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1

Overexpression, Purification, Characterization, and Pathogenicity of Vibrio harveyi Hemolysin VHH  

PubMed Central

Vibrio harveyi VHH hemolysin is a putative pathogenicity factor in fish. In this study, the hemolysin gene vhhA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified VHH was characterized with regard to pH and temperature profiles, phospholipase activity, cytotoxicity, pathogenicity to flounder, and the signal peptide. PMID:16988279

Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Chen, Jixiang; Chi, Zhenghao; Sun, Boguang; Li, Yun; Austin, Brian

2006-01-01

2

Draft Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Vibrio harveyi Strain ZJ0603  

PubMed Central

Vibrio harveyi is an important pathogen that causes vibriosis in various aquatic organisms. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of V. harveyi strain ZJ0603, which was isolated from diseased Orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) in Guangdong, China. PMID:23144396

Huang, Yucong; Jian, Jichang; Lu, Yishan; Cai, Shuanghu; Wang, Bei; Tang, Jufen; Pang, Huanying; Ding, Yu

2012-01-01

3

Draft genome sequence of the fish pathogen Vibrio harveyi strain ZJ0603.  

PubMed

Vibrio harveyi is an important pathogen that causes vibriosis in various aquatic organisms. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of V. harveyi strain ZJ0603, which was isolated from diseased Orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) in Guangdong, China. PMID:23144396

Huang, Yucong; Jian, Jichang; Lu, Yishan; Cai, Shuanghu; Wang, Bei; Tang, Jufen; Pang, Huanying; Ding, Yu; Wu, Zaohe

2012-12-01

4

Inhibition of Luminescence and Virulence in the Black Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon) Pathogen Vibrio harveyi by Intercellular Signal Antagonists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expression of luminescence in the Penaeus monodon pathogen Vibrio harveyi is regulated by an intercellular quorum sensing mechanism involving the synthesis and detection of two signaling molecules, one of which is N-hydroxy butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone and the other of which is uncharacterized. Indirect evidence has suggested that virulence, associated with a toxic extracellular protein, and luminescence in V. harveyi are coregulated.

MICHAEL MANEFIELD; LACHLAN HARRIS; SCOTT A. RICE; ROCKY DE NYS; STAFFAN KJELLEBERG

2000-01-01

5

Characterization of DegQVh, a Serine Protease and a Protective Immunogen from a Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi Strain? †  

PubMed Central

Vibrio harveyi is an important marine pathogen that can infect a number of aquaculture species. V. harveyi degQ (degQVh), the gene encoding a DegQ homologue, was cloned from T4, a pathogenic V. harveyi strain isolated from diseased fish. DegQVh was closely related to the HtrA family members identified in other Vibrio species and could complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of an Escherichia coli strain defective in degP. Expression of degQVh in T4 was modulated by temperature, possibly through the ?E-like factor. Enzymatic analyses demonstrated that the recombinant DegQVh protein expressed in and purified from E. coli was an active serine protease whose activity required the integrity of the catalytic site and the PDZ domains. The optimal temperature and pH of the recombinant DegQVh protein were 50°C and pH 8.0. A vaccination study indicated that the purified recombinant DegQVh was a protective immunogen that could confer protection upon fish against infection by V. harveyi. In order to improve the efficiency of DegQVh as a vaccine, a genetic construct in the form of the plasmid pAQ1 was built, in which the DNA encoding the processed DegQVh protein was fused with the DNA encoding the secretion region of AgaV, an extracellular ?-agarase. The E. coli strain harboring pAQ1 could express and secrete the chimeric DegQVh protein into the culture supernatant. Vaccination of fish with viable E. coli expressing chimeric degQVh significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced the survival of fish against V. harveyi challenge, which was possibly due to the relatively prolonged exposure of the immune system to the recombinant antigen produced constitutively, albeit at a gradually decreasing level, by the carrier strain. PMID:18723647

Zhang, Wei-wei; Sun, Kun; Cheng, Shuang; Sun, Li

2008-01-01

6

Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]).  

PubMed

Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine ?-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J

2015-01-01

7

Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV])  

PubMed Central

Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine ?-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W. Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan

2015-01-01

8

Evolution of tolerance to PCBs and susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen (Vibrio harveyi) in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from New Bedford (MA, USA) harbor  

PubMed Central

A population of the non-migratory estuarine fish Fundulus heteroclitus (Atlantic killifish) resident to New Bedford (NB), Massachusetts, USA, an urban harbor highly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), demonstrates recently evolved tolerance to some aspects of PCB toxicity. PCB toxicology, ecological theory, and some precedence supported expectations of increased susceptibility to pathogens in NB killifish. However, laboratory bacterial challenges of the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi to wild fish throughout the reproductive season and to their mature laboratory-raised progeny demonstrated comparable survival by NB and reference killifish, and improved survival by NB males. These results are inconsistent with hypothesized tradeoffs of adaptation, and suggest that evolved tolerance in NB killifish may include mechanisms that minimize the immunosuppressive effects of PCBs. Compensatory strategies of populations persisting in highly contaminated environments provide a unique perspective for understanding the long-term ecological effects of toxic chemicals. PMID:19110353

Nacci, Diane; Huber, Marina; Champlin, Denise; Jayaraman, Saro; Cohen, Sarah; Gauger, Eric; Fong, Allison; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

2009-01-01

9

Quorum sensing negatively regulates chitinase in Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, regulates the virulence of Vibrio harveyi towards different hosts. Chitinase can be considered as a virulence factor because it helps pathogenic bacteria to attach to the host and to penetrate its tissues (e.g. in case of shrimp). Here, we show that quorum sensing negatively regulates chitinase in V. harveyi. Chitinolytic activity towards natural chitin from crab shells, the synthetic chitin derivative chitin azure, and fluorogenic chitin oligomers was significantly higher in a mutant in which the quorum-sensing system is completely inactivated when compared with a mutant in which the system is maximally active. Furthermore, the addition of signal molecule containing cell-free culture fluids decreased chitinase activity in a Harveyi Autoinducer 1 and Autoinducer 2-deficient double mutant. Finally, chitinase A mRNA levels were fivefold lower in the mutant in which the quorum-sensing system is maximally active when compared with the mutant in which the system is completely inactivated. [Correction added on 25 September 2009, after first online publication: the preceding sentence was corrected from 'Finally, chitinase A mRNA levels were fivefold lower in the mutant in which the quorum-sensing system is completely inactivated when compared with the mutant in which the system is maximally active.'] We argue that this regulation might help the vibrios to switch between host-associated and free-living life styles. PMID:23765997

Defoirdt, Tom; Darshanee Ruwandeepika, H A; Karunasagar, Indrani; Boon, Nico; Bossier, Peter

2010-02-01

10

Disruption of quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi by the AiiA protein of Bacillus thuringiensis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quorum sensing is a mechanism in which bacteria coordinate the expression of certain genes in response to their population density by producing, releasing and detecting signal molecules called autoinducers. Quorum sensing is responsible for controlling a plethora of virulence genes in several bacterial pathogens. Disruption of the quorum sensing system of Vibrio harveyi has been proposed as a new anti-infective

Fangfang Bai; Yin Han; Jixiang Chen; Xiao-Hua Zhang

2008-01-01

11

Molecular identification of Vibrio harveyi-related isolates associated with diseased aquatic organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty strains belonging to Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, and the recently described Vibrio rotiferianus, were analysed using phenotypic and genomic techniques with the aim of analysing the usefulness of the different techniques for the identification of V. harveyi-related species. The species V. harveyi and V. campbellii were phenotypically indistinguishable by more than 100 phenotypic features. Thirty-nine experimental strains were phenotypically

Bruno Gomez-Gil; Sonia Soto-Rodriguez; Alejandra Garcia-Gasca; Ana Roque; Ricardo Vazquez-Juarez; Fabiano L. Thompson; Jean Swings

2004-01-01

12

Three Parallel Quorum-Sensing Systems Regulate Gene Expression in Vibrio harveyi  

PubMed Central

In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate using extracellular signal molecules termed autoinducers. Two parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. System 1 consists of the LuxM-dependent autoinducer HAI-1 and the HAI-1 sensor, LuxN. System 2 consists of the LuxS-dependent autoinducer AI-2 and the AI-2 detector, LuxPQ. The related bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen, possesses System 2 (LuxS, AI-2, and LuxPQ) but does not have obvious homologues of V. harveyi System 1. Rather, System 1 of V. cholerae is made up of the CqsA-dependent autoinducer CAI-1 and a sensor called CqsS. Using a V. cholerae CAI-1 reporter strain we show that many other marine bacteria, including V. harveyi, produce CAI-1 activity. Genetic analysis of V. harveyi reveals cqsA and cqsS, and phenotypic analysis of V. harveyi cqsA and cqsS mutants shows that these functions comprise a third V. harveyi quorum-sensing system that acts in parallel to Systems 1 and 2. Together these communication systems act as a three-way coincidence detector in the regulation of a variety of genes, including those responsible for bioluminescence, type III secretion, and metalloprotease production. PMID:15466044

Henke, Jennifer M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

2004-01-01

13

Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

Svenningsen, Sine Lo

14

Monitoring of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing activity in real time during infection of brine shrimp larvae.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, has been linked to the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, in vitro experiments have shown that many bacterial pathogens regulate the expression of virulence genes by this cell-to-cell communication process. Moreover, signal molecules have been detected in samples retrieved from infected hosts and quorum sensing disruption has been reported to result in reduced virulence in different host-pathogen systems. However, data on in vivo quorum sensing activity of pathogens during infection of a host are currently lacking. We previously reported that quorum sensing regulates the virulence of Vibrio harveyi in a standardised model system with gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) larvae. Here, we monitored quorum sensing activity in Vibrio harveyi during infection of the shrimp, using bioluminescence as a read-out. We found that wild-type Vibrio harveyi shows a strong increase in quorum sensing activity early during infection. In this respect, the bacteria behave remarkably similar in different larvae, despite the fact that only half of them survive the infection. Interestingly, when expressed per bacterial cell, Vibrio harveyi showed around 200-fold higher maximal quorum sensing-regulated bioluminescence when associated with larvae than in the culture water. Finally, the in vivo quorum sensing activity of mutants defective in the production of one of the three signal molecules is consistent with their virulence, with no detectable in vivo quorum sensing activity in AI-2- and CAI-1-deficient mutants. These results indicate that AI-2 and CAI-1 are the dominant signals during infection of brine shrimp. PMID:22673627

Defoirdt, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick

2012-12-01

15

Interference of Cranberry Constituents in Cell–Cell Signaling System of Vibrio harveyi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cranberry juice has long been recognized in folk medicine as a therapeutic agent, mainly in urinary track infections. It acts\\u000a as an antibiofilm agent against various pathogens. Quorum sensing is process where bacteria communicate with each other via\\u000a signal molecules known as autoinducers. This process is strongly involved in various bacterial pathological and physiological\\u000a pathways. Various strains of Vibrio harveyi

Mark Feldman; Ervin I. Weiss; Itzhak Ofek; Doron Steinberg

2009-01-01

16

Cross-Species Induction of Luminescence in the Quorum Sensing Bacterium Vibrio harveyi  

Microsoft Academic Search

At least two species of marine bacteria, Vibrio fischeri and Vibrio harveyi, express bioluminescence in response to cell den- sity. These two vibrios are found in different environments in the ocean. V. harveyi is found free-living in the sea as well as in the gut tracts of marine animals, where it exists at high popu- lation densities in association with

BONNIE L. BASSLER; E. PETER GREENBERG; ANN M. STEVENS

1997-01-01

17

Quorum sensing regulates the osmotic stress response in Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress. PMID:25313392

van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James; Bassler, Bonnie L

2015-01-01

18

Transcriptional regulation of lux genes transferred into Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Past work has shown that transformed Escherichia coli is not a suitable vehicle for studying the expression and regulation of the cloned luminescence (lux) genes of Vibrio harveyi. Therefore, we have used a conjugative system to transfer lux genes cloned into E. coli back into V. harveyi, where they can be studied in the parental organism. To do this, lux DNA was inserted into a broad-spectrum vector, pKT230, cloned in E. coli, and then mobilized into V. harveyi by mating aided by the conjugative plasmid pRK2013, also contained in E. coli. Transfer of the wild-type luxD gene into the V. harveyi M17 mutant by this means resulted in complementation of the luxD mutation and full restoration of luminescence in the mutant; expression of transferase activity was induced if DNA upstream of luxC preceded the luxD gene on the plasmid, indicating the presence of a strong inducible promoter. To extend the usefulness of the transfer system, the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was inserted into the pKT230 vector as a reporter. The promoter upstream of luxC was verified to be cell density regulated and, in addition, glucose repressible. It is suggested that this promoter may be the primary autoregulated promoter of the V. harveyi luminescence system. Strong termination signals on both DNA strands were recognized and are located downstream from luxE at a point complementary to the longest mRNA from the lux operon. Structural lux genes transferred back into V. harveyi under control of the luxC promoter are expressed at very high levels in V. harveyi as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis: the gene transfer system is thus useful for expression of proteins as well as for studying the regulation of lux genes in their native environment. PMID:2180915

Miyamoto, C M; Meighen, E A; Graham, A F

1990-04-01

19

Autoinducers Act as Biological Timers in Vibrio harveyi  

PubMed Central

Quorum sensing regulates cell density-dependent phenotypes and involves the synthesis, excretion and detection of so-called autoinducers. Vibrio harveyi strain ATCC BAA-1116 (recently reclassified as Vibrio campbellii), one of the best-characterized model organisms for the study of quorum sensing, produces and responds to three autoinducers. HAI-1, AI-2 and CAI-1 are recognized by different receptors, but all information is channeled into the same signaling cascade, which controls a specific set of genes. Here we examine temporal variations of availability and concentration of the three autoinducers in V. harveyi, and monitor the phenotypes they regulate, from the early exponential to the stationary growth phase in liquid culture. Specifically, the exponential growth phase is characterized by an increase in AI-2 and the induction of bioluminescence, while HAI-1 and CAI-1 are undetectable prior to the late exponential growth phase. CAI-1 activity reaches its maximum upon entry into stationary phase, while molar concentrations of AI-2 and HAI-1 become approximately equal. Similarly, autoinducer-dependent exoproteolytic activity increases at the transition into stationary phase. These findings are reflected in temporal alterations in expression of the luxR gene that encodes the master regulator LuxR, and of four autoinducer-regulated genes during growth. Moreover, in vitro phosphorylation assays reveal a tight correlation between the HAI-1/AI-2 ratio as input and levels of receptor-mediated phosphorylation of LuxU as output. Our study supports a model in which the combinations of autoinducers available, rather than cell density per se, determine the timing of various processes in V. harveyi populations. PMID:23110227

Anetzberger, Claudia; Reiger, Matthias; Fekete, Agnes; Schell, Ursula; Stambrau, Nina; Plener, Laure; Kopka, Joachim; Schmitt-Kopplin, Phillippe; Hilbi, Hubert; Jung, Kirsten

2012-01-01

20

Autoinducers act as biological timers in Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing regulates cell density-dependent phenotypes and involves the synthesis, excretion and detection of so-called autoinducers. Vibrio harveyi strain ATCC BAA-1116 (recently reclassified as Vibrio campbellii), one of the best-characterized model organisms for the study of quorum sensing, produces and responds to three autoinducers. HAI-1, AI-2 and CAI-1 are recognized by different receptors, but all information is channeled into the same signaling cascade, which controls a specific set of genes. Here we examine temporal variations of availability and concentration of the three autoinducers in V. harveyi, and monitor the phenotypes they regulate, from the early exponential to the stationary growth phase in liquid culture. Specifically, the exponential growth phase is characterized by an increase in AI-2 and the induction of bioluminescence, while HAI-1 and CAI-1 are undetectable prior to the late exponential growth phase. CAI-1 activity reaches its maximum upon entry into stationary phase, while molar concentrations of AI-2 and HAI-1 become approximately equal. Similarly, autoinducer-dependent exoproteolytic activity increases at the transition into stationary phase. These findings are reflected in temporal alterations in expression of the luxR gene that encodes the master regulator LuxR, and of four autoinducer-regulated genes during growth. Moreover, in vitro phosphorylation assays reveal a tight correlation between the HAI-1/AI-2 ratio as input and levels of receptor-mediated phosphorylation of LuxU as output. Our study supports a model in which the combinations of autoinducers available, rather than cell density per se, determine the timing of various processes in V. harveyi populations. PMID:23110227

Anetzberger, Claudia; Reiger, Matthias; Fekete, Agnes; Schell, Ursula; Stambrau, Nina; Plener, Laure; Kopka, Joachim; Schmitt-Kopplin, Phillippe; Hilbi, Hubert; Jung, Kirsten

2012-01-01

21

Nitric oxide as an antimicrobial molecule against Vibrio harveyi infection in the hepatopancreas of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.  

PubMed

Nitric oxide (NO) is a key effector molecule produced in the innate immune systems of many species for antimicrobial defense. However, how NO production is regulated during bacterial infection in invertebrates, especially crustaceans, remains poorly understood. Vibrio harveyi, a Gram-negative marine pathogen, is among the most prevalent and serious threats to the world's shrimp culture industry. Its virulence typically manifests itself through shrimp hepatopancreas destruction. In the current study, we found that NO generated by an in vitro donor system (NOC-18) could rapidly and effectively kill V. harveyi. In addition, injection of heat-killed V. harveyi increased the concentration of NO/nitrite and the mRNA expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the hepatopancreas of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the commercially most significant shrimp species. Live V. harveyi challenge also induced NO/nitrite production and NOS gene expression in primary L. vannamei hepatopancreatic cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Co-incubation of l-NAME, an inhibitor selective for mammalian constitutive NOSs, dose-dependently blocked V. harveyi-induced NO/nitrite production, without affecting V. harveyi-induced NOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, l-NAME treatment significantly increased the survival rate of infecting V. harveyi in cultured primary hepatopancreatic cells of L. vannamei. As a whole, we have demonstrated that endogenous NO produced by L. vannamei hepatopancreatic cells occurs in enzymatically regulated manners and is sufficient to act as a bactericidal molecule for V. harveyi clearance. PMID:25449376

Chen, Ting; Wong, Nai-Kei; Jiang, Xiao; Luo, Xing; Zhang, Lvping; Yang, Dan; Ren, Chunhua; Hu, Chaoqun

2015-01-01

22

Chitoporin from Vibrio harveyi, a Channel with Exceptional Sugar Specificity  

PubMed Central

Chitoporin (VhChiP) is a sugar-specific channel responsible for the transport of chitooligosaccharides through the outer membrane of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Single channel reconstitution into black lipid membrane allowed single chitosugar binding events in the channel to be resolved. VhChiP has an exceptionally high substrate affinity, with a binding constant of K = 5.0 × 106 m?1 for its best substrate (chitohexaose). The on-rates of chitosugars depend on applied voltages, as well as the side of the sugar addition, clearly indicating the inherent asymmetry of the VhChiP lumen. The binding affinity of VhChiP for chitohexaose is 1–5 orders of magnitude larger than that of other known sugar-specific porins for their preferred substrates. Thus, VhChiP is the most potent sugar-specific channel reported to date, with its high efficiency presumably reflecting the need for the bacterium to take up chitin-containing nutrients promptly under turbulent aquatic conditions to exploit them efficiently as its sole source of energy. PMID:23447539

Suginta, Wipa; Chumjan, Watcharin; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias

2013-01-01

23

Negative Feedback in the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Circuit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quorum sensing is the mechanism by which bacteria communicate and synchronize group behaviors. Multiple feedbacks have been identified in the model quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but it has been unclear how these feedbacks interact in individual cells to control the fidelity of signal transduction. We measured the copy number distribution of the master regulators to quantify the activity of the signaling network. We find that the feedbacks affect the production rate, level, and noise of the core quorum-sensing components. Using fluorescence time-lapse microscopy, we directly observed the master regulator in individual cells, and analyzed the persistence of heterogeneity in terms of the normalized time-delayed direct correlation. Our findings suggest that feedback from small regulatory RNAs regulates a receptor to control the noise level in signal transduction. We further tested this model by re-engineering the gene circuit to specifically diminish this feedback. We conclude that negative feedbacks mediated by sRNAs permit fine-tuning of gene regulation, thereby increasing the fidelity of signal transduction.

Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessie; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Phuan Ong, Nai

2010-03-01

24

Virulence Changes to Harveyi Clade Bacteria Infected with Bacteriophage from Vibrio owensii.  

PubMed

Vibrio owensii is one of the most virulent vibrios known being able to kill crustacean larvae at 10(2) CFU ml(-1). This study describes virulence changes to naïve strains of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio campbellii when infected with the bacteriophage VOB from a closely related species V. owensii 47666-1. The bacteriophage from V. owensii was induced into lytic phase by using mitomycin C at 100 ng ml(-1). One strain of V. harveyi and two strains of V. campbellii from 29 tested containing no prophage were susceptible to lysogenic conversion with VOB. Virulence changes induced in Harveyi clade bacteria included the up-regulation of protein secretion, statistically significant increased haemolysin and chitinase production and increased mortality to nauplii of Penaeus monodon. No change in siderophore production was observed. Bacteriophage VOB is likely to be responsible for some of the virulence factors expressed by V. owensii. As this bacteriophage is able to infect strains of V. harveyi and V. campbellii this phage may contribute to increased virulence of other vibrios in aquaculture and in the natural environment. PMID:24426274

Busico-Salcedo, Nancy; Owens, Leigh

2013-09-01

25

The Small RNA Chaperone Hfq and Multiple Small RNAs Control Quorum Sensing in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quorum-sensing bacteria communicate with extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. This process allows community-wide synchronization of gene expression. A screen for additional components of the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing circuits revealed the protein Hfq. Hfq mediates interactions between small, regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) and specific messenger RNA (mRNA) targets. These interactions typically alter the stability of the target transcripts. We

Derrick H. Lenz; Kenny C. Mok; Brendan N. Lilley; Rahul V. Kulkarni; Ned S. Wingreen; Bonnie L. Bassler

2004-01-01

26

Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

Alifano, P.; Nassisi, V.; Siciliano, M. V.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S. M.

2011-05-01

27

Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment  

SciTech Connect

Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

Alifano, P.; Tala, A.; Tredici, S. M. [Dipartimento Microbiologia, Di.S.Te.B.A., Universita del Salento, via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, C.P. 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Nassisi, V. [Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento and INFN-Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Siciliano, M. V. [Laboratorio di Elettronica Applicata e Strumentazione, LEAS, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento and INFN-Lecce, Via Provinciale Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, University of Salento, via Provinciale Lecce- Monteroni, C.P. 193, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

2011-05-15

28

Lead Precipitation by Vibrio harveyi: Evidence for Novel Quorum-Sensing Interactions  

PubMed Central

Three pleiotropic, quorum sensing-defective Vibrio harveyi mutants were observed to precipitate soluble Pb2+ as an insoluble compound. The compound was purified and subjected to X-ray diffraction and elemental analyses. These assays identified the precipitated compound as Pb9(PO4)6, an unusual and complex lead phosphate salt that is produced synthetically at temperatures of ca. 200°C. Regulation of the precipitation phenotype was also examined. Introduction of a luxO::kan allele into one of the mutants abolished lead precipitation, indicating that the well-characterized autoinducer 1 (AI1)-AI2 quorum-sensing system can block lead precipitation in dense cell populations. Interestingly, the V. harveyi D1 mutant, a strain defective for secretion of both AI1 and AI2, was shown to be an effective trans inhibitor of lead precipitation. This suggests that a previously undescribed V. harveyi autoinducer, referred to as AI3, can also negatively regulate lead precipitation. Experiments with heterologous bacterial populations demonstrated that many different species are capable of trans regulating the V. harveyi lead precipitation phenotype. Moreover, one of the V. harveyi mutants in this study exhibited little or no response to intercellular signals from other V. harveyi inocula but was quite responsive to some of the heterologous bacteria. Based on these observations, we propose that V. harveyi carries at least one quorum sensor that is specifically dedicated to receiving cross-species communication. PMID:14766565

Mire, Chad E.; Tourjee, Jeanette A.; O'Brien, William F.; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V.; Hecht, Gregory B.

2004-01-01

29

Three Parallel Quorum-Sensing Systems Regulate Gene Expression in Vibrio harveyi  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate using extracellular signal molecules termed auto- inducers. Two parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. System 1 consists of the LuxM-dependent autoinducer HAI-1 and the HAI-1 sensor, LuxN. System 2 consists of the LuxS-dependent autoinducer AI-2 and the AI-2 detector, LuxPQ. The related bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, a

Jennifer M. Henke; Bonnie L. Bassler

2004-01-01

30

Gender-specific metabolic responses in hepatopancreas of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis challenged by Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish and frequently studied in shellfish immunology. In this work, the gender-specific metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in hepatopancreas from M. galloprovincialis were characterized using NMR-based metabolomics. In details, V. harveyi challenge increased the levels of amino acids including (valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, alanine, arginine and tyrosine) and ATP, and decreased the level of glucose in male mussel hepatopancreas. In V. harveyi-challenged female mussel hepatopancreas, both threonine and AMP were significantly elevated, and choline, phoshphocholine, sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, taurine, betaine and ATP were depleted. Obviously, only threonine was similarly altered to that in V. harveyi-challenged male mussel hepatopancreas. These findings confirmed the gender-specific metabolic responses in mussels challenged by V. harveyi. Overall, V. harveyi induced an enhanced energy demand through activated glycolysis and immune response indicated by increased BCAAs in male mussel hepatopancreas. In female mussel hepatopancreas, V. harveyi basically caused disturbances in both osmotic regulation and energy metabolism through the metabolic pathways of conversions of phosphocholine and ADP to choline and ATP, and sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and H2O into choline and sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (Cu/Zn-SOD, HSP90, lysozyme and defensin) suggested that V. harveyi induced obvious oxidative and immune stresses in both male and female mussel hepatopancreas. This work demonstrated that V. harveyi could induce gender-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis hepatopancreas using NMR-based metabolomics. PMID:25123832

Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Ma, Mengwen; Zhang, Yuemei

2014-10-01

31

Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi  

SciTech Connect

Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from (1-14C)myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from (14C)C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from (14C)acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

Byers, D.M.

1989-01-01

32

The Outer Membrane Protein VhOmp of Vibrio harveyi : PoreForming Properties in Black Lipid Membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio harveyi is known to cause fatal vibriosis in marine animals. Here, an outer membrane protein from V. harveyi, namely, VhOmp, was isolated and functionally characterized in terms of pore-forming contact with artificial lipid membranes.\\u000a The native VhOmp exists as a trimer of a molecular weight similar to that of the porin OmpF from Escherichia coli. Reconstitution of VhOmp into

Albert Schulte; Sompong Ruamchan; Panida Khunkaewla; Wipa Suginta

2009-01-01

33

Quorum Sensing in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Vibrio harveyi: A New Family of Genes Responsible for Autoinducer Production  

Microsoft Academic Search

In bacteria, the regulation of gene expression in response to changes in cell density is called quorum sensing. Quorum-sensing bacteria produce, release, and respond to hormone-like molecules (autoinducers) that accumulate in the external environment as the cell population grows. In the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi two parallel quorum-sensing systems exist, and each is composed of a sensor-autoinducer pair. V. harveyi

Michael G. Surette; Melissa B. Miller; Bonnie L. Bassler

1999-01-01

34

Molecular Uptake of Chitooligosaccharides through Chitoporin from the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi  

PubMed Central

Background Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer in marine ecosystems. However, there is no accumulation of chitin in the ocean-floor sediments, since marine bacteria Vibrios are mainly responsible for a rapid turnover of chitin biomaterials. The catabolic pathway of chitin by Vibrios is a multi-step process that involves chitin attachment and degradation, followed by chitooligosaccharide uptake across the bacterial membranes, and catabolism of the transport products to fructose-6-phosphate, acetate and NH3. Principal Findings This study reports the isolation of the gene corresponding to an outer membrane chitoporin from the genome of Vibrio harveyi. This porin, expressed in E. coli, (so called VhChiP) was found to be a SDS-resistant, heat-sensitive trimer. Immunoblotting using anti-ChiP polyclonal antibody confirmed the expression of the recombinant ChiP, as well as endogenous expression of the native protein in the V. harveyi cells. The specific function of VhChiP was investigated using planar lipid membrane reconstitution technique. VhChiP nicely inserted into artificial membranes and formed stable, trimeric channels with average single conductance of 1.8±0.13 nS. Single channel recordings at microsecond-time resolution resolved translocation of chitooligosaccharides, with the greatest rate being observed for chitohexaose. Liposome swelling assays showed no permeation of other oligosaccharides, including maltose, sucrose, maltopentaose, maltohexaose and raffinose, indicating that VhChiP is a highly-specific channel for chitooligosaccharides. Conclusion/Significance We provide the first evidence that chitoporin from V. harveyi is a chitooligosaccharide specific channel. The results obtained from this study help to establish the fundamental role of VhChiP in the chitin catabolic cascade as the molecular gateway that Vibrios employ for chitooligosaccharide uptake for energy production. PMID:23383078

Suginta, Wipa; Chumjan, Watcharin; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Janning, Petra; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias

2013-01-01

35

Bioluminescent assay for sphingolipid ceramide N-deacylase using Vibrio harveyi dark mutant M-17  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new bioluminescent assay method for the activity of sphingolipid ceramide N-deacylase (SCDase: EC 3.5.1.69) as well as ceramidase\\u000a (CDase: EC 3.5.1.23) was developed using bioluminescent marine bacteria. Enzymatically synthesized ceramide (N-myristoyl sphigosine,\\u000a C14:0-18:l) and commercial SCDase were used in this demonstration, and myristic (tetradecanoic, C14:0) acid produced by the\\u000a SCDase hydrolysis was quantified using Vibrio harveyi M-17, a dark

Ki Woong Cho

2008-01-01

36

A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

2009-12-01

37

Differentially expressed genes in hemocytes of Vibrio harveyi-challenged shrimp Penaeus monodon.  

PubMed

Differential Display PCR technique (DD-PCR) was used for the analysis of altered gene expression in hemocytes of Vibrio harveyi-infected Penaeus monodon. Forty-four combinations of arbitrary and oligo(dT) primers were used to screen for differentially expressed genes. A total of 79 differentially expressed bands could be identified from 33 primer combinations. These included 48 bands (61%) whose expression level increased and 31 bands (39%) decreased after V. harveyi challenge. Subsequently, forty-eight differential display fragments were successfully reamplified and cloned. A total of 267 clones were randomly selected and sequenced. The sequence analysis showed that 85 (31%) out of 267 clones were matched with sequences in the GenBank database which represented 24 different genes with known functions. Among the known genes, glucose transporter 1, interferon-related developmental regulator 1, lysozyme, profilin, SERPINB3, were selected for further confirmation of their differentially expression patterns by real-time PCR. The results showed increasing in expression level of the selected genes in shrimp hemocytes after microbial challenge suggesting the involvement of such genes in bacterial response in shrimp. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor type 3 (ALFPm3) gene, previously reported in P. monodon (Supungul et al., 2002) was found among the up-regulated genes but diversity due to amino acid changes was observed. Increase in ALFPm3 transcripts upon V. harveyi injection is in accordance with that found in the previous study. PMID:16466635

Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Supungul, Premruethai; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Aoki, Takashi; Hirono, Ikuo; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

2006-01-31

38

Effect of combined function of temperature and water activity on the growth of Vibrio harveyi  

PubMed Central

Vibrio harveyi is considered as a causative agent of the systemic disease, vibriosis, which occurs in many biological fields. The effects of temperatures (12.9–27.1 °C) and water activity (NaCl% 0.6%-3.4%) on V. harveyi were investigated. The behavior and growth characteristics of V. harveyi was studied and modeled. Growth curves were fitted by using Gompertz and Baranyi models, and the Baranyi model showed a better fittness. Then, the maximum growth rates (?max) and lag phase durations (LPD, ?) obtained from both Gompertz and Baranyi model were modeled as a combination function of temperature and water activity using the response surface and Arrhenius-Davey models for secondary model. The value of r2, MSE, bias and accuracy factor suggest Baranyi model has better fitness than Gompertz model. Furthermore, validation of the developed models with independent data from ComBase also shown better interrelationship between observed and predicted growth parameter when using Baranyi model. PMID:24031965

Zhou, Kang; Gui, Meng; Li, Pinglan; Xing, Shaohua; Cui, Tingting; Peng, Zhaohui

2012-01-01

39

Discovery of a nitric oxide responsive quorum sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Bacteria use small molecules to assess the density and identity of nearby organisms and formulate a response. This process, called quorum sensing (QS), commonly regulates bioluminescence, biofilm formation, and virulence. Vibrio harveyi have three described QS circuits. Each involves the synthesis of a molecule that regulates phosphorylation of its cognate receptor kinase. Each receptor exchanges phosphate with a common phosphorelay protein, LuxU, which ultimately regulates bioluminescence. Here, we show that another small molecule, nitric oxide (NO), participates in QS through LuxU. V. harveyi display a NO concentration-dependent increase in bioluminescence that is regulated by an hnoX gene. We demonstrate that H-NOX is a NO sensor and NO/H-NOX regulates phosphorylation of a kinase that transfers phosphate to LuxU. This study reveals the discovery of a fourth QS pathway in V. harveyi and suggests that bacteria use QS to integrate not only the density of bacteria but also other diverse information about their environment into decisions about gene expression. PMID:22606970

Henares, Bernadette M; Higgins, Kate E; Boon, Elizabeth M

2012-08-17

40

Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsThe marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh)

Zeena E. Nackerdien; Alexander Keynan; Bonnie L. Bassler; Joshua Lederberg; David S. Thaler; Julian Rutherford

2008-01-01

41

Interference with the quorum sensing systems in a Vibrio harveyi strain alters the growth rate of gnotobiotically cultured rotifer Brachionus plicatilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: To evaluate the effect of Vibrio harveyi strains on the growth rate of the gnotobiotically cultured rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, and to establish whether quorum sensing is involved in the observed phenomena. Methods and Results: Gnotobiotic B. plicatilis sensu strictu, obtained by hatch- ing glutaraldehyde-treated amictic eggs, were used as test organisms. Challenge tests were performed with 11 V. harveyi

N. T. N. Tinh; N. D. Linh; T. K. Wood; K. Dierckens; P. Sorgeloos; P. Bossier

2007-01-01

42

The Vibrio harveyi GTPase CgtAV Is Essential and Is Associated with the 50S Ribosomal Subunit  

PubMed Central

It was previously reported that unlike the other obg/cgtA GTPases, the Vibrio harveyi cgtAV is not essential. Here we show that cgtAV was not disrupted in these studies and is, in fact, essential for viability. Depletion of CgtAV did not result in cell elongation. CgtAV is associated with the large ribosomal particle. In light of our results, we predict that the V. harveyi CgtAV protein plays a similar essential role to that seen for Obg/CgtA proteins in other bacteria. PMID:16428430

Sikora, A. E.; Zielke, R.; Datta, K.; Maddock, J. R.

2006-01-01

43

A Nonluminescent and Highly Virulent Vibrio harveyi Strain Is Associated with “Bacterial White Tail Disease” of Litopenaeus vannamei Shrimp  

PubMed Central

Recurrent outbreaks of a disease in pond-cultured juvenile and subadult Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp in several districts in China remain an important problem in recent years. The disease was characterized by “white tail” and generally accompanied by mass mortalities. Based on data from the microscopical analyses, PCR detection and 16S rRNA sequencing, a new Vibrio harveyi strain (designated as strain HLB0905) was identified as the etiologic pathogen. The bacterial isolation and challenge tests demonstrated that the HLB0905 strain was nonluminescent but highly virulent. It could cause mass mortality in affected shrimp during a short time period with a low dose of infection. Meanwhile, the histopathological and electron microscopical analysis both showed that the HLB0905 strain could cause severe fiber cell damages and striated muscle necrosis by accumulating in the tail muscle of L. vannamei shrimp, which led the affected shrimp to exhibit white or opaque lesions in the tail. The typical sign was closely similar to that caused by infectious myonecrosis (IMN), white tail disease (WTD) or penaeid white tail disease (PWTD). To differentiate from such diseases as with a sign of “white tail” but of non-bacterial origin, the present disease was named as “bacterial white tail disease (BWTD)”. Present study revealed that, just like IMN and WTD, BWTD could also cause mass mortalities in pond-cultured shrimp. These results suggested that some bacterial strains are changing themselves from secondary to primary pathogens by enhancing their virulence in current shrimp aquaculture system. PMID:22383954

Zhou, Junfang; Fang, Wenhong; Yang, Xianle; Zhou, Shuai; Hu, Linlin; Li, Xincang; Qi, Xinyong; Su, Hang; Xie, Layue

2012-01-01

44

Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication. Recently, Bassler et al. studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. According to Michaelis—Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper, we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (AI) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS. These results are fit to the experimental results. In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time deday. In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise.

Shen, Jian-Wei

2011-03-01

45

A nitric oxide-responsive quorum sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi regulates flagella production and biofilm formation.  

PubMed

Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

Henares, Bernadette M; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M

2013-01-01

46

Computational modeling of differences in the quorum sensing induced luminescence phenotypes of \\textit{Vibrio harveyi} and \\textit{Vibrio cholerae}  

E-print Network

\\textit{Vibrio harveyi} and \\textit{Vibrio cholerae} have quorum sensing pathways with similar design and highly homologous components including multiple small RNAs (sRNAs). However, the associated luminescence phenotypes of strains with sRNA deletions differ dramatically: in \\textit{V. harveyi}, the sRNAs act additively; however, in \\textit{V. cholerae}, the sRNAs act redundantly. Furthermore, there are striking differences in the luminescence phenotypes for different pathway mutants in \\textit{V. harveyi} and \\textit{V. cholerae}. However these differences have not been connected with the observed differences for the sRNA deletion strains in these bacteria. In this work, we present a model for quorum sensing induced luminescence phenotypes focusing on the interactions of multiple sRNAs with target mRNA. Within our model, we find that one key parameter -- the fold-change in protein concentration necessary for luminescence activation -- can control whether the sRNAs appear to act additively or redundantly. For specific parameter choices, we find that differences in this key parameter can also explain hitherto unconnected luminescence phenotypes differences for various pathway mutants in \\textit{V. harveyi} and \\textit{V. cholerae}. The model can thus provide a unifying explanation for observed differences in luminescence phenotypes and can also be used to make testable predictions for future experiments.

Andrew T Fenley; Suman K Banik; Rahul V Kulkarni

2011-01-27

47

A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr.

Hunter, G. A. M.; Guevara Vasquez, F.; Keener, J. P.

2013-08-01

48

Novel beta-lactamase genes from two environmental isolates of Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Two ampicillin-resistant (Amp(r)) isolates of Vibrio harveyi, W3B and HB3, were obtained from the coastal waters of the Indonesian island of Java. Strain W3B was isolated from marine water near a shrimp farm in North Java while HB3 was from pristine seawater in South Java. In this study, novel beta-lactamase genes from W3B (bla(VHW-1)) and HB3 (bla(VHH-1)) were cloned and their nucleotide sequences were determined. An open reading frame (ORF) of 870 bp encoding a deduced protein of 290 amino acids (VHW-1) was revealed for the bla gene of strain W3B while an ORF of 849 bp encoding a 283-amino-acid protein (VHH-1) was deduced for bla(VHH-1). At the DNA level, genes for VHW-1 and VHH-1 have a 97% homology, while at the protein level they have a 91% homology of amino acid sequences. Neither gene sequence showed homology to any other beta-lactamases in the databases. The deduced proteins were found to be class A beta-lactamases bearing low levels of homology (<50%) to other beta-lactamases of the same class. The highest level of identity was obtained with beta-lactamases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, i.e., PSE-1, PSE-4, and CARB-3, and Vibrio cholerae CARB-6. Our study showed that both strains W3B and HB3 possess an endogenous plasmid of approximately 60 kb in size. However, Southern hybridization analysis employing bla(VHW-1) as a gene probe demonstrated that the bla gene was not located in the plasmid. A total of nine ampicillin-resistant V. harveyi strains, including W3B and HB3, were examined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of NotI-digested genomic DNA. Despite a high level of intrastrain genetic diversity, the bla(VHW-1) probe hybridized only to an 80- or 160-kb NotI genomic fragment in different isolates. PMID:10770767

Teo, J W; Suwanto, A; Poh, C L

2000-05-01

49

Control of the Type 3 Secretion System in Vibrio harveyi by Quorum Sensing through Repression of ExsA ? ‡  

PubMed Central

The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) genes of Vibrio harveyi are activated at low cell density and repressed at high cell density by quorum sensing (QS). Repression requires LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS-controlled genes. Here, we determine the mechanism underlying the LuxR repression of the T3SS system. Using a fluorescence-based cell sorting approach, we isolated V. harveyi mutants that are unable to express T3SS genes at low cell density and identified two mutations in the V. harveyi exsBA operon. While LuxR directly represses the expression of exsBA, complementation and epistasis analyses reveal that it is the repression of exsA expression, but not exsB expression, that is responsible for the QS-mediated repression of T3SS genes at high cell density. The present work further defines the genes in the V. harveyi QS regulon and elucidates a mechanism demonstrating how multiple regulators can be linked in series to direct the expression of QS target genes specifically at low or high cell density. PMID:20543047

Waters, Christopher M.; Wu, Julie T.; Ramsey, Meghan E.; Harris, Rebecca C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

2010-01-01

50

Control of the type 3 secretion system in Vibrio harveyi by quorum sensing through repression of ExsA.  

PubMed

The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) genes of Vibrio harveyi are activated at low cell density and repressed at high cell density by quorum sensing (QS). Repression requires LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS-controlled genes. Here, we determine the mechanism underlying the LuxR repression of the T3SS system. Using a fluorescence-based cell sorting approach, we isolated V. harveyi mutants that are unable to express T3SS genes at low cell density and identified two mutations in the V. harveyi exsBA operon. While LuxR directly represses the expression of exsBA, complementation and epistasis analyses reveal that it is the repression of exsA expression, but not exsB expression, that is responsible for the QS-mediated repression of T3SS genes at high cell density. The present work further defines the genes in the V. harveyi QS regulon and elucidates a mechanism demonstrating how multiple regulators can be linked in series to direct the expression of QS target genes specifically at low or high cell density. PMID:20543047

Waters, Christopher M; Wu, Julie T; Ramsey, Meghan E; Harris, Rebecca C; Bassler, Bonnie L

2010-08-01

51

Determinants governing ligand specificity of the Vibrio harveyi?LuxN quorum-sensing receptor.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, release and receptor-driven detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi exclusively detects the autoinducer N-((R)-3-hydroxybutanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OH-C4 HSL) via the two-component receptor LuxN. To discover the principles underlying the exquisite selectivity LuxN has for its ligand, we identified LuxN mutants with altered specificity. LuxN uses three mechanisms to verify that the bound molecule is the correct ligand: in the context of the overall ligand-binding site, His210 validates the C3 modification, Leu166 surveys the chain-length and a strong steady-state kinase bias imposes an energetic hurdle for inappropriate ligands to elicit signal transduction. Affinities for the LuxN kinase on and kinase off states underpin whether a ligand will act as an antagonist or an agonist. Mutations that bias LuxN to the agonized, kinase off, state are clustered in a region adjacent to the ligand-binding site, suggesting that this region acts as the switch that triggers signal transduction. Together, our analyses illuminate how a histidine sensor kinase differentiates between ligands and exploits those differences to regulate its signaling activity. PMID:25367076

Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C; Bassler, Bonnie L

2015-01-01

52

Tryptophan fluorescence reveals induced folding of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein upon interaction with partner enzymes.  

PubMed

We have introduced tryptophan as a local fluorescent probe to monitor the conformation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small flexible protein that is unfolded at neutral pH but must undergo reversible conformational change during the synthesis and delivery of bacterial fatty acids. Consistent with known 3D structures of ACP, steady-state fluorescence and quenching experiments indicated that Trp at positions 46, 50, and 72 are buried in the hydrophobic core upon Mg(2+)-induced ACP folding, whereas residues 25 and 45 remain in a hydrophilic environment on the protein surface. Attachment of fatty acids to the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group progressively stabilized the folded conformation of all Trp-substituted ACPs, but longer chains (14:0) were less effective than medium chains (8:0) in shielding Trp from acrylamide quenching in the L46W protein. Interaction with ACP-dependent enzymes LpxA and holo-ACP synthase also caused folding of L46W; fluorescence quenching indicated proximity of Trp-45 in helix II of ACP in LpxA binding. Our results suggest that divalent cations and fatty acylation produce differing environments in the ACP core and also reveal enzyme partner-induced folding of ACP, a key feature of "natively unfolded" proteins. PMID:18773978

Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Peter W; Langille, Gavin M; Minielly, Sarah J; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

2008-11-01

53

Computational modeling of differences in the quorum sensing induced luminescence phenotypes of \\textit{Vibrio harveyi} and \\textit{Vibrio cholerae}  

E-print Network

\\textit{Vibrio harveyi} and \\textit{Vibrio cholerae} have quorum sensing pathways with similar design and highly homologous components including multiple small RNAs (sRNAs). However, the associated luminescence phenotypes of strains with sRNA deletions differ dramatically: in \\textit{V. harveyi}, the sRNAs act additively; however, in \\textit{V. cholerae}, the sRNAs act redundantly. Furthermore, there are striking differences in the luminescence phenotypes for different pathway mutants in \\textit{V. harveyi} and \\textit{V. cholerae}. However these differences have not been connected with the observed differences for the sRNA deletion strains in these bacteria. In this work, we present a model for quorum sensing induced luminescence phenotypes focusing on the interactions of multiple sRNAs with target mRNA. Within our model, we find that one key parameter -- the fold-change in protein concentration necessary for luminescence activation -- can control whether the sRNAs appear to act additively or redundantly. Fo...

Fenley, Andrew T; Kulkarni, Rahul V

2011-01-01

54

Vibrio parahaemolyticus cell biology and pathogenicity determinants  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Characterization of this pathogen has revealed a unique repertoire of virulence factors that allow for colonization of the human host and disease. The following describes the known pathogenicity determinants while establishing the need for continued research. PMID:21782964

Broberg, Christopher A.; Calder, Thomas J.; Orth, Kim

2011-01-01

55

Proteases Produced by Vibrio cholerae and Other Pathogenic Vibrios: Pathogenic Roles and Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pathogenic vibrios produce various pathogenic factors such as enterotoxin, hemolysin, cytotoxin, protease, siderophore, adhesive\\u000a factor, and hemagglutinin. Direct toxic factors such as enterotoxin, hemolysin, and cytotoxin are related to the symptoms,\\u000a whereas siderophore and adhesive factors may cause indirect factors, which play roles in the establishment of the infection.\\u000a The proteases produced by pathogenic vibrios are long recognized to play

Sumio Shinoda

56

Synthesis and evaluation of thiazolidinedione and dioxazaborocane analogues as inhibitors of AI-2 quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Two focused libraries based on two types of compounds, that is, thiazolidinediones and dioxazaborocanes were designed. Structural resemblances can be found between thiazolidinediones and well-known furanone type quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors such as N-acylaminofuranones, and/or acyl-homoserine lactone signaling molecules, while dioxazaborocanes structurally resemble previously reported oxazaborolidine derivatives which antagonized autoinducer 2 (AI-2) binding to its receptor. Because of this, we hypothesized that these compounds could affect AI-2 QS in Vibrio harveyi. Although all compounds blocked QS, the thiazolidinediones were the most active AI-2 QS inhibitors, with EC(50) values in the low micromolar range. Their mechanism of inhibition was elucidated by measuring the effect on bioluminescence in a series of V. harveyi QS mutants and by DNA-binding assays with purified LuxR protein. The active compounds neither affected bioluminescence as such nor the production of AI-2. Instead, our results indicate that the thiazolidinediones blocked AI-2 QS in V. harveyi by decreasing the DNA-binding ability of LuxR. In addition, several dioxazaborocanes were found to block AI-2 QS by targeting LuxPQ. PMID:23286963

Brackman, Gilles; Al Quntar, Abed Al Aziz; Enk, Claes D; Karalic, Izet; Nelis, Hans J; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Srebnik, Morris; Coenye, Tom

2013-02-01

57

Exposure to static magnetic field stimulates quorum sensing circuit in luminescent Vibrio strains of the Harveyi clade.  

PubMed

In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

2014-01-01

58

Contrasting Inter- and Intraspecies Recombination Patterns in the “Harveyi Clade” Vibrio Collected over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales  

PubMed Central

Recombination plays an important role in the divergence of bacteria, but the frequency of interspecies and intraspecies recombination events remains poorly understood. We investigated recombination events that occurred within core genomes of 35 Vibrio strains (family Vibrionaceae, Gammaproteobacteria), from six closely related species in the so-called “Harveyi clade.” The strains were selected from a collection of strains isolated in the last 90 years, from various environments worldwide. We found a close relationship between the number of interspecies recombination events within core genomes of the 35 strains and the overall genomic identity, as inferred from calculations of the average nucleotide identity. The relationship between the overall nucleotide identity and the number of detected interspecies recombination events was comparable when analyzing strains isolated over 80 years apart, from different hemispheres, or from different ecologies, as well as in strains isolated from the same geographic location within a short time frame. We further applied the same method of detecting recombination events to analyze 11 strains of Vibrio campbellii, and identified disproportionally high number of intraspecies recombination events within the core genomes of some, but not all, strains. The high number of recombination events was detected between V. campbellii strains that have significant temporal (over 18 years) and geographical (over 10,000 km) differences in their origins of isolation. Results of this study reveal a remarkable stability of Harveyi clade species, and give clues about the origins and persistence of species in the clade. PMID:25527835

Urbanczyk, Henryk; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya

2015-01-01

59

The Vibrio harveyi master quorum-sensing regulator, LuxR, a TetR-type protein is both an activator and a repressor: DNA  

E-print Network

The Vibrio harveyi master quorum-sensing regulator, LuxR, a TetR-type protein is both an activator, USA. 6 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Summary Quorum sensing. The detection of these autoinducers ultimately leads to the produc- tion of LuxR, the quorum-sensing master

Bulyk, Martha L.

