background: The compounds (+)-pinoresinol-β-glucoside (1) forsythiaside, (2) phillyrin (3) and phillygenin (4) were elucidated to be the characteristic constituents for quality control of Forsythiae Fructus extract by chromatographic fingerprint in 2010 edition of Chinese Pharmacopoeia due to their numerous important pharmacological actions. It is of great interest to extract these medicinally active constituents from Forsythiae Fructus simultaneously. Materials and Methods: In this study, a new ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method was developed for the simultaneous extraction of biological components 1-4 in Forsythiae Fructus. The quantitative effects of extraction time, ratio of liquid to solid, extraction temperature, and methanol concentration on yield of these four important biological constituents from Forsythiae Fructus were investigated using response surface methodology with Box-Behnken design. The compounds 1-4 extracted by UAE were quantitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detect (HPLC-PAD), and overall desirability (OD), the geometric mean of the contents of four major biological components, was used as a marker to evaluate the extraction efficiency. Results: By solving the regression equation and analyzing 3-D plots, the optimum condition was at extraction temperature 70°C, time 60 min, ratio of liquid to solid 20, and methanol concentration 76.6%. Under these conditions, extraction yields of compounds 1-4 were 2.92 mg/g, 52.10 mg/g, 0.90 mg/g and 0.57 mg/g, respectively, which were in good agreement with the predicted OD values. In order to achieve a similar yield as UAE, soxhlet extraction required at least 6 h and maceration extraction required much longer time of 24 h. Established UAE method has been successfully applied to sample preparation for the quality control of Forsythiae Fructus. Additionally, a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to the structural confirmation of analytes

  6. Relationship between the Pathogenic Representatives of Periodontal Pockets Microbiocenosis in Patients with Periodontitis with Varying Degrees of Severity

    PubMed Central

    Zorina, O.A.; Kulakov, A.A.; Boriskina, O.A.; Rebrikov, D.V.

    2011-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common disease that is considered to be a manifestation of the distortion of the ratio between the normal and conditionally pathogenic microflora of periodontal pockets. In this study, the ratio between the six most important periodontal pathogens and the total microflora of the periodontal pocket in healthy individuals and patients with varying severity of periodontitis was ascertained by quantitative real-time PCR. It was ascertained that the relative content ofPorphyromonas gingivalis,Prevotella intermedia, andTannerella forsythensis(Bacteroides forsythus) persistently develops in the total microflora of the periodontal pocket upon progressing periodontitis; this value is higher than that in the control group by more than two orders of magnitude upon a severe degree of chronic generalized periodontitis. PMID:22649688

  7. Bloodborne pathogens

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000453.htm Bloodborne pathogens To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A pathogen is something that causes disease. Germs that can ...

  8. Microbial Changes in Subgingival Plaque and Polymicrobial Intracellular Flora in Buccal Cells after Fixed Orthodontic Appliance Therapy: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Montaldo, Caterina; Giovanna Pili, Francesca Maria; Peluffo, Carla; Nucaro, Annalisa; Orrù, Germano; Denotti, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    The oral ecosystem is strictly related to a balance maintained by specific niches recognized as sites, where oral bacteria can metabolize avoiding the immune system response. The oral bacteria species that colonize the ecological niches vary during fixed orthodontic treatment, with a prevalence of periodontal bacterial species. Qualitative analysis of five periodontal pathogens was used to investigate the microbial colonization rate in the crevice and buccal epithelial cells. The presence of inadequate oral hygiene was considered as a modulation variable for microbial colonization. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test, ANOVA, and Pearson correlation. A P value lower than 0.05 was assumed as statistically significant. Tannerella forsythia was the only periodontal pathogen detected with a statistically admissible frequency. The positivity for Tannerella forsythia was correlated to sampling time and oral hygiene motivation. In buccal epithelial cells, both factors contributed to microbial decrease (P < 0.05), whereas, in crevice, oral hygiene motivation promoted a decrease in the microbial colonization rate (P < 0.05). According to microbiological findings, it is possible to identify how correct motivation for oral hygiene is more than enough to modulate or to avoid an upset of the oral ecosystem balance in early stages of orthodontic treatment. PMID:24223591

  9. Microbiological effects of periodontal therapy plus azithromycin in patients with diabetes: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hincapié, Juan P; Castrillón, Cesar A; Yepes, Fanny L; Roldan, Natalia; Becerra, María A; Moreno, Sandra M; Consuegra, Jessika; Contreras, Adolfo; Botero, Javier E

    2014-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that periodontal infection may aggravate diabetes control. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in the frequency with which Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected in patients with diabetes with the use of non-surgical therapy plus azithromycin in a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and five (105) patients with diabetes and chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: subgingival mechanical therapy with azithromycin, subgingival mechanical therapy with placebo and supragingival prophylaxis with azithromycin. Complete periodontal clinical examinations and detection of periodontal pathogens using polymerase chain reaction were carried out at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months after periodontal therapy. The frequency with which Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected decreased at 3 months in all groups. Tannerella forsythia increased after3 months in all groups. All organisms had similar frequencies at 9 months in all groups. Subgingival mechanical therapy with adjunctive azithromycin had no additional effect on the frequency with which the periodontal pathogens investigated were detected in patients with diabetes. PMID:25523961

  10. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78°C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences. PMID:24267075

  11. Antiasthmatic action of dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans from fruits of Forsythia viridissima on asthmatic responses to ovalbumin challenge in conscious guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Ji Yun; Kim, Tae Doo; Kim, Chang Jong

    2011-03-01

    It was reported previously that dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans from Forsythia viridissima fruits, which are traditional medicines for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, have antiinflammatory effects. In this study, the effects on the immediate-phase response (IAR) and late-phase response (LAR) following aerosolized-ovalbumin challenge in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were evaluated by measuring the specific airway resistance (sRaw), recruitment of leukocytes and chemical mediators in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) as well as a histopathological survey. Arctiin and matairesinol at 12.5 mg/kg significantly (p < 0.05) decreased sRaw by 51.83% and 43.15% in IAR and by 47.41% and 35.43% in LAR, respectively, whereas arctigenin at 25 mg/kg was significantly active, compared with the controls. Furthermore, arctiin and arctigenin dose-dependently inhibited histamine, and the activities of phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in BALF, respectively, whereas matairesinol inhibited EPO and PLA₂ at 12.5 mg/kg and histamine at 50 mg/kg, in addition, they moderately improved the infiltration of eosinophils, compared with controls. Dexamethasone, cromolyn and salbutamol significantly inhibited sRaw in both IAR and LAR, and the recruitment of leukocytes and chemical mediators, whereas salbutamol did not alter chemical mediators, in BALF. These results indicate the three lignans have antiasthmatic effects which were less active than those of the reference drugs. PMID:20734328

  12. Pathogen intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

  13. A Study on the Chemical Compositions of the Yinqiaosan (Lonicerae and Forsythiae Powder) at Different Time of Later-decoction by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yachun; Chen, Yajun; Qin, Kunming; Liu, Xiao; Cai, Baochang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Yinqiaosan (Lonicerae and Forsythiae Powder), as a famous prescription of Dr. Wu Jutong in Qing dynasty of China, has the effects of diaphoresis cooling, fire-purging, and detoxicaton. It is mainly used in the treatment of influenza, hand-foot-mouth disease, esophagitis, pneumonia, acute tonsillitis, mumps, and other viral infections. It is one of the widely used traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions with proven curative effects in clinical use. Objective: To research the material basis of Yinqiaosan decoction when decocting mint, herba schizonepetae in different length of later-decoction time, to find the influence on volatile components of Yinqiaosan decoction decocted later in different length of time, to lay the foundation to further clarify the after-decoction mechanism of Yinqiaosan, and the specification of Yinqiaosan decoction process. Materials and Methods: Gas chromatography mass spectrometry method is used to analyze the volatile components of Yinqiaosan decoction samples decocted for 0, 3, 5, 8, and 10 min. Results: Later-decocting mint and herba schizonepetae at different time when decocting Yinqiaosan had a significant influence on the volatile components of the solution. 54 different chemical components were identified: 25 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 3 min; 13 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 5 min; 11 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 8 min; 7 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 10 min; and 26 were identified when later-decocting the sample for 0 min. There were more volatile components in the sample after-decocted for 3 min. A total of 54 different chemical components were identified in different later-decocting solution samples. These components form the basis of the Yinqiaosan drug effect. Conclusions: The length of later-decoction time of mint and herba schizonepetae was confirmed to be 3 min when decocting Yinqiaosan. SUMMARY Later-decocting mint and

  14. Association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and pathogenic oral bacteria in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sahli, Michelle W; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ram, Pavani K; LaMonte, Michael J.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Genco, Robert J.; Andrews, Christopher A.; Millen, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings of an association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and periodontal disease, may be partially explained by vitamin D’s antimicrobial properties. To our knowledge, no study has investigated the association between 25(OH)D and pathogenic oral bacteria, a putative cause of periodontal disease. Methods We examined the association between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations and pathogenic oral bacteria among postmenopausal women in the Buffalo Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease Study (1997–2000), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Subgingival plaque samples were assessed using immunofluorescence for the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Campylobacter rectus. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalent bacteria by quintile (Q) of 25(OH)D concentrations adjusting for age and body mass index. Results Of the 855 participants, 288 (34%) had deficient/inadequate (<50 nmol/L) 25(OH)D concentrations and 497 (58%) had at least one species of pathogenic bacteria. No significant association was found between 25(OH)D and presence of any of these bacteria (adjusted OR for high (Q5) compared to low (Q1) 25(OH)D=0.96; 95% CI: 0.61–1.50, p for trend=0.50). Inverse, although not statistically significant, associations were found between 25(OH)D and more than one species of pathogenic bacteria (adjusted OR for adequate compared to deficient/inadequate 25(OH)D=0.85; 95% CI: 0.60–1.19). Conclusions No association was observed between pathogenic oral bacteria and 25(OH)D concentrations in postmenopausal women. This may be due to the species of bacteria assessed, small effect size or a true absence of an association. PMID:24261910

  15. Oral microflora and periodontal disease: new technology for diagnosis in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Carinci, Francesco; Scapoli, Luca; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Lauritano, Dorina; Nardi, Gianna Maria; Palmieri, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    Summary Periodontitis is a disease that affects and destroys the tissues that support teeth. Tissues damage results from a prolonged inflammatory response to an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Three bacterial species that constitute the red complex group, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, are considered the main pathogens involved in periodontitis. In the present study a real-time PCR based assay was designed to detect and quantify red complex species, then used to investigate 146 periodontal pocket samples from 66 periodontitis patients and 80 controls. Results demonstrated a significant higher prevalence of red complex species and increased amount of P. gingivalis and T. denticola in periodontal pocket of periodontitis patients. PMID:23991267

  16. Microflora and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Scapoli, Luca; Girardi, Ambra; Palmieri, Annalisa; Testori, Tiziano; Zuffetti, Francesco; Monguzzi, Riccardo; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Periodontitis is a disease that affects and destroys the tissues that support teeth. Tissue damage results from a prolonged inflammatory response to an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Three bacterial species that constitute the red complex group, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, are considered the main pathogens involved in periodontitis. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction bases assay was designed to detect and quantify red complex species, then used to investigate 307 periodontal pocket samples from 127 periodontitis patients and 180 controls. Results: Significant higher prevalence of red complex species and increased amount of P. gingivalis and T. denticola were detected in periodontal pocket of periodontitis patients. Conclusions: Results demonstrated that the test is a valuable tool to improve diagnosis of periodontal disease. PMID:23814584

  17. Life in a Diverse Oral Community – Strategies for Oxidative Stress Survival

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Leroy G.; Boutrin, Marie-Claire; Aruni, Wilson; Robles, Antonette; Ximinies, Alexia; Fletcher, Hansel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background While the oral cavity harbors more than 680 bacterial species, the interaction and association of selected bacterial species play a role in periodontal diseases. Bacterial species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, a consortium previously designated as the “red complex” is now being expanded to include other new emerging pathogens that are significantly associated with periodontal disease. Highlight In addition to novel mechanisms for oxidative resistance of individual species, community dynamics may lead to an overall strategy for survival in the inflammatory environment of the periodontal pocket. Complex systems controlled by response regulators protect against oxidative and nitrosative stress. Conclusion The combination of these multifaceted strategies would provide a comprehensive defense and support system against the repetitive host immune response to promote microbial persistence and disease. PMID:26744578

  18. Pathogene Mikroorganismen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin

    Infektionen, die vom Tier auf den Menschen übertragen werden, werden als Zoonosen bezeichnet. Pathogene Mikroorganismen können entweder durch Mensch-Mensch, Mensch-Tier-Kontakt oder durch Kontakt mit kontaminierten Vektoren übertragen werden [39]. Vektoren können einerseits belebt (z. B. blutsaugende Insekten), andererseits unbelebt sein. Kontaminierte Lebensmittel und Wasser gehören zu den wichtigsten unbelebten Vektoren. Neben Lebensmitteln können aber auch kontaminierte Gegenstände oder der Kontakt mit Kontaminationsquellen in der Umwelt Auslöser von Krankheitsfällen sein. Weltweit sind mehr als 1400 krankheitsverursachende biologische Agentien bekannt, von denen über 60 % ein zoonotisches Potenzial aufweisen. Als Ergebnis von Expertengesprächen wurde kürzlich berichtet, dass etwa 3 bis 4, meist virale, neu auftretende Infektionskrankheiten ("emerging diseases“) pro Jahr erwartet werden können [15]. Es handelt sich bei diesen Vorgängen aber nicht nur um das Auftauchen vollkommen neuer oder unbeschriebener Spezies, sondern auch um evolutionsbedingte Anpassungen von mikrobiellen Populationen an neue Bedingungen in ihrem Ökosystem [7]. Molekulare Analysen an Umweltchlamydien erbrachten Hinweise, dass die Evolution erste genetische Pathogenitätsmerkmale in dieser Spezies schon vor 700 Mio. Jahren entstehen ließ [14]. Viele Faktoren befeuern den Prozess der Anpassung, unter anderem auch alle Strategien, mit denen der Mensch seit Jahrtausenden versucht, Lebensmittel sicher und haltbar zu machen. Als die treibenden Kräfte des Auftretens neuer Krankheitserreger werden in der Gegenwart vor allem das sich ändernde Weltklima, die globalen Warenströme und die sich verändernden Konsumgewohnheiten genannt. Es steht auch außer Zweifel, dass viele dieser Erreger Tiere als ihr natürliches Reservoir haben werden, d. h. Zoonosen im klassischen Sinne sind [15].