60

Genomics of Pathogenic Vibrio Species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Members of the heterotrophic bacterial family Vibrionaceae are native inhabitants of aquatic environments worldwide, constituting a diverse and abundant component of marine microbial organisms. Over 60 species of the genus Vibrio have been identified (Thompson et al., 2004) and their phenotypic heterogeneity is well documented. The ecology of the genus remains less well understood, however, despite reports that vibrios are the dominant microorganisms inhabiting the superficial water layer and colonizing the chitinous exoskeleton of zooplankton (e.g., copepods, Thompson et al., 2004). Although some species were originally isolated from seawater as free living organisms, most were isolated in association with marine life such as bivalves, fish, eels, or shrimp.

Dziejman, Michelle; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

61

Transcriptomic profiling of the oyster pathogen Vibrio splendidus opens a window on the evolutionary dynamics of the small RNA repertoire in the Vibrio genus  

PubMed Central

Work in recent years has led to the recognition of the importance of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial regulation networks. New high-throughput sequencing technologies are paving the way to the exploration of an expanding sRNA world in nonmodel bacteria. In the Vibrio genus, compared to the enterobacteriaceae, still a limited number of sRNAs have been characterized, mostly in Vibrio cholerae, where they have been shown to be important for virulence, as well as in Vibrio harveyi. In addition, genome-wide approaches in V. cholerae have led to the discovery of hundreds of potential new sRNAs. Vibrio splendidus is an oyster pathogen that has been recently associated with massive mortality episodes in the French oyster growing industry. Here, we report the first RNA-seq study in a Vibrio outside of the V. cholerae species. We have uncovered hundreds of candidate regulatory RNAs, be it cis-regulatory elements, antisense RNAs, and trans-encoded sRNAs. Conservation studies showed the majority of them to be specific to V. splendidus. However, several novel sRNAs, previously unidentified, are also present in V. cholerae. Finally, we identified 28 trans sRNAs that are conserved in all the Vibrio genus species for which a complete genome sequence is available, possibly forming a Vibrio “sRNA core.” PMID:23097430

Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Nguyen, An N.; Kuchly, Claire; Ott, Alban; Gautheret, Daniel; Bouloc, Philippe; Jacq, Annick

2012-01-01

62

Vibrio fluvialis: an emerging human pathogen.  

PubMed

Vibrio fluvialis is a pathogen commonly found in coastal environs. Considering recent increase in numbers of diarrheal outbreaks and sporadic extraintestinal cases, V. fluvialis has been considered as an emerging pathogen. Though this pathogen can be easily isolated by existing culture methods, its identification is still a challenging problem due to close phenotypic resemblance either with Vibrio cholerae or Aeromonas spp. However, using molecular tools, it is easy to identify V. fluvialis from clinical and different environmental samples. Many putative virulence factors have been reported, but its mechanisms of pathogenesis and survival fitness in the environment are yet to be explored. This chapter covers some of the major discoveries that have been made to understand the importance of V. fluvialis. PMID:24653717

Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Shinoda, Sumio

2014-01-01

63

Vibrio fluvialis: an emerging human pathogen  

PubMed Central

Vibrio fluvialis is a pathogen commonly found in coastal environs. Considering recent increase in numbers of diarrheal outbreaks and sporadic extraintestinal cases, V. fluvialis has been considered as an emerging pathogen. Though this pathogen can be easily isolated by existing culture methods, its identification is still a challenging problem due to close phenotypic resemblance either with Vibrio cholerae or Aeromonas spp. However, using molecular tools, it is easy to identify V. fluvialis from clinical and different environmental samples. Many putative virulence factors have been reported, but its mechanisms of pathogenesis and survival fitness in the environment are yet to be explored. This chapter covers some of the major discoveries that have been made to understand the importance of V. fluvialis. PMID:24653717

Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Shinoda, Sumio

2014-01-01

64

Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Vibrio Harveyi Isolated from Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus Monodon)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, a total of 30 luminous bacteria were successfully isolated from the hepatopancreas of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) in Kedah, Terengganu and Johore. Based on the Baumann and Schubert (12) scheme, all isolates were identified as V. harveyi. Thirty biochemical and physiological tests were carried out to reveal the similarity and differentiatial phenotypes among the isolates. Although

Najiah Musa; Lee Seong Wei; Wendy Wee

2008-01-01

65

Identification and analysis of an intracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Sepiella maindroni under stress of Vibrio harveyi and Cd2+.  

PubMed

Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are ubiquitous family of metalloenzymes involved in protecting organisms from excess reactive oxygen species damage. In this paper, a novel intracellular Cu/ZnSOD from Sepiella maindroni (designated as SmSOD) was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA sequence of SmSOD (GenBank accession No. KF908850) was 709 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 459 bp, encoding 153 amino acid residues peptide with predicted pI/MW (6.02/15.75 kDa), a 131 bp-5'- and 116 bp-3'- untranslated region (UTR). BLASTn analysis and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that the sequence shared high similarity with known Cu/Zn SODs. Several highly conserved motifs, including two typical Cu/Zn SOD family domains, two conserved Cu-/Zn-binding sites (H-47, H-49, H-64, H-120 for Cu binding, and H-64, H-72, H-81, D-84 for Zn binding) and intracellular disulfide bond (C-58 and C-146), were also identified in SmSOD. Time-dependent mRNA expression of SmSOD in hepatopancreas was recorded by quantitative real-time RT-PCR after Vibrio harveyi injection and Cd(2+) exposure. The results indicated that SmSOD was an acute-phase protein involved in the immune responses against pathogens and biological indicator for metal contaminants in aquatic environment. PMID:24975083

He, Jian-yu; Chi, Chang-feng; Liu, Hui-hui

2014-11-01

66

Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence  

PubMed Central

Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. Conclusions/Significance The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate. PMID:18301749

Nackerdien, Zeena E.; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S.

2008-01-01

67

Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC) in Soil Water Extracts Using Vibrio harveyi BB721 and Its Implication for Microbial Biomass  

PubMed Central

Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is commonly used to measure the growth potential of microorganisms in water, but has not yet been investigated for measuring microbial growth potential in soils. In this study, a simple, rapid, and non-growth based assay to determine AOC in soil was developed using a naturally occurring luminous strain Vibrio harveyi BB721 to determine the fraction of low molecular weight organic carbon in soil water extract. Calibration of the assay was achieved by measuring the luminescence intensity of starved V. harveyi BB721 cells in the late exponential phase with a concentration range from 0 to 800 µg l?1 glucose (equivalent to 0–16.0 mg glucose C kg?1 soil) with the detection limit of 10 µg l?1 equivalent to 0.20 mg glucose C kg?1 soil. Results showed that bioluminescence was proportional to the concentration of glucose added to soil. The luminescence intensity of the cells was highly pH dependent and the optimal pH was about 7.0. The average AOC concentration in 32 soils tested was 2.9±2.2 mg glucose C kg?1. Our data showed that AOC levels in soil water extracts were significantly correlated (P<0.05) with microbial biomass determined as microbial biomass carbon, indicating that the AOC concentrations determined by the method developed might be a good indicator of soil microbial biomass. Our findings provide a new approach that may be used to determine AOC in environmental samples using a non-growth bioluminescence based assay. Understanding the levels of AOC in soil water extract provides new insights into our ability to estimate the most available carbon pool to bacteria in soil that may be easily assimilated into cells for many metabolic processes and suggest possible the links between AOC, microbial regrowth potential, and microbial biomass in soils. PMID:22679477

Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A. Mark; Leddy, Menu; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E.

2012-01-01

68

Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in soil water extracts using Vibrio harveyi BB721 and its implication for microbial biomass.  

PubMed

Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is commonly used to measure the growth potential of microorganisms in water, but has not yet been investigated for measuring microbial growth potential in soils. In this study, a simple, rapid, and non-growth based assay to determine AOC in soil was developed using a naturally occurring luminous strain Vibrio harveyi BB721 to determine the fraction of low molecular weight organic carbon in soil water extract. Calibration of the assay was achieved by measuring the luminescence intensity of starved V. harveyi BB721 cells in the late exponential phase with a concentration range from 0 to 800 µg l(-1) glucose (equivalent to 0-16.0 mg glucose C kg(-1) soil) with the detection limit of 10 µg l(-1) equivalent to 0.20 mg glucose C kg(-1) soil. Results showed that bioluminescence was proportional to the concentration of glucose added to soil. The luminescence intensity of the cells was highly pH dependent and the optimal pH was about 7.0. The average AOC concentration in 32 soils tested was 2.9±2.2 mg glucose C kg(-1). Our data showed that AOC levels in soil water extracts were significantly correlated (P<0.05) with microbial biomass determined as microbial biomass carbon, indicating that the AOC concentrations determined by the method developed might be a good indicator of soil microbial biomass. Our findings provide a new approach that may be used to determine AOC in environmental samples using a non-growth bioluminescence based assay. Understanding the levels of AOC in soil water extract provides new insights into our ability to estimate the most available carbon pool to bacteria in soil that may be easily assimilated into cells for many metabolic processes and suggest possible the links between AOC, microbial regrowth potential, and microbial biomass in soils. PMID:22679477

Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A Mark; Wang, Haizhen; Xu, Jianming; Leddy, Menu; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E

2012-01-01

69

Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from digestive tract of wild shrimp on growth and survival of white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) challenged with Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Two hundred and two strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from digestive tracts of cultivated and wild adult shrimp, including Litopenaeus vannamei, Metapenaeus brevicornis and Penaeus merguiensis were selected based on their antibacterial activity against Vibrio harveyi. LAB strain of MRO3.12 exhibiting highest reduction of V. harveyi was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum MRO3.12 based on the nucleotide sequence of its 16S rDNA, which showed 99% (780/786 bp) homology to L. plantarum strain L5 (GenBank accession number DQ 239698.1). Co-cultivation of V. harveyi and L. plantarum MRO3.12 showed complete reduction of V. harveyi at 24 h under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, whereas L. plantarum increased from 5.29 to 9.47 log CFU ml(-1). After 6-week feeding trial with L. plantarum supplemented diet, white shrimp (L. vannamei) exhibited significant differences (p < 0.05) in relative growth rate (% RGR), feed conversion ratio (FCR) and survival compared to the control group fed with non-supplemented diet. LAB-fed group showed 98.89% survival, whereas only 68.89% survival was observed in the control group. LAB from the digestive tract of probiotic-fed shrimp showed higher level of 5.0 ± 0.14 log CFU/g than the non-supplemented ones (3.34 ± 0.21 log CFU/g). However, total bacterial and non-fermenting vibrios counts decreased in shrimps fed on L. plantarum. Ten days after infection with V. harveyi (5.3-5.5 log CFU ml(-1)), significant survival (p < 0.05) of 77% was observed in LAB supplemented shrimp, while only 67% survival was observed in the control. PMID:22126856

Kongnum, Khanitta; Hongpattarakere, Tipparat

2012-01-01

70

Studies on the immunomodulatory effect of polysaccharide gel extracted from Durio zibethinus in Penaeus monodon shrimp against Vibrio harveyi and WSSV.  

PubMed

Oral administration of polysaccharide gel (PG) in shrimp diets revealed immunostimulating potential and disease resistance in Penaeus monodon (black tiger shrimp). PG from the fruit-rind of Durio zibethinus has been characterized to be a pectic polysaccharide with immunomodulating and antibacterial activities. PG inhibited growth of the shrimp bacterial pathogen, Vibrio harveyi 1526, by agar diffusion and broth microdilution tests. Clear inhibition zones on agar plates were observed at the lowest PG concentration of 3.1 mg/ml, where minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for PG were 6.3 and 12.5 mg/ml, respectively. Each group of juvenile shrimps, initial mean body weight 0.29 +/- 0.04 g, was housed in a closed-recirculating treated water system and was fed with PG-supplemented diets containing 1, 2 and 3% PG or shrimp basal diet in the control group for 8 and 12 weeks. PG-supplemented diets did not contribute to the overall growth of black tiger shrimp. The immune response was evaluated by analysis of prophenoloxidase activity and total hemocyte count in the shrimp fed PG-supplemented diets for 12 weeks. Prophenoloxidase activity in shrimp fed the 1, 2 and 3% PG-supplemented diet and total hemocyte count in shrimp fed the 1 and 2% PG-supplemented diet were higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group. The percent survival was higher in groups fed the 1-3% PG-supplemented diets in challenge tests with either white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) or the bacterium V. harveyi 1526 than that of the control group. Relative percent survival (RPS) values in groups fed the 2% PG-supplemented diet showed the highest RPS value for disease resistance of 100% (at Day 6) and 36% (at Day 4) in treated shrimp against viral and bacterial infection, respectively. Mortality of PG-supplemented diets in treated shrimps against WSSV infection was also found to be much lower (P < 0.05) than that of the control group. PMID:20034573

Pholdaeng, Komsil; Pongsamart, Sunanta

2010-04-01

71

Prevention of quorum-sensing-mediated biofilm development and virulence factors production in Vibrio spp. by curcumin.  

PubMed

The increasing occurrence of disease outbreaks caused by Vibrio spp. and the emergence of antibiotic resistance has led to a growing interest in finding alternative strategies to prevent vibriosis. Since the pathogenicity of vibrios is controlled in part by quorum-sensing (QS) system, interfering with this mechanism would prevent the pathogenicity of vibrios without developing resistance. Hence, a non-toxic phytochemical curcumin from Curcuma longa was assessed for its potential in reducing the production of QS-dependent virulence factors in Vibrio spp. The obtained results evidenced 88% reduction in bioluminescence of Vibrio harveyi by curcumin. Further, curcumin exhibited a significant inhibition in alginate, exopolysaccharides, motility, biofilm development and other virulence factors production in Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and V. harveyi. In in vivo analysis, curcumin enhanced the survival rate of Artemia nauplii up to 67% against V. harveyi infection by attenuating its QS-mediated virulence. PMID:23354447

Packiavathy, Issac Abraham Sybiya Vasantha; Sasikumar, Pitchaikani; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Veera Ravi, Arumugam

2013-12-01

72

Pathogenic vibrios in environmental, seafood and clinical sources in Germany.  

PubMed

Bacteria of the family Vibrionaceae naturally occur in marine and estuarine environments. Only few species of Vibrionaceae are associated with human cases of gastroenteritis, ear and wound infections, caused by ingestion of seafood or contact with Vibrio containing water. Increasing consumption of seafood (fish, fishery products and shellfish) poses a possible source of Vibrio infections in Germany. Additionally, there is a growing concern that abundances of pathogenic vibrios may increase in German coastal waters as a result of e.g. climate change resulting in probably rising surface water temperatures. According to the One Health concept the VibrioNet consortium started in 2010 to investigate the occurrence and relevance of non-cholera vibrios of human concern in Germany. Vibrios from environmental, seafood and clinical sources were analyzed with the aim to find connections between different reservoirs or sources and to identify potential ways of transmission of these pathogens to assess the risk of infections associated with them. Potentially pathogenic strains mostly belong to the species Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae. Investigations on imported seafood and mussels from primary production areas confirmed the frequent occurrence of these species. Moreover, studies of German coastal waters and sediments showed the presence and seasonality of these marine bacteria. So far the incidence of clinical cases of vibriosis in Germany is low. Between 1994 and 2013 thirteen cases of Vibrio spp. associated wound infections and/or septicaemia have been reported. However, the high prevalence of vibrios in aquatic environments and aquatic organisms is of concern and demands continued control of food and surveillance for clinical infections with pathogenic vibrios. PMID:25129553

Huehn, Stephan; Eichhorn, Christin; Urmersbach, Sara; Breidenbach, Janina; Bechlars, Silke; Bier, Nadja; Alter, Thomas; Bartelt, Edda; Frank, Christina; Oberheitmann, Boris; Gunzer, Florian; Brennholt, Nicole; Böer, Simone; Appel, Bernd; Dieckmann, Ralf; Strauch, Eckhard

2014-10-01

73

Mortalities of eastern and pacific oyster larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio cora...

74

Chemical and structural characterization of hydroxamate siderophore produced by marine Vibrio harveyi  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, 22 different bacteria were isolated from open ocean water from the Gulf of Mannar, India. Of the 22\\u000a isolates, 4 were identified as Vibrio spp. (VM1, VM2, VM3 and VM4) and found to produce siderophores (iron-binding chelators) under iron-limited conditions. Different\\u000a media were found to have an influence on siderophore production. Maximum siderophore production was observed

R. M. Murugappan; A. Aravinth; M. Karthikeyan

2011-01-01

75

Preliminary assessment of mutagenic and anti-mutagenic potential of some aminoalkanolic derivatives of xanthone by use of the Vibrio harveyi assay.  

PubMed

The Vibrio harveyi assay was used to evaluate mutagenic and anti-mutagenic effects of four new aminoalkanolic derivatives of xanthone with anticonvulsant activity, to select the potentially safe compounds for further in vivo studies in animal models. The study showed that at a concentration of 40 ng/ml the test compounds were not mutagenic. Additionally, two of the investigated compounds, namely the (R,S)-N-methyl-1-amino-2-propanol derivative of 6-methoxyxanthone (compound III) and the (R)-N-methyl-2-amino-1-butanol derivative of 7-chloroxanthone (compound IV) were strong inhibitors of the mutagenicity induced by 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) in V. harveyi strains BB7M and BB7XM. The inhibition percentages for compound IV were 49 (in BB7M) and 69 (in BB7XM), whereas for compound III these percentages were 47 (in BB7M) and 42 (in BB7XM), respectively. The present study demonstrates that four bioactive derivatives of xanthone display no mutagenic activity in the V. harveyi assay. In addition, compounds III and IV demonstrated considerable anti-mutagenic activity in this test. Based on the results obtained here, these compounds could be selected for further studies in animal models, while compounds III and IV should be tested further for their anti-mutagenic properties. PMID:24769486

S?oczy?ska, Karolina; Waszkielewicz, Anna Maria; Marona, Henryk

2014-07-01

76

Severe Wound Infection with Photobacterium damselae ssp. damselae and Vibrio harveyi, following a Laceration Injury in Marine Environment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Marine microorganisms are uncommon etiologies of skin and skin structure infections, that is, wound infections. We report a case of severe wound infection, caused by the marine Photobacterium damselae (Vibrionaceae), in a 64-year-old male patient, returning from Australia. The isolate tested positive for pPHDD1, a plasmid conferring high-level virulence. Furthermore, the wound was coinfected with Vibrio harveyi, a halophile bacterium, which has never been reported from human infections before. Identification was achieved by use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and confirmed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Data retrieval from bibliography was complicated since P. damselae has been renamed often with a number of synonyms present in the literature: Photobacterium damsela, Vibrio damselae, Vibrio damsela, Pasteurella damselae, and Listonella damsela. With all synonyms used as query terms, a literature search provided less than 20 cases published worldwide. A majority of those cases presenting as severe wound infection are even fatal following progression into necrotizing fasciitis. Management with daily wound dressing and antibiotic therapy (ofloxacin empirically, followed by doxycycline after availability of microbiology) led in the reported case to a favorable outcome, which seems to be, however, the exception based on a review of the available literature. PMID:24171004

Hundenborn, Jörg; Thurig, Steffi

2013-01-01

77

Vibriophages and Their Interactions with the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum  

PubMed Central

Vibrio anguillarum is an important pathogen in aquaculture, responsible for the disease vibriosis in many fish and invertebrate species. Disease control by antibiotics is a concern due to potential development and spread of antibiotic resistance. The use of bacteriophages to control the pathogen may offer a non-antibiotic-based approach to reduce vibriosis. A detailed understanding of the phage-host interaction is needed to evaluate the potential of phages to control the pathogen. In this study, we examined the diversity and interactions of 11 vibriophages, 24 V. anguillarum strains, and 13 Vibrio species strains. Together, the host ranges of the 11 phages covered all of the tested 37 Vibrio sp. host strains, which represented considerable temporal (20 years) and geographical (9 countries) differences in their origins of isolation. Thus, despite the occurrence of unique susceptibility patterns of the individual host isolates, key phenotypic properties related to phage susceptibility are distributed worldwide and maintained in the global Vibrio community for decades. The phage susceptibility pattern of the isolates did not show any relation to the physiological relationships obtained from Biolog GN2 profiles, demonstrating that similar phage susceptibility patterns occur across broad phylogenetic and physiological differences in Vibrio strains. Subsequent culture experiments with two phages and two V. anguillarum hosts demonstrated an initial strong lytic potential of the phages. However, rapid regrowth of both phage-resistant and phage-sensitive cells following the initial lysis suggested that several mechanisms of protection against phage infection had developed in the host populations. PMID:24610858

Tan, Demeng; Gram, Lone

2014-01-01

78

Identification of immune-related genes from kidney and spleen of turbot, Psetta maxima (L.), by suppression subtractive hybridization following challenge with Vibrio harveyi.  

PubMed

Suppression subtractive hybridization was used to investigate the response of turbot, Psetta maxima (L.), to Vibrio harveyi, by using a cDNA library constructed from artificially infected turbot kidney and spleen mRNA. Forty-nine expressed sequence tags were obtained. Several immune system genes were identified, including a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ia gene and a heat shock protein 70 gene. Some signalling molecules were also present in the cDNA libraries, including src-family tyrosine kinase SCK, sgk-1 serine-threonine protein kinase and amyloid precursor-like protein 2. The full length of MHC class Ia cDNA was cloned from turbot cDNA by rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction. The nucleotide sequence of turbot MHC class Ia has been submitted to GenBank with accession number EF032639. The turbot MHC class Ia cDNA has an open reading frame encoding 354 amino acids, and the deduced amino acid sequence of turbot MHC class Ia has 68%, 54%, 51%, 52%, 57%, 33%, 29% and 29% identities to those of olive flounder, medaka, rainbow trout, Atlantic cod, tiger puffer, chicken, mouse and human, respectively. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR was performed for the MHC class Ia gene, and it was revealed that the expression level of the MHC class Ia gene in V. harveyi-challenged turbot increased to fourfold that of the controls. PMID:18577100

Wang, C; Zhang, X-H; Jia, A; Chen, J; Austin, B

2008-07-01

79

Draft Genome Sequence of Fish Pathogenic Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2.  

PubMed

Vibrio vulnificus is a marine pathogen capable of causing severe soft tissue infections and septicemia in humans. V. vulnificus biotype 2 is the etiological agent of fish vibriosis. We describe here the first draft genome sequence of V. vulnificus biotype 2, strain ES-7601, isolated from an infected eel in Japan. PMID:25428972

Koton, Yael; Eghbaria, Saleh; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Bisharat, Naiel

2014-01-01

80

Draft Genome Sequence of Fish Pathogenic Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 2  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus is a marine pathogen capable of causing severe soft tissue infections and septicemia in humans. V. vulnificus biotype 2 is the etiological agent of fish vibriosis. We describe here the first draft genome sequence of V. vulnificus biotype 2, strain ES-7601, isolated from an infected eel in Japan. PMID:25428972

Koton, Yael; Eghbaria, Saleh; Gordon, Michal; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered

2014-01-01

81

Genome Sequences of Vibrio navarrensis, a Potential Human Pathogen  

PubMed Central

Vibrio navarrensis is an aquatic bacterium recently shown to be associated with human illness. We report the first genome sequences of three V. navarrensis strains obtained from clinical and environmental sources. Preliminary analyses of the sequences reveal that V. navarrensis contains genes commonly associated with virulence in other human pathogens. PMID:25414502

Gladney, Lori M.; Katz, Lee S.; Knipe, Kristen M.; Rowe, Lori A.; Conley, Andrew B.; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

2014-01-01

82

Low Dose Gamma Irradiation to Reduce Pathogenic Vibrios in Live Oysters (Crassostrea virginica)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathogenic strains of Vibrio (Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus), natural inhabitants of estuarine and ocean environments, can cause serious illness and death in susceptible persons from consumption of raw half-shell oysters. Objectives of this study were (1) to establish the irradiation dose needed to reduce pathogenic vibrios to nondetectable levels and (2) to determine consumer's ability to differentiate between irradiated

Linda Andrews; Michael Jahncke; Kumar Mallikarjunan

2003-01-01

83

Benthic ecology of Vibrio spp. and pathogenic Vibrio species in a coastal Mediterranean environment (La Spezia Gulf, Italy).  

PubMed

We carried out a 16-month in situ study to investigate the ecology of Vibrio spp. and pathogenic Vibrio species in coastal sediments of the Mediterranean Sea, employing multiple-regression analysis to reveal the major environmental factors controlling their occurrence in the benthic environment. In addition, association between vibrios and sediment-inhabiting meiofauna, which is a major component of benthic ecosystems, was investigated. Culturable and total Vibrio spp. estimates by most-probable-number technique coupled with standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods, respectively, were at least one order of magnitude higher in sediment than in seawater. In addition, potential human pathogenic species Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus occurred in the sediment with V. parahaemolyticus being the most frequently found. In the pelagic environment, 60% of total variance in culturable Vibrio data was explained by sea surface temperature (40%), salinity (13%) and organic matter concentration (7%). In the benthic environment, sea surface temperature was the only factor that significantly affected culturable Vibrio occurrence although it explained only 25% of total variance, suggesting that additional unexplored factors may play a role as well. No correlation was found between culturable Vibrio spp. concentrations and the abundance of harpacticoid copepods in the sediment whilst a negative correlation was found between Vibrio spp. and nematode abundance which accounted for almost 90% of the total meiofaunal density. Taxonomic analysis revealed that selective bacterial feeders accounted for nearly 50% of the total nematode community and included genera such as Terschellingia, Molgolaimus and Halalaimus, suggesting that top-down control by nematode grazing may be an important factor affecting Vibrio occurrence in these sediments. It is concluded that the benthic marine environment may function as a reservoir of Vibrio spp. and potential pathogenic vibrios whose ecological features appeared substantially different from the ones recognised in the pelagic environment. PMID:19543938

Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Moreno, Mariapaola; Fabiano, Mauro; Pane, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

2009-11-01

84

Vibrio vulnificusBiotype 2, Pathogenic for Eels, Is Also an Opportunistic Pathogen for Humans  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report that the eel pathogen Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is also an opportunistic pathogen for humans. Results from a detailed comparative study using reference strains of both biotypes revealed that the clinical strain ATCC 33817, originally isolated from a human leg wound and classified as V. vulnificus (no reference on its biotype is noted), belongs to biotype 2 of

CARMEN AMARO; ANDELENA G. BIOSCA

85

Temperature regulation of virulence factors in the pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.  

PubMed

Sea surface temperatures (SST) are rising because of global climate change. As a result, pathogenic Vibrio species that infect humans and marine organisms during warmer summer months are of growing concern. Coral reefs, in particular, are already experiencing unprecedented degradation worldwide due in part to infectious disease outbreaks and bleaching episodes that are exacerbated by increasing SST. For example, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a globally distributed bacterium associated with multiple coral diseases, infects corals at temperatures above 27 °C. The mechanisms underlying this temperature-dependent pathogenicity, however, are unknown. In this study, we identify potential virulence mechanisms using whole genome sequencing of V. coralliilyticus ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) BAA-450. Furthermore, we demonstrate direct temperature regulation of numerous virulence factors using proteomic analysis and bioassays. Virulence factors involved in motility, host degradation, secretion, antimicrobial resistance and transcriptional regulation are upregulated at the higher virulent temperature of 27 °C, concurrent with phenotypic changes in motility, antibiotic resistance, hemolysis, cytotoxicity and bioluminescence. These results provide evidence that temperature regulates multiple virulence mechanisms in V. coralliilyticus, independent of abundance. The ecological and biological significance of this temperature-dependent virulence response is reinforced by climate change models that predict tropical SST to consistently exceed 27 °C during the spring, summer and fall seasons. We propose V. coralliilyticus as a model Gram-negative bacterium to study temperature-dependent pathogenicity in Vibrio-related diseases. PMID:22158392

Kimes, Nikole E; Grim, Christopher J; Johnson, Wesley R; Hasan, Nur A; Tall, Ben D; Kothary, Mahendra H; Kiss, Hajnalka; Munk, A Christine; Tapia, Roxanne; Green, Lance; Detter, Chris; Bruce, David C; Brettin, Thomas S; Colwell, Rita R; Morris, Pamela J

2012-04-01

86

Inhibitory activity of probiotic Bacillus subtilis UTM 126 against vibrio species confers protection against vibriosis in juvenile shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).  

PubMed

The bacterial strain Bacillus subtilis UTM 126 produced antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Vibrio species, including V. alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. harveyi. The probiotic effect of B. subtilis was tested by feeding juvenile shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) food supplemented with B. subtilis (10(5 )CFU/g) for 28 days before an immersion challenge with V. harveyi at 10(5 )CFU/mL for 24 h. The treatment with B. subtilis UTM 126 decreased final mortality to 18.25%, compared with 51.75% in the control group. Bacillus subtilis UTM 126 has potential applications for controlling pathogenic V. harveyi in shrimp aquaculture. PMID:17680306

Balcázar, José Luis; Rojas-Luna, Tyrone

2007-11-01

87

Individual and Combined Roles of the Master Regulators AphA and LuxR in Control of the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Regulon  

PubMed Central

Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to control transitions between individual and group behaviors. In the Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing circuit, two master transcription factors, AphA and LuxR, coordinate the quorum-sensing response. Here we show that AphA regulates 167 genes, LuxR regulates 625 genes, and they coregulate 77 genes. LuxR strongly controls genes at both low cell density and high cell density, suggesting that it is the major quorum-sensing regulator. In contrast, AphA is absent at high cell density and acts to fine-tune quorum-sensing gene expression at low cell density. We examined two loci as case studies of coregulation by AphA and LuxR. First, AphA and LuxR directly regulate expression of the genes encoding the quorum-regulatory small RNAs Qrr2, Qrr3, and Qrr4, the consequence of which is a specifically timed transition between the individual and the group life-styles. Second, AphA and LuxR repress type III secretion system genes but at different times and to different extents. The consequence of this regulation is that type III secretion is restricted to a peak at mid-cell density. Thus, the asymmetric production of AphA and LuxR coupled with differences in their strengths and timing of target gene regulation generate a precise temporal pattern of gene expression. PMID:23204455

van Kessel, Julia C.; Rutherford, Steven T.; Shao, Yi; Utria, Alan F.

2013-01-01

88

Occurrence, Diversity, and Pathogenicity of Halophilic Vibrio spp. and Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae from Estuarine Waters along the Italian Adriatic Coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence, diversity, and pathogenicity of Vibrio spp. were investigated in two estuaries along the Italian Adriatic coast. Vibrio alginolyticus was the predominant species, followed by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, non-O1 Vibrio cholerae, and Vibrio vulnificus. By using a biochemical fingerprinting method, all isolates were grouped into nine phenotypes with similarity levels of 75 to 97.5%. The production of toxins capable of

ELENA BARBIERI; LOREDANA FALZANO; CARLA FIORENTINI; ANNA PIANETTI; WALLY BAFFONE; ALESSIA FABBRI; PAOLA MATARRESE; ANNARITA CASIERE; MOHAMMAD KATOULI; INGER KUHN; ROLAND MOLLBY; FRANCESCA BRUSCOLINI; GIANFRANCO DONELLI

1999-01-01

89

Mortalities of Eastern and Pacific Oyster Larvae Caused by the Pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii.  

PubMed

Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a well-known coral pathogen, has recently been shown to elicit mortality in fish and shellfish. Several strains of V. coralliilyticus, such as ATCC 19105 and Pacific isolates RE22 and RE98, were misidentified as V. tubiashii until recently. We compared the mortalities caused by two V. tubiashii and four V. coralliilyticus strains in Eastern and Pacific oyster larvae. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of V. coralliilyticus in Eastern oysters (defined here as the dose required to kill 50% of the population in 6 days) ranged from 1.1 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml seawater; strains RE98 and RE22 were the most virulent. This study shows that V. coralliilyticus causes mortality in Eastern oyster larvae. Results for Pacific oysters were similar, with LD50s between 1.2 × 10(4) and 4.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml. Vibrio tubiashii ATCC 19106 and ATCC 19109 were highly infectious toward Eastern oyster larvae but were essentially nonpathogenic toward healthy Pacific oyster larvae at dosages of ?1.1 × 10(4) CFU/ml. These data, coupled with the fact that several isolates originally thought to be V. tubiashii are actually V. coralliilyticus, suggest that V. coralliilyticus has been a more significant pathogen for larval bivalve shellfish than V. tubiashii, particularly on the U.S. West Coast, contributing to substantial hatchery-associated morbidity and mortality in recent years. PMID:25344234

Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A; Needleman, David S; Church, Karlee M; Häse, Claudia C

2015-01-01

90

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Interference with the quorum sensing systems in a Vibrio  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Interference with the quorum sensing systems in a Vibrio harveyi strain alters is influenced Keywords Brachionus, brominated furanone, quorum sensing, Vibrio harveyi. Correspondence Nguyen whether quorum sensing is involved in the observed phenomena. Methods and Results: Gnotobiotic B

Wood, Thomas K.

91

Phage therapy treatment of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus  

PubMed Central

Vibrio coralliilyticus is an important coral pathogen demonstrated to cause disease outbreaks worldwide. This study investigated the feasibility of applying bacteriophage therapy to treat the coral pathogen V. coralliilyticus. A specific bacteriophage for V. coralliilyticus strain P1 (LMG23696), referred to here as bacteriophage YC, was isolated from the seawater above corals at Nelly Bay, Magnetic Island, central Great Barrier Reef (GBR), the same location where the bacterium was first isolated. Bacteriophage YC was shown to be a lytic phage belonging to the Myoviridae family, with a rapid replication rate, high burst size, and high affinity to its host. By infecting its host bacterium, bacteriophage YC was able to prevent bacterial-induced photosystem inhibition in pure cultures of Symbiodinium, the photosymbiont partner of coral and a target for virulence factors produced by the bacterial pathogen. Phage therapy experiments using coral juveniles in microtiter plates as a model system revealed that bacteriophage YC was able to prevent V. coralliilyticus-induced photoinactivation and tissue lysis. These results demonstrate that bacteriophage YC has the potential to treat coral disease outbreaks caused by the bacterial pathogen V. coralliilyticus, making it a good candidate for phage therapy treatment of coral disease. PMID:23239510

Cohen, Yossi; Joseph Pollock, F; Rosenberg, Eugene; Bourne, David G

2013-01-01

92

The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii.  

PubMed

Obtaining a better understanding of mechanisms involved in bacterial infections is of paramount importance for the development of novel agents to control disease caused by (antibiotic resistant) pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we investigated the impact of catecholamine stress hormones on growth and virulence factor production of pathogenic vibrios (i.e. two Vibrio campbellii strains and two Vibrio anguillarum strains). Both norepinephrine and dopamine (at 100 ?M) significantly induced growth in media containing serum. The compounds also increased swimming motility of the tested strains, whereas they had no effect on caseinase, chitinase, and hemolysin activities. Further, antagonists for eukaryotic catecholamine receptors were able to neutralize some of the effects of the catecholamines. Indeed, the dopaminergic receptor antagonist chlorpromazine neutralized the effect of dopamine, and the ?-adrenergic receptor antagonists phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine neutralized the effect of norepinephrine, whereas the ?-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol had limited to no effect. Finally, pretreatment of pathogenic V. campbellii with catecholamines significantly increased its virulence toward giant freshwater prawn larvae. However, the impact of catecholamine receptor antagonists on in vivo virulence was less clear-cut when compared to the in vitro experiments. In summary, our results show that - similar to enteric pathogens - catecholamines also increase the virulence of vibrios that are pathogenic to aquatic organisms by increasing motility and growth in media containing serum. PMID:25264299

Pande, Gde Sasmita J; Suong, Nguyen Thao; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

2014-12-01

93

Comparison of the Heme Iron Utilization Systems of Pathogenic Vibrios  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus utilized heme and hemoglobin as iron sources and contained chromosomal DNA similar to several Vibrio cholerae heme iron utilization genes. A V. parah- aemolyticus gene that performed the function of V. cholerae hutA was isolated. A portion of the tonB1 locus of V. parahaemolyticus was sequenced and found to encode proteins similar in

C. E. RASHIDI; M. Y. MORA; S. M. PAYNE; D. P. HENDERSON

1999-01-01

94

The human pathogenic vibrios--a public health update with environmental perspectives.  

PubMed Central

Pathogenic Vibrio species are naturally-occurring bacteria in freshwater and saline aquatic environments. Counts of free-living bacteria in water are generally less than required to induce disease. Increases in number of organisms towards an infective dose can occur as water temperatures rise seasonally followed by growth and concentration of bacteria on higher animals, such as chitinous plankton, or accumulation by shellfish and seafood. Pathogenic Vibrio species must elaborate a series of virulence factors to elicit disease in humans. Activities which predispose diarrhoeal and extraintestinal infections include ingestion of seafood and shellfish and occupational or recreational exposure to natural aquatic environments, especially those above 20 degrees C. Travel to areas endemic for diseases due to pathogenic Vibrio species may be associated with infections. Host risk factors strongly associated with infections are lack of gastric acid and liver disorders. Involvement of pathogenic Vibrio species in cases of diarrhoea should be suspected especially if infection is associated with ingestion of seafood or shellfish, raw or undercooked, in the previous 72 h. Vibrio species should be suspected in any acute infection associated with wounds sustained or exposed in the marine or estuarine environment. Laboratories serving coastal areas where infection due to pathogenic Vibrio species are most likely to occur should consider routine use of TCBS agar and other detection regimens for culture of Vibrio species from faeces, blood and samples from wound and ear infections. PMID:2673820

West, P. A.

1989-01-01

95

Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema

Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

2013-02-12

96

Pathogenicity comparison of high and low virulent strains of Vibrio scophthalmi in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Vibrio scophthalmi is a bacterial pathogen of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and virulence is different from various strains. There is not information available on pathogenicity to olive flounder caused by different strains of V. scophthalmi. In this study, the high and low virulent strains...

97

Persistence, seasonal dynamics and pathogenic potential of Vibrio communities from Pacific oyster hemolymph.  

PubMed

Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

Wendling, Carolin C; Batista, Frederico M; Wegner, K Mathias

2014-01-01

98

Persistence, Seasonal Dynamics and Pathogenic Potential of Vibrio Communities from Pacific Oyster Hemolymph  

PubMed Central

Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

Wendling, Carolin C.; Batista, Frederico M.; Wegner, K. Mathias

2014-01-01

99

Complete Genome Sequence for the Shellfish Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 Isolated from a Shellfish Hatchery  

PubMed Central

Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp) and two megaplasmids (380,714 and 319,400 bp). PMID:25523764

Bono, James L.; Watson, Michael A.; Needleman, David S.

2014-01-01

100

Complete Genome Sequence for the Shellfish Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 Isolated from a Shellfish Hatchery.  

PubMed

Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp) and two megaplasmids (380,714 and 319,400 bp). PMID:25523764

Richards, Gary P; Bono, James L; Watson, Michael A; Needleman, David S

2014-01-01

101

Complete Genome Sequence of the Larval Shellfish Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii Type Strain ATCC 19109  

PubMed Central

Vibrio tubiashii is a larval shellfish pathogen. Here, we report the first closed genome sequence for this species (ATCC type strain 19109), which consists of two chromosomes (3,294,490 and 1,766,582 bp), two megaplasmids (251,408 and 122,808 bp), and two plasmids (57,076 and 47,973 bp). PMID:25523763

Needleman, David S.; Watson, Michael A.; Bono, James L.

2014-01-01

102

Detection of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster enrichments by real time PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed and evaluated to detect the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh), a current marker of pathogenicity in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The real time PCR fluorogenic probe and primer set was tested against a panel of numerous strains from 13 different bacterial species. Only V. parahaemolyticus strains possessing the tdh

George M Blackstone; Jessica L Nordstrom; Michael C. L Vickery; Michael D Bowen; Richard F Meyer; Angelo DePaola

2003-01-01

103

Abstract Vibrio cholerae is an important human pathogen that causes the diarrheal disease cholera.  

E-print Network

Abstract Vibrio cholerae is an important human pathogen that causes the diarrheal disease cholera of several V. cholerae genes, including those involved in motility, chemotaxis, outer membrane protein pro bile-regulated RND-family efflux systems, named here vexAB and vexCD, that are involved in V. cholerae

Provenzano, Daniele

104

Genetic Determinants of Virulence in the Marine Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum  

PubMed Central

One of the most studied fish pathogens is Vibrio anguillarum. Development of the genetics and biochemistry of the mechanisms of virulence in this fish pathogen together with clinical and ecologic studies has permitted the intensive development of microbiology in fish diseases. It is the intention of this review to compile the exhaustive knowledge accumulated on this bacterium and its interaction with the host fish by reporting a complete analysis of the V. anguillarum virulence factors and the genetics of their complexity. PMID:21625345

Naka, Hiroaki; Crosa, Jorge H.

2011-01-01

105

Vibrios Associated with Litopenaeus vannamei Larvae, Postlarvae, Broodstock, and Hatchery Probionts  

PubMed Central

Several bacteriological surveys were performed from 1994 to 1996 at different Litopenaeus vannamei hatcheries (in Ecuador) and shrimp farms (in Mexico). Samples were taken from routine productions of healthy and diseased L. vannamei larvae, postlarvae, and their culture environment and from healthy and diseased juveniles and broodstock. In Ecuador, the dominant bacterial flora associated with shrimp larvae showing symptoms of zoea 2 syndrome, mysis mold syndrome, and bolitas syndrome has been determined. Strains were characterized by Biolog metabolic fingerprinting and identified by comparison to a database of 850 Vibrio type and reference strains. A selection of strains was further genotypically fine typed by AFLP. Vibrio alginolyticus is predominantly present in all larval stages and is associated with healthy nauplius and zoea stages. AFLP genetic fingerprinting shows high genetic heterogeneity among V. alginolyticus strains, and the results suggest that putative probiotic and pathogenic strains each have specific genotypes. V. alginolyticus was found to be associated with larvae with the zoea 2 syndrome and the mysis mold syndrome, while different Vibrio species (V. alginolyticus and V. harveyi) are associated with the bolitas syndrome. V. harveyi is associated with diseased postlarvae, juveniles, and broodstock. The identities of the strains identified as V. harveyi by the Biolog system could not be unambiguously confirmed by AFLP genomic fingerprinting. Vibrio strain STD3-988 and one unidentified strain (STD3-959) are suspected pathogens of only juvenile and adult stages. V. parahaemolyticus, Photobacterium damselae, and V. mimicus are associated with juvenile and adult stages. PMID:10347048

Vandenberghe, Johan; Verdonck, Linda; Robles-Arozarena, Rocio; Rivera, Gabriel; Bolland, Annick; Balladares, Marcos; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Calderon, Jorge; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Swings, Jean

1999-01-01

106

Vibrios associated with Litopenaeus vannamei larvae, postlarvae, broodstock, and hatchery probionts.  

PubMed

Several bacteriological surveys were performed from 1994 to 1996 at different Litopenaeus vannamei hatcheries (in Ecuador) and shrimp farms (in Mexico). Samples were taken from routine productions of healthy and diseased L. vannamei larvae, postlarvae, and their culture environment and from healthy and diseased juveniles and broodstock. In Ecuador, the dominant bacterial flora associated with shrimp larvae showing symptoms of zoea 2 syndrome, mysis mold syndrome, and bolitas syndrome has been determined. Strains were characterized by Biolog metabolic fingerprinting and identified by comparison to a database of 850 Vibrio type and reference strains. A selection of strains was further genotypically fine typed by AFLP. Vibrio alginolyticus is predominantly present in all larval stages and is associated with healthy nauplius and zoea stages. AFLP genetic fingerprinting shows high genetic heterogeneity among V. alginolyticus strains, and the results suggest that putative probiotic and pathogenic strains each have specific genotypes. V. alginolyticus was found to be associated with larvae with the zoea 2 syndrome and the mysis mold syndrome, while different Vibrio species (V. alginolyticus and V. harveyi) are associated with the bolitas syndrome. V. harveyi is associated with diseased postlarvae, juveniles, and broodstock. The identities of the strains identified as V. harveyi by the Biolog system could not be unambiguously confirmed by AFLP genomic fingerprinting. Vibrio strain STD3-988 and one unidentified strain (STD3-959) are suspected pathogens of only juvenile and adult stages. V. parahaemolyticus, Photobacterium damselae, and V. mimicus are associated with juvenile and adult stages. PMID:10347048

Vandenberghe, J; Verdonck, L; Robles-Arozarena, R; Rivera, G; Bolland, A; Balladares, M; Gomez-Gil, B; Calderon, J; Sorgeloos, P; Swings, J

1999-06-01

107

Vibrio Pathogenicity Island and Cholera Toxin Genetic Element-Associated Virulence Genes and Their Expression in Non-O1 Non-O139 Strains of Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

A non-O1 non-O139 Vibrio cholerae strain, 10259, belonging to the serogroup O53 was shown to harbor genes related to the vibrio pathogenicity island (VPI) and a cholera toxin (CT) genetic element called CTX. While the nucleotide sequence of the strain 10259 tcpA gene differed significantly (26 and 28%) from those of O1 classical and El Tor biotype strains, respectively, partial

Amit Sarkar; Ranjan K. Nandy; G. Balakrish Nair; Asoke C. Ghose

2002-01-01

108

Vibrio vulnificus, a Notably Lethal Human Pathogen Derived from Seafood: A Review of Its Pathogenicity, Subspecies Characterization, and Molecular Methods of Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio vulnificus is presently considered the most infectious and lethal of all human pathogenic vibrios. The organism requires at least 0.5 NaCl for growth, is naturally ubiquitous to marine coastal waters and shellfish, and is sensitive to refrigeration temperatures. Septisemic infections by the organism usually result from the consumption of raw shellfish. Three biotypes are presently recognized and distinguished on

Robert E. Levin

2005-01-01

109

Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis of the pathogenic potential of Vibrio furnissii.  

PubMed

We recently reported the genome sequence of a free-living strain of Vibrio furnissii (NCTC 11218) harvested from an estuarine environment. V. furnissii is a widespread, free-living proteobacterium and emerging pathogen that can cause acute gastroenteritis in humans and lethal zoonoses in aquatic invertebrates, including farmed crustaceans and molluscs. Here we present the analyses to assess the potential pathogenic impact of V. furnissii. We compared the complete genome of V. furnissii with 8 other emerging and pathogenic Vibrio species. We selected and analyzed more deeply 10 genomic regions based upon unique or common features, and used 3 of these regions to construct a phylogenetic tree. Thus, we positioned V. furnissii more accurately than before and revealed a closer relationship between V. furnissii and V. cholerae than previously thought. However, V. furnissii lacks several important features normally associated with virulence in the human pathogens V. cholera and V. vulnificus. A striking feature of the V. furnissii genome is the hugely increased Super Integron, compared to the other Vibrio. Analyses of predicted genomic islands resulted in the discovery of a protein sequence that is present only in Vibrio associated with diseases in aquatic animals. We also discovered evidence of high levels horizontal gene transfer in V. furnissii. V. furnissii seems therefore to have a dynamic and fluid genome that could quickly adapt to environmental perturbation or increase its pathogenicity. Taken together, these analyses confirm the potential of V. furnissii as an emerging marine and possible human pathogen, especially in the developing, tropical, coastal regions that are most at risk from climate change. PMID:25191313

Lux, Thomas M; Lee, Rob; Love, John

2014-01-01

110

Cryptic luminescence in the cold-water fish pathogen Vibrio salmonicida.  

PubMed

The recent discovery that the fish pathogen Vibrio salmonicida is closely related to the luminous bacteria Vibrio fischeri and Vibrio logei suggested that V. salmonicida might also be capable of bioluminescence. Interestingly, cells of V. salmonicida were found to produce light in culture, but only when exposed to either an aliphatic aldehyde and/or the major V. fischeri autoinducer N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, a transcriptional activator of the luminescence (lux) genes. An extract of spent medium of V. salmonicida that should contain any V. salmonicida acyl-homoserine lactone autoinducer, when added to V. fischeri cells, led to an induction of their luminescence. These results show that V. salmonicida is a newly recognized luminous bacterial species that apparently both produces an autoinducer activity and responds to exogenous V. fischeri autoinducer. PMID:10201098

Fidopiastis, P M; Sørum, H; Ruby, E G

1999-02-01

111

Multi-site Analysis Reveals Widespread Antibiotic Resistance in the Marine Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio vulnificus is a serious opportunistic human pathogen commonly found in subtropical coastal waters, and is the leading cause of seafood-borne\\u000a mortality in the USA. This taxon does not sustain prolonged presence in clinical or agricultural settings, where it would\\u000a undergo human-induced selection for antibiotic resistance. Therefore, few studies have verified the effectiveness of commonly\\u000a prescribed antibiotics in V. vulnificus

Craig Baker-Austin; J. V. McArthur; Angela H. Lindell; Meredith S. Wright; R. Cary Tuckfield; Jan Gooch; Liza Warner; James Oliver; Ramunas Stepanauskas

2009-01-01

112

Outcomes of infections of sea anemone Aiptasia pallida with Vibrio spp. pathogenic to corals.  

PubMed

Incidents of coral disease are on the rise. However, in the absence of a surrogate animal host, understanding of the interactions between coral pathogens and their hosts remains relatively limited, compared to other pathosystems of similar global importance. A tropical sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, has been investigated as a surrogate model to study certain aspects of coral biology. Therefore, to test whether the utility of this surrogate model can be extended to study coral diseases, in the present study, we tested its susceptibility to common coral pathogens (Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio shiloi) as well as polymicrobial consortia recovered from the Caribbean Yellow Band Disease (CYBD) lesions. A. pallida was susceptible to each of the tested pathogens. A. pallida responded to the pathogens with darkening of the tissues (associated with an increased melanization) and retraction of tentacles, followed by complete disintegration of polyp tissues. Loss of zooxanthellae was not observed; however, the disease progression pattern is consistent with the behavior of necrotizing pathogens. Virulence of some coral pathogens in Aiptasia was paralleled with their glycosidase activities. PMID:24619233

Zaragoza, William J; Krediet, Cory J; Meyer, Julie L; Canas, Gabriela; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

2014-08-01

113

Distribution and ecology of Vibrio vulnificus and other lactose-fermenting marine vibrios in coastal waters of the southeastern United States.  

PubMed Central

Water, sediment, plankton, and animal samples from five coastal sites from North Carolina to Georgia were sampled for their lactose-fermenting vibrio populations. Over 20% of all vibrios tested were sucrose negative and o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) positive, suggesting identification as the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. These vibrios were isolated from all sample sites and sources (water, sediment, plankton, and animals). Correlations with several of 19 environmental parameters monitored at each site were found for total vibrios. The presence of ONPG-positive, sucrose-negative vibrios was correlated with hydrocarbon levels in the water and, in the case of plankton samples, with salinity. A total of 279 sucrose-negative, ONPG-positive isolates were subjected to numerical taxonomic analysis, which resulted in three major clusters. Cluster I corresponded to and included 11 reference strains of V. vulnificus. Cluster II contained the largest number (133) of isolates, of which the great majority were bioluminescent. Although having a resemblance to V. harveyi, the isolates were ONPG positive and many were H2S positive. Cluster III consisted of strains similar to the group F vibrios (V. fluvialis). Of all of the isolates, 55% were luminescent, of which over 20% were lethal when injected into mice. Problems involved in detecting lactose fermentation among marine vibrios and the potential pathogenicity of these organisms are discussed. PMID:7159083

Oliver, J D; Warner, R A; Cleland, D R

1982-01-01

114

VibrioBase: A MALDI-TOF MS database for fast identification of Vibrio spp. that are potentially pathogenic in humans.  

PubMed

Mesophilic marine bacteria of the family Vibrionaceae, specifically V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, are considered to cause severe illness in humans. Due to climate-change-driven temperature increases, higher Vibrio abundances and infections are predicted for Northern Europe, which in turn necessitates environmental surveillance programs to evaluate this risk. We propose that whole-cell matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) profiling is a promising tool for the fast and reliable species classification of environmental isolates. Because the reference database does not contain sufficient Vibrio spectra we generated the VibrioBase database in this study. Mass spectrometric data were generated from 997 largely environmental strains and filed in this new database. MALDI-TOF MS clusters were assigned based on the species classification obtained by analysis of partial rpoB (RNA polymerase beta-subunit) sequences. The affiliation of strains to species-specific clusters was consistent in 97% of all cases using both approaches, and the extended VibrioBase generated more specific species identifications with higher matching scores compared to the commercially available database. Therefore, we have made the VibrioBase database freely accessible, which paves the way for detailed risk assessment studies of potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. from marine environments. PMID:25466918

Erler, René; Wichels, Antje; Heinemeyer, Ernst-August; Hauk, Gerhard; Hippelein, Martin; Reyes, Nadja Torres; Gerdts, Gunnar

2014-11-01

115

Structure, gene regulation and environmental response of flagella in Vibrio  

PubMed Central

Vibrio species are Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that live in aqueous environments. Several species, such as V. harveyi, V. alginotyticus, and V. splendidus, are associated with diseases in fish or shellfish. In addition, a few species, such as V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus, are risky for humans due to infections from eating raw shellfish infected with these bacteria or from exposure of wounds to the marine environment. Bacterial flagella are not essential to live in a culture medium. However, most Vibrio species are motile and have rotating flagella which allow them to move into favorable environments or to escape from unfavorable environments. This review summarizes recent studies about the flagellar structure, function, and regulation of Vibrio species, especially focused on the Na+-driven polar flagella that are principally responsible for motility and sensing the surrounding environment, and discusses the relationship between flagella and pathogenicity. PMID:24400002

Zhu, Shiwei; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

2013-01-01

116

Excision dynamics of Vibrio pathogenicity island-2 from Vibrio cholerae: role of a recombination directionality factor VefA  

PubMed Central

Background Vibrio Pathogenicity Island-2 (VPI-2) is a 57 kb region present in choleragenic V. cholerae isolates that is required for growth on sialic acid as a sole carbon source. V. cholerae non-O1/O139 pathogenic strains also contain VPI-2, which in addition to sialic acid catabolism genes also encodes a type 3 secretion system in these strains. VPI-2 integrates into chromosome 1 at a tRNA-serine site and encodes an integrase intV2 (VC1758) that belongs to the tyrosine recombinase family. IntV2 is required for VPI-2 excision from chromosome 1, which occurs at very low levels, and formation of a non-replicative circular intermediate. Results We determined the conditions and the factors that affect excision of VPI-2 in V. cholerae N16961. We demonstrate that excision from chromosome 1 is induced at low temperature and after sublethal UV-light irradiation treatment. In addition, after UV-light irradiation compared to untreated cells, cells showed increased expression of three genes, intV2 (VC1758), and two putative recombination directionality factors (RDFs), vefA (VC1785) and vefB (VC1809) encoded within VPI-2. We demonstrate that along with IntV2, the RDF VefA is essential for excision. We constructed a knockout mutant of vefA in V. cholerae N16961, and found that no excision of VPI-2 occurred, indicating that a functional vefA gene is required for excision. Deletion of the second RDF encoded by vefB did not result in a loss of excision. Among Vibrio species in the genome database, we identified 27 putative RDFs within regions that also encoded IntV2 homologues. Within each species the RDFs and their cognate IntV2 proteins were associated with different island regions suggesting that this pairing is widespread. Conclusions We demonstrate that excision of VPI-2 is induced under some environmental stress conditions and we show for the first time that an RDF encoded within a pathogenicity island in V. cholerae is required for excision of the region. PMID:21118541

2010-01-01

117

Administration of Bacillus subtilis strains in the rearing water enhances the water quality, growth performance, immune response, and resistance against Vibrio harveyi infection in juvenile white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.  

PubMed

In this study, vegetative cell suspensions of two Bacillus subtilis strains, L10 and G1 in equal proportions, was administered at two different doses 10(5) (BM5) and 10(8) (BM8) CFU ml(-1) in the rearing water of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) for eight weeks. Both probiotic groups showed a significant reduction of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate ions under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In comparison to untreated control group, final weight, weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), food conversion ratio (FCR) and digestive enzymatic activity were significantly greater in the BM5 and BM8 groups. Significant differences for survival were recorded in the BM8 group as compared to the control. Eight weeks after the start of experiment, shrimp were challenged with Vibrio harveyi. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in shrimp survival between probiotic and control groups. Cumulative mortality of the control group was 80%, whereas cumulative mortality of the shrimp that had been given probiotics was 36.7% with MB8 and 50% with MB5. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was employed to determine the mRNA levels of prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (PE), lipopolysaccharide- and ?-1,3-glucan- binding protein (LGBP) and serine protein (SP). The expression of all immune-related genes studied was only significantly up-regulated in the BM5 group compared to the BM8 and control groups. These results suggest that administration of B. subtilis strains in the rearing water confers beneficial effects for shrimp aquaculture, considering water quality, growth performance, digestive enzymatic activity, immune response and disease resistance. PMID:24161773

Zokaeifar, Hadi; Babaei, Nahid; Saad, Che Roos; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Balcazar, Jose Luis

2014-01-01

118

Description of a bacteriocinogenic plasmid in Beneckea harveyi.  

PubMed Central

A total of 795 strains of marine Vibrio species and Beneckea harveyi, a luminescent marine bacterium, were isolated from various sources in the area of Galveston Island, Tex., and screened for the production of bacteriocin-like substances. More than 8% of the Vibrio isolates produced low-molecular-weight (dialyzable) substances, which were lethal to a test strain of V. parahaemolyticus. Approximately 5% of the B. harveyi isolates produced higher-molecular-weight (nondialyzable) substances which were lethal to a test strain of B. harveyi. One of the B. harveyi strains (strain SY) produced a nondialyzable substance which was lethal to two of 39 strains of B. harveyi. The substance showed no activity toward 17 test strains drawn from the Vibrionaceae and Enterobacteriaceae. Strain SY showed no sensitivity to its own lethal agent and was shown by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy to harbor a single plasmid of 38 x 10(6) daltons. Variants of strain SY lacking the plasmid were produced by growth in the presence of the antibiotic novobiocin. These variants lacked both the ability to produce the lethal substance and the ability to survive in its presence. The lethal agent produced by strain SY is the first bacteriocin reported in marine bacteria. The term "harveyicin" is proposed to name this lethal substance. Images PMID:317423

McCall, J O; Sizemore, R K

1979-01-01

119

An outbreak of foodborne gastroenteritis caused by dual pathogens, Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden and Vibrio fluvialis in Kolkata, India.  

PubMed

Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden and Vibrio fluvialis were identified as etiological agents of a foodborne gastroenteritis outbreak after an Iftar feast in North Dumdum. Of the 278 cases admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kolkata, 44 stool samples were tested for the enteric pathogens. Six were positive for Salmonella Weltevreden, 5 for Vibrio fluvialis, and 8 contained both of the pathogens. Consumption of mutton-ghogni might have been the likely vehicle of this outbreak. In the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Salmonella Weltevreden was identified as a single clone but the V. fluvialis strains were heterogeneous. PMID:23789767

Chowdhury, Goutam; Sarkar, Anirban; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Bhattacharya, Mihir K; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

2013-10-01

120

Parallel Quorum Sensing Systems Converge to Regulate Virulence in Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi possesses two quorum sensing systems (System 1 and System 2) that regulate bioluminescence. Although the Vibrio cholerae genome sequence reveals that a V. harveyi-like System 2 exists, it does not predict the existence of a V. harveyi-like System 1 or any obvious quorum sensing-controlled target genes. In this report we identify and characterize the genes

Melissa B. Miller; Karen Skorupski; Derrick H. Lenz; Ronald K. Taylor; Bonnie L. Bassler

2002-01-01

121

Multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains.  

PubMed

Foodborne disease caused by pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus has become a serious public health problem in many countries. Rapid diagnosis and the identification of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus are very important in the context of public health. In this study, an EvaGreen-based multiplex real-time PCR assay was established for the detection of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. This assay targeted three genetic markers of V. parahaemolyticus (species-specific gene toxR and virulence genes tdh and trh). The assay could unambiguously identify pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus with a minimum detection limit of 1.4 pg genomic DNA per reaction (concentration giving a positive multiplex real-time PCR result in 95% of samples). The specificity of the assay was evaluated using 72 strains of V. parahaemolyticus and other bacteria. A validation of the assay with clinical samples confirmed its sensitivity and specificity. Our data suggest the newly established multiplex real-time PCR assay is practical, cost-effective, specific, sensitive and capable of high-throughput detection of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:24924797

He, Peiyan; Chen, Zhongwen; Luo, Jianyong; Wang, Henghui; Yan, Yong; Chen, Lixia; Gao, Wenjie

2014-01-01

122

Biochemical properties of a new ?-carbonic anhydrase from the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

Abstract Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of cholera and colonizes the upper small intestine where sodium bicarbonate is present at a high concentration. Sodium bicarbonate is a potential inducer of virulence gene expression. Bacteria can increase cytosolic bicarbonate levels through the existence of transporter family proteins or through the action of metalloenzymes, called carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1). Vibrio cholerae, lacking of transporter proteins in its genome, utilizes the CA system to accumulate bicarbonate into the cell suggesting a pivotal role of this metalloenzymes in the microbial virulence. Here, we report for the first time the characterization of the ?-CA of V. cholerae (VchCA), which has been identified by translated genome inspection. The ?-CA encoding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein purified to homogeneity. This investigation aimed to study the biochemical properties of VchCA and to provide preliminary insights in the field of this pathogen virulence. VchCA has a low esterase activity with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate, and a high activity for the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate. PMID:23321008

Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Scozzafava, Andrea; Carginale, Vincenzo; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

2014-02-01

123

Genome anatomy of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus of crustacean origin  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an important human pathogen, is associated with gastroenteritis and transmitted through partially cooked seafood. It has become a major concern in the production and trade of marine food products. The prevalence of potentially virulent and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in raw seafood is of public health significance. Here we describe the genome sequence of a V. parahaemolyticus isolate of crustacean origin which was cultured from prawns in 2008 in Selangor, Malaysia (isolate PCV08-7). The next generation sequencing and analysis revealed that the genome of isolate PCV08-7 has closest similarity to that of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. However, there are certain unique features of the PCV08-7 genome such as the absence of TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), and the presence of HU-alpha insertion. The genome of isolate PCV08-7 encodes a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), an important virulence factor that classifies PCV08-7 isolate to be a serovariant of O3:K6 strain. Apart from these, we observed that there is certain pattern of genetic rearrangements that makes V. parahaemolyticus PCV08-7 a non-pandemic clone. We present detailed genome statistics and important genetic features of this bacterium and discuss how its survival, adaptation and virulence in marine and terrestrial hosts can be understood through the genomic blueprint and that the availability of genome sequence entailing this important Malaysian isolate would likely enhance our understanding of the epidemiology, evolution and transmission of foodborne Vibrios in Malaysia and elsewhere. PMID:24330647

2013-01-01

124

Ocean acidification and host-pathogen interactions: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, encountering Vibrio tubiashii.  

PubMed

Ocean acidification (OA) can shift the ecological balance between interacting organisms. In this study, we have used a model system to illustrate the interaction between a calcifying host organism, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and a common bivalve bacterial pathogen, Vibrio tubiashii, with organisms being exposed to a level of acidification projected to occur by the end of the 21st century. OA exposures of the mussels were carried out in relative long-term (4 months) and short-term (4 days) experiments. We found no effect of OA on the culturability of V.?tubiashii, in broth or in seawater. OA inhibited mussel shell growth and impaired crystalline shell structures but did not appear to affect mussel immune parameters (i.e haemocyte counts and phagocytotic capacity). Despite no evident impact on host immunity or growth and virulence of the pathogen, V.?tubiashii was clearly more successful in infecting mussels exposed to long-term OA compared to those maintained under ambient conditions. Moreover, OA exposed V.?tubiashii increased their viability when exposed to haemocytes of OA-treated mussel. Our findings suggest that even though host organisms may have the capacity to cope with periods of OA, these conditions may alter the outcome of host-pathogen interactions, favouring the success of the latter. PMID:24147969

Asplund, Maria E; Baden, Susanne P; Russ, Sarah; Ellis, Robert P; Gong, Ningping; Hernroth, Bodil E

2014-04-01

125

Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens  

PubMed Central

Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens. PMID:21314902

2011-01-01

126

Molecular epidemiology and genetic variation of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Peru.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a foodborne pathogen that has become a public health concern at the global scale. The epidemiological significance of V. parahaemolyticus infections in Latin America received little attention until the winter of 1997 when cases related to the pandemic clone were detected in the region, changing the epidemic dynamics of this pathogen in Peru. With the aim to assess the impact of the arrival of the pandemic clone on local populations of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in Peru, we investigated the population genetics and genomic variation in a complete collection of non-pandemic strains recovered from clinical sources in Peru during the pre- and post-emergence periods of the pandemic clone. A total of 56 clinical strains isolated in Peru during the period 1994 to 2007, 13 strains from Chile and 20 strains from Asia were characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and checked for the presence of Variable Genomic Regions (VGRs). The emergence of O3:K6 cases in Peru implied a drastic disruption of the seasonal dynamics of infections and a shift in the serotype dominance of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. After the arrival of the pandemic clone, a great diversity of serovars not previously reported was detected in the country, which supports the introduction of additional populations cohabitating with the pandemic group. Moreover, the presence of genomic regions characteristic of the pandemic clone in other non-pandemic strains may represent early evidence of genetic transfer from the introduced population to the local communities. Finally, the results of this study stress the importance of population admixture, horizontal genetic transfer and homologous recombination as major events shaping the structure and diversity of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23696906

Gavilan, Ronnie G; Zamudio, Maria L; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

2013-01-01

127

Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Variation of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Peru  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a foodborne pathogen that has become a public health concern at the global scale. The epidemiological significance of V. parahaemolyticus infections in Latin America received little attention until the winter of 1997 when cases related to the pandemic clone were detected in the region, changing the epidemic dynamics of this pathogen in Peru. With the aim to assess the impact of the arrival of the pandemic clone on local populations of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in Peru, we investigated the population genetics and genomic variation in a complete collection of non-pandemic strains recovered from clinical sources in Peru during the pre- and post-emergence periods of the pandemic clone. A total of 56 clinical strains isolated in Peru during the period 1994 to 2007, 13 strains from Chile and 20 strains from Asia were characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and checked for the presence of Variable Genomic Regions (VGRs). The emergence of O3:K6 cases in Peru implied a drastic disruption of the seasonal dynamics of infections and a shift in the serotype dominance of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. After the arrival of the pandemic clone, a great diversity of serovars not previously reported was detected in the country, which supports the introduction of additional populations cohabitating with the pandemic group. Moreover, the presence of genomic regions characteristic of the pandemic clone in other non-pandemic strains may represent early evidence of genetic transfer from the introduced population to the local communities. Finally, the results of this study stress the importance of population admixture, horizontal genetic transfer and homologous recombination as major events shaping the structure and diversity of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23696906

Gavilan, Ronnie G.; Zamudio, Maria L.; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

2013-01-01

128

Kinetics of adhesion of selected fish-pathogenic Vibrio strains of skin mucus of gilt-head sea bream (Sparus aurata L.).  

PubMed Central

The kinetics of adhesion of Vibrio strains isolated from diseased fish to skin mucus of gilt-head sea bream was studied. A modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was calculated, and the results obtained indicate that the strains tested (Vibrio alginolyticus DP1HE4 and Vibrio anguillarum-like DC12R8 and DC12R9) showed a saturation kinetics except for V. alginolyticus (CAN), which showed a proportional adsorption kinetics. The adhesive capability for skin mucus does not seem to be an essential virulence factor of pathogenic strains of Vibrio, since this specific interaction depended on several environmental factors, temperature and salinity being the most important. However, the absence of an inhibitory effect of mucus on the pathogenic microorganisms, and the capability of the Vibrio strains to utilize mucus as a carbon source, could favor their settlement on the skin with a potential for infection of cultured, stressed fish. PMID:8837420

Bordas, M A; Balebona, M C; Zorrilla, I; Borrego, J J; Moriñigo, M A

1996-01-01

129

Pathogenicity of Vibrio alginolyticus for Cultured Gilt-Head Sea Bream (Sparus aurata L.)  

PubMed Central

The in vivo and in vitro pathogenic activities of whole cells and extracellular products of Vibrio alginolyticus for cultured gilt-head sea bream were evaluated. The 50% lethal doses ranged from 5.4 × 104 to 1.0 × 106 CFU/g of body weight. The strains examined had the ability to adhere to skin, gill, and intestinal mucus of sea bream and to cultured cells of a chinook salmon embryo cell line. In addition, the in vitro ability of V. alginolyticus to adhere to mucus and skin cells of sea bream was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. The biological activities of extracellular products of V. alginolyticus were hydrolytic activities; the products were able to degrade sea bream mucus. V. alginolyticus was cytotoxic for fish cell lines and lethal for sea bream. Moreover, the extracellular products could degrade sea bream tissues. However, experiments performed with the bath immersion inoculation technique demonstrated that V. alginolyticus should be considered a pathogen for sea bream only when the mucus layer is removed and the skin is damaged. PMID:9797276

Balebona, M. Carmen; Andreu, Manuel J.; Bordas, M. Angeles; Zorrilla, Irene; Moriñigo, Miguel A.; Borrego, Juan J.

1998-01-01

130

The MSHA pilus of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has lectin functionality and enables TTSS-mediated pathogenicity.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a seafood-borne pathogen which causes acute inflammatory gastroenteritis--a process which is mediated by the translocation of type three secretion system effector proteins. The molecular interactions governing colonization of the intestinal epithelium by this pathogen remain poorly understood. The mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin (MSHA) pilus was identified in this study as a significant factor in bacterial-host cell adherence and subsequent pathogenesis towards Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells. Deletion of essential components of the MSHA pilus resulted in a 60% decrease in adherence and a similar reduction in bacterial uptake by human intestinal cells. The diminished adherence of MSHA mutants correlated with significant decreases in V. parahaemolyticus-induced Caco-2 cell lysis, cell rounding and IL-8 secretion. Glycan array comparison between the V. parahaemolyticus wild type and MSHA deficient mutants identified lectin functionality for the MSHA pilus with specificity towards the fucosylated blood group oligosaccharide antigens Lewis A and X and blood groups A and B. The MSHA pilus also exhibited high affinity for the structurally related asialo-GM1 ganglioside, lacto-N-fucopentaose I and lacto-N-difucohexaose I. We hypothesize that these glycans act as receptors for the MSHA pilus in the gastrointestinal tract, thereby facilitating efficient colonization of the intestinal epithelium by V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23981476

O'Boyle, Nicky; Houeix, Benoit; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Joshi, Lokesh; Boyd, Aoife

2013-12-01

131

Marine Lactobacillus pentosus H16 protects Artemia franciscana from Vibrio alginolyticus pathogenic effects.  

PubMed

Vibrio alginolyticus is an opportunistic pathogen which may affect different aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the probiotic properties and the protective mode of action of Lactobacillus pentosus H16 against V. alginolyticus 03/8525, through in vitro and in vivo studies using Artemia franciscana (hereafter Artemia). This strain showed antimicrobial activity against V. alginolyticus 03/8525 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC33658 possibly related to lactobacilli organic acid production. It was able to survive at high rainbow trout bile concentrations and showed high selective adhesion to rainbow trout mucus (1.2 × 105 ± 8.0 × 103 cells cm-2). H16 outcompeted V. alginolyticus 03/8525 and A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC33658, greatly reducing their adherence to rainbow trout mucus (64.8 and 74.1%, respectively). Moreover, H16 produced a cell-bound biosurfactant which caused an important decrease in the surface tension. H16 also protected Artemia nauplii against mortality when it was administered previous to V. alginolyticus 03/8525 inoculation. Furthermore, H16 bioencapsulated in Artemia, suggesting that it is possible to use live carriers in its administration. We conclude that the ability of L. pentosus H16 to selectively adhere to mucosal surfaces and produce cell-bound biosurfactants, displacing pathogenic strains, in addition to its antimicrobial activity, confer H16 competitive advantages against pathogens as demonstrated in in vivo challenge experiments. Thus, L. pentosus H16, a marine bacterium from the intestinal tract of hake, is an interesting probiotic for Artemia culture and also has the potential to prevent vibriosis in other aquaculture activities such as larvae culture and fish farming. PMID:25667335

Garcés, M E; Sequeiros, C; Olivera, N L

2015-02-10

132

Genomic science in understanding cholera outbreaks and evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a human pathogen.  

PubMed

Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX? prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

Robins, William P; Mekalanos, John J

2014-01-01

133

Interactions between the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus and red-tide dinoflagellates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogenic bacterium in marine and estuarine waters. To investigate interactions between V. parahaemolyticus and co-occurring redtide dinoflagellates, we monitored the daily abundance of 5 common red tide dinoflagellates in laboratory culture; Amphidinium carterae, Cochlodinium ploykrikoides, Gymnodinium impudicum, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Additionally, we measured the ingestion rate of each dinoflagellate on V. parahaemolyticus as a function of prey concentration. Each of the dinoflagellates responded differently to the abundance of V. parahaemolyticus. The abundances of A. carterae and P. micans were not lowered by V. parahaemolyticus, whereas that of C. polykrikodes was lowered considerably. The harmful effect depended on bacterial concentration and incubation time. Most C. polykrikoides cells died after 1 hour incubation when the V. parahaemolyticus concentration was 1.4×107 cells ml-1, while cells died within 2 days of incubation when the bacterial concentration was 1.5×106 cells ml-1. With increasing V. parahaemolyticus concentration, ingestion rates of P. micans, P. minimum, and A. carterae on the prey increased, whereas that on C. polykrikoides decreased. The maximum or highest ingestion rates of P. micans, P. minimum, and A. carterae on V. parahaemolyticus were 55, 5, and 2 cells alga-1 h-1, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that V. parahaemolyticus can be both the killer and prey for some red tide dinoflagellates.

Seong, Kyeong Ah; Jeong, Hae Jin

2011-06-01

134

Iron(III) complexation by Vanchrobactin, a siderophore of the bacterial fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.  

PubMed

The bacterial fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum serotype O2 strain RV22 produces the mono catecholate siderophore Vanchrobactin (Vb) under conditions of iron deficiency. Vb contains two potential bidentate coordination sites: catecholate and salicylate groups. The iron(III) coordination properties of Vb is investigated in aqueous solutions using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The stepwise equilibrium constants (log?K) for successive addition of Vb dianion to a ferric ion are 19.9; 13.3, and 9.5, respectively, for an overall association constant of 42.7. Based on the previous results, we estimated the equilibrium concentration of free iron(III) under physiological conditions for pH 7.4 solution containing 10(-6) M total iron and 10(-5) M total Vb as pFe = 20 (=-log[Fe(3+)]). The Vb model compounds catechol (Cat) and 2,4-dihydroxy-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)benzamide (Dhb) have also been examined, and the obtained results show that the interaction of the whole system of Vb that contains the ferric-chelating groups of both Dhb and Cat, is synergically greater than the separate parts; i.e. Vb is the best chelating agent either in acid or basic media. In summary, bacteria employing Vb-mediated iron transport thus are able to compete effectively for iron with other microorganisms within which they live. PMID:21494744

Iglesias, Emilia; Brandariz, Isabel; Jiménez, Carlos; Soengas, Raquel G

2011-05-01

135

Anion inhibition studies of the ?-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

An ?-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has been recently cloned and characterized in the human pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae, denominated VchCA (Del Prete et al. J. Med. Chem.2012, 55, 10742). This enzyme shows a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, comparable to that of the human (h) isoform hCA I. Many inorganic anions and several small molecules were investigated as VchCA inhibitors. Inorganic anions such as cyanate, cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen sulfite, and trithiocarbonate were effective VchCA inhibitors with inhibition constants in the range of 33-88?M. Other effective inhibitors were diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid, with KIs of 7-43?M. Halides (bromide, iodide), bicarbonate and carbonate were much less effective VchCA inhibitors, with KIs in the range of 4.64-28.0mM. The resistance of VchCA to bicarbonate inhibition may represent an evolutionary adaptation of this enzyme to living in an environment rich in this ion, such as the gastrointestinal tract, as bicarbonate is a virulence enhancer of this bacterium. PMID:23414807

Vullo, Daniela; Isik, Semra; Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

2013-03-15

136

Genomic Science in Understanding Cholera Outbreaks and Evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a Human Pathogen  

PubMed Central

Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX–? prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core- and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

Mekalanos, John J.

2014-01-01

137

Temporal and Spatial Variability in Culturable Pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita ? †  

PubMed Central

We investigated the abundance, distribution, and virulence gene content of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus in the waters of southern Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana on four occasions from October 2005 to September 2006, using selective cultivation and molecular assays. The three targeted pathogenic vibrios were generally below the detection level in January 2006, when the water was cold (13°C), and most abundant in September 2006, when the lake water was warmest (30°C). The maximum values for these species were higher than reported previously for the lake by severalfold to orders of magnitude. The only variable consistently correlated with total vibrio abundance within a single sampling was distance from shore (P = 0.000). Multiple linear regression of the entire data set revealed that distance from shore, temperature, and turbidity together explained 82.1% of the variability in total vibrio CFU. The log-transformed mean abundance of V. vulnificus CFU in the lake was significantly correlated with temperature (P = 0.014), but not salinity (P = 0.625). Virulence-associated genes of V. cholerae (ctx) and V. parahaemolyticus (trh and tdh) were not detected in any isolates of these species (n = 128 and n = 20, respectively). In contrast, 16S rRNA typing of V. vulnificus (n = 298) revealed the presence of both environmental (type A) and clinical (type B) strains. The percentage of the B-type V. vulnificus was significantly higher in the lake in October 2005 (35.8% of the total) than at other sampling times (P ? 0.004), consistent with the view that these strains represent distinct ecotypes. PMID:21642406

Nigro, Olivia D.; Hou, Aixin; Vithanage, Gayatri; Fujioka, Roger S.; Steward, Grieg F.

2011-01-01

138

Temporal and spatial variability in culturable pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.  

PubMed

We investigated the abundance, distribution, and virulence gene content of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus in the waters of southern Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana on four occasions from October 2005 to September 2006, using selective cultivation and molecular assays. The three targeted pathogenic vibrios were generally below the detection level in January 2006, when the water was cold (13°C), and most abundant in September 2006, when the lake water was warmest (30°C). The maximum values for these species were higher than reported previously for the lake by severalfold to orders of magnitude. The only variable consistently correlated with total vibrio abundance within a single sampling was distance from shore (P = 0.000). Multiple linear regression of the entire data set revealed that distance from shore, temperature, and turbidity together explained 82.1% of the variability in total vibrio CFU. The log-transformed mean abundance of V. vulnificus CFU in the lake was significantly correlated with temperature (P = 0.014), but not salinity (P = 0.625). Virulence-associated genes of V. cholerae (ctx) and V. parahaemolyticus (trh and tdh) were not detected in any isolates of these species (n = 128 and n = 20, respectively). In contrast, 16S rRNA typing of V. vulnificus (n = 298) revealed the presence of both environmental (type A) and clinical (type B) strains. The percentage of the B-type V. vulnificus was significantly higher in the lake in October 2005 (35.8% of the total) than at other sampling times (P ? 0.004), consistent with the view that these strains represent distinct ecotypes. PMID:21642406

Nigro, Olivia D; Hou, Aixin; Vithanage, Gayatri; Fujioka, Roger S; Steward, Grieg F

2011-08-01

139

Genes Similar to the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Virulence-Related Genes tdh, tlh, and vscC2 Occur in Other Vibrionaceae Species Isolated from a Pristine Estuary  

PubMed Central

Detection of the human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus often relies on molecular biological analysis of species-specific virulence factor genes. These genes have been employed in determinations of V. parahaemolyticus population numbers and the prevalence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains. Strains of the Vibrionaceae species Photobacterium damselae, Vibrio diabolicus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio natriegens, as well as strains similar to Vibrio tubiashii, were isolated from a pristine salt marsh estuary. These strains were examined for the V. parahaemolyticus hemolysin genes tdh, trh, and tlh and for the V. parahaemolyticus type III secretion system 2? gene vscC2 using established PCR primers and protocols. Virulence-related genes occurred at high frequencies in non-V. parahaemolyticus Vibrionaceae species. V. diabolicus was of particular interest, as several strains were recovered, and the large majority (>83%) contained virulence-related genes. It is clear that detection of these genes does not ensure correct identification of virulent V. parahaemolyticus. Further, the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus-like virulence factors in other vibrios potentially complicates tracking of outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus infections. PMID:24212573

Klein, Savannah L.; Gutierrez West, Casandra K.; Mejia, Diana M.

2014-01-01

140

Selected Bacterial Strains Protect Artemia spp. from the Pathogenic Effects of Vibrio proteolyticus CW8T2  

PubMed Central

In this study Vibrio proteolyticus CW8T2 has been identified as a virulent pathogen for Artemia spp. Its infection route has been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. The pathogen affected microvilli and gut epithelial cells, disrupted epithelial cell junctions, and reached the body cavity, where it devastated cells and tissues. In vivo antagonism tests showed that preemptive colonization of the culture water with nine selected bacterial strains protected Artemia juveniles against the pathogenic effects. Two categories of the selected strains could be distinguished: (i) strains providing total protection, as no mortality occurred 2 days after the experimental infection with V. proteolyticus CW8T2, with strain LVS8 as a representative, and (ii) strains providing partial protection, as significant but not total mortality was observed, with strain LVS2 as a representative. The growth of V. proteolyticus CW8T2 in the culture medium was slowed down in the presence of strains LVS2 and LVS8, but growth suppression was distinctly higher with LVS8 than with LVS2. It was striking that the strains that gave only partial protection against the pathogen in the in vivo antagonism test showed also a restricted capability to colonize the Artemia compared to the strains providing total protection. The in vivo antagonism tests and the filtrate experiments showed that probably no extracellular bacterial compounds were involved in the protective action but that the living cells were required to protect Artemia against V. proteolyticus CW8T2. PMID:10698783

Verschuere, Laurent; Heang, Hanglamong; Criel, Godelieve; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy

2000-01-01

141

Complete genome sequence of virulent bacteriophage SHOU24, which infects foodborne pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus.  

PubMed

A novel lytic Vibrio parahaemolyticus phage (SHOU24) belonging to the family Siphoviridae was isolated from aquatic market sewage. The phage is only able to infect V. parahaemolyticus containing a tdh gene. SHOU24 has a linear genome of 77,837 bp with a G+C content of 46.0 %. In total, 88 predicted proteins have homologues in databases, and the majority of the core genes share high sequence similarity with genes from unrelated viruses and bacteria. Genes related to lysogeny and host lysis were not detected. However, the detection method, the results of a one-step growth experiment and analysis using the Phage Classification Tool Set (PHACTS) indicate that SHOU24 is lytic. A bioinformatics analysis showed that SHOU24 is not closely related to other Vibrio phages. PMID:25115946

Yuan, Lin; Cui, Zelin; Wang, Yanchun; Guo, Xiaokui; Zhao, Yong

2014-11-01

142

Molecular cloning of the recA analog from the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recA analog from Vibrio anguillarum 775 was isolated by complementation of recA mutations in Escherichia coli, and its protein product was identified. The recA analog promoted recombination between two partially deleted lactose operons, stimulated both spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced phage production in RecA- lambda lysogens, and restored near wild-type levels of resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate.

1989-01-01

143

Pathogenic Potential of Non-O1, Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Vibrio cholerae organisms are known to exist in more than 200 different serogroups based on their “O” antigenic characters. Out of these,\\u000a strains belonging to O1 or O139 serogroups have been implicated as the causative agent of cholera in the epidemic form. On\\u000a the other hand, V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 organisms, ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment, are usually nonpathogenic

Amit Sarkar; Ranjan K. Nandy; Asoke C. Ghose

144

Selection and identification of non-pathogenic bacteria isolated from fermented pickles with antagonistic properties against two shrimp pathogens.  

PubMed

In this study, potential probiotic strains were isolated from fermented pickles based on antagonistic activity against two shrimp pathogens (Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). Two strains L10 and G1 were identified by biochemical tests, followed by16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis as Bacillus subtilis, and characterized by PCR amplification of repetitive bacterial DNA elements (Rep-PCR). Subsequently, B. subtilis L10 and G1 strains were tested for antibacterial activity under different physical conditions, including culture medium, salinity, pH and temperature using the agar well diffusion assay. Among the different culture media, LB broth was the most suitable medium for antibacterial production. Both strains showed the highest level of antibacterial activity against two pathogens at 30?°C and 1.0% NaCl. Under the pH conditions, strain G1 showed the greatest activity against V. harveyi at pH 7.3-8.0 and against V. parahaemolyticus at pH 6.0-8.0, whereas strain L10 showed the greatest activity against two pathogens at pH 7.3. The cell-free supernatants of both strains were treated with four different enzymes in order to characterize the antibacterial substances against V. harveyi. The result showed considerable reduction of antibacterial activity for both strains, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the antibacterial substances. A wide range of tolerance to NaCl, pH and temperature was also recorded for both strains. In addition, both strains showed no virulence effect in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. On the basis of these results and safety of strains to L. vannamei, they may be considered for future challenge experiments in shrimp as a very promising alternative to the use of antibiotics. PMID:22491136

Zokaeifar, Hadi; Balcázar, José Luis; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Arshad, Aziz; Saad, Che Roos

2012-06-01

145

Presence of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in waters and seafood from the Tunisian Sea.  

PubMed

The occurrence of the hemolysin genes, tdh and trh, in Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from environmental samples collected from various exported seafood products comprising of fishes and shellfish (Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas) or seawater, was studied. Eight strains were confirmed as V. parahaemolyticus by toxR -based polymerase chain reaction and only one strain out of these 8 strains was positive for tdh and trh genes. Toxigenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates are present in Tunisian coastal areas and they may also be present in Tunisian exported seafood products. PMID:23430717

Khouadja, Sadok; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Spagnoletti, Matteo; Croci, Luciana; Colombo, Mauro M; Amina, Bakhrouf

2013-08-01

146

Genome-Wide SNP-Genotyping Array to Study the Evolution of the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 3  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus is an aquatic bacterium and an important human pathogen. Strains of V. vulnificus are classified into three different biotypes. The newly emerged biotype 3 has been found to be clonal and restricted to Israel. In the family Vibrionaceae, horizontal gene transfer is the main mechanism responsible for the emergence of new pathogen groups. To better understand the evolution of the bacterium, and in particular to trace the evolution of biotype 3, we performed genome-wide SNP genotyping of 254 clinical and environmental V. vulnificus isolates with worldwide distribution recovered over a 30-year period, representing all phylogeny groups. A custom single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array implemented on the Illumina GoldenGate platform was developed based on 570 SNPs randomly distributed throughout the genome. In general, the genotyping results divided the V. vulnificus species into three main phylogenetic lineages and an additional subgroup, clade B, consisting of environmental and clinical isolates from Israel. Data analysis suggested that 69% of biotype 3 SNPs are similar to SNPs from clade B, indicating that biotype 3 and clade B have a common ancestor. The rest of the biotype 3 SNPs were scattered along the biotype 3 genome, probably representing multiple chromosomal segments that may have been horizontally inserted into the clade B recipient core genome from other phylogroups or bacterial species sharing the same ecological niche. Results emphasize the continuous evolution of V. vulnificus and support the emergence of new pathogenic groups within this species as a recurrent phenomenon. Our findings contribute to a broader understanding of the evolution of this human pathogen. PMID:25526263

Hayman, Ryan B.; Bar-On, Yudi; Linetsky, Alex; Shmoish, Michael; Sanjuán, Eva; Amaro, Carmen; Walt, David R.; Kashi, Yechezkel

2014-01-01

147

Effect of poly-?-hydroxybutyrate on Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis, larvae challenged with pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum.  

PubMed

This study investigated the protective effect of poly-?-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) on Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis, zoea larvae challenged with pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum. PHB was delivered to the crab larvae through rotifer and Artemia bioencapsulation. Zoea 3 larvae were challenged with V. anguillarum at a final concentration of 10(5) CFU mL(-1). PHB-enriched rotifers and Artemia nauplii were added to the culture water 24 h prior to, upon and 24 h after challenge. The results confirmed that PHB could enhance the survival and growth of unexposed E. sinensis larvae. Moreover, PHB protected larvae from the pathogen as the larvae fed PHB-enriched live food showed the highest survival and development rate in all challenged groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, larval performance was the best when PHB was delivered to the larvae 24 h before challenge (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our results indicate that PHB can be used as part of an effective strategy to protect E. sinensis larvae from V. anguillarum resulting in higher survival and better growth, especially when applied before the challenge. PMID:22417317

Sui, L; Cai, J; Sun, H; Wille, M; Bossier, P

2012-05-01

148

Screening of marine fungus from Nanji Island and activity of their metabolites against pathogenic Vibrio from Pseudosciaena crocea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seventy-eight marine fungal strains were isolated from sediment samples collected off the coast of Nanji Island, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. Antibacterial screening using the agar disc method showed that 19 of the isolated strains could inhibit at least one pathogenic V ibrio from P seudosciaena crocea. Subsequent screening confirmed that nine strains produced antibacterial metabolites that had activity against one or several types of pathogenic V ibrio. Strain NJ0104 had the widest antimicrobial spectrum and strong activity, particularly against Vibrio parahaemolyticus-MM0810072. A preliminary study of NJ0104 antibacterial metabolites demonstrated that they had thermal stability up to 80°C, ultraviolet stability up to 40 min and pH stability between 4.0-7.0. In addition, the antibacterial metabolites were readily soluble in butanol. To identify the specific strain, the ITS-5.8S rDNA regions of NJ0104 were PCR amplified and sequenced. Based on the combination of phenotypic and genotypic data, the strain was identified as Arthrinium sp.

Zhao, Shujiang; Li, Shuping; Liu, Huihui; Zhao, Qian; Wang, Jieyou; Yan, Maocang

2012-09-01

149

Facile synthesis of multifunctional multi-walled carbon nanotube for pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus detection in fishery and environmental samples.  

PubMed

Interest in carbon nanotubes for detecting the presence of pathogens arises because of developments in chemical vapor deposition synthesis and progresses in biomolecular modification. Here we reported the facile synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which functioned as immuno-, magnetic, fluorescent sensors in detecting Vibrio alginolyticus (Va). The structures and properties of functionalized MWCNTs were characterized by ultraviolet (UV), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), magnetic property measurement system (MPMS) and fluorescent spectra (FL). It was found that the functionalized MWCNTs showed: (1) low nonspecific adsorption for antibody-antigen, (2) strong interaction with antibody, and (3) high immune-magnetic activity for pathogenic cells. Further investigations revealed a strong positive linear relationship (R=0.9912) between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Va in the range of 9.0 × 10(2) to 1.5 × 10(6) cfum L(-1). Moreover, the relative standard deviation for 11 replicate detections of 1.0 × 10(4) cfum L(-1) Va was 2.4%, and no cross-reaction with the other four strains was found, indicating a good specificity for Va detection. These results demonstrated the remarkable advantages of the multifunctional MWCNTs, which offer great potential for the rapid, sensitive and quantitative detection of Va in fishery and environmental samples. PMID:25059166

Liu, Yue; Hu, Jia; Sun, Jin-Sheng; Li, Yan; Xue, Shu-Xia; Chen, Xiao-Qin; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Du, Gui-Xiang

2014-10-01

150

Evidence for the Emergence of Non-O1 and Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae Strains with Pathogenic Potential by Exchange of O-Antigen Biosynthesis Regions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The novel epidemic strain Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal originated from a seventh-pandemic O1 El Tor strain by antigenic shift resulting from homologous recombination-mediated exchange of O-antigen biosynthesis (wb*) clusters. Conservation of the genetic organization of wb* regions seen in other serogroups raised the possibility of the existence of pathogenic non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae strains that emerged by similar events.

Manrong Li; Toshio Shimada; J. Glenn Morris; Alexander Sulakvelidze; Shanmuga Sozhamannan

2002-01-01

151

Exposure of gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana larvae to abiotic stress promotes heat shock protein 70 synthesis and enhances resistance to pathogenic Vibrio campbellii  

PubMed Central

Larvae of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana serve as important feed in fish and shellfish larviculture; however, they are subject to bacterial diseases that devastate entire populations and consequently hinder their use in aquaculture. Exposure to abiotic stress was shown previously to shield Artemia larvae against infection by pathogenic Vibrio, with the results suggesting a mechanistic role for heat shock protein 70. In the current report, combined hypothermic/hyperthermic shock followed by recovery at ambient temperature induced Hsp70 synthesis in Artemia larvae. Thermotolerance was also increased as was protection against infection by Vibrio campbellii, the latter indicated by reduced mortality and lower bacterial load in challenge tests. Resistance to Vibrio improved in the face of declining body mass as demonstrated by measurement of ash-free dry weight. Hypothermic stress only and acute osmotic insult did not promote Hsp70 expression and thermotolerance in Artemia larvae nor was resistance to Vibrio challenge augmented. The data support a causal link between Hsp70 accumulation induced by abiotic stress and enhanced resistance to infection by V. campbellii, perhaps via stimulation of the Artemia immune system. This possibility is now under investigation, and the work may reveal fundamental properties of crustacean immunity. Additionally, the findings are important in aquaculture where development of procedures to prevent bacterial infection of feed stock such as Artemia larvae is a priority. PMID:18347942

Pineda, Carlos; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

2008-01-01

152

Predatory bacteria as natural modulators of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in seawater and oysters  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This study shows that naturally occurring Vibrio predatory bacteria (VPB) exert a major role in controlling pathogenic vibrios in seawater and shellfish. The growth and persistence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) and Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) were assessed in natural seawater and in the Eastern oyster...

153

Quorum Sensing Regulatory Cascades Control Vibrio fluvialis Pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which individual bacteria are able to communicate with one another, thereby enabling the population as a whole to coordinate gene regulation and subsequent phenotypic outcomes. Communication is accomplished through production and detection of small molecules in the extracellular milieu. In many bacteria, particularly Vibrio species, multiple QS systems result in multiple signals, as well as cross talk between systems. In this study, we identify two QS systems in the halophilic enteric pathogen Vibrio fluvialis: one acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) based and one CAI-1/AI-2 based. We show that a LuxI homolog, VfqI, primarily produces 3-oxo-C10-HSL, which is sensed by a LuxR homolog, VfqR. VfqR-AHL is required to activate vfqI expression and autorepress vfqR expression. In addition, we have shown that similar to that in V. cholerae and V. harveyi, V. fluvialis produces CAI-1 and AI-2 signal molecules to activate the expression of a V. cholerae HapR homolog through LuxO. Although VfqR-AHL does not regulate hapR expression, HapR can repress vfqR transcription. Furthermore, we found that QS in V. fluvialis positively regulates production of two potential virulence factors, an extracellular protease and hemolysin. QS also affects cytotoxic activity against epithelial tissue cultures. These data suggest that V. fluvialis integrates QS regulatory pathways to play important physiological roles in pathogenesis. PMID:23749976

Wang, Yunduan; Wang, Hui; Liang, Weili; Hay, Amanda J.; Zhong, Zengtao

2013-01-01

154

Purification, characterization and production optimization of a vibriocin produced by mangrove associated Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify a potential bacterium which produces antimicrobial peptide (vibriocin), and its purification, characterization and production optimization. The bacteria subjected in the study were isolated from a highly competitive ecological niche of mangrove ecosystem. Methods The bacterium was characterized by phenotype besides 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The antibacterial activity was recognised by using agar well diffusion method. The vibriocin was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation, butanol extraction, gel filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and subsequently, by HPLC. Molecular weight of the substance identified in SDS-PAGE. Production optimization performed according to Taguchi's mathematical model using 6 different nutritional parameters as variables. Results The objective bacterium was identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The vibriocin showed 18 KDa of molecular mass with mono peptide in nature and highest activity against pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. The peptide act stable in a wide range of pH, temperature, UV radiation, solvents and chemicals utilized. An overall ?20% of vibriocin production was improved, and was noticed that NaCl and agitation speed played a vital role in secretion of vibriocin. Conclusion The vibriocin identified here would be an effective alternative for chemically synthesized drugs for the management of Vibrio infections in mariculture industry. PMID:25182547

Balakrishnan, Baskar; Ranishree, Jayappriyan Kothilmozhian; Thadikamala, Sathish; Panchatcharam, Prabakaran

2014-01-01

155

Production and sequence validation of a complete full length ORF collection for the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Cholera, an infectious disease with global impact, is caused by pathogenic strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. High-throughput functional proteomics technologies now offer the opportunity to investigate all aspects of the proteome, which has led to an increased demand for comprehensive protein expression clone resources. Genome-scale reagents for cholera would encourage comprehensive analyses of immune responses and systems-wide functional studies that could lead to improved vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Here, we report the production of the FLEXGene clone set for V. cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961: a complete-genome collection of ORF clones. This collection includes 3,761 sequence-verified clones from 3,887 targeted ORFs (97%). The ORFs were captured in a recombinational cloning vector to facilitate high-throughput transfer of ORF inserts into suitable expression vectors. To demonstrate its application, ?15% of the collection was transferred into the relevant expression vector and used to produce a protein microarray by transcribing, translating, and capturing the proteins in situ on the array surface with 92% success. In a second application, a method to screen for protein triggers of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) was developed. We tested in vitro-synthesized proteins for their ability to stimulate TLR5 in A549 cells. This approach appropriately identified FlaC, and previously uncharacterized TLR5 agonist activities. These data suggest that the genome-scale, fully sequenced ORF collection reported here will be useful for high-throughput functional proteomic assays, immune response studies, structure biology, and other applications. PMID:18337508

Rolfs, Andreas; Montor, Wagner R.; Yoon, Sang Sun; Hu, Yanhui; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Kelley, Fontina; McCarron, Seamus; Jepson, Daniel A.; Shen, Binghua; Taycher, Elena; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Zuo, Dongmei; Williamson, Janice; Mekalanos, John; LaBaer, Joshua

2008-01-01

156

Implications of Chitin Attachment for the Environmental Persistence and Clinical Nature of the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus naturally inhabits a variety of aquatic organisms, including oysters, and is the leading cause of seafood-related death in the United States. Strains of this bacterium are genetically classified into environmental (E) and clinical (C) genotypes, which correlate with source of isolation. E-genotype strains integrate into marine aggregates more efficiently than do C-genotype strains, leading to a greater uptake of strains of this genotype by oysters feeding on these aggregates. The causes of this increased integration of E-type strains into marine “snow” have not been demonstrated. Here, we further investigate the physiological and genetic causalities for this genotypic heterogeneity by examining the ability of strains of each genotype to attach to chitin, a major constituent of marine snow. We found that E-genotype strains attach to chitin with significantly greater efficiency than do C-genotype strains when incubated at 20°C. Type IV pili were implicated in chitin adherence, and even in the absence of chitin, the expression level of type IV pilin genes (pilA, pilD, and mshA) was found to be inherently higher by E genotypes than by C genotypes. In contrast, the level of expression of N-acetylglucosamine binding protein A (gbpA) was significantly higher in C-genotype strains. Interestingly, incubation at a clinically relevant temperature (37°C) resulted in a significant increase in C-genotype attachment to chitin, which subsequently provided a protective effect against exposure to acid or bile, thus offering a clue into their increased incidence in human infections. This study suggests that C- and E-genotype strains have intrinsically divergent physiological programs, which may help explain the observed differences in the ecology and pathogenic potential between these two genotypes. PMID:24362430

Williams, Tiffany C.; Ayrapetyan, Mesrop

2014-01-01

157

Transcriptional Regulation of opaR, qrr2–4 and aphA by the Master Quorum-Sensing Regulator OpaR in Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of infectious diarrhea and enterogastritis via the fecal-oral route. V. harveyi is a pathogen of fishes and invertebrates, and has been used as a model for quorum sensing (QS) studies. LuxR is the master QS regulator (MQSR) of V. harveyi, and LuxR-dependent expression of its own gene, qrr2–4 and aphA have been established in V. harveyi. Molecular regulation of target genes by the V. parahaemolyticus MQSR OpaR is still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings The bioinformatics analysis indicated that V. parahaemolyticus OpaR, V. harveyi LuxR, V. vulnificu SmcR, and V. alginolyticus ValR were extremely conserved, and that these four MQSRs appeared to recognize the same conserved cis-acting signals, which was represented by the consensus constructs manifesting as a position frequency matrix and as a 20 bp box, within their target promoters. The MQSR box-like sequences were found within the upstream DNA regions of opaR, qrr2–4 and aphA in V. parahaemolyticus, and the direct transcriptional regulation of these target genes by OpaR were further confirmed by multiple biochemical experiments including primer extension assay, gel mobility shift assay, and DNase I footprinting analysis. Translation and transcription starts, core promoter elements for sigma factor recognition, Shine-Dalgarno sequences for ribosome recognition, and OpaR-binding sites were determined for the five target genes of OpaR, which gave a structural map of the OpaR-dependent promoters. Further computational promoter analysis indicated the above regulatory circuits were shared by several other closely related Vibrios but with slight exceptions. Conclusions/Significance This study gave a comprehensive computational and characterization of the direct transcriptional regulation of five target genes, opaR, qrr2–4 and ahpA, by OpaR in V. parahaemolyticus. These characterized regulatory circuits were conserved in V. harveyi and V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:22506036

Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yang, Ruifu; Zhou, Dongsheng

2012-01-01

158

Genomic taxonomy of vibrios  

PubMed Central

Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA), supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI), genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.). A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ? 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in the birth of the online genomic taxonomy whereby researchers and end-users of taxonomy will be able to identify their isolates through a web-based server. This novel approach to microbial systematics will result in a tremendous advance concerning biodiversity discovery, description, and understanding. PMID:19860885

Thompson, Cristiane C; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Souza, Rangel C; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Vesth, Tammi; Alves, Nelson; Ussery, David W; Iida, Tetsuya; Thompson, Fabiano L

2009-01-01

159

Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

Makemson, J.C.