  19. Ionic Liquid-Based Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction of Forsythosides from the Leaf of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl and Subsequent Separation and Purification by High-Speed Counter-Current Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinshi; Hou, Zhiguang; Liu, Zhengbo; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    An ionic liquid-based ultrasonic-assisted extraction (ILUAE) method was developed for the extraction of the two forsythosides, namely forsythosides I and A from the leaf of Forsythia suspensa (Thunb.) Vahl. Three kinds of l-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids with different alkyl chain and anion were investigated. The results indicated that ionic liquids showed remarkable effects on the extraction yields of forsythosides. In addition, several ILUAE ultrasonic parameters, such as the solvent concentration, solvent to solid ratio and extraction time have been optimized. Under these optimal conditions (e.g., with 0.6 M [C6MIM]Br, solvent to solid ratio of 15 mL/g and extraction time of 10 min), this approach gained the highest extraction yields of forsythoside I (0.89%) and forsythoside A (10.74%). Meanwhile, forsythosides in the ILUAE extract were separated and purified successfully through the high-speed counter-current chromatography with a two-phase solvent system consisting of ethyl acetate-ethanol-acetic acid-water (4 : 1 : 0.25 : 6, v/v). 5.4 mg of forsythoside I and 59.7 mg of forsythoside A were obtained from 120 mg of the prepurified sample in one-step separation, with the purity of 96.1 and 97.9%, respectively, as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were identified by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and (13)C NMR. PMID:27165571

  20. Lipochemistry of the progamic stage of a self-incompatible species: Neutral lipids and fatty acids of the secretory stigma during its glandular activity, and of the solid style, the ovary and the anther in Forsythia intermedia Zab. (Heterostylic species).

    PubMed

    Dumas, C

    1977-01-01

    Chromatographic (thin-layer, gas column, column chromatography) analyses of neutral lipids and fatty acids of reproductive tissues of Forsythia intermedia Zab., a self-incompatible species, were performed with two objectives in mind: 1. To determine whether there is a qualitative evolution of the different classes of lipids and fatty acids that could be correlated with the three functional stages observed during previous histochemical and ultrastructural studies. The stigmatic exudate and intracellular accumulations consist mainly of neutral lipids. 2. To compare the lipid composition of the stigma (both "thrum" and "pin" forms) with that of the style, the ovary, and the anther, and to investigate the possible existence of a stigma-specific lipid compound. Stigmatic neutral lipids are found mostly in a glyceridic mixture probably containing hydrocarbons and terpenes. The fatty acids identified are between C:7 and C: 12, with the maximum unsaturated form being a C: 18. During the secretory process there is no great qualitative diference between the neutral lipids and fatty acids found in the stigmas of "thrum" and "pin" forms. Sterols are present in styles, ovaries, and anthers, but not in stigmas. They represent the only difference in the lipid composition of these various floral structures. PMID:24420636

  1. Molecular data and ecological niche modeling reveal population dynamics of widespread shrub Forsythia suspensa (Oleaceae) in China’s warm-temperate zone in response to climate change during the Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite its high number of endemic deciduous broad-leaved species in China’s warm-temperate zone, far less attention has been paid to phylogeographic studies in this region. In this work, the phylogeographic history of Forsythia suspensa endemic to China’s warm-temperate zone was investigated to explore the effect of climate change during the Pleistocene on the distribution of this deciduous broad-leaved species in China. Results The cpDNA data revealed seven phylogeographical groups corresponding to geographical regions. By contrast, the nrDNA data supported the samples clustered into three groups, which was inconsistent with separate geographical regions supported by cpDNA data. Ecological niche modeling showed that the climatically suitable area during the cold period was larger than that during the warm period. Conclusions Both molecular data and ecological niche modeling indicated that F. suspensa expanded to nearby low-elevation plains in the glacial periods, and retreated to mountaintops during interglacial warmer stages. This study thus supported that F. suspensa persisted in situ during the glacial of the Pleistocene with enlarged distribution area, contrary to the hypothesis of long distance southward migration or large-scale range contraction. PMID:24885704

  2. Bacteria prevalence in a large Italian population sample: a clinical and microbiological study.

    PubMed

    Checchi, L; Gatto, M R; Checchi, V; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    The present study detects those bacterial species which are more strongly related to bleeding on probing, suppuration and smoking in periodontal-affected patients. Nine hundred and fifty-one patients with periodontal diseases were admitted to the Department of Periodontology and Implantology, Dental School of Bologna University where they underwent microbiological tests for six periodontal pathogens (Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia). Cluster analysis explored the variables that mostly influence both the presence and absolute\\relative bacterial load. Logistic regression and multivariate linear regression quantifies these relations. The probability of recovering bacteria belonging to the Red Complex is greater by 25-48% in presence of bleeding on probing. When probing depth is less than 3 mm the probability of presence of each bacterial species is inferior in comparison with depth >6 mm both for Red Complex (of 20-37%), the Orange complex (of 41-61%) and Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans (46%). Total bacterial cell count increases with pocket depth above all for the Red Complex. As Treponema Denticola and Tannerella Forsytia presence is associated with bleeding on probing and Prevotella intermedia presence with suppuration and smoking. The examination of these three as indicators of periodontitis evolution is suggested. PMID:27469569

  3. Co-Localized or Randomly Distributed? Pair Cross Correlation of In Vivo Grown Subgingival Biofilm Bacteria Quantified by Digital Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Renate; Riep, Birgit; Kikhney, Judith; Friedmann, Anton; Wolinsky, Lawrence E.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Daims, Holger; Moter, Annette

    2012-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of periodontal diseases is reflected by the diversity of phylotypes detected in subgingival plaque and the finding that consortia of suspected pathogens rather than single species are associated with disease development. A number of these microorganisms have been demonstrated in vitro to interact and enhance biofilm integration, survival or even pathogenic features. To examine the in vivo relevance of these proposed interactions, we extended the spatial arrangement analysis tool of the software daime (digital image analysis in microbial ecology). This modification enabled the quantitative analysis of microbial co-localization in images of subgingival biofilm species, where the biomass was confined to fractions of the whole-image area, a situation common for medical samples. Selected representatives of the disease-associated red and orange complexes that were previously suggested to interact with each other in vitro (Tannerella forsythia with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis with Prevotella intermedia) were chosen for analysis and labeled with specific fluorescent probes via fluorescence in situ hybridization. Pair cross-correlation analysis of in vivo grown biofilms revealed tight clustering of F. nucleatum/periodonticum and T. forsythia at short distances (up to 6 µm) with a pronounced peak at 1.5 µm. While these results confirmed previous in vitro observations for F. nucleatum and T. forsythia, random spatial distribution was detected between P. gingivalis and P. intermedia in the in vivo samples. In conclusion, we successfully employed spatial arrangement analysis on the single cell level in clinically relevant medical samples and demonstrated the utility of this approach for the in vivo validation of in vitro observations by analyzing statistically relevant numbers of different patients. More importantly, the culture-independent nature of this approach enables similar quantitative analyses for

  4. Optimization of quantitative polymerase chain reactions for detection and quantification of eight periodontal bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to optimize quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for 8 major periodontal pathogens, i.e. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tanerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, and of the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Results Eighteen different primer pairs were analyzed in silico regarding specificity (using BLAST analysis) and the presence of secondary structures at primer binding sites (using mFOLD). The most specific and efficiently binding primer pairs, according to these analyses, were selected for qPCR-analysis to determine amplification efficiency, limit of quantification and intra-run reproducibility. For the selected primer pairs, one for each species, the specificity was confirmed by assessing amplification of DNA extracts from isolates of closely related species. For these primer pairs, the intercycler portability was evaluated on 3 different thermal cyclers (the Applied Biosystems 7300, the Bio-Rad iQ5 and the Roche Light Cycler 480). For all assays on the different cyclers, a good correlation of the standard series was obtained (i.e. r2 ≥ 0.98), but quantification limits varied among cyclers. The overall best quantification limit was obtained by using a 2 μl sample in a final volume of 10 μl on the Light Cycler 480. Conclusions In conclusion, the proposed assays allow to quantify the bacterial loads of S. mutans, 6 periodontal pathogenic species and the genus Fusobacterium.This can be of use in assessing periodontal risk, determination of the optimal periodontal therapy and evaluation of this treatment. PMID:23199017

  5. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  6. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  7. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOEpatents

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  8. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  9. Emerging Escherichia Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Permpalung, Nitipong; Sentochnik, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia hermannii was first identified as a new species in 1982. It has rarely been reported as a human pathogen. We report the first case of E. hermannii as the sole pathogen in a catheter-related bloodstream infection. PMID:23740732

  10. Plant pathogen resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  11. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emergence of new foodborne pathogens is due to a number of factors. An important factor is the globalization of the food supply with the possibility of the introduction of foodborne pathogens from other countries. Animal husbandry, food production, food processing, and food distribution system...

  12. A Filifactor alocis-centered co-occurrence group associates with periodontitis across different oral habitats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Menghui; Wang, Guoyang; Qi, Zhengnan; Bridgewater, Laura; Zhao, Liping; Tang, Zisheng; Pang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent polymicrobial disease worldwide, yet the synergistic pattern of the multiple oral pathogens involved is still poorly characterized. Here, saliva, supragingival and subgingival plaque samples from periodontitis patients and periodontally healthy volunteers were collected and profiled with 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Different oral habitats harbored significantly different microbiota, and segregation of microbiota composition between periodontitis and health was observed as well. Two-step redundancy analysis identified twenty-one OTUs, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Filifactor alocis, as potential pathogens that were significantly associated with periodontitis and with two periodontitis diagnostic parameters (pocket depth and attachment loss) in both saliva and supragingival plaque habitats. Interestingly, pairwise correlation analysis among the 21 OTUs revealed that Filifactor alocis was positively correlated with seven other putative pathogens (R > 0.6, P < 0.05), forming a co-occurrence group that was remarkably enriched in all three habitats of periodontitis patients. This bacterial cluster showed a higher diagnostic value for periodontitis than did any individual potential pathogens, especially in saliva. Thus, our study identified a potential synergistic ecological pattern involving eight co-infecting pathogens across various oral habitats, providing a new framework for understanding the etiology of periodontitis and developing new diagnoses and therapies. PMID:25761675

  13. Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Prevalence of Key Periodontal Pathogens, Salivary Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Bone Remodeling Markers in Sudanese Adults with and without Chronic Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hasaan Gassim; Idris, Shaza Bushra; Mustafa, Manal; Ahmed, Mutaz Faisal; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Mustafa, Kamal; Ibrahim, Salah Osman

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the influence of type 2 diabetes on the occurrence of six periodontal pathogens in plaque samples of patients with and without chronic periodontitis. Levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, RANKL, and OPG were also investigated. The study enrolled 31 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis (DM + CP), 29 with chronic periodontitis (CP), and 20 with type 2 diabetes (DM). Questionnaire-guided interviews were conducted and plaque index, bleeding on probing, and pocket depth were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was utilized to determine the prevalence of the bacteria. The levels of salivary molecules were determined by enzyme immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CP group had the highest prevalence of P. gingivalis (81.5%), followed by the DM + CP (59.3%) and DM (55.0%) groups (P > 0.05). Similar trends were observed for P. intermedia and T. denticola. The prevalence of T. forsythia was 100% in both periodontitis groups compared to 90% in the DM group. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding the concentrations of MMP-8, MMP-9, or OPG. RANKL concentrations were below the detection limit. Our data show that type 2 diabetes has no significant influence on the prevalence of the investigated periodontal pathogens, or the levels of salivary MMP-8, MMP-9, and OPG. PMID:26989414

  14. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species. PMID:27142589

  15. Pathogenicity of entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Kagan, I G

    1975-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Entamoeba histolytica is discussed from an immunologic point of view. The evidence that there is some "trigger" mechanism which converts a commensal dwelling organism into a tissue invasive pathogen is rejected as inadequate. The number of liver abscess cases in comparison with the number of intestinal amebic infections in a population is so low that this in itself suggests that tissue invasion is a rare event in the life history of the ameba. A review is made of the experimental evidence that some type of sensitization is necessary before ameba can invade tissue. In postulating an immunologic basis for the pathogenicity of ameba, a parallel between the behavior of malignant cells in the body and an amebic infection in the gut is made. An appealing hypothesis which deserves further research effort is that an altered immune response is the basis for the pathogenic mechanism in the host. PMID:171223

  16. A comprehensive Prunus pathogen array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comprehensive pathogen array was developed for the detection of pathogens of many major crops in the Prunus genus. The APS disease lists for peach, plum, apricot and cherry were combined into a single Prunus pathogen list, containing 102 pathogens (75 fungi, 18 viruses, 6 bacteria and 3 phytoplasm...

  17. Stomata and pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. PMID:20514224

  18. Bioterrorism: pathogens as weapons.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter D; Bokor, Gyula

    2012-10-01

    Biowarfare has been used for centuries. The use of biological weapons in terrorism remains a threat. Biological weapons include infectious agents (pathogens) and toxins. The most devastating bioterrorism scenario would be the airborne dispersal of pathogens over a concentrated population area. Characteristics that make a specific pathogen a high-risk for bioterrorism include a low infective dose, ability to be aerosolized, high contagiousness, and survival in a variety of environmental conditions. The most dangerous potential bioterrorism agents include the microorganisms that produce anthrax, plague, tularemia, and smallpox. Other diseases of interest to bioterrorism include brucellosis, glanders, melioidosis, Q fever, and viral encephalitis. Food safety and water safety threats are another area of concern. PMID:23011963

  19. Dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans from Forsythia koreana fruits attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthetase and cyclooxygenase-2 expressions through activation of nuclear factor-κb and mitogen-activated protein kinase in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Bong Jae; Park, Tae Wook; Park, Byoung Eun; Kim, Soo Jung; Sim, Sang Soo; Kim, Chang Jong

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we reported that dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans (DBLLs) from the fruit of Forsythia koreana NAKAI (Oleaceae) has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-asthmatic effects. In this study, to clarify the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of DBLL, we evaluated the effects of DBLLs on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) productions, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activations, inhibitor of κB (IκB) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) phosphorylations in cytosolic proteins, and cytotoxicity in Raw264.7 cells. DBLLs potently suppressed both the enzyme expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Arctiin, arctigenin (1.0 µM) and matairesinol (10 µM) inhibited the expression of iNOS by 37.71±2.86%, 32.51±4.28%, and 27.44±2.65%, respectively, and arctiin, arctigenin (0.1 µM) and matairesinol (1.0 µM) inhibited COX-2 expression by 37.93±7.81%, 26.70±4.61% and 29.37±5.21%, respectively. The inhibitory effects of DBLLs on NO and PGE(2) productions were the same patterns as those seen for the reductions in iNOS and COX-2 expression, respectively. Arctiin, arctigenin (1.0 µM) and matairesinol (10 µM) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited NF-κB DNA binding by 44.85±6.67%, 44.16±6.61%, and 44.79±5.62%, respectively, and arctiin (0.1 µM) and arctigenin (1.0 µM) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB by 20.58±3.86% and 25.99±6.18%, respectively. Furthermore, arctiin, matairesinol (1.0 µM) and arctigenin (10 µM) inhibited the phosphorylation of IKK by 38.80±6.64%, 38.33±6.65%, and 38.57±8.14%, respectively. In addition, DBLLs potently inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of MAPKs (SAPK/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal receptor-activated kinase (ERK)1/2). Overall, arctiin was the most effective; its effect was nearly

  20. Waterborne Pathogens: The Protozoans.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Waterborne diseases associated with polluted recreational and potable waters have been documented for more than a century. Key microbial protozoan parasites, such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are causative agents for gastrointestinal disease worldwide. Although not a first-line diagnostic approach for these diseases, medical imaging, such as radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and nuclear medicine technologies, can be used to evaluate patients with long-term effects. This article describes protozoan pathogens that affect human health, treatment of common waterborne pathogen-related diseases, and associated medical imaging. PMID:27601690

  1. Bloodborne Pathogens Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasdell, Sharon

    1993-01-01

    The final rule on the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens was published in the Federal Register on Dec. 6, 1991. This Standard, 29 CFR Part 1910.130, is expected to prevent 8,900 hepatitis B infections and nearly 200 deaths a year in healthcare workers in the U.S. The Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health Services at KSC has been planning to implement this standard for several years. Various aspects of this standard and its Bloodborne Pathogens Program at KSC are discussed.

  2. Pharmacokinetics screening for multi-components absorbed in the rat plasma after oral administration of traditional Chinese medicine Flos Lonicerae Japonicae-Fructus Forsythiae herb couple by sequential negative and positive ionization ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Tam, Kin Y; Meng, Minxin; Shan, Jinjun; Wang, Shouchuan; Ju, Wenzheng; Cai, Baochang; Di, Liuqing

    2015-01-01

    The current study aims to investigate the pharmacokinetics of multi-components (caffeic acid, quinic acid, genistein, luteolin, quercetin, neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, arctigenin, genistin, luteoloside, astragalin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, rutin, loganin, pinoresinol-β-d-glucoside, phillyrin, isoforsythoside, forsythoside A and forsythoside B) following oral administration of Flos Lonicerae Japonicae-Fructus Forsythiae herb couple in rats. A rapid and sensitive UPLC-ESI-MS/MS with sequential positive and negative ionization modes was developed to determine the 23 absorbed ingredients using one sample preparation combined with three chromatographic conditions in rat plasma. After mixing with internal standard (IS) (tinidazole and chloramphenicol), samples were pretreated by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with n-butyl alcohol/ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v). The separations for pinoresinol-β-d-glucoside, phillyrin, isoforsythoside, forsythoside A and forsythoside B were performed on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH C18 column (100mm×2.1mm, 1.7μm) with acetonitrile/methanol (4:1, v/v)-water as mobile phase. For analyzing quinic acid, an ACQUITY UPLC HSS T3 column (100mm×2.1mm, 1.8μm) was applied with acetonitrile/methanol (4:1, v/v)-0.01% formic acid as mobile phase after dilution up to 25-fold. The same column was applied to the other components with acetonitrile/methanol (4:1, v/v)-0.4% formic acid as mobile phase. The method validation results demonstrated that the proposed method was sensitive, specific and reliable, which was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of the multi-components after oral administration of Flos Lonicerae Japonicae-Fructus Forsythiae herb couple. PMID:25533397

  3. Pathogenicity and virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many pathogenic microorganisms are host-specific in that they parasitize only one or a few animal species. For example, the cause of equine strangles, Streptococcus equi subspecies equi, is essentially limited to infection of horses. Others—certain Salmonella serotypes, for example—have a broad host...

  4. DISINFECTION OF EMERGING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing awareness of the need to control waterborne microbial pathogens. This presentation will concentate on the role of chemical inactivation, using chlorine, chloramines and ozone as a means of controlling bacterial and protozoan species. Information will be present...

  5. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

  6. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  7. Polymicrobial infection alter inflammatory microRNA in rat salivary glands during periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Gautam; Gauna, Adrienne; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Cha, Seunghee

    2016-04-01

    Periodontal disease initiated by subgingival pathogens is linked with diminished secretion of saliva, and implies pathogenic bacteria dissemination to or affects secondary sites such as the salivary glands. MicroRNAs activated in response to bacteria may modulate immune responses against pathogens. Therefore, Sprague-Dawley rats were infected by oral lavage consisting of polymicrobial inocula, namely Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, or sham-infected for 12 weeks (n = 6). We quantified inflammatory miRNA expression levels of miRNA-132, miR-146a, and miR-155 at secondary sites to the primary infection of the gingiva, including submandibular salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and pancreas. The presence of bacteria was detected in situ at secondary sites. Infected rat gingiva showed increased relative expression of miR-155. In contrast, miRNA-155 expression was decreased in submandibular salivary glands, along with positive identification of P. gingivalis in 2/6 and T. denticola in 1/6 rat salivary glands. Furthermore, miRNA-132 and miRNA-146a were significantly decreased in the pancreas of infected rats. This study is the first to show primary periodontal infections can alter miRNA profiles in secondary sites such as the salivary gland and pancreas. Whether these alterations contribute to pathologies of salivary glands in Sjögren's syndrome or of pancreas in diabetes warrants further investigation. PMID:26481834

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis Periodontal Infection and Its Putative Links with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singhrao, Sim K.; Harding, Alice; Poole, Sophie; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are inflammatory conditions affecting the global adult population. In the pathogenesis of PD, subgingival complex bacterial biofilm induces inflammation that leads to connective tissue degradation and alveolar bone resorption around the teeth. In health, junctional epithelium seals the gingiva to the tooth enamel, thus preventing bacteria from entering the gingivae. Chronic PD involves major pathogens (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia) which have an immune armoury that can circumvent host's immune surveillance to create and maintain an inflammatory mediator rich and toxic environment to grow and survive. The neurodegenerative condition, AD, is characterised by poor memory and specific hallmark proteins; periodontal pathogens are increasingly being linked with this dementing condition. It is therefore becoming important to understand associations of periodontitis with relevance to late-onset AD. The aim of this review is to discuss the relevance of finding the keystone periodontal pathogen P. gingivalis in AD brains and its plausible contribution to the aetiological hypothesis of this dementing condition. PMID:26063967

  9. A bacterial glycan core linked to surface (S)-layer proteins modulates host immunity through Th17 suppression

    PubMed Central

    Settem, Rajendra P.; Honma, Kiyonobu; Nakajima, Takuma; Phansopa, Chatchawal; Roy, Sumita; Stafford, Graham P.; Sharma, Ashu

    2014-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a pathogen implicated in periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth supporting tissues often leading to tooth loss. This key periodontal pathogen is decorated with a unique glycan core O-glycosidically linked to the bacterium’s proteinacious surface(S)-layer lattice and other glycoproteins. Herein we show that the terminal motif of this glycan core acts to modulate dendritic cell effector functions to suppress Th17 responses. In contrast to the wild-type bacterial strain, infection with a mutant strain lacking the complete S-layer glycan core induced robust Th17 and reduced periodontal bone loss in mice. Our findings demonstrate that surface glycosylation of this pathogen acts to ensure its persistence in the host by suppressing Th17 responses. In addition our data suggest that the bacterium then induces the TLR2-Th2 inflammatory axis that has previously shown to cause bone destruction. Our study provides a biological basis for pathogenesis and opens opportunities in exploiting bacterial glycans as therapeutic targets against periodontitis and a range of other infectious diseases. PMID:22968422

  10. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:27072489

  11. WATERBORNE PATHOGENS IN URBAN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogens are microorganisms that can cause sickness or even death. A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combi...

  12. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  13. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary Teresa; Slezak, Thomas Richard; Messenger, Sharon Lee

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  14. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  15. Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:14726454

  16. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  17. Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaper, James B; Nataro, James P; Mobley, Harry L

    2004-02-01

    Few microorganisms are as versatile as Escherichia coli. An important member of the normal intestinal microflora of humans and other mammals, E. coli has also been widely exploited as a cloning host in recombinant DNA technology. But E. coli is more than just a laboratory workhorse or harmless intestinal inhabitant; it can also be a highly versatile, and frequently deadly, pathogen. Several different E. coli strains cause diverse intestinal and extraintestinal diseases by means of virulence factors that affect a wide range of cellular processes. PMID:15040260

  18. The Keystone Pathogen Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Darveau, Richard P.; Curtis, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of the human microbiome in host health and disease. However, for the most part the mechanisms by which the microbiome mediates disease, or protection from it, remain poorly understood. The “keystone pathogen” hypothesis holds that certain low-abundance microbial pathogens can orchestrate inflammatory disease by remodelling a normally benign microbiota into a dysbiotic one. In this Opinion, we critically assess the available literature in support of this hypothesis, which may provide a novel conceptual basis for the development of targeted diagnostic and treatment modalities for complex dysbiotic diseases. PMID:22941505

  19. BK polyomavirus: emerging pathogen.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shauna M; Broekema, Nicole M; Imperiale, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a small double-stranded DNA virus that is an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. BKPyV is widespread in the general population, but primarily causes disease when immune suppression leads to reactivation of latent virus. Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis in renal and bone marrow transplant patients, respectively, are the most common diseases associated with BKPyV reactivation and lytic infection. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance, effects on the host, virus life cycle, and current treatment protocols. PMID:22402031

  20. Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Prouty, Anne J.; Albersheim, Peter

    1975-01-01

    A polysaccharide from the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum causes browning and phytoalexin production when applied to the cut surfaces of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cotyledons and hypocotyls. The application of an amount of polysaccharide equivalent to less than 100 ng of glucose will elicit this response in the bean tissues. The polysaccharide has been isolated both from culture filtrates and from the mycelial walls of the fungus. Purification of the polysaccharide involved anion and cation exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharide has an apparent molecular weight between 1,000,000 and 5,000,000 daltons, and consists predominantly of 3- and 4-linked glucosyl residues. PMID:16659289

  1. Root Canal Microbiota of Teeth with Chronic Apical Periodontitis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, I. N.; Siqueira, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    Samples from infected root canals of 43 teeth with chronic apical periodontitis were analyzed for the presence and relative levels of 83 oral bacterial species and/or phylotypes using a reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization assay. Associations between the most frequently detected taxa were also recorded. The most prevalent taxa were Olsenella uli (74%), Eikenella corrodens (63%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (56%), Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (54%), and Bacteroidetes oral clone X083 (51%). When prevalence was considered only for bacteria present at levels >105, Bacteroidetes clone X083 was the most frequently isolated bacterium (37%), followed by Parvimonas micra (28%), E. corrodens (23%), and Tannerella forsythia (19%). The number of target taxa per canal was directly proportional to the size of the apical periodontitis lesion, with lesions >10 mm in diameter harboring a mean number of approximately 20 taxa. Several positive associations for the most prevalent taxa were disclosed for the first time and may have important ecological and pathogenic implications. In addition to strengthening the association of several cultivable named species with chronic apical periodontitis, the present findings using a large-scale analysis allowed the inclusion of some newly named species and as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes in the set of candidate pathogens associated with this disease. PMID:18768651

  2. Root canal microbiota of teeth with chronic apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rôças, I N; Siqueira, J F

    2008-11-01

    Samples from infected root canals of 43 teeth with chronic apical periodontitis were analyzed for the presence and relative levels of 83 oral bacterial species and/or phylotypes using a reverse-capture checkerboard hybridization assay. Associations between the most frequently detected taxa were also recorded. The most prevalent taxa were Olsenella uli (74%), Eikenella corrodens (63%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (56%), Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (54%), and Bacteroidetes oral clone X083 (51%). When prevalence was considered only for bacteria present at levels >10(5), Bacteroidetes clone X083 was the most frequently isolated bacterium (37%), followed by Parvimonas micra (28%), E. corrodens (23%), and Tannerella forsythia (19%). The number of target taxa per canal was directly proportional to the size of the apical periodontitis lesion, with lesions >10 mm in diameter harboring a mean number of approximately 20 taxa. Several positive associations for the most prevalent taxa were disclosed for the first time and may have important ecological and pathogenic implications. In addition to strengthening the association of several cultivable named species with chronic apical periodontitis, the present findings using a large-scale analysis allowed the inclusion of some newly named species and as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes in the set of candidate pathogens associated with this disease. PMID:18768651

  3. Periodontal bacteria in the genital tract: are they related to adverse pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Cassini, M A; Pilloni, A; Condò, S G; Vitali, L A; Pasquantonio, G; Cerroni, L

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important factors implicated in preterm birth (PTB) is acute genitourinary tract infection. The bacteria causing chronic periodontal inflammation include Gram-negative rods and anaerobes similar to those found in women with bacterial vaginosis. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate the relationship between oral and vaginal microflora and preterm low birth weight. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect both the presence and level of six periodontitis-related species: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp(Fn), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) for both oral samples of subgingival plaque and cervical samples, obtained from 80 patients, during gynaecological examinations. The more representative oral pathogen (less than 60 percent) species in oral samples of preterm and term group were Tf, Td, and Fn. 24.4 percent of pregnant women presented periodontal pathogens in vaginal swab; the most representative species with a percentage over 0.1 percent of total bacteria in genital tract of preterm group were Tf, Td, and Piwith a positive correlation (less than 0.5). The presence of the bacterium T. denticolain the vagina, regardless of the amount, adversely affects preterm delivery. PMID:24355228

  4. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  5. Host Specificity of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas; Fang, Ferric C.

    2013-01-01

    Most pathogens are able to infect multiple hosts but some are highly adapted to a single-host species. A detailed understanding of the basis of host specificity can provide important insights into molecular pathogenesis, the evolution of pathogenic microbes, and the potential for pathogens to cross the species barrier to infect new hosts. Comparative genomics and the development of humanized mouse models have provided important new tools with which to explore the basis of generalism and specialism. This review will examine host specificity of bacterial pathogens with a focus on generalist and specialist serovars of Salmonella enterica. PMID:24296346

  6. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary; Slezak, Thomas; Birch, James M.

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  7. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  8. Lipoproteins of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, A; Titball, R W; Michell, S L

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  9. Respiratory Pathogens in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Good, Robert C.; May, Bessie D.