1986-02-01

160

Multiple regulators control capsular polysaccharide production in Vibrio parahaemolyticus.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a biofouling marine bacterium and human pathogen, undergoes phase variation displaying translucent (TR) and opaque (OP) colony morphologies. Prior studies demonstrated that OP colonies produce more capsular polysaccharide (CPS) than TR colonies and that opacity is controlled by the Vibrio harveyi LuxR-type transcriptional activator OpaR. CPS has also been shown to be regulated by the scrABC signaling pathway, which involves a GGDEF-EAL motif-containing sensory protein. The present study identifies cps genes and examines their regulation. Transposon insertions in the cps locus, which contains 11 genes, abolished opacity. Such mutants failed to produce CPS and were defective in pellicle formation in microtiter wells and in a biofilm attachment assay. Reporter fusions to cpsA, the first gene in the locus, showed approximately 10-fold-enhanced transcription in the OP (opaR+) strain compared to a TR (deltaopaR) strain. Two additional transcriptional regulators were discovered. One potential activator, CpsR, participates in the scrABC GGDEF-EAL-signaling pathway; CpsR was required for the increased cps expression observed in scrA deltaopaR strains. CpsR, which contains a conserved module found in members of the AAA+ superfamily of ATP-interacting proteins, is homologous to Vibrio cholerae VpsR; however, unlike VpsR, CpsR was not essential for cps expression. CpsS, the second newly identified regulator, contains a CsgD-type DNA-binding domain and appears to act as a repressor. Mutants with cpsS defects have greatly elevated cps transcription; their high level of cpsA expression was CpsR dependent in TR strains and primarily OpaR dependent in OP strains. Thus, a network of positive and negative regulators modulates CPS production in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:12949095

Güvener, Zehra Tüzün; McCarter, Linda L

2003-09-01

161

Multiple Regulators Control Capsular Polysaccharide Production in Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a biofouling marine bacterium and human pathogen, undergoes phase variation displaying translucent (TR) and opaque (OP) colony morphologies. Prior studies demonstrated that OP colonies produce more capsular polysaccharide (CPS) than TR colonies and that opacity is controlled by the Vibrio harveyi LuxR-type transcriptional activator OpaR. CPS has also been shown to be regulated by the scrABC signaling pathway, which involves a GGDEF-EAL motif-containing sensory protein. The present study identifies cps genes and examines their regulation. Transposon insertions in the cps locus, which contains 11 genes, abolished opacity. Such mutants failed to produce CPS and were defective in pellicle formation in microtiter wells and in a biofilm attachment assay. Reporter fusions to cpsA, the first gene in the locus, showed ?10-fold-enhanced transcription in the OP (opaR+) strain compared to a TR (?opaR) strain. Two additional transcriptional regulators were discovered. One potential activator, CpsR, participates in the scrABC GGDEF-EAL-signaling pathway; CpsR was required for the increased cps expression observed in scrA ?opaR strains. CpsR, which contains a conserved module found in members of the AAA+ superfamily of ATP-interacting proteins, is homologous to Vibrio cholerae VpsR; however, unlike VpsR, CpsR was not essential for cps expression. CpsS, the second newly identified regulator, contains a CsgD-type DNA-binding domain and appears to act as a repressor. Mutants with cpsS defects have greatly elevated cps transcription; their high level of cpsA expression was CpsR dependent in ?R strains and primarily OpaR dependent in OP strains. Thus, a network of positive and negative regulators modulates CPS production in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:12949095

Güvener, Zehra Tüzün; McCarter, Linda L.

2003-01-01

162

Cultivation of Vibrio foetus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio foetus is non-pathogenic for small laboratory animals. As it can cause abortion in sheep and cattle, and is then found in the embryo, cultivation in incubated chicken eggs was attempted. The organism grows easily in the allantoic fluid of seven-to-nine-day eggs. Three days after inoculation, there is a rich growth of Vibrio foetus in the allantoic fluid. The organism

Jac. Jansen; H. Kunst

1951-01-01

163

Polysiphonia harveyi, WNC2005-126  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

WNC2005-126, Polysiphonia harveyi J. Bailey, Floating docks at Banks Channel, Wrightville Beach, New Hanover County, NC, 30 Jan 2005, Coll: DW Freshwater & B Stuercke, Det: DW Freshwater & B Stuercke, Poly NC6

Freshwater, Wilson

2008-03-07

164

Roles of motility and flagellar structure in pathogenicity of Vibrio cholerae: analysis of motility mutants in three animal models.  

PubMed Central

Wild-type Vibrio cholerae of both El Tor and classical biotypes (strains N16961 and 395, respectively) and nonmotile mutant derivatives with and without flagellar structures were characterized in three different animal models: (i) the rabbit ileal loop, (ii) the removable intestinal tie adult rabbit diarrhea (RITARD) model, and (iii) the suckling mouse model. Both the wild-type strains and nonmotile mutants were toxinogenic in the rabbit ileal loop and the suckling mouse models. However, all of the nonmotile mutants produced significantly less fluid accumulation than did the wild-type parental strains. The two nonmotile mutants of strain N16961 did not adhere to rabbit ileal mucosa, but both nonmotile mutants derived from strain 395 exhibited adherence. In the RITARD model, the motile El Tor strains were more virulent than both the flagellate and aflagellate nonmotile mutants (all infected rabbits died within 18 h), while the nonmotile mutants, when fatalities occurred, required 78 to 105 h to produce a fatal outcome. Likewise, the motile classical parent 395 produced a fatal outcome within ca. 25 h, while nonmotile mutants required 69 to 96 h. The nonmotile flagellate strain KR31 was not significantly more virulent than the nonmotile aflagellate strain KR26. Of the two classical nonmotile mutants, KR1, which produces a coreless sheathlike structure, was clearly more virulent (5 of 10 rabbits died within 96 h), while KR3 (nonmotile, aflagellate) did not produce fatalities in any of the 10 rabbits tested. Similarly, no significant difference in diarrheagenicity or colonizing ability was detected between the two nonmotile mutants derived from the El Tor strain, but the classical nonmotile mutant with the coreless sheath caused significantly greater diarrhea and colonized for a longer time than did the isogenic nonmotile aflagellate strain, KR3. No significant differences between the nonmotile mutants were detected in competition studies done with suckling mice. Analysis of the wild-type and mutant strains in these three animal models clearly demonstrated a role for motility in V. cholerae pathogenicity, while analysis of only the nonmotile mutants derived from the classical parent suggested a role for flagellar structures. Images PMID:1855990

Richardson, K

1991-01-01

165

Gatesoupe, F.J., Lambert, C., Nicolas, J.L., 1999. Pathogenicity of vibrio splendidus strains associated with turbot larvae, Scophthalmus maximus. Journal of Applied Microbiology 87, 757-763.  

E-print Network

associated with turbot larvae, Scophthalmus maximus. Journal of Applied Microbiology 87, 757-763. 1 Pathogenicity of Vibrio splendidus strains associated with turbot larvae, Scophthalmus maximus F.J. Gatesoupe1 Plouzané,France (e-mail: joel.gatesoupe@ifremer.fr). Abstract : Turbot larvae were challenged with eight

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Development and evaluation of a real-time fluorogenic loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay integrated on a microfluidic disc chip (on-chip LAMP) for rapid and simultaneous detection of ten pathogenic bacteria in aquatic animals.  

PubMed

Rapid, low-cost, and user-friendly strategies are urgently needed for early disease diagnosis and timely treatment, particularly for on-site screening of pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we successfully developed a real-time fluorogenic loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay integrated on a microfluidic disc chip (on-chip LAMP), which was capable of simultaneously detecting 10 pathogenic bacteria in aquatic animals, i.e., Nocardia seriolae, Pseudomonas putida, Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio rotiferianus, and Vibrio vulnificus. The assay provided a nearly-automated approach, with only a single pipetting step per chip for sample dispensing. This technique could achieve limits of detection (LOD) ranging from 0.40 to 6.42pg per 1.414?L reaction in less than 30 min. The robust reproducibility was demonstrated by a little variation among duplications for each bacterium with the coefficient of variation (CV) for time to positive (Tp) value less than 0.10. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of this on-chip LAMP assay in detecting field samples were 96.2% and 93.8% by comparison with conventional microbiological methods. Compared with other well-known techniques, on-chip LAMP assay provides low sample and reagent consumption, ease-of-use, accelerated analysis, multiple bacteria and on-site detection, and high reproducibility, indicating that such a technique would be applicable for on-site detection and routine monitoring of multiple pathogens in aquaculture. PMID:24954661

Zhou, Qian-Jin; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jiong; Wang, Rui-Na; Shi, Yu-Hong; Li, Chang-Hong; Zhang, De-Min; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Jun

2014-09-01

167

Evidence for the Emergence of Non-O1 and Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae Strains with Pathogenic Potential by Exchange of O-Antigen Biosynthesis Regions  

PubMed Central

The novel epidemic strain Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal originated from a seventh-pandemic O1 El Tor strain by antigenic shift resulting from homologous recombination-mediated exchange of O-antigen biosynthesis (wb*) clusters. Conservation of the genetic organization of wb* regions seen in other serogroups raised the possibility of the existence of pathogenic non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae strains that emerged by similar events. To test this hypothesis, 300 V. cholerae isolates of non-O1 and non-O139 serogroups were screened for the presence of virulence genes and an epidemic genetic background by DNA dot blotting, IS1004 fingerprinting, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. We found four non-O1 strains (serogroups O27, O37, O53, and O65) with an O1 genetic backbone suggesting exchange of wb* clusters. DNA sequence analysis of the O37 wb* region revealed that a novel ?23.4-kb gene cluster had replaced all but the ?4.2-kb right junction of the 22-kb O1 wbe region. In sharp contrast to the backbones, the virulence regions of the four strains were quite heterogeneous; the O53 and O65 strains had the El Tor vibrio pathogenicity island (VPI) cluster, the O37 strain had the classical VPI cluster, and the O27 strain had a novel VPI cluster. Two of the four strains carried CTX?; the O27 strain possessed a CTX? with a recently reported immune specificity (rstR-4** allele) and a novel ctxB allele, and the O37 strain had an El Tor CTX? (rstRET allele) and novel ctxAB alleles. Although the O53 and O65 strains lacked the ctxAB genes, they carried a pre-CTX? (i.e., rstRcla). Identification of non-O1 and non-O139 serogroups with pathogenic potential in epidemic genetic backgrounds means that attention should be paid to possible future epidemics caused by these serogroups and to the need for new, rapid vaccine development strategies. PMID:11953381

Li, Manrong; Shimada, Toshio; Morris, J. Glenn; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

2002-01-01

168

Cyclo(Phe-Pro) Produced by the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Inhibits Host Innate Immune Responses through the NF-?B Pathway.  

PubMed

Cyclo(Phe-Pro) (cFP) is a secondary metabolite produced by certain bacteria and fungi. Although recent studies highlight the role of cFP in cell-to-cell communication by bacteria, its role in the context of the host immune response is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of cFP produced by the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus in the modulation of innate immune responses toward the pathogen. cFP suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocyte/macrophage cell line and in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Specifically, cFP inhibited inhibitory ?B (I?B) kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, I?B? degradation, and nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) translocation to the cell nucleus, indicating that cFP affects the NF-?B pathway. We searched for genes that are responsible for cFP production in V. vulnificus and identified VVMO6_03017 as a causative gene. A deletion of VVMO6_03017 diminished cFP production and decreased virulence in subcutaneously inoculated mice. In summary, cFP produced by V. vulnificus actively suppresses the innate immune responses of the host, thereby facilitating its survival and propagation in the host environment. PMID:25561711

Kim, Kiwan; Kim, Na-Jeong; Kim, So Young; Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Kun-Soo; Lee, Gap Ryol

2015-03-01

169

Environmental parameters influence on the dynamics of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus densities in Crassostrea virginica harvested from Mexico's Gulf coast.  

PubMed

The influence of environmental parameters on the total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus seasonal densities in American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) was evaluated for 1year. Harvesting site A yielded the highest mean densities of V. parahaemolyticus tlh+, tdh+/trh-, tdh-/trh+ and tdh+/trh+ during spring season at 2.57, 1.74, 0.36, and -0.40 log10MPN/g, respectively, and tdh+/orf8+ during winter season (0.90 log10MPN/g). V. parahaemolyticus tlh+ densities were associated to salinity (R(2)=0.372, P<0.022), tdh+/trh+ to turbidity (R(2)=0.597, P<0.035), and orf8+ to temperature, salinity, and pH (R(2)=0.964, P<0.001). The exposure to salinity and temperature conditions during winter and spring seasons regulated the dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus harboring potentially pathogenic genotypes within the oyster. The adaptive response of V. parahaemolyticus to seasonal environmental changes may lead to an increase in survival and virulence, threatening the seafood safety and increasing the risk of illness. PMID:25510545

López-Hernández, Karla M; Pardío-Sedas, Violeta T; Lizárraga-Partida, Leonardo; Williams, José de J; Martínez-Herrera, David; Flores-Primo, Argel; Uscanga-Serrano, Roxana; Rendón-Castro, Karla

2015-02-15

170

Characterization and pathogenicity of Vibrio splendidus strains associated with massive mortalities of commercial hatchery-reared larvae of scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck, 1819).  

PubMed

Three strains (VPAP16, VPAP18 and VPAP23 strains) were isolated as the most predominant organisms from 3 different episodes of massive mortalities of larval cultures of the Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus occurred in different commercial hatcheries located in northern Chile. The main aims of this study were to identify the pathogenic strains and investigate their pathogenic activity. Based on selected phenotypic features and sequence identity of the 16S rRNA gene and the housekeeping gene, RNA polymerase ?-chain rpoA, all pathogenic strains were identified as Vibrio splendidus. Healthy 10-day-old scallop larvae cultures exhibited mortality percentages of 69.61±3.35%, 79.78±6.11% and 61.73±3.71% after 48h when were inoculated with 1×10(6)CFU (colony forming units)mL(-1) of VPAP16, VPAP18 and VPAP23 strains, respectively, and evidenced that concentrations ?10(4)CFUmL(-1) would probably be detrimental for the larval culture. The main clinical signs observed in challenged larvae for 24h were bacterial swarms on the margins of the larvae, extension and disruption of the velum, detachment of velum cilia cells and digestive tissue necrosis. Otherwise, challenge assays using pathogenic strains stained with 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]amino)fluorescein hydrochloride (5-DTAF)evidenced that after 1h stained bacteria were detected in high density in the digestive gland and the margin of the shell. When larval cultures were inoculated with cell-free extracellular products (ECP) of V. splendidus strains, exhibited larval mortalities higher than 70% (VPAP16), 80% (VPAP18) and 50% (VPAP23) after 24h, even when ECP were treated with proteinase K or heat, indicating that extracellular pathogenic activity is mainly mediated by non-proteic thermostable compounds. In this study all Koch's postulates were fulfilled and it was demonstrated for the first time the pathogenic activity of V. splendidus strains on reared-larvae of scallop A. purpuratus and prompt the necessity to maintain this species at concentrations lower than 10(4)CFUmL(-1) to avoid episodes of mass mortalities in scallop hatcheries. PMID:25450196

Rojas, Rodrigo; Miranda, Claudio D; Opazo, Rafael; Romero, Jaime

2015-01-01

171

Vibrio campbellii hmgA-mediated pyomelanization impairs quorum sensing, virulence, and cellular fitness.  

PubMed

Melanization due to the inactivation of the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene (hmgA) has been demonstrated to increase stress resistance, persistence, and virulence in some bacterial species but such pigmented mutants have not been observed in pathogenic members of the Vibrio Harveyi clade. In this study, we used Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 as model organism to understand how melanization affected cellular phenotype, metabolism, and virulence. An in-frame deletion of the hmgA gene resulted in the overproduction of a pigment in cell culture supernatants and cellular membranes that was identified as pyomelanin. Unlike previous demonstrations in Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia cepacia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the pigmented V. campbellii mutant did not show increased UV resistance and was found to be ~2.7 times less virulent than the wild type strain in Penaeus monodon shrimp virulence assays. However, the extracted pyomelanin pigment did confer a higher resistance to oxidative stress when incubated with wild type cells. Microarray-based transcriptomic analyses revealed that the hmgA gene deletion and subsequent pyomelanin production negatively effected the expression of 129 genes primarily involved in energy production, amino acid, and lipid metabolism, and protein translation and turnover. This transcriptional response was mediated in part by an impairment of the quorum sensing regulon as transcripts of the quorum sensing high cell density master regulator LuxR and other operonic members of this regulon were significantly less abundant in the hmgA mutant. Taken together, the results suggest that the pyomelanization of V. campbellii sufficiently impairs the metabolic activities of this organism and renders it less fit and virulent than its isogenic wild type strain. PMID:24376440

Wang, Zheng; Lin, Baochuan; Mostaghim, Anahita; Rubin, Robert A; Glaser, Evan R; Mittraparp-Arthorn, Pimonsri; Thompson, Janelle R; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Vora, Gary J

2013-01-01

172

Identification and Characterization of a Novel Type III Secretion System in trh-Positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strain TH3996 Reveal Genetic Lineage and Diversity of Pathogenic Machinery beyond the Species Level? †  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a bacterial pathogen causative of food-borne gastroenteritis. Whole-genome sequencing of V. parahaemolyticus strain RIMD2210633, which exhibits Kanagawa phenomenon (KP), revealed the presence of two sets of the genes for the type III secretion system (T3SS) on chromosomes 1 and 2, T3SS1 and T3SS2, respectively. Although T3SS2 of the RIMD2210633 strain is thought to be involved in human pathogenicity, i.e., enterotoxicity, the genes for T3SS2 have not been found in trh-positive (KP-negative) V. parahaemolyticus strains, which are also pathogenic for humans. In the study described here, the DNA region of approximately 100 kb that surrounds the trh gene of a trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strain, TH3996, was sequenced and its genetic organization determined. This revealed the presence of the genes for a novel T3SS in this region. Animal experiments using the deletion mutant strains of a gene (vscC2) for the novel T3SS apparatus indicated that the T3SS is essential for the enterotoxicity of the TH3996 strain. PCR analysis showed that all the trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strains tested possess the novel T3SS-related genes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that although the novel T3SS is closely related to T3SS2 of KP-positive V. parahaemolyticus, it belongs to a distinctly different lineage. Furthermore, the two types of T3SS2 lineage are also found among pathogenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains. Our findings demonstrate that these two distinct types are distributed not only within a species but also beyond the species level and provide a new insight into the pathogenicity and evolution of Vibrio species. PMID:19075025

Okada, Natsumi; Iida, Tetsuya; Park, Kwon-Sam; Goto, Naohisa; Yasunaga, Teruo; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kodama, Toshio; Honda, Takeshi

2009-01-01

173

Detection and differentiation of Vibrio spp. in seafood and fish samples with cultural and molecular methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio spp. as natural inhabitants of sea- and brackwater of both tropical and temperate regions of the world are commonly found in different kinds of seafood. Even among the three main human pathogenic species Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus most of the isolates from seafood do not carry the different virulence factors responsible for foodborne infections. Therefore, the

U. Messelhäusser; J. Colditz; D. Thärigen; W. Kleih; C. Höller; U. Busch

2010-01-01

174

Epidemiological Evidence of Lesser Role of Thermostable Direct Hemolysin (TDH)-Related Hemolysin (TRH) Than TDH on Vibrio parahaemolyticus Pathogenicity.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus carrying the tdh gene, encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), or the trh gene, encoding the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), are both considered virulent strains. There are, however, disproportionally fewer reports of infections caused by seafood contaminated with trh-positive strains than by seafood contaminated with tdh-positive strains. Bivalves such as clams and oysters are the major seafood varieties associated with the infections. In this study, the prevalence of strains possessing the tdh and trh genes was investigated in Japan in 74 samples collected in 2007-2008 and in 177 samples collected in 2010 of domestic bivalves, bloody clams, hen clams, short-neck clams, and rock oysters. The tdh-positive and trh-negative, tdh-negative and trh-positive, and tdh-positive and trh-positive samples represented 5.4%, 12.2%, and 4.1% of all samples collected in 2007-2008, and 5.1%, 18.6%, and 5.6% of all samples collected in 2010, respectively. As determined by polymerase chain reaction, the prevalence of tdh negative and trh positive in all samples was two to four times higher than that of tdh positive and trh negative. In the samples collected in 2010, the tdh-negative and trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus (20 samples) was more often isolated than tdh-positive and trh-negative V. parahaemolyticus (7 samples). The most common serotype of tdh-positive isolates (22 of 24 strains) was pandemic O3:K6. The trh-positive isolates (61 strains) were various serotypes including OUT:KUT. In 330 V. parahaemolyticus outbreaks and sporadic infections in Japan, most outbreaks and sporadic infections were caused by tdh-positive and trh-negative strains (89.4%). The frequencies of infections caused by tdh-negative and trh-positive, and both tdh- and trh-positive strains were 1.2% and 3.0%, respectively. This finding suggests that the virulence of trh might be less than that of tdh, although trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus frequently contaminated bivalves. PMID:25646967

Saito, Shioko; Iwade, Yoshito; Tokuoka, Eisuke; Nishio, Tomohiro; Otomo, Yoshimitsu; Araki, Emiko; Konuma, Hirotaka; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Kanji; Hasegawa, Akio; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

2015-02-01

175

Quantification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae are human pathogens. Little is known about these Vibrio spp. in the coastal lagoons of France. The purpose of this study was to investigate their incidence in water, shellfish and sediment of three French Mediterranean coastal lagoons using the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR). In summer, the total number of V. parahaemolyticus in water, sediment, mussels and clams collected from the three lagoons varied from 1 to >1.1 × 10³ MPN/l, 0.09 to 1.1 × 10³ MPN/ml, 9 to 210 MPN/g and 1.5 to 2.1 MPN/g, respectively. In winter, all samples except mussels contained V. parahaemolyticus, but at very low concentrations. Pathogenic (tdh- or trh2-positive) V. parahaemolyticus were present in water, sediment and shellfish samples collected from these lagoons. The number of V. vulnificus in water, sediment and shellfish samples ranged from 1 to 1.1 × 10³ MPN/l, 0.07 to 110 MPN/ml and 0.04 to 15 MPN/g, respectively, during summer. V. vulnificus was not detected during winter. V. cholerae was rarely detected in water and sediment during summer. In summary, results of this study highlight the finding that the three human pathogenic Vibrio spp. are present in the lagoons and constitute a potential public health hazard. PMID:23770313

Cantet, Franck; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Caro, Audrey; Le Mennec, Cécile; Monteil, Caroline; Quéméré, Catherine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

2013-10-01

176

Quantification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae are human pathogens. Little is known about these Vibrio spp. in the coastal lagoons of France. The purpose of this study was to investigate their incidence in water, shellfish and sediment of three French Mediterranean coastal lagoons using the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR). In summer, the total number of V. parahaemolyticus in water, sediment, mussels and clams collected from the three lagoons varied from 1 to >1.1 × 103 MPN/l, 0.09 to 1.1 × 103 MPN/ml, 9 to 210 MPN/g and 1.5 to 2.1 MPN/g, respectively. In winter, all samples except mussels contained V. parahaemolyticus, but at very low concentrations. Pathogenic (tdh- or trh2-positive) V. parahaemolyticus were present in water, sediment and shellfish samples collected from these lagoons. The number of V. vulnificus in water, sediment and shellfish samples ranged from 1 to 1.1 × 103 MPN/l, 0.07 to 110 MPN/ml and 0.04 to 15 MPN/g, respectively, during summer. V. vulnificus was not detected during winter. V. cholerae was rarely detected in water and sediment during summer. In summary, results of this study highlight the finding that the three human pathogenic Vibrio spp. are present in the lagoons and constitute a potential public health hazard. PMID:23770313

Cantet, Franck; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Caro, Audrey; Le Mennec, Cécile; Monteil, Caroline; Quéméré, Catherine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Colwell, Rita R.; Monfort, Patrick

2014-01-01

177

Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

MedlinePLUS

... Foodnet Data Reports Trends, Data Tables, and Figures Select MMWR Articles CDC. Vibrio parahaemolyticus infections associated with ... Pacific Northwest, 1997 . MMWR 1998;47:457-462. Select CDC References Baker-Austin C. Spread of Pacific ...

178

A gyrB-based PCR for the detection of Vibrio vulnificus and its application for direct detection of this pathogen in oyster enrichment broths  

Microsoft Academic Search

A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method based on the gyrB (encoding gyrase B or topoisomerase II) gene sequence was developed for the detection of Vibrio vulnificus in seafood. The gyrB primers detected all laboratory isolates of V. vulnificus and did not cross react with other Vibiro and non-Vibrio species examined in this study. The sensitivity of detection of V. vulnificus

H. Sanath Kumar; Ammini Parvathi; Indrani Karunasagar; Iddya Karunasagar

2006-01-01

179

Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters  

SciTech Connect

Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)

1988-12-31

180

Vibrio biofilms: so much the same yet so different  

PubMed Central

Vibrios are natural inhabitants of aquatic environments and form symbiotic or pathogenic relationships with eukaryotic hosts. Recent studies reveal that the ability of vibrios to form biofilms – i.e. matrix-enclosed, surface-associated communities– depends upon specific structural genes (flagella, pili, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis) and regulatory processes (two-component regulators, quorum sensing, and c-di-GMP signaling). In this review, we compare and contrast mechanisms and regulation of biofilm formation by Vibrio species, with a focus on Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio fischeri. While many aspects are the same, others differ dramatically. Critical questions that remain to be answered regarding the molecular underpinnings of Vibrio biofilm formation will also be discussed. PMID:19231189

Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Visick, Karen L.

2009-01-01

181

Biodiversity of Vibrios  

PubMed Central

Vibrios are ubiquitous and abundant in the aquatic environment. A high abundance of vibrios is also detected in tissues and/or organs of various marine algae and animals, e.g., abalones, bivalves, corals, fish, shrimp, sponges, squid, and zooplankton. Vibrios harbour a wealth of diverse genomes as revealed by different genomic techniques including amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing, repetetive extragenic palindrome PCR, ribotyping, and whole-genome sequencing. The 74 species of this group are distributed among four different families, i.e., Enterovibrionaceae, Photobacteriaceae, Salinivibrionaceae, and Vibrionaceae. Two new genera, i.e., Enterovibrio norvegicus and Grimontia hollisae, and 20 novel species, i.e., Enterovibrio coralii, Photobacterium eurosenbergii, V. brasiliensis, V. chagasii, V. coralliillyticus, V. crassostreae, V. fortis, V. gallicus, V. hepatarius, V. hispanicus, V. kanaloaei, V. neonatus, V. neptunius, V. pomeroyi, V. pacinii, V. rotiferianus, V. superstes, V. tasmaniensis, V. ezurae, and V. xuii, have been described in the last few years. Comparative genome analyses have already revealed a variety of genomic events, including mutations, chromosomal rearrangements, loss of genes by decay or deletion, and gene acquisitions through duplication or horizontal transfer (e.g., in the acquisition of bacteriophages, pathogenicity islands, and super-integrons), that are probably important driving forces in the evolution and speciation of vibrios. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics through the application of, e.g., microarrays will facilitate the investigation of the gene repertoire at the species level. Based on such new genomic information, the taxonomy and the species concept for vibrios will be reviewed in the next years. PMID:15353563

Thompson, Fabiano L.; Iida, Tetsuya; Swings, Jean

2004-01-01

182

Bacteremia caused by Vibrio hollisae.  

PubMed Central

Vibrio hollisae was recovered from the bloodstream of a 36-year-old man with chronic active hepatitis who was admitted to the hospital with signs of gastrointestinal illness. V. hollisae is an infrequent human pathogen associated with seafood ingestion. No etiologic link to seafood was demonstrated in this case report. PMID:3343331

Rank, E L; Smith, I B; Langer, M

1988-01-01

183

Reactive oxygen species generated by a heat shock protein (Hsp) inducing product contributes to Hsp70 production and Hsp70-mediated protective immunity in Artemia franciscana against pathogenic vibrios.  

PubMed

The cytoprotective role of heat shock protein (Hsp70) described in a variety of animal disease models, including vibriosis in farmed aquatic animals, suggests that new protective strategies relying upon the use of compounds that selectively turn on Hsp genes could be developed. The product Tex-OE® (hereafter referred to as Hspi), an extract from the skin of the prickly pear fruit, Opuntia ficus indica, was previously shown to trigger Hsp70 synthesis in a non-stressful situation in a variety of animals, including in a gnotobiotically (germ-free) cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana model system. This model system offers great potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of compounds that have health benefit effects. By using this model system, we aimed to disclose the underlying cause behind the induction of Hsp70 by Hspi in the shrimp host, and to determine whether the product affects the shrimp in inducing resistance towards pathogenic vibrios. We provide unequivocal evidences indicating that during the pretreatment period with Hspi, there is an initial release of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide anion), generated by the added product, in the rearing water and associated with the host. The reactive molecules generated are the triggering factors responsible for causing Hsp70 induction within Artemia. We have also shown that Hspi acts prophylactically at an optimum dose regimen to confer protection against pathogenic vibrios. This salutary effect was associated with upregulation of two important immune genes, prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase of the innate immune system. These findings suggest that inducers of stress protein (e.g. Hsp70) are potentially important modulator of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to cultured shrimp against Vibrio infection. PMID:24950414

Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Linayati, Linayati; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

2014-10-01

184

Occurrence of the three major Vibrio species pathogenic for human in seafood products consumed in France using real-time PCR.  

PubMed

Vibrio spp. have emerged as a serious threat to human health worldwide. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus are of particular concern as they have been linked to gastrointestinal infections and septicemia associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. We developed hydrolysis probe-based real-time PCR systems with an internal amplification control for the detection of these species. We applied these systems to a total of 167 fresh or frozen crustacean, fish and shellfish samples consumed in France. Of them, 34.7% (n=58) were positive for Vibrio. V. parahaemolyticus was the most common, in 31.1% of samples, followed by V. vulnificus in 12.6% and V. cholerae in 0.6%. Furthermore, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus were present simultaneously in 9.6% of samples. Virulence genes (tdh and trh sequences) were present in 25% of the V. parahaemolyticus-positive samples. The V. cholerae strain detected was non toxigenic. The densities of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae ranged from <10(2) to 10(4)bacteria/g of seafood. All samples positive for V. vulnificus displayed low-level contamination with fewer than 10(2)bacteria/g. Our findings indicate that seafood consumption presents a potential risk to human health in France and highlight the importance of tools for a preventive consumer protection policy. PMID:25128747

Robert-Pillot, Annick; Copin, Stéphanie; Himber, Charlotte; Gay, Mélanie; Quilici, Marie-Laure

2014-10-17

185

Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.  

PubMed

Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries. PMID:23394143

Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

2013-04-01

186

Occurrence of virulence genes among Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from treated wastewaters.  

PubMed

Pathogenic Vibrio species are an important cause of foodborne illnesses. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species in the final effluents of a wastewater treatment plant and the risk that they may pose to public health. During the 1-year monitoring, a total of 43 Vibrio strains were isolated: 23 Vibrio alginolyticus, 1 Vibrio cholerae, 4 Vibrio vulnificus, and 15 Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The PCR investigation of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae virulence genes (tlh, trh, tdh, toxR, toxS, toxRS, toxT, zot, ctxAB, tcp, ace, vpi, nanH) revealed the presence of some of these genes in a significant number of strains. Intraspecies variability and genetic relationships among the environmental isolates were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR). We report the results of the first isolation and characterization of an environmental V. cholerae non-O1 non-O139 and of a toxigenic V. parahaemolyticus strain in Tunisia. We suggest that non-pathogenic Vibrio might represent a marine reservoir of virulence genes that can be transmitted between strains by horizontal transfer. PMID:25023745

Khouadja, Sadok; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Baccouche, Besma; Croci, Luciana; Bakhrouf, Amina

2014-10-01

187

Novel cholix toxin variants, ADP-ribosylating toxins in Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains, and their pathogenicity.  

PubMed

Cholix toxin (ChxA) is a recently discovered exotoxin in Vibrio cholerae which has been characterized as a third member of the eukaryotic elongation factor 2-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase toxins, in addition to exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and diphtheria toxin of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. These toxins consist of three characteristic domains for receptor binding, translocation, and catalysis. However, there is little information about the prevalence of chxA and its genetic variations and pathogenic mechanisms. In this study, we screened the chxA gene in a large number (n = 765) of V. cholerae strains and observed its presence exclusively in non-O1/non-O139 strains (27.0%; 53 of 196) and not in O1 (n = 485) or O139 (n = 84). Sequencing of these 53 chxA genes generated 29 subtypes which were grouped into three clusters designated chxA I, chxA II, and chxA III. chxA I belongs to the prototype, while chxA II and chxA III are newly discovered variants. ChxA II and ChxA III had unique receptor binding and catalytic domains, respectively, in comparison to ChxA I. Recombinant ChxA I (rChxA I) and rChxA II but not rChxA III showed variable cytotoxic effects on different eukaryotic cells. Although rChxA II was more lethal to mice than rChxA I when injected intravenously, no enterotoxicity of any rChxA was observed in a rabbit ileal loop test. Hepatocytes showed coagulation necrosis in rChxA I- or rChxA II-treated mice, seemingly the major target for ChxA. The present study illustrates the potential of ChxA as an important virulence factor in non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, which may be associated with extraintestinal infections rather than enterotoxicity. PMID:23230295

Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Golbar, Hossain M; Yamate, Jyoji; Arakawa, Eiji; Tada, Toshiji; Ramamurthy, T; Yamasaki, Shinji

2013-02-01

188

Putative virulence traits and pathogenicity of Vibrio cholerae Non-O1, Non-O139 isolates from surface waters in Kolkata, India.  

PubMed

Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was isolated from natural surface waters from different sites sampled in diarrhea endemic zones in Kolkata, India. Twenty-one of these isolates were randomly selected and included in the characterization. The multiserogroup isolates were compared by their virulence traits with a group of clinical non-O1, non-O139 isolates from the same geographic area. Of the 21 environmental isolates, 6 and 14 strains belonged to Heiberg groups I and II, respectively. Three of the environmental isolates showed resistance to 2,2-diamine-6,7-diisopropylpteridine phosphate. All of the non-O1, non-O139 strains were positive for toxR, and except for one environmental isolate, none of them were positive for tcpA in the PCR assay. None of the isolates were positive for genes encoding cholera toxin (ctxA), heat-stable toxin (est), heat-labile toxin (elt), and Shiga toxin variants (stx) of Escherichia coli. Additionally, except for one environmental isolate (PC32), all were positive for the gene encoding El Tor hemolysin (hly). The culture supernatants of 86% (18 of 21) of the environmental isolates showed a distinct cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells, and some of these strains also produced cell-rounding factor. The lipase, protease, and cell-associated hemagglutination activities and serum resistance properties of the environmental and clinical isolates did not differ much. However, seven environmental isolates exhibited very high hemolytic activities (80 to 100%), while none of the clinical strains belonged to this group. The environmental isolates manifested three adherence patterns, namely, carpet-like, diffuse, and aggregative adherence, and the clinical isolates showed diffuse adherence on HeLa cells. Of the 11 environmental isolates tested for enteropathogenic potential, 8 (73%) induced positive fluid accumulation (>/=100) in a mouse model, and the reactivities of these isolates were comparable to those of clinical strains of non-O1, non-O139 and toxigenic O139 V. cholerae. Comparison of the counts of the colonized environmental and clinical strains in the mouse intestine showed that the organisms of both groups had similar colonizing efficiencies. These findings indicate the presence of potentially pathogenic V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 strains in surface waters of the studied sites in Kolkata. PMID:18641168

Bag, Prasanta K; Bhowmik, Poulami; Hajra, Tapas K; Ramamurthy, T; Sarkar, Pradipta; Majumder, Mrinmoyee; Chowdhury, Goutam; Das, Suresh C

2008-09-01

189

Novel Cholix Toxin Variants, ADP-Ribosylating Toxins in Vibrio cholerae Non-O1/Non-O139 Strains, and Their Pathogenicity  

PubMed Central

Cholix toxin (ChxA) is a recently discovered exotoxin in Vibrio cholerae which has been characterized as a third member of the eukaryotic elongation factor 2-specific ADP-ribosyltransferase toxins, in addition to exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and diphtheria toxin of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. These toxins consist of three characteristic domains for receptor binding, translocation, and catalysis. However, there is little information about the prevalence of chxA and its genetic variations and pathogenic mechanisms. In this study, we screened the chxA gene in a large number (n = 765) of V. cholerae strains and observed its presence exclusively in non-O1/non-O139 strains (27.0%; 53 of 196) and not in O1 (n = 485) or O139 (n = 84). Sequencing of these 53 chxA genes generated 29 subtypes which were grouped into three clusters designated chxA I, chxA II, and chxA III. chxA I belongs to the prototype, while chxA II and chxA III are newly discovered variants. ChxA II and ChxA III had unique receptor binding and catalytic domains, respectively, in comparison to ChxA I. Recombinant ChxA I (rChxA I) and rChxA II but not rChxA III showed variable cytotoxic effects on different eukaryotic cells. Although rChxA II was more lethal to mice than rChxA I when injected intravenously, no enterotoxicity of any rChxA was observed in a rabbit ileal loop test. Hepatocytes showed coagulation necrosis in rChxA I- or rChxA II-treated mice, seemingly the major target for ChxA. The present study illustrates the potential of ChxA as an important virulence factor in non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, which may be associated with extraintestinal infections rather than enterotoxicity. PMID:23230295

Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Golbar, Hossain M.; Yamate, Jyoji; Arakawa, Eiji; Tada, Toshiji; Ramamurthy, T.

2013-01-01

190

Vibrios dominate as culturable nitrogen-fixing bacteria of the Brazilian coral Mussismilia hispida.  

PubMed

Taxonomic characterization was performed on the putative N(2)-fixing microbiota associated with the coral species Mussismilia hispida, and with its sympatric species Palythoa caribaeorum, P. variabilis, and Zoanthus solanderi, off the coast of São Sebastião (São Paulo State, Brazil). The 95 isolates belonged to the Gammaproteobacteria according to the 16S rDNA gene sequences. In order to identify the isolates unambiguously, pyrH gene sequencing was carried out. The majority of the isolates (n = 76) fell within the Vibrio core group, with the highest gene sequence similarity being towards Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio alginolyticus. Nineteen representative isolates belonging to V. harveyi (n = 7), V. alginolyticus (n = 8), V. campbellii (n = 3), and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 1) were capable of growing six successive times in nitrogen-free medium and some of them showed strong nitrogenase activity by means of the acetylene reduction assay (ARA). It was concluded that nitrogen fixation is a common phenotypic trait among Vibrio species of the core group. The fact that different Vibrio species can fix N(2) might explain why they are so abundant in the mucus of different coral species. PMID:18678453

Chimetto, Luciane A; Brocchi, Marcelo; Thompson, Cristiane C; Martins, Roberta C R; Ramos, Heloiza R; Thompson, Fabiano L

2008-09-01

191

Predatory bacteria as natural modulators of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in seawater and oysters.  

PubMed

This study shows that naturally occurring Vibrio predatory bacteria (VPB) exert a major role in controlling pathogenic vibrios in seawater and shellfish. The growth and persistence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus were assessed in natural seawater and in the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. The pathogens examined were V. vulnificus strain VV1003, V. parahaemolyticus O1:KUT (KUT stands for K untypeable), and V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 and corresponding O3:K6 mutants deficient in the toxRS virulence regulatory gene or the rpoS alternative stress response sigma factor gene. Vibrios were selected for streptomycin resistance, which facilitated their enumeration. In natural seawater, oysters bioconcentrated each Vibrio strain for 24 h at 22°C; however, counts rapidly declined to near negligible levels by 72 h. In natural seawater with or without oysters, vibrios decreased more than 3 log units to near negligible levels within 72 h. Neither toxRS nor rpoS had a significant effect on Vibrio levels. In autoclaved seawater, V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 counts increased 1,000-fold over 72 h. Failure of the vibrios to persist in natural seawater and oysters led to screening of the water samples for VPB on lawns of V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 host cells. Many VPB, including Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs; Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Bacteriovorax stolpii) and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus-like predators, were detected by plaque assay and electron microscopic analysis of plaque-purified isolates from Atlantic, Gulf Coast, and Hawaiian seawater. When V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 was added to natural seawater containing trace amounts of VPB, Vibrio counts diminished 3 log units to nondetectable levels, while VPB increased 3 log units within 48 h. We propose a new paradigm that VPB are important modulators of pathogenic vibrios in seawater and oysters. PMID:22904049

Richards, Gary P; Fay, Johnna P; Dickens, Keyana A; Parent, Michelle A; Soroka, Douglas S; Boyd, E Fidelma

2012-10-01

192

Predatory Bacteria as Natural Modulators of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in Seawater and Oysters  

PubMed Central

This study shows that naturally occurring Vibrio predatory bacteria (VPB) exert a major role in controlling pathogenic vibrios in seawater and shellfish. The growth and persistence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus were assessed in natural seawater and in the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. The pathogens examined were V. vulnificus strain VV1003, V. parahaemolyticus O1:KUT (KUT stands for K untypeable), and V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 and corresponding O3:K6 mutants deficient in the toxRS virulence regulatory gene or the rpoS alternative stress response sigma factor gene. Vibrios were selected for streptomycin resistance, which facilitated their enumeration. In natural seawater, oysters bioconcentrated each Vibrio strain for 24 h at 22°C; however, counts rapidly declined to near negligible levels by 72 h. In natural seawater with or without oysters, vibrios decreased more than 3 log units to near negligible levels within 72 h. Neither toxRS nor rpoS had a significant effect on Vibrio levels. In autoclaved seawater, V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 counts increased 1,000-fold over 72 h. Failure of the vibrios to persist in natural seawater and oysters led to screening of the water samples for VPB on lawns of V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 host cells. Many VPB, including Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs; Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Bacteriovorax stolpii) and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus-like predators, were detected by plaque assay and electron microscopic analysis of plaque-purified isolates from Atlantic, Gulf Coast, and Hawaiian seawater. When V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 was added to natural seawater containing trace amounts of VPB, Vibrio counts diminished 3 log units to nondetectable levels, while VPB increased 3 log units within 48 h. We propose a new paradigm that VPB are important modulators of pathogenic vibrios in seawater and oysters. PMID:22904049

Fay, Johnna P.; Dickens, Keyana A.; Parent, Michelle A.; Soroka, Douglas S.; Boyd, E. Fidelma

2012-01-01

193

Ethanolamine utilization in Vibrio alginolyticus  

PubMed Central

Abstract Ethanolamine is used as an energy source by phylogenetically diverse bacteria including pathogens, by the concerted action of proteins from the eut-operon. Previous studies have revealed the presence of eutBC genes encoding ethanolamine-ammonia lyase, a key enzyme that breaks ethanolamine into acetaldehyde and ammonia, in about 100 bacterial genomes including members of gamma-proteobacteria. However, ethanolamine utilization has not been reported for any member of the Vibrio genus. Our comparative genomics study reveals the presence of genes that are involved in ethanolamine utilization in several Vibrio species. Using Vibrio alginolyticus as a model system we demonstrate that ethanolamine is better utilized as a nitrogen source than as a carbon source. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Lakshminarayan Iyer and Dr. Vivek Anantharaman (nominated by Dr. L Aravind). PMID:23234435

2012-01-01

194

Evidence for the role of horizontal transfer in generating pVT1, a large mosaic conjugative plasmid from the clam pathogen, Vibrio tapetis.  

PubMed

The marine bacterium Vibrio tapetis is the causative agent of the brown ring disease, which affects the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and causes heavy economic losses in North of Europe and in Eastern Asia. Further characterization of V. tapetis isolates showed that all the investigated strains harbored at least one large plasmid. We determined the sequence of the 82,266 bp plasmid pVT1 from the CECT4600(T) reference strain and analyzed its genetic content. pVT1 is a mosaic plasmid closely related to several conjugative plasmids isolated from Vibrio vulnificus strains and was shown to be itself conjugative in Vibrios. In addition, it contains DNA regions that have similarity with several other plasmids from marine bacteria (Vibrio sp., Shewanella sp., Listonella anguillarum and Photobacterium profundum). pVT1 contains a number of mobile elements, including twelve Insertion Sequences or inactivated IS genes and an RS1 phage element related to the CTXphi phage of V. cholerae. The genetic organization of pVT1 underscores an important role of horizontal gene transfer through conjugative plasmid shuffling and transposition events in the acquisition of new genetic resources and in generating the pVT1 modular organization. In addition, pVT1 presents a copy number of 9, relatively high for a conjugative plasmid, and appears to belong to a new type of replicon, which may be specific to Vibrionaceae and Shewanelleacae. PMID:21326607

Erauso, Gaël; Lakhal, Fatma; Bidault-Toffin, Adeline; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Bouloc, Philippe; Paillard, Christine; Jacq, Annick

2011-01-01

195

Disruption of Cell-to-Cell Signaling Does Not Abolish the Antagonism of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis toward the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum in Algal Systems  

PubMed Central

Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic Phaeobacter and QS inhibitors is a feasible strategy for aquaculture disease control. PMID:23811510

Prol García, M. J.; D'Alvise, P. W.

2013-01-01

196

Vibrio communis sp. nov., isolated from the marine animals Mussismilia hispida, Phyllogorgia dilatata, Palythoa caribaeorum, Palythoa variabilis and Litopenaeus vannamei.  