    1971-01-01

    Respiratory disease in a dynamic colony of nonhuman primates during a 4-year period was due primarily to infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Diplococcus pneumoniae, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, and Haemophilus influenzae. The principal secondary invaders were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and streptococci. A high fatality rate was associated with infections caused by each of the primary pathogens, and females appeared to be more susceptible than males. Incidence of respiratory disease was greatest in the fall and early winter; however, at all times newly colonized monkeys had a higher infection rate than conditioned monkeys. Infections were occasionally confined only to the lungs and were sometimes present without grossly observable lung lesions. The information given on susceptibility of 10 species of nonhuman primates to respiratory infections provides a basis for developing disease models. PMID:16557951

  10. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  11. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  12. Promiscuous Pathogenicity Islands and Phylogeny of Pathogenic Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucheng; Bignell, Dawn R D; Zuo, Ran; Fan, Qiurong; Huguet-Tapia, Jose C; Ding, Yousong; Loria, Rosemary

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 10 Streptomyces species cause disease on underground plant structures. The most economically important of these is potato scab, and the most studied of these pathogens is Streptomyces scabiei (syn. S. scabies). The main pathogenicity determinant of scab-causing Streptomyces species is a nitrated diketopiperazine, known as thaxtomin A (ThxA). In the pathogenic species Streptomyces turgidiscabies, ThxA biosynthetic genes reside on a mobile pathogenicity island (PAI). However, the mobilization of PAIs in other Streptomyces species remains uncharacterized. Here, we investigated the mobilization of the PAI of S. scabiei 87-22. Based on whole genome sequences, we inferred the evolutionary relationships of pathogenic Streptomyces species and discovered that Streptomyces sp. strain 96-12, a novel pathogenic species isolated from potatoes in Egypt, was phylogenetically grouped with nonpathogenic species rather than with known pathogenic species. We also found that Streptomyces sp. strain 96-12 contains a PAI that is almost identical to the PAI in S. scabiei 87-22, despite significant differences in their genome sequences. This suggested direct or indirect in vivo mobilization of the PAI between S. scabiei and nonpathogenic Streptomyces species. To test whether the S. scabiei 87-22 PAI could, indeed, be mobilized, S. scabiei 87-22 deletion mutants containing antibiotic resistance markers in the PAI were mated with Streptomyces diastatochromogenes, a nonpathogenic species. The PAI of S. scabiei was site-specifically inserted into the aviX1 gene of S. diastatochromogenes and conferred pathogenicity in radish seedling assays. Our results demonstrated that S. scabiei, the earliest described Streptomyces pathogen, could be the source of a PAI responsible for the emergence of novel pathogenic species. PMID:27502745

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains from the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a highly infectious swine pathogen and is the causative agent of enzootic pneumonia (EP). Following the previous report of a proteomic survey of the pathogenic 7448 strain of swine pathogen, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, we performed comparative protein profiling of three M. hyopneumoniae strains, namely the non-pathogenic J strain and the two pathogenic strains 7448 and 7422. Results In 2DE comparisons, we were able to identify differences in expression levels for 67 proteins, including the overexpression of some cytoadherence-related proteins only in the pathogenic strains. 2DE immunoblot analyses allowed the identification of differential proteolytic cleavage patterns of the P97 adhesin in the three strains. For more comprehensive protein profiling, an LC-MS/MS strategy was used. Overall, 35% of the M. hyopneumoniae genome coding capacity was covered. Partially overlapping profiles of identified proteins were observed in the strains with 81 proteins identified only in one strain and 54 proteins identified in two strains. Abundance analysis of proteins detected in more than one strain demonstrates the relative overexpression of 64 proteins, including the P97 adhesin in the pathogenic strains. Conclusions Our results indicate the physiological differences between the non-pathogenic strain, with its non-infective proliferate lifestyle, and the pathogenic strains, with its constitutive expression of adhesins, which would render the bacterium competent for adhesion and infection prior to host contact. PMID:20025764

  14. Proteomics of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerquist, Clifton K.

    This chapter is intended to be a relatively brief overview of proteomic techniques currently in use for the identification and analysis of microorganisms with a special emphasis on foodborne pathogens. The chapter is organized as follows. First, proteomic techniques are introduced and discussed. Second, proteomic applications are presented specifically as they relate to the identification and qualitative/quantitative analysis of foodborne pathogens.

  15. Pathogens of Whiteflies (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whiteflies belong to the order Homoptera, and the family Aleyrodidae. They are tropical and subtropical in origin, and can be serious pests in field crops of the southern areas of the world and in glasshouses. Whiteflies have many pathogens, but nearly all known pathogens are fungi, which can infect...

  16. Microbiological pathogens: Live poultry considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry products continue to be implicated as the predominate source of food-borne pathogens worldwide. Most food-borne pathogen contamination from poultry originates from ante mortem poultry infections. This book section will address several potential areas of concern regarding the microbial ecolog...

  17. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  18. Common themes in microbial pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Finlay, B B; Falkow, S

    1989-01-01

    A bacterial pathogen is a highly adapted microorganism which has the capacity to cause disease. The mechanisms used by pathogenic bacteria to cause infection and disease usually include an interactive group of virulence determinants, sometimes coregulated, which are suited for the interaction of a particular microorganism with a specific host. Because pathogens must overcome similar host barriers, common themes in microbial pathogenesis have evolved. However, these mechanisms are diverse between species and not necessarily conserved; instead, convergent evolution has developed several different mechanisms to overcome host barriers. The success of a bacterial pathogen can be measured by the degree with which it replicates after entering the host and reaching its specific niche. Successful microbial infection reflects persistence within a host and avoidance or neutralization of the specific and nonspecific defense mechanisms of the host. The degree of success of a pathogen is dependent upon the status of the host. As pathogens pass through a host, they are exposed to new environments. Highly adapted pathogenic organisms have developed biochemical sensors exquisitely designed to measure and respond to such environmental stimuli and accordingly to regulate a cascade of virulence determinants essential for life within the host. The pathogenic state is the product of dynamic selective pressures on microbial populations. PMID:2569162

  19. Physical constraints for pathogen movement.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-10-01

    In this pedagogical review, we discuss the physical constraints that pathogens experience when they move in their host environment. Due to their small size, pathogens are living in a low Reynolds number world dominated by viscosity. For swimming pathogens, the so-called scallop theorem determines which kinds of shape changes can lead to productive motility. For crawling or gliding cells, the main resistance to movement comes from protein friction at the cell-environment interface. Viruses and pathogenic bacteria can also exploit intracellular host processes such as actin polymerization and motor-based transport, if they present the appropriate factors on their surfaces. Similar to cancer cells that also tend to cross various barriers, pathogens often combine several of these strategies in order to increase their motility and therefore their chances to replicate and spread. PMID:26456297

  20. Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Kenneth; Wade, Mark; Albersheim, Peter

    1978-01-01

    A β-glucan isolated from the mycelial walls of Phytophthora megasperma var. sojae and a glucan purified from yeast extract stimulate the accumulation of phytoalexins in red kidney bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, and stimulate the accumulation of the phytoalexin, rishitin, in potato tubers, Solanum tuberosum. These glucans have previously been shown to be potent elicitors of glyceollin accumulation in soybean, Glycine max. Treatment of kidney bean cotyledons with the glucan elicitors resulted in the accumulation of at least five fungistatic compounds. These compounds migrate during thin layer chromatography identically to the fungistatic compounds which accumulate in kidney beans which have been inoculated with Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, a fungal pathogen of kidney beans. Potatoes accumulate as much as 29 micrograms of rishitin per gram fresh weight following exposure to the glucan from Phytophthora megasperma var. sojae and as much as 19.5 micrograms of rishitin per gram fresh weight following exposure to yeast glucan. Potatoes accumulated 28 micrograms of rishitin per gram fresh weight following inoculation with live Phytophthora megasperma var. sojae. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:16660638

  1. 40 CFR 503.32 - Pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pathogens. 503.32 Section 503.32... DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE Pathogens and Vector Attraction Reduction § 503.32 Pathogens. (a) Sewage sludge... to pathogens. (2) The Class A pathogen requirements in § 503.32 (a)(3) through (a)(8) shall be...

  2. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-05-01

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution. PMID:19864267

  3. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  4. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  5. P. gingivalis in Periodontal Disease and Atherosclerosis – Scenes of Action for Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehak; Stover, Cordula M.; Dupont, Aline

    2015-01-01

    According to the NHS, it is estimated that over 50% of the adult population are, to some extent, affected by gum disease and approximately 15% of UK population have been diagnosed with severe periodontitis. Periodontitis, a chronic polymicrobial disease of the gums, causes inflammation in its milder form, whereas in its severe form affects the surrounding tissues and can result in tooth loss. During periodontitis, plaque accumulates and sits between the junctional epithelium and the tooth itself, resulting in inflammation and the formation of a periodontal pocket. An interface is formed directly between the subgingival bacteria and the junctional epithelial cells. Bacterial pathogens commonly associated with periodontal disease are, among others, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, together known as the “red complex.” This review will mostly concentrate on the role of P. gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and one of the major and most studied contributors of this disease. Because periodontal disease is associated with the development of atherosclerosis, it is important to understand the local immune response to P. gingivalis. Innate immune players, in particular, complement and antimicrobial peptides and their effects with regard to P. gingivalis during periodontitis and in the development of atherosclerosis will be presented. PMID:25713575

  6. Effects of Hangeshashinto on Growth of Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Chinami; Omiya, Yuji; Arimoto, Takafumi; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Kataoka, Hideo; Kadena, Miki; Funatsu, Takahiro; Fukutake, Masato; Kase, Yoshio; Kuwata, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy has a significant impact on quality of life, and causes considerable morbidity. Oral microorganisms are likely to intensify the inflammatory process and aggravate the formation of ulcers. Hangeshashinto (HST), a Japanese kampo medicine, has been reported to be effective when used as a gargle for the treatment of OM. To clarify the effects of HST on oral microorganisms, we assessed its antimicrobial activity against 27 microbial species, including 19 oral bacteria and one fungus. HST extract inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, though inhibitory effects were less pronounced for Gram-positive bacteria and the fungal strain. We then investigated the effects of antibacterial activities on 15 purified ingredients of HST and determined that baicalein, berberine, coptisine, [6]-shogaol, and homogentisic acid actively inhibited the growth of these bacteria. These findings showed that HST inhibits the growth of specific Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, which are significant pathogens in OM, without disturbing the normal oral flora. Our data suggest that HST may be a useful treatment for OM in patients undergoing anticancer treatment. PMID:26170876

  7. The influence of orthodontic fixed appliances on the oral microbiota: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Amanda Osório Ayres; Marquezan, Mariana; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that the presence of orthodontic fixed appliances influences the oral microbiota. Methods The search for articles was conducted in PubMed; ISI Web of Knowledge and Ovid databases, including articles published in English until May 17th, 2012. They should report human observational studies presenting the following keywords: "fixed orthodontic appliance" AND "microbiological colonization"; OR "periodontal pathogens"; OR "Streptococcus"; OR "Lactobacillus"; OR "Candida"; OR "Tannerella forsythia"; OR "Treponema denticola"; OR "Fusobacterium nucleatum"; OR "Actimomyces actinomycetemcomitans"; OR "Prevotella intermedia", OR "Prevotella nigrescens"; OR "Porphyromonas gingivalis". Articles were previously selected by title and abstract. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed and classified as having low, moderate or high methodology quality. A new detailed checklist for quality assessment was developed based on the information required for applicable data extraction for reviews. The study design, sample, follow-up period, collection and microbial analysis methods, statistical treatment, results and discussion were assessed. Results The initial search retrieved 305 articles of which 33 articles were selected by title and abstract. After full-text reading, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria, out of which 4 articles were classified as having low and 4 as moderate methodological quality. The moderate methodological quality studies were included in the systematic review. Conclusions The literature revealed moderate evidence that the presence of fixed appliances influences the quantity and quality of oral microbiota. PMID:24945514

  8. Longitudinal study on clinical and microbial analysis of periodontal status in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda Campos; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Apolônio, Ana Carolina Morais; Ribeiro, Luiz Claudio; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to provide a longitudinal overview of the subgingival bacterial microbiome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, in women in the second trimester of pregnancy (between 14 and 24 weeks), and 48 h and 8 weeks postpartum. Of 31 women evaluated during pregnancy, 24 returned for the 48-h and 18 for their 8-week exams postpartum. Probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected, and FISH was used to identify the numbers of eight periodontal pathogens. Friedman test was used to compare differences between follow-up examinations, followed by a multiple comparison test for a post hoc pairwise comparison. Clinically, a significantly greater number of teeth with PD = 4-5 mm were found during pregnancy than on postpartum examinations. Microbial analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in cell count over the study period for Prevotella nigrescens. P. intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis also decrease, although not significantly, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increased. No significant changes were found for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Treponema denticola, or Tannerella forsythia. Our data demonstrate a change in the subgingival microbiota during pregnancy, at least for P. nigrescens. PMID:27556678

  9. Detection of periodontal markers in chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Asa; Carlén, Anette; Bengtsson, Lisbeth; Dahlén, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to compare the detection frequency of periodontopathogens by using the Pado Test 4.5 and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique in chronic periodontitis patients.Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis were tested cross-sectionally with DNA/RNA oligogenomic probe method (IAI Pado Test 4.5) and DNA/DNA whole genomic probe (checkerboard) method. Samples were taken by two paper points at the deepest site in each of the four quadrants and pooled into one sample for each of the two methods. The samples were sent to the two laboratories (IAI, Zuchwil, Switzerland, and Oral Microbiology Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and were analyzed in a routine setting for the presence and amount of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola.While Pado Test 4.5 detected the four periodontal pathogens in 11 (36.7%) of the patients, the checkerboard method showed presence in all patients (100%) using the lower score (Score 1 corresponding to 10(4) bacterial cells) and 16 (53.3%) using a higher treshold (score 3 corresponding to between >10(5) and 10(6) cells).The results of the present study showed low agreement for a positive microbiological outcome using the two diagnostic methods. It was also concluded that microbiological analysis in practice should include a larger number of bacterial species to better serve as markers for a diseased associated flora in chronic periodontitis cases. PMID:21769304

  10. P. gingivalis in Periodontal Disease and Atherosclerosis - Scenes of Action for Antimicrobial Peptides and Complement.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mehak; Stover, Cordula M; Dupont, Aline

    2015-01-01

    According to the NHS, it is estimated that over 50% of the adult population are, to some extent, affected by gum disease and approximately 15% of UK population have been diagnosed with severe periodontitis. Periodontitis, a chronic polymicrobial disease of the gums, causes inflammation in its milder form, whereas in its severe form affects the surrounding tissues and can result in tooth loss. During periodontitis, plaque accumulates and sits between the junctional epithelium and the tooth itself, resulting in inflammation and the formation of a periodontal pocket. An interface is formed directly between the subgingival bacteria and the junctional epithelial cells. Bacterial pathogens commonly associated with periodontal disease are, among others, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, together known as the "red complex." This review will mostly concentrate on the role of P. gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium and one of the major and most studied contributors of this disease. Because periodontal disease is associated with the development of atherosclerosis, it is important to understand the local immune response to P. gingivalis. Innate immune players, in particular, complement and antimicrobial peptides and their effects with regard to P. gingivalis during periodontitis and in the development of atherosclerosis will be presented. PMID:25713575

  11. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24270074

  12. Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interractions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, A; Folta, P

    2006-07-27

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  13. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche

    PubMed Central

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible–infected–recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host–pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity. PMID:25040161

  14. Compositions and methods for pathogen transport

    DOEpatents

    El-Etr, Sahar; Farquar, George R.

    2016-01-26

    This disclosure provides a method for transporting a pathogen under ambient conditions, by culturing the pathogen with an amoeba under conditions that favor the incorporation of the pathogen into a trophozoite, starving the amoeba until it encysts, then culturing under conditions that favor conversion of the amoeba back to a trophozoite. In one aspect, the conditions that favor incorporation of the pathogen into the cyst of the amoeba comprises contacting the pathogen with the amoeba in an iron rich environment. Virus and/or bacteria are pathogens that can be transported by the disclosed method. Amoeba that are useful in the disclosed methods include, without limitation Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria gruberi. The disclosed methods have utility in: transporting pathogens from military field hospitals and clinics to the laboratory; transporting pathogens from global satellite laboratories to clinical laboratories; long term storage of pathogens; enriching contaminated patient samples for pathogens of interest; biosurveillance and detection efforts.

  15. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche.

    PubMed

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host-pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity. PMID:25040161

  16. [Population genetics of plant pathogens].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Zhan, Jia-Sui

    2012-02-01

    Comparing to natural ecosystems, the evolution of plant pathogens in agricultural ecosystems is generally faster due to high-density monocultures, large-scale application of agrochemicals, and international trade in agricultural products. Knowledge of the population genetics and evolutionary biology of plant pathogens is necessary to understand disease epidemiology, effectively breed and use resistant cultivars, and control plant diseases. In this article, we outlined the aims of population genetic studies in plant pathogens, discuss contributions of five evolutionary forces (i.e., mutation, gene flow, recombination, random genetic drift, and natural selection) to origin, maintenance, and distribution of genetic variation in time and space, and gave an overview of current research status in this field. PMID:22382057

  17. The main Aeromonas pathogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Tomás, J M

    2012-01-01

    The members of the Aeromonas genus are ubiquitous, water-borne bacteria. They have been isolated from marine waters, rivers, lakes, swamps, sediments, chlorine water, water distribution systems, drinking water and residual waters; different types of food, such as meat, fish, seafood, vegetables, and processed foods. Aeromonas strains are predominantly pathogenic to poikilothermic animals, and the mesophilic strains are emerging as important pathogens in humans, causing a variety of extraintestinal and systemic infections as well as gastrointestinal infections. The most commonly described disease caused by Aeromonas is the gastroenteritis; however, no adequate animal model is available to reproduce this illness caused by Aeromonas. The main pathogenic factors associated with Aeromonas are: surface polysaccharides (capsule, lipopolysaccharide, and glucan), S-layers, iron-binding systems, exotoxins and extracellular enzymes, secretion systems, fimbriae and other nonfilamentous adhesins, motility and flagella. PMID:23724321

  18. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  19. From multiple pathogenicity islands to a unique organized pathogenicity archipelago.

    PubMed

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Reverchon, Sylvie; Képès, François

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity islands are sets of successive genes in a genome that determine the virulence of a bacterium. In a growing number of studies, bacterial virulence appears to be determined by multiple islands scattered along the genome. This is the case in a family of seven plant pathogens and a human pathogen that, under KdgR regulation, massively secrete enzymes such as pectinases that degrade plant cell wall. Here we show that their multiple pathogenicity islands form together a coherently organized, single "archipelago" at the genome scale. Furthermore, in half of the species, most genes encoding secreted pectinases are expressed from the same DNA strand (transcriptional co-orientation). This genome architecture favors DNA conformations that are conducive to genes spatial co-localization, sometimes complemented by co-orientation. As proteins tend to be synthetized close to their encoding genes in bacteria, we propose that this architecture would favor the efficient funneling of pectinases at convergent points within the cell. The underlying functional hypothesis is that this convergent funneling of the full blend of pectinases constitutes a crucial strategy for successful degradation of the plant cell wall. Altogether, our work provides a new approach to describe and predict, at the genome scale, the full virulence complement. PMID:27302835

  20. From multiple pathogenicity islands to a unique organized pathogenicity archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Reverchon, Sylvie; Képès, François

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity islands are sets of successive genes in a genome that determine the virulence of a bacterium. In a growing number of studies, bacterial virulence appears to be determined by multiple islands scattered along the genome. This is the case in a family of seven plant pathogens and a human pathogen that, under KdgR regulation, massively secrete enzymes such as pectinases that degrade plant cell wall. Here we show that their multiple pathogenicity islands form together a coherently organized, single “archipelago” at the genome scale. Furthermore, in half of the species, most genes encoding secreted pectinases are expressed from the same DNA strand (transcriptional co-orientation). This genome architecture favors DNA conformations that are conducive to genes spatial co-localization, sometimes complemented by co-orientation. As proteins tend to be synthetized close to their encoding genes in bacteria, we propose that this architecture would favor the efficient funneling of pectinases at convergent points within the cell. The underlying functional hypothesis is that this convergent funneling of the full blend of pectinases constitutes a crucial strategy for successful degradation of the plant cell wall. Altogether, our work provides a new approach to describe and predict, at the genome scale, the full virulence complement. PMID:27302835

  1. New trends in emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Niels

    2007-12-15

    The emergence of pathogens is the result of a number of impact in all parts of the food chain. The emerging technologies in food production explain how new pathogens can establish themselves in the food chain and compromise food safety. The impact of the food technology is analysed for several bacteria, such as Yersinia, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter pullorum, Enterobacter sakazakii, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis, prions related to vCJD and others. The importance of the ability of many microbes to form VBNC forms is elaborated on. Research on culture independent methods may address this outstanding issue to the better understanding of emerging pathogens. The "demerging" of pathogens also occur, and examples of this are explained. The reaction of bacteria to stresses and sublethal treatments, and how exposure to one stress factor can confer resistance to other stresses, literally speaking causing contagious resistance, are explained. The implication of this e.g. in modern approaches of food preservation, such as Minimally processed Foods, is considerable. Intestinal colonization of EHEC may be regulated by Quorum sensing, and this ability of microbes plays an important role in the colonization of microbes in food and on food processing equipment, an important factor in the emergence of pathogens. The emergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an opportunistic human pathogen, used for centuries for food and production of alcoholic beverages, calls for research in molecular tools to distinguish between probiotic and clinical strains. Cyclospora cayetanensis and Norovirus outbreaks can no longer be designated as emerging pathogens, they share however one characteristic in the epidemiology of emerging nature, the importance of the hygiene in the primary production stage, including supply of potable water, and the application of GMP and the HACCP principles in the beginning of the food chain. Hepatitis E virus is a potential emerging food borne

  2. Overview of Pathogen Groups: Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fungi comprise a diverse array of taxa that exhibit a great diversity of properties and requirements. These microorganisms collectively occupy virtually every niche in which arthropods are also found, and, consequently, there has been great interest in the use of these pathogens as microbial bi...

  3. Microbial Forensics and Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New awareness of the vulnerability of a nation's agricultural infrastructure to the intentional introduction of pathogens or pests has led to the enhancement of programs for prevention and preparedness. A necessary component of a balanced bio-security plan is the capability to determine whether an ...

  4. Bacterial itaconate degradation promotes pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Sasikaran, Jahminy; Ziemski, Michał; Zadora, Piotr K; Fleig, Angela; Berg, Ivan A

    2014-05-01

    Itaconate (methylenesuccinate) was recently identified as a mammalian metabolite whose production is substantially induced during macrophage activation. This compound is a potent inhibitor of isocitrate lyase, a key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, which is a pathway required for the survival of many pathogens inside the eukaryotic host. Here we show that numerous bacteria, notably many pathogens such as Yersinia pestis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have three genes for itaconate degradation. They encode itaconate coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, itaconyl-CoA hydratase and (S)-citramalyl-CoA lyase, formerly referred to as CitE-like protein. These genes are known to be crucial for survival of some pathogens in macrophages. The corresponding enzymes convert itaconate into the cellular building blocks pyruvate and acetyl-CoA, thus enabling the bacteria to metabolize itaconate and survive in macrophages. The itaconate degradation and detoxification pathways of Yersinia and Pseudomonas are the result of convergent evolution. This work revealed a common persistence factor operating in many pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24657929

  5. Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  6. The Evolution of Foodborne Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Ali, Galeb S.; Manning, Shannon D.

    Despite continuous advances in food safety and disease surveillance, control, and prevention, foodborne bacterial infections remain a major public health concern. Because foodborne pathogens are commonly exposed to multiple environmental stressors, such as low pH and antibiotics, most have evolved specific mechanisms to facilitate survival in adverse environments.

  7. Microbiological pathogens: Live poultry considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food-borne illness is a significant worldwide public health problem. Salmonella is the predominate food-borne pathogen worldwide, and poultry and poultry products are, reportedly, a prevailing vehicle for salmonellosis. More recently, population-based active surveillance by investigators of the Fo...

  8. Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Care Association, Atlanta, GA.

    This sample exposure control plan is a guide to assist child care providers in complying with the blood-borne pathogens standard issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The standard requires employers to establish a written exposure control plan by May 5, 1992 (for exposure to microorganisms in human blood that cause…

  9. USEPA PERSPECTIVE ON CONTROLLING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA minimizes the risk of infectious diseases from the beneficial use of sludge by requiring its treatment to reduce pathogen levels below the detection limit. How new treatment processes can be shown equivalent to ones specified in 40CFR503 will be discussed together with ways t...

  10. Microbial Genomics of Aquaculture Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious diseases cause substantial economic loss in aquaculture and are a factor limiting production of many species. Given increasing seafood demand worldwide, there is an escalating need for research to identify solutions to fish health problems. With the advent of pathogen and host-genome sequ...

  11. PATHOGENIC 'NAEGLERIA': DISTRIBUTION IN NATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infection in man with pathogenic Naegleria, a free-living soil amoeba, results in a usually fatal disease entity known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Epidemiological data usually included exposure to freshwater lakes or streams within the week prior to onset. However, no...

  12. Pathogenic Pseudorabies Virus, China, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiuling; Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Dongmei; Zhang, Qian; Han, Tao; Li, Xiaoxia; Gu, Xiaoxue; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Baoyue; Qu, Ping; Liu, Jinhua; Zhai, Xinyan

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, an unprecedented large-scale outbreak of disease in pigs in China caused great economic losses to the swine industry. Isolates from pseudorabies virus epidemics in swine herds were characterized. Evidence confirmed that the pathogenic pseudorabies virus was the etiologic agent of this epidemic. PMID:24377462

  13. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a summary of the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) publication entitled Managing Urban Watershed Pathogen Contamination, EPA/600/R-03/111 (September 2003). It is available on the internet at http://www.epa.gov/ednnrmrl/repository/water...

  14. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  15. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is written as a resource for state and local watershed managers who have the responsibility of managing pathogen contamination in urban watersheds. In addition it can be an information source for members of the public interested in watershed mitigation efforts aime...

  16. Proteomics of foodborne bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter focuses on recent research on foodborne bacterial pathogens that use mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques as well as protein microarrays. Mass spectrometry ionization techniques (e.g. electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization), analyzers (e.g. ion ...

  17. Biosignatures of Pathogen and Host

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; Chromy, B A; Forde, C E; Garcia, E; Gardner, S N; Gu, P P; Kuczmarksi, T A; Melius, C F; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Milanovich, F P; Motin, V L; Ott, L L; Quong, A A; Quong, J N; Rocco, J M; Slezak, T R; Sokhansanj, B A; Vitalis, E A; Zemla, A T; McCready, P M

    2002-08-27

    In information theory, a signature is characterized by the information content as well as noise statistics of the communication channel. Biosignatures have analogous properties. A biosignature can be associated with a particular attribute of a pathogen or a host. However, the signature may be lost in backgrounds of similar or even identical signals from other sources. In this paper, we highlight statistical and signal processing challenges associated with identifying good biosignatures for pathogens in host and other environments. In some cases it may be possible to identify useful signatures of pathogens through indirect but amplified signals from the host. Discovery of these signatures requires new approaches to modeling and data interpretation. For environmental biosignal collections, it is possible to use signal processing techniques from other applications (e.g., synthetic aperture radar) to track the natural progression of microbes over large areas. We also present a computer-assisted approach to identify unique nucleic-acid based microbial signatures. Finally, an understanding of host-pathogen interactions will result in better detectors as well as opportunities in vaccines and therapeutics.

  18. Pathogen pollution and the emergence of a deadly amphibian pathogen.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Peterson, Anna C

    2012-11-01

    Imagine a single pathogen that is responsible for mass mortality of over a third of an entire vertebrate class. For example, if a single pathogen were causing the death, decline and extinction of 30% of mammal species (including humans), the entire world would be paying attention. This is what has been happening to the world's amphibians - the frogs, toads and salamanders that are affected by the chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (referred to as Bd), which are consequently declining at an alarming rate. It has aptly been described as the worst pathogen in history in terms of its effects on biodiversity (Kilpatrick et al. 2010). The pathogen was only formally described about 13 years ago (Longcore et al. 1999), and scientists are still in the process of determining where it came from and investigating the question: why now? Healthy debate has ensued as to whether Bd is a globally endemic organism that only recently started causing high mortality due to shifting host responses and/or environmental change (e.g. Pounds et al. 2006) or whether a virulent strain of the pathogen has rapidly disseminated around the world in recent decades, affecting new regions with a vengeance (e.g. Morehouse et al. 2003; Weldon et al. 2004; Lips et al. 2008). We are finally beginning to shed more light on this question, due to significant discoveries that have emerged as a result of intensive DNA-sequencing methods comparing Bd isolates from different amphibian species across the globe. Evidence is mounting that there is indeed a global panzootic lineage of Bd (BdGPL) in addition to what appear to be more localized endemic strains (Fisher et al. 2009; James et al. 2009; Farrer et al. 2011). Additionally, BdGPL appears to be a hypervirulent strain that has resulted from the hybridization of different Bd strains that came into contact in recent decades, and is now potentially replacing the less-virulent endemic strains of the pathogen (Farrer et al. 2011

  19. Diarrheagenic Pathogens in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Brianna; Ramamurthy, T.; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Rajendran, Krishnan; Nair, G. Balakrish

    2011-01-01

    During systematic active surveillance of the causes of diarrhea in patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases and Beliaghata General Hospital in Kolkata, India, we looked for 26 known gastrointestinal pathogens in fecal samples from 2,748 patients. Samples from about one-third (29%) of the patients contained multiple pathogens. Polymicrobial infections frequently contained Vibrio cholerae O1 and rotavirus. When these agents were present, some co-infecting agents were found significantly less often (p = 10–5 to 10–33), some were detected significantly more often (p = 10–5 to 10–26), and others were detected equally as often as when V. cholerae O1 or rotavirus was absent. When data were stratified by patient age and season, many nonrandom associations remained statistically significant. The causes and effects of these nonrandom associations remain unknown. PMID:21470448

  20. Lagenidium giganteum Pathogenicity in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Raquel; Taylor, John W.; Walker, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of mammals by species in the phylum Oomycota taxonomically and molecularly similar to known Lagenidium giganteum strains have increased. During 2013–2014, we conducted a phylogenetic study of 21 mammalian Lagenidium isolates; we found that 11 cannot be differentiated from L. giganteum strains that the US Environmental Protection Agency approved for biological control of mosquitoes; these strains were later unregistered and are no longer available. L. giganteum strains pathogenic to mammals formed a strongly supported clade with the biological control isolates, and both types experimentally infected mosquito larvae. However, the strains from mammals grew well at 25°C and 37°C, whereas the biological control strains developed normally at 25°C but poorly at higher temperatures. The emergence of heat-tolerant strains of L. giganteum pathogenic to lower animals and humans is of environmental and public health concern. PMID:25625190

  1. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  2. Toll receptors and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo

    2003-03-01

    Toll receptors in insects, mammals and plants are key players that sense the invasion of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mammals have been established to detect specific components of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that TLRs are involved in the recognition of viral invasion. Signalling pathways via TLRs originate from the conserved Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The TIR domain-containing MyD88 acts as a common adaptor that induces inflammatory cytokines; however, there exists a MyD88-independent pathway that induces type I IFNs in TLR4 and TLR3 signalling. Another TIR domain-containing adaptor, TIRAP/Mal has recently been shown to mediate the MyD88-dependent activation in the TLR4 and TLR2 signalling pathway. Thus, individual TLRs may have their own signalling systems that characterize their specific activities. PMID:12614458

  3. [Arcobacter - an underestimated zoonotic pathogen?].