PubMed

Eight Vibrio isolates originating from the marine corals Mussismilia hispida and Phyllogorgia dilatata and the zoanthids Palythoa caribaeorum and Palythoa variabilis in Brazil and the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in Ecuador were studied by means of a polyphasic approach. The novel isolates formed a tight monophyletic group in the genus Vibrio and were closely related to species of the Vibrio harveyi group, to which they showed more than 99?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Analysis based on concatenated sequences of the following seven genes, 16S rRNA, gyrB, recA, rpoA, topA, pyrH and mreB (5633 bp in length), showed clear separation between the isolates and species of the V. harveyi group. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, performed previously, revealed that a representative isolate of this group, LMG 20370, was clearly separate from known Vibrio species (it belonged to the so-called AFLP cluster A31). DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) experiments with representative isolates and type strains of the V. harveyi species group revealed high DDH between the novel isolates (more than 74?%) and less than 70?% DDH towards type strains of related Vibrio species, proving the novel species status of the isolates. Phenotypically, the novel species belongs to the arginine dihydrolase (A)-negative, lysine decarboxylase (L)-positive and ornithine decarboxylase (O)-positive (A-/L+/O+) cluster reported previously. Most species of the V. harveyi group (i.e. Vibrio rotiferianus, V. harveyi, V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus) also belong to this A-/L+/O+ cluster. However, several phenotypic features can be used for the identification of the novel species. In contrast to its closest phylogenetic neighbours, the novel species exhibits esterase (C4) and N-acetyl-?-glucosaminidase activities, but it does not produce acetoin, does not use citrate, ?-ketoglutaric acid or propionic acid and does not ferment melibiose. The novel species can also be differentiated on the basis of the presence of the fatty acids C(17?:?0,) C(17?:?1)?8c, iso-C(17?:?0) and iso-C(13?:?0) and the absence of the fatty acid C(18?:?0). The name Vibrio communis sp. nov. is proposed for this taxon. Strain R-40496(T) (=LMG 25430(T) =CAIM 1816(T)) is the type strain. PMID:20305064

Chimetto, Luciane A; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Alves, Nelson; Silva, Bruno Sergio; Brocchi, Marcelo; Willems, Anne; De Vos, Paul; Thompson, Fabiano L

2011-02-01

197

Role of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae and coral mucus in the adhesion of the coral-bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi to its host  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio shiloi, the causative agent of bleaching the coral Oculina patagonica in the Mediterranean Sea, adheres to its coral host by a ?-D-galactopyranoside-containing receptor on the coral surface. The receptor is present in the coral mucus, since V. shiloi adhered avidly to mucus-coated ELISA plates. Adhesion was inhibited by methyl-?-D-galactopyranoside. Removal of the mucus from O. patagonica resulted in a

Ehud Banin; Tomer Israely; Maoz Fine; Yossi Loya; Eugene Rosenberg

2001-01-01

198

PCR Detection of a Newly Emerged Pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 Pathogen in Pure Cultures and Seeded Waters from the Gulf of Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the optimization of PCR parameters and testing of a wide number of microbial species to establish a highly specific and sensitive PCR-based method of detection of a newly emerged pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 strain in pure cultures and seeded waters from the Gulf of Mexico (gulf water). The selected open reading frame 8 (ORF8) DNA-specific oligonucleotide primers

Michael L. Myers; Gitika Panicker; Asim K. Bej

2003-01-01

199

Expression, purification, and characterization of thermolabile hemolysin (TLH) from Vibrio alginolyticus.  

PubMed

Hemolysin is a putative pathogenicity factor in many bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA fragment containing the open reading frame (1254 bp) of the thermolabile hemolysin gene (tlh) from Vibrio alginolyticus V05 was amplified and cloned into the expression plasmid pET-24d(+). The deduced amino acid sequence of the thermolabile hemolysin (TLH) shared 94 and 83% identity with the lecithin-dependent hemolysin (LDH)/TLH of V. parahaemolyticus and V. harveyi thermolabile hemolysin (VHH), respectively. The sequence analysis also indicated that it contained a GDSL lipase domain like VHH. The recombinant protein with a predicted molecular mass of 47.2 kDa was expressed in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) as a His-tag fused protein. TLH purified by the nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) His-Bind Resin method showed phospholipase activity on an egg yolk emulsion plate and hemolytic activity against flounder erythrocytes with a specific activity of 18 hemolytic units microg(-1). The addition of divalent cations at different concentrations decreased hemolytic activity of the purified TLH, but monavalent cations did not affect hemolytic activity. The hemolytic activity of TLH was also markedly inhibited by protein modification reagents, i.e. beta-mercaptoethanol, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Moreover, TLH was toxic to zebrafish when injected intraperitoneally, with a median lethal dose (LD50) of 0.8 microg protein g(-1) fish. This work shows that TLH could potentially be developed as a vaccine and used as a diagnostic tool for vibriosis. PMID:20662368

Jia, Airong; Woo, Norman Y S; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

2010-06-11

200

Genome Sequence of Vibrio rotiferianus Strain DAT722?  

PubMed Central

Vibrio rotiferianus is a marine pathogen capable of causing disease in various aquatic organisms. We announce the genome sequence of V. rotiferianus DAT722, which has a large chromosomal integron containing 116 gene cassettes and is a model organism for studying the role of this system in vibrio evolution. PMID:21551292

Chowdhury, Piklu Roy; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H. W.; Labbate, Maurizio

2011-01-01

201

The fusion Vibrio campbellii luciferase as a eukaryotic gene reporter.  

PubMed

Bacterial luciferase from Vibrio campbellii is a thermostable enzyme with an in vitro thermal inactivation half-life of ~1020 min at 37°C. The enzyme also binds tightly to reduced FMN. In this study, a V. campbellii fusion luciferase construct in which the ? and ? subunits are linked with a decapeptide was made and characterized. In general, the overall enzymatic properties of the two enzymes are similar. Expression of the enzymes in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase emits less light than the native luciferase, but still emits a much greater amount of light than native luciferase from Vibrio harveyi and Photobacterium leiognathi TH1. The intensity of light emitted by the V. campbellii fusion luciferase was more than 80-fold greater than that from the V. harveyi native luciferase when expressed at 37°C. Biochemical characterization has shown that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase also retains a high binding affinity for reduced flavin mononucleotide and high thermostability. The levels of bioluminescence emitted by the V. campbellii fusion luciferase expressed in HEK293T cells reached ~1×10(6) Relative Light Units/mg total protein. These findings suggest that the V. campbellii fusion luciferase is a promising candidate for further development as a luciferase-based reporter for eukaryotic systems. PMID:23000378

Tinikul, Ruchanok; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Thaveekarn, Wichit; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Chaiyen, Pimchai

2012-12-31

202

AphA and LuxR/HapR reciprocally control quorum sensing in vibrios  

PubMed Central

Bacteria cycle between periods when they perform individual behaviors and periods when they perform group behaviors. These transitions are controlled by a cell–cell communication process called quorum sensing, in which extracellular signal molecules, called autoinducers (AIs), are released, accumulate, and are synchronously detected by a group of bacteria. AI detection results in community-wide changes in gene expression, enabling bacteria to collectively execute behaviors such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, and virulence factor production. In this study, we show that the transcription factor AphA is a master regulator of quorum sensing that operates at low cell density (LCD) in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae. In contrast, LuxR (V. harveyi)/HapR (V. cholerae) is the master regulator that operates at high cell density (HCD). At LCD, redundant small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) activate production of AphA, and AphA and the sRNAs repress production of LuxR/HapR. Conversely, at HCD, LuxR/HapR represses aphA. This network architecture ensures maximal AphA production at LCD and maximal LuxR/HapR production at HCD. Microarray analyses reveal that 300 genes are regulated by AphA at LCD in V. harveyi, a subset of which is also controlled by LuxR. We propose that reciprocal gradients of AphA and LuxR/HapR establish the quorum-sensing LCD and HCD gene expression patterns, respectively. PMID:21325136

Rutherford, Steven T.; van Kessel, Julia C.; Shao, Yi; Bassler, Bonnie L.

2011-01-01

203

Genome sequence of Vibrio diabolicus and identification of the exopolysaccharide HE800 biosynthesis locus.  

PubMed

Vibrio diabolicus, a marine bacterium originating from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, produces the HE800 exopolysaccharide with high value for biotechnological purposes, especially for human health. Its genome was sequenced and analyzed; phylogenetic analysis using the core genome revealed V. diabolicus is close to another deep-sea Vibrio sp. (Ex25) within the Harveyi clade and Alginolyticus group. A genetic locus homologous to the syp cluster from Vibrio fischeri was demonstrated to be involved in the HE800 production. However, few genetic particularities suggest that the regulation of syp expression may be different in V. diabolicus. The presence of several types of glycosyltransferases within the locus indicates a capacity to generate diversity in the glycosidic structure, which may confer an adaptability to environmental conditions. These results contribute to better understanding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and for developing new efficient processes to produce this molecule for biotechnological applications. PMID:25273176

Goudenège, David; Boursicot, Vincent; Versigny, Typhaine; Bonnetot, Sandrine; Ratiskol, Jacqueline; Sinquin, Corinne; LaPointe, Gisèle; Le Rous, Frédérique; Roux, Frédérique Le; Delbarre-Ladrat, Christine

2014-12-01

204

Obacunone Represses Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 in an envZ-Dependent Fashion  

PubMed Central

Obacunone belongs to a class of unique triterpenoids called limonoids, present in Citrus species. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested that obacunone possesses antivirulence activity and demonstrates inhibition of cell-cell signaling in Vibrio harveyi and Escherichia coli O157:H7. The present work sought to determine the effect of obacunone on the food-borne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 by using a cDNA microarray. Transcriptomic studies indicated that obacunone represses Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1), the maltose transporter, and the hydrogenase operon. Furthermore, phenotypic data for the Caco-2 infection assay and maltose utilization were in agreement with microarray data suggesting repression of SPI1 and maltose transport. Further studies demonstrated that repression of SPI1 was plausibly mediated through hilA. Additionally, obacunone seems to repress SPI2 under SPI2-inducing conditions as well as in Caco-2 infection models. Furthermore, obacunone seems to repress hilA in an EnvZ-dependent fashion. Altogether, the results of the study seems to suggest that obacunone exerts an antivirulence effect on S. Typhimurium and may serve as a lead compound for development of antivirulence strategies for S. Typhimurium. PMID:22843534

Vikram, Amit; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K.; Jesudhasan, Palmy R.

2012-01-01

205

Glucose- but not rice-based oral rehydration therapy enhances the production of virulence determinants in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings. PMID:25474211

Kühn, Juliane; Finger, Flavio; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Blokesch, Melanie

2014-12-01

206

Glucose- but Not Rice-Based Oral Rehydration Therapy Enhances the Production of Virulence Determinants in the Human Pathogen Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings. PMID:25474211

Kühn, Juliane; Finger, Flavio; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Blokesch, Melanie

2014-01-01

207

A novel C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) protein from Mytilus coruscus with the transcriptional analysis against marine pathogens and heavy metals.  

PubMed

The C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins, which are involved in various processes of vertebrates, are important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity of invertebrates. In present study, a novel C1qDC was identified from Mytilus coruscus (designated as McC1qDC), which was 917 bp in length encoding 236 amino acids with a typical signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues in N-terminus. Based on its conserved C1q domain and molecular architecture of 10 ?-strand jelly-roll folding topology structure, McC1qDC might be classified as a member of the C1q family. The mRNA transcript of McC1qDC was predominantly detectable in the hemocytes, and a less degree in gill, gonad and mantle, but trace in foot, adductor and digestive gland. Upon induction by Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio alginolyticus, McC1qDC expression was significantly up-regulated. Time-dependent mRNA expression of McC1qDC was found during copper and cadmium exposure for its heavy metal-binding domain. These results indicated that McC1qDC was a novel member of the C1qDC protein family as a pattern recognition receptor against pathogens, and might be developed as a potential indicator for monitoring heavy metals pollution. PMID:24296435

Liu, Hui-Hui; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

2014-05-01

208

Vibrio and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... html Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.2013. Vibrio parahaemolyticus . [Accessed January 2015]. Available at URL: http://www.cdc.gov/vibrio/vibriop.html Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...

209

Use of oligonucleotide array for identification of six foodborne pathogens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown on selective media.  

PubMed

Identification of presumptive foodborne pathogens grown on selective media may take one to several days and requires a different battery of biochemical tests for each microorganism. A molecular identification method was developed in which universal primers were used to amplify the 16S to 23S rDNA intergenic spacer of target microorganisms, and PCR products were hybridized to a panel of species-specific oligonucleotides that were immobilized on a nylon membrane. The seven target microorganisms were Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. After testing a large collection of target bacteria (29 to 51 strains) and nontarget bacteria (> 500 strains), the performances (sensitivity and specificity) of the oligonucleotide array were as follows: B. cereus (100 and 77%), E. coli (100 and 100%), L. monocytogenes (100 and 90%), P. aeruginosa (100 and 100%), Salmonella (100 and 100%), S. aureus (100 and 100%), and V. parahaemolyticus (100 and 94.2%). Other species in the B. cereus group cross-hybridized to the probes used for identification of B. cereus, and positive results should be confirmed by additional morphological observation of colonies. Listeria innocua cross-reacted with probes used to identify L. monocytogenes, but a simple hemolysis test was used to differentiate the two species. Some strains of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio mimicus cross-hybridized with probes used for identification of V. parahaemolyticus and caused false-positive reactions. The advantage of the array is that a common protocol was used to identify the seven target microorganisms and multiple different microorganisms could be simultaneously identified on a single array. PMID:16300063

Lin, Miao Chu; Huang, Ay Huey; Tsen, Hau Yang; Wong, Hin-Chung; Chang, Tsung Chain

2005-11-01

210

Genomic and functional analysis of Vibrio phage SIO-2 reveals novel insights into ecology and evolution of marine siphoviruses  

PubMed Central

We report on a genomic and functional analysis of a novel marine siphovirus, the Vibrio phage SIO-2. This phage is lytic for related Vibrio species of great ecological interest including the broadly antagonistic bacterium Vibrio sp. SWAT3 as well as notable members of the Harveyi clade (V. harveyi ATTC BAA-1116 and V. campbellii ATCC 25920). Vibrio phage SIO-2 has a circularly permuted genome of 80,598 bp, which displays unusual features. This genome is larger than that of most known siphoviruses and only 38 of the 116 predicted proteins had homologues in databases. Another divergence is manifest by the origin of core genes, most of which share robust similarities with unrelated viruses and bacteria spanning a wide range of phyla. These core genes are arranged in the same order as in most bacteriophages but they are unusually interspaced at two places with insertions of DNA comprising a high density of uncharacterized genes. The acquisition of these DNA inserts is associated with morphological variation of SIO-2 capsid, which assembles as a large (80 nm) shell with a novel T=12 symmetry. These atypical structural features confer on SIO-2 a remarkable stability to a variety of physical, chemical and environmental factors. Given this high level of functional and genomic novelty, SIO-2 emerges as a model of considerable interest in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:22225728

Baudoux, A-C.; Hendrix, R.W.; Lander, G.C.; Bailly, X.; Podell, S.; Paillard, C.; Johnson, J.E.; Potter, C.S.; Carragher, B.; Azam, F.

2011-01-01

211

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

This review highlighted the following: (i) pathogenic mechanism of the thermostable direct hemolysin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, especially on its cardiotoxicity, (ii) heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, especially structure–activity relationship of heat-stable enterotoxin, (iii) RNA N-glycosidase activity of Vero toxins (VT1 and VT2) produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, (iv) discovery of Vibrio cholerae O139, (v) isolation of new variant of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor that carries classical ctxB, and production of high concentration of cholera toxin by these strains, and (vi) conversion of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae to culturable state by co-culture with eukaryotic cells. PMID:21233598

TAKEDA, Yoshifumi

2011-01-01

212

Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum Harboring the pJM1 Virulence Plasmid and Genomic Comparison with Other Virulent Strains of V. anguillarum and V. ordalii ? †  

PubMed Central

We dissected the complete genome sequence of the O1 serotype strain Vibrio anguillarum 775(pJM1) and determined the draft genomic sequences of plasmidless strains of serotype O1 (strain 96F) and O2? (strain RV22) and V. ordalii. All strains harbor two chromosomes, but 775 also harbors the virulence plasmid pJM1, which carries the anguibactin-producing and cognate transport genes, one of the main virulence factors of V. anguillarum. Genomic analysis identified eight genomic islands in chromosome 1 of V. anguillarum 775(pJM1) and two in chromosome 2. Some of them carried potential virulence genes for the biosynthesis of O antigens, hemolysins, and exonucleases as well as others for sugar transport and metabolism. The majority of genes for essential cell functions and pathogenicity are located on chromosome 1. In contrast, chromosome 2 contains a larger fraction (59%) of hypothetical genes than does chromosome 1 (42%). Chromosome 2 also harbors a superintegron, as well as host “addiction” genes that are typically found on plasmids. Unique distinctive properties include homologues of type III secretion system genes in 96F, homologues of V. cholerae zot and ace toxin genes in RV22, and the biofilm formation syp genes in V. ordalii. Mobile genetic elements, some of them possibly originated in the pJM1 plasmid, were very abundant in 775, resulting in the silencing of specific genes, with only few insertions in the 96F and RV22 chromosomes. PMID:21576332

Naka, Hiroaki; Dias, Graciela M.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Dubay, Christopher; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Crosa, Jorge H.

2011-01-01

213

Sequence polymorphism-based identification and quantification of Vibrio nigripulchritudo at the species and subspecies level targeting an emerging pathogen for cultured shrimp in New Caledonia.  

E-print Network

at the species and subspecies level targeting an emerging pathogen for cultured shrimp in New Caledonia. Cyrille with shrimp mortality events in New Caledonia. Using sequence polymorphisms evidenced in this previous Multi Locus Sequence Typing study, we developed two new quantitative PCR assays permitting the detection

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

The Vibrio cholerae Genome Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Institute For Genomic Research (TIGR) has placed online the latest versions of the DNA sequence of both chromosomes of the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The TIGR site offers data access via a hypertext Gene Identification Table, DNA Molecule Information, Gene Name Search, Locus Search, RNA Gene Table, Paralogous Gene Families, a Sequence Search, or by download (FTP). Originally published by Heidelberg et al. in the journal Nature [106:477-483, 2000], further information is available to users via links at the TIGR site.

215

Connecting type VI secretion, quorum sensing, and c-di-GMP production in fish pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus through phosphatase PppA.  

PubMed

Vibrio alginolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium, has brought about severe economic damage to the mariculture industry by causing vibriosis in various fish species. We are intrigued in the regulation of the pathogenesis in this bacterium. Here, we reported a complex regulatory connection among the newly defined type VI secretion system (T6SS), quorum sensing (QS), and 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) signal through the phosphatase PppA encoded in the T6SS gene cluster of V. alginolyticus. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed various regulatory targets of PppA including the T6SS substrate hemolysin coregulated protein (Hcp), quorum sensing regulator LuxR, exotoxin alkaline serine protease (Asp), flagellar proteins, as well as proteins involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis and transport. Western blot analysis showed PppA served as a negative regulator of the expression and secretion of Hcp1. Mutation of pppA resulted in an increased level of the intracellular second messenger c-di-GMP and a decreased expression of the QS regulator LuxR as well as exotoxin Asp. Complementation of intact pppA gene in ?pppA mutant restored the production of c-di-GMP, LuxR, and Asp to the wild-type level. Phenotypic studies suggested that PppA takes part in the modulation of biofilm formation, motility, and cell aggregation. These results demonstrated new roles of PppA in controlling virulence factors and pleiotropic phenotypes and contributed to our understanding of the regulation of pathogenesis in V. alginolyticus. PMID:23021863

Sheng, Lili; Lv, Yuanzhi; Liu, Qin; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

2013-03-23

216

Illuminating Cell Signaling: Using "Vibrio harveyi" in an Introductory Biology Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cell signaling is an essential cellular process that is performed by all living organisms. Bacteria communicate with each other using a chemical language in a signaling pathway that allows bacteria to evaluate the size of their population, determine when they have reached a critical mass (quorum sensing), and then change their behavior in unison…

Hrizo, Stacy L.; Kaufmann, Nancy

2009-01-01

217

Virulence plasmid pJM1 prevents the conjugal entry of plasmid DNA into the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775.  

PubMed

Studies involving the introduction of cloned homologous genes into Vibrio anguillarum revealed that several plasmids could not be conjugally introduced into V. anguillarum 775(pJM1), but were transmissible to the pJM1-cured derivative H775-3. Recombinant pBR322 plasmids containing V. anguillarum genomic DNA inserts were mobilized from Escherichia coli donors, using pRK2013, into V. anguillarum H775-3 recipients at frequencies of 10(-6) to 10(-5) per recipient. When identical matings were performed with V. anguillarum 775(pJM1) recipients, the infrequent exconjugants recovered carried the pBR322-based plasmid but had lost the large virulence plasmid pJM1. Similar studies were carried out with plasmid RP4 and with recombinant derivatives of the closely related broad-host-range plasmid pRK290. While RP4 was transmissible from E. coli to V. anguillarum H775-3 at frequencies of 6.7 x 10(-2) per recipient, transmission to V. anguillarum 775(pJM1) recipients occurred at frequencies of only 2.5 x 10(-7). When pRK290 contained V. anguillarum DNA inserts, the only exconjugants recovered had lost pJM1, or contained pJM1 and a deletion derivative of the recombinant pRK290 plasmid where all of the DNA insert had been deleted. The use of Dam-, Dcm-, or EcoK- methylation-deficient E. coli donor strains failed to result in appreciable numbers of V. anguillarum 775(pJM1) exconjugants that contained the desired transferred plasmids. Following UV mutagenesis, a derivative of V. anguillarum 775(pJM1) was isolated that would accept conjugally transferred plasmid DNAs at frequencies similar to those observed when using V. anguillarum H775-3 recipients. These data suggest that virulence plasmid pJM1 mediates a restriction system that prevents conjugal transmission of plasmid DNA from E. coli donors into V. anguillarum 775(pJM1). This putative restriction system appears not to be directed towards Dam-, Dcm-, or EcoK-methylated DNA, and appears not to involve a Type II restriction endonuclease. PMID:1336793

Singer, J T; Choe, W; Schmidt, K A; Makula, R A

1992-12-01

218

Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio fortis Dalian14 Isolated from Diseased Sea Urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedius)  

PubMed Central

Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio fortis Dalian14 isolated from diseased sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedius) during disease outbreaks in North China. The availability of this genome sequence will facilitate the study of the mechanisms of pathogenicity and evolution of Vibrio species. PMID:24994792

Ding, Jun; Dou, Yan; Wang, Yinan

2014-01-01

219

Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA.  

PubMed

Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous in the marine-estuarine environment, but the magnitude of human non-ingestion exposure to these waterborne pathogens is largely unknown. We evaluated the magnitude of dermal exposure to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus among swimmers recreating in Vibrio-populated waters by conducting swim studies at four swimming locations in the Chesapeake Bay in 2009 and 2011. Volunteers (n=31) swam for set time periods, and surface water (n=25) and handwash (n=250) samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for Vibrio concentrations using quantitative PCR. Linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate factors associated with recreational exposures. Mean surface water V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus concentrations were 1128CFUmL(-1) (95% confidence interval (CI): 665.6, 1591.4) and 18CFUmL(-1) (95% CI: 9.8, 26.1), respectively, across all sampling locations. Mean Vibrio concentrations in handwash samples (V. vulnificus, 180CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 136.6, 222.5); V. parahaemolyticus, 3CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 2.4, 3.7)) were significantly associated with Vibrio concentrations in surface water (V. vulnificus, p<0.01; V. parahaemolyticus, p<0.01), but not with salinity or temperature (V. vulnificus, p=0.52, p=0.17; V. parahaemolyticus, p=0.82, p=0.06). Handwashing reduced V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus on subjects' hands by approximately one log (93.9%, 89.4%, respectively). It can be concluded that when Chesapeake Bay surface waters are characterized by elevated concentrations of Vibrio, swimmers and individuals working in those waters could experience significant dermal exposures to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, increasing their risk of infection. PMID:25454225

Shaw, Kristi S; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobs, John M; He, Xin; Crump, Byron C

2015-01-01

220

Antibiotic Resistant Salmonella and Vibrio Associated with Farmed Litopenaeus vannamei  

PubMed Central

Salmonella and Vibrio species were isolated and identified from Litopenaeus vannamei cultured in shrimp farms. Shrimp samples showed occurrence of 3.3% of Salmonella and 48.3% of Vibrio. The isolates were also screened for antibiotic resistance to oxolinic acid, sulphonamides, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, norfloxacin, ampicillin, doxycycline hydrochloride, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and nitrofurantoin. Salmonella enterica serovar Corvallis isolated from shrimp showed individual and multiple antibiotic resistance patterns. Five Vibrio species having individual and multiple antibiotic resistance were also identified. They were Vibrio cholerae (18.3%), V. mimicus (16.7%), V. parahaemolyticus (10%), V. vulnificus (6.7%), and V. alginolyticus (1.7%). Farm owners should be concerned about the presence of these pathogenic bacteria which also contributes to human health risk and should adopt best management practices for responsible aquaculture to ensure the quality of shrimp. PMID:22619583

Banerjee, Sanjoy; Ooi, Mei Chen; Shariff, Mohamed; Khatoon, Helena

2012-01-01

221

Local Mobile Gene Pools Rapidly Cross Species Boundaries To Create within Global Vibrio cholerae Populations  

E-print Network

Vibrio cholerae represents both an environmental pathogen and a widely distributed microbial species comprised of closely related strains occurring in the tropical to temperate coastal ocean across the globe (Colwell RR, ...

Boucher, Yan

222

Detection of V. harveyi in shrimp postlarvae and hatchery tank water by the Most Probable Number technique with PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

V. harveyi is the cause of serious disease in the shrimp industry in Thailand during cultivation. In this study, the gyrB gene of V. harveyi NICA, isolated from shrimp in Thailand, was sequenced. A pair of specific primers (A2B3) was designed that allowed amplification of a 363 bp gene fragment of V. harveyi. No cross reaction was detected in 17 other

Sawitree Thaithongnum; Pimonsri Ratanama; Karnchana Weeradechapol; Ampaitip Sukhoom; Varaporn Vuddhakul

2006-01-01

223

Oleic Acid Produced by a Marine Vibrio spp. Acts as an Anti-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Agent  

PubMed Central

It is known that some strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are responsible for gastroenteric diseases caused by the ingestion of marine organisms contaminated with these bacterial strains. Organic products that show inhibitory activity on the growth of the pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were extracted from a Vibrio native in the north of Chile. The inhibitory organic products were isolated by reverse phase chromatography and permeation by Sephadex LH20, and were characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques. The results showed that the prevailing active product is oleic acid, which was compared with standards by gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These active products might be useful for controlling the proliferation of pathogenic clones of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:22073014

Leyton, Yanett; Borquez, Jorge; Darias, José; Cueto, Mercedes; Díaz-Marrero, Ana R.; Riquelme, Carlos

2011-01-01

224

Vibrio cholerae: Measuring Natural Transformation Frequency.  

PubMed

Many bacteria can become naturally competent to take up extracellular DNA across their outer and inner membranes by a dedicated competence apparatus. Whereas some studies show that the DNA delivered to the cytoplasm may be used for genome repair or for nutrition, it can also be recombined onto the chromosome by homologous recombination: a process called natural transformation. Along with conjugation and transduction, natural transformation represents a mechanism for horizontal transfer of genetic material, e.g., antibiotic resistance genes, which can confer new beneficial characteristics onto the recipient bacteria. Described here are protocols for quantifying the frequency of transformation for the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, one of several Vibrio species recently shown to be capable of natural transformation. © 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25367272

Watve, Samit S; Bernardy, Eryn E; Hammer, Brian K

2014-01-01

225

Quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Multiple quorum-sensing circuits function in parallel to control virulence and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae . In contrast to other bacterial pathogens that induce virulence factor production and\\/or biofilm for- mation at high cell density in the presence of quorum- sensing autoinducers, V. cholerae represses these behaviours at high cell density. Consistent with this, we show here that V.

Brian K. Hammer; Bonnie L. Bassler

2003-01-01

226

Characterization of a mutant of Vibrio vulnificus for heme utilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio vulnificus, an opportunistic human pathogen, can obtain iron from a variety of heme proteins. This process involves the digestion of heme proteins by an exoprotease to liberate protoheme (iron-protoporphyrin IX). In the present study, we isolated and characterized a mutant for protoheme utilization. One mutant isolated by treatment with a chemical mutagen was shown to be unable to use

Shin-ichi Miyoshi; Yu Inami; Yuko Moriya; Takehito Kamei; Shigeo Yamamoto; Ken-ichi Tomochika; Sumio Shinoda

1997-01-01

227

New Vibrio species associated to molluscan microbiota: a review  

PubMed Central

The genus Vibrio consists of more than 100 species grouped in 14 clades that are widely distributed in aquatic environments such as estuarine, coastal waters, and sediments. A large number of species of this genus are associated with marine organisms like fish, molluscs and crustaceans, in commensal or pathogenic relations. In the last decade, more than 50 new species have been described in the genus Vibrio, due to the introduction of new molecular techniques in bacterial taxonomy, such as multilocus sequence analysis or fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism. On the other hand, the increasing number of environmental studies has contributed to improve the knowledge about the family Vibrionaceae and its phylogeny. Vibrio crassostreae, V. breoganii, V. celticus are some of the new Vibrio species described as forming part of the molluscan microbiota. Some of them have been associated with mortalities of different molluscan species, seriously affecting their culture and causing high losses in hatcheries as well as in natural beds. For other species, ecological importance has been demonstrated being highly abundant in different marine habitats and geographical regions. The present work provides an updated overview of the recently characterized Vibrio species isolated from molluscs. In addition, their pathogenic potential and/or environmental importance is discussed. PMID:24427157

Romalde, Jesús L.; Dieguez, Ana L.; Lasa, Aide; Balboa, Sabela

2014-01-01

228

Oligotyping reveals community level habitat selection within the genus Vibrio  

PubMed Central

The genus Vibrio is a metabolically diverse group of facultative anaerobic bacteria, common in aquatic environments and marine hosts. The genus contains several species of importance to human health and aquaculture, including the causative agents of human cholera and fish vibriosis. Vibrios display a wide variety of known life histories, from opportunistic pathogens to long-standing symbionts with individual host species. Studying Vibrio ecology has been challenging as individual species often display a wide range of habitat preferences, and groups of vibrios can act as socially cohesive groups. Although strong associations with salinity, temperature and other environmental variables have been established, the degree of habitat or host specificity at both the individual and community levels is unknown. Here we use oligotyping analyses in combination with a large collection of existing Vibrio 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence data to reveal patterns of Vibrio ecology across a wide range of environmental, host, and abiotic substrate associated habitats. Our data show that individual taxa often display a wide range of habitat preferences yet tend to be highly abundant in either substrate-associated or free-living environments. Our analyses show that Vibrio communities share considerable overlap between two distinct hosts (i.e., sponge and fish), yet are distinct from the abiotic plastic substrates. Lastly, evidence for habitat specificity at the community level exists in some habitats, despite considerable stochasticity in others. In addition to providing insights into Vibrio ecology across a broad range of habitats, our study shows the utility of oligotyping as a facile, high-throughput and unbiased method for large-scale analyses of publically available sequence data repositories and suggests its wide application could greatly extend the range of possibilities to explore microbial ecology. PMID:25431569

Schmidt, Victor T.; Reveillaud, Julie; Zettler, Erik; Mincer, Tracy J.; Murphy, Leslie; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

2014-01-01

229

New insights into Oculina patagonica coral diseases and their associated Vibrio spp. communities.  

PubMed

Bleaching of Oculina patagonica has been extensively studied in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, although no studies have been carried out in the Western basin. In 1996 Vibrio mediterranei was reported as the causative agent of bleaching in O. patagonica but it has not been related to bleached or healthy corals since 2003, suggesting that it was no longer involved in bleaching of O. patagonica. In an attempt to clarify the relationship between Vibrio spp., seawater temperature and coral diseases, as well as to investigate the putative differences between Eastern and Western Mediterranean basins, we have analysed the seasonal patterns of the culturable Vibrio spp. assemblages associated with healthy and diseased O. patagonica colonies. Two sampling points located in the Spanish Mediterranean coast were chosen for this study: Alicante Harbour and the Marine Reserve of Tabarca. A complex and dynamic assemblage of Vibrio spp. was present in O. patagonica along the whole year and under different environmental conditions and coral health status. While some Vibrio spp. were detected all year around in corals, the known pathogens V. mediteranei and V. coralliilyticus were only present in diseased specimens. The pathogenic potential of these bacteria was studied by experimental infection under laboratory conditions. Both vibrios caused diseased signs from 24?°C, being higher and faster at 28?°C. Unexpectedly, the co-inoculation of these two Vibrio species seemed to have a synergistic pathogenic effect over O. patagonica, as disease signs were readily observed at temperatures at which bleaching is not normally observed. PMID:24621525

Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Yarza, Pablo; Peñalver, Cindy; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A; Antón, Josefa

2014-09-01

230

Molecular Characterization of Direct Target Genes and cis-Acting Consensus Recognized by Quorum-Sensing Regulator AphA in Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Background AphA is the master quorum-sensing (QS) regulator operating at low cell density in vibrios. Molecular regulation of target genes by AphA has been characterized in Vibrio harveyi and V. cholerae, but it is still poorly understood in V. parahaemolyticus. Methodology/Principal Findings The AphA proteins are extremely conserved in V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio sp. Ex25, Vibrio sp. EJY3, V. harveyi, V. vulnificus, V. splendidus, V. anguillarum, V. cholerae, and V. furnissii. The above nine AphA orthologs appear to recognize conserved cis-acting DNA signals which can be represented by two consensus constructs, a 20 bp box sequence and a position frequency matrix. V. parahaemolyticus AphA represses the transcription of ahpA, qrr4, and opaR through direct AphA-target promoter DNA association, while it inhibits the qrr2-3 transcription in an indirect manner. Translation and transcription starts, core promoter elements for sigma factor recognition, Shine-Dalgarno sequences for ribosome recognition, and AphA-binding sites (containing corresponding AphA box-like sequences) were determined for the three direct AphA targets ahpA, qrr4, and opaR in V. parahaemolyticus. Conclusions/Significance AphA-mediated repression of ahpA, qrr2-4, and opaR was characterized in V. parahaemolyticus by using multiple biochemical and molecular experiments. The computational promoter analysis indicated the conserved mechanism of transcriptional regulation of QS regulator-encoding genes ahpA, qrr4, and opaR in vibrios. PMID:22984476

Sun, Fengjun; Zhang, Yiquan; Wang, Li; Yan, Xiaojuan; Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Qiu, Jingfu; Yang, Ruifu; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng

2012-01-01

231

GOING AGAINST THE GRAIN: CHEMOTAXIS AND INFECTION IN VIBRIO CHOLERAE  

PubMed Central

Chemotaxis is the process by which motile cells move in a biased manner both towards favourable and away from unfavourable environments. The requirement of this process for infection has been examined in several bacterial pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae. The single polar flagellum of Vibrio species is powered by a sodium-motive force across the inner membrane, and can rotate to produce speeds of up to 60 cell-body lengths (~60µm) per second. Investigating the role of the chemotactic control of rapid flagellar motility during V. cholerae infection has revealed some unexpected and intriguing results. PMID:16012515

Butler, Susan M.; Camilli, Andrew

2009-01-01

232

The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

1981-01-01

233

Vibrio fischeri metabolism: symbiosis and beyond.  

PubMed

Vibrio fischeri is a bioluminescent, Gram-negative marine bacterium that can be found free living and in a mutualistic association with certain squids and fishes. Over the past decades, the study of V. fischeri has led to important discoveries about bioluminescence, quorum sensing, and the mechanisms that underlie beneficial host-microbe interactions. This chapter highlights what has been learned about metabolic pathways in V. fischeri, and how this information contributes to a broader understanding of the role of bacterial metabolism in host colonization by both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, as well as in the growth and survival of free-living bacteria. PMID:23046951

Dunn, Anne K

2012-01-01

234

Evidence that Water TransmitsVibrio vulnificus Biotype 2 Infections to Eels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is classically considered an obligate eel pathogen. However, it has recently been associated with one human septicemic case. In this paper, the opportunistic behavior of this pathogen is discussed. The bacterium can survive alone in brackish water or attached to eel surfaces for at least 14 days. It is able to spread through water and infect

CARMEN AMARO; ELENA G. BIOSCA; BELEN FOUZ; ELENA ALCAIDE; ANDCONSUELO ESTEVE

235

Occurrence of Vibrio vulnificus and toxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus on sea catfishes from Galveston Bay, Texas.  

PubMed

Dorsal and pectoral fin spines from two species of sea catfishes (Bagre marinus and Ariopsis felis) landed at 54 sites in Galveston Bay, Texas, and its sub-bays from June to October 2005 were screened with traditional cultivation-based assays and quantitative PCR assays for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. vulnificus was present on 51.2% of fish (n = 247), with an average of 403 ± 337 SD cells g(-1). V. parahaemolyticus was present on 94.2% (n = 247); 12.8% tested positive for the virulence-conferring tdh gene, having an average 2,039 ± 2,171 SD cells g(-1). The increasing trend in seafood consumption of "trash fishes" from lower trophic levels, such as sea catfishes, warrants evaluation of their life histories for association with pathogens of concern for human consumption. PMID:25285498

Baumeister, Leslie; Hochman, Mona E; Schwarz, John R; Brinkmeyer, Robin

2014-10-01

236

Drug-resistant plasmids from fish pathogens.  

PubMed

The epidemiological surveillance of drug-resistant strains of the fish pathogenic bacteria Vibrio anguillarum and Pasteurella piscicida carrying transferable R plasmids in fish farms is described. The DNA structure of R plasmids, and the drug-resistant determinants of R plasmids from the fish pathogens Aeromonas hydrophila,aeromonas salmonicida, Edwardsiella tarda, V. anguillarum, and P. piscicida are discussed. PMID:3079184

Aoki, T

1988-07-01

237

Genome Sequence of Vibrio cholerae Strain O1 Ogawa El Tor, Isolated in Mexico, 2013  

PubMed Central

We present the draft genome sequence of Vibrio cholerae InDRE 3140 recovered in 2013 during a cholera outbreak in Mexico. The genome showed the Vibrio 7th pandemic islands VSP1 and VSP2, the pathogenic islands VPI-1 and VPI-2, the integrative and conjugative element SXT/R391 (ICE-SXT), and both prophages CTX? and RS1?. PMID:25359919

Hernández-Monroy, Irma; López-Martínez, Irma; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

2014-01-01

238

Substrate specificity and function of the pheromone receptor AinR in Vibrio fischeri ES114.  

PubMed

Two distinct but interrelated pheromone-signaling systems, LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR, positively control bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri. Although each system generates an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, the protein sequences of LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR are unrelated. AinS and LuxI generate the pheromones N-octanoyl-AHL (C8-AHL) and N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-AHL (3OC6-AHL), respectively. LuxR is a transcriptional activator that responds to 3OC6-AHL, and to a lesser extent to C8-AHL. AinR is hypothesized to respond to C8-AHL and, based on homology to Vibrio harveyi LuxN, to mediate the repression of a Qrr regulatory RNA. However, a ?ainR mutation decreased luminescence, which was not predicted based on V. harveyi LuxN, raising the possibility of a distinct regulatory mechanism for AinR. Here we show that ainR can complement a luxN mutant, suggesting functional similarity. Moreover, in V. fischeri, we observed ainR-dependent repression of a Pqrr-lacZ transcriptional reporter in the presence of C8-AHL, consistent with its hypothesized regulatory role. The system appears quite sensitive, with a half-maximal effect on a Pqrr reporter at 140 pM C8-AHL. Several other AHLs with substituted and unsubstituted acyl chains between 6 and 10 carbons also displayed an AinR-dependent effect on Pqrr-lacZ; however, AHLs with acyl chains of four carbons or 12 or more carbons lacked activity. Interestingly, 3OC6-AHL also affected expression from the qrr promoter, but this effect was largely luxR dependent, indicating a previously unknown connection between these systems. Finally, we propose a preliminary explanation for the unexpected luminescence phenotype of the ?ainR mutant. PMID:24056099

Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

2013-11-01

239

Identification of capsule, biofilm, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili in Vibrio mimicus strains.  

PubMed

Vibrio mimicus is a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis; it is closely related to Vibrio cholerae, and can cause acute diarrhea like cholera- or dysentery-type diarrhea. It is distributed worldwide. Factors associated with virulence (such as hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases, phospholipases, aerobactin, and hemagglutinin) have been identified; however, its pathogenicity mechanism is still unknown. In pathogenic Vibrio species such as V. cholerae, Vibrio. parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, capsule, biofilms, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili are structures described as essential for pathogenicity. These structures had not been described in V. mimicus until this work. We used 20 V. mimicus strains isolated from water (6), oyster (9), and fish (5) samples and we were able to identify the capsule, biofilm, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili through phenotypic tests, electron microscopy, PCR, and sequencing. In all tested strains, we observed and identified the presence of capsular exopolysaccharide, biofilm formation in an in vitro model, as well as swarming, multiple flagellation, and pili. In addition, we identified homologous genes to those described in other bacteria of the genus in which these structures have been found. Identification of these structures in V. mimicus is a contribution to the biology of this organism and can help to reveal its pathogenic behavior. PMID:25246027

Tercero-Alburo, J J; González-Márquez, H; Bonilla-González, E; Quiñones-Ramírez, E I; Vázquez-Salinas, C

2014-11-01

240

Isolation of Vibrio vulnificus from Seawater and Emerging Vibrio vulnificus Septicemia on Jeju Island  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus is an opportunistic human pathogen, transmitted from seawater, raw oyster, and shellfish and responsible for severe septicemia. We studied V. vulnificus from surface seawater around Jeju Island between 2010 and 2011. In 2010, V. vulnificus was isolated and V. vulnificus septicemia was reported. Surface seawater temperature is an important factor for growth of V. vulnificus, and here we showed that high surface seawater temperature may influence growth of V. vulnificus and occurrence of emerging V. vulnificus septicemia on Jeju Island. This is the first report of isolation of V. vulnificus and emerging V. vulnificus septicemia on Jeju Island. PMID:25024873

Lee, Keun Hwa; Kim, Young Ree; Pang, Ig-Chan

2014-01-01

241

Cytotoxic Cell Vacuolating Activity from Vibrio cholerae Hemolysin  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Vibrio cholerae cytotoxin, designated VcVac, was found to cause vacuolation in Vero cells. It was originally detected in the pathogenic O1 Amazonia variant of V. cholerae and later shown to be produced in environmental strains and some El Tor strains. Comparison of VcVac production in various strains suggested that hemolysin was responsible for the vacuolating phenotype. Genetic experiments established

ANA COELHO; JOAO R. C. ANDRADE; ANA CAROLINA P. VICENTE; VICTOR J. DIRITA

2000-01-01

242

Highly Potent, Chemically Stable Quorum Sensing Agonists for Vibrio Cholerae.  

PubMed

In the Vibrio cholerae pathogen, initiation of bacterial quorum sensing pathways serves to suppress virulence. We describe herein a potent and chemically stable small molecule agonist of V. cholerae quorum sensing, which was identified through rational drug design based on the native quorum sensing signal. This novel agonist may serve as a useful lead compound for the control of virulence in V. cholerae. PMID:24436778

Perez, Lark J; Karagounis, Theodora K; Hurley, Amanda; Bassler, Bonnie L; Semmelhack, Martin F

2014-01-01

243

Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus ATCC 17749T  

PubMed Central

Vibrio alginolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium and has been recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in both humans and marine animals. It is the causative agent of food-borne diseases, such as gastroenteritis, and it invades through wounds in predisposed individuals. In this study, we present the completed genome of V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749T through high-throughput sequencing. PMID:25635021

Liu, Xiao-Fei; Cao, Yuan; Zhang, He-Lin; Chen, Ying-Jian

2015-01-01

244

Vibrio vulnificus Phage PV94 Is Closely Related to Temperate Phages of V. cholerae and Other Vibrio Species  

PubMed Central

Background Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1) infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. Results In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5?-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. Conclusion We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species. PMID:24732980

Reetz, Jochen; Strauch, Eckhard; Hertwig, Stefan

2014-01-01

245

Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Recovered from Recreational and Commercial Areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n?=?120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n?=?77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p?=?0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial susceptibility data of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus recovered from the Chesapeake Bay. These data can serve as a baseline against which future studies can be compared to evaluate whether susceptibilities change over time. PMID:24586914

Shaw, Kristi S.; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M.; Crump, Byron C.; Sapkota, Amy R.

2014-01-01

246

A fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay for the vibrio in large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea (Richardson)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay for the Vibrio alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus infecting the large yellow croaker has been developed. The specific antisera for the two strains of vibrio were prepared with New Zealand rabbit and the antiserum and cross-reactive efficacy was tested by coagulation in tube. It showed that the goat anti-rabbit IgG had been labeled by fluorescence isothiocyanate (FITC). The results showed that positive reactions were 100% for the large yellow croaker Pseudosciaena crocea with typical symptom of vibrio infection, while the positive reaction to the pathogen in healthy yellow croakers reached 40%, but seemed negative for aquaculture water. The results demonstrated that this fast and indirect fluorescent antibody assay can be used not only to test the vibrio pathogen in diseased yellow croaker but also in infected animals with no symptom.

Wang, Jun; Su, Yongquan; Yan, Qingpi

2003-03-01

247

Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio vulnificus 93U204, a Bacterium Isolated from Diseased Tilapia in Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Vibrio vulnificus 93U204 is a bacterium isolated from a moribund tilapia collected in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its pathogenicity and for comparative analyses with human-pathogenic strains within the same species. PMID:25278541

Lo, Wen-Sui; Chen, Hwajiun; Chen, Chun-Yao

2014-01-01

248

Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio vulnificus 93U204, a Bacterium Isolated from Diseased Tilapia in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Vibrio vulnificus 93U204 is a bacterium isolated from a moribund tilapia collected in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium to facilitate the investigation of its pathogenicity and for comparative analyses with human-pathogenic strains within the same species. PMID:25278541

Lo, Wen-Sui; Chen, Hwajiun; Chen, Chun-Yao; Kuo, Chih-Horng

2014-01-01

249

Abundance and distribution of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus following a major freshwater intrusion into the Mississippi Sound.  

PubMed

In response to a major influx of freshwater to the Mississippi Sound following the opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway, water samples were collected from three sites along the Mississippi shoreline to assess the impact of altered salinity on three pathogenic Vibrio species. Salinity readings across the affected area during the 2011 sample period ranged from 1.4 to 12.9 ppt (mean = 7.0) and for the 2012 sample period from 14.1 to 23.6 ppt (mean = 19.8). Analyses of the data collected in 2011 showed a reduction in densities of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus with a concurrent increase of Vibrio cholerae numbers, with V. cholerae becoming the only Vibrio detected once salinity readings dropped to 6 ppt. Follow-up samples taken in 2012 after recovery of the salinity in the sound showed that the relative densities of the three pathogenic vibrios had reverted back to normal levels. This study shows that although the spillway was open but a few weeks and the effects were therefore time limited, the Mississippi River water had a profound, if temporary, effect on Vibrio ecology in the Mississippi Sound. PMID:23494573

Griffitt, Kimberly J; Grimes, D Jay

2013-04-01

250

Occurrence of Vibrio Pathotypes in the Final Effluents of Five Wastewater Treatment Plants in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa  

PubMed Central

We assessed the occurrence of Vibrio pathogens in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa over a 12 months period between September 2012 and August 2013 using standard membrane filtration technique followed by cultivation on thiosulphate citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar. The identities of the presumptive Vibrio isolates were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including delineation into V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. fluvialis pathotypes. The counts of Vibrio spp. varied with months in all the study sites and ranged in the order of 101 and 104 CFU/100mL. Vibrio distribution also showed seasonality with high counts being obtained in autumn and spring (p < 0.05). Prevalence of Vibrio spp. among the five WWTPs also differed significantly (p < 0.05). Of the 300 isolates that were confirmed as belonging to the Vibrio genus, 29% (86) were V. fluvialis, 28% (84) were V. vulnificus and 12% (35) were V. parahaemolyticus. The isolation of Vibrio pathogens from the final effluent suggests that this pathogen is in circulation in some pockets of the population and that the WWTPs under study do not efficiently remove bacterial pathogens from the wastewater and consequently are threats to public health. PMID:25093653

Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Okoh, Anthony I.

2014-01-01

251

Occurrence of vibrio pathotypes in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa.  

PubMed

We assessed the occurrence of Vibrio pathogens in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa over a 12 months period between September 2012 and August 2013 using standard membrane filtration technique followed by cultivation on thiosulphate citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar. The identities of the presumptive Vibrio isolates were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including delineation into V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. fluvialis pathotypes. The counts of Vibrio spp. varied with months in all the study sites and ranged in the order of 101 and 104 CFU/100mL. Vibrio distribution also showed seasonality with high counts being obtained in autumn and spring (p < 0.05). Prevalence of Vibrio spp. among the five WWTPs also differed significantly (p < 0.05). Of the 300 isolates that were confirmed as belonging to the Vibrio genus, 29% (86) were V. fluvialis, 28% (84) were V. vulnificus and 12% (35) were V. parahaemolyticus. The isolation of Vibrio pathogens from the final effluent suggests that this pathogen is in circulation in some pockets of the population and that the WWTPs under study do not efficiently remove bacterial pathogens from the wastewater and consequently are threats to public health. PMID:25093653

Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Okoh, Anthony I

2014-08-01

252

Vibrio Infections and Surveillance in Maryland, 2002–2008  

PubMed Central

Objective Vibrio is a naturally occurring waterborne pathogen with potential occupational, recreational, and commercial impacts. During the last 15 years in the U.S. and in Maryland, the incidence of vibriosis has increased. Due to the increase in cases in Maryland, warming water temperatures, and public concern about human health effects resulting from exposure to the Chesapeake Bay, we reviewed cases of vibriosis and evaluated the Vibrio surveillance system in Maryland for timeliness and data quality, attributes necessary for successful outbreak investigation and illness prevention. Methods The evaluation included (1) informal qualitative surveys of state and local personnel who report and manage Vibrio cases and (2) a review of Vibrio surveillance data from 2002 through 2008 for data quality and timeliness of the system. Results From 2002 to 2008, 188 laboratory-confirmed cases of vibriosis were reported in Maryland with an annual average of 27 cases. The species of Vibrio that were most frequently responsible for infection, regardless of clinical presentation, were V. parahaemolyticus (43.6%), V. vulnificus (23.9%), V. alginolyticus (9.6%), and non-toxigenic V. cholerae (9.0%). The case fatality rate fluctuated during the study period, but the number of cases increased. Conclusions The surveillance system in Maryland is flexible and captures cases of vibriosis where specimens were collected for testing; however, the system may not adequately capture mild, self-limiting infections. Better integration of data collection for clinical, laboratory, and environmental information and improved completion of variables for shellfish harvest or water exposure locations could improve the system. Quarterly meetings comprising surveillance, public health laboratory, and food-control personnel could direct and ensure the success of improvement efforts. PMID:24179265

Feldman, Katherine A.; Palmer, Amanda; Butler, Erin; Blythe, David; Mitchell, Clifford S.

2013-01-01

253

Vibrio Zinc-Metalloprotease Causes Photoinactivation of Coral Endosymbionts and Coral Tissue Lesions  

PubMed Central

Background Coral diseases are emerging as a serious threat to coral reefs worldwide. Of nine coral infectious diseases, whose pathogens have been characterized, six are caused by agents from the family Vibrionacae, raising questions as to their origin and role in coral disease aetiology. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report on a Vibrio zinc-metalloprotease causing rapid photoinactivation of susceptible Symbiodinium endosymbionts followed by lesions in coral tissue. Symbiodinium photosystem II inactivation was diagnosed by an imaging pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer in two bioassays, performed by exposing Symbiodinium cells and coral juveniles to non-inhibited and EDTA-inhibited supernatants derived from coral white syndrome pathogens. Conclusion/Significance These findings demonstrate a common virulence factor from four phylogenetically related coral pathogens, suggesting that zinc-metalloproteases may play an important role in Vibrio pathogenicity in scleractinian corals. PMID:19225559

Sussman, Meir; Mieog, Jos C.; Doyle, Jason; Victor, Steven; Willis, Bette L.; Bourne, David G.

2009-01-01

254

Vibrio natriegens: A Rapidly Growing Micro-Organism Ideally Suited for Class Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes five microbiological experiments using the marine organism Vibrio natriegens. This organism is highly suitable for laboratory work because it is non-pathogenic and grows extremely rapidly, having the distinction of the lowest mean generation time yet recorded (9.8 minutes). (JR)

Mullenger, L.; Gill, Nijole R.

1973-01-01

255

Comparing the efficiency of chitosan with chlorine for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shrimp  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thailand is one of the leading exporters of frozen shrimp to many countries. Chlorine is the decontaminating agent most frequently used in the frozen shrimp industries to kill potential pathogens. However, long time contact to chlorine causes severe respiratory tract damage. In this study, chitosan was compared to chlorine for reducing Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In vitro investigation, chitosan could reduce more

S. Chaiyakosa; W. Charernjiratragul; K. Umsakul; V. Vuddhakul

2007-01-01

256

Construction and Phenotypic Evaluation of a Vibrio vulnificus vvpE Mutant for Elastolytic Protease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio vulnificus is an opportunistic gram-negative pathogen that commonly contaminates oysters. Predis- posed individuals who consume raw oysters can die within days from sepsis, and even otherwise healthy people are susceptible to serious wound infection after contact with contaminated seafood or seawater. Numerous secreted and cell-associated virulence factors have been proposed to account for the fulminating and destruc- tive nature

KWANG CHEOL JEONG; HYE SOOK JEONG; JOON HAENG RHEE; SHEE EUN LEE; SUN SIK CHUNG; ANGELA M. STARKS; GLORIA M. ESCUDERO; PAUL A. GULIG; SANG HO CHOI

2000-01-01

257

Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

258

Draft Genome Sequences of Four Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates from Clinical Cases in Canada.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis following ingestion of contaminated seafood. This report presents the draft genome sequences of four clinical strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated in Canada. All four strains lack traditional pathogenic markers and possess uniquely individual characteristics identified using other typing criteria. PMID:25635013

Banerjee, Swapan; Petronella, Nicholas; Chew Leung, Courtney; Farber, Jeffrey

2015-01-01

259

Draft Genome Sequences of Four Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates from Clinical Cases in Canada  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis following ingestion of contaminated seafood. This report presents the draft genome sequences of four clinical strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated in Canada. All four strains lack traditional pathogenic markers and possess uniquely individual characteristics identified using other typing criteria. PMID:25635013

Petronella, Nicholas; Chew Leung, Courtney; Farber, Jeffrey

2015-01-01

260

Prevalence and characterisation of non-cholerae Vibrio spp. in final effluents of wastewater treatment facilities in two districts of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa: implications for public health.  

PubMed

Vibrios and other enteric pathogens can be found in wastewater effluents of a healthy population. We assessed the prevalence of three non-cholerae vibrios in wastewater effluents of 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chris Hani and Amathole district municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa for a period of 12 months. With the exception of WWTP10 where presumptive vibrios were not detected in summer and spring, presumptive vibrios were detected in all seasons in other WWTP effluents. When a sample of 1,000 presumptive Vibrio isolates taken from across all sampling sites were subjected to molecular confirmation for Vibrio, 668 were confirmed to belong to the genus Vibrio, giving a prevalence rate of 66.8 %. Further, molecular characterisation of 300 confirmed Vibrio isolates revealed that 11.6 % (35) were Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 28.6 % (86) were Vibrio fluvialis and 28 % (84) were Vibrio vulnificus while 31.8 % (95) belonged to other Vibrio spp. not assayed for in this study. Antibiogram profiling of the three Vibrio species showed that V. parahaemolyticus was ?50 % susceptible to 8 of the test antibiotics and ?50 % resistant to only 5 of the 13 test antibiotics, while V. vulnificus showed a susceptibility profile of ?50 % to 7 of the test antibiotics and a resistance profile of ?50 % to 6 of the 13 test antibiotics. V. fluvialis showed ?50 % resistance to 8 of the 13 antibiotics used while showing ?50 % susceptibility to only 4 antibiotics used. All three Vibrio species were susceptible to gentamycin, cefuroxime, meropenem and imipenem. Multiple antibiotic resistance patterns were also evident especially against such antibiotics as tetracyclin, polymixin B, penicillin G, sulfamethazole and erythromycin against which all Vibrio species were resistant. These results indicate a significant threat to public health, more so in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa which is characterised by widespread poverty, with more than a third of the population directly relying on surface water sources for drinking and daily use. PMID:25167817

Okoh, Anthony I; Sibanda, Timothy; Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Adefisoye, Martins; Olayemi, Osuolale O; Nontongana, Nolonwabo

2015-02-01

261

Cell-Surface-Associated Properties of Fish Pathogenic Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pathogenicity assays showed that 33 of 42 potentially pathogenic strains of bacteria tested were virulent to rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Regardless of their degree of virulence to fish, strains of motile Aeromonas, A. salmonicida, and Vibrio anguillarum were moderately hydrophobic. Only 46 and 25°10 of the strains were able to hemagglutinate human and trout erythrocytes, respectively. Hydrophobicity and hemagglutination were

Ysabel Santos; Isabel BandíN; Teresa P. Nieto; Juan L. Barja; Alicia E. Toranzo; Anthony E. Ellis

1991-01-01

262

Exoproteome and Secretome Derived Broad Spectrum Novel Drug and Vaccine Candidates in Vibrio cholerae Targeted by Piper betel Derived Compounds  

PubMed Central

Vibrio cholerae is the causal organism of the cholera epidemic, which is mostly prevalent in developing and underdeveloped countries. However, incidences of cholera in developed countries are also alarming. Because of the emergence of new drug-resistant strains, even though several generic drugs and vaccines have been developed over time, Vibrio infections remain a global health problem that appeals for the development of novel drugs and vaccines against the pathogen. Here, applying comparative proteomic and reverse vaccinology approaches to the exoproteome and secretome of the pathogen, we have identified three candidate targets (ompU, uppP and yajC) for most of the pathogenic Vibrio strains. Two targets (uppP and yajC) are novel to Vibrio, and two targets (uppP and ompU) can be used to develop both drugs and vaccines (dual targets) against broad spectrum Vibrio serotypes. Using our novel computational approach, we have identified three peptide vaccine candidates that have high potential to induce both B- and T-cell-mediated immune responses from our identified two dual targets. These two targets were modeled and subjected to virtual screening against natural compounds derived from Piper betel. Seven compounds were identified first time from Piper betel to be highly effective to render the function of these targets to identify them as emerging potential drugs against Vibrio. Our preliminary validation suggests that these identified peptide vaccines and betel compounds are highly effective against Vibrio cholerae. Currently we are exhaustively validating these targets, candidate peptide vaccines, and betel derived lead compounds against a number of Vibrio species. PMID:23382822

Barh, Debmalya; Barve, Neha; Gupta, Krishnakant; Chandra, Sudha; Jain, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Rodrigues dos Santos, Anderson; Hassan, Syed Shah; Almeida, Síntia; Thiago Jucá Ramos, Rommel; Augusto Carvalho de Abreu, Vinicius; Ribeiro Carneiro, Adriana; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Luiz de Paula Castro, Thiago; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Kumar, Anil; Narayan Misra, Amarendra; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R.; Azevedo, Vasco

2013-01-01

263

Genome Sequence of Vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African Clinical Wouter J. le Roux,a Wai Yin Chan,b Pieter De Maayer,b,c Stephanus N. Venterb  

E-print Network

Genome Sequence of Vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African Clinical Isolate Wouter J. le Roux,a Wai, Department of Genetics, University of Pretoria, South Africac Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative pathogen autochthonous to the aquatic environment, is the causative agent of cholera. Here, we report the complete genome

264

RNA Colony Blot Hybridization Method for Enumeration of Culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus Bacteria?  

PubMed Central

A species-specific RNA colony blot hybridization protocol was developed for enumeration of culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus bacteria in environmental water samples. Bacterial colonies on selective or nonselective plates were lysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate, and the lysates were immobilized on nylon membranes. A fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe targeting a phylogenetic signature sequence of 16S rRNA of V. cholerae and V. mimicus was hybridized to rRNA molecules immobilized on the nylon colony lift blots. The protocol produced strong positive signals for all colonies of the 15 diverse V. cholerae-V. mimicus strains tested, indicating 100% sensitivity of the probe for the targeted species. For visible colonies of 10 nontarget species, the specificity of the probe was calculated to be 90% because of a weak positive signal produced by Grimontia (Vibrio) hollisae, a marine bacterium. When both the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated using lake water samples amended with a bioluminescent V. cholerae strain, no false-negative or false-positive results were found, indicating 100% sensitivity and specificity for culturable bacterial populations in freshwater samples when G. hollisae was not present. When the protocol was applied to laboratory microcosms containing V. cholerae attached to live copepods, copepods were found to carry approximately 10,000 to 50,000 CFU of V. cholerae per copepod. The protocol was also used to analyze pond water samples collected in an area of cholera endemicity in Bangladesh over a 9-month period. Water samples collected from six ponds demonstrated a peak in abundance of total culturable V. cholerae bacteria 1 to 2 months prior to observed increases in pathogenic V. cholerae and in clinical cases recorded by the area health clinic. The method provides a highly specific and sensitive tool for monitoring the dynamics of V. cholerae in the environment. The RNA blot hybridization protocol can also be applied to detection of other gram-negative bacteria for taxon-specific enumeration. PMID:19561182

Grim, Christopher J.; Zo, Young-Gun; Hasan, Nur A.; Ali, Afsar; Chowdhury, Wasimul B.; Islam, Atiqul; Rashid, Mohammed H.; Alam, Munirul; Morris, J. Glenn; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

2009-01-01

265

[A multipathogen selective enrichment broth (SVV) for simultaneous growth of Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio cholerae].  

PubMed

We formulated a selective enrichment broth (SVV) for simultaneous growth of Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio cholerae by single factor experiment and response surface method. We evaluated the enrichment effect of SVV by conventional culture method and real-time PCR assay. We obtained the SVV broth by supplementting the Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) with bile salt no. 3, potassium tellurite, and sodium citrate as inhibitors, and glucose, mannitol, snhydrous sodium sulfite and sodium pyruvate as accelerants. We also modified the concentration of sodium chloride in BPW. When mixed at equal or varied proportions, the target pathogens had a great accumulation (10(5)-10(8) CFU/mL) after incubated in SVV for 18 h at 37 degrees C with shaking. It can also effectively inhibit the competitive microflora. We detected 10 artificial simulated samples and 608 real samples using SVV with real-time PCR. After enriched in SVV for 18 h, the quantity of the bacteria in samples were above the detection limit. The SVV with PCR assay showed higher tested positive (4.06%) compared to that of the conventional detection method (3.78%) and there was no false report. In summary, SVV is a promising new multiplex selective enrichment broth that can be used in detection of seafood. PMID:20112694

Qin, Yiying; Wu, Hui; Xiao, Xinglong; Yu, Yigang; Liu, Dongmei; Li, Xiaofeng; Tang, Yuqian

2009-10-01

266

Vibrio fischeri flavohemoglobin protects against nitric oxide during initiation of the squid-Vibrio symbiosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in a wide range of biological processes, including innate immunity against pathogens, signal transduction, and protection against oxidative stress. However, its possible roles in beneficial host-microbe associations are less well recognized. During the early stages of the squid-vibrio symbiosis, the bacterial symbiont Vibrio fischeri encounters host-derived NO, which has been hypothesized to serve as specificity determinant. We demonstrate here that the flavohemoglobin, Hmp, of V. fischeri protects against NO, both in culture and during colonization of the squid host. Transcriptional analyses indicate that hmp expression is highly responsive to NO, principally through the repressor, NsrR. Hmp protects V. fischeri from NO inhibition of aerobic respiration, and removes NO under both oxic and anoxic conditions. A ?hmp mutant of V. fischeri initiates squid colonization less effectively than wild type, but is rescued by the presence of an NO synthase inhibitor. The hmp promoter is activated during the initial stage of colonization, during which the ?hmp strain fails to form normal-sized aggregates of colonizing cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the sensing of host-derived NO by NsrR, and the subsequent removal of NO by Hmp, influence aggregate size and, thereby, V. fischeri colonization efficiency. PMID:20815823

Wang, Yanling; Dunn, Anne K.; Wilneff, Jacqueline; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Spiro, Stephen; Ruby, Edward G.

2010-01-01

267

Distribution of the Luminous Bacterium Beneckea harveyi in a Semitropical Estuarine Environment  

PubMed Central

Bioluminescent bacteria were found in the water column, sediment, shrimp, and gastrointestinal tract of marine fishes from the semitropical estuarine environment of the East Lagoon, Galveston Island, Tex. Populations in the water column decreased during cold weather while sedimentary populations persisted. The highest percentages of luminous organisms were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of marine fishes, where they persisted during 5 days of starvation. The presence of chitin temporarily increased intestinal populations. All isolates were Beneckea harveyi, whose natural habitat appears to be the gut of fishes and whose free-living reservoir appears to be marine sediments. PMID:16345465

O'Brien, Catherine H.; Sizemore, Ronald K.

1979-01-01

268

Effect of Temperature on Growth of Vibrio paraphemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in Flounder, Salmon Sashimi and Oyster Meat  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus are the major pathogenic Vibrio species which contaminate ready-to-eat seafood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of human illness resulting from consumption of ready-to-eat seafood such as sashimi and raw oyster meat due to the presence of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. We compared the growth kinetics of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus strains in broth and ready-to-eat seafood, including flounder and salmon sashimi, as a function of temperature. The growth kinetics of naturally occurring V. vulnificus in raw oyster meat was also evaluated. The minimum growth temperatures of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth were 13 °C and 11 °C, respectively. Overall, significant differences in lag time (LT) and specific growth rate (SGR) values between flounder and salmon sashimi were observed at temperatures ranging from 13 °C to 30 °C (p < 0.05). The growth of naturally occurring V. vulnificus reached stationary phase at ~4 log CFU/g in oysters, regardless of the storage temperature. This data indicates that the population of V. vulnificus in oysters did not reach the maximum population density as observed in the broth, where growth of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus isolated from oysters grew up to >8 log CFU/mL. PMID:23330227

Kim, Yoo Won; Lee, Soon Ho; Hwang, In Gun; Yoon, Ki Sun

2012-01-01

269

VIBRIO VULNIFICUS EDUCATION WORKSHOPS / MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

This project will promote Vibrio vulnificus education on-line continuing medical education units to health care professionals that counsel and care for at-risk individuals. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will purchase advertisement and promotion in me...

270

Light scattering sensor for real-time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholera colonies on solid agar plates  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, V. cholerae, V. parahemolyticus and V. vulnificus, are of major concern as water- and food-borne pathogens because of an increasing incidence of water and seafood related outbreaks and illnesses worldwide. Current methods are time-consuming and req...

271

Increases in the Amounts of Vibrio spp. in Oysters upon Addition of Exogenous Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus is found naturally in brackish coastal waters but can be greatly concentrated by filter-feeding organisms such as shellfish. Numerous experiments in which exogenous V. vulnificus cells are added to oysters in an attempt to measure uptake and depuration have been performed. In nearly all cases, results have shown that laboratory-grown bacteria are rapidly taken up by the oysters but ultimately eliminated, while naturally present Vibrio populations in oysters are resistant to depuration. In this study, oysters harvested during winter months, with low culturable Vibrio concentrations, were incubated in aquaria supplemented with strains of V. vulnificus that were either genotypically or phenotypically distinct from the background bacteria. These exogenous cells were eliminated from the oysters, as previously seen, but other vibrios already inhabiting the oysters responded to the V. vulnificus inoculum by rapidly increasing in number and maintaining a large stable population. The presence of such an oyster-adapted Vibrio population would be expected to prevent colonization by exogenous V. vulnificus cells, thus explaining the rapid depuration of these added bacteria. PMID:23793640

Oliver, James

2013-01-01

272

Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chesapeake Bay  

PubMed Central

A study of the ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related vibrios in the Rhode River area of Chesapeake Bay was carried out over the period December 1970 through August 1971. The incidence of V. parahaemolyticus and related vibrios was found to be correlated with water temperature. The vibrios could not be detected in the water column during the winter months, although they were present in sediment. From late spring to early summer, when water temperatures were 14 ± 1 C, vibrios over-wintering in sediment were released from the bottom communities and attached to zooplankton, proliferating as the temperature rose. The number of vibrios in and on plankton was reflected in the water column bacterial population densities at water temperatures of ca. 19 C. Thus, temperature of the water column in the range of 14 to 19 C was found to be critical in the annual cycle of the vibrios. Interaction between sediment, water, and zooplankton was found to be essential in the natural estuarine ecosystem. Bacterial counts of zooplankton were found to be temperature dependent. The bacterial population associated with zooplankton was found to be predominantly on external surfaces and was specific, differing from that of the sediment. Vibrio spp. and related organisms comprised the total bacterial population associated with zooplankton in summer months. The ecological role of Vibrio spp., including V. parahaemolyticus, was found to be significant, with respect to their property of chitin digestion and in relation to the population dynamics of zooplankton in Chesapeake Bay. PMID:4567138

Kaneko, Tatsuo; Colwell, Rita R.

1973-01-01

273

Recombination Shapes the Structure of an Environmental Vibrio cholerae Population ? †  

PubMed Central

Vibrio cholerae consists of pathogenic strains that cause sporadic gastrointestinal illness or epidemic cholera disease and nonpathogenic strains that grow and persist in coastal aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies of disease-causing strains have shown V. cholerae to be a primarily clonal bacterial species, but isolates analyzed have been strongly biased toward pathogenic genotypes, while representing only a small sample of the vast diversity in environmental strains. In this study, we characterized homologous recombination and structure among 152 environmental V. cholerae isolates and 13 other putative Vibrio isolates from coastal waters and sediments in central California, as well as four clinical V. cholerae isolates, using multilocus sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes. Recombinant regions were identified by at least three detection methods in 72% of our V. cholerae isolates. Despite frequent recombination, significant linkage disequilibrium was still detected among the V. cholerae sequence types. Incongruent but nonrandom associations were observed for maximum likelihood topologies from the individual loci. Overall, our estimated recombination rate in V. cholerae of 6.5 times the mutation rate is similar to those of other sexual bacteria and appears frequently enough to restrict selection from purging much of the neutral intraspecies diversity. These data suggest that frequent recombination among V. cholerae may hinder the identification of ecotypes in this bacterioplankton population. PMID:21075874

Keymer, Daniel P.; Boehm, Alexandria B.

2011-01-01

274

Isolation and Characterization of Vibrio tubiashii Outer Membrane Proteins and Determination of a toxR Homolog  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although Vibrio tubiashii was originally found to cause bacillary necrosis in larval and juvenile mollusks (3, 10, 27, 28), recent studies have shown that it can also cause diarrhea in suckling mice (8). Additionally, its ability to cause death in fish (1) has led to the conclusion that V. tubiashii may also be a finfish pathogen. In the present study,

J. Jean-Gilles Beaubrun; M. H. Kothary; S. K. Curtis; N. C. Flores; B. E. Eribo; B. D. Tall

2008-01-01

275

Pleiotropic effects of the twin-arginine translocation system on biofilm formation, colonization, and virulence in Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system serves to translocate folded proteins, including periplasmic enzymes that bind redox cofactors in bacteria. The Tat system is also a determinant of virulence in some pathogenic bacteria, related to pleiotropic effects including growth, motility, and the secretion of some virulent factors. The contribution of the Tat pathway to Vibrio cholerae has not been explored.

Lijuan Zhang; Zhaoqin Zhu; Huaiqi Jing; Jingyun Zhang; Yanwen Xiong; Meiying Yan; Shouyi Gao; Long-Fei Wu; Jianguo Xu; Biao Kan

2009-01-01

276

Environmental Investigations of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Oysters after Outbreaks in Washington, Texas, and New York (1997 and 1998)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total Vibrio parahaemolyticus densities and the occurrence of pathogenic strains in shellfish were determined following outbreaks in Washington, Texas, and New York. Recently developed nonradioactive DNA probes were utilized for the first time for direct enumeration of V. parahaemolyticus in environmental shellfish samples. V. parahaemolyticus was prevalent in oysters from Puget Sound, Wash.; Galveston Bay, Tex.; and Long Island Sound,

ANGELO DEPAOLA; CHARLES A. KAYSNER; JOHN BOWERS; DAVID W. COOK

2000-01-01

277

Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model"  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagella synthesis as well as a wide range of ...

278

RAPID TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY TO ASSESS THE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES AGAINST VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS  

EPA Science Inventory

An assay was developed to assess the ability of oyster, Crassostrea virginica, hemocytes to kill the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (ATCC 17802). Bacterial killing was estimated colorimetrically by the enzymatic reduction of a tetrazolium dye, 3-(4,5-dimethyl...

279

Pathogenesis of Infection by Clinical and Environmental Strains of Vibrio vulnificus in Iron-Dextran-Treated Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio vulnificus is an opportunistic pathogen that contaminates oysters harvested from the Gulf of Mexico. In humans with compromising conditions, especially excess levels of iron in plasma and tissues, consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of wounds to contaminated water can lead to systemic infection and disfiguring skin infection with extremely high mortality. V. vulnificus-associated diseases are noted for the

ANGELA M. STARKS; TRENTON R. SCHOEB; MARK L. TAMPLIN; SALINA PARVEEN; THOMAS J. DOYLE; PHILIP E. BOMEISL; GLORIA M. ESCUDERO; PAUL A. GULIG

2000-01-01

280

The haem-uptake gene cluster in Vibrio fischeri is regulated by Fur and contributes to symbiotic  

E-print Network

been described in Vibrio anguillarum, where expression is controlled in response to iron concentration that bacteria-colonizing host tissues are commonly faced with iron-limiting condi- tions and that pathogenic bacteria often utilize iron from host-derived haem-based compounds, the mechanisms of iron acquisition

McFall-Ngai, Margaret

281

Dynamics in genome evolution of Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of the acute secretary diarrheal disease cholera, is still a major public health concern in developing countries. In former centuries cholera was a permanent threat even to the highly developed populations of Europe, North America, and the northern part of Asia. Extensive studies on the cholera bug over more than a century have made significant advances in our understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients. V. cholerae has more than 200 serogroups, but only few serogroups have caused disease on a worldwide scale. Until the present, the evolutionary relationship of these pandemic causing serogroups was not clear. In the last decades, we have witnessed a shift involving genetically and phenotypically varied pandemic clones of V. cholerae in Asia and Africa. The exponential knowledge on the genome of several representatives V. cholerae strains has been used to identify and analyze the key determinants for rapid evolution of cholera pathogen. Recent comparative genomic studies have identified the presence of various integrative mobile genetic elements (IMGEs) in V. cholerae genome, which can be used as a marker of differentiation of all seventh pandemic clones with very similar core genome. This review attempts to bring together some of the important researches in recent times that have contributed towards understanding the genetics, epidemiology and evolution of toxigenic V. cholerae strains. PMID:24462909

Banerjee, Rachana; Das, Bhabatosh; Balakrish Nair, G; Basak, Surajit

2014-04-01

282

Changes in Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to Vibrio parahaemolyticus.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which owes its origin to the marine environment, is considered as one of the most common causes of infectious diarrhea worldwide. The present study investigated the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus against the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. Infection in the host was localized with GFP-tagged V. parahaemolyticus using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The times required for causing infection, bacterial load in intestine, chemotactic response, and alteration in pharyngeal pumping were analyzed in the host system. In addition, the regulation of innate immune-related genes, lys-7, clec- 60, and clec-87, was analyzed using real-time PCR. The role of immune-responsible pmk-1 was studied using mutant strains. The pathogenicity of environmental strain CM2 isolated from the Gulf of Mannar, India was compared with that of a reference strain obtained from ATCC. The pathogen infected animals appeared to ward off infection by upregulating candidate antimicrobial genes for a few hours after the exposure, before succumbing to the pathogen. For the first time, the pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus at both the physiological and molecular levels has been studied in detail using the model organism C. elegans. PMID:22031026

Durai, Sellegounder; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

2011-10-01

283

Multiplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Simultaneous Detection of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus  

PubMed Central

Objectives A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the identification of three Vibrio species: Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. Methods Specific primers and probes targeting the hlyA, tlh, and vvhA genes were selected and used for multiplex real-time PCR to confirm the identification of V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus, respectively. This method was applied to screen Vibrio species from environmental samples and combining it with a culture-based method, its effectiveness was evaluated in comparison with culture-based methods alone. Results Specific PCR fragments were obtained from isolates belonging to the target species, indicating a high specificity of this multiplex real-time PCR. No cross-reactivity with the assay was observed between the tested bacteria. The sensitivity of the multiplex real-time PCR was found to have a lower limit of 104 colony-forming units/reaction for all three Vibrio species. The combination strategy raised the isolation ratio of all three Vibrio species 1.26- to 2.75-fold. Conclusion This assay provides a rapid, sensitive, and specific technique to detect these three Vibrio species in the environment. PMID:24159544

Park, Jie Yeun; Jeon, Semi; Kim, Jun Young; Park, Misun; Kim, Seonghan

2013-01-01

284

Free-Living and Plankton-Associated Vibrios: Assessment in Ballast Water, Harbor Areas, and Coastal Ecosystems in Brazil  

PubMed Central

Ballast water (BW) is a major transport vector of exotic aquatic species and pathogenic microorganisms. The wide-ranging spread of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from harbor areas has been frequently ascribed to discharge of contaminated BW into eutrophic coastal environments, such as during the onset of the seventh cholera pandemic in South America in the early 1990s. To determine the microbiological hazards of BWs transported to Brazilian ports, we evaluated water and plankton samples taken from (i) BW tanks of recently arrived ships, (ii) port areas along the Brazilian coastline from ?1 to 32°S and (iii) three coastal areas in São Paulo State. Vibrio concentration and toxigenic V. cholerae O1 occurrence were analyzed. Plankton-associated vibrios were more abundant than free-living vibrios in all studied environments. V. cholerae was found in 9.5% of ballast tanks and 24.2% of port samples, both as free-living and attached forms and, apart from the Santos harbor, was absent off São Paulo State. Toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates (ctxA+, tcpA+), involved in cholera disease, were found in BW (2%) and harbor (2%) samples. These results confirm that BW is an important carrier of pathogenic organisms, and that monitoring of vibrios and other plankton-attached bacteria is of paramount importance in BW management programs. PMID:23335920

Rivera, Irma N. G.; Souza, Keili M. C.; Souza, Claudiana P.; Lopes, Rubens M.

2013-01-01

285

Free-living and plankton-associated vibrios: assessment in ballast water, harbor areas, and coastal ecosystems in Brazil.  

PubMed

Ballast water (BW) is a major transport vector of exotic aquatic species and pathogenic microorganisms. The wide-ranging spread of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 from harbor areas has been frequently ascribed to discharge of contaminated BW into eutrophic coastal environments, such as during the onset of the seventh cholera pandemic in South America in the early 1990s. To determine the microbiological hazards of BWs transported to Brazilian ports, we evaluated water and plankton samples taken from (i) BW tanks of recently arrived ships, (ii) port areas along the Brazilian coastline from ?1 to 32°S and (iii) three coastal areas in São Paulo State. Vibrio concentration and toxigenic V. cholerae O1 occurrence were analyzed. Plankton-associated vibrios were more abundant than free-living vibrios in all studied environments. V. cholerae was found in 9.5% of ballast tanks and 24.2% of port samples, both as free-living and attached forms and, apart from the Santos harbor, was absent off São Paulo State. Toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates (ctxA(+), tcpA(+)), involved in cholera disease, were found in BW (2%) and harbor (2%) samples. These results confirm that BW is an important carrier of pathogenic organisms, and that monitoring of vibrios and other plankton-attached bacteria is of paramount importance in BW management programs. PMID:23335920

Rivera, Irma N G; Souza, Keili M C; Souza, Claudiana P; Lopes, Rubens M

2012-01-01

286

Sequence and expression divergence of an ancient duplication of the chaperonin groESEL operon in Vibrio species.  

PubMed

Heat-shock proteins are molecular chaperones essential for protein folding, degradation and trafficking. The human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus encodes a copy of the groESEL operon in both chromosomes and these genes share <80?% similarity with each other. Comparative genomic analysis was used to determine whether this duplication is prevalent among Vibrionaceae specifically or Gammaproteobacteria in general. Among the Vibrionaceae complete genome sequences in the database (31 species), seven Vibrio species contained a copy of groESEL in each chromosome, including the human pathogens Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Phylogenetic analysis of GroEL among the Gammaproteobacteria indicated that GroESEL-1 encoded in chromosome I was the ancestral copy and GroESEL-2 in chromosome II arose by an ancient gene duplication event. Interestingly, outside of the Vibrionaceae within the Gammaproteobacteria, groESEL chromosomal duplications were rare among the 296 genomes examined; only five additional species contained two or more copies. Examination of the expression pattern of groEL from V. vulnificus cells grown under different conditions revealed differential expression between the copies. The data demonstrate that groEL-1 was more highly expressed during growth in exponential phase than groEL-2 and a similar pattern was also found in both V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus. Overall these data suggest that retention of both copies of groESEL in Vibrio species may confer an evolutionary advantage. PMID:24913685

Chowdhury, Nityananda; Kingston, Joseph J; Whitaker, W Brian; Carpenter, Megan R; Cohen, Analuisa; Boyd, E Fidelma

2014-09-01

287

Radiofrequency transmission line for bioluminescent Vibrio sp. irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the study and the analyses of a transmission line for radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of bacteria belonging to Vibrio harveyi-related strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with many marine organisms. The bioluminescence represents a new biologic indicator which is useful for studying the behaviour of living samples in the presence of RF waves due to the modern communication systems. A suitable transmission line, used as an irradiating cell and tested up to the maximum frequency used by the global system for mobile communications and universal mobile telecommunications system transmissions, was characterized. In this experiment, the RF voltage applied to the transmission line was 1 V. Due to short dimensions of the line and the applied high frequencies, standing waves were produced in addition to progressing waves and the electric field strength varies particularly along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic field map was not strongly linked to the electric one due to the presence of standing waves and of the outgoing irradiation. RF fields were measured by two homemade suitable probes able to diagnostic fields of high frequency. The field measurements were performed without any specimens inside the line. Being our sample made of living matter, the real field was modified and its value was estimated by a simulation code. The bioluminescence experiments were performed only at 900 MHz for two different measured electric fields, 53 and 140 V/m. The light emission was measured right from the beginning and after 7 and 25 h. Under RF irradiation, we found that the bioluminescence activity decreased. Compared with the control sample, the diminution was 6.8% and 44% after 7 and 25 h of irradiation, respectively, both with the low or high field. No changes of the survival factor for all the samples were observed. Besides, to understand the emission processes, we operated the deconvolution of the spectra by two Gaussian curves. The Gaussian peaks were approximately centered at 460 nm and 490 nm. The 490 nm peak was higher than the control one. Under RF, the 490 nm peak decreased compared to the 460 nm one. The decreasing was stronger for the sample in the higher field. The ratio of the emission area of the 490 nm to 460 nm was 5 for the control sample. It decreased up to 1.6 for the samples under RF. The bioluminescence improves the DNA repair by photoreactivation, and there is evidence that photolyase is preferentially activated by blue/violet light. Our finding suggests that RF exposure may stimulate DNA repair by shifting the emission spectra from blue/green (490 nm) to blue/violet (460 nm).

Nassisi, V.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Velardi, L.

2012-07-01

288

Structural and kinetic features of family I inorganic pyrophosphatase from Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, kinetic properties of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase of family I from Vibrio cholerae (V-PPase), intestinal pathogen and causative agent of human cholera, are characterized in detail, and the crystal structure\\u000a of a metal-free enzyme is reported. Hydrolytic activity of V-PPase has been studied as a function of pH, concentration of\\u000a metal cofactors (Mg2+ or Mn2+), and ionic

E. V. Rodina; V. R. Samygina; N. N. Vorobyeva; T. S. Sitnik; S. A. Kurilova; T. I. Nazarova

2009-01-01

289

Two soluble pyrophosphatases in Vibrio cholerae : Transient redundancy or enduring cooperation?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soluble pyrophosphatases (PPases), which are essential for cell life, comprise two evolutionarily unrelated families (I and\\u000a II). Prokaryotic genomes generally contain a single PPase gene encoding either family I or family II enzyme. Surprisingly,\\u000a four Vibrionales species, including the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, contain PPase genes of both families. Here we show that both genes are transcriptionally active in V.

A. Salminen; M. Ilias; G. A. Belogurov; A. A. Baykov; R. Lahti; T. Young

2006-01-01

290

Vibrio parahaemolyticus Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis: An Atypical Organism Causing an Unusual Presentation  

PubMed Central

Background necrotizing fasciitis (NF) represents a life-threatening bacterial infection characterized by a rapid necrosis of deep subcutaneous tissue and facia underlying the skin. Despite its lethal nature, NF occurs infrequently, leaving many physicians unfamiliar with the disease process, common pathogens, and treatment strategies. Here we present a case of NF caused by an unlikely organism, Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We highlight the innocuous nature of initial presentation and the potentially devastating sequela. PMID:24455339

Ahmad, Asim; Brumble, Lisa; Maniaci, Michael

2013-01-01

291

Vibrio cholerae Strains Possess Multiple Strategies for Abiotic and Biotic Surface Colonization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite its notoriety as a human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic microbe suited to live in freshwater, estuarine, and marine environments where biofilm formation may provide a selective advantage. Here we report characterization of biofilms formed on abiotic and biotic surfaces by two non-O1\\/O139 V. cholerae strains, TP and SIO, and by the O1 V. cholerae strain N16961 in

Ryan S. Mueller; Diane McDougald; Danielle Cusumano; Nidhi Sodhi; Staffan Kjelleberg; Farooq Azam; Douglas H. Bartlett

2007-01-01

292

Quorum-sensing regulators control virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of virulence factors including cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is strongly influenced by environmental conditions. The well-characterized ToxR signal transduction cascade is responsible for sensing and integrating the environmental information and controlling the virulence regulon. We show here that, in addition to the known components of the ToxR signaling circuit, quorum-sensing

Jun Zhu; Melissa B. Miller; Russell E. Vance; Michelle Dziejman; John J. Mekalanos

2002-01-01

293

Sialic Acid Catabolism and Transport Gene Clusters Are Lineage Specific in Vibrio vulnificus  

PubMed Central

Sialic or nonulosonic acids are nine-carbon alpha ketosugars that are present in all vertebrate mucous membranes. Among bacteria, the ability to catabolize sialic acid as a carbon source is present mainly in pathogenic and commensal species of animals. Previously, it was shown that several Vibrio species carry homologues of the genes required for sialic acid transport and catabolism, which are genetically linked. In Vibrio cholerae on chromosome I, these genes are carried on the Vibrio pathogenicity island-2 region, which is confined to pathogenic isolates. We found that among the three sequenced Vibrio vulnificus clinical strains, these genes are present on chromosome II and are not associated with a pathogenicity island. To determine whether the sialic acid transport (SAT) and catabolism (SAC) region is universally present within V. vulnificus, we examined 67 natural isolates whose phylogenetic relationships are known. We found that the region was present predominantly among lineage I of V. vulnificus, which is comprised mainly of clinical isolates. We demonstrate that the isolates that contain this region can catabolize sialic acid as a sole carbon source. Two putative transporters are genetically linked to the region in V. vulnificus, the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter SiaPQM and a component of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in siaM, a component of the TRAP transporter, and demonstrate that this transporter is essential for sialic acid uptake in this species. Expression analysis of the SAT and SAC genes indicates that sialic acid is an inducer of expression. Overall, our study demonstrates that the ability to catabolize and transport sialic acid is predominately lineage specific in V. vulnificus and that the TRAP transporter is essential for sialic acid uptake. PMID:22344665

Lubin, Jean-Bernard; Kingston, Joseph J.; Chowdhury, Nityananda

2012-01-01

294

Melanization reaction products of shrimp display antimicrobial properties against their major bacterial and fungal pathogens.  

PubMed

Melanization is a rapid defense mechanism in invertebrates. The substrate specificity of phenoloxidases (POs) and the role of melanization reaction products were investigated in the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Two PmPOs (PmproPO1 and PmproPO2) were found to display a substrate specificity towards monophenols and diphenols, and exhibit relatively weak activity against 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI). Systemic infection of the PmproPO1/2 co-silenced shrimp with the fungus, Fusarium solani, led to a significantly increased mortality, suggesting an important role of PmproPOs in shrimp's defense against fungal infection. Using L-DOPA, dopamine or DHI as a substrate, the melanization reaction products exhibited in vitro antimicrobial activities towards Gram-negative bacteria (Vibrio harveyi and Vibrioparahaemolyticus) and Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis), whereas the lower effect was detected against the fungus (F. solani). SEM analysis revealed the morphological changes and damage of cell membranes of V. harveyi and F. solani after treatment with shrimp melanization reaction products. Together, these findings demonstrate the crucial functions of the proPO system and the importance of melanization reaction products in the shrimp's immune defense. PMID:25043262

Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Amparyup, Piti; Suriyachan, Chawapat; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

2014-11-01

295

Dynamic intervention: pathogen disarmament of mitochondrial-based immune surveillance.  

PubMed

In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Suzuki et al. (2014) describe a Vibrio cholerae Type-III-secreted effector that targets mitochondrial dynamics to dampen host innate immune signaling. This suggests that mammalian hosts possess surveillance mechanisms to monitor pathogen-mediated alterations in the integrity of normal cellular processes and organelles. PMID:25525786

Holland, Robin L; Blanke, Steven R

2014-11-12

296

Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Vibrio, salmonella, and Aeromonas isolates from various uncooked seafoods in Thailand.  

PubMed

Uncooked seafood samples were collected from open markets and supermarkets in Bangkok, Thailand, and were examined for the presence of Vibrio, Salmonella, and Aeromonas species from January to February 2008. From 120 samples, 272 bacterial isolates were identified through biochemical testing. Of all sea bass, shrimp, oyster, and blood cockle samples (30 of each) that were processed for culture, 114 (95%) samples had at least one detectable isolate of Vibrio, Salmonella, or Aeromonas, leaving only 6 (5%) samples free of them. All oyster sample (100%) had at least one pathogen, followed by sea bass (97%), blood cockles (97%), and shrimp (90%). Overall, 111 (92%) of all samples had detectable Vibrio spp., 32 (27%) had detectable Aeromonas spp., and 25 (21%) had detectable Salmonella enterica. There was no overall difference between positive samples collected from fresh markets versus supermarkets (relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.05). Resistance to ampicillin among isolated pathogens was relatively high (56%), while resistance to 12 other antibiotics, including azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was relatively low (0, 0, and 3%, respectively). Study results indicate that uncooked seafood in Bangkok, Thailand, commonly harbors enteric pathogens and that consumption of uncooked seafood should be avoided to reduce foodborne illnesses. PMID:22221354

Woodring, Joseph; Srijan, Apichai; Puripunyakom, Paksathorn; Oransathid, Wilawan; Wongstitwilairoong, Boonchai; Mason, Carl

2012-01-01

297

Molecular factors associated with virulence of marine vibrios isolated from striped bass in Chesapeake Bay.  

PubMed Central

On the basis of cultural and biochemical properties as well as DNA homology assays, 81 Vibrio strains isolated from diseased striped bass and from Chesapeake Bay water were assigned to eight distinct groups. All organisms belonging to two of the groups were pathogenic for striped bass and were identified as Vibrio anguillarum, whereas organisms classified in the other six groups were nonpathogenic and were designated as Vibrio spp. Unlike the pathogenic V. anguillarum strain 775 isolated in the Pacific Northwest, strains pathogenic for striped bass did not contain any plasmids; however, they were similar to the Northwest isolates in that virulence was correlated with their ability to grow in the presence of nonimmune striped bass serum or under conditions of iron limitation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of outer membranes showed that additional proteins were induced in those organisms capable of growth under conditions of iron limitation. It was of interest that 22 of the nonpathogenic isolates harbored one or more plasmids which, by restriction endonuclease analyses, were shown to be clearly different from the virulence plasmid pJM1. Images PMID:6840838

Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L; Potter, S A; Colwell, R R; Hetrick, F M; Crosa, J H

1983-01-01

298

The effect of storage time on Vibrio spp. and fecal indicator bacteria in an Isco autosampler.  

PubMed

Monitoring concentrations of bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination in coastal and estuarine ecosystems is critical to reduce adverse effects to public health. During storm events, particularly hurricanes, floods, Nor'easters, and tropical cyclones, sampling of coastal and estuarine waters is not generally possible due to safety concerns. It is particularly important to monitor waters during these periods as it is at precisely these times that pathogenic bacteria such as Vibrio spp. and fecal indicator bacteria concentrations fluctuate, potentially posing significant risks to public health. Automated samplers, such as the Isco sampler, are commonly used to conduct remote sample collection. Remote sampling is employed during severe storm periods, thereby reducing risk to researchers. Water samples are then stored until conditions are safe enough to retrieve them, typically in less than 21h, to collect the samples. Concerns exist regarding potential "bottle effects", whereby containment of sample might result in altered results. While these effects are well documented in samples being held for 24h or more, there is little data on bottle effects occurring during the first 24h of containment, and less still on the specific effects related to this type of sampling regime. Estuarine water samples were collected in the fall of 2013, placed into an Isco autosampler and subsampled over time to determine the effects of storage within this type of autosampling device. Vibrio spp. and fecal indicator bacteria were quantified using replicated culture-based methods, including Enterolert™ and membrane filtration. The experiments demonstrated no significant impact of storage time when comparing concentrations of total Vibrio spp., Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, or Enterococcus spp. after storage compared to original concentrations. However, the findings also suggested that increased variability and growth can occur during the middle of the day. Therefore, if at all possible, analysis schedules should be modified to account for this variability, e.g. collection of samples after overnight storage should occur as early in the morning as practicable. PMID:25008356

Ghazaleh, Maite N; Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

2014-09-01

299

Surface Immuno-Functionalisation for the Capture and Detection of Vibrio Species in the Marine Environment: A New Management Tool for Industrial Facilities  

PubMed Central

Bacteria from the genus Vibrio are a common and environmentally important group of bacteria within coastal environments and include species pathogenic to aquaculture organisms. Their distribution and abundance are linked to specific environmental parameters, including temperature, salinity and nutrient enrichment. Accurate and efficient detection of Vibrios in environmental samples provides a potential important indicator of overall ecosystem health while also allowing rapid management responses for species pathogenic to humans or species implicated in disease of economically important aquacultured fish and invertebrates. In this study, we developed a surface immuno-functionalisation protocol, based on an avidin-biotin type covalent binding strategy, allowing specific sandwich-type detection of bacteria from the Vibrio genus. The assay was optimized on 12 diverse Vibrio strains, including species that have implications for aquaculture industries, reaching detection limits between 7×103 to 3×104 cells mL?1. Current techniques for the detection of total Vibrios rely on laborious or inefficient analyses resulting in delayed management decisions. This work represents a novel approach for a rapid, accurate, sensitive and robust tool for quantifying Vibrios directly in industrial systems and in the environment, thereby facilitating rapid management responses. PMID:25310801

Laczka, Olivier F.; Labbate, Maurizio; Seymour, Justin R.; Bourne, David G.; Fielder, Stewart S.; Doblin, Martina A.

2014-01-01

300

Molecular analysis of the emergence of pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is abundant in the aquatic environment particularly in warmer waters and is the leading cause of seafood borne gastroenteritis worldwide. Prior to 1995, numerous V. parahaemolyticus serogroups were associated with disease, however, in that year an O3:K6 serogroup emerged in Southeast Asia causing large outbreaks and rapid hospitalizations. This new highly virulent strain is now globally disseminated. Results We performed a four-way BLAST analysis on the genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, an O3:K6 isolate from Japan recovered in 1996, versus the genomes of four published Vibrio species and constructed genome BLAST atlases. We identified 24 regions, gaps in the genome atlas, of greater than 10 kb that were unique to RIMD2210633. These 24 regions included an integron, f237 phage, 2 type III secretion systems (T3SS), a type VI secretion system (T6SS) and 7 Vibrio parahaemolyticus genomic islands (VPaI-1 to VPaI-7). Comparative genomic analysis of our fifth genome, V. parahaemolyticus AQ3810, an O3:K6 isolate recovered in 1983, identified four regions unique to each V. parahaemolyticus strain. Interestingly, AQ3810 did not encode 8 of the 24 regions unique to RMID, including a T6SS, which suggests an additional virulence mechanism in RIMD2210633. The distribution of only the VPaI regions was highly variable among a collection of 42 isolates and phylogenetic analysis of these isolates show that these regions are confined to a pathogenic clade. Conclusion Our data show that there is considerable genomic flux in this species and that the new highly virulent clone arose from an O3:K6 isolate that acquired at least seven novel regions, which included both a T3SS and a T6SS. PMID:18590559

Boyd, E Fidelma; Cohen, Ana Luisa V; Naughton, Lynn M; Ussery, David W; Binnewies, Tim T; Stine, O Colin; Parent, Michelle A

2008-01-01

301

Non-Lethal Heat Shock Increased Hsp70 and Immune Protein Transcripts but Not Vibrio Tolerance in the White-Leg Shrimp  

PubMed Central

Non-lethal heat shock boosts bacterial and viral disease tolerance in shrimp, possibly due to increases in endogenous heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and/or immune proteins. To further understand the mechanisms protecting shrimp against infection, Hsp70 and the mRNAs encoding the immune-related proteins prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin, penaeidin, crustin and hemocyanin were studied in post-larvae of the white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, following a non-lethal heat shock. As indicated by RT-qPCR, a 30 min abrupt heat shock increased Hsp70 mRNA in comparison to non-heated animals. Immunoprobing of western blots and quantification by ELISA revealed that Hsp70 production after heat shock was correlated with enhanced Hsp70 mRNA. proPO and hemocyanin mRNA levels were augmented, whereas peroxinectin and crustin mRNA levels were unchanged following non-lethal heat shock. Penaeidin mRNA was decreased by all heat shock treatments. Thirty min abrupt heat shock failed to improve survival of post-larvae in a standardized challenge test with Vibrio harveyi, indicating that under the conditions of this study, L. vannamei tolerance to Vibrio infection was influenced neither by Hsp70 accumulation nor the changes in the immune-related proteins, observations dissimilar to other shrimp species examined. PMID:24039886

Loc, Nguyen Hong; MacRae, Thomas H.; Musa, Najiah; Bin Abdullah, Muhd Danish Daniel; Abdul Wahid, Mohd. Effendy; Sung, Yeong Yik

2013-01-01

302

Subversion of the cytoskeleton by intracellular bacteria: lessons from Listeria, Salmonella and Vibrio.  

PubMed

Entry into host cells and intracellular persistence by invasive bacteria are tightly coupled to the ability of the bacterium to disrupt the eukaryotic cytoskeletal machinery. Herein we review the main strategies used by three intracellular pathogens to harness key modulators of the cytoskeleton. Two of these bacteria, namely Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, exhibit quite distinct intracellular lifestyles and therefore provide a comprehensive panel for the understanding of the intricate bacteria-cytoskeleton interplay during infections. The emerging intracellular pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus is depicted as a developing model for the uncovering of novel mechanisms used to hijack the cytoskeleton. PMID:25440316

de Souza Santos, Marcela; Orth, Kim

2015-02-01

303

Identification of genetic bases of vibrio fluvialis species-specific biochemical pathways and potential virulence factors by comparative genomic analysis.  