    PubMed

    Hänel, Ingrid; Tomaso, Herbert; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2016-06-01

    The relevance for public health of the agent Arcobacter is mostly unclear despite of an increasing number of studies. Recent evidence shows that especially Arcobacter (A.) butzleri but also A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii may be involved in human enteric diseases. However, little is currently known about pathogenicity or potential virulence factors. Livestock animals, particularly poultry and pigs, might be a significant reservoir of Arcobacter spp. Furthermore, Arcobacter spp. could be isolated from retail raw meat products of these animals as well as from drinking water. There are currently no standardized isolation and detection methods to collect comparable data. Further studies and efforts of both human and veterinary medicine are needed to elucidate prevalence, epidemiology, the pathogenic role and potential virulence factors of Arcobacter spp. These data are the necessary basis for further risk assessment. PMID:27177896

  4. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol". PMID:27570260

  5. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  6. Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens. PMID:21314902

  7. Mapping population and pathogen movements

    PubMed Central

    Tatem, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    For most of human history, populations have been relatively isolated from each other, and only recently has there been extensive contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both old and new worlds. The reach, volume and speed of modern travel are unprecedented, with human mobility increasing in high income countries by over 1000-fold since 1800. This growth is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases, and from completely new diseases, while ever more cases of the movement of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are being seen. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Equally however, we now have access to the most detailed and comprehensive datasets on human mobility and pathogen distributions ever assembled, in order to combat these threats. This short review paper provides an overview of these datasets, with a particular focus on low income regions, and covers briefly approaches used to combine them to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of population and pathogen movements. PMID:24480992

  8. Pathogenic properties of Edwardsiella species.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M; Abbott, S L; Kroske-Bystrom, S; Cheung, W K; Powers, C; Kokka, R P; Tamura, K

    1991-01-01

    The pathogenic characteristics of 35 Edwardsiella strains from clinical and environmental sources were investigated. Overall, most Edwardsiella tarda strains were invasive in HEp-2 cell monolayers, produced a cell-associated hemolysin and siderophores, and bound Congo red; many strains also expressed mannose-resistant hemagglutination against guinea pig erythrocytes. Edwardsiella hoshinae strains bound Congo red and were variable in their invasive and hemolytic capabilities while Edwardsiella ictaluri strains did not produce either factor; neither E. hoshinae nor E. ictaluri expressed mannose-resistant hemagglutination nor elaborated siderophores under the tested conditions. Selected strains of each species tested for mouse lethality indicated strain variability in pathogenic potential, with E. tarda strains being the most virulent; 50% lethal doses in individual strains did not correlate with plasmid content, chemotactic motility, serum resistance, or expression of selected enzyme activities. The results suggest some potential important differences in pathogenic properties that may help explain their environmental distribution and ability to cause disease in humans. Images PMID:1774326

  9. Mapping population and pathogen movements.

    PubMed

    Tatem, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    For most of human history, populations have been relatively isolated from each other, and only recently has there been extensive contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both old and new worlds. The reach, volume and speed of modern travel are unprecedented, with human mobility increasing in high income countries by over 1000-fold since 1800. This growth is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases, and from completely new diseases, while ever more cases of the movement of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are being seen. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Equally however, we now have access to the most detailed and comprehensive datasets on human mobility and pathogen distributions ever assembled, in order to combat these threats. This short review paper provides an overview of these datasets, with a particular focus on low income regions, and covers briefly approaches used to combine them to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of population and pathogen movements. PMID:24480992

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  11. Foodborne pathogen detection using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens can cause various diseases and even death when humans consume foods contaminated with microbial pathogens. Traditional culture-based direct plating methods are still the “gold standard” for presumptive-positive pathogen screening. Although considerable research has been devoted t...

  12. Response of soybean pathogens to glyceollin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to recognize pathogens and respond biochemically to prevent or inhibit pathogen invasion and colonization in plant cells is an active disease resistance response in plants. The involvement of soybean phytoalexin glyceollin in defense responses to the soybean pathogens Diaporthe phaseolor...

  13. Pathogen evolution under host avoidance plasticity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David V; Day, Troy

    2015-09-01

    Host resistance consists of defences that limit pathogen burden, and can be classified as either adaptations targeting recovery from infection or those focused upon infection avoidance. Conventional theory treats avoidance as a fixed strategy which does not vary from one interaction to the next. However, there is increasing empirical evidence that many avoidance strategies are triggered by external stimuli, and thus should be treated as phenotypically plastic responses. Here, we consider the implications of avoidance plasticity for host-pathogen coevolution. We uncover a number of predictions challenging current theory. First, in the absence of pathogen trade-offs, plasticity can restrain pathogen evolution; moreover, the pathogen exploits conditions in which the host would otherwise invest less in resistance, causing resistance escalation. Second, when transmission trades off with pathogen-induced mortality, plasticity encourages avirulence, resulting in a superior fitness outcome for both host and pathogen. Third, plasticity ensures the sterilizing effect of pathogens has consequences for pathogen evolution. When pathogens castrate hosts, selection forces them to minimize mortality virulence; moreover, when transmission trades off with sterility alone, resistance plasticity is sufficient to prevent pathogens from evolving to fully castrate. PMID:26336170

  14. Contamination of water resources by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Water-borne pathogen contamination in water resources and related diseases are a major water quality concern throughout the world. Increasing interest in controlling water-borne pathogens in water resources evidenced by a large number of recent publications clearly attests to the need for studies that synthesize knowledge from multiple fields covering comparative aspects of pathogen contamination, and unify them in a single place in order to present and address the problem as a whole. Providing a broader perceptive of pathogen contamination in freshwater (rivers, lakes, reservoirs, groundwater) and saline water (estuaries and coastal waters) resources, this review paper attempts to develop the first comprehensive single source of existing information on pathogen contamination in multiple types of water resources. In addition, a comprehensive discussion describes the challenges associated with using indicator organisms. Potential impacts of water resources development on pathogen contamination as well as challenges that lie ahead for addressing pathogen contamination are also discussed. PMID:25006540

  15. Hyphal chemotropism in fungal pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Turrà, David; Nordzieke, Daniela; Vitale, Stefania; El Ghalid, Mennat; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    The ability to grow as filamentous hyphae defines the lifestyle of fungi. Hyphae are exposed to a variety of chemical stimuli such as nutrients or signal molecules from mating partners and host organisms. How fungi sense and process this chemical information to steer hyphal growth is poorly understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa have served as genetic models for the identification of cellular components functioning in chemotropism. A recent study in the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum revealed distinct MAPK pathways governing hyphal growth towards nutrient sources and sex pheromones or plant signals, suggesting an unanticipated complexity of chemosensing during fungus-host interactions. PMID:27150623

  16. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  17. How old are bacterial pathogens?

    PubMed

    Achtman, Mark

    2016-08-17

    Only few molecular studies have addressed the age of bacterial pathogens that infected humans before the beginnings of medical bacteriology, but these have provided dramatic insights. The global genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori, which infects human stomachs, parallels that of its human host. The time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of these bacteria approximates that of anatomically modern humans, i.e. at least 100 000 years, after calibrating the evolutionary divergence within H. pylori against major ancient human migrations. Similarly, genomic reconstructions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis, from ancient skeletons in South America and mummies in Hungary support estimates of less than 6000 years for the tMRCA of M. tuberculosis Finally, modern global patterns of genetic diversity and ancient DNA studies indicate that during the last 5000 years plague caused by Yersinia pestis has spread globally on multiple occasions from China and Central Asia. Such tMRCA estimates provide only lower bounds on the ages of bacterial pathogens, and additional studies are needed for realistic upper bounds on how long humans and animals have suffered from bacterial diseases. PMID:27534956

  18. Lantibiotic production by pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Karen M; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2012-09-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesised, post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides produced by Gram positive bacteria, many which have broad-ranging antimicrobial activities. Lantibiotics have long been the subject of investigation with a view to their application as food preservatives or chemotherapeutic agents for clinical and veterinary medicine, while the associated biosynthetic machinery has been employed for peptide engineering purposes. However, although many lantibiotics are produced by generally regarded as safe or food-grade bacteria, it is increasingly apparent that a number of Gram positive pathogens, including strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus uberis and Enterococcus faecalis, also produce these compounds. It is proposed that production of these antimicrobials may provide the associated microorganisms with a competitive advantage when colonizing/infecting a host, thereby enhancing the virulence of the producing strain. Here we review the production of lantibiotics by these pathogens and discuss how their production may contribute to their disease-causing potential. PMID:22708496

  19. How old are bacterial pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Only few molecular studies have addressed the age of bacterial pathogens that infected humans before the beginnings of medical bacteriology, but these have provided dramatic insights. The global genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori, which infects human stomachs, parallels that of its human host. The time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of these bacteria approximates that of anatomically modern humans, i.e. at least 100 000 years, after calibrating the evolutionary divergence within H. pylori against major ancient human migrations. Similarly, genomic reconstructions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis, from ancient skeletons in South America and mummies in Hungary support estimates of less than 6000 years for the tMRCA of M. tuberculosis. Finally, modern global patterns of genetic diversity and ancient DNA studies indicate that during the last 5000 years plague caused by Yersinia pestis has spread globally on multiple occasions from China and Central Asia. Such tMRCA estimates provide only lower bounds on the ages of bacterial pathogens, and additional studies are needed for realistic upper bounds on how long humans and animals have suffered from bacterial diseases. PMID:27534956

  20. [Major pathogenic links of atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Antelava, N A; Pachkoriia, K Z; Kezeli, T D; Nikuradze, N S; Shamkulashvili, G G

    2005-11-01

    The experimental and clinical data concerning pathogenesis of the atherosclerosis are summarized and analyzed in this article. Major concepts that explain initiation and progressive growth of atherosclerosis such as lipid infiltrations, response to disturbing factors, "response on the keeping of particles" and inflammatory processes are discussed. These concepts are considered as base for integral theory of atherosclerosis according which the inflammatory process in atherosclerosis are the result of the universal response reaction of endothelium to the various disturbing risk factors. Chronic inflammation leads to complex cellular and molecular interactions among cells derived from the endothelium, smooth muscle and several blood cell components and causes oxidative stress, proliferation of smooth muscle cells, oxidative modification of LDL, uptake and macrophage foam cell formation, endothelium dysfunction. Major pathogenic links of atherosclerosis, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, oxidative modification of LDL, lipid infiltration, endothelial dysfunction closely interact, forming close vicious circles which leads to metabolic and morphological disturbances, re-modulation of blood vessels, cardiovascular diseases and such complication as cardiac infarction and stroke. Pathogenic peculiarities of atherosclerosis are the theoretic base to the elaboration of therapeutic strategy. Endothelium may be discussed as a new therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. So far as the leukotrienes play an important role in inflammatory processes, it is suggested that the leukotrienes may be as a potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:16369071

  1. Enteric pathogens through life stages

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Glynis; Wu, Martin; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Enteric infections and diarrheal diseases constitute pervasive health burdens throughout the world, with rates being highest at the two ends of life. During the first 2–3 years of life, much of the disease burden may be attributed to infection with enteric pathogens including Salmonella, rotavirus, and many other bacterial, viral, and protozoan organisms; however, infections due to Clostridium difficile exhibit steady increases with age. Still others, like Campylobacter infections in industrialized settings are high in early life (<2 years old) and increase again in early adulthood (called the “second weaning” by some). The reasons for these differences undoubtedly reside in part in pathogen differences; however, host factors including the commensal intestinal microbial communities, immune responses (innate and acquired), and age-dependant shifts likely play important roles. Interplay of these factors is illustrated by studies examining changes in human gut microbiota with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Recent gut microbial surveys have indicated dramatic shifts in gut microbial population structure from infants to young adults to the elders. An understanding of the evolution of these factors and their interactions (e.g., how does gut microbiota modulate the “inflamm-aging” process or vice versa) through the human life “cycle” will be important in better addressing and controlling these enteric infections and their consequences for both quality and quantity of life (often assessed as disability adjusted life-years or “DALYs”). PMID:22937528

  2. Plants versus pathogens: an evolutionary arms race

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Gleason, Cynthia A.; Foley, Rhonda C.; Thrall, Peter H.; Burdon, Jeremy B.; Singh, Karam B.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of plant–pathogen interactions is a rapidly moving research field and one that is very important for productive agricultural systems. The focus of this review is on the evolution of plant defence responses and the coevolution of their pathogens, primarily from a molecular-genetic perspective. It explores the evolution of the major types of plant defence responses including pathogen associated molecular patterns and effector triggered immunity as well as the forces driving pathogen evolution, such as the mechanisms by which pathogen lineages and species evolve. Advances in our understanding of plant defence signalling, stomatal regulation, R gene–effector interactions and host specific toxins are used to highlight recent insights into the coevolutionary arms race between pathogens and plants. Finally, the review considers the intriguing question of how plants have evolved the ability to distinguish friends such as rhizobia and mycorrhiza from their many foes. PMID:21743794

  3. Hard tick factors implicated in pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang Ye; Bonnet, Sarah I

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are the most common arthropod vector, after mosquitoes, and are capable of transmitting the greatest variety of pathogens. For both humans and animals, the worldwide emergence or re-emergence of tick-borne disease is becoming increasingly problematic. Despite being such an important issue, our knowledge of pathogen transmission by ticks is incomplete. Several recent studies, reviewed here, have reported that the expression of some tick factors can be modulated in response to pathogen infection, and that some of these factors can impact on the pathogenic life cycle. Delineating the specific tick factors required for tick-borne pathogen transmission should lead to new strategies in the disruption of pathogen life cycles to combat emerging tick-borne disease. PMID:24498444

  4. Space: A Final Frontier for Vacuolar Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Smith, Judith A; Ficht, Thomas A; Samuel, James E; de Figueiredo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    There is a fundamental gap in our understanding of how a eukaryotic cell apportions the limited space within its cell membrane. Upon infection, a cell competes with intracellular pathogens for control of this same precious resource. The struggle between pathogen and host provides us with an opportunity to uncover the mechanisms regulating subcellular space by understanding how pathogens modulate vesicular traffic and membrane fusion events to create a specialized compartment for replication. By comparing several important intracellular pathogens, we review the molecular mechanisms and trafficking pathways that drive two space allocation strategies, the formation of tight and spacious pathogen-containing vacuoles. Additionally, we discuss the potential advantages of each pathogenic lifestyle, the broader implications these lifestyles might have for cellular biology and outline exciting opportunities for future investigation. PMID:26842840

  5. Association between Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Oral Microbiota and Systemic Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis. PMID:25232962

  6. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis. PMID:25232962

  7. Bacterial Community Shift in Treated Periodontitis Patients Revealed by Ion Torrent 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jünemann, Sebastian; Prior, Karola; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Harks, Inga; Ehmke, Benjamin; Goesmann, Alexander; Stoye, Jens; Harmsen, Dag

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis, one of the most common diseases in the world, is caused by a mixture of pathogenic bacteria and inflammatory host responses and often treated by antimicrobials as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP). Our study aims to elucidate explorative and descriptive temporal shifts in bacterial communities between patients treated by SRP alone versus SRP plus antibiotics. This is the first metagenomic study using an Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Eight subgingival plaque samples from four patients with chronic periodontitis, taken before and two months after intervention were analyzed. Amplicons from the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene were generated and sequenced each on a 314 chip. Sequencing reads were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 3% distance), described by community metrics, and taxonomically classified. Reads ranging from 599,933 to 650,416 per sample were clustered into 1,648 to 2,659 non-singleton OTUs, respectively. Increased diversity (Shannon and Simpson) in all samples after therapy was observed regardless of the treatment type whereas richness (ACE) showed no correlation. Taxonomic analysis revealed different microbial shifts between both therapy approaches at all taxonomic levels. Most remarkably, the genera Porphyromonas, Tannerella, Treponema, and Filifactor all harboring periodontal pathogenic species were removed almost only in the group treated with SPR and antibiotics. For the species T. forsythia and P. gingivalis results were corroborated by real-time PCR analysis. In the future, hypothesis free metagenomic analysis could be the key in understanding polymicrobial diseases and be used for therapy monitoring. Therefore, as read length continues to increase and cost to decrease, rapid benchtop sequencers like the PGM might finally be used in routine diagnostic. PMID:22870235

  8. First airborne pathogen direct analysis system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Yuxiao; Jing, Wenwen; Liu, Sixiu; Zhang, Dawei; Sui, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    We report a portable "sample to answer" system for the rapid detection of airborne pathogens for the first time. The system contains a key microfluidic chip which fulfills both pathogen enrichment and biological identification functions. The system realizes simple operation and less human intervention as well as minimum reagent contamination. The operation is user-friendly and suitable for field and point-of-care applications. The system is capable of handling detection of different pathogens by changing the primers. PMID:26854120

  9. PAK in pathogen-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Doerig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral pathogens are known to interfere with signaling pathways of their host to promote their own survival and proliferation. Here, we present selected examples of modulation of PAK activity in human cells by both intracellular and extracellular pathogens, focusing on one eukaryotic pathogen, the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, two Gram-negative bacteria (Helicobacter pylori and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and two viruses belonging to distinct groups, the lentivirus HIV and the orthomyxovirus Influenza virus A. PMID:23125952

  10. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen-host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus-animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. PMID:27071652

  11. Pathogen Inhibition by Multivalent Ligand Architectures.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sumati; Camacho, Luis Cuellar; Haag, Rainer

    2016-07-20

    Interfacial multivalent interactions at pathogen-cell interfaces can be competitively inhibited by multivalent scaffolds that prevent pathogen adhesion to the cells during the initial stages of infection. The lack of understanding of complex biological systems makes the design of an efficient multivalent inhibitor a toilsome task. Therefore, we have highlighted the main issues and concerns associated with blocking pathogen at interfaces, which are dependent on the nature and properties of both multivalent inhibitors and pathogens, such as viruses and bacteria. The challenges associated with different cores or carrier scaffolds of multivalent inhibitors are concisely discussed with selected examples. PMID:27341003

  12. Chronic Bacterial Pathogens: Mechanisms of Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Byndloss, Mariana X.; Tsolis, Renee M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many bacterial pathogens can cause acute infections that are cleared with onset of adaptive immunity, however a subset of these pathogens can establish persistent, and sometimes lifelong infections. While bacteria causing chronic infections are phylogenetically diverse, they share common features in their interactions with the host that enable a protracted period of colonization. This chapter will compare the persistence strategies of two chronic pathogens from the Proteobacteria, Brucella abortus, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) to consider how these two pathogens, which are very different at the genomic level, can utilize common strategies to evade immune clearance to cause chronic intracellular infections of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:27227304

  13. Dietary Cholesterol Modulates Pathogen Blocking by Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Caragata, Eric P.; Rancès, Edwige; Hedges, Lauren M.; Gofton, Alexander W.; Johnson, Karyn N.; O'Neill, Scott L.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This “pathogen blocking” could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV), a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2–5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking. PMID:23825950

  14. Innate Defense against Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Rebecca A.; Gaffen, Sarah L.; Hise, Amy G.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2014-01-01

    Human fungal infections have been on the rise in recent years and proved increasingly difficult to treat as a result of the lack of diagnostics, effective antifungal therapies, and vaccines. Most pathogenic fungi do not cause disease unless there is a disturbance in immune homeostasis, which can be caused by modem medical interventions, disease induced immunosuppression, and naturally occurring human mutations. The innate im mune system is weII equipped to recognize and destroy pathogeni cf ungi through speciaIized cells expressing a broad range of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review will outline the cells and PRRs required for effective antifungal immunity, with a special focus on the major antifungal cytokine IL-17 and recently characterized antifungal inflammasomes. PMID:25384766

  15. The Candida Pathogenic Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Siobhán A.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Candida species are the most common causes of fungal infection. Approximately 90% of infections are caused by five species: Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida krusei. Three (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis) belong to the CTG clade, in which the CTG codon is translated as serine and not leucine. C. albicans remains the most commonly isolated but is decreasing relative to the other species. The increasing incidence of C. glabrata is related to its reduced susceptibility to azole drugs. Genome analysis suggests that virulence in the CTG clade is associated with expansion of gene families, particularly of cell wall genes. Similar independent processes took place in the C. glabrata species group. Gene loss and expansion in an ancestor of C. glabrata may have resulted in preadaptations that enabled pathogenicity. PMID:25183855

  16. A streptomycete pathogenic to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.

    1949-01-01

    A streptomycete and pseutdomonad were isolated from blueback salmon, Oncorhynchuis nerka (WValbaum), and shown to be pathogenic to fish. Trhese organisms were isolated from young blueback salmon taken from a gr'oup that developed an increasing mortality after feeding about a month at the United States Fishery Station, Leavenworth, Washington. A superficial examination revealed only the presence of fungus (probably Sap0olcynia parasitica), which wvas on the gills and was eliminated by treatment with a quaternary ammonium salt. Although the fungus infection was eliminated, the mortality continued. It was observed by the station biologist at the time that the majority of the fish in the hatchery troughs were healthy, but that there w-as alwzays present an apathetic group that hud(dled on the bottom, refused food, ancl eventually weakene(l and died. The bulk of the daily mortality was composedI of fish from this group. The apathetic group received constant recruitment from the more vigorous stock, and their number showed a gradual increase rather than clepletion. A more critical examination of the larger affected fish revealedl that thc kICidneys and spleens weIe disintegrating; mycelial masses w-ere sporadically observed in the body cavity; congestion wN-as present in the gastrointestinal tract; some hemorrhagic areas were present in the body musculature; an(l a few fish had a perforating ulceration of the body wall. Furi'unculosis was immediately suspected, and attempts were made to isolate from the diseaseti fish Bacteriim .salininicida Lehmann and Netumann, the etiological agent of furunculosis. B. salmornicida Awas not recovered, however, even after repeated attempts at isolation. Subsequently it was discovered that two other organisms, a streptomycete and a pseudomonad, were characteristically present in the diseased fish. Both organisms were found experimentally to be pathogenic to fish.

  17. Pathogenic roles for fungal melanins.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, E S

    2000-10-01

    Melanins represent virulence factors for several pathogenic fungi; the number of examples is growing. Thus, albino mutants of several genera (in one case, mutated precisely in the melanizing enzyme) exhibit decreased virulence in mice. We consider the phenomenon in relation to known chemical properties of melanin, beginning with biosynthesis from ortho-hydroquinone precursors which, when oxidized enzymatically to quinones, polymerize spontaneously to melanin. It follows that melanizing intermediates are cross-linking reagents; melanization stabilizes the external cell wall against hydrolysis and is thought to determine semipermeability in the osmotic ram (the appressorium) of certain plant pathogens. Polymeric melanins undergo reversible oxidation-reduction reactions between cell wall-penetrating quinone and hydroquinone oxidation states and thus represent polymeric redox buffers; using strong oxidants, it is possible to titrate the melanin on living cells and thereby demonstrate protection conferred by melanin in several species. The amount of buffering per cell approximately neutralizes the amount of oxidant generated by a single macrophage. Moreover, the intermediate oxidation state, the semiquinone, is a very stable free radical and is thought to trap unpaired electrons. We have suggested that the oxidation state of external melanin may be regulated by external Fe(II). An independent hypothesis holds that in Cryptococcus neoformans, an important function of the melanizing enzyme (apart from melanization) is the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), thereby forestalling generation of the harmful hydroxyl radical from H(2)O(2). Thus, problems in fungal pathogenesis have led to evolving hypotheses regarding melanin functioning. PMID:11023965

  18. Pathogenic Roles for Fungal Melanins

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Eric S.

    2000-01-01

    Melanins represent virulence factors for several pathogenic fungi; the number of examples is growing. Thus, albino mutants of several genera (in one case, mutated precisely in the melanizing enzyme) exhibit decreased virulence in mice. We consider the phenomenon in relation to known chemical properties of melanin, beginning with biosynthesis from ortho-hydroquinone precursors which, when oxidized enzymatically to quinones, polymerize spontaneously to melanin. It follows that melanizing intermediates are cross-linking reagents; melanization stabilizes the external cell wall against hydrolysis and is thought to determine semipermeability in the osmotic ram (the appressorium) of certain plant pathogens. Polymeric melanins undergo reversible oxidation-reduction reactions between cell wall-penetrating quinone and hydroquinone oxidation states and thus represent polymeric redox buffers; using strong oxidants, it is possible to titrate the melanin on living cells and thereby demonstrate protection conferred by melanin in several species. The amount of buffering per cell approximately neutralizes the amount of oxidant generated by a single macrophage. Moreover, the intermediate oxidation state, the semiquinone, is a very stable free radical and is thought to trap unpaired electrons. We have suggested that the oxidation state of external melanin may be regulated by external Fe(II). An independent hypothesis holds that in Cryptococcus neoformans, an important function of the melanizing enzyme (apart from melanization) is the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), thereby forestalling generation of the harmful hydroxyl radical from H2O2. Thus, problems in fungal pathogenesis have led to evolving hypotheses regarding melanin functioning. PMID:11023965

  19. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-01-01

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen–host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus–animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. PMID:27071652

  20. Determinants of pathogenicity of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ducks have been implicated in the dissemination and evolution of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses. The pathogenicity of H5N1 HPAI viruses in domestic ducks has increased over time with some viruses producing 100% mortality in very short time. The determinants of pathogenic...

  1. Application of complementation tests in identifying pathogenicity determinants of the chickpea pathogen Ascochyta rabiei

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrotrophic pathogen Ascochyta rabiei causes chickpea Ascochyta blight. Very little is known about its pathogenicity mechanisms. The objective of this research was to identify pathogenicity determinants of A. rabiei using complementation tests. The hygromycin-resistant mutant ArW519 was non-pa...

  2. TREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL SLUDGE FOR PATHOGEN REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in municipal sewage sludge and the commonly employed Class A and B processes for controlling pathogens. It notes how extensively they are used and discusses issues and concerns with their application. The...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1915.1030 Section 1915.1030 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...

  8. Characterization of Potential Surrogates for Produce Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Escherichia coli (E. coli) is commonly used as a surrogate for pathogens in research to identify sources of agricultural contamination and to characterize how pathogens persist on plant surfaces. However, E. coli strains are highly diverse, exhibiting differences in physical, chemical and...

  9. Targeting of the hydrophobic metabolome by pathogens.

    PubMed

    Helms, J Bernd; Kaloyanova, Dora V; Strating, Jeroen R P; van Hellemond, Jaap J; van der Schaar, Hilde M; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Brouwers, Jos F

    2015-05-01

    The hydrophobic molecules of the metabolome - also named the lipidome - constitute a major part of the entire metabolome. Novel technologies show the existence of a staggering number of individual lipid species, the biological functions of which are, with the exception of only a few lipid species, unknown. Much can be learned from pathogens that have evolved to take advantage of the complexity of the lipidome to escape the immune system of the host organism and to allow their survival and replication. Different types of pathogens target different lipids as shown in interaction maps, allowing visualization of differences between different types of pathogens. Bacterial and viral pathogens target predominantly structural and signaling lipids to alter the cellular phenotype of the host cell. Fungal and parasitic pathogens have complex lipidomes themselves and target predominantly the release of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the host cell lipidome, resulting in the generation of eicosanoids by either the host cell or the pathogen. Thus, whereas viruses and bacteria induce predominantly alterations in lipid metabolites at the host cell level, eukaryotic pathogens focus on interference with lipid metabolites affecting systemic inflammatory reactions that are part of the immune system. A better understanding of the interplay between host-pathogen interactions will not only help elucidate the fundamental role of lipid species in cellular physiology, but will also aid in the generation of novel therapeutic drugs. PMID:25754025

  10. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype...

  11. Hunting for insect pathogens: A genomics approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging methods within the field of genomics have increased the number of insect pathogens being discovered and characterized each year. These pathogens provide a rich resource for biological control agents, gene expression systems, and other molecular tools. Using Metagenomics, and gene expression...