PubMed

Vibrio fluvialis is an important food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we sequenced the genome of a clinical V. fluvialis strain and determined its phylogenetic relationships with other Vibrio species by comparative genomic analysis. We found that the closest relationship was between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii, followed by those with V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Moreover, based on genome comparisons and gene complementation experiments, we revealed genetic mechanisms of the biochemical tests that differentiate V. fluvialis from closely related species. Importantly, we identified a variety of genes encoding potential virulence factors, including multiple hemolysins, transcriptional regulators, and environmental survival and adaptation apparatuses, and the type VI secretion system, which is indicative of complex regulatory pathways modulating pathogenesis in this organism. The availability of V. fluvialis genome sequences may promote our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms for this emerging pathogen. PMID:24441165

Lu, Xin; Liang, Weili; Wang, Yunduan; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

2014-03-01

304

Phenotypic characterization of Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2, a lipopolysaccharide-based homogeneous O serogroup within Vibrio vulnificus.  

PubMed Central

In this study, we have reevaluated the taxonomic position of biotype 2 of Vibrio vulnificus. For this purpose, we have biochemically and serologically characterized 83 biotype 2 strains from diseased eels, comparing them with 17 biotype 1 strains from different sources. Selected strains were also molecularly analyzed and tested for eel and mouse pathogenicity. Results have shown that biotype 2 (i) is biochemically homogeneous, indole production being the main trait that distinguishes it from biotype 1, (ii) presents small variations in DNA restriction profiles and outer membrane protein patterns, some proteins being immunologically related to outer membrane proteins from biotype 1, (iii) expresses a common lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profile, which is immunologically identical among strains and distinct from that of LPS of tested biotype 1 strains, and (iv) contains at least two high-Mr plasmids. Regarding host range, we have confirmed that both biotypes are pathogenic for mice but only biotype 2 is pathogenic for eels. On the basis of these data, we propose that biotype 2 of V. vulnificus constitutes an LPS-based O serogroup which is phenotypically homogeneous and pathogenic for eels. In this article, the serogroup is designated serogroup E (for eels). PMID:8975619

Biosca, E G; Oliver, J D; Amaro, C

1996-01-01

305

Vibrio metoecus sp. nov., a close relative of Vibrio cholerae isolated from coastal brackish ponds and clinical specimens.  

PubMed

A Gram-staining-negative, curved-rod-shaped bacterium with close resemblance to Vibrio cholerae, the aetiological agent of cholera, was isolated over the course of several years from coastal brackish water (17 strains) and from clinical cases (two strains) in the United States. 16S rRNA gene identity with V. cholerae exceeded 98?% yet an average nucleotide identity based on genome data of around 86?% and multi locus sequence analysis of six housekeeping genes (mdh, adk, gyrB, recA, pgi and rpoB) clearly delineated these isolates as a distinct genotypic cluster within the V. cholerae-V. mimicus clade. Most standard identification techniques do not differentiate this cluster of isolates from V. cholerae. Only amplification of the ompW gene using V. cholerae-specific primers and a negative Voges-Proskauer test showed a difference between the two clusters. Additionally, all isolated strains differed phenotypically from V. cholerae in their ability to utilize N-acetyl-d-galactosamine and d-glucuronic acid as sole carbon sources. Furthermore, they were generally unable to infect the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum, a widespread ability in V. cholerae. Based on these clear phenotypic differences that are not necessarily apparent in standard tests as well as average nucleotide identity and phylogeny of protein-coding genes, we propose the existence of a novel species, Vibrio metoecus sp. nov. with the type strain OP3H(T) (?=?LMG 27764(T)?=?CIP 110643(T)). Due to its close resemblance to V. cholerae and the increasing number of strains isolated over the past several years, we suggest that V. metoecus sp. nov. is a relatively common species of the genus Vibrio, isolates of which have been identified as atypical isolates of V. cholerae in the past. Its isolation from clinical samples also indicates that strains of this species, like V. cholerae, are opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24972615

Kirchberger, Paul C; Turnsek, Maryann; Hunt, Dana E; Haley, Bradd J; Colwell, Rita R; Polz, Martin F; Tarr, Cheryl L; Boucher, Yan

2014-09-01

306

'Bioluminescent' reporter phage for the detection of Category A bacterial pathogens.  

PubMed

Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis are Category A bacterial pathogens that are the causative agents of the plague and anthrax, respectively. Although the natural occurrence of both diseases' is now relatively rare, the possibility of terrorist groups using these pathogens as a bioweapon is real. Because of the disease's inherent communicability, rapid clinical course, and high mortality rate, it is critical that an outbreak be detected quickly. Therefore methodologies that provide rapid detection and diagnosis are essential to ensure immediate implementation of public health measures and activation of crisis management. Recombinant reporter phage may provide a rapid and specific approach for the detection of Y. pestis and B. anthracis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently use the classical phage lysis assays for the confirmed identification of these bacterial pathogens. These assays take advantage of naturally occurring phage which are specific and lytic for their bacterial hosts. After overnight growth of the cultivated bacterium in the presence of the specific phage, the formation of plaques (bacterial lysis) provides a positive identification of the bacterial target. Although these assays are robust, they suffer from three shortcomings: 1) they are laboratory based; 2) they require bacterial isolation and cultivation from the suspected sample, and 3) they take 24-36 h to complete. To address these issues, recombinant "light-tagged" reporter phage were genetically engineered by integrating the Vibrio harveyi luxAB genes into the genome of Y. pestis and B. anthracis specific phage. The resulting luxAB reporter phage were able to detect their specific target by rapidly (within minutes) and sensitively conferring a bioluminescent phenotype to recipient cells. Importantly, detection was obtained either with cultivated recipient cells or with mock-infected clinical specimens. For demonstration purposes, here we describe the method for the phage-mediated detection of a known Y. pestis isolate using a luxAB reporter phage constructed from the CDC plague diagnostic phage ?A1122 (Figure 1). A similar method, with minor modifications (e.g. change in growth temperature and media), may be used for the detection of B. anthracis isolates using the B. anthracis reporter phage W?::luxAB. The method describes the phage-mediated transduction of a biolumescent phenotype to cultivated Y. pestis cells which are subsequently measured using a microplate luminometer. The major advantages of this method over the traditional phage lysis assays is the ease of use, the rapid results, and the ability to test multiple samples simultaneously in a 96-well microtiter plate format. Figure 1. Detection schematic. The phage are mixed with the sample, the phage infects the cell, luxAB are expressed, and the cell bioluminesces. Sample processing is not necessary; the phage and cells are mixed and subsequently measured for light. PMID:21775956

Schofield, David A; Molineux, Ian J; Westwater, Caroline

2011-01-01

307

Vibrio cholerae Represses Polysaccharide Synthesis To Promote Motility in Mucosa.  

PubMed

The viscoelastic mucus layer of gastrointestinal tracts is a host defense barrier that a successful enteric pathogen, such as Vibrio cholerae, must circumvent. V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is able to penetrate the mucosa and colonize the epithelial surface of the small intestine. In this study, we found that mucin, the major component of mucus, promoted V. cholerae movement on semisolid medium and in liquid medium. A genome-wide screen revealed that Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS) production was inversely correlated with mucin-enhanced motility. Mucin adhesion assays indicated that VPS bound to mucin. Moreover, we found that vps expression was reduced upon exposure to mucin. In an infant mouse colonization model, mutants that overexpressed VPS colonized less effectively than wild-type strains in more distal intestinal regions. These results suggest that V. cholerae is able to sense mucosal signals and modulate vps expression accordingly so as to promote fast motion in mucus, thus allowing for rapid spread throughout the intestines. PMID:25561707

Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Yuning; Liu, Shengyan; Sheng, Ying; Rueggeberg, Karl-Gustav; Wang, Hui; Li, Jie; Gu, Frank X; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Zhu, Jun

2015-03-01

308

[Antimicrobial activity of Morinda morindoides on in vitro growth of vibrio cholerae in Côte d'Ivoire].  

PubMed

Cholera is a major public health problem in developing countries. As a contribution to management of this disease, the study described herein was carried out in Côte d'Ivoire. The purpose was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of products obtained by various techniques from the leaves of Morinda morindoides on a pathogenic strain of Vibrio cholerae O:1. Morinda morindoides is a medicinal plant in the Ivorian pharmacopoeia. The products were obtained as aqueous extracts, 70% ethanolic extracts, residual extracts and a chromatographic fraction (BGG F5). All three extracts and the chromatographic fraction showed considerable in vitro antimicrobial efficacy against Vibrio cholerae O:1. The most active against in vitro growth of Vibrio cholorae O:1 was the 70% ethanolic extract with a minimal bactericidal concentration of 5 mg/ml. The antibacterial properties of this medicinal plant can be of great benefit for management of cholera. PMID:20337116

Koffi, A E; Yapi, H F; Bahi, C; Guessend, K N; Djaman, J A; Guede-Guina, F

2010-02-01

309

A simple fluorogenic method to detect Vibrio cholerae and Aeromonas hydrophila in well water for areas impacted by catastrophic disasters.  

PubMed

The colony overlay procedure for peptidases (COPP) is a simple, fluorogenic assay that can rapidly detect and quantify Vibrio cholerae and Aeromonas hydrophila in well water. Cleavage of the substrate L-lysyl-7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin by enzymes present in Vibrio and Aeromonas species produces fluorescent foci on cellulose acetate membranes exposed to long-wave ultraviolet light. Vibrio cholerae O1, O139, O155, and A. hydrophila were readily detected using this procedure, whereas Enterobacteriaceae and other non-Vibrionaceae pathogens did not produce fluorescence. The assay is practical for assessing the relative safety of well water in areas that have experienced catastrophic devastation from natural disasters, acts of war, or civil strife and may help curb outbreaks of cholera and other enteric illnesses in affected areas. In tropical climates, the procedure may be adapted for use in areas without electricity. PMID:16968933

Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A

2006-09-01

310

Vibrio chromosome-specific families  

PubMed Central

We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished chromosomes, we find a core set of 1269 encoded protein families for chromosome 1, and a core of 252 encoded protein families for chromosome 2. Many of these core proteins are also found in the draft genomes (although which chromosome they are located on is unknown.) Of the chromosome specific core protein families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different “Molecular Function” GO categories were found for chromosome 1 specific protein families, and these include several broad activities: pyridoxine 5' phosphate synthetase, glucosylceramidase, heme transport, DNA ligase, amino acid binding, and ribosomal components; in contrast, chromosome 2 specific protein families have only 66 Molecular Function GO terms and include many membrane-associated activities, such as ion channels, transmembrane transporters, and electron transport chain proteins. Thus, it appears that whilst there are many “housekeeping systems” encoded in chromosome 1, there are far fewer core functions found in chromosome 2. However, the presence of many membrane-associated encoded proteins in chromosome 2 is surprising. PMID:24672511

Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David W.

2014-01-01

311

Comparative genomic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: serotype conversion and virulence  

PubMed Central

Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common cause of foodborne disease. Beginning in 1996, a more virulent strain having serotype O3:K6 caused major outbreaks in India and other parts of the world, resulting in the emergence of a pandemic. Other serovariants of this strain emerged during its dissemination and together with the original O3:K6 were termed strains of the pandemic clone. Two genomes, one of this virulent strain and one pre-pandemic strain have been sequenced. We sequenced four additional genomes of V. parahaemolyticus in this study that were isolated from different geographical regions and time points. Comparative genomic analyses of six strains of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from Asia and Peru were performed in order to advance knowledge concerning the evolution of V. parahaemolyticus; specifically, the genetic changes contributing to serotype conversion and virulence. Two pre-pandemic strains and three pandemic strains, isolated from different geographical regions, were serotype O3:K6 and either toxin profiles (tdh+, trh-) or (tdh-, trh+). The sixth pandemic strain sequenced in this study was serotype O4:K68. Results Genomic analyses revealed that the trh+ and tdh+ strains had different types of pathogenicity islands and mobile elements as well as major structural differences between the tdh pathogenicity islands of the pre-pandemic and pandemic strains. In addition, the results of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis showed that 94% of the SNPs between O3:K6 and O4:K68 pandemic isolates were within a 141 kb region surrounding the O- and K-antigen-encoding gene clusters. The "core" genes of V. parahaemolyticus were also compared to those of V. cholerae and V. vulnificus, in order to delineate differences between these three pathogenic species. Approximately one-half (49-59%) of each species' core genes were conserved in all three species, and 14-24% of the core genes were species-specific and in different functional categories. Conclusions Our data support the idea that the pandemic strains are closely related and that recent South American outbreaks of foodborne disease caused by V. parahaemolyticus are closely linked to outbreaks in India. Serotype conversion from O3:K6 to O4:K68 was likely due to a recombination event involving a region much larger than the O-antigen- and K-antigen-encoding gene clusters. Major differences between pathogenicity islands and mobile elements are also likely driving the evolution of V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, our analyses categorized genes that may be useful in differentiating pathogenic Vibrios at the species level. PMID:21645368

2011-01-01

312

The Virulence Activator AphA Links Quorum Sensing to Pathogenesis and Physiology in Vibrio cholerae by Repressing the Expression of a Penicillin Amidase Gene on the Small Chromosome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activation of the tcpPH promoter on the Vibrio pathogenicity island by AphA and AphB initiates the Vibrio cholerae virulence cascade and is regulated by quorum sensing through the repressive action of HapR on aphA expression. To further understand how the chromosomally encoded AphA protein activates tcpPH expression, site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify the base pairs critical for AphA binding

Gabriela Kovacikova; Wei Lin; Karen Skorupski

2003-01-01

313

Vibrio variabilis sp. nov. and Vibrio maritimus sp. nov., isolated from Palythoa caribaeorum.  

PubMed

Two novel vibrio isolates (R-40492(T) and R-40493(T)) originating from the zoanthid Palythoa caribaeorum in Brazil in 2005 were taxonomically characterized by means of a polyphasic approach comprising multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH), ?T(m) analysis and phenotypic characterization. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that R-40492(T) and R-40493(T) fell within the genus Vibrio and were most closely related to each other with 99% similarity; similarities of these two novel isolates towards Vibrio neptunius LMG 20536(T), Vibrio coralliilyticus LMG 20984(T), Vibrio nigripulchritudo LMG 3896(T), Vibrio sinaloensis LMG 25238(T) and Vibrio brasiliensis LMG 20546(T) varied between 97.1 and 98.5%. DDH experiments showed that the two isolates had less than 15% relatedness to the phylogenetically most closely related Vibrio species. R-40492(T) and R-40493(T) had 55-57% relatedness to each other. The ?T(m) between R-40492(T) and R-40493(T) was 6.12 °C. In addition, MLSA of concatenated sequences (16S rRNA, ftsZ, gyrB, recA, rpoA, topA, pyrH and mreB; 6035 bp in length) showed that the two novel isolates formed a separate branch with less than 92% concatenated gene sequence similarity towards known species of vibrios. Two novel species are proposed to accommodate these novel isolates, namely Vibrio variabilis sp. nov. (type strain, R-40492(T)=LMG 25438(T)=CAIM 1454(T)) and Vibrio maritimus sp. nov. (type strain, R-40493(T)=LMG 25439(T)=CAIM 1455(T)). PMID:21296931

Chimetto, Luciane A; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Brocchi, Marcelo; Willems, Anne; De Vos, Paul; Thompson, Fabiano L

2011-12-01

314

Phage Therapy as an Approach to Prevent Vibrio anguillarum Infections in Fish Larvae Production  

PubMed Central

Fish larvae in aquaculture have high mortality rates due to pathogenic bacteria, especially the Vibrio species, and ineffective prophylactic strategies. Vaccination is not feasible in larvae and antibiotics have reduced efficacy against multidrug resistant bacteria. A novel approach to controlling Vibrio infections in aquaculture is needed. The potential of phage therapy to combat vibriosis in fish larvae production has not yet been examined. We describe the isolation and characterization of two bacteriophages capable of infecting pathogenic Vibrio and their application to prevent bacterial infection in fish larvae. Two groups of zebrafish larvae were infected with V. anguillarum (?106 CFU mL?1) and one was later treated with a phage lysate (?108 PFU mL?1). A third group was only added with phages. A fourth group received neither bacteria nor phages (fish control). Larvae mortality, after 72 h, in the infected and treated group was similar to normal levels and significantly lower than that of the infected but not treated group, indicating that phage treatment was effective. Thus, directly supplying phages to the culture water could be an effective and inexpensive approach toward reducing the negative impact of vibriosis in larviculture. PMID:25464504

Silva, Yolanda J.; Costa, Liliana; Pereira, Carla; Mateus, Cristiana; Cunha, Ângela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Pardo, Miguel A.; Hernandez, Igor; Almeida, Adelaide

2014-01-01

315

Genetic transformation of Vibrio anguillarum and Pasteurella piscicida by electroporation.  

PubMed

Vibrio anguillarum and Pasteurella piscicida are Gram-negative bacteria which are pathogenic for marine fish and we report here the first successful transformation of these two bacteria by electroporation. The optimal conditions for electroporation included a field strength of 12.5 kV cm-1 and a time constant of 5 ms using 0.2-cm cuvettes. With these parameters, three plasmids (pSU2718, pCML, pEV3) with molecular sizes of 2.6, 5 and 13.7 kb, respectively were successfully transformed into both pathogens. V. anguillarum isolates belonging to serotypes O1 and O2 were transformed with greatest efficiency, 2.5 x 10(3) transformants per micrograms DNA, being achieved in the serotype O2 strains using plasmid pCML. Strains of serotype O3 were not transformed. In the case of P. piscicida the maximum efficiency achieved was 9.8 x 10(2) transformants per micrograms pCML plasmid DNA. This optimized system will allow development of procedures for the genetic manipulation of these pathogens. PMID:7744241

Cutrín, J M; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

1995-04-15

316

Utilization of hemin and hemoglobin by Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2.  

PubMed Central

The eel pathogen Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is able to use hemoglobin (Hb) and hemin (Hm) to reverse iron limitation. In this stud, the adjuvant effect of both compounds on eel pathogenicity has been evaluated and confirmed. Further, we have studied the heme-iron acquisition mechanism displayed by this bacterium. Whole cells were capable of binding Hb and Hm, independently of (i) iron levels in growth medium and (ii) the presence of polysaccharide capsules on bacterial surface. The Hb- and Hm-binding capacity was retained by the outer membrane protein (OMP) fraction and was abolished after proteolytic digestion of OMP samples. Western blotting (immunoblotting) of denatured OMPs revealed that two major protein bands of 36 and 32 kDa were involved in both Hm and Hb binding. The expression of these proteins was not affected by iron levels. In addition, V. vulnificus biotype 2 produced extracellular proteases, not regulated by iron, that were active against native Hb. In conclusion, the overall data suggest that the eel pathogen V. vulnificus biotype 2 can obtain iron by means of a mechanism which involves a direct interaction between the heme moiety and constitutive OMPs. PMID:8702273

Fouz, B; Mazoy, R; Lemos, M L; del Olmo, M J; Amaro, C

1996-01-01

317

Lessons from cholera & Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

Cholera is an acute form of diarrhoeal disease that plagued human civilization over the centuries. The sudden and explosive onset of the disease in the form of an outbreak or epidemic, coupled with high mortality and morbidity rates, had a tragic impact on the personal as well as social life of people living in the affected areas. The enormity of human sufferings led clinicians and scientists to carry out extensive research on cholera and Vibrio cholerae (the causative bacterium of the disease) leading to major discoveries that opened up novel areas of research or new disciplines in biomedical sciences. An attempt is made here to summarize some of these breakthroughs and outline their significance in broader perspectives. Finally, the possible impact of the global socio-political scenario on the spread of cholera epidemics (pandemicity of cholera) is briefly discussed. PMID:21415490

Ghose, Asoke C

2011-02-01

318

VIBRIO VULNIFICUS EDUCATION WORKSHOP FOR THE FLORIDA MEDICAL COMMUNITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Vibrio vulnificus is a naturally occurring microorganism that occurs warm marine and estuarine waters. The bacteria are concentrated by filter feeding shellfish. Certain immunocompromised individuals and those with liver disease can be adversely, even fatally affected by Vibrio...

319

Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Bacteriophage vB_VpaM_MAR  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a major pathogen that is mainly associated with seafood and is a global food safety issue. Our objective was to isolate and completely sequence a specific phage against this bacterium. Phage vB_VpaM_MAR is able to lyse 76% of the V. parahaemolyticus strains tested. MAR belongs to the Myoviridae family and has a genome comprised of double-stranded DNA with a size of 41,351 bp, a G+C content of 51.3%, and 62 open reading frames (ORFs). Bioinformatic analysis showed that phage MAR is closely related to Vibrio phages VHML, VP58.5, and VP882 and Halomonas aquamarina phage ?HAP-1. PMID:23118463

Alanis Villa, Argentina; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Abbasifar, Reza

2012-01-01

320

Siderocalin outwits the coordination chemistry of vibriobactin, a siderophore of Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

The human protein siderocalin (Scn) inhibits bacterial iron acquisition by binding catechol siderophores. Several pathogenic bacteria respond by making stealth siderophores that are not recognized by Scn. Fluvibactin and vibriobactin, respectively of Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio cholerae, include an oxazoline adjacent to a catechol. This chelating unit binds iron either in a catecholate or a phenolate oxazoline coordination mode. The latter has been suggested to make vibriobactin a stealth siderophore without directly identifying the coordination mode in relation to Scn binding. We use Scn binding assays with the two siderophores and two oxazoline substituted analogs and the crystal structure of Fe fluvibactin:Scn to show that the oxazoline does not prevent Scn binding; hence, vibriobactin is not a stealth siderophore. We show that the phenolate oxazoline coordination mode is present at physiological pH and is not bound by Scn. However, Scn binding shifts the coordination to the catecholate mode and thereby inactivates this siderophore. PMID:23755875

Allred, Benjamin E.; Correnti, Colin; Clifton, Matthew C.; Strong, Roland K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2013-01-01

321

Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant flagellin A from Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. Bacteria flagellins play an important role during infection and induction of the host immune response. Thus, flagellin proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified the complete flagellin subunit gene ( flaA) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 62.78 kDa. We purified and characterized the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for further studies into the utility of the FlaA protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified FlaA protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Liu, Yang; Ge, Hui; Qiu, Xuemei

2010-11-01

322

Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio owensii GRA50-12, Isolated from Green Algae in the Intertidal Zone of Eastern Taiwan.  

PubMed

Vibrio owensii GRA50-12 was isolated from symbiotic green algae of coral. The genome contains genes encoding toxin production, virulence regulation, stress response proteins, types II, IV, and VI secretion systems, and proteins for the metabolism of aromatic compounds, which reflects its pathogenic potential and its ecological roles in the ocean. PMID:25593265

Lin, Ling-Chun; Lin, Guang-Huey; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung; Yu, Mei-Shiuan

2015-01-01

323

Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio owensii GRA50-12, Isolated from Green Algae in the Intertidal Zone of Eastern Taiwan  

PubMed Central

Vibrio owensii GRA50-12 was isolated from symbiotic green algae of coral. The genome contains genes encoding toxin production, virulence regulation, stress response proteins, types II, IV, and VI secretion systems, and proteins for the metabolism of aromatic compounds, which reflects its pathogenic potential and its ecological roles in the ocean. PMID:25593265

Lin, Ling-Chun; Lin, Guang-Huey

2015-01-01

324

Draft Genome Sequences of Two Vibrionaceae Species, Vibrio ponticus C121 and Photobacterium aphoticum C119, Isolated as Coral Reef Microbiota.  

PubMed

Here, the draft genome sequences of two Vibrionaceae, Vibrio ponticus C121 and Photobacterium aphoticum C119, which were isolated from the coral reef vicinity in Okinawa, Japan, are reported. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity, and ecophysiology, including pathogenicity and evolution, of these genera. PMID:25359913

Al-Saari, Nurhidayu; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya; Thompson, Fabiano L; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

2014-01-01

325

Draft Genome Sequences of Two Vibrionaceae Species, Vibrio ponticus C121 and Photobacterium aphoticum C119, Isolated as Coral Reef Microbiota  

PubMed Central

Here, the draft genome sequences of two Vibrionaceae, Vibrio ponticus C121 and Photobacterium aphoticum C119, which were isolated from the coral reef vicinity in Okinawa, Japan, are reported. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity, and ecophysiology, including pathogenicity and evolution, of these genera. PMID:25359913

Al-saari, Nurhidayu; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Sawabe, Toko

2014-01-01

326

Development of a two-step, multiplex SYBR green quantitative PCR (MSG qPCR)assay for the rapid detection of vibrio anguillarum from seawater  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Vibrio anguillarum is an aggressive and halophilic bacterial pathogen commonly found in seawater. Its presence in aquaculture facilities causes significant morbidity and mortality among aquaculture species primarily from hemorrhaging of the body and skin of the infected fish that eventually leads t...

327

Insights into Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 Response to Artificial Gastric Fluid Stress by Transcriptomic Analysis  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis disease. Once consumed, human acid gastric fluid is perhaps one of the most important environmental stresses imposed on the bacterium. Herein, for the first time, we investigated Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 response to artificial gastric fluid (AGF) stress by transcriptomic analysis. The bacterium at logarithmic growth phase (LGP) displayed lower survival rates than that at stationary growth phase (SGP) under a sub-lethal acid condition (pH 4.9). Transcriptome data revealed that 11.6% of the expressed genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 was up-regulated in LGP cells after exposed to AGF (pH 4.9) for 30 min, including those involved in sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, energy production and protein biosynthesis, whereas 14.0% of the genes was down-regulated, such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and flagellar biosynthesis genes. In contrast, the AGF stress only elicited 3.4% of the genes from SGP cells, the majority of which were attenuated in expression. Moreover, the number of expressed regulator genes was also substantially reduced in SGP cells. Comparison of transcriptome profiles further revealed forty-one growth-phase independent genes in the AGF stress, however, half of which displayed distinct expression features between the two growth phases. Vibrio parahaemolyticus seemed to have evolved a number of molecular strategies for coping with the acid stress. The data here will facilitate future studies for environmental stresses and pathogenicity of the leading seafood-borne pathogen worldwide. PMID:25490137

Sun, Xuejiao; Liu, Taigang; Peng, Xu; Chen, Lanming

2014-01-01

328

Evaluation of bactericidal activity of weakly acidic electrolyzed water (WAEW) against Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibriovulnificus cause severe foodborne illness in humans; thus, to reduce outbreaks of disease, it is clearly important to reduce food contamination by these pathogens. Although electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water has been reported to exhibit strong bactericidal activities against many pathogens, it has never been tested against V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of weakly acidic electrolyzed water (WAEW), a type of EO water, against V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. Cell suspensions and cell cultures of both pathogens were treated for 30s with sodium hypochlorite solution containing 35mg/L available chlorine concentration (ACC) or WAEW containing 35mg/L ACC. After an initial inoculum of 5.7logCFU/mL, the number of viable V. vulnificus cells was reduced by 2.2 logs after treatment for 60s with sodium hypochlorite solution containing 35mg/L ACC, while no cells survived treatment with WAEW for 30s. Similar results were obtained for V. parahaemolyticus. Under open storage conditions, WAEW maintained bactericidal activities against cell suspensions of both strains after 5weeks but disappeared against cell cultures of the two strains after 5weeks. Under closed storage conditions, however, WAEW maintained bactericidal activities against both cell suspensions and cell cultures of each strain after 5weeks. No cells were detected in the cell suspensions and cultures when the ACC of WAEW was more than 20mg/L and treatment time was greater than 15s. Bactericidal activity of WAEW against V. vulnificus cell culture was reduced when the ACC of WAEW was less than 15mg/L but was maintained in the V. vulnificus cell suspension when the ACC of WAEW was 0.5mg/L. Thus, the bactericidal activity of WAEW was primarily affected by ACC rather than treatment time. Similar results were obtained for V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that WAEW kills these microorganisms more quickly than a chemical product such as sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), even at equivalent ACCs. PMID:20004034

Quan, Yaru; Choi, Kyoo-Duck; Chung, Donghwa; Shin, Il-Shik

2010-01-01

329

Control of luminous Vibrio species in penaeid aquaculture ponds  

Microsoft Academic Search

A crisis has arisen in the prawn industry in many regions with the onset of disease, with Vibrio spp. being important major causal factors. The value of adding selected strains of Bacillus as probiotic bacteria to control the Vibrio is shown by comparing farms in Indonesia using the same water sources, which contained luminous Vibrio strains. The farms that did

D. J. W Moriarty

1998-01-01

330

Optimization of medium for the production of a novel aquaculture probiotic, Micrococcus MCCB 104 using central composite design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A marine isolate ofMicrococcus MCCB 104 has been identified as an aquaculture probiotic antagonistic toVibrio. In the present study different carbon and nitrogen sources and growth factors in a mineral base medium were optimized for\\u000a enhanced biomass production and antagonistic activity against the target pathogen,Vibrio harveyi, following response surface methodology (RSM). Accordingly the minimum and maximum limits of the selected

R. Preetha; N. S. Jayaprakash; Rosamma Philip; I. S. Bright Singh

2007-01-01

331

Identification of a conserved bacterial protein secretion system in Vibrio cholerae using the Dictyostelium host model system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bacterium Vibrio cholerae, like other human pathogens that reside in environmental reservoirs, survives predation by unicellular eukaryotes. Strains of the O1 and O139 serogroups cause cholera, whereas non-O1\\/non-O139 strains cause human infections through poorly defined mechanisms. Using Dictyostelium discoideum as a model host, we have identified a virulence mechanism in a non-O1\\/non-O139 V. cholerae strain that involves extracellular translocation

Stefan Pukatzki; Amy T. Ma; Derek Sturtevant; Bryan Krastins; David Sarracino; William C. Nelson; John F. Heidelberg; John J. Mekalanos

2006-01-01

332

Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains  

SciTech Connect

Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to define pathogenic V. cholerae clones.

Brettin, Thomas S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bruce, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Challacombe, Jean F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Detter, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Cliff S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Munik, A C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saunders, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Choi, Seon Y [SEOUL NATL. UNIV.; Haley, Bradd J [U. MARYLAND; Taviani, Elisa [U. MARYLAND; Jeon, Yoon - Seong [INTL. VACCINE INST. SEOUL; Kim, Dong Wook [INTL. VACCINE INST. SEOUL; Lee, Jae - Hak [SEOUL NATL. UNIV.; Walters, Ronald A [PNNL; Hug, Anwar [NATL. INST. CHOLERIC ENTERIC DIS.; Colwell, Rita R [U. MARYLAND

2009-01-01

333

Protein A-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for separation of Vibrio cholerae from water samples.  

PubMed

Pathogen separation is of great significance for precise detection and prevention of disease outbreaks. For the first time, protein A conjugated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was prepared for pathogen separation at low concentrations from liquid samples. Vibrio cholerae O1 (VO1) bacteria were used for testing the effectiveness of this conjugate. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to confirm the presence of captured VO1. The results showed that, after binding with a specific antibody, the conjugate allows separation of VO1 bacteria from water samples at a concentration as low as 10 cfu mL(-1). Moreover, the conjugate can be used in parallel with conventional or modern diagnostic tests for quick and accurate detection of pathogens. PMID:25421572

Huy, Tran Quang; Van Chung, Pham; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Thanh, Nguyen Th Kim

2014-11-25

334

Proton circulation in Vibrio costicola.  

PubMed Central

The importance of proton movements was assessed in the moderate halophile Vibrio costicola. When anaerobic cells in acidic buffer (pH 6.5) were given an O2 pulse, protons were extruded regardless of the presence of Na+. At pH 8.5, however, V. costicola produced an acidic response to an O2 pulse in the absence of Na+ and an alkaline response when Na+ was present. An Na+/H+ antiport activity was confirmed at pH 8.5. All of these effects were prevented by protonophores or butanol treatment. Growth in complex medium at pH 8.5 was prevented by a high concentration (50 microM) of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP) or a low concentration (5 microM) of another protonophore, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS). The relative ineffectiveness of the former protonophore was caused by the proteose peptone and tryptone ingredients of the complex medium, since 5 microM completely prevented growth in their absence. The results are explained by a primary respiratory-linked proton efflux coupled to a secondary Na+/H+ antiport operating at alkaline pH. Evidence was seen for a role of Na+ in stimulating proton influx at alkaline pH, presumably via the pH homeostasis mechanism. PMID:2981820

Hamaide, F; Kushner, D J; Sprott, G D

1985-01-01

335

?-Hydroxyketone synthesis and sensing by Legionella and Vibrio.  

PubMed

Bacteria synthesize and sense low molecular weight signaling molecules, termed autoinducers, to measure their population density and community complexity. One class of autoinducers, the ?-hydroxyketones (AHKs), is produced and detected by the water-borne opportunistic pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Vibrio cholerae, which cause Legionnaires' disease and cholera, respectively. The "Legionella quorum sensing" (lqs) or "cholera quorum sensing" (cqs) genes encode enzymes that produce and sense the AHK molecules "Legionella autoinducer-1" (LAI-1; 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) or cholera autoinducer-1 (CAI-1; 3-hydroxytridecane-4-one). AHK signaling regulates the virulence of L. pneumophila and V. cholerae, pathogen-host cell interactions, formation of biofilms or extracellular filaments, expression of a genomic "fitness island" and competence. Here, we outline the processes, wherein AHK signaling plays a role, and review recent insights into the function of proteins encoded by the lqs and cqs gene clusters. To this end, we will focus on the autoinducer synthases catalysing the biosynthesis of AHKs, on the cognate trans-membrane sensor kinases detecting the signals, and on components of the down-stream phosphorelay cascade that promote the transmission and integration of signaling events regulating gene expression. PMID:22736983

Tiaden, André; Hilbi, Hubert

2012-01-01

336

Genetic characterization of trh positive Vibrio spp. isolated from Norway  

PubMed Central

The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) genes are carried by most virulent Vibrio parahaemolyticus serovars. In Norway, trh+ V. parahaemolyticus constitute 4.4 and 4.5% of the total number of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and water, respectively. The trh gene is located in a region close to the gene cluster for urease production (ure). This region was characterized in V. parahaemolyticus strain TH3996 and it was found that a nickel transport operon (nik) was located between the first gene (ureR) and the rest of the ure cluster genes. The organization of the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster in the Norwegian trh+ isolates was unknown. In this study, we explore the gene organization within the trh-ureR-nik-ure cluster for these isolates. PCR analyses revealed that the genes within the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster of Norwegian trh+ isolates were organized in a similar fashion as reported previously for TH33996. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationship among these trh+ isolates was investigated using Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST). Analysis by MLST or ureR-trh sequences generated two different phylogenetic trees for the same strains analyzed, suggesting that ureR-trh genes have been acquired at different times in Norwegian V. parahaemolyticus isolates. MLST results revealed that some pathogenic and non-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates in Norway appear to be highly genetically related. PMID:24400227

Ellingsen, Anette B.; Olsen, Jaran S.; Granum, Per E.; Rørvik, Liv M.; González-Escalona, Narjol

2013-01-01

337

Antimicrobial Peptides Protect Coho Salmon from Vibrio anguillarum Infections  

PubMed Central

Fish losses from infectious diseases are a significant problem in aquaculture worldwide. Therefore, we investigated the ability of cationic antimicrobial peptides to protect against infection caused by the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. To identify effective peptides for fish, the MICs of certain antimicrobial peptides against fish pathogens were determined in vitro. Two of the most effective antimicrobial peptides, CEME, a cecropin-melittin hybrid peptide, and pleurocidin amide, a C-terminally amidated form of the natural flounder peptide, were selected for in vivo studies. A single intraperitoneal injection of CEME did not affect mortality rates in juvenile coho salmon infected with V. anguillarum, the causative agent of vibriosis. Therefore, the peptides were delivered continuously using miniosmotic pumps placed in the peritoneal cavity. Twelve days after pump implantation, the fish received intraperitoneal injections of V. anguillarum at a dose that would kill 50 to 90% of the population. Fish receiving 200 ?g of CEME per day survived longer and had significantly lower accumulated mortalities (13%) than the control groups (50 to 58%). Fish receiving pleurocidin amide at 250 ?g per day also survived longer and had significantly lower accumulated mortalities (5%) than the control groups (67 to 75%). This clearly shows the potential for antimicrobial peptides to protect fish against infections and indicates that the strategy of overexpressing the peptides in transgenic fish may provide a method of decreasing bacterial disease problems. PMID:10788362

Jia, X.; Patrzykat, A.; Devlin, R. H.; Ackerman, P. A.; Iwama, G. K.; Hancock, R. E. W.

2000-01-01

338

Characteristics of Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 from Asia  

PubMed Central

A variety of serovars of the food-borne pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus normally cause infection. Since 1996, the O3:K6 strains of this pathogen have caused pandemics in many Asian countries, including Taiwan. For a better understanding of these pandemic strains, the recently isolated clinical O3:K6 strains from India, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan were examined in terms of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing and other biological characteristics. After PFGE and cluster analysis, all the O3:K6 strains were grouped into two unrelated groups. The recently isolated O3:K6 strains were all in one group, consisting of eight closely related patterns, with I1(81%) and I5(13%) being the most frequent patterns. Pattern I1 was the major one for strains from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. All recently isolated O3:K6 strains carried the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) gene. No significant difference was observed between recently isolated O3:K6 strains and either non-O3:K6 reference strains or old O3:K6 strains isolated before 1996 with respect to antibiotic susceptibility, the level of thermostable direct hemolysin, and the susceptibility to environmental stresses. Results in this study confirmed that the recently isolated O3:K6 strains of V. parahaemolyticus are genetically close to each other, while the other biological traits examined were usually strain dependent, and no unique trait was found in the recently isolated O3:K6 strains. PMID:10966418

Wong, Hin-Chung; Liu, Shu-Hui; Wang, Tien-Kuei; Lee, Chih-Lung; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Liu, Ding-Ping; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Lee, Bok-Kwon

2000-01-01

339

Effect of the addition of four potential probiotic strains on the survival of pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) following immersion challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus.  

PubMed

Four bacterial strains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of adult shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, Vibrio alginolyticus UTM 102, Bacillus subtilis UTM 126, Roseobacter gallaeciensis SLV03, and Pseudomonas aestumarina SLV22, were evaluated for potential use as probiotics for shrimp. In vitro studies demonstrated antagonism against the shrimp-pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus PS-017. Feeding shrimp with diets containing the potential probiotics showed the best feed conversion ratio in comparison with the control groups. After feeding with the potential probiotics for 28 days, challenge by immersion indicated effectiveness at reducing disease caused by V. parahaemolyticus in shrimp. PMID:17544437

Balcázar, José Luis; Rojas-Luna, Tyrone; Cunningham, David P

2007-10-01

340

High-salt preadaptation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus enhances survival in response to lethal environmental stresses.  

PubMed

Adaptation to changing environmental conditions is an important strategy for survival of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a gram-negative seafoodborne enteric pathogen found in the marine environment both free living and associated with oysters. This pathogen is a moderate halophile, with optimal growth at 3% NaCl. Among the several stresses imposed upon enteric bacteria, acid stress is perhaps one of the most important. V. parahaemolyticus has a lysine decarboxylase system responsible for decarboxylation of lysine to the basic product cadaverine, an important acid stress response system in bacteria. Preadaptation to mild acid conditions, i.e., the acid tolerance response, enhances survival under lethal acid conditions. Because of the variety of conditions encountered by V. parahaemolyticus in the marine environment and in oyster postharvest facilities, we examined the nature of the V. parahaemolyticus acid tolerance response under high-salinity conditions. Short preadaptation to a 6% salt concentration increased survival of the wild-type strain but not that of a cadA mutant under lethal acid conditions. However, prolonged exposure to high salinity (16 h) increased survival of both the wild-type and the cadA mutant strains. This phenotype was not dependent on the stress response sigma factor RpoS. Although this preadaptation response is much more pronounced in V. parahaemolyticus, this characteristic is not limited to this species. Both Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus also survive better under lethal acid stress conditions when preadapted to high-salinity conditions. High salt both protected the organism against acid stress and increased survival under -20°C cold stress conditions. High-salt adaptation of V. parahaemolyticus strains significantly increases survival under environmental stresses that would otherwise be lethal to these bacteria. PMID:24490918

Kalburge, Sai Siddarth; Whitaker, W Brian; Boyd, E Fidelma

2014-02-01

341

Plasmid carriage in Vibrio vulnificus and other lactose-fermenting marine vibrios.  

PubMed Central

A total of 42 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio vulnificus were examined for plasmid carriage. Of these, only five (12%) harbored plasmids, which were of various molecular weights. In contrast, 20 of 32 (62.5%) unidentified lactose-fermenting Vibrio spp. were found to possess plasmids with masses of 2.1 to 150 megadaltons. In these isolates, multiple plasmids were common, with an average of 2.25 plasmids per plasmid-containing strain. Attempts to demonstrate a correlation with the plasmids identified in the various Vibrio spp. and a variety of phenotypic traits, production of several enzymes potentially involved in virulence, cytotoxicity for Chinese hamster ovary cells, and mouse lethality were unsuccessful. A correlation was observed, however, between the presence of a 6.5-megadalton plasmid and resistance to pteridine 0/129. It was concluded that V. vulnificus, unlike most other Vibrio spp., shows a general lack of these extrachromosomal elements. PMID:3729404

Davidson, L S; Oliver, J D

1986-01-01

342

Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus SNUVpS-1 Isolated from Korean Seafood  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of food-borne diseases, and several pathogenic strains cause global gastroenteritis outbreaks. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus SNUVpS-1, which was isolated from seafood in a fishery market in the Republic of Korea and contained TL, toxR, and toxRSold genes. The current draft genome sequence will contribute to the effort to monitor the spread of V. parahaemolyticus seafood isolates and clinical isolates. PMID:23405312

Jun, Jin Woo; Kim, Ji Hyung; Choresca, Casiano H.; Shin, Sang Phil; Han, Jee Eun

2013-01-01

343

Invasive Vibrio cholerae non-O1 non-0139 infection in a thalassemic child.  

PubMed

Invasive, extra-intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 is rare especially among children. Herein the authors report a 12-year-old girl with underlying beta-thalassemia status post-splenectomy presenting with V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 gastroenteritis with concomitant septicemia. The pathogen was identified from stool and blood culture and the patient recovered uneventfully after antimicrobial and supportive therapy. A review and comparison of clinical manifestations and outcomes with the previous four cases of invasive V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 in postsplenectomy thalassemic pediatric patients is reported. PMID:22043781

Punpanich, Warunee; Sirikutt, Pugpen; Waranawat, Naris

2011-08-01

344

Essential Role for Estrogen in Protection against Vibrio vulnificus-Induced Endotoxic Shock  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the underlying mechanisms that result in a sexually dimorphic response to Vibrio vulnificus endotoxic shock. V. vulnificus is a gram-negative bacterium, considered one of the most invasive and rapidly fatal human pathogens known. However, 85% of individuals that develop endotoxic shock from V. vulnificus are males. Using the rat, we have developed a model for V. vulnificus endotoxic shock that mimics the sexually dimorphic response in humans. Gonadectomy in females results in increased mortality, and estrogen replacement results in decreased mortality in both gonadectomized males and females. These results demonstrate that estrogen is providing protection against V. vulnificus lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock. PMID:11553550

Merkel, Sandra M.; Alexander, Sarah; Zufall, Eric; Oliver, James D.; Huet-Hudson, Yvette M.

2001-01-01

345

A marine bacterium, Micrococcus MCCB 104, antagonistic to vibrios in prawn larval rearing systems.  

PubMed

A marine bacterium, Micrococcus MCCB 104, isolated from hatchery water, demonstrated extracellular antagonistic properties against Vibrio alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. fluviallis, V. nereis, V. proteolyticus, V. mediterranei, V cholerae and Aeromonas sp., bacteria associated with Macrobrachium rosenbergii larval rearing systems. The isolate inhibited the growth of V. alginolyticus during co-culture. The antagonistic component of the extracellular product was heat-stable and insensitive to proteases, lipase, catalase and alpha-amylase. Micrococcus MCCB 104 was demonstrated to be non-pathogenic to M. rosenbergii larvae. PMID:16465832

Jayaprakash, N S; Pai, S Somnath; Anas, A; Preetha, R; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

2005-12-30

346

Priming the prophenoloxidase system of Artemia franciscana by heat shock proteins protects against Vibrio campbellii challenge.  

PubMed

Like other invertebrates, the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana relies solely on innate immunity, which by definition lacks adaptive characteristics, to combat against invading pathogens. One of the innate mechanisms is melanisation of bacteria mediated by the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system. The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) derived from either prokaryote (Escherichia coli) or eukaryote (Artemia), well conserved and immune-dominant molecules, protect Artemia against Vibrio campbellii. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these proteins protect Artemia against Vibrio campbellii infection are unknown. Here we demonstrated that feeding gnotobiotically grown Artemia with either Artemia Hsp70 or the E. coli Hsp70 equivalent DnaK, each overproduced in E. coli, followed by V. campbellii challenge enhanced the proPO system, at both mRNA and protein activity levels. Additionally, the Artemia fed with these proteins survived well in a Vibrio challenge assay. These results indicated that Hsp70s derived from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic sources generate protective immunity in the crustacean Artemia against V. campbellii infection by priming the proPO system. This is apparently the first in vivo report on priming activity of Hsp70 in an invertebrate. PMID:21554959

Baruah, Kartik; Ranjan, Jayant; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Macrae, Thomas H; Bossier, Peter

2011-07-01

347

Ingestion of bacteria overproducing DnaK attenuates Vibrio infection of Artemia franciscana larvae  

PubMed Central

Feeding of bacterially encapsulated heat shock proteins (Hsps) to invertebrates is a novel way to limit Vibrio infection. As an example, ingestion of Escherichia coli overproducing prokaryotic Hsps significantly improves survival of gnotobiotically cultured Artemia larvae upon challenge with pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. The relationship between Hsp accumulation and enhanced resistance to infection may involve DnaK, the prokaryotic equivalent to Hsp70, a major molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells. In support of this proposal, heat-stressed bacterial strains LVS 2 (Bacillus sp.), LVS 3 (Aeromonas hydrophila), LVS 8 (Vibrio sp.), GR 8 (Cytophaga sp.), and GR 10 (Roseobacter sp.) were shown in this work to be more effective than nonheated bacteria in protecting gnotobiotic Artemia larvae against V. campbellii challenge. Immunoprobing of Western blots and quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the amount of DnaK in bacteria and their ability to enhance larval resistance to infection by V. campbellii are correlated. Although the function of DnaK is uncertain, it may improve tolerance to V. campbellii via immune stimulation, a possibility of significance from a fundamental perspective and also because it could be applied in aquaculture, a major method of food production. PMID:19373565

Dhaene, Till; Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

2009-01-01

348

Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis.  

PubMed

The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K

2014-01-01

349

Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis  

PubMed Central

The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study.

Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

2014-01-01

350

Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

Fuchs, Thilo Martin

351

Preventing Maritime Transfer of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Organisms, including Vibrio cholerae, can be transferred between harbors in the ballast water of ships. Zones in the Caribbean region where distance from shore and water depth meet International Maritime Organization guidelines for ballast water exchange are extremely limited. Use of ballast water treatment systems could mitigate the risk for organism transfer. PMID:23017338

Slaten, Douglas D.; Marano, Nina; Tappero, Jordan W.; Wellman, Michael; Albert, Ryan J.; Hill, Vincent R.; Espey, David; Handzel, Thomas; Henry, Ariel; Tauxe, Robert V.

2012-01-01

352

Preventing maritime transfer of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

Organisms, including Vibrio cholerae, can be transferred between harbors in the ballast water of ships. Zones in the Caribbean region where distance from shore and water depth meet International Maritime Organization guidelines for ballast water exchange are extremely limited. Use of ballast water treatment systems could mitigate the risk for organism transfer. PMID:23017338

Cohen, Nicole J; Slaten, Douglas D; Marano, Nina; Tappero, Jordan W; Wellman, Michael; Albert, Ryan J; Hill, Vincent R; Espey, David; Handzel, Thomas; Henry, Ariel; Tauxe, Robert V

2012-10-01

353

A medium for presumptive identification of Vibrio anguillarum.  

PubMed Central

A medium (VAM) for differentiation of Vibrio anguillarum is described. The presence of bile salts, the high pH, and the high NaCl concentration select mainly for Vibrio species. The high salinity and the ampicillin select for a fraction of Vibrio species, and sorbitol fermentation differentiates among those vibrios still able to grow. One hundred ninety-seven of 227 strains of V. anguillarum were identified with this medium. Only 3 of 66 strains of Vibrio that were not V. anguillarum or V. anguillarum-like were recognized with this medium, and any of 7 non-Vibrio strains related to fish diseases or Escherichia coli grew on the medium. It is our contention that the medium described here constitutes an efficient instrument for presumptive detection of V. anguillarum in pathological and environmental samples. PMID:8017947

Alsina, M; Martínez-Picado, J; Jofre, J; Blanch, A R

1994-01-01

354

Glycan specificity of the Vibrio vulnificus hemolysin lectin outlines evolutionary history of membrane targeting by a toxin family.  