  12. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  13. WORKSHOP ON EMERGING PATHOGENS IN RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is considerable concern among regulatory authorities, the agricultural community and the public as a whole about the scientific community's ability to measure the level(s) of known pathogens in residuals. There is also concern for whether we are aware of all the pathogens t...

  14. Pathogen threat assessment is predictive plant pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Society of Plant Pathologists has maintained a formal effort to prioritize threatening and emerging crop pathogens for over 70 years, and the APS Emerging Pathogens and Diseases Committee is continuing the process. In order to accomplish prioritization in a rigorous fashion, criteria mu...

  15. Arthropods vector grapevine trunk disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Moyo, P; Allsopp, E; Roets, F; Mostert, L; Halleen, F

    2014-10-01

    Arthropod-mediated dispersal of pathogens is known in many cropping systems but has never been demonstrated for grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Arthropods from vineyards were screened for the presence of pathogens associated with Petri disease and esca using cultural and molecular techniques. The ability of the most abundant pathogen-carrying species to inoculate healthy grapevine vascular tissues was also determined. Millipedes and ants were allowed to associate with a DsRed- Express-transformed Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, after which they were exposed to freshly pruned healthy grapevines under controlled conditions and wounds were monitored for subsequent infection. In addition, the possibility of millipede excreta, commonly found on pruning wounds in the field, to act as inoculum source was determined. A diverse arthropod fauna was associated with declining grapevines and many of these carried trunk disease pathogens. However, spiders, the ant Crematogaster peringueyi, and the millipede Ommattoiulus moreleti were the most abundant pathogen carriers. The ant and millipede species fed on pruning wound sap and effectively transmitted trunk disease pathogens. Millipede excreta contained viable spores of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and may serve as an inoculum source. Numerous arthropods, including beneficial predators, are potential vectors of grapevine trunk disease pathogens. Our results highlight the need for an integrated approach, including targeted management of ants and millipedes at the time of pruning, to limit the spread of grapevine trunk diseases. PMID:24624953

  16. 29 CFR 1910.1030 - Bloodborne pathogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bloodborne pathogens. 1910.1030 Section 1910.1030 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1030 Bloodborne pathogens. (a) Scope...

  17. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  18. Insect pathogens: molecular approaches and techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book serves as a primer for molecular techniques in insect pathology and is tailored for a wide scientific audience. Contributing authors are internationally recognized experts. The book comprises four sections: 1) pathogen identification and diagnostics, 2) pathogen population genetics and p...

  19. Host Range and Emerging and Reemerging Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gowtage-Sequeria, Sonya

    2005-01-01

    An updated literature survey identified 1,407 recognized species of human pathogen, 58% of which are zoonotic. Of the total, 177 are regarded as emerging or reemerging. Zoonotic pathogens are twice as likely to be in this category as are nonzoonotic pathogens. Emerging and reemerging pathogens are not strongly associated with particular types of nonhuman hosts, but they are most likely to have the broadest host ranges. Emerging and reemerging zoonoses are associated with a wide range of drivers, but changes in land use and agriculture and demographic and societal changes are most commonly cited. However, although zoonotic pathogens do represent the most likely source of emerging and reemerging infectious disease, only a small minority have proved capable of causing major epidemics in the human population. PMID:16485468

  20. Phytophthora parasitica: a model oomycete plant pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yuling; Zhang, Qiang; Ding, Wei; Shan, Weixing

    2014-01-01

    Oomycetes are eukaryotic microorganisms morphologically similar to but phylogenetically distant from true fungi. Most species in the genus Phytophthora of oomycetes are devastating plant pathogens, causing damages to both agricultural production and natural ecosystems. Tremendous progress has been achieved in recent years in diversity, evolution and lifestyles of oomycete plant pathogens, as well as on the understanding of genetic and molecular basis of oomycete-plant interactions. Phytophthora parasitica is a soilborne pathogen with a wide range of host plants and represents most species in the genus Phytophthora. In this review, we present some recent progress of P. parasitica research by highlighting important features that make it emerge as a model species of oomycete pathogens. The emerged model pathogen will facilitate improved understanding of oomycete biology and pathology that are crucial to the development of novel disease-control strategies and improved disease-control measures. PMID:24999436

  1. Microbial pathogen quality criteria of rendered products.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pramod K; Biswas, Sagor; Kass, Philip

    2016-06-01

    The North American rendering industry processes approximately 24 million metric tons (Mt) of raw materials and produces more than 8 million Mt of rendered products. More than 85 % of rendered products produced annually in the USA are used for producing animal feed. Pathogen contamination in rendered products is an important and topical issue. Although elevated temperatures (115-140 °C) for 40-90 min during the standard rendering processes are mathematically sufficient to completely destroy commonly found pathogens, the presence of pathogens in rendered products has nevertheless been reported. Increased concern over the risk of microbial contamination in rendered products may require additional safeguards for producing pathogen-free rendered products. This study provides an overview of rendered products, existing microbial pathogen quality criteria of rendered products (MPQCR), limitations, and the scope of improving the MPQCR. PMID:27121572

  2. Algae as Reservoirs for Coral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Michael J.; Bythell, John C.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2013-01-01

    Benthic algae are associated with coral death in the form of stress and disease. It's been proposed that they release exudates, which facilitate invasion of potentially pathogenic microbes at the coral-algal interface, resulting in coral disease. However, the original source of these pathogens remains unknown. This study examined the ability of benthic algae to act as reservoirs of coral pathogens by characterizing surface associated microbes associated with major Caribbean and Indo-Pacific algal species/types and by comparing them to potential pathogens of two dominant coral diseases: White Syndrome (WS) in the Indo-Pacific and Yellow Band Disease (YBD) in the Caribbean. Coral and algal sampling was conducted simultaneously at the same sites to avoid spatial effects. Potential pathogens were defined as those absent or rare in healthy corals, increasing in abundance in healthy tissues adjacent to a disease lesion, and dominant in disease lesions. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected in both WS and YBD and were also present within the majority of algal species/types (54 and 100% for WS and YBD respectively). Pathogenic ciliates were associated only with WS and not YBD lesions and these were also present in 36% of the Indo-Pacific algal species. Although potential pathogens were associated with many algal species, their presence was inconsistent among replicate algal samples and detection rates were relatively low, suggestive of low density and occurrence. At the community level, coral-associated microbes irrespective of the health of their host differed from algal-associated microbes, supporting that algae and corals have distinctive microbial communities associated with their tissue. We conclude that benthic algae are common reservoirs for a variety of different potential coral pathogens. However, algal-associated microbes alone are unlikely to cause coral death. Initial damage or stress to the coral via other competitive mechanisms is most likely a

  3. Host-Pathogen Interactions 1

    PubMed Central

    Cervone, Felice; Hahn, Michael G.; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of a plant-derived polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) on the activity of endopolygalacturonases isolated from fungi. PGIP's effect on endopolygalacturonases is to enhance the production of oligogalacturonides that are active as elicitors of phytoalexin (antibiotic) accumulation and other defense reactions in plants. Only oligogalacturonides with a degree of polymerization higher than nine are able to elicit phytoalexin synthesis in soybean cotyledons. In the absence of PGIP, a 1-minute exposure of polygalacturonic acid to endopolygalacturonase resulted in the production of elicitor-active oligogalacturonides. However, the enzyme depolymerized essentially all of the polygalacturonic acid substrate to elicitor-inactive oligogalacturonides within 15 minutes. When the digestion of polygalacturonic acid was carried out with the same amount of enzyme but in the presence of excess PGIP, the rate of production of elicitor-active oligogalacturonides was dramatically altered. The amount of elicitor-active oligogalacturonide steadily increased for 24 hours. It was only after about 48 hours that the enzyme converted the polygalacturonic acid into short, elicitor-inactive oligomers. PGIP is a specific, reversible, saturable, high-affinity receptor for endopolygalacturonase. Formation of the PGIP-endopolygalacturonase complex results in increased concentrations of oligogalacturonides that activate plant defense responses. The interaction of the plant-derived PGIP with fungal endopolygalacturonases may be a mechanism by which plants convert endopolygalacturonase, a factor important for the virulence of pathogens, into a factor that elicits plant defense mechanisms. PMID:16666805

  4. Pathogenic tracks in fatigue syndromes.

    PubMed

    Moutschen, M; Triffaux, J M; Demonty, J; Legros, J J; Lefèbvre, P J

    1994-01-01

    This review analyses the recent literature devoted to two related fatigue syndromes: chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and acute onset postviral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). The articles are grouped into five pathogenic tracks: infectious agents, immune system, skeletic muscle, hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and psychiatric factors. Although a particular infectious agent is unlikely to be responsible for all CFS cases, evidence is shown that host-parasite relationships are modified in a large proportion of patients with chronic fatigue. Antibody titres against infectious agents are often elevated and replication of several viruses could be increased. Chronic activation of the immune system is also observed and could be due to the reactivation of persistent or latent infectious agents such as herpes viruses (i.e. HHV-6) or enteroviruses. It could also be favorised by an impaired negative feedback of the HPA axis on the immune system. A model is proposed where the abnormalities of the HPA axis are primary events and are mainly responsible for a chronic activation of the immune system which in turn induces an increased replication of several viruses under the control of cellular transcription factors. These replicating viruses together with cytokines such as TNF-alpha would secondarily induce functional disorders of muscle and several aspects of asthenia itself. PMID:7871934

  5. Lipid signaling in pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Shea, John M; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of lipid signaling molecules in the development and pathogenicity of clinically important fungi. In Cryptococcus neoformans, sphingolipid-derived diacylglycerol has been shown to induce the transcription of the putative virulence factor App1, which inhibits the phagocytosis of fungal cells by alveolar macrophages, as well as to activate the protein kinase C Pkc1, which promotes cell-wall stability and increased melanin production. In Candida albicans, exposure to the oxylipin farnesol causes the regulation of specific genes involved in hyphal development, drug resistance and iron acquisition. Farnesol increases resistance to oxidative stress in C. albicans but, interestingly, induces apoptotic-like cell death in Aspergillus nidulans, suggesting that this molecule has multiple and opposing functions. Finally, fungal cells secrete eicosanoids, which are lipid molecules with putative signaling functions in fungi, and the recent characterization of the first fungal enzymes associated with the production of eicosanoids in A. nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus provides new insights into the understanding of the role of eicosanoid production in the biology of fungal pathogenesis. PMID:16798065

  6. Pathogenic Microorganisms and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunsaier; Li, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Accumulating reports have demonstrated that there is an association between pathogenic microorganisms and pancreatic cancer. Summary A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that microbiota are likely to influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the literature on studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer. Key Message Helicobacter pylori infection may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer; chronic hepatitis virus and oral microbiota may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Practical Implications Considering the worldwide burden of the disease, the association between microbiota and pancreatic cancer in this review may provide new ideas to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies in this direction are urgently needed. PMID:26673459

  7. Pathogenicity and virulence: another view.

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, H D

    1988-01-01

    The concepts of pathogenicity and virulence have governed our perception of microbial harmfulness since the time of Pasteur and Koch. These concepts resulted in the recognition and identification of numerous etiological agents and provided natural and synthetic agents effective in therapy and prevention of diseases. However, Koch's postulates--the premier product of this view--place the onus of harmfulness solely on the microbial world. Our recent experiences with polymicrobic and nosocomial infections, legionellosis, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome point to the host as the major determinant of disease. The principles of parasitism, enunciated by Theobold Smith, approximate more accurately the disturbances of the host-parasite equilibrium we designate as infection. Many complex attributes of microbial anatomy and physiology have been obscured by our dependency on the pure-culture technique. For example, bacterial attachment organelles and the production of exopolysaccharides enable microorganisms to interact with mammalian glycocalyces and specific receptors. In addition, selection, through the use of therapeutic agents, aids in the progression of environmental organisms to members of the intimate human biosphere, with the potential to complicate the recovery of patients. These factors emphasize further the pivotal significance of host reactions in infections. Parasitism, in its negative aspects, explains the emergence of "new" infections that involve harm to more than host organs and cells: we may encounter subtler infections that reveal parasitic and host cell nucleic acid interactions in a form of genomic parasitism. PMID:3060244

  8. New and emerging yeast pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

  9. Endemicity of chytridiomycosis features pathogen overdispersion.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Laura F; Phillott, Andrea D; Scheele, Benjamin C; Berger, Lee; Cashins, Scott D; Bell, Sara C; Puschendorf, Robert; Skerratt, Lee F

    2016-05-01

    Pathogens can be critical drivers of the abundance and distribution of wild animal populations. The presence of an overdispersed pathogen load distribution between hosts (where few hosts harbour heavy parasite burdens and light infections are common) can have an important stabilizing effect on host-pathogen dynamics where infection intensity determines pathogenicity. This may potentially lead to endemicity of an introduced pathogen rather than extirpation of the host and/or pathogen. Overdispersed pathogen load distributions have rarely been considered in wild animal populations as an important component of the infection dynamics of microparasites such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi. Here we examined the abundance, distribution and transmission of the model fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, cause of amphibian chytridiomycosis) between wild-caught Litoria rheocola (common mist frogs) to investigate the effects of an overdispersed pathogen load distribution on the host population in the wild. We quantified host survival, infection incidence and recovery probabilities relative to infectious burden, and compared the results of models where pathogen overdispersion either was or was not considered an important feature of host-pathogen dynamics. We found the distribution of Bd load between hosts to be highly overdispersed. We found that host survival was related to infection burden and that accounting for pathogen overdispersion allowed us to better understand infection dynamics and their implications for disease control. In addition, we found that the pattern of host infections and recoveries varied markedly with season whereby (i) infections established more in winter, consistent with temperature-dependent effects on fungal growth, and (ii) recoveries (loss of infection) occurred frequently in the field throughout the year but were less likely in winter. Our results suggest that pathogen overdispersion is an important feature of endemic

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fim-A genotype distribution among Colombians

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Adriana; Parra, Beatriz; Botero, Javier Enrique; Contreras, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with periodontitis and exhibit a wide array of virulence factors, including fimbriae which is encoded by the FimA gene representing six known genotypes. Objetive: To identify FimA genotypes of P. gingivalis in subjects from Cali-Colombia, including the co-infection with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. Methods: Subgingival samples were collected from 151 people exhibiting diverse periodontal condition. The occurrence of P. gingivalis, FimA genotypes and other bacteria was determined by PCR. Results: P. gingivalis was positive in 85 patients. Genotype FimA II was more prevalent without reach significant differences among study groups (54.3%), FimA IV was also prevalent in gingivitis (13.0%). A high correlation (p= 0.000) was found among P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia co-infection. The FimA II genotype correlated with concomitant detection of T. denticola and T. forsythia. Conclusions: Porphyromonas gingivalis was high even in the healthy group at the study population. A trend toward a greater frequency of FimA II genotype in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was determined. The FimA II genotype was also associated with increased pocket depth, greater loss of attachment level, and patients co-infected with T. denticola and T. forsythia. PMID:26600627