PubMed

Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are a class of pathogen-secreted molecules that oligomerize to form transmembrane channels in cellular membranes. Determining the mechanism for how PFTs bind membranes is important in understanding their role in disease and for developing possible ways to block their action. Vibrio vulnificus, an aquatic pathogen responsible for severe food poisoning and septicemia in humans, secretes a PFT called V. vulnificus hemolysin (VVH), which contains a single C-terminal targeting domain predicted to resemble a ?-trefoil lectin fold. In order to understand the selectivity of the lectin for glycan motifs, we expressed the isolated VVH ?-trefoil domain and used glycan-chip screening to identify that VVH displays a preference for terminal galactosyl groups including N-acetyl-d-galactosamine and N-acetyl-d-lactosamine. The X-ray crystal structure of the VVH lectin domain solved to 2.0Å resolution reveals a heptameric ring arrangement similar to the oligomeric form of the related, but inactive, lectin from Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Structures bound to glycerol, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, and N-acetyl-d-lactosamine outline a common and versatile mode of recognition allowing VVH to target a wide variety of cell-surface ligands. Sequence analysis in light of our structural and functional data suggests that VVH may represent an earlier step in the evolution of Vibrio PFTs. PMID:24862282

Kaus, Katherine; Lary, Jeffrey W; Cole, James L; Olson, Rich

2014-07-29

355

Temperature effect on high salinity depuration of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus from the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).  

PubMed

Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are opportunistic human pathogens naturally associated with the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The abundances of both pathogens in oysters are positively correlated with temperature, thus ingestion of raw oysters during the warm summer months is a risk factor for contracting illness from these bacteria. Current post-harvest processing (PHP) methods for elimination of these pathogens are expensive and kill the oyster, changing their organoleptic properties and making them less appealing to some consumers. High salinity has proven effective in reducing Vv numbers in the wild and our research aims at developing an indoor recirculating system to reduce pathogenic Vibrios while maintaining the taste and texture of live oysters. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of temperature on the efficacy of high salinity depuration. Vv was enumerated as most probable number (MPN) per gram of oyster tissue using the FDA-approved modified cellobiose polymyxin colistin (mCPC) protocol and with an alternative Vibrio specific media CHROMagar™ Vibrio (CaV). CaV was also used to quantify Vp. Oysters were held at 35 psu for 10 days at three temperatures: low (20°C), mid (22.5°C) and high (25°C). There was no difference in MPN/g of Vv between media; however more Vv isolates were obtained from mCPC than CaV. There was no significant effect of temperature on reduction of Vv or Vp throughout depuration but there was a tendency for low temperatures to be less effective than the higher ones. High salinity resulted in a significant decrease in Vv by day 3 and again by day 10, and a decrease in Vp by day 3. Oyster condition indices were maintained throughout depuration and mortality was low (4% across three trials). Overall these results support the use of mCPC for Vv enumeration and demonstrate the promise of high salinity depuration for PHP of the Eastern oyster. The trend for lower temperatures to be less effective is surprising and indicates a potential interaction between salinity and temperature that should be further investigated. PMID:25310264

Larsen, A M; Rikard, F S; Walton, W C; Arias, C R

2015-01-01

356

Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

Slock, James

1995-01-01

357

Vibrios associated with red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum.  

PubMed Central

Vibrios were isolated from red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum and also throughout the year in the Ria de Pontevedra, Spain. The isolates were grouped into 14 phena by numerical toxonomy. Strains associated with red tides were restricted to four phena: phena I and II were Vibrio alginolyticus, and phena III and IV were Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio anguillarum, respectively. V. anguillarum-like strains (phena V through XI) predominated throughout the year outside the red tide areas. Cytotoxicity assays conducted in different poikilothermic and homoiothermic cell lines showed that cytotoxin production was not necessarily associated with the species selected during the red tides. PMID:2268167

Romalde, J L; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

1990-01-01

358

Abundance of Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, and V. parahaemolyticus in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) from Long Island sound.  

PubMed

Vibriosis is a leading cause of seafood-associated morbidity and mortality in the United States. Typically associated with consumption of raw or undercooked oysters, vibriosis associated with clam consumption is increasingly being reported. However, little is known about the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in clams. The objective of this study was to compare the levels of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oysters and clams harvested concurrently from Long Island Sound (LIS). Most probable number (MPN)-real-time PCR methods were used for enumeration of total V. cholerae, V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus, and pathogenic (tdh(+) and/or trh(+)) V. parahaemolyticus. V. cholerae was detected in 8.8% and 3.3% of oyster (n = 68) and clam (n = 30) samples, with levels up to 1.48 and 0.48 log MPN/g in oysters and clams, respectively. V. vulnificus was detected in 97% and 90% of oyster and clam samples, with median levels of 0.97 and -0.08 log MPN/g, respectively. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in all samples, with median levels of 1.88 and 1.07 log MPN/g for oysters and clams, respectively. The differences between V. vulnificus and total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels in the two shellfish species were statistically significant (P < 0.001). These data indicate that V. vulnificus and total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus are more prevalent and are present at higher levels in oysters than in hard clams. Additionally, the data suggest differences in vibrio populations between shellfish harvested from different growing area waters within LIS. These results can be used to evaluate and refine illness mitigation strategies employed by risk managers and shellfish control authorities. PMID:25281373

Jones, Jessica L; Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Bowers, John C; DeRosia-Banick, Kristin; Carey, David H; Hastback, William

2014-12-01

359

PhoB regulates both environmental and virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Vibrio cholerae is a facultative pathogen that thrives in two nutritionally disparate environments, aquatic and human small intestine. Phosphate (Pi) is an essential nutrient that is limited in aquatic ecosystems and of unknown availability in the small intestine. Here we show that the Pi (Pho) regulon, which is controlled by the Pi-specific transporter (Pst) and two-component system PhoBR, is required for V. cholerae survival in both environments, though for differing reasons. While induction of Pi acquisition systems including Pst is critical for survival in the aquatic environment, regulation of virulence genes by PhoB and not Pi transport per se is required for colonization of the small intestine. We show that PhoB regulates virulence genes by directly controlling expression of a key upstream transcriptional regulator, tcpPH. Thus, the Pho regulon includes virulence genes and represents a diverse gene set essential to pathogenic V. cholerae throughout its life cycle. PMID:20659293

Pratt, Jason T.; Ismail, Ayman M.; Camilli, Andrew

2010-01-01

360

Roles of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of seafood borne bacterial gastroenteritis in the world, often associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. However, not all strains of V. parahaemolyticus are pathogenic. The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) encoded by tdh and trh genes, respectively, are considered major virulence factors in V. parahaemolyticus. However, about 10% of clinical strains do not contain tdh and/or trh. Environmental isolates of V. parahaemolyticus lacking tdh and/or trh are also highly cytotoxic to human gastrointestinal cells. Even in the absence of these hemolysins, V. parahaemolyticus remains pathogenic indicating other virulence factors exist. This mini review aims at discussing the possible roles of tdh and trh genes in clinical and environmental isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:25657643

Raghunath, Pendru

2015-01-01

361

Genetic basis of toxin production and pathogenesis in Vibrio cholerae: evidence against phage conversion.  

PubMed Central

The pathogenicity of Vibrio cholerae strains "cured" of "Kappa-type" phage was not significantly altered relative to that of their "Kappa" lysogenic parental strains. Unlike Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the capacity of V. cholerae to produce exotoxin was not stimulated as a consequence of active phage multiplication. Toxin production in cultures in which Kappa-type phage multiplication was initiated either by inducing Kappa lysogens or by infecting naturally occurring or "cured" Kappa-sensitive strains was greatly reduced compared to normally growing control cultures. Kappa-sensitive El Tor strain Mak 757 and a Kappa lysogen derived from it did not differ in their capacity to colonize ligated rabbit ileal loops nor in their sensitivites to ultraviolet radiation, acidic pH, or osmotic shock. We conclude that Kappa-type phages do not directly affect the pathogenicity of these V. cholerae strains. Images PMID:1090531

Gerdes, J C; Romig, W R

1975-01-01

362

Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

2011-06-01

363

Nigribactin, a Novel Siderophore from Vibrio nigripulchritudo, Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen that employs a number of virulence factors as part of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore marine bacteria as a source of compounds that modulate virulence gene expression in S. aureus. During the global marine Galathea 3 expedition, a strain collection was established comprising bacteria that express antimicrobial activity against Vibrio anguillarum and/or Staphylococcus aureus. Within this collection we searched colony material, culture supernatants, and cell extracts for virulence modulating activity showing that 68 out of 83 marine bacteria (affiliated with the Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonas sp.) influenced expression of S. aureus hla encoding ?-hemolysin toxin and/or spa encoding Protein A. The isolate that upon initial screening showed the highest degree of interference (crude ethyl acetate extract) was a Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Extraction, purification and structural elucidation revealed a novel siderophore, designated nigribactin, which induces spa transcription. The effect of nigribactin on spa expression is likely to be independent from its siderophore activity, as another potent siderophore, enterobactin, failed to influence S. aureus virulence gene expression. This study shows that marine microorganisms produce compounds with potential use in therapeutic strategies targeting virulence rather than viability of human pathogens. PMID:23203279

Nielsen, Anita; Mansson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias; Varming, Anders N.; Phipps, Richard K.; Larsen, Thomas O.; Gram, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

2012-01-01

364

Stress and Stress-Induced Neuroendocrine Changes Increase the Susceptibility of Juvenile Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to Vibrio splendidus  

PubMed Central

Oysters are permanently exposed to various microbes, and their defense system is continuously solicited to prevent accumulation of invading and pathogenic organisms. Therefore, impairment of the animal's defense system usually results in mass mortalities in cultured oyster stocks or increased bacterial loads in food products intended for human consumption. In the present study, experiments were conducted to examine the effects of stress on the juvenile oyster's resistance to the oyster pathogen Vibrio splendidus. Oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were challenged with a low dose of a pathogenic V. splendidus strain and subjected to a mechanical stress 3 days later. Both mortality and V. splendidus loads increased in stressed oysters, whereas they remained low in unstressed animals. Injection of noradrenaline or adrenocorticotropic hormone, two key components of the oyster neuroendocrine stress response system, also caused higher mortality and increased accumulation of V. splendidus in challenged oysters. These results suggest that the physiological changes imposed by stress, or stress hormones, influenced host-pathogen interactions in oysters and increased juvenile C. gigas vulnerability to Vibrio splendidus. PMID:11319116

Lacoste, Arnaud; Jalabert, Fabienne; Malham, Shelagh K.; Cueff, Anne; Poulet, Serge A.

2001-01-01

365

Identification of an Antagonistic Probiotic Combination Protecting Ornate Spiny Lobster (Panulirus ornatus) Larvae against Vibrio owensii Infection  

PubMed Central

Vibrio owensii DY05 is a serious pathogen causing epizootics in the larviculture of ornate spiny lobster Panulirus ornatus. In the present study a multi-tiered probiotic screening strategy was used to identify a probiotic combination capable of protecting P. ornatus larvae (phyllosomas) from experimental V. owensii DY05 infection. From a pool of more than 500 marine bacterial isolates, 91 showed definitive in vitro antagonistic activity towards the pathogen. Antagonistic candidates were shortlisted based on phylogeny, strength of antagonistic activity, and isolate origin. Miniaturized assays used a green fluorescent protein labelled transconjugant of V. owensii DY05 to assess pathogen growth and biofilm formation in the presence of shortlisted candidates. This approach enabled rapid processing and selection of candidates to be tested in a phyllosoma infection model. When used in combination, strains Vibrio sp. PP05 and Pseudoalteromonas sp. PP107 significantly and reproducibly protected P. ornatus phyllosomas during vectored challenge with V. owensii DY05, with survival not differing significantly from unchallenged controls. The present study has shown the value of multispecies probiotic treatment and demonstrated that natural microbial communities associated with wild phyllosomas and zooplankton prey support antagonistic bacteria capable of in vivo suppression of a pathogen causing epizootics in phyllosoma culture systems. PMID:22792184

Goulden, Evan F.; Hall, Michael R.; Pereg, Lily L.; Høj, Lone

2012-01-01

366

Pathogen intelligence  

PubMed Central

Different species inhabit different sensory worlds and thus have evolved diverse means of processing information, learning and memory. In the escalated arms race with host defense, each pathogenic bacterium not only has evolved its individual cellular sensing and behavior, but also collective sensing, interbacterial communication, distributed information processing, joint decision making, dissociative behavior, and the phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity necessary for epidemiologic success. Moreover, pathogenic populations take advantage of dormancy strategies and rapid evolutionary speed, which allow them to save co-generated intelligent traits in a collective genomic memory. This review discusses how these mechanisms add further levels of complexity to bacterial pathogenicity and transmission, and how mining for these mechanisms could help to develop new anti-infective strategies. PMID:24551600

Steinert, Michael

2014-01-01

367

Localized Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quorum sensing is almost always regarded as a population density effect in three-dimensional bulk samples of bacteria. Here we create two-dimensional samples of Vibrio fischeri cells adhered onto glass surfaces to examine the effect of local population densities on quorum sensing. This is done by measuring the luminescent response. The 2-D bacterial populations enable us to simultaneously account for time

Mary E. Parent; Charles E. Snyder; Nathaniel D. Kopp; Darrell Velegol

2008-01-01

368

Extended serotyping scheme for Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifty-seven new O serogroups have been added to the existing serotyping scheme ofVibrio cholerae to extend the scheme from O84 to O140. Prominent new additions were serogroups O139 and O140. The reference strain of O139 was isolated from a patient from an epidemic of cholera-like diarrhea in Madras, Southern India. Serogroup O140 was assigned to a group ofV. cholerae strains

Toshio Shimada; Eiji Arakawa; Kenichiro Itoh; Tadayuki Okitsu; Akiyoshi Matsushima; Yoshio Asai; Shiro Yamai; Tamotsu Nakazato; G. Balakrish Nair; M. John Albert; Yoshifumi Takeda

1994-01-01

369

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phylogeny and fitness of Vibrio fischeri from the  

E-print Network

The bioluminescent, heterotrophic marine bacter- ium Vibrio fischeri (Gammaproteobacteria: Vibrio- naceae) maintains). The host animals are hypothesized to receive a behavioral benefit from bacterial bioluminescence, whereas the bacteria are hypothesized to receive a metabolic benefit from the host (Stabb and Millikan, 2009

McFall-Ngai, Margaret

370

Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio mimicus Strain CAIM 602T  

PubMed Central

Vibrio mimicus is a Gram-negative bacterium associated with gastrointestinal diseases in humans around the world. We report the complete genome sequence of the Vibrio mimicus strain CAIM 602T (CDC1721-77, LMG 7896T, ATCC 33653T). PMID:23516211

Guardiola-Avila, Iliana; Acedo-Felix, Evelia; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel

2013-01-01

371

Vibrio cholerae Proteome-Wide Screen for Immunostimulatory Proteins Identifies  

E-print Network

Vibrio cholerae Proteome-Wide Screen for Immunostimulatory Proteins Identifies Phosphatidylserine Activators. Out of 3,882 Vibrio cholerae proteins, we identified phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSD. cholerae PSD as a novel TLR4 agonist and further demonstrate the potential application of PSD as a vaccine

Mekalanos, John

372

Two cases of bacteriemia caused by nontoxigenic, non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae isolates in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.  

PubMed

The toxigenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae belonging to the O1 and O139 serogroups is commonly associated with epidemic diarrhea in tropical settings; other diseases caused by this environmental pathogen are seldom identified. Here we report two unassociated cases of nonfatal, nontoxigenic V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 bacteremia in patients with comorbidities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, that occurred within a 4-week period. PMID:25122858

Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Yen, Nguyen Thi Thu; Dung, Le Thi; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James I; Whitehorn, Jamie; Thwaites, Guy; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Baker, Stephen

2014-10-01

373

Two Cases of Bacteriemia Caused by Nontoxigenic, Non-O1, Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae Isolates in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  

PubMed Central

The toxigenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae belonging to the O1 and O139 serogroups is commonly associated with epidemic diarrhea in tropical settings; other diseases caused by this environmental pathogen are seldom identified. Here we report two unassociated cases of nonfatal, nontoxigenic V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 bacteremia in patients with comorbidities in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, that occurred within a 4-week period. PMID:25122858

Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Yen, Nguyen Thi Thu; Dung, Le Thi; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James I.; Whitehorn, Jamie; Thwaites, Guy; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh

2014-01-01

374

Antibacterial activity of the lipopetides produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens M1 against multidrug-resistant Vibrio spp. isolated from diseased marine animals.  

PubMed

In this work, the antibacterial activity of the lipopeptides produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens M1 was examined against multidrug-resistant Vibrio spp. and Shewanella aquimarina isolated from diseased marine animals. A new and cheap medium which contained 1.0 % soybean powder, 1.5 % wheat flour, pH 7.0 was developed. A crude surfactant concentration of 0.28 mg/ml was obtained after 18 h of 10-l fermentation and diameter of the clear zone on the plate seeded with Vibrio anguillarum was 34 mm. A preliminary characterization suggested that the lipopeptide N3 produced by B. amyloliquefaciens M1 was the main product and contained the surfactin isoforms with amino acids (GLLVDLL) and hydroxy fatty acids (of 12-15 carbons in length). The evaluation of the antibacterial activity of the lipopeptide N3 was carried out against S. aquimarina and nine species of Vibrio spp.. It was found that all the Vibrio spp. and S. aquimarina showed resistance to several different antibiotics, suggesting that they were the multidrug resistance. It was also indicated that all the Vibrio spp. strains and S. aquimarina were sensitive to the surfactin N3, in particular V. anguillarum. The results demonstrated that the lipopeptides produced by B. amyloliquefaciens M1 had a broad spectrum of action, including antibacterial activity against the pathogenic Vibrio spp. with multidrug-resistant profiles. After the treatment with the lipopeptide N3, the cell membrane of V. anguillarum was damaged, and the whole cells of the bacterium were disrupted. PMID:24132666

Xu, Hong-Mei; Rong, Yan-Jun; Zhao, Ming-Xin; Song, Bo; Chi, Zhen-Ming

2014-01-01

375

Vibrio diversity and dynamics in the Monterey Bay upwelling region  

PubMed Central

The Vibrionaceae (Vibrio) are a ubiquitous group of metabolically flexible marine bacteria that play important roles in biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. Despite this versatility, little is known about Vibrio diversity and abundances in upwelling regions. The seasonal dynamics of Vibrio populations was examined by analysis of 16S rRNA genes in Monterey Bay (MB), California from April 2006–April 2008 at two long term monitoring stations, C1 and M2. Vibrio phylotypes within MB were diverse, with subpopulations clustering with several different cultured representatives including Allivibrio spp., Vibrio penaecida, and Vibrio splendidus as well as with many unidentified marine environmental bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Total Vibrio population abundances, as well as abundances of a Vibrio sp. subpopulation (MBAY Vib7) and an Allivibrio sp. subpopulation (MBAY Vib4) were examined in the context of environmental parameters from mooring station and CTD cast data. Total Vibrio populations showed some seasonal variability but greater variability was observed within the two subpopulations. MBAY Vib4 was negatively associated with MB upwelling indices and positively correlated with oceanic season conditions, when upwelling winds relax and warmer surface waters are present in MB. MBAY Vib7 was also negatively associated with upwelling indices and represented a deeper Vibrio sp. population. Correlation patterns suggest that larger oceanographic conditions affect the dynamics of the populations in MB, rather than specific environmental factors. This study is the first to target and describe the diversity and dynamics of these natural populations in MB and demonstrates that these populations shift seasonally within the region. PMID:24575086

Mansergh, Sarah; Zehr, Jonathan P.

2013-01-01

376

Factors That Explain Excretion of Enteric Pathogens by Persons Without Diarrhea  

PubMed Central

Excretion of enteropathogens by subjects without diarrhea influences our appreciation of the role of these pathogens as etiologic agents. Characteristics of the pathogens and host and environmental factors help explain asymptomatic excretion of diarrheal pathogens by persons without diarrhea. After causing acute diarrhea followed by clinical recovery, some enteropathogens are excreted asymptomatically for many weeks. Thus, in a prevalence survey of persons without diarrhea, some may be excreting pathogens from diarrheal episodes experienced many weeks earlier. Volunteer challenges with Vibrio cholerae O1, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli, Campylobacter jejuni, and Giardia lamblia document heterogeneity among enteropathogen strains, with some inexplicably not eliciting diarrhea. The immune host may not manifest diarrhea following ingestion of a pathogen but may nevertheless asymptomatically excrete. Some human genotypes render them less susceptible to symptomatic or severe diarrheal infection with certain pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae O1 and norovirus. Pathogens in stools of individuals without diarrhea may reflect recent ingestion of inocula too small to cause disease in otherwise susceptible hosts or of animal pathogens (eg, bovine or porcine ETEC) that do not cause human illness. PMID:23169942

Levine, Myron M.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.

2012-01-01

377

High-throughput screening and whole genome sequencing identifies an antimicrobially active inhibitor of Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Background Pathogenic serotypes of Vibrio cholerae cause the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The increasing development of bacterial resistances against the known antibiotics necessitates the search for new antimicrobial compounds and targets for this pathogen. Results A high-throughput screening assay with a Vibrio cholerae reporter strain constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was developed and applied in the investigation of the growth inhibitory effect of approximately 28,300 structurally diverse natural compounds and synthetic small molecules. Several compounds with activities in the low micromolar concentration range were identified. The most active structure, designated vz0825, displayed a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.6 ?M and a minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 3.2 ?M against several strains of V. cholerae and was specific for this pathogen. Mutants with reduced sensitivity against vz0825 were generated and whole genome sequencing of 15 pooled mutants was carried out. Comparison with the genome of the wild type strain identified the gene VC_A0531 (GenBank: AE003853.1) as the major site of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the resistant mutants. VC_A0531 is located on the small chromosome of V. cholerae and encodes the osmosensitive K+-channel sensor histidine kinase (KdpD). Nucleotide exchange of the major mutation site in the wild type strain confirmed the sensitive phenotype. Conclusion The reporter strain MO10 pG13 was successfully used for the identification of new antibacterial compounds against V. cholerae. Generation of resistant mutants and whole genome sequencing was carried out to identify the histidine kinase KdpD as a novel antimicrobial target. PMID:24568688

2014-01-01

378

Evaluation of a new chromogenic medium, chromID™ Vibrio, for the isolation and presumptive identification of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus from human clinical specimens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the chromID™ Vibrio medium for the detection of Vibrio cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus in stool and swab specimens in comparison with thiosulfate citrate bile salts sucrose (TCBS) medium. A total of 96 samples\\u000a including 30 fresh stool, 32 stool, and 34 swab specimens originating from routine laboratories were tested.

R. Eddabra; Y. Piemont; J. M. Scheftel

2011-01-01

379

Vibrio parahaemolyticus strengthens their virulence through modulation of cellular reactive oxygen species in vitro  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is one of the emergent food-borne pathogens that are commensally associated with various shellfish species throughout the world. It is strictly environmental and many strains are pathogenic to humans. The virulent strains cause distinct diseases, including wound infections, septicemia, and most commonly, acute gastroenteritis, which is acquired through the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood, especially shellfish. Vp has two type three secretion systems (T3SSs), which triggering its cytotoxicity and enterotoxicity via their effectors. To better understand the pathogenesis of Vp, we established a cell infection model in vitro using a non-phagocytic cell line. Caco-2 cells were infected with different strains of Vp (pandemic and non-pandemic strains) and several parameters of cytotoxicity were measured together with adhesion and invasion indices, which reflect the pathogen's virulence. Our results show that Vp adheres to cell monolayers and can invade non-phagocytic cells. It also survives and persists in non-phagocytic cells by modulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), allowing its replication, and resulting in complete cellular destruction. We conclude that the pathogenicity of Vp is based on its capacities for adhesion and invasion. Surprisingly's; enhanced of ROS resistance period could promote the survival of Vp inside the intestinal tract, facilitating tissue infection by repressing the host's oxidative stress response. PMID:25566508

El-Malah, Shimaa S.; Yang, Zhenquan; Hu, Maozhi; Li, Qiuchun; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

2014-01-01

380

The function of integron-associated gene cassettes in Vibrio species: the tip of the iceberg  

PubMed Central

The integron is a genetic element that incorporates mobile genes termed gene cassettes into a reserved genetic site via site-specific recombination. It is best known for its role in antibiotic resistance with one type of integron, the class 1 integron, a major player in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes across Gram negative pathogens and commensals. However, integrons are ancient structures with over 100 classes (including class 1) present in bacteria from the broader environment. While, the class 1 integron is only one example of an integron being mobilized into the clinical environment, it is by far the most successful. Unlike clinical class 1 integrons which are largely found on plasmids, other integron classes are found on the chromosomes of bacteria and carry diverse gene cassettes indicating a non-antibiotic resistance role(s). However, there is very limited knowledge on what these alternative roles are. This is particularly relevant to Vibrio species where gene cassettes make up approximately 1–3% of their entire genome. In this review, we discuss how emphasis on class 1 integron research has resulted in a limited understanding by the wider research community on the role of integrons in the broader environment. This has the capacity to be counterproductive in solving or improving the antibiotic resistance problem into the future. Furthermore, there is still a significant lack of knowledge on how gene cassettes in Vibrio species drive adaptation and evolution. From research in Vibrio rotiferianus DAT722, new insight into how gene cassettes affect cellular physiology offers new alternative roles for the gene cassette resource. At least a subset of gene cassettes are involved in host surface polysaccharide modification suggesting that gene cassettes may be important in processes such as bacteriophage resistance, adhesion/biofilm formation, protection from grazers and bacterial aggregation. PMID:24367362

Rapa, Rita A.; Labbate, Maurizio

2013-01-01

381

The Effects of Storage Temperature on the Growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Organoleptic Properties in Oysters  

PubMed Central

During harvesting and storage, microbial pathogens and natural spoilage flora may grow, negatively affecting the composition and texture of oysters and posing a potential health threat to susceptible consumers. A solution to these problems would mitigate associated damaging effects on the seafood industry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of storage temperature on growth of vibrios as well as other microbial, sensory, and textural characteristics of post-harvest shellstock Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). Oysters harvested from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, during summer months (June, July, and August, 2010) were subjected to three storage temperatures (5, 10, and 20°C) over a 10-day period. At selected time intervals (0, 1, 3, 7, and 10?days), two separate samples of six oysters each were homogenated and analyzed for pH, halophilic plate counts (HPC), total vibrios, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp). Oyster meats shucked after storage were also organoleptically evaluated (acceptability, appearance, and odor). Texture analysis was performed using a texture analyzer on meats shucked from oysters held under the same conditions. The pH of the oyster homogenates showed no consistent pattern with storage time and temperature. The HPC (4.5–9.4?log?CFU/g) were highest on day 7 at 20°C while olfactory acceptance reduced with time and increasing storage temperatures. The Vp counts increased over time from 3.5 to 7.5?log MPN/g by day 10. Loss of freshness as judged by appearance and odor was significant over time (p?

Mudoh, Meshack Fon; Parveen, Salina; Schwarz, Jurgen; Rippen, Tom; Chaudhuri, Anish

2014-01-01

382

The Effects of Storage Temperature on the Growth of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Organoleptic Properties in Oysters.  

PubMed

During harvesting and storage, microbial pathogens and natural spoilage flora may grow, negatively affecting the composition and texture of oysters and posing a potential health threat to susceptible consumers. A solution to these problems would mitigate associated damaging effects on the seafood industry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of storage temperature on growth of vibrios as well as other microbial, sensory, and textural characteristics of post-harvest shellstock Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). Oysters harvested from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, during summer months (June, July, and August, 2010) were subjected to three storage temperatures (5, 10, and 20°C) over a 10-day period. At selected time intervals (0, 1, 3, 7, and 10?days), two separate samples of six oysters each were homogenated and analyzed for pH, halophilic plate counts (HPC), total vibrios, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp). Oyster meats shucked after storage were also organoleptically evaluated (acceptability, appearance, and odor). Texture analysis was performed using a texture analyzer on meats shucked from oysters held under the same conditions. The pH of the oyster homogenates showed no consistent pattern with storage time and temperature. The HPC (4.5-9.4?log?CFU/g) were highest on day 7 at 20°C while olfactory acceptance reduced with time and increasing storage temperatures. The Vp counts increased over time from 3.5 to 7.5?log MPN/g by day 10. Loss of freshness as judged by appearance and odor was significant over time (p?

Mudoh, Meshack Fon; Parveen, Salina; Schwarz, Jurgen; Rippen, Tom; Chaudhuri, Anish

2014-01-01

383

Uncertainty in model predictions of Vibrio vulnificus response to climate variability and change: a Chesapeake Bay case study.  

PubMed

The effect that climate change and variability will have on waterborne bacteria is a topic of increasing concern for coastal ecosystems, including the Chesapeake Bay. Surface water temperature trends in the Bay indicate a warming pattern of roughly 0.3-0.4°C per decade over the past 30 years. It is unclear what impact future warming will have on pathogens currently found in the Bay, including Vibrio spp. Using historical environmental data, combined with three different statistical models of Vibrio vulnificus probability, we explore the relationship between environmental change and predicted Vibrio vulnificus presence in the upper Chesapeake Bay. We find that the predicted response of V. vulnificus probability to high temperatures in the Bay differs systematically between models of differing structure. As existing publicly available datasets are inadequate to determine which model structure is most appropriate, the impact of climatic change on the probability of V. vulnificus presence in the Chesapeake Bay remains uncertain. This result points to the challenge of characterizing climate sensitivity of ecological systems in which data are sparse and only statistical models of ecological sensitivity exist. PMID:24874082

Urquhart, Erin A; Zaitchik, Benjamin F; Waugh, Darryn W; Guikema, Seth D; Del Castillo, Carlos E

2014-01-01

384

Uncertainty in Model Predictions of Vibrio vulnificus Response to Climate Variability and Change: A Chesapeake Bay Case Study  

PubMed Central

The effect that climate change and variability will have on waterborne bacteria is a topic of increasing concern for coastal ecosystems, including the Chesapeake Bay. Surface water temperature trends in the Bay indicate a warming pattern of roughly 0.3–0.4°C per decade over the past 30 years. It is unclear what impact future warming will have on pathogens currently found in the Bay, including Vibrio spp. Using historical environmental data, combined with three different statistical models of Vibrio vulnificus probability, we explore the relationship between environmental change and predicted Vibrio vulnificus presence in the upper Chesapeake Bay. We find that the predicted response of V. vulnificus probability to high temperatures in the Bay differs systematically between models of differing structure. As existing publicly available datasets are inadequate to determine which model structure is most appropriate, the impact of climatic change on the probability of V. vulnificus presence in the Chesapeake Bay remains uncertain. This result points to the challenge of characterizing climate sensitivity of ecological systems in which data are sparse and only statistical models of ecological sensitivity exist. PMID:24874082

Urquhart, Erin A.; Zaitchik, Benjamin F.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Guikema, Seth D.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.

2014-01-01

385

Low-resolution structure determination of Na(+)-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae by ab initio phasing and electron microscopy.  

PubMed

A low-resolution structure of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae was determined by ab initio phasing and independently confirmed by electron microscopy. This multi-subunit membrane-protein complex (molecular weight 210 kDa) generates an Na(+) gradient that is essential for substrate uptake, motility, pathogenicity and efflux of antibiotics. The obtained 16 Å resolution electron density-map revealed an asymmetric particle with a central region of low electron density and a putative detergent region, and allowed the identification of the transmembrane regions of the complex. PMID:22683795

Lunin, Vladimir Y; Lunina, Natalia L; Casutt, Marco S; Knoops, Kèvin; Schaffitzel, Christiane; Steuber, Julia; Fritz, Günter; Baumstark, Manfred W

2012-06-01

386

Hepcidin-Induced Hypoferremia Is a Critical Host Defense Mechanism against the Siderophilic Bacterium Vibrio vulnificus.  

PubMed

Hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disease caused by a deficiency in the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin, is associated with lethal infections by siderophilic bacteria. To elucidate the mechanisms of this susceptibility, we infected wild-type and hepcidin-deficient mice with the siderophilic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus and found that hepcidin deficiency results in increased bacteremia and decreased survival of infected mice, which can be partially ameliorated by dietary iron depletion. Additionally, timely administration of hepcidin agonists to hepcidin-deficient mice induces hypoferremia that decreases bacterial loads and rescues these mice from death, regardless of initial iron levels. Studies of Vibrio vulnificus growth ex vivo show that high iron sera from hepcidin-deficient mice support extraordinarily rapid bacterial growth and that this is inhibited in hypoferremic sera. Our findings demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated hypoferremia is a host defense mechanism against siderophilic pathogens and suggest that hepcidin agonists may improve infection outcomes in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis or thalassemia. PMID:25590758

Arezes, João; Jung, Grace; Gabayan, Victoria; Valore, Erika; Ruchala, Piotr; Gulig, Paul A; Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Bulut, Yonca

2015-01-14

387

Interspecific Quorum Sensing Mediates the Resuscitation of Viable but Nonculturable Vibrios  

PubMed Central

Entry and exit from dormancy are essential survival mechanisms utilized by microorganisms to cope with harsh environments. Many bacteria, including the opportunistic human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus, enter a form of dormancy known as the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. VBNC cells can resuscitate when suitable conditions arise, yet the molecular mechanisms facilitating resuscitation in most bacteria are not well understood. We discovered that bacterial cell-free supernatants (CFS) can awaken preexisting dormant vibrio populations within oysters and seawater, while CFS from a quorum sensing mutant was unable to produce the same resuscitative effect. Furthermore, the quorum sensing autoinducer AI-2 could induce resuscitation of VBNC V. vulnificus in vitro, and VBNC cells of a mutant unable to produce AI-2 were unable to resuscitate unless the cultures were supplemented with exogenous AI-2. The quorum sensing inhibitor cinnamaldehyde delayed the resuscitation of wild-type VBNC cells, confirming the importance of quorum sensing in resuscitation. By monitoring AI-2 production by VBNC cultures over time, we found quorum sensing signaling to be critical for the natural resuscitation process. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms stimulating VBNC cell exit from dormancy, which has significant implications for microbial ecology and public health. PMID:24509922

Ayrapetyan, Mesrop; Williams, Tiffany C.

2014-01-01

388

Cloning, expressing, and hemolysis of tdh, trh and tlh genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VP) is one of the pathogenic vibrios endangering net-cage cultured Pseudosciaena crocea, Fennerpenaeus chinensis, and shellfish in coastal areas of China. Several types of hemolysins produced by Vp have been characterized as major virulence factors. They are thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and thermolabile hemolysin (TLH). In this study, we cloned tdh, trh, and tlh genes from the genome DNA of VP by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We ligated the three genes into prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a (+), and transformed the recombinant plasmids into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The expression of recombinant proteins was induced by isopropyl-?-D-thiogalacto-pyranoside (IPTG). The recombinant proteins were expressed in a form of inclusion bodies and thus purified with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Western blotting results showed that recombinant proteins, TDH, TRH and TLH, could be recognized by rabbit anti-VP serum. The three purified proteins were renatured by gradient dialysis. The renatured proteins exhibited hemolytic activity except for TLH in the presence of phosphatidylcholine. These results not only are helpful for better understanding these genes' functions under a single factor level, but also provide evidence for VP vaccine engineering.

Zhao, Yonggang; Tang, Xiaoqian; Zhan, Wenbin

2011-09-01

389

Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae  

SciTech Connect

The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod (Guelph); (NIH); (UCSD)

2008-07-15

390

Transcript changes in Vibrio cholerae in response to salt stress.  

PubMed

Vibrio cholerae, which is a serious human intestinal pathogen, often resides and thrives in estuaries but requires major self-regulation to overcome intestinal hyperosmotic stress or high salt stress in water and food. In the present study, we selected multiple O1 and O139 group V. cholerae strains that were isolated from different regions and during different years to study their salt tolerance. Based on the mechanisms that other bacteria use to respond to high salt stress, we selected salt stress-response related genes to study the mechanisms which V. cholerae responds to high salt stress. V. cholerae strains showed salt-resistance characteristics that varied in salt concentrations from 4% to 6%. However, group O1 and group O139 showed no significant difference in the degree of salt tolerance. The primary responses of bacteria to salt stress, including Na(+) exclusion, K(+) uptake and glutamate biosynthesis, were observed in V. cholerae strains. In addition, some sigma factors were up-regulated in V. cholerae strains, suggesting that V. cholerae may recruit common sigma factors to achieve an active salt stress response. However, some changes in gene transcript levels in response to salt stress in V. cholerae were strain-specific. In particular, hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes indicated that transcript levels of these genes were correlated with the degree of salt tolerance. Therefore, elevated transcript levels of some genes, including sigma factors and genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, may be due to the salt tolerance of strains. In addition, high salt-tolerant strains may recruit common as well as additional sigma factors to activate the salt stress response. PMID:25589902

Fu, Xiuping; Liang, Weili; Du, Pengcheng; Yan, Meiying; Kan, Biao

2014-01-01

391

Mechanistic insights into filamentous phage integration in Vibrio cholerae.  

PubMed

Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif) of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5'-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5'-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the vibriophages. PMID:25506341

Das, Bhabatosh

2014-01-01

392

Mechanistic insights into filamentous phage integration in Vibrio cholerae  

PubMed Central

Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif) of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5?-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5?-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the vibriophages. PMID:25506341

Das, Bhabatosh

2014-01-01

393

21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte (salts) depletion, and by vomiting,...

2011-04-01

394

21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte (salts) depletion, and by vomiting,...

2013-04-01

395

21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.  

...caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte (salts) depletion, and by vomiting,...

2014-04-01

396

21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte (salts) depletion, and by vomiting,...

2010-04-01

397

21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte (salts) depletion, and by vomiting,...

2012-04-01

398

Selection and identification of a DNA aptamer targeted to Vibrio parahemolyticus.  

PubMed

A whole-bacterium systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method was applied to a combinatorial library of FAM-labeled single-stranded DNA molecules to identify DNA aptamers demonstrating specific binding to Vibrio parahemolyticus . FAM-labeled aptamer sequences with high binding affinity to V. parahemolyticus were identified by flow cytometric analysis. Aptamer A3P, which showed a particularly high binding affinity in preliminary studies, was chosen for further characterization. This aptamer displayed a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 16.88 ± 1.92 nM. Binding assays to assess the specificity of aptamer A3P showed a high binding affinity (76%) for V. parahemolyticus and a low apparent binding affinity (4%) for other bacteria. Whole-bacterium SELEX is a promising technique for the design of aptamer-based molecular probes for microbial pathogens that does not require the labor-intensive steps of isolating and purifying complex markers or targets. PMID:22480209

Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun; Wang, Zhouping

2012-04-25

399

Bacterial evolution. The type VI secretion system of Vibrio cholerae fosters horizontal gene transfer.  

PubMed

Natural competence for transformation is a common mode of horizontal gene transfer and contributes to bacterial evolution. Transformation occurs through the uptake of external DNA and its integration into the genome. Here we show that the type VI secretion system (T6SS), which serves as a predatory killing device, is part of the competence regulon in the naturally transformable pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The T6SS-encoding gene cluster is under the positive control of the competence regulators TfoX and QstR and is induced by growth on chitinous surfaces. Live-cell imaging revealed that deliberate killing of nonimmune cells via competence-mediated induction of T6SS releases DNA and makes it accessible for horizontal gene transfer in V. cholerae. PMID:25554784

Borgeaud, Sandrine; Metzger, Lisa C; Scrignari, Tiziana; Blokesch, Melanie

2015-01-01

400

Association of CRISPR/Cas Evolution with Vibrio parahaemolyticus Virulence Factors and Genotypes.  

PubMed

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), which is considered to be an immune system for bacteria, has been widely used as a tool for genome editing and genotyping. It has also been reported to be associated with virulence factors in some bacteria. To understand the role of CRISPR in the virulence and evolution of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 154 V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from clinical samples and 54 strains from food samples taken in Shenzhen, China were subjected to a correlation analysis of CRISPR and virulence factors TDH and TRH. We also performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for genotype analysis. Six different CRISPR sequence types (CSTs) of V. parahaemolyticus were identified, and CSTs were found to be significantly associated with the virulence factors tested and MLST genotype. Therefore, CSTs provide insight into the evolution of V. parahaemolyticus. Moreover, identification of CSTs may lend insight into the virulence potential of strains. PMID:25455966

Sun, Honghu; Li, Yinghui; Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Zhang, Jinjin; Liu, Yao; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Qiongcheng; Sun, Qun; Hu, Qinghua

2015-01-01

401

H-NS is a repressor of major virulence gene loci in Vibrio parahaemolyticus  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a leading cause of seafood-associated diarrhea and gastroenteritis, harbors three major virulence gene loci T3SS1, Vp-PAI (T3SS1+tdh2) and T6SS2. As showing in this study, the nucleoid-associated DNA-binding regulator H-NS binds to multiple promoter-proximal regions in each of the above three loci to repress their transcription, and moreover H-NS inhibits the cytotoxicitiy, enterotoxicity, hemolytic activity, and mouse lethality of V. parahaemolyticus. H-NS appears to act as a major repressor of the virulence of this pathogen. Date presented here would promote us to gain a deeper understanding of H-NS-mediated silencing of horizontally acquired virulence loci in V. parahaemolyticus.

Sun, Fengjun; Zhang, Yiquan; Qiu, Yefeng; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Yin, Zhe; Wang, Jie; Yang, Ruifu; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng

2014-01-01

402

Natural transformation of a marine Vibrio species by plasmid DNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio sp. DI9, recently isolated from Tampa Bay, FL, has been found to be naturally transformed by the broad host range plasmid pKT230 in both filter transformation assays and sterile sediment microcosms. This is the first report of natural transformation by plasmid DNA of aVibrio sp. and of a marine bacterial isolate. Transformation frequencies ranged from 0.3 to 3.1×10?8 transformants

Wade H. Jeffrey; John H. Paul; Gregory J. Stewart

1990-01-01

403

Diversity and Genetic Basis of Polysaccharide Biosynthesis in Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Vibrio cholerae elaborates three types of polysaccharide structures: lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of which is the O-polysaccharide\\u000a or O-antigen, capsular polysaccharide (CPS) or K-antigen, and “rugose” polysaccharide also known as exopolysaccharide (EPS)\\u000a or Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS). The major protective antigen for V. cholerae is the O-antigen. A strain typing scheme based on the somatic O-antigen has been in use for

Shanmuga Sozhamannan; Fitnat H. Yildiz

404

Quorum Sensing-Dependent Biofilms Enhance Colonization in Vibrio cholerae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. By an incompletely understood developmental process, V. cholerae forms complex surface-associated communities called biofilms. Here we show that quorum sensing-deficient mutants of V. cholerae produce thicker biofilms than those formed by wild-type bacteria. Microarray analysis of biofilm-associated bacteria shows that expression of the Vibrio polysaccharide synthesis (vps) operons is

Jun Zhu; John J. Mekalanos

2003-01-01

405

Transcriptome analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in type III secretion system 1 inducing conditions  

PubMed Central

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging bacterial pathogen capable of causing inflammatory gastroenteritis, wound infections, and septicemia. As a food-borne illness, infection is most frequently associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood, particularly shellfish. It is the primary cause of Vibrio-associated food-borne illness in the United States and the leading cause of food-borne illness in Japan. The larger of its two chromosomes harbors a set of genes encoding type III section system 1 (T3SS1), a virulence factor present in all V. parahaemolyticus strains that is similar to the Yersinia ysc T3SS. T3SS1 translocates effector proteins into eukaryotic cells where they induce changes to cellular physiology and modulate host-pathogen interactions. T3SS1 is also responsible for cytotoxicity toward several different cultured cell lines as well as mortality in a mouse model. Herein we used RNA-seq to obtain global transcriptome patterns of V. parahaemolyticus under conditions that either induce [growth in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) media, in trans expression of transcriptional regulator exsA] or repress T3SS1 expression (growth in LB-S media, in trans exsD expression) and during infection of HeLa cells over time. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated notable differences in the expression patterns under inducing conditions and was also used to generate an expression profile of V. parahaemolyticus during infection of HeLa cells. In addition, we identified several new genes that are associated with T3SS1 expression and may warrant further study. PMID:24478989

Nydam, Seth D.; Shah, Devendra H.; Call, Douglas R.

2014-01-01

406

Identification of a novel vaccine candidate by immunogenic screening of Vibrio parahaemolyticus outer membrane proteins.  

PubMed

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important halophilous pathogen that can cause not only a broad range of disease in aquatic animals but also serious seafood-borne illness in humans as a result of the consumption of seafood. To avoid the use of antibiotics, it is critical to identify protective antigens for developing highly effective vaccines against this pathogen. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) have been suggested as potential vaccine candidates for conferring protection against infection. In this study, we identified novel immunogenic OMPs using an immune assay with serum antibodies from mice infected by V. parahaemolyticus combined with mass spectrometry analysis. Nine OMPs were identified to be immunogenic proteins, and four of these identified proteins with relatively low abundance in OMP profiles, LptD, VP0802, VP1243 and VP0966, were determined to have immunogenicity for the first time. One OMP of interest, VP0802, is highly conserved among major Vibrio species and was proposed to adopt a ?-barrel conformation and to be a member of the OprD protein family by bioinformatic analysis. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of VP0802 were further evaluated by bacterial challenge postimmunization in a mouse model. VP0802 was confirmed to be highly immunogenic and to offer strong protection against V. parahaemolyticus infection, with an RPS of at least 66.7. Efficient clearance of bacteria from the blood of vaccinated mice was also observed. Moreover, upregulation of VP0802 expression was found after bacteria were exposed to fresh sera. These data, taken together, suggest that VP0802 is a promising candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine to prevent V. parahaemolyticus infection. PMID:25236587

Li, Chuchu; Ye, Zhicang; Wen, Liangyou; Chen, Ran; Tian, Lihua; Zhao, Fukun; Pan, Jianyi

2014-10-21

407

A universal protocol for PCR detection of 13 species of foodborne pathogens in foods.  

PubMed

A universal protocol for PCR detection of 13 species of foodborne pathogens in foods was developed. The protocol used a universal culture medium and the same PCR conditions with 13 sets of specific primers. The 13 species of foodborne pathogens examined were Escherichia coli, E. coli-ETEC, E. coli-O157:H7, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. No interference was observed using the PCR assay when food sample was artificially inoculated with each individual bacterial species. Twelve different seafood samples and two soft cheese samples without artificial inoculation were examined by this protocol. Vibrio vulnificus, Salmonella spp., E. coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus cereus were detected in some foods. Internal probe hybridization and nested PCR procedures were used to confirm the above findings. PMID:9449811

Wang, R F; Cao, W W; Cerniglia, C E

1997-12-01

408

Antibacterial activity of silver and zinc nanoparticles against Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain two dominant bacterial causes of severe secretory diarrhea and still a significant cause of death, especially in developing countries. In order to investigate new effective and inexpensive therapeutic approaches, we analyzed nanoparticles synthesized by a green approach using corresponding salt (silver or zinc nitrate) with aqueous extract of Caltropis procera fruit or leaves. We characterized the quantity and quality of nanoparticles by UV–visible wavelength scans and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Nanoparticles could be synthesized in reproducible yields of approximately 108 particles/ml with mode particles sizes of approx. 90–100 nm. Antibacterial activity against two pathogens was assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration assays and survival curves. Both pathogens exhibited similar resistance profiles with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging between 5 × 105 and 107 particles/ml. Interestingly, zinc nanoparticles showed a slightly higher efficacy, but sublethal concentrations caused adverse effects and resulted in increased biofilm formation of V. cholerae. Using the expression levels of the outer membrane porin OmpT as an indicator for cAMP levels, our results suggest that zinc nanoparticles inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. This consequently deceases the levels of this second messenger, which is a known inhibitor of biofilm formation. Finally, we demonstrated that a single oral administration of silver nanoparticles to infant mice colonized with V. cholerae or ETEC significantly reduces the colonization rates of the pathogens by 75- or 100-fold, respectively. PMID:25466205

Salem, Wesam; Leitner, Deborah R.; Zingl, Franz G.; Schratter, Gebhart; Prassl, Ruth; Goessler, Walter; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

2015-01-01

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Antibacterial activity of silver and zinc nanoparticles against Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain two dominant bacterial causes of severe secretory diarrhea and still a significant cause of death, especially in developing countries. In order to investigate new effective and inexpensive therapeutic approaches, we analyzed nanoparticles synthesized by a green approach using corresponding salt (silver or zinc nitrate) with aqueous extract of Caltropis procera fruit or leaves. We characterized the quantity and quality of nanoparticles by UV-visible wavelength scans and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Nanoparticles could be synthesized in reproducible yields of approximately 10(8)particles/ml with mode particles sizes of approx. 90-100nm. Antibacterial activity against two pathogens was assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration assays and survival curves. Both pathogens exhibited similar resistance profiles with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging between 5×10(5) and 10(7)particles/ml. Interestingly, zinc nanoparticles showed a slightly higher efficacy, but sublethal concentrations caused adverse effects and resulted in increased biofilm formation of V. cholerae. Using the expression levels of the outer membrane porin OmpT as an indicator for cAMP levels, our results suggest that zinc nanoparticles inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. This consequently deceases the levels of this second messenger, which is a known inhibitor of biofilm formation. Finally, we demonstrated that a single oral administration of silver nanoparticles to infant mice colonized with V. cholerae or ETEC significantly reduces the colonization rates of the pathogens by 75- or 100-fold, respectively. PMID:25466205

Salem, Wesam; Leitner, Deborah R; Zingl, Franz G; Schratter, Gebhart; Prassl, Ruth; Goessler, Walter; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan