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Sample records for pathogen vibrio harveyi

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Opportunistic Marine Pathogen Vibrio harveyi Strain E385.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingjia; Ren, Chunhua; Qiu, Jinrong; Luo, Peng; Zhu, Ruyi; Zhao, Zhe; Hu, Chaoqun

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi strain E385 was isolated from a diseased cage-cultured grouper in Daya Bay, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed similarity with V. harveyi strain BAA-1116. We sequenced the pathogenic strain V. harveyi E385 and compared the genome with that of the nonpathogenic strain V. harveyi BAA-1116. PMID:24336361

  2. Effect of organic acids on shrimp pathogen, Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Mine, Saori; Boopathy, Raj

    2011-07-01

    Shrimp farming accounts for more than 40% of the world shrimp production. Luminous vibriosis is a shrimp disease that causes major economic losses in the shrimp industry as a result of massive shrimp kills due to infection. Some farms in the South Asia use antibiotics to control Vibrio harveyi, a responsible pathogen for luminous vibriosis. However, the antibiotic-resistant strain was found recently in many shrimp farms, which makes it necessary to develop alternative pathogen control methods. Short-chain fatty acids are metabolic products of organisms, and they have been used as food preservatives for a long time. Organic acids are also commonly added in feeds in animal husbandry, but not in aquaculture. In this study, growth inhibitory effects of short-chain fatty acids, namely formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid, on V. harveyi were investigated. Among four acids, formic acid showed the strongest inhibitory effect followed by acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.035% formic acid suppressed growth of V. harveyi. The major inhibitory mechanism seems to be the pH effect of organic acids. The effective concentration 50 (EC50) values at 96 h inoculation for all organic acids were determined to be 0.023, 0.041, 0.03, and 0.066% for formic, acetic, propionic, and butyric acid, respectively. The laboratory study results are encouraging to formulate shrimp feeds with organic acids to control vibrio infection in shrimp aquaculture farms. PMID:21479932

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of the Fish Pathogen Vibrio harveyi Strains VH2 and VH5

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Daniel; D’Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang; Kalatzis, Panos G.; Kokkari, Constantina

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is an important marine pathogen that is responsible for vibriosis outbreaks in cultured fish and invertebrates worldwide. Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of V. harveyi strains VH2 and VH5, isolated from farmed juvenile Seriola dumerili during outbreaks of vibriosis in Crete, Greece. PMID:26383670

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of the Fish Pathogen Vibrio harveyi Strains VH2 and VH5.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; D'Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang; Kalatzis, Panos G; Kokkari, Constantina; Katharios, Pantelis

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is an important marine pathogen that is responsible for vibriosis outbreaks in cultured fish and invertebrates worldwide. Here, we announce the draft genome sequences of V. harveyi strains VH2 and VH5, isolated from farmed juvenile Seriola dumerili during outbreaks of vibriosis in Crete, Greece. PMID:26383670

  5. Unique and conserved genome regions in Vibrio harveyi and related species in comparison with the shrimp pathogen Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Valles, Iliana; Vora, Gary J; Lin, Baochuan; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; González-Castillo, Adrián; Ussery, Dave; Høj, Lone; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio harveyi CAIM 1792 is a marine bacterial strain that causes mortality in farmed shrimp in north-west Mexico, and the identification of virulence genes in this strain is important for understanding its pathogenicity. The aim of this work was to compare the V. harveyi CAIM 1792 genome with related genome sequences to determine their phylogenic relationship and explore unique regions in silico that differentiate this strain from other V. harveyi strains. Twenty-one newly sequenced genomes were compared in silico against the CAIM 1792 genome at nucleotidic and predicted proteome levels. The proteome of CAIM 1792 had higher similarity to those of other V. harveyi strains (78%) than to those of the other closely related species Vibrio owensii (67%), Vibrio rotiferianus (63%) and Vibrio campbellii (59%). Pan-genome ORFans trees showed the best fit with the accepted phylogeny based on DNA-DNA hybridization and multi-locus sequence analysis of 11 concatenated housekeeping genes. SNP analysis clustered 34/38 genomes within their accepted species. The pangenomic and SNP trees showed that V. harveyi is the most conserved of the four species studied and V. campbellii may be divided into at least three subspecies, supported by intergenomic distance analysis. blastp atlases were created to identify unique regions among the genomes most related to V. harveyi CAIM 1792; these regions included genes encoding glycosyltransferases, specific type restriction modification systems and a transcriptional regulator, LysR, reported to be involved in virulence, metabolism, quorum sensing and motility. PMID:26198743

  6. Sigma E Regulators Control Hemolytic Activity and Virulence in a Shrimp Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Rattanama, Pimonsri; Thompson, Janelle R.; Kongkerd, Natthawan; Srinitiwarawong, Kanchana; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Mekalanos, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the genus Vibrio are important marine and aquaculture pathogens. Hemolytic activity has been identified as a virulence factor in many pathogenic vibrios including V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi and V. vulnificus. We have used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the hemolytic activity of shrimp-pathogenic V. harveyi strain PSU3316. Out of 1,764 mutants screened, five mutants showed reduced hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar and exhibited virulence attenuation in shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). Mutants were identified by comparing transposon junction sequences to a draft of assembly of the PSU3316 genome. Surprisingly none of the disrupted open reading frames or gene neighborhoods contained genes annotated as hemolysins. The gene encoding RseB, a negative regulator of the sigma factor (σE), was interrupted in 2 out of 5 transposon mutants, in addition, the transcription factor CytR, a threonine synthetase, and an efflux-associated cytoplasmic protein were also identified. Knockout mutations introduced into the rpoE operon at the rseB gene exhibited low hemolytic activity in sheep blood agar, and were 3-to 7-fold attenuated for colonization in shrimp. Comparison of whole cell extracted proteins in the rseB mutant (PSU4030) to the wild-type by 2-D gel electrophoresis revealed 6 differentially expressed proteins, including two down-regulated porins (OmpC-like and OmpN) and an upregulated protease (DegQ) which have been associated with σE in other organisms. Our study is the first report linking hemolytic activity to the σE regulators in pathogenic Vibrio species and suggests expression of this virulence-linked phenotype is governed by multiple regulatory pathways within the V. harveyi. PMID:22384269

  7. Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, in contrast to non-pathogenic strains, intervenes with the p38 MAPK pathway to avoid an abalone haemocyte immune response.

    PubMed

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Friedman, Carolyn S; Buzin, Florence; Cougard, Bertrand; Huchette, Sylvain; Koken, Marcel; Paillard, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a marine bacterial pathogen responsible for episodic abalone epidemics associated with massive mortalities in France, Japan, and Australia. The aim of this study was the understanding of a possible role of the p38 MAPK in abalone haemocyte responses towards this bacterium. First, the pathogenicity of different V. harveyi strains was compared in both immersion and injection trials, and clear differences were detected. The three strains, ORM4, 04/092, and 05/053, all isolated from moribund abalone, induced up to 80% mortalities in immersion or injection challenges (LD(50) (ORM4) = 2.5 x 10(2) CFU animal(-1)). The two strains, LMG 4044T and LMG 7890 were non-pathogenic towards abalone in immersion trials, and needed very high numbers for killing by intramuscular injections (LD(50) = 8.9 x 10(4) and 1.6 x 10(5) CFU animal(-1), respectively). To start unraveling the mechanism explaining these differences, the p38-MAPK, a keyplayer in antimicrobial immune response, was studied. The non-pathogenic strain, LMG 7890 can be eliminated by abalone haemocytes and induces haemocyte phagocytosis and high ROS production. With different concentrations of a p38-specific inhibitor, SB203580, p38 implication was shown. This inhibitor reduced phagocytosis and ROS induction leading to LMG 7890 proliferation. In the case of the pathogenic ORM4 which can not be eliminated by abalone haemocytes, no phagocytosis and ROS production was induced, and a retarded p38 activation was observed. Taken together, our results suggest that p38 MAPK modulation may be one of the ways of virulent V. harveyi to attack its host and escape abalone immune response. PMID:19058134

  8. Simulated hatchery system to assess bacteriophage efficacy against Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Raghu Patil, J; Desai, Srividya Narayanamurthy; Roy, Panchali; Durgaiah, Murali; Saravanan, R Sanjeev; Vipra, Aradhana

    2014-12-01

    Vibriosis caused by luminous Vibrio harveyi commonly contributes to poor survival in shrimp hatcheries and aquaculture ponds. Lytic bacteriophages pathogenic for V. harveyi are currently being investigated as an alternative to antibiotics to prevent vibriosis. Here, 8 bacteriophages were isolated from oysters and clams using V. harveyi strains as baiting hosts. Among these bacteriophages, 1 strain (VHP6b) identified as broadly pathogenic for 27 V. harveyi strains examined was further characterized by electron microscopy and genome sequence analysis. Phage VHP6b possessed a tail and morphology consistent with it being a member of the family Siphoviridae, and its genome and proteome were most closely related to the Vibrio phages SSP02 and MAR10. An integrase gene essential for lysogeny was not evident. The ability of bacteriophage VHP6b to protect shrimp postlarvae against vibriosis caused by V. harveyi strain VH6 was demonstrated in a model system designed to simulate typical hatchery conditions. Bacteriophage treatment improved survival of postlarvae by 40 to 60% under these conditions, so therapies based on this or other bacteriophages may be useful in shrimp hatcheries. PMID:25449322

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine ?-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV])

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W. Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine ?-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]). PMID:25635019

  11. Vibrio lentus protects gnotobiotic sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) larvae against challenge with Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Schaeck, M; Duchateau, L; Van den Broeck, W; Van Trappen, S; De Vos, P; Coulombet, C; Boon, N; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2016-03-15

    Due to the mounting awareness of the risks associated with the use of antibiotics in aquaculture, treatment with probiotics has recently emerged as the preferred environmental-friendly prophylactic approach in marine larviculture. However, the presence of unknown and variable microbiota in fish larvae makes it impossible to disentangle the efficacy of treatment with probiotics. In this respect, the recent development of a germ-free culture model for European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) larvae opened the door for more controlled studies on the use of probiotics. In the present study, 206 bacterial isolates, retrieved from sea bass larvae and adults, were screened in vitro for haemolytic activity, bile tolerance and antagonistic activity against six sea bass pathogens. Subsequently, the harmlessness and the protective effect of the putative probiotic candidates against the sea bass pathogen Vibrio harveyi were evaluated in vivo adopting the previously developed germ-free sea bass larval model. An equivalence trial clearly showed that no harmful effect on larval survival was elicited by all three selected probiotic candidates: Bacillus sp. LT3, Vibrio lentus and Vibrio proteolyticus. Survival of Vibrio harveyi challenged larvae treated with V. lentus was superior in comparison with the untreated challenged group, whereas this was not the case for the larvae supplemented with Bacillus sp. LT3 and V. proteolyticus. In this respect, our results unmistakably revealed the protective effect of V. lentus against vibriosis caused by V. harveyi in gnotobiotic sea bass larvae, rendering this study the first in its kind. PMID:26931390

  12. Production of monoclonal antibodies for detection of Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Phianphak, Wannipa; Rengpipat, Sirirat; Rukpratanporn, Sombat; Longyant, Siwaporn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin; Sithigorngul, Weerawan; Sithigorngul, Paisarn

    2005-02-28

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Vibrio harveyi were produced from mice immunized with heat-killed and SDS-mercaptoethanol-treated highly virulent V. harveyi 639. Fifteen MAbs were selected and sorted into 6 groups according to their specificity to various proteins of apparent molecular weight ranging from 8 to 49 kDa. Some antibodies were used for detection of V. harveyi at concentrations as low as 10(4) CFU ml(-1) using immunodot blots. Most of the selected MAbs did not show cross-reactivity to other Vibrio species and other gram-negative bacteria tested. Only 1 MAb (VH39-4E) showed slight cross-reactivity to Aeromonas hydrophila. Another MAb (VH24-8H) bound lightly to V. harveyi 1526 but strongly to V. harveyi 639, allowing rapid differentiation. Two of the MAb groups were used to localize V. harveyi in tissues of infected black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon by immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates the versatility of a highly specific immunological tool for the detection of V. harveyi in aquaculture and opens the way for further development of convenient test kits. PMID:15819431

  13. Vibrio harveyi as a causative agent of the White Syndrome in tropical stony corals.

    PubMed

    Luna, Gian Marco; Bongiorni, Lucia; Gili, Claudia; Biavasco, Francesca; Danovaro, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    We investigated bacterial assemblages associated with corals displaying symptoms of the 'White Syndrome' (WS), a general term used for indicating the appearance of bands, spots or patches of tissue loss, which is devastating wide areas of tropical ecosystems worldwide. We collected WS-diseased (n = 15) and healthy (n = 15) corals from the natural reef (Indonesia, Indian Ocean) and from four large public aquaria. By using culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques, we found that a large fraction (73%) of the investigated WS events was associated with the presence of a high bacterial abundance and, specifically, of Vibrio spp. Vibrio harveyi, a pathogen of many marine organisms and recently involved in coral Yellow Band disease, was the most represented species, being recovered from five out of 15 diseased corals. In experimental infection assays, two V. harveyi strains, isolated from diseased corals, were inoculated on a total of 62 healthy colonies of Pocillopora damicornis. WS signs appeared in 57 corals, confirming the ability of V. harveyi strains to induce the disease. We conclude that V. harveyi is one of the coral pathogens involved in the appearance of WS. However, not all of the investigated WSs were associated to V. harveyi detection, nor to other Vibrio species (such as V. coralliilyticus), which supports the hypothesis that WS is not caused exclusively by Vibrio spp., but rather can have a multifactorial aetiology, or can represent a group of diseases caused by a variety of agents. Further investigations to identify specific virulence traits will contribute to the understanding of the role of V. harveyi in WS pathogenesis. PMID:23766006

  14. Characterization of abalone Haliotis tuberculata-Vibrio harveyi interactions in gill primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Delphine; Cudennec, Benoit; Huchette, Sylvain; Djediat, Chakib; Renault, Tristan; Paillard, Christine; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie

    2013-10-01

    The decline of European abalone Haliotis tuberculata populations has been associated with various pathogens including bacteria of the genus Vibrio. Following the summer mortality outbreaks reported in France between 1998 and 2000, Vibrio harveyi strains were isolated from moribund abalones, allowing in vivo and in vitro studies on the interactions between abalone H. tuberculata and V. harveyi. This work reports the development of primary cell cultures from abalone gill tissue, a target tissue for bacterial colonisation, and their use for in vitro study of host cell-V. harveyi interactions. Gill cells originated from four-day-old explant primary cultures were successfully sub-cultured in multi-well plates and maintained in vitro for up to 24 days. Cytological parameters, cell morphology and viability were monitored over time using flow cytometry analysis and semi-quantitative assay (XTT). Then, gill cell cultures were used to investigate in vitro the interactions with V. harveyi. The effects of two bacterial strains were evaluated on gill cells: a pathogenic bacterial strain ORM4 which is responsible for abalone mortalities and LMG7890 which is a non-pathogenic strain. Cellular responses of gill cells exposed to increasing concentrations of bacteria were evaluated by measuring mitochondrial activity (XTT assay) and phenoloxidase activity, an enzyme which is strongly involved in immune response. The ability of gill cells to phagocyte GFP-tagged V. harveyi was evaluated by flow cytometry and gill cells-V. harveyi interactions were characterized using fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. During phagocytosis process we evidenced that V. harveyi bacteria induced significant changes in gill cells metabolism and immune response. Together, the results showed that primary cell cultures from abalone gills are suitable for in vitro study of host-pathogen interactions, providing complementary assays to in vivo experiments. PMID:23756730

  15. Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

  16. Vibrio harveyi adheres to and penetrates tissues of the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata within the first hours of contact.

    PubMed

    Cardinaud, Marion; Barbou, Annaïck; Capitaine, Carole; Bidault, Adeline; Dujon, Antoine Marie; Moraga, Dario; Paillard, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a marine bacterial pathogen responsible for episodic epidemics generally associated with massive mortalities in many marine organisms, including the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata. The aim of this study was to identify the portal of entry and the dynamics of infection of V. harveyi in the European abalone. The results indicate that the duration of contact between V. harveyi and the European abalone influences the mortality rate and precocity. Immediately after contact, the epithelial and mucosal area situated between the gills and the hypobranchial gland was colonized by V. harveyi. Real-time PCR analyses and culture quantification of a green fluorescent protein-tagged strain of V. harveyi in abalone tissues revealed a high density of bacteria adhering to and then penetrating the whole gill-hypobranchial gland tissue after 1 h of contact. V. harveyi was also detected in the hemolymph of a significant number of European abalones after 3 h of contact. In conclusion, this article shows that a TaqMan real-time PCR assay is a powerful and useful technique for the detection of a marine pathogen such as V. harveyi in mollusk tissue and for the study of its infection dynamics. Thus, we have revealed that the adhesion and then the penetration of V. harveyi in European abalone organs begin in the first hours of contact. We also hypothesize that the portal of entry of V. harveyi in the European abalone is the area situated between the gills and the hypobranchial gland. PMID:25107972

  17. Vibrio harveyi Adheres to and Penetrates Tissues of the European Abalone Haliotis tuberculata within the First Hours of Contact

    PubMed Central

    Barbou, Annaïck; Capitaine, Carole; Bidault, Adeline; Dujon, Antoine Marie; Moraga, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a marine bacterial pathogen responsible for episodic epidemics generally associated with massive mortalities in many marine organisms, including the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata. The aim of this study was to identify the portal of entry and the dynamics of infection of V. harveyi in the European abalone. The results indicate that the duration of contact between V. harveyi and the European abalone influences the mortality rate and precocity. Immediately after contact, the epithelial and mucosal area situated between the gills and the hypobranchial gland was colonized by V. harveyi. Real-time PCR analyses and culture quantification of a green fluorescent protein-tagged strain of V. harveyi in abalone tissues revealed a high density of bacteria adhering to and then penetrating the whole gill-hypobranchial gland tissue after 1 h of contact. V. harveyi was also detected in the hemolymph of a significant number of European abalones after 3 h of contact. In conclusion, this article shows that a TaqMan real-time PCR assay is a powerful and useful technique for the detection of a marine pathogen such as V. harveyi in mollusk tissue and for the study of its infection dynamics. Thus, we have revealed that the adhesion and then the penetration of V. harveyi in European abalone organs begin in the first hours of contact. We also hypothesize that the portal of entry of V. harveyi in the European abalone is the area situated between the gills and the hypobranchial gland. PMID:25107972

  18. Synergistic activation of quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Mandabi, Aviad; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M

    2015-09-15

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) has been suggested to serve as a ubiquitous quorum sensing (QS) signal that mediates intra- and interspecies cross-talk between bacteria. To add tools for the study of its function in bacterial communication, we present a new and an improved synthetic route to AI-2 and aromatic analogues. We used this strategy to prepare naphthyl-DPD, and observed remarkably high synergistic activity at low nanomolar concentrations for this analogue in Vibrio harveyi. PMID:26248803

  19. Norepinephrine and dopamine increase motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Anh, Nguyen D. Q.; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, affecting both vertebrates and invertebrates, and causes important losses in the aquaculture industry. In order to develop novel methods to control disease caused by this pathogen, we need to obtain a better understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Sensing of catecholamines increases both growth and production of virulence-related factors in pathogens of terrestrial animals and humans. However, at this moment, knowledge on the impact of catecholamines on the virulence of pathogens of aquatic organisms is lacking. In the present study, we report that in V. harveyi, norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (Dopa) increased growth in serum-supplemented medium, siderophore production, swimming motility, and expression of genes involved in flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and exopolysaccharide production. Consistent with this, pretreatment of V. harveyi with catecholamines prior to inoculation into the rearing water resulted in significantly decreased survival of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, when compared to larvae challenged with untreated V. harveyi. Further, NE-induced effects could be neutralized by α-adrenergic antagonists or by the bacterial catecholamine receptor antagonist LED209, but not by β-adrenergic or dopaminergic antagonists. Dopa-induced effects could be neutralized by dopaminergic antagonists or LED209, but not by adrenergic antagonists. Together, our results indicate that catecholamine sensing increases the success of transmission of V. harveyi and that interfering with catecholamine sensing might be an interesting strategy to control vibriosis in aquaculture. We hypothesize that upon tissue and/or hemocyte damage during infection, pathogens come into contact with elevated catecholamine levels, and that this stimulates the expression of virulence factors that are required to colonize a new host. PMID:25414697

  20. Improved quorum sensing capacity by culturing Vibrio harveyi in microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Song, Huiyi; Liu, Xiudong; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-04-01

    Microcapsule entrapped low density cells with culture (ELDCwc), different from free cell culture, conferred stronger stress resistance and improved cell viability of microorganisms. In this paper, the quorum sensing (QS) system of Vibrio harveyi was used to investigate changes when cells were cultured in microcapsules. Cells in ELDCwc group grew into cell aggregates, which facilitated cell-cell communication and led to increased bioluminescence intensity. Moreover, the luxS-AI-2 system, a well-studied QS signal pathway, was detected as both luxS gene and the AI-2 signaling molecule, and the results were analyzed with respect to QS capacity of unit cell. The V. harveyi of ELDCwc also showed higher relative gene expression and stronger quorum sensing capacity when compared with free cells. In conclusion, the confined microcapsule space can promote the cell aggregates formation, reduce cell-cell communication distance and increase local concentration of signal molecule, which are beneficial to bacterial QS. PMID:26364746

  1. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria. [Vibrio harveyi

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with (/sup 14/C) acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree (/sup 14/C)fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with (/sup 14/C)acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition.

  2. Unveiling the Metabolic Pathways Associated with the Adaptive Reduction of Cell Size During Vibrio harveyi Persistence in Seawater Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Montánchez, Itxaso; Parada, Claudia; Orruño, Maite; Arana, Inés; Barcina, Isabel

    2015-10-01

    Owing to their ubiquitous presence and ability to act as primary or opportunistic pathogens, Vibrio species greatly contribute to the diversity and evolution of marine ecosystems. This study was aimed at unveiling the cellular strategies enabling the marine gammaproteobacterium Vibrio harveyi to adapt and persist in natural aquatic systems. We found that, although V. harveyi incubation in seawater microcosm at 20 °C for 2 weeks did not change cell viability and culturability, it led to a progressive reduction in the average cell size. Microarray analysis revealed that this morphological change was accompanied by a profound decrease in gene expression affecting the central carbon metabolism, major biosynthetic pathways, and energy production. In contrast, V. harveyi elevated expression of genes closely linked to the composition and function of cell envelope. In addition to triggering lipid degradation via the ?-oxidation pathway and apparently promoting the use of endogenous fatty acids as a major energy and carbon source, V. harveyi upregulated genes involved in ancillary mechanisms important for sustaining iron homeostasis, cell resistance to the toxic effect of reactive oxygen species, and recycling of amino acids. The above adaptation mechanisms and morphological changes appear to represent the major hallmarks of the initial V. harveyi response to starvation. PMID:25903990

  3. Nitric oxide as an antimicrobial molecule against Vibrio harveyi infection in the hepatopancreas of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wong, Nai-Kei; Jiang, Xiao; Luo, Xing; Zhang, Lvping; Yang, Dan; Ren, Chunhua; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key effector molecule produced in the innate immune systems of many species for antimicrobial defense. However, how NO production is regulated during bacterial infection in invertebrates, especially crustaceans, remains poorly understood. Vibrio harveyi, a Gram-negative marine pathogen, is among the most prevalent and serious threats to the world's shrimp culture industry. Its virulence typically manifests itself through shrimp hepatopancreas destruction. In the current study, we found that NO generated by an in vitro donor system (NOC-18) could rapidly and effectively kill V. harveyi. In addition, injection of heat-killed V. harveyi increased the concentration of NO/nitrite and the mRNA expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the hepatopancreas of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), the commercially most significant shrimp species. Live V. harveyi challenge also induced NO/nitrite production and NOS gene expression in primary L. vannamei hepatopancreatic cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Co-incubation of l-NAME, an inhibitor selective for mammalian constitutive NOSs, dose-dependently blocked V. harveyi-induced NO/nitrite production, without affecting V. harveyi-induced NOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, l-NAME treatment significantly increased the survival rate of infecting V. harveyi in cultured primary hepatopancreatic cells of L. vannamei. As a whole, we have demonstrated that endogenous NO produced by L. vannamei hepatopancreatic cells occurs in enzymatically regulated manners and is sufficient to act as a bactericidal molecule for V. harveyi clearance. PMID:25449376

  4. Bacterial dynamics in intestines of the black tiger shrimp and the Pacific white shrimp during Vibrio harveyi exposure.

    PubMed

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Klanchui, Amornpan; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota play important roles in health of their host, contributing to maintaining the balance and resilience against pathogen. To investigate effects of pathogen to intestinal microbiota, the bacterial dynamics upon a shrimp pathogen, Vibrio harveyi, exposures were determined in two economically important shrimp species; the black tiger shrimp (BT) and the Pacific white shrimp (PW). Both shrimp species were reared under the same diet and environmental conditions. Shrimp survival rates after the V. harveyi exposure revealed that the PW shrimp had a higher resistance to the pathogen than the BT shrimp. The intestinal bacterial profiles were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and barcoded pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA sequences under no pathogen challenge control and under pathogenic V. harveyi challenge. The DGGE profiles showed that the presence of V. harveyi altered the intestinal bacterial patterns in comparison to the control in BT and PW intestines. This implies that bacterial balance in shrimp intestines was disrupted in the presence of V. harveyi. The barcoded pyrosequencing analysis showed the similar bacterial community structures in intestines of BT and PW shrimp under a normal condition. However, during the time course exposure to V. harveyi, the relative abundance of bacteria belong to Vibrio genus was higher in the BT intestines at 12h after the exposure, whereas relative abundance of vibrios was more stable in PW intestines. The principle coordinates analysis based on weighted-UniFrac analysis showed that intestinal bacterial population in the BT shrimp lost their ability to restore their bacterial balance during the 72-h period of exposure to the pathogen, while the PW shrimp were able to reestablish their bacterial population to resemble those seen in the unexposed control group. This observation of bacterial disruption might correlate to different mortality rates observed between the two shrimp species. Our findings provide evidence of intestinal bacterial population altered by a presence of the pathogen in shrimp intestines and intestinal bacterial stability might provide colonization resistance against the invading pathogen in the host shrimp. Hence, intestinal microbial ecology management may potentially contribute to disease prevention in aquaculture. PMID:26585302

  5. Immunological study of the outer membrane proteins of Vibrio harveyi: insights that link immunoprotectivity to interference with bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan-ping; Hu, Yong-hua; Sun, Bo-guang; Sun, Li

    2013-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a bacterial pathogen that affects marine vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we identified 13 outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from a pathogenic V. harveyi strain and analyzed their immunological properties. In vivo immunogenicity analysis showed that antibodies specific to recombinant proteins of the 13 OMPs were detected in the antiserum of V. harveyi-infected rat. When used as subunit vaccines to immunize Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), all OMPs were able to elicit specific serum antibody production in the vaccinated fish; however, only two OMPs (OMP173 and OMP214) induced high levels (>70%) of relative percent survival. Pre-incubation of V. harveyi with the antisera of protective OMPs significantly impaired bacterial infectivity against peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), whereas the antisera of non-protective OMPs had no apparent effect on infection. OMP173 antibodies could bind whole V. harveyi cells and exhibit bactericidal effect in a complement-dependent manner. Passive immunization showed that fish received OMP173 antiserum before being infected with V. harveyi exhibited significantly reduced mortality rate and lower bacterial loads in liver, spleen, and kidney. Finally, treatment of FG cells with OMP173 prior to V. harveyi infection protected the cells from bacterial invasion to a significant extent. Take together, these results indicate that two of the examined OMPs induce protective immunity through production of specific antibodies that block bacterial invasion, and that one OMP is likely to be involved in host cell interaction during the infection process. Thus, the immunoprotectivity of the OMPs is probably associated with functional participations of the OMPs in bacterial infection. PMID:23932987

  6. The early stages of the immune response of the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata to a Vibrio harveyi infection.

    PubMed

    Cardinaud, Marion; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Huchette, Sylvain; Moraga, Dario; Paillard, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a marine bacterial pathogen responsible for episodic abalone mortalities in France, Japan and Australia. In the European abalone, V. harveyi invades the circulatory system in a few hours after exposure and is lethal after 2 days of infection. In this study, we investigated the responses of European abalone immune cells over the first 24 h of infection. Results revealed an initial induction of immune gene expression including Rel/NF-kB, Mpeg and Clathrin. It is rapidly followed by a significant immuno-suppression characterized by reduced cellular hemocyte parameters, immune response gene expressions and enzymatic activities. Interestingly, Ferritin was overexpressed after 24 h of infection suggesting that abalone attempt to counter V. harveyi infection using soluble effectors. Immune function alteration was positively correlated with V. harveyi concentration. This study provides the evidence that V. harveyi has a hemolytic activity and an immuno-suppressive effect in the European abalone. PMID:25766281

  7. Genetically modified Vibrio harveyi strains as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Czyz, A.; Jasiecki, J.; Bogdan, A.; Szpilewska, H.; Wegrzyn, G.

    2000-02-01

    For biodetection of mutagenic pollution of marine environments, an organism naturally occurring in these habitats should be used. The authors found that marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may be an appropriate bioindicator of mutagenic pollution. For positive selection of mutants, they developed a simple method for isolation of V. harveyi mutants resistant to neomycin. The authors constructed genetically modified V. harveyi strains that produce significantly more neomycin-resistant mutants upon treatment with low concentrations of mutagens than the wild-type counterpart. The sensitivity of the mutagenicity test with the V. harveyi strains is at least comparable to (if not higher than) that of the commonly used Ames test, which uses Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains. Therefore, the authors consider that the V. harveyi strains described in this report could be used as potential bioindicators of mutagenic pollution of marine environments.

  8. Chitoporin from Vibrio harveyi, a channel with exceptional sugar specificity.

    PubMed

    Suginta, Wipa; Chumjan, Watcharin; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Schulte, Albert; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2013-04-19

    Chitoporin (VhChiP) is a sugar-specific channel responsible for the transport of chitooligosaccharides through the outer membrane of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Single channel reconstitution into black lipid membrane allowed single chitosugar binding events in the channel to be resolved. VhChiP has an exceptionally high substrate affinity, with a binding constant of K = 5.0 × 10(6) M(-1) for its best substrate (chitohexaose). The on-rates of chitosugars depend on applied voltages, as well as the side of the sugar addition, clearly indicating the inherent asymmetry of the VhChiP lumen. The binding affinity of VhChiP for chitohexaose is 1-5 orders of magnitude larger than that of other known sugar-specific porins for their preferred substrates. Thus, VhChiP is the most potent sugar-specific channel reported to date, with its high efficiency presumably reflecting the need for the bacterium to take up chitin-containing nutrients promptly under turbulent aquatic conditions to exploit them efficiently as its sole source of energy. PMID:23447539

  9. Negative Feedback in the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessie; Wingreen, Ned; Bassler, Bonnie; Phuan Ong, Nai

    2010-03-01

    Quorum sensing is the mechanism by which bacteria communicate and synchronize group behaviors. Multiple feedbacks have been identified in the model quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi, but it has been unclear how these feedbacks interact in individual cells to control the fidelity of signal transduction. We measured the copy number distribution of the master regulators to quantify the activity of the signaling network. We find that the feedbacks affect the production rate, level, and noise of the core quorum-sensing components. Using fluorescence time-lapse microscopy, we directly observed the master regulator in individual cells, and analyzed the persistence of heterogeneity in terms of the normalized time-delayed direct correlation. Our findings suggest that feedback from small regulatory RNAs regulates a receptor to control the noise level in signal transduction. We further tested this model by re-engineering the gene circuit to specifically diminish this feedback. We conclude that negative feedbacks mediated by sRNAs permit fine-tuning of gene regulation, thereby increasing the fidelity of signal transduction.

  10. Characterization of phenotype variations of luminescent and non-luminescent variants of Vibrio harveyi wild type and quorum sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Hong, N T X; Baruah, K; Vanrompay, D; Bossier, P

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio harveyi, a luminescent Gram-negative motile marine bacterium, is an important pathogen responsible for causing severe diseases in shrimp, finfish and molluscs leading to severe economic losses. Non-luminescent V. harveyi obtained by culturing luminescent strains under static and dark condition were reported to alter the levels of virulence factors and metalloprotease gene and luxR expression when compared to their luminescent variants. Presently, we conducted an in vitro study aiming at the characterization of virulence-related phenotypic traits of the wild-type V. harveyi BB120 strain and its isogenic quorum sensing mutants before and after switching to the non-luminescent status. We measured the production of caseinase, haemolysin and elastase and examined swimming motility and biofilm formation. Our results showed that switching from the bioluminescent to the non-luminescent state changed the phenotypic physiology or behaviour of V. harveyi resulting in alterations in caseinase and haemolytic activities, swimming motility and biofilm formation. The switching capacity was to a large extent independent from the quorum sensing status, in that quorum sensing mutants were equally capable of making the phenotypic switch. PMID:25865123

  11. Summer immune depression associated with increased susceptibility of the European abalone, Haliotis tuberculata to Vibrio harveyi infection.

    PubMed

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Le Goïc, Nelly; Huchette, Sylvain; Koken, Marcel; Paillard, Christine

    2008-12-01

    Haliotis tuberculata mortality outbreaks have occurred in France since 1998 and were attributed to a pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. These mortalities were recorded in September, a month with abalone reproduction and characterised by high seawater temperatures. The importance of gonadal maturation and temperature increase on abalone immunity and susceptibility to V. harveyi infection needed to be clarified. Therefore, an immune survey analyzing a large panel of parameters was performed from June to September 2007 on abalone from the Bay of Brest. The data obtained were put in relation with abalone reproductive status and its susceptibility to V. harveyi. Most parameters showed clear patterns from early to late summer and during gametogenesis, phagocytosis and phenoloxidase activity were reduced, whereas basal reactive oxygen species production and agglutination titres were significantly increased. Total haemocyte counts went up after the partial spawning event at the end of June, and cell complexity diminished. Using a Principal Component Analysis, the "haemolymph profile" was shown to decrease in parallel with spawning and gonadal maturation processes, and reached a minimum just after total spawning. A significant correlation between this "haemolymph profile" and disease susceptibility allowed us to establish for the first time in abalone, a clear concordance between maturation and spawning processes, immune status and abalone susceptibility to V. harveyi. PMID:18786640

  12. Identification of Vibrio harveyi isolated from diseased Asian seabass Lates calcarifer by use of 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ransangan, Julian; Mustafa, Saleem

    2009-09-01

    The grow out of Asian seabass Lates calcarifer in marine net-cages is a popular aquaculture activity in Malaysia. Production of this species is greatly affected by the occurrence of vibriosis, which causes heavy mortality. Generally, young fish are more susceptible; they exhibit anorexia and skin darkening, followed by heavy mortality. The acutely affected older fish may also exhibit bloody lesions around the anus and the base of the fins. Twenty-one bacterial isolates obtained from internal organs (kidney, heart, spleen and liver) of the affected specimens were subjected to phenotypic characterization, testing for antibiotic susceptibility, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. The sequencing result showed that all of the bacterial isolates belonged to Vibrio harveyi. The phenotypic characterization, however, identified 4 of the bacterial isolates as V. harveyi, 16 as V. parahaemolyticus, and 1 as V. alginolyticus. These findings suggest that biochemical features alone cannot be reliably used to identify bacterial pathogens, including V. harveyi, in aquaculture. Antibiotic susceptibility assays showed that some antibiotics, including oxytetracycline, nitrofurantoin, furazolidone, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid were effective against V. harveyi. Considering the side effects of these antibiotics, however, their use is not recommended in the aquaculture of Asian seabass. PMID:20043399

  13. Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifano, P.; Nassisi, V.; Siciliano, M. V.; Talà, A.; Tredici, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

  14. Unexpected photoreactivation of Vibrio harveyi bacteria living in ionization environment

    SciTech Connect

    Alifano, P.; Tala, A.; Tredici, S. M.; Nassisi, V.; Siciliano, M. V.

    2011-05-15

    Bacteria undergoing environmental effects is extremely interesting for structural, mechanistic, and evolutionary implications. Luminescent bacteria that have evolved in a specific ambient have developed particular responses and their behavior can give us new suggestions on the task and production of luciferina proteins. To analyze the UV interaction under controlled laboratory conditions, we used photoluminescent bacterial strains belonging to a new species evolutionarily close to Vibrio harveyi sampled from a coastal cave with a high radon content that generates ionizing radiation. The survival of the bacterial strains was analyzed, in the light and in the dark, following a variety of genotoxic treatments including UV radiation exposure. The strains were irradiated by a germicide lamp. The results demonstrated that most of the strains exhibited a low rate of survival after the UV exposure. After irradiation by visible light following the UV exposure, all strains showed a high capability of photoreactivation when grown. This capability was quite unexpected because these bacteria were sampled from a dark ambient without UV radiation. This leads us to hypothesize that the photoreactivation in these bacteria might have been evolved to repair DNA lesions also induced by different radiation sources other than UV (e.g., x-ray) and that the luminescent bacteria might use their own light emission to carry out the photoreactivation. The high capability of photoreactivation of these bacteria was also justified by the results of deconvolution. The deconvolution was applied to the emission spectra and it was able to show evidence of different light peaks. The presence of the visible peak could control the photolysis enzyme.

  15. A sensitive fluorescence reporter for monitoring quorum sensing regulated protease production in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T

    2011-02-01

    Many bacteria produce and secrete proteases during host invasion and pathogenesis. Vibrio harveyi, an opportunistic pathogen of shrimp, is known to use a two-component quorum sensing (QS) mechanism for coordination of gene expression including protease secretion at high population densities. We examined the role of V. harveyi's QS signaling molecules, N-(3-hydroxybutanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (AI-1) and the boron derivative of autoinducer-2 (BAI-2) in extracellular protease production. A fusion protein, M3CLPY (Rajamani et al., 2007), consisting of a large protease sensitive BAI-2 mutant receptor LuxP (~38kDa) flanked by two protease insensitive cyan and yellow variants of GFP (~28kDa each) was utilized as a substrate to detect secreted protease activity. The M3CLPY fusion, with the addition of wild-type V. harveyi (BB120) cell-free culture filtrate showed a time-dependent loss in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) associated with the cleavage of the LuxP linker protein and hence separation of the two fluorophores. This cleavage of LuxP linker protein leading to decreased FRET efficiency was further confirmed by immunoblotting using anti-GFP antibody. The addition of cell-free filtrates from strains defective in one or both of the two-component QS pathways: luxN(-) (defective in AI-1), luxS(-) (defective in BAI-2), and luxN(-)/luxS(-) (defective in both AI-1/BAI-2) showed differential levels of protease production. The observed protease activities were most pronounced in wild-type, followed by the AI-1 defective mutant (BB170) and the least for luxS(-) mutant (MM30) and luxN(-)/luxS(-) double mutant (MM32) strains. Incidentally, the lowest protease producing strains MM30 and MM32 were both defective in BAI-2 production. This observation was validated by addition of synthetic BAI-2 to MM30 and MM32 strains to restore protease production. Our results indicate that BAI-2 signaling in the two-component QS pathway plays the key role in regulating extracellular protease production in V. harveyi. PMID:21129419

  16. Gender-specific metabolic responses in hepatopancreas of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis challenged by Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Ma, Mengwen; Zhang, Yuemei

    2014-10-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish and frequently studied in shellfish immunology. In this work, the gender-specific metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in hepatopancreas from M. galloprovincialis were characterized using NMR-based metabolomics. In details, V. harveyi challenge increased the levels of amino acids including (valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, alanine, arginine and tyrosine) and ATP, and decreased the level of glucose in male mussel hepatopancreas. In V. harveyi-challenged female mussel hepatopancreas, both threonine and AMP were significantly elevated, and choline, phoshphocholine, sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, taurine, betaine and ATP were depleted. Obviously, only threonine was similarly altered to that in V. harveyi-challenged male mussel hepatopancreas. These findings confirmed the gender-specific metabolic responses in mussels challenged by V. harveyi. Overall, V. harveyi induced an enhanced energy demand through activated glycolysis and immune response indicated by increased BCAAs in male mussel hepatopancreas. In female mussel hepatopancreas, V. harveyi basically caused disturbances in both osmotic regulation and energy metabolism through the metabolic pathways of conversions of phosphocholine and ADP to choline and ATP, and sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and H2O into choline and sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (Cu/Zn-SOD, HSP90, lysozyme and defensin) suggested that V. harveyi induced obvious oxidative and immune stresses in both male and female mussel hepatopancreas. This work demonstrated that V. harveyi could induce gender-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis hepatopancreas using NMR-based metabolomics. PMID:25123832

  17. Reprogramming of Vibrio harveyi gene expression during adaptation in cold seawater.

    PubMed

    Montánchez, Itxaso; Arana, Inés; Parada, Claudia; Garaizabal, Idoia; Orruño, Maite; Barcina, Isabel; Kaberdin, Vladimir R

    2014-01-01

    The life and survival of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi during its adaptation in natural aquatic systems is highly influenced by the availability of nutrients and temperature. To learn about adaptation strategies evolved by this bacterium to cope with drastic temperature downshifts and nutrients depletion, we have studied the phenotypical and gene expression changes occurring in V. harveyi during its adaptation to cold seawater. We found that incubation in cold seawater up to 12 h did not cause any significant morphological changes in V. harveyi and had no effect on the number of viable and culturable cells. Microarray analysis revealed that the V. harveyi response to cold seawater leads to up- and downregulation of numerous genes controlling the central carbon metabolism, nucleotide and amino acid biosynthesis as well as DNA repair. In addition, expression of some genes controlling biosynthesis of lipids, molecular transport, and energy production was altered to likely affect the composition and properties of the V. harveyi cell envelope, thus implying the putative role of this compartment in adaptation to stress. Here, we discuss these results with regard to the putative adaptive responses likely triggered by V. harveyi to cope with environmental challenges in natural aquatic systems. PMID:24102529

  18. Metabolic profiling of the tissue-specific responses in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-08-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish distributing widely along the coast in north China. In this work, we studied the differential metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in digestive gland and gill tissues from M. galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics. The differential metabolic responses in the two tissue types were detected, except the similarly altered taurine and betaine. These metabolic responses suggested that V. harveyi mainly induced osmotic disruption and reduced energy demand via the metabolic pathways of glucose synthesis and ATP/AMP conversion in mussel digestive gland. In mussel gill tissues, V. harveyi basically caused osmotic stress and possible reduced energy demand as shown by the elevated phosphocholine that is involved in one of the metabolic pathways of ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphocholine. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (superoxide dismutase with copper and zinc, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear oxidative and immune stresses in both digestive gland and gill tissues. However, the mRNA expression levels of both lysozyme and defensin in digestive gland were more significantly up-regulated than those in gill from V. harveyi-challenged mussel M. galloprovincialis, meaning that the immune organ, digestive gland, was more sensitive than gill. Overall, our results indicated that V. harveyi could induce tissue-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis. PMID:24911264

  19. Immunological evaluation of Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio vulnificus and infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) combined-vaccine efficacy in Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhijian; Tang, Jingjing; Li, Mei; Fu, Yacheng; Dong, Chuanfu; Zhong, Jiang F; He, Jianguo

    2012-11-15

    Combined vaccines are immunological products intended for immunization against multifactorial infectious diseases caused by different types or variants of pathogens. In this study, the effectiveness of Vibrio alginolyticus (Va), Vibrio harveyi (Vh), Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), an iridovirus, combined-vaccine (Vibrio and ISKNV combined vaccines, VICV), Va+Vh+Vv inactive vaccine (VIV) and ISKNV whole cell inactive vaccine (IWCIV) in Epinephelus coioides were evaluated using various immunological parameters including antibody titer, serum lysozyme activity (LA), respiratory burst (RB) activity, bactericidal activity (BA) and relative percentage survival (RPS). E. coioides immunized with VICV and challenged with Va+Vh+Vv+ISKNV had an RPS of 80%. The RPS was 73.3% in E. coioides immunized with VIV and challenged with Va+Vh+Vv. E. coioides immunized with IWCIV and challenged with ISKNV had an RPS of 69.6%. Serum LA in the vaccinated group was significantly higher than the control group on days 21 and 28 post-vaccination (P<0.01). The RB activity of head kidney cells in the vaccinated group was significantly higher (P<0.01) compared to that in the control group. However, RB activity of spleen cells in the vaccinated group and the control group were not significantly different (P>0.05). After immunization with VICV, BA values of blood leucocytes and head kidney cells increased significantly more than spleen cells. BA value of blood leucocytes was higher than that in head kidney cells. There were distinct difference between BA values in head kidney cells and in spleen cells (P<0.05) as well as between BA value of blood leucocytes and head kidney cells (P<0.01). E. coioides vaccinated with VICV have significantly higher antibody levels than control groupers (P<0.01). Our study suggests that the VICV candidate can effectively protect groupers against multiple bacterial and viral pathogens. PMID:23010220

  20. Multiple small RNAs act additively to integrate sensory information and control quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell–cell communication mechanism that bacteria use to collectively regulate gene expression and, at a higher level, to coordinate group behavior. In the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, sensory information from three independent quorum-sensing systems converges on the shared response regulator LuxO. When LuxO is phosphorylated, it activates the expression of a putative repressor that destabilizes the mRNA encoding the master quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator LuxR. In the closely related species Vibrio cholerae, this repressor was revealed to be the RNA chaperone Hfq together with four small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) called Qrr1–4 (quorum regulatory RNA). Here, we identify five Qrr sRNAs that control quorum sensing in V. harveyi. Mutational analysis reveals that only four of the five Qrrs are required for destabilization of the luxR mRNA. Surprisingly, unlike in V. cholerae where the sRNAs act redundantly, in V. harveyi, the Qrr sRNAs function additively to control quorum sensing. This latter mechanism produces a gradient of LuxR that, in turn, enables differential regulation of quorum-sensing target genes. Other regulators appear to be involved in control of V. harveyi qrr expression, allowing the integration of additional sensory information into the regulation of quorum-sensing gene expression. PMID:17234887

  1. Spongosine production by a Vibrio harveyi strain associated with the sponge Tectitethya crypta.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Schwartz, Sarah L; Lee, John; Korobeynikov, Anton; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H

    2015-03-27

    Spongosine (1), deoxyspongosine (2), spongothymidine (Ara T) (3), and spongouridine (Ara U) were isolated from the Caribbean sponge Tectitethya crypta and given the general name "spongonucleosides". Spongosine, a methoxyadenosine derivative, has demonstrated a diverse bioactivity profile including anti-inflammatory activity and analgesic and vasodilation properties. Investigations into unusual nucleoside production by T. crypta-associated microorganisms using mass spectrometric techniques have identified a spongosine-producing strain of Vibrio harveyi and several structurally related compounds from multiple strains. PMID:25668560

  2. Duplication of Hemolysin Genes in a Virulent Isolate of Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X.-H.; Meaden, P. G.; Austin, B.

    2001-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi VIB 645, which is very pathogenic towards salmonids and produces extracellular product with a high titer of hemolytic activity towards fish erythrocytes, was found to contain two closely related hemolysin genes (designated vhhA and vhhB), whereas the majority of strains examined (11 of 13) carried only a single hemolysin gene. Both genes from VIB 645 were cloned and sequenced. The open reading frames (ORFs) of vhhA and vhhB shared a high level of identity (98.8%) and were predicted to encode identical polypeptides comprising 418 amino acid residues. The VHH protein shows homology to the lecithinase of V. mimicus and V. cholerae. Transformants of Escherichia coli containing the ORF of either vhhA or vhhB displayed weak hemolytic activity in rainbow trout blood agar. The hemolytic activity was very high when the ORF of vhhB was cloned in E. coli together with the native promoter. Surprisingly, the level of vhh-specific RNA transcript produced by VIB 645 was found to be very low. We conclude that the hemolytic phenotype of VIB 645 is not due to increased expression of one or both copies of the vhh gene. PMID:11425736

  3. Molecular variations in Vibrio alginolyticus and V. harveyi in shrimp-farming systems upon stress

    PubMed Central

    Santhyia, Anix Vivek; Mulloorpeedikayil, Rosalind George; Kollanoor, Riji John; Jeyaseelan, Prince M.J.

    2015-01-01

    A study was performed to investigate the genomic variations in the shrimp farm isolates of Vibrio alginolyticus and V. harveyi when the isolates were subjected to environmental stress. Samples of shrimps, water and sediment were collected from Southern Indian coastal shrimp farms. Vibrio isolates were biochemically identified and confirmed using 16S rDNA and gyrB gene specific PCR. The bacterial strains were genotyped by PCR fingerprinting using GTG(5) and IS (Insertion Sequence) primers. Seven strains each of V. alginolyticus and V. harveyi were subjected to 10 passages through trypticase soya broth (TSB), which contained different NaCl concentrations (3, 6 and 8%) and trypticase soya agar (TSA). V. alginolyticus was also passaged through TSB with a 12% NaCl concentration. PCR fingerprinting, which was performed on the strains that were passaged through different salt concentrations, confirmed that V. alginolyticus and V. harveyi could affect the genomic variations, depending on the environmental conditions of the culture. The study highlights the complex genotypic variations that occur in Vibrio strains of tropical aquatic environment because of varied environmental conditions, which result in genetic divergence and/or probable convergence. Such genetic divergence and/or convergence can lead to the organismal adaptive variation, which results in their ability to cause a productive infection in aquatic organisms or generation of new strains. PMID:26691457

  4. Molecular variations in Vibrio alginolyticus and V. harveyi in shrimp-farming systems upon stress.

    PubMed

    Santhyia, Anix Vivek; Mulloorpeedikayil, Rosalind George; Kollanoor, Riji John; Jeyaseelan, Prince M J

    2015-12-01

    A study was performed to investigate the genomic variations in the shrimp farm isolates of Vibrio alginolyticus and V. harveyi when the isolates were subjected to environmental stress. Samples of shrimps, water and sediment were collected from Southern Indian coastal shrimp farms. Vibrio isolates were biochemically identified and confirmed using 16S rDNA and gyrB gene specific PCR. The bacterial strains were genotyped by PCR fingerprinting using GTG(5) and IS (Insertion Sequence) primers. Seven strains each of V. alginolyticus and V. harveyi were subjected to 10 passages through trypticase soya broth (TSB), which contained different NaCl concentrations (3, 6 and 8%) and trypticase soya agar (TSA). V. alginolyticus was also passaged through TSB with a 12% NaCl concentration. PCR fingerprinting, which was performed on the strains that were passaged through different salt concentrations, confirmed that V. alginolyticus and V. harveyi could affect the genomic variations, depending on the environmental conditions of the culture. The study highlights the complex genotypic variations that occur in Vibrio strains of tropical aquatic environment because of varied environmental conditions, which result in genetic divergence and/or probable convergence. Such genetic divergence and/or convergence can lead to the organismal adaptive variation, which results in their ability to cause a productive infection in aquatic organisms or generation of new strains. PMID:26691457

  5. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from (1-14C)myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from (14C)C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from (14C)acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  6. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Ruwandeepika, H. A. Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  7. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  8. Identification of upregulated immune-related genes in Vibrio harveyi challenged Penaeus monodon postlarvae.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S; Singh, S K; Ramaiah, N; Sreepada, R A

    2010-09-01

    A subtracted cDNA library was constructed and analyzed to elucidate the response of Penaeus monodon postlarvae challenged with Vibrio harveyi. As many as 960 randomly selected cDNA fragments generated through suppression subtractive hybridization were single pass sequenced. Forty five genes and 20 hypothetical proteins were identified, a few being first reports from shrimps. The most abundant immune relevant genes were ferritin, hemocyanin, and TCTP (translationally controlled tumor protein) indicating their upregulation as also confirmed through qPCR. Post-infection qPCR analyses confirmed 2.04, 2.09, 3.28, 5.49, 6.47, and 11.63 fold rise respectively in ferritin, penaeidin, MnSOD, lysozyme, TCTP, and hemocyanin genes. These genes may be involved in the regulation of the host defense against V. harveyi. PMID:20580834

  9. A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

  10. Chitin Degradation Proteins Produced by the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi Growing on Different Forms of Chitin.

    PubMed

    Svitil, A L; Chadhain, S; Moore, J A; Kirchman, D L

    1997-02-01

    Relatively little is known about the number, diversity, and function of chitinases produced by bacteria, even though chitin is one of the most abundant polymers in nature. Because of the importance of chitin, especially in marine environments, we examined chitin-degrading proteins in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. This bacterium had a higher growth rate and more chitinase activity when grown on (beta)-chitin (isolated from squid pen) than on (alpha)-chitin (isolated from snow crab), probably because of the more open structure of (beta)-chitin. When exposed to different types of chitin, V. harveyi excreted several chitin-degrading proteins into the culture media. Some chitinases were present with all of the tested chitins, while others were unique to a particular chitin. We cloned and identified six separate chitinase genes from V. harveyi. These chitinases appear to be unique based on DNA restriction patterns, immunological data, and enzyme activity. This marine bacterium and probably others appear to synthesize separate chitinases for efficient utilization of different forms of chitin and chitin by-products. PMID:16535505

  11. The Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing system uses shared regulatory components to discriminate between multiple autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2006-01-01

    The quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi produces and responds to three autoinducers (AIs), and this sensory information converges to control the expression of bioluminescence, biofilm formation, type III secretion (TTS), and protease production. The AIs are detected by cognate sensor histidine kinases that all relay phosphate to the shared response regulator LuxO. LuxO indirectly represses the master regulator of quorum sensing, LuxR, through the activation of multiple genes encoding small regulatory RNAs (called qrr genes for Quorum Regulatory RNA). Here we use differential fluorescence induction to identify 50 quorum-sensing-controlled promoters. Some promoters only showed significant responses in the simultaneous presence of all three AIs, while others displayed substantial responses to the individual AIs. A differential response to each AI input state was also observed for qrr and luxR expression and LuxR protein production. Individual cell analyses revealed that, in each case, all the bacteria in the population respond in unison to the various AI inputs. We propose that the V. harveyi quorum-sensing transition is not switch-like but rather operates in a graded manner, and that this signaling arrangement, which uses shared regulatory proteins, nonetheless provides V. harveyi a mechanism to respond uniquely to different AI input states. PMID:17015436

  12. Polycistronic mRNAs code for polypeptides of the Vibrio harveyi luminescence system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, C.M.; Graham, A.D.; Boylan, M.; Evans, J.F.; Hasel, K.W.; Meighen, E.A.; Graham, A.F.

    1985-03-01

    DNA coding for the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of Vibrio harveyi luciferase, the luxA and luxB genes, and the adjoining chromosomal regions on both sides of these genes (total of 18 kilobase pairs) was cloned into Escherichia coli. Using labeled DNA coding for the ..cap alpha.. subunit as a hybridization probe, the authors identified a set of polycistronic mRNAs (2.6, 4, 7, and 8 kilobases) by Northern blotting; the most prominent of these was the one 4 kilobases long. This set of mRNAs was induced during the development of bioluminescence in V. harveyi. Furthermore, the same set of mRNAs was synthesized in E. coli by a recombinant plasmid that contained a 12-kilobase pair length of V. harveyi DNA and expressed the genes for the luciferase subunits. A cloned DNA segment corresponding to the major 4-kilobase mRNA coded for the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of luciferase, as well as a 32,000-dalton protein upstream from these genes that could be specifically modified by acyl-coenzyme A and is a component of the bioluminescence system. V. harveyi mRNA that was hybridized to the released from cloned DNA encompassing the luxA and luxB genes was translated in vitro. Luciferase ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits and the 32,000-dalton polypeptide were detected among the products, along with 42,000- and 55,000-dalton polypeptides, which are encoded downstream from the lux genes and are thought to be involved in luminescence.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Virulence-Enhancing Siphophage VHS1 from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Khemayan, Krit; Prachumwat, Anuphap; Sonthayanon, Burachai; Intaraprasong, Aungkul; Sriurairatana, Siriporn

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi siphophage 1 (VHS1) is a tailed phage with an icosahedral head of approximately 66 nm in diameter and an unornamented, flexible tail of approximately 153 nm in length. When Vibrio harveyi 1114GL is lysogenized with VHS1, its virulence for the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) increases by more than 100 times, and this coincides with production of a toxin(s) associated with shrimp hemocyte agglutination. Curiously, the lysogen does not show increased virulence for the whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus [Litopenaeus] vannamei). Here we present and annotate the complete, circular genome of VHS1 (81,509 kbp; GenBank accession number JF713456). By software analysis, the genome contains 125 putative open reading frames (ORFs), all of which appear to be located on the same DNA strand, similar to the case for many other bacteriophages. Most of the putative ORFs show no significant homology to known sequences in GenBank. Notable exceptions are ORFs for a putative DNA polymerase and putative phage structural proteins, including a portal protein, a phage tail tape measure protein, and a phage head protein. The last protein was identified as a component of the species-specific toxin mixture described above as being associated with agglutination of hemocytes from P. monodon. PMID:22307287

  14. Flavonoids from Piper delineatum modulate quorum-sensing-regulated phenotypes in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, Alberto J; Ticona, Juan C; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Flores, Ninoska; Fernández, José J; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2015-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), or bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a key process for bacterial colonization of substrata through biofilm formation, infections, and production of virulence factors. In an ongoing investigation of bioactive secondary metabolites from Piper species, four new flavonoids (1-4), along with five known ones (5-9) were isolated from the leaves of Piper delineatum. Their stereostructures were established by spectroscopic and spectrometric methods, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments, and comparison with data reported in the literature. The compounds were screened for their ability to interfere with QS signaling in the bacterial model Vibrio harveyi. Four compounds from this series (2, 3, 6, and 7) exhibited remarkable activity in the micromolar range, being compounds 3 and 7 particularly attractive since they did not affect bacterial growth. The results suggest that these flavonoids disrupt QS-mediated bioluminescence by interaction with elements downstream LuxO in the QS circuit of V. harveyi, and also, they exhibited a strong dose-dependent inhibition of biofilm formation. The present findings shed light on the QS inhibition mechanisms of flavonoids, underlining their potential applications. PMID:26070141

  15. A small-RNA-mediated negative feedback loop controls quorum-sensing dynamics in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C; Waters, Christopher M; Svenningsen, Sine L; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2008-01-01

    The bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi uses a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum sensing (QS) to co-ordinate behaviours in response to changes in population density. QS is accomplished through the secretion and detection of extracellular signalling molecules called autoinducers. At the centre of the V. harveyi QS circuit are five small regulatory RNAs called Qrr1–5 which destabilize the mRNA of luxR, encoding LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS target genes. Here we show that LuxR directly activates transcription of qrr2, qrr3 and qrr4, leading to the rapid downregulation of luxR. The LuxR-binding sites in the promoters of qrr2, qrr3 and qrr4 were identified and mutated to determine the consequences of this regulatory loop on QS dynamics. Disruption of the loop delays the transition from high to low cell density, and more significantly, decreases the cell density at which the population reaches a quorum. Our results suggest that feedback is essential for optimizing the dynamics of the transitions between individual and group behaviours. PMID:18808382

  16. Identification and analysis of HSP70 from Sepiella maindroni under stress of Vibrio harveyi and Cd(2.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-hui; He, Jian-yu; Chi, Chang-feng; Lv, Zhen-ming

    2015-11-01

    The 70-kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70) play crucial roles in protecting cells against environmental stresses, such as heat shock, heavy metals and pathogenic bacteria. The full-length HSP70 cDNA of Sepiella maindroni (designated as SmHSP70, GenBank accession no. KJ739788) was 2109 bp, including an ORF of 1950 bp encoding a polypeptide of 649 amino acids with predicted pI/MW 5.24/71.30 kDa, a 62 bp-5'-UTR and a 97 bp-3'-UTR. BLASTp analysis and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that the amino acid sequence was a member of HSP70 family. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that SmHSP70 and other known HSP70 were highly conserved, especially in the regions of HSP70 family signatures, the bipartite nuclear targeting sequence, ATP/GTP-binding site motif and 'EEVD' motif. Time-dependent mRNA expression of SmHSP70 in the liver was recorded by quantitative real-time RT-PCR after Vibrio harveyi injection and Cd(2+) exposure. The results indicated that SmHSP70 played a significant role in mediating the environmental stress and immune response against pathogens. PMID:26192462

  17. Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian-Wei

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication. Recently, Bassler et al. studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. According to Michaelis—Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper, we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (AI) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS. These results are fit to the experimental results. In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time deday. In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise.

  18. A nitric oxide-responsive quorum sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi regulates flagella production and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Henares, Bernadette M; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  19. Proteomic analysis of protein expression in the induction of the viable but Nonculturable State of Vibrio harveyi SF1.

    PubMed

    Jia, Juntao; Li, Zhengyi; Cao, Jijuan; Jiang, Yinghui; Liang, Chengzhu; Liu, Mengzhen

    2013-10-01

    Vibrio harveyi has been reported to enter into a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. One marine V. harveyi strain, SF1 became nonculturable when incubated in seawater microcosm at 4 °C within 60 days. We investigated protein expression in the exponential phase of V. harveyi SF1 and compared it to the VBNC state. Cytosolic proteins were resolved by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using pH 4-7 linear gradients. Among these proteins, sixteen proteins which were strongly downregulated or upregulated in the VBNC cells were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results indicated that the differentially expressed proteins were mainly focused on stress response proteins and key components of central and intermediary metabolism, like carbohydrate metabolism, transport, and translation. This study provided clues for understanding the mechanism of adaptation to the VBNC state. PMID:23689940

  20. A Nitric Oxide-Responsive Quorum Sensing Circuit in Vibrio harveyi Regulates Flagella Production and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Henares, Bernadette M.; Xu, Yueming; Boon, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling plays an important role in the survival of bacterial colonies. They use small molecules to coordinate gene expression in a cell density dependent manner. This process, known as quorum sensing, helps bacteria regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation and virulence. In Vibrio harveyi, a bioluminescent marine bacterium, four parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified to regulate light production. We have previously reported that nitric oxide (NO), through the H-NOX/HqsK quorum sensing pathway contributes to light production in V. harveyi through the LuxU/LuxO/LuxR quorum sensing pathway. In this study, we show that nitric oxide (NO) also regulates flagellar production and enhances biofilm formation. Our data suggest that V. harveyi is capable of switching between lifestyles to be able to adapt to changes in the environment. PMID:23965964

  1. Metabolomic analysis revealed the differential responses in two pedigrees of clam Ruditapes philippinarum towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Qing

    2013-12-01

    Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is an important marine aquaculture shellfish. This species has several pedigrees including White, Zebra, Liangdao Red and Marine Red distributing in the coastal areas in North China. In this work, we studied the metabolic differences induced by Vibrio harveyi in hepatopancreas from White and Zebra clams using NMR-based metabolomics. Metabolic responses (e.g., amino acids, glucose, glycogen, ATP and succinate) and altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (ATP synthase, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear disruption in energy metabolism and immune stresses in both White and Zebra clam hepatopancreas. However, V. harveyi caused obvious osmotic stress in Zebra clam hepatopancreas, which was not observed in V. harveyi-challenged White clams samples. In addition, V. harveyi challenge induced more severe disruption in energy metabolism and immune stress in White clams than in Zebra clams. Overall, our results indicated that the biological differences between different pedigrees of R. philippinarum should be considered in immunity studies. PMID:24161758

  2. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent bacteria related to human pathogenic Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nur A; Grim, Christopher J; Lipp, Erin K; Rivera, Irma N G; Chun, Jongsik; Haley, Bradd J; Taviani, Elisa; Choi, Seon Young; Hoq, Mozammel; Munk, A Christine; Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David; Challacombe, Jean F; Detter, J Chris; Han, Cliff S; Eisen, Jonathan A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2015-05-26

    Vibrio species are both ubiquitous and abundant in marine coastal waters, estuaries, ocean sediment, and aquaculture settings worldwide. We report here the isolation, characterization, and genome sequence of a novel Vibrio species, Vibrio antiquarius, isolated from a mesophilic bacterial community associated with hydrothermal vents located along the East Pacific Rise, near the southwest coast of Mexico. Genomic and phenotypic analysis revealed V. antiquarius is closely related to pathogenic Vibrio species, namely Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio vulnificus, but sufficiently divergent to warrant a separate species status. The V. antiquarius genome encodes genes and operons with ecological functions relevant to the environment conditions of the deep sea and also harbors factors known to be involved in human disease caused by freshwater, coastal, and brackish water vibrios. The presence of virulence factors in this deep-sea Vibrio species suggests a far more fundamental role of these factors for their bacterial host. Comparative genomics revealed a variety of genomic events that may have provided an important driving force in V. antiquarius evolution, facilitating response to environmental conditions of the deep sea. PMID:25964331

  3. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent bacteria related to human pathogenic Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nur A.; Grim, Christopher J.; Lipp, Erin K.; Rivera, Irma N. G.; Chun, Jongsik; Haley, Bradd J.; Taviani, Elisa; Choi, Seon Young; Hoq, Mozammel; Munk, A. Christine; Brettin, Thomas S.; Bruce, David; Challacombe, Jean F.; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff S.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio species are both ubiquitous and abundant in marine coastal waters, estuaries, ocean sediment, and aquaculture settings worldwide. We report here the isolation, characterization, and genome sequence of a novel Vibrio species, Vibrio antiquarius, isolated from a mesophilic bacterial community associated with hydrothermal vents located along the East Pacific Rise, near the southwest coast of Mexico. Genomic and phenotypic analysis revealed V. antiquarius is closely related to pathogenic Vibrio species, namely Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio vulnificus, but sufficiently divergent to warrant a separate species status. The V. antiquarius genome encodes genes and operons with ecological functions relevant to the environment conditions of the deep sea and also harbors factors known to be involved in human disease caused by freshwater, coastal, and brackish water vibrios. The presence of virulence factors in this deep-sea Vibrio species suggests a far more fundamental role of these factors for their bacterial host. Comparative genomics revealed a variety of genomic events that may have provided an important driving force in V. antiquarius evolution, facilitating response to environmental conditions of the deep sea. PMID:25964331

  4. Characterization of four lytic transducing bacteriophages of luminescent Vibrio harveyi isolated from shrimp (Penaeus monodon) hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Sanjeevi; Chrisolite, Bagthasingh; Alavandi, Shankar V; Poornima, Modem; Kalaimani, Natarajan; Santiago, T Chinnappan

    2011-12-01

    Four lytic bacteriophages designated as ?Vh1, ?Vh2, ?Vh3, and ?Vh4 were isolated from commercial shrimp hatcheries, possessing broad spectrum of infectivity against luminescent Vibrio harveyi isolates, considering their potential as biocontrol agent of luminescent bacterial disease in shrimp hatcheries, and were characterized by electron microscopy, genomic analysis, restriction enzyme analysis (REA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Three phages ?Vh1, ?Vh2, and ?Vh4 had an icosahedral head of 60-115 nm size with a long, noncontractile tail of 130-329 × 1-17 nm, belonged to the family Siphoviridae. ?Vh3 had an icosahedral head (72 ± 5 nm) with a short tail (27 × 12 nm) and belonged to Podoviridae. REA with DraI and PFGE of genomic DNA digested with ScaI and XbaI and cluster analysis of their banding patterns indicated that ?Vh3 was distinct from the other three siphophages. PFGE-based genome mean size of the four bacteriophages ?Vh1, ?Vh2, ?Vh3, and ?Vh4 was estimated to be about 85, 58, 64, and 107 kb, respectively. These phages had the property of generalized transduction as demonstrated by transduction with plasmid pHSG 396 with frequencies ranging from 4.1 × 10(-7) to 2 × 10(-9) per plaque-forming unit, suggesting a potential ecological role in gene transfer among aquatic vibrios. PMID:22092866

  5. Bacteriophage adenine methyltransferase: a life cycle regulator? Modelled using Vibrio harveyi myovirus like.

    PubMed

    Bochow, S; Elliman, J; Owens, L

    2012-11-01

    The adenine methyltransferase (DAM) gene methylates GATC sequences that have been demonstrated in various bacteria to be a powerful gene regulator functioning as an epigenetic switch, particularly with virulence gene regulation. However, overproduction of DAM can lead to mutations, giving rise to variability that may be important for adaptation to environmental change. While most bacterial hosts carry a DAM gene, not all bacteriophage carry this gene. Currently, there is no literature regarding the role DAM plays in life cycle regulation of bacteriophage. Vibrio campbellii strain 642 carries the bacteriophage Vibrio harveyi myovirus like (VHML) that has been proven to increase virulence. The complete genome sequence of VHML bacteriophage revealed a putative adenine methyltransferase gene. Using VHML, a new model of phage life cycle regulation, where DAM plays a central role between the lysogenic and lytic states, will be hypothesized. In short, DAM methylates the rha antirepressor gene and once methylation is removed, homologous CI repressor protein becomes repressed and non-functional leading to the switching to the lytic cycle. Greater understanding of life cycle regulation at the genetic level can, in the future, lead to the genesis of chimeric bacteriophage with greater control over their life cycle for their safe use as probiotics within the aquaculture industry. PMID:22681538

  6. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. A. M.; Guevara Vasquez, F.; Keener, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr.

  7. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase by Chemical Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Meekrathok, Piyanat; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vibrio harveyi GH20 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase) is a chitinolytic enzyme responsible for the successive degradation of chitin fragments to GlcNAc monomers, activating the onset of the chitin catabolic cascade in marine Vibrios. Methods Two invariant acidic pairs (Asp303-Asp304 and Asp437-Glu438) of VhGlcNAcase were mutated using a site-directed mutagenesis strategy. The effects of these mutations were examined and the catalytic roles of these active-site residues were elucidated using a chemical rescue approach. Enhancement of the enzymic activity of the VhGlcNAcase mutants was evaluated by a colorimetric assay using pNP-GlcNAc as substrate. Results Substitution of Asp303, Asp304, Asp437 or Glu438 with Ala/Asn/Gln produced a dramatic loss of the GlcNAcase activity. However, the activity of the inactive D437A mutant was recovered in the presence of sodium formate. Our kinetic data suggest that formate ion plays a nucleophilic role by mimicking the β-COO-side chain of Asp437, thereby stabilizing the reaction intermediate during both the glycosylation and the deglycosylation steps. Conclusions Chemical rescue of the inactive D437A mutant of VhGlcNAcase by an added nucleophile helped to identify Asp437 as the catalytic nucleophile/base, and hence its acidic partner Glu438 as the catalytic proton donor/acceptor. General Significance Identification of the catalytic nucleophile of VhGlcNAcases supports the proposal of a substrate-assisted mechanism of GH20 GlcNAcases, requiring the catalytic pair Asp437-Glu438 for catalysis. The results suggest the mechanistic basis of the participation of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase in the chitin catabolic pathway of marine Vibrios. PMID:26870945

  8. Determinants governing ligand specificity of the Vibrio harveyi LuxN quorum-sensing receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiaobo; Miller, Laura C.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-cell communication that relies on the production, release, and receptor-driven detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. The quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi exclusively detects the autoinducer N-((R)-3-hydroxybutanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OH-C4 HSL) via the two-component receptor LuxN. To discover the principles underlying the exquisite selectivity LuxN has for its ligand, we identified LuxN mutants with altered specificity. LuxN uses three mechanisms to verify that the bound molecule is the correct ligand: In the context of the overall ligand-binding site, His210 validates the C3 modification, Leu166 surveys the chain-length, and a strong steady-state kinase bias imposes an energetic hurdle for inappropriate ligands to elicit signal transduction. Affinities for the LuxN Kinaseon and Kinaseoff states underpin whether a ligand will act as an antagonist or an agonist. Mutations that bias LuxN to the agonized, Kinaseoff, state are clustered in a region adjacent to the ligand-binding site, suggesting that this region acts as the switch that triggers signal transduction. Together, our analyses illuminate how a histidine sensor kinase differentiates between ligands and exploits those differences to regulate its signaling activity. PMID:25367076

  9. Virulence genes and pathogenicity islands in environmental Vibrio strains nonpathogenic to humans.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Micol; Ghidini, Valentina; Caburlotto, Greta; Lleo, Maria M

    2012-12-01

    Most Vibrio species in autochthonous marine microbial communities, such as Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio anguillarum among others, are considered nonpathogenic for humans. However, because many bacterial virulence genes are located in mobile genetic elements, the acquisition of mobile DNA could mediate the appearance of virulent or more virulent strains even in a species defined as nonpathogenic. In this study, we screened a collection of marine nonpathogenic Vibrio strains isolated in the area of the Venetian Lagoon for the presence of virulence and fitness genes usually present in Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus clinical isolates. More than one-third of the strains tested positive for the presence of at least one of the potential virulence/fitness genes with the gene encoding the V. cholerae neuraminidase the most frequently detected. Moreover, 13 of the environmental strains carried modified versions of the V. cholerae pathogenicity island VPI-2, and four of them also contained partial fragments of the V. parahaemolyticus Vp-PAI. The data obtained support the view of nonpathogenic Vibrio strains as a significant reservoir of virulence and fitness genes. The emergence of environmental bacteria with new virulence traits might constitute a direct concern for public health and a risk for human health. PMID:22676367

  10. Vibrio parahaemolyticus cell biology and pathogenicity determinants.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Christopher A; Calder, Thomas J; Orth, Kim

    2011-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Characterization of this pathogen has revealed a unique repertoire of virulence factors that allow for colonization of the human host and disease. The following describes the known pathogenicity determinants while establishing the need for continued research. PMID:21782964

  11. Exposure to static magnetic field stimulates quorum sensing circuit in luminescent Vibrio strains of the Harveyi clade.

    PubMed

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  12. Exposure to Static Magnetic Field Stimulates Quorum Sensing Circuit in Luminescent Vibrio Strains of the Harveyi Clade

    PubMed Central

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  13. Involvement of the cgtA gene function in stimulation of DNA repair in Escherichia coli and Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Ryszard; Sikora, Aleksandra; Dutkiewicz, Rafa?; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Czyz, Agata

    2003-07-01

    CgtA is a member of the Obg/Gtp1 subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins. CgtA homologues have been found in various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, ranging from bacteria to humans. Nevertheless, despite the fact that cgtA is an essential gene in most bacterial species, its function in the regulation of cellular processes is largely unknown. Here it has been demonstrated that in two bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Vibrio harveyi, the cgtA gene product enhances survival of cells after UV irradiation. Expression of the cgtA gene was found to be enhanced after UV irradiation of both E. coli and V. harveyi. Moderate overexpression of cgtA resulted in higher UV resistance of E. coli wild-type and dnaQ strains, but not in uvrA, uvrB, umuC and recA mutant hosts. Overexpression of the E. coli recA gene in the V. harveyi cgtA mutant, which is very sensitive to UV light, restored the level of survival of UV-irradiated cells to the levels observed for wild-type bacteria. Moreover, the basal level of the RecA protein was lower in a temperature-sensitive cgtA mutant of E. coli than in the cgtA(+) strain, and contrary to wild-type bacteria, no significant increase in recA gene expression was observed after UV irradiation of this cgtA mutant. Finally, stimulation of uvrB gene transcription under these conditions was impaired in the V. harveyi cgtA mutant. All these results strongly suggest that the cgtA gene product is involved in DNA repair processes, most probably by stimulation of recA gene expression and resultant activation of RecA-dependent DNA repair pathways. PMID:12855728

  14. Contrasting inter- and intraspecies recombination patterns in the "Harveyi clade" vibrio collected over large spatial and temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recombination plays an important role in the divergence of bacteria, but the frequency of interspecies and intraspecies recombination events remains poorly understood. We investigated recombination events that occurred within core genomes of 35 Vibrio strains (family Vibrionaceae, Gammaproteobacteria), from six closely related species in the so-called "Harveyi clade." The strains were selected from a collection of strains isolated in the last 90 years, from various environments worldwide. We found a close relationship between the number of interspecies recombination events within core genomes of the 35 strains and the overall genomic identity, as inferred from calculations of the average nucleotide identity. The relationship between the overall nucleotide identity and the number of detected interspecies recombination events was comparable when analyzing strains isolated over 80 years apart, from different hemispheres, or from different ecologies, as well as in strains isolated from the same geographic location within a short time frame. We further applied the same method of detecting recombination events to analyze 11 strains of Vibrio campbellii, and identified disproportionally high number of intraspecies recombination events within the core genomes of some, but not all, strains. The high number of recombination events was detected between V. campbellii strains that have significant temporal (over 18 years) and geographical (over 10,000 km) differences in their origins of isolation. Results of this study reveal a remarkable stability of Harveyi clade species, and give clues about the origins and persistence of species in the clade. PMID:25527835

  15. Contrasting Inter- and Intraspecies Recombination Patterns in the “Harveyi Clade” Vibrio Collected over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales

    PubMed Central

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recombination plays an important role in the divergence of bacteria, but the frequency of interspecies and intraspecies recombination events remains poorly understood. We investigated recombination events that occurred within core genomes of 35 Vibrio strains (family Vibrionaceae, Gammaproteobacteria), from six closely related species in the so-called “Harveyi clade.” The strains were selected from a collection of strains isolated in the last 90 years, from various environments worldwide. We found a close relationship between the number of interspecies recombination events within core genomes of the 35 strains and the overall genomic identity, as inferred from calculations of the average nucleotide identity. The relationship between the overall nucleotide identity and the number of detected interspecies recombination events was comparable when analyzing strains isolated over 80 years apart, from different hemispheres, or from different ecologies, as well as in strains isolated from the same geographic location within a short time frame. We further applied the same method of detecting recombination events to analyze 11 strains of Vibrio campbellii, and identified disproportionally high number of intraspecies recombination events within the core genomes of some, but not all, strains. The high number of recombination events was detected between V. campbellii strains that have significant temporal (over 18 years) and geographical (over 10,000 km) differences in their origins of isolation. Results of this study reveal a remarkable stability of Harveyi clade species, and give clues about the origins and persistence of species in the clade. PMID:25527835

  16. The Vibrio harveyi bioassay used routinely to detect AI-2 quorum sensing inhibition is confounded by inconsistent normalization across marine matrices.

    PubMed

    Blair, Walter M; Doucette, Gregory J

    2013-03-01

    The Vibrio harveyi autoinducer-2 (AI-2) bioassay is used routinely to screen for inhibition of the AI-2 quorum sensing system. The present study utilizes three well-described bacterial strains to demonstrate that inconsistent normalization across matrices undermines the assay's use in screening marine samples for AI-2 inhibition. PMID:23305926

  17. Genomics of Pathogenic Vibrio Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziejman, Michelle; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    Members of the heterotrophic bacterial family Vibrionaceae are native inhabitants of aquatic environments worldwide, constituting a diverse and abundant component of marine microbial organisms. Over 60 species of the genus Vibrio have been identified (Thompson et al., 2004) and their phenotypic heterogeneity is well documented. The ecology of the genus remains less well understood, however, despite reports that vibrios are the dominant microorganisms inhabiting the superficial water layer and colonizing the chitinous exoskeleton of zooplankton (e.g., copepods, Thompson et al., 2004). Although some species were originally isolated from seawater as free living organisms, most were isolated in association with marine life such as bivalves, fish, eels, or shrimp.

  18. The Phosphorylation Flow of the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Cascade Determines Levels of Phenotypic Heterogeneity in the Population

    PubMed Central

    Plener, Laure; Lorenz, Nicola; Reiger, Matthias; Ramalho, Tiago; Gerland, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication process that enables a bacterial population to coordinate and synchronize specific behaviors. The bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi integrates three autoinducer (AI) signals into one quorum-sensing cascade comprising a phosphorelay involving three hybrid sensor kinases: LuxU; LuxO, an Hfq/small RNA (sRNA) switch; and the transcriptional regulator LuxR. Using a new set of V. harveyi mutants lacking genes for the AI synthases and/or sensors, we assayed the activity of the quorum-sensing cascade at the population and single-cell levels, with a specific focus on signal integration and noise levels. We found that the ratios of kinase activities to phosphatase activities of the three sensors and, hence, the extent of phosphorylation of LuxU/LuxO are important not only for the signaling output but also for the degree of noise in the system. The pools of phosphorylated LuxU/LuxO per cell directly determine the amounts of sRNAs produced and, consequently, the copy number of LuxR, generating heterogeneous quorum-sensing activation at the single-cell level. We conclude that the ability to drive the heterogeneous expression of QS-regulated genes in V. harveyi is an inherent feature of the architecture of the QS cascade. IMPORTANCE V. harveyi possesses one of the most complex quorum-sensing (QS) cascades known, using three different autoinducers (AIs) to control the induction of, e.g., bioluminescence, virulence factors, and biofilm and exoprotease production. We constructed various V. harveyi mutants to study the impact of each component and subsystem of the QS signaling cascade on QS activation at the population and single-cell levels. We found that the output was homogeneous only in the presence of all AIs. In the absence of any one AI, QS activation varied from cell to cell, resulting in phenotypic heterogeneity. This study elucidates a molecular design principle which enables a tightly integrated signaling cascade to control the expression of diverse phenotypes within a genetically homogeneous population. PMID:25755191

  19. Transcriptomic profiling of the oyster pathogen Vibrio splendidus opens a window on the evolutionary dynamics of the small RNA repertoire in the Vibrio genus

    PubMed Central

    Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Nguyen, An N.; Kuchly, Claire; Ott, Alban; Gautheret, Daniel; Bouloc, Philippe; Jacq, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Work in recent years has led to the recognition of the importance of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial regulation networks. New high-throughput sequencing technologies are paving the way to the exploration of an expanding sRNA world in nonmodel bacteria. In the Vibrio genus, compared to the enterobacteriaceae, still a limited number of sRNAs have been characterized, mostly in Vibrio cholerae, where they have been shown to be important for virulence, as well as in Vibrio harveyi. In addition, genome-wide approaches in V. cholerae have led to the discovery of hundreds of potential new sRNAs. Vibrio splendidus is an oyster pathogen that has been recently associated with massive mortality episodes in the French oyster growing industry. Here, we report the first RNA-seq study in a Vibrio outside of the V. cholerae species. We have uncovered hundreds of candidate regulatory RNAs, be it cis-regulatory elements, antisense RNAs, and trans-encoded sRNAs. Conservation studies showed the majority of them to be specific to V. splendidus. However, several novel sRNAs, previously unidentified, are also present in V. cholerae. Finally, we identified 28 trans sRNAs that are conserved in all the Vibrio genus species for which a complete genome sequence is available, possibly forming a Vibrio “sRNA core.” PMID:23097430

  20. Vibrio fluvialis: an emerging human pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Shinoda, Sumio

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio fluvialis is a pathogen commonly found in coastal environs. Considering recent increase in numbers of diarrheal outbreaks and sporadic extraintestinal cases, V. fluvialis has been considered as an emerging pathogen. Though this pathogen can be easily isolated by existing culture methods, its identification is still a challenging problem due to close phenotypic resemblance either with Vibrio cholerae or Aeromonas spp. However, using molecular tools, it is easy to identify V. fluvialis from clinical and different environmental samples. Many putative virulence factors have been reported, but its mechanisms of pathogenesis and survival fitness in the environment are yet to be explored. This chapter covers some of the major discoveries that have been made to understand the importance of V. fluvialis. PMID:24653717

  1. Preparation of fatty-acylated derivatives of acyl carrier protein using Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z; Fice, D; Byers, D M

    1992-07-01

    A simple two-step purification of Vibrio harveyi fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) synthetase, which is useful for the quantitative preparation and analysis of fatty-acylated derivatives of ACP, is described. Acyl-ACP synthetase can be partially purified from extracts of this bioluminescent bacterium by Cibacron blue chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and is stable for months at -20 degrees C in the presence of glycerol. Incubation of ACP from Escherichia coli with ATP and radiolabeled fatty acids (6 to 16 carbons in length) in the presence of the enzyme resulted in quantitative conversion to biologically active acylated derivatives. The enzyme reaction can be monitored by a filter disk assay to quantitate levels of ACP or by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to detect ACP in cell extracts. With its broad fatty acid chain length specificity and optimal activity in mild nondenaturing buffers, the soluble V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase provides an attractive alternative to current chemical and enzymatic methods of acyl-ACP preparation and analysis. PMID:1514693

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the LuxC gene and the upstream DNA from the bioluminescent system of Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, C M; Graham, A F; Meighen, E A

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the luxC gene (1431 bp) and the upstream DNA (1049 bp) of the luminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi has been determined. The luxC gene can be translated into a polypeptide of 55 kDa in excellent agreement with the molecular mass of the reductase polypeptide required for synthesis of the aldehyde substrate for the bioluminescent reaction. Analyses of codon usage showed a high frequency (1.9%) of the isoleucine codon, AUA, in the luxC gene compared to that found in Escherichia coli genes (0.2%) and its absence in the luxA, B and D genes. The low G/C content of the luxC gene and upstream DNA (38-39%) compared to that found in the other lux genes of V. harveyi (45%) was primarily due to a stretch of 500 nucleotides with only a 24% G/C content, extending from 200 bp inside lux C to 300 bp upstream. Moreover, an open reading frame did not extend for more than 48 codons between the luxC gene and 600 bp upstream at which point a gene transcribed in the opposite direction started. As the lux system in the luminescent bacterium, V. fischeri, contains a regulatory gene immediately upstream of luxC transcribed in the same direction, these results show that the organization and regulation of the lux genes have diverged in different luminescent bacteria. PMID:3347497

  3. Profiling of a few immune responsive genes expressed in postlarvae of Fenneropenaeus indicus challenged with Vibrio harveyi D3.

    PubMed

    Nayak, S; Ajay, K M; Ramaiah, N; Meena, Ram M; Sreepada, R A

    2011-06-01

    We identified 38 genes and eight hypothetical proteins by sequencing of 1200 clones from a Vibrio harveyi challenged Fenneropenaeus indicus subtracted cDNA library. Based on physiological roles and functions these genes were categorized into 10 groups with ?29% of the sequences having no matches in the databases. Immune related transcripts in the library were carboxypeptidase B, ferritin, translationally controlled tumor proteins (TCTP), hemocyanin, chitinase and serine carboxy peptidase. Remarkably, qPCR results imply 4.15, 3.45 and 1.86-fold rises in expression of ferritin, TCTP and hemocyanin transcripts respectively. Additionally, minor upregulation of other immune relevant genes lectin, penaeidin, crustin, MnSOD was observed in the challenged postlarvae. PMID:21515280

  4. Identification and analysis of an intracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Sepiella maindroni under stress of Vibrio harveyi and Cd2+.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-yu; Chi, Chang-feng; Liu, Hui-hui

    2014-11-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are ubiquitous family of metalloenzymes involved in protecting organisms from excess reactive oxygen species damage. In this paper, a novel intracellular Cu/ZnSOD from Sepiella maindroni (designated as SmSOD) was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA sequence of SmSOD (GenBank accession No. KF908850) was 709 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 459 bp, encoding 153 amino acid residues peptide with predicted pI/MW (6.02/15.75 kDa), a 131 bp-5'- and 116 bp-3'- untranslated region (UTR). BLASTn analysis and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that the sequence shared high similarity with known Cu/Zn SODs. Several highly conserved motifs, including two typical Cu/Zn SOD family domains, two conserved Cu-/Zn-binding sites (H-47, H-49, H-64, H-120 for Cu binding, and H-64, H-72, H-81, D-84 for Zn binding) and intracellular disulfide bond (C-58 and C-146), were also identified in SmSOD. Time-dependent mRNA expression of SmSOD in hepatopancreas was recorded by quantitative real-time RT-PCR after Vibrio harveyi injection and Cd(2+) exposure. The results indicated that SmSOD was an acute-phase protein involved in the immune responses against pathogens and biological indicator for metal contaminants in aquatic environment. PMID:24975083

  5. Assimilable Organic Carbon (AOC) in Soil Water Extracts Using Vibrio harveyi BB721 and Its Implication for Microbial Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jincai; Ibekwe, A. Mark; Leddy, Menu; Yang, Ching-Hong; Crowley, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Assimilable organic carbon (AOC) is commonly used to measure the growth potential of microorganisms in water, but has not yet been investigated for measuring microbial growth potential in soils. In this study, a simple, rapid, and non-growth based assay to determine AOC in soil was developed using a naturally occurring luminous strain Vibrio harveyi BB721 to determine the fraction of low molecular weight organic carbon in soil water extract. Calibration of the assay was achieved by measuring the luminescence intensity of starved V. harveyi BB721 cells in the late exponential phase with a concentration range from 0 to 800 µg l?1 glucose (equivalent to 0–16.0 mg glucose C kg?1 soil) with the detection limit of 10 µg l?1 equivalent to 0.20 mg glucose C kg?1 soil. Results showed that bioluminescence was proportional to the concentration of glucose added to soil. The luminescence intensity of the cells was highly pH dependent and the optimal pH was about 7.0. The average AOC concentration in 32 soils tested was 2.9±2.2 mg glucose C kg?1. Our data showed that AOC levels in soil water extracts were significantly correlated (P<0.05) with microbial biomass determined as microbial biomass carbon, indicating that the AOC concentrations determined by the method developed might be a good indicator of soil microbial biomass. Our findings provide a new approach that may be used to determine AOC in environmental samples using a non-growth bioluminescence based assay. Understanding the levels of AOC in soil water extract provides new insights into our ability to estimate the most available carbon pool to bacteria in soil that may be easily assimilated into cells for many metabolic processes and suggest possible the links between AOC, microbial regrowth potential, and microbial biomass in soils. PMID:22679477

  6. A Nonluminescent and Highly Virulent Vibrio harveyi Strain Is Associated with “Bacterial White Tail Disease” of Litopenaeus vannamei Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junfang; Fang, Wenhong; Yang, Xianle; Zhou, Shuai; Hu, Linlin; Li, Xincang; Qi, Xinyong; Su, Hang; Xie, Layue

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of a disease in pond-cultured juvenile and subadult Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp in several districts in China remain an important problem in recent years. The disease was characterized by “white tail” and generally accompanied by mass mortalities. Based on data from the microscopical analyses, PCR detection and 16S rRNA sequencing, a new Vibrio harveyi strain (designated as strain HLB0905) was identified as the etiologic pathogen. The bacterial isolation and challenge tests demonstrated that the HLB0905 strain was nonluminescent but highly virulent. It could cause mass mortality in affected shrimp during a short time period with a low dose of infection. Meanwhile, the histopathological and electron microscopical analysis both showed that the HLB0905 strain could cause severe fiber cell damages and striated muscle necrosis by accumulating in the tail muscle of L. vannamei shrimp, which led the affected shrimp to exhibit white or opaque lesions in the tail. The typical sign was closely similar to that caused by infectious myonecrosis (IMN), white tail disease (WTD) or penaeid white tail disease (PWTD). To differentiate from such diseases as with a sign of “white tail” but of non-bacterial origin, the present disease was named as “bacterial white tail disease (BWTD)”. Present study revealed that, just like IMN and WTD, BWTD could also cause mass mortalities in pond-cultured shrimp. These results suggested that some bacterial strains are changing themselves from secondary to primary pathogens by enhancing their virulence in current shrimp aquaculture system. PMID:22383954

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a GH20 ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Meekrathok, Piyanat; Bürger, Marco; Porfetye, Arthur T; Vetter, Ingrid R; Suginta, Wipa

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio harveyi ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase) is a new member of the GH20 glycoside hydrolase family responsible for the complete degradation of chitin fragments, with N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) monomers as the final products. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data of wild-type VhGlcNAcase and its catalytically inactive mutant D437A in the absence and the presence of substrate are reported. Crystals of wild-type VhGlcNAcase were grown in 0.1?M sodium acetate pH 4.6, 1.4?M sodium malonate, while crystals of the D437A mutant were obtained in 0.1?M bis-tris pH 7.5, 0.1?M sodium acetate, 20% PEG 3350. X-ray data from the wild-type and the mutant crystals were collected at a synchrotron-radiation light source and were complete to a resolution of 2.5?Å. All crystals were composed of the same type of dimer, with the substrate N,N'-diacetylglucosamine (GlcNAc? or diNAG) used for soaking was cleaved by the active enzyme, leaving only a single GlcNAc molecule bound to the protein. PMID:25849504

  8. Azide anions inhibit GH-18 endochitinase and GH-20 Exo ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Sirimontree, Paknisa; Fukamizo, Tamo; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a bioluminescent marine bacterium that utilizes chitin as its sole source of energy. In the course of chitin degradation, the bacterium primarily secretes an endochitinase A (VhChiA) to hydrolyze chitin, generating chitooligosaccharide fragments that are readily transported into the cell and broken down to GlcNAc monomers by an exo ?-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase). Here we report that sodium salts, especially sodium azide, inhibit two classes of these chitin-degrading enzymes (VhChiA and VhGlcNAcase) with distinct modes of action. Kinetic analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pNP-glycoside substrates reveals that sodium azide inhibition of VhChiA has a mixed-type mode, but that it inhibits VhGlcNAcase competitively. We propose that azide anions inhibit chitinase activity by acting as strong nucleophiles that attack C? of the catalytic Glu or C? of the neighbouring Asp residues. Azide anions may bind not only to the catalytic centre, but also to the other subsites in the substrate-binding cleft of VhChiA. In contrast, azide anions may merely occupy the small-binding pocket of VhGlcNAcase, thereby blocking the accessibility of its active site by short-chain substrates. PMID:26330565

  9. Interaction of haematopoietic tissue cultures of the Dublin Bay Prawn, Nephrops norvegicus (L.), with the causal agent of luminous vibriosis Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, A. L.; Zhang, X. H.; Xu, H. S.; Austin, B.

    2002-04-01

    Vibrio harveyi cells (dose—<103 cells mL-1) and extracellular products (ECP; >25 μmg mL-1 of total protein concentration) destroyed haematopoietic cultures of Nephrops norvegicus within 24 h of exposure. Cytopathic effects (CPE) started after 4h of exposure to the bacterial cells, with some granularity in the cytoplasm, mostly in cells in the outer periphery of the explant growth. At the end of the infection, a considerable number of nuclei remained attached to the substrate, apparently unaffected. Following exposure to ECP, initial deterioration was observed at 2 h with the presence of granularity in the cytoplasm of<20% cells, and few cells displayed small vacuoles around the nuclei. Parallel results were obtained using whole animal experiments, with V. harveyi cells being lethal to nephrops within 24 h.

  10. Isolation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein and the fabG, acpP, and fabF genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1996-01-01

    We report the isolation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP) and cloning of a 3,973-bp region containing the fabG (encoding 3-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, 25.5 kDa), acpP (encoding ACP, 8.7 kDa), fabF (encoding 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, 43.1 kDa), and pabC (encoding aminodeoxychorismate lyase, 29.9 kDa) genes. Predicted amino acid sequences were, respectively, 78, 86, 76, and 35% identical to those of the corresponding Escherichia coli proteins. Five of the 11 sequence differences between V. harveyi and E. coli ACP were nonconservative amino acid differences concentrated in a loop region between helices I and II. PMID:8550484

  11. Immune responses of barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch), after administration of an experimental Vibrio harveyi bacterin by intraperitoneal injection, anal intubation and immersion.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, P B B; Nowak, B F

    2004-11-01

    Barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch), were immunized with an experimental Vibrio harveyi bacterin via intraperitoneal injection, immersion and anal intubation. Both specific and non-specific immune parameters were measured to compare responses to bacterin after delivery by various methods. Elevated antibody activities in sera were found in all treatment groups with barramundi injected intraperitoneally displaying significantly higher antibody activity than the other groups. In addition, there was evidence of memory induction with a heightened antibody response in the intraperitoneally injected group only. Bacteriostatic assays indicated activity against V. harveyi in the sera of all bacterin-treated groups; again this activity was significantly higher in the intraperitoneally injected groups. There was no enhancement noted in head kidney macrophage phagocytic activity or in serum lysozyme levels. PMID:15509257

  12. Haemocyanin content of shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis) associated with white spot syndrome virus and Vibrio harveyi infection process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yanhong; Xing, Jing; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Haemocyanin (Hc) is frequently reported to vary significantly by physiological status and environmental stress in Crustaceans. In this paper, the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was infected with different concentrations of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio harveyi. Then, the variation of Hc and total protein content of the haemolymph (TPCH) were investigated using the established double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) and Coomassie brilliant blue method, respectively. The results showed that the Hc content peaked at 12 h post-infection (PI) in the 10(-2), 10(-4) and 10(-6) viral supernatant (VS) groups, and the maximum was 93.03 ± 2.55 mg ml(-1), 77.57 ± 6.02 mg ml(-1) and 70.25 ± 3.96 mg ml(-1), respectively. TPCH reached the maximum of 108.18 ± 1.36 mg ml(-1) and 103.49 ± 1.33 mg ml(-1) at 12 h PI in the 10(-2) and 10(-4) VS groups, respectively. The maximum was 96.94 ± 1.06 mg ml(-1) at 24 h PI in the 10(-6) VS group. In the V. harveyi infection groups, the Hc content reached a maximum of 87.97 ± 4.39 mg ml(-1) at 36 h PI in the 10(6) CFU ml(-1) group, 73.74 ± 4.38 mg ml(-1) and 72.47 ± 2.09 mg ml(-1) at 12 h PI in the 10(7) and 10(8) CFU ml(-1) groups, respectively. TPCH reached a maximum of 111.16 ± 0.86 mg ml(-1) at 36 h PI in the 10(6) CFU ml(-1) group, 100.41 ± 0.51 mg ml(-1) and 101.94 ± 0.47 mg ml(-1) at 12 h PI in the 10(7) and 10(8) CFU ml(-1) groups, respectively. These data showed that both Hc content and TPCH varied as the same extent after infection. The up-regulation of the Hc content at 6-36 h PI might be a reference threshold for shrimp infection. PMID:26616234

  13. Pathogenic vibrios in environmental, seafood and clinical sources in Germany.

    PubMed

    Huehn, Stephan; Eichhorn, Christin; Urmersbach, Sara; Breidenbach, Janina; Bechlars, Silke; Bier, Nadja; Alter, Thomas; Bartelt, Edda; Frank, Christina; Oberheitmann, Boris; Gunzer, Florian; Brennholt, Nicole; Böer, Simone; Appel, Bernd; Dieckmann, Ralf; Strauch, Eckhard

    2014-10-01

    Bacteria of the family Vibrionaceae naturally occur in marine and estuarine environments. Only few species of Vibrionaceae are associated with human cases of gastroenteritis, ear and wound infections, caused by ingestion of seafood or contact with Vibrio containing water. Increasing consumption of seafood (fish, fishery products and shellfish) poses a possible source of Vibrio infections in Germany. Additionally, there is a growing concern that abundances of pathogenic vibrios may increase in German coastal waters as a result of e.g. climate change resulting in probably rising surface water temperatures. According to the One Health concept the VibrioNet consortium started in 2010 to investigate the occurrence and relevance of non-cholera vibrios of human concern in Germany. Vibrios from environmental, seafood and clinical sources were analyzed with the aim to find connections between different reservoirs or sources and to identify potential ways of transmission of these pathogens to assess the risk of infections associated with them. Potentially pathogenic strains mostly belong to the species Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae. Investigations on imported seafood and mussels from primary production areas confirmed the frequent occurrence of these species. Moreover, studies of German coastal waters and sediments showed the presence and seasonality of these marine bacteria. So far the incidence of clinical cases of vibriosis in Germany is low. Between 1994 and 2013 thirteen cases of Vibrio spp. associated wound infections and/or septicaemia have been reported. However, the high prevalence of vibrios in aquatic environments and aquatic organisms is of concern and demands continued control of food and surveillance for clinical infections with pathogenic vibrios. PMID:25129553

  14. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  15. Mortalities of eastern and pacific oyster larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio cora...

  16. Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf dietary effects on the immunity response and disease resistance of Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer challenged with Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Talpur, Allah Dad; Ikhwanuddin, Mhd

    2013-01-01

    The present study was aimed to address the possible evaluation of Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf-supplemented diets on innate immune response in Asian seabass, Lates calcarifer fingerlings against Vibrio harveyi infection. Fish were fed for two weeks diets containing six graded levels of neem leaf at 0 g, 1 g, 2 g, 3 g, 4 g and 5 g per kg feed. Fish fed neem leaf-supplemented diet displayed significant differences (p < 0.05) in weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR) and feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control group fed without neem leaf-supplemented diet. Various innate immune parameters were examined pre-challenge and post-challenge. Fish was injected intraperitoneally with a lethal dose of V. harveyi containing 10(8) cells mL(-1). Supplementation of neem leaf diet significantly increased phagocytic activity, superoxide anion production, serum lysozyme, serum bactericidal activity, serum anti-protease activity throughout the experimental period when compared with the control group. Dietary doses of neem leaf diet significantly influenced the immune parameters, haematological parameters and blood biochemical indices of treated fish. The results suggested that fish fed neem leaf-supplemented diet improved the immune system and increased survival rate in L. calcarifer fingerlings against V. harveyi infection. PMID:23178500

  17. Comparison of the heme iron utilization systems of pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, S M; Mouton, S L; Occhino, D A; Deanda, M T; Rashidi, J R; Fuson, K L; Rashidi, C E; Mora, M Y; Payne, S M; Henderson, D P

    1999-06-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus utilized heme and hemoglobin as iron sources and contained chromosomal DNA similar to several Vibrio cholerae heme iron utilization genes. A V. parahaemolyticus gene that performed the function of V. cholerae hutA was isolated. A portion of the tonB1 locus of V. parahaemolyticus was sequenced and found to encode proteins similar in amino acid sequence to V. cholerae HutW, TonB1, and ExbB1. A recombinant plasmid containing the V. cholerae tonB1 and exbB1D1 genes complemented a V. alginolyticus heme utilization mutant. These data suggest that the heme iron utilization systems of the pathogenic vibrios tested, particularly V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus, are similar at the DNA level, the functional level, and, in the case of V. parahaemolyticus, the amino acid sequence or protein level to that of V. cholerae. PMID:10348876

  18. Comparison of the Heme Iron Utilization Systems of Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, S. M.; Mouton, S. L.; Occhino, D. A.; Deanda, M. T.; Rashidi, J. R.; Fuson, K. L.; Rashidi, C. E.; Mora, M. Y.; Payne, S. M.; Henderson, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus utilized heme and hemoglobin as iron sources and contained chromosomal DNA similar to several Vibrio cholerae heme iron utilization genes. A V. parahaemolyticus gene that performed the function of V. cholerae hutA was isolated. A portion of the tonB1 locus of V. parahaemolyticus was sequenced and found to encode proteins similar in amino acid sequence to V. cholerae HutW, TonB1, and ExbB1. A recombinant plasmid containing the V. cholerae tonB1 and exbB1D1 genes complemented a V. alginolyticus heme utilization mutant. These data suggest that the heme iron utilization systems of the pathogenic vibrios tested, particularly V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus, are similar at the DNA level, the functional level, and, in the case of V. parahaemolyticus, the amino acid sequence or protein level to that of V. cholerae. PMID:10348876

  19. Novel host-specific iron acquisition system in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Pajuelo, David; Lee, Chung-Te; Roig, Francisco J; Hor, Lien-I; Amaro, Carmen

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium associated with human and fish (mainly farmed eels) diseases globally known as vibriosis. The ability to infect and overcome eel innate immunity relies on a virulence plasmid (pVvbt2) specific for biotype 2 (Bt2) strains. In the present study, we demonstrated that pVvbt2 encodes a host-specific iron acquisition system that depends on an outer membrane receptor for eel transferrin called Vep20. The inactivation of vep20 did not affect either bacterial growth in human plasma or virulence for mice, while bacterial growth in eel blood/plasma was abolished and virulence for eels was significantly impaired. Furthermore, vep20 is an iron-regulated gene overexpressed in eel blood during artificially induced vibriosis both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, homologues to vep20 were identified in the transferable plasmids of two fish pathogen species of broad-host range, Vibrio harveyi (pVh1) and Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (pPHDD1). These data suggest that Vep20 belongs to a new family of plasmid-encoded fish-specific transferrin receptors, and the acquisition of these plasmids through horizontal gene transfer is likely positively selected in the fish-farming environment. Moreover, we propose Ftbp (fish transferrin binding proteins) as a formal name for this family of proteins. PMID:25630302

  20. [Cloning, physical and chemical property analysis of the Japanese sea bass Wap65-2 gene and its expression following Vibrio harveyi infection].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu-Hong; Chen, Jiong; Gao, Shan-Shan; Shen, Guang-Qiang; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Li, Ming-Yun

    2012-10-01

    The warm temperature acclimation related 65 kDa protein-2 (Wap65-2), a teleost plasma glycoprotein, plays an important role in immune regulation against bacterial infection. Here, for the first time we determined the full length cDNA sequence of the Japanese sea bass Wap65-2 gene (1 601 bp in length excluding the 3'-polyA tail). The sequence contains an open reading frame that encodes a protein of 436 amino acids with a molecular weight of 4.87×10(4). The predicted protein had a signal peptide in the N-terminal domain containing 19 residues. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the Japanese sea bass Wap65-2 has a relatively high similarity to the Dicentrarchus labrax Wap65-2. In the healthy Japanese sea bass, Wap65-2 mRNA was expressed mainly in the liver and weakly in the heart and muscle. qRT-PCR results revealed that liver Wap65-2 transcripts were significantly increased after a Vibrio harveyi infection, and peaked 24 hour post injection (6.89 fold increase). The Japanese sea bass Wap65-2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently used for antiserum preparation. Western blot analysis showed that Wap65-2 was significantly increased in V. harveyi infected Japanese sea bass and reached a maximum of 5.33-fold increase at 36 h. In conclusion, the alteration of Japanese sea bass Wap65-2 expression was tightly associated with the progression of the V. harveyi bacterial infection. PMID:23019029

  1. Severe Wound Infection with Photobacterium damselae ssp. damselae and Vibrio harveyi, following a Laceration Injury in Marine Environment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hundenborn, Jörg; Thurig, Steffi; Kommerell, Mechthild; Haag, Heike; Nolte, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are uncommon etiologies of skin and skin structure infections, that is, wound infections. We report a case of severe wound infection, caused by the marine Photobacterium damselae (Vibrionaceae), in a 64-year-old male patient, returning from Australia. The isolate tested positive for pPHDD1, a plasmid conferring high-level virulence. Furthermore, the wound was coinfected with Vibrio harveyi, a halophile bacterium, which has never been reported from human infections before. Identification was achieved by use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and confirmed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Data retrieval from bibliography was complicated since P. damselae has been renamed often with a number of synonyms present in the literature: Photobacterium damsela, Vibrio damselae, Vibrio damsela, Pasteurella damselae, and Listonella damsela. With all synonyms used as query terms, a literature search provided less than 20 cases published worldwide. A majority of those cases presenting as severe wound infection are even fatal following progression into necrotizing fasciitis. Management with daily wound dressing and antibiotic therapy (ofloxacin empirically, followed by doxycycline after availability of microbiology) led in the reported case to a favorable outcome, which seems to be, however, the exception based on a review of the available literature. PMID:24171004

  2. Severe Wound Infection with Photobacterium damselae ssp. damselae and Vibrio harveyi, following a Laceration Injury in Marine Environment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hundenborn, Jörg; Thurig, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are uncommon etiologies of skin and skin structure infections, that is, wound infections. We report a case of severe wound infection, caused by the marine Photobacterium damselae (Vibrionaceae), in a 64-year-old male patient, returning from Australia. The isolate tested positive for pPHDD1, a plasmid conferring high-level virulence. Furthermore, the wound was coinfected with Vibrio harveyi, a halophile bacterium, which has never been reported from human infections before. Identification was achieved by use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and confirmed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Data retrieval from bibliography was complicated since P. damselae has been renamed often with a number of synonyms present in the literature: Photobacterium damsela, Vibrio damselae, Vibrio damsela, Pasteurella damselae, and Listonella damsela. With all synonyms used as query terms, a literature search provided less than 20 cases published worldwide. A majority of those cases presenting as severe wound infection are even fatal following progression into necrotizing fasciitis. Management with daily wound dressing and antibiotic therapy (ofloxacin empirically, followed by doxycycline after availability of microbiology) led in the reported case to a favorable outcome, which seems to be, however, the exception based on a review of the available literature. PMID:24171004

  3. [Selection of cross-protective antigens from outer membrane proteins of three pathogenic vibrios isolated from infected large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongwen; Mao, Zhijuan; Yu, Lian

    2012-12-01

    Vibrios are universal conditioned-pathogenic bacteria in marine culture environment, and the outbreak of vibrio disease resulted in a serious damage to aquaculture. Considering that vibrio disease in aquatic species, especially fishes, usually originated from mixed infection of different species (serotypes or subspecies) of vibrios, it is important to select the potential cross-protective protein antigens as candidates of polyvalent or combined vaccines. In present research, several strains of vibrios were isolated from infected large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) and subsequently identified as six strains of V. harveyi, one V. parahaemolyticus and one V. alginolyticus by physiological, biochemical and molecular biological methods. Their outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were extracted and the SDS-PAGE and Western blotting results show that three immuno-blots with common molecular weight presented at approximate 45 kDa, 35 kDa and 22 kDa on their OMP electrophoretogram, indicating the existence of antigens with cross-protection in their OMPs. With the aids of combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-D) and Western blotting and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), a deduced porin (GenBank Accession No. ZP_01260407) from V. alginolyticus and a maltoporin precursor (GenBank Accession No. NP_801154) from V. parahaemolyticus were able to react with polyclonal antibody to whole V. harveyi, suggesting these two proteins could act as the cross-protective antigens and the vaccines prepared with these porins would be probable to bring cross protection to three different vibrios. PMID:23593870

  4. Vibriophages and Their Interactions with the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Demeng; Gram, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is an important pathogen in aquaculture, responsible for the disease vibriosis in many fish and invertebrate species. Disease control by antibiotics is a concern due to potential development and spread of antibiotic resistance. The use of bacteriophages to control the pathogen may offer a non-antibiotic-based approach to reduce vibriosis. A detailed understanding of the phage-host interaction is needed to evaluate the potential of phages to control the pathogen. In this study, we examined the diversity and interactions of 11 vibriophages, 24 V. anguillarum strains, and 13 Vibrio species strains. Together, the host ranges of the 11 phages covered all of the tested 37 Vibrio sp. host strains, which represented considerable temporal (20 years) and geographical (9 countries) differences in their origins of isolation. Thus, despite the occurrence of unique susceptibility patterns of the individual host isolates, key phenotypic properties related to phage susceptibility are distributed worldwide and maintained in the global Vibrio community for decades. The phage susceptibility pattern of the isolates did not show any relation to the physiological relationships obtained from Biolog GN2 profiles, demonstrating that similar phage susceptibility patterns occur across broad phylogenetic and physiological differences in Vibrio strains. Subsequent culture experiments with two phages and two V. anguillarum hosts demonstrated an initial strong lytic potential of the phages. However, rapid regrowth of both phage-resistant and phage-sensitive cells following the initial lysis suggested that several mechanisms of protection against phage infection had developed in the host populations. PMID:24610858

  5. Benthic ecology of Vibrio spp. and pathogenic Vibrio species in a coastal Mediterranean environment (La Spezia Gulf, Italy).

    PubMed

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Moreno, Mariapaola; Fabiano, Mauro; Pane, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2009-11-01

    We carried out a 16-month in situ study to investigate the ecology of Vibrio spp. and pathogenic Vibrio species in coastal sediments of the Mediterranean Sea, employing multiple-regression analysis to reveal the major environmental factors controlling their occurrence in the benthic environment. In addition, association between vibrios and sediment-inhabiting meiofauna, which is a major component of benthic ecosystems, was investigated. Culturable and total Vibrio spp. estimates by most-probable-number technique coupled with standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods, respectively, were at least one order of magnitude higher in sediment than in seawater. In addition, potential human pathogenic species Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus occurred in the sediment with V. parahaemolyticus being the most frequently found. In the pelagic environment, 60% of total variance in culturable Vibrio data was explained by sea surface temperature (40%), salinity (13%) and organic matter concentration (7%). In the benthic environment, sea surface temperature was the only factor that significantly affected culturable Vibrio occurrence although it explained only 25% of total variance, suggesting that additional unexplored factors may play a role as well. No correlation was found between culturable Vibrio spp. concentrations and the abundance of harpacticoid copepods in the sediment whilst a negative correlation was found between Vibrio spp. and nematode abundance which accounted for almost 90% of the total meiofaunal density. Taxonomic analysis revealed that selective bacterial feeders accounted for nearly 50% of the total nematode community and included genera such as Terschellingia, Molgolaimus and Halalaimus, suggesting that top-down control by nematode grazing may be an important factor affecting Vibrio occurrence in these sediments. It is concluded that the benthic marine environment may function as a reservoir of Vibrio spp. and potential pathogenic vibrios whose ecological features appeared substantially different from the ones recognised in the pelagic environment. PMID:19543938

  6. Inhibition of Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence by cerulenin: In vivo evidence for covalent modification of the reductase enzyme involved in aldehyde synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M. ); Meighen, E.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Bacterial bioluminescence is very sensitive to cerulenin, a fungal antibiotic which is known to inhibit fatty acid synthesis. When Vibrio harveyi cells pretreated with cerulenin were incubated with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid in vivo, acylation of the 57-kilodalton reductase subunit of the luminescence-specific fatty acid reductase complex was specifically inhibited. Light emission of wild-type V. harveyi was 20-fold less sensitive to cerulenin at low concentrations (10{mu}g/ml) than that of the dark mutant strain M17, which requires exogenous myristic acid for luminescence because of a defective transferase subunit. The sensitivity of myristic acid-stimulated luminescence in the mutant strain M17 exceeded that of phospholipid synthesis from ({sup 14}C)acetate, whereas uptake and incorporation of exogenous ({sup 14}C)myristic acid into phospholipids was increased by cerulenin. The reductase subunit could be labeled by incubating M17 cells with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin; this labeling was prevented by preincubation with either unlabeled cerulenin or myristic acid. Labeling of the reductase subunit with ({sup 3}H)tetrahydrocerulenin was also noted in an aldehyde-stimulated mutant (A16) but not in wild-type cells or in another aldehyde-stimulated mutant (M42) in which ({sup 3}H)myristoyl turnover at the reductase subunit was found to be defective. These results indicate that (i) cerulenin specifically and covalently inhibits the reductase component of aldehyde synthesis, (ii) this enzyme is partially protected from cerulenin inhibition in the wild-type strain in vivo, and (iii) two dark mutants which exhibit similar luminescence phenotypes (mutants A16 and M42) are blocked at different stages of fatty acid reduction.

  7. Temperature regulation of virulence factors in the pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Kimes, Nikole E; Grim, Christopher J; Johnson, Wesley R; Hasan, Nur A; Tall, Ben D; Kothary, Mahendra H; Kiss, Hajnalka; Munk, A Christine; Tapia, Roxanne; Green, Lance; Detter, Chris; Bruce, David C; Brettin, Thomas S; Colwell, Rita R; Morris, Pamela J

    2012-04-01

    Sea surface temperatures (SST) are rising because of global climate change. As a result, pathogenic Vibrio species that infect humans and marine organisms during warmer summer months are of growing concern. Coral reefs, in particular, are already experiencing unprecedented degradation worldwide due in part to infectious disease outbreaks and bleaching episodes that are exacerbated by increasing SST. For example, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a globally distributed bacterium associated with multiple coral diseases, infects corals at temperatures above 27 °C. The mechanisms underlying this temperature-dependent pathogenicity, however, are unknown. In this study, we identify potential virulence mechanisms using whole genome sequencing of V. coralliilyticus ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) BAA-450. Furthermore, we demonstrate direct temperature regulation of numerous virulence factors using proteomic analysis and bioassays. Virulence factors involved in motility, host degradation, secretion, antimicrobial resistance and transcriptional regulation are upregulated at the higher virulent temperature of 27 °C, concurrent with phenotypic changes in motility, antibiotic resistance, hemolysis, cytotoxicity and bioluminescence. These results provide evidence that temperature regulates multiple virulence mechanisms in V. coralliilyticus, independent of abundance. The ecological and biological significance of this temperature-dependent virulence response is reinforced by climate change models that predict tropical SST to consistently exceed 27 °C during the spring, summer and fall seasons. We propose V. coralliilyticus as a model Gram-negative bacterium to study temperature-dependent pathogenicity in Vibrio-related diseases. PMID:22158392

  8. Vibrio ostreicida sp. nov., a new pathogen of bivalve larvae.

    PubMed

    Prado, Susana; Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Toranzo, Alicia E; Barja, Juan L

    2014-05-01

    The taxonomic position of the bivalve pathogen PP-203T was studied together with those of two similar isolates (PP-200 and PP-204). The bacterial strains were isolated from samples of young oyster spat in a bivalve hatchery in Galicia (NW Spain), which was continually affected by outbreaks of disease and severe mortalities. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the three strains formed a cluster within the genus Vibrio and were most closely related to Vibrio pectenicida DSM 19585T (97.9% similarity). Additional multilocus sequence analysis, including sequences of the housekeeping genes rpoA, recA, pyrH, gyrB and ftsZ, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated that the strains were distinct from currently known species of the genus Vibrio and confirmed the clustering of the three isolates. Several phenotypic features, such as growth in TCBS medium and nitrate reduction, proved useful for distinguishing the proposed novel species from its closest relatives. The findings support the description of a novel species to include the three isolates, for which the name Vibrio ostreicida sp. nov. (type strain PP-203T=CECT 7398T=DSM 21433T) is proposed. PMID:24510976

  9. Characterization of the Secretomes of Two Vibrios Pathogenic to Mollusks

    PubMed Central

    Madec, Stéphanie; Pichereau, Vianney; Jacq, Annick; Paillard, Mathieu; Boisset, Claire; Guérard, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio tapetis causes the brown ring disease in the Japanese clam Ruditapes philippinarum while Vibrio aestuarianus is associated with massive oyster mortalities. As extracellular proteins are often associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria, we undertook a proteomic approach to characterize the secretomes of both vibrios. The extracellular proteins (ECPs) of both species were fractionated by SEC-FPLC and in vitro assays were performed to measure the effects of each fraction on hemocyte cellular parameters (phagocytosis and adhesion). Fractions showing a significant effect were subjected to SDS-PAGE, and proteins were identified by nano LC-MS/MS. 45 proteins were identified for V. aestuarianus and 87 for V. tapetis. Most of them belonged to outer membrane or were periplasmic, including porins or adhesins that were already described as virulence factors in other bacterial species. Others were transporter components, flagella proteins, or proteins of unknown function (14 and 15 respectively). Interestingly, for V. aestuarianus, we noted the secretion of 3 extracellular enzymes including the Vam metalloprotease and two other enzymes (one putative lipase and one protease). For V. tapetis, we identified five extracellular enymes, i.e. two different endochitinases, one protease, one lipase and an adhesin. A comparison of both secretomes also showed that only the putative extracellular lipase was common to both secretomes, underscoring the difference in pathogenicity mechanisms between these two species. Overall, these results characterize for the first time the secretomes of these two marine pathogenic vibrios and constitute a useful working basis to further analyze the contribution of specific proteins in the virulence mechanisms of these species. PMID:25401495

  10. Characterization of the secretomes of two vibrios pathogenic to mollusks.

    PubMed

    Madec, Stéphanie; Pichereau, Vianney; Jacq, Annick; Paillard, Mathieu; Boisset, Claire; Guérard, Fabienne; Paillard, Christine; Nicolas, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio tapetis causes the brown ring disease in the Japanese clam Ruditapes philippinarum while Vibrio aestuarianus is associated with massive oyster mortalities. As extracellular proteins are often associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria, we undertook a proteomic approach to characterize the secretomes of both vibrios. The extracellular proteins (ECPs) of both species were fractionated by SEC-FPLC and in vitro assays were performed to measure the effects of each fraction on hemocyte cellular parameters (phagocytosis and adhesion). Fractions showing a significant effect were subjected to SDS-PAGE, and proteins were identified by nano LC-MS/MS. 45 proteins were identified for V. aestuarianus and 87 for V. tapetis. Most of them belonged to outer membrane or were periplasmic, including porins or adhesins that were already described as virulence factors in other bacterial species. Others were transporter components, flagella proteins, or proteins of unknown function (14 and 15 respectively). Interestingly, for V. aestuarianus, we noted the secretion of 3 extracellular enzymes including the Vam metalloprotease and two other enzymes (one putative lipase and one protease). For V. tapetis, we identified five extracellular enymes, i.e. two different endochitinases, one protease, one lipase and an adhesin. A comparison of both secretomes also showed that only the putative extracellular lipase was common to both secretomes, underscoring the difference in pathogenicity mechanisms between these two species. Overall, these results characterize for the first time the secretomes of these two marine pathogenic vibrios and constitute a useful working basis to further analyze the contribution of specific proteins in the virulence mechanisms of these species. PMID:25401495

  11. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes produced by human pathogenic vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus, a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor eliciting the secondary skin damage characterized by formation of the hemorrhagic brae. The vibriolysin from intestinal pathogens may play indirect roles in pathogenicity because it can activate protein toxins and hemagglutinin by the limited proteolysis and can affect the bacterial attachment to or detachment from the intestinal surface by degradation of the mucus layer. Two species causing wound infections, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, produce another metalloproteases so-called collagenases. Although the detailed pathological roles have not been studied, the collagenase is potent to accelerate the bacterial dissemination through digestion of the protein components of the extracellular matrix. Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal pathogens produce sufficient amounts of the metalloprotease at the small intestinal temperature; however, the metalloprotease production by extra-intestinal pathogens is much higher around the body surface temperature. On the other hand, the serine protease is expressed only in the absence of the metalloprotease. PMID:24302921

  12. Chitoporin from the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi: PROBING THE ESSENTIAL ROLES OF TRP136 AT THE SURFACE OF THE CONSTRICTION ZONE.

    PubMed

    Chumjan, Watcharin; Winterhalter, Mathias; Schulte, Albert; Benz, Roland; Suginta, Wipa

    2015-07-31

    VhChiP is a sugar-specific porin present in the outer membrane of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. VhChiP is responsible for the uptake of chitin oligosaccharides, with particular selectivity for chitohexaose. In this study, we employed electrophysiological and biochemical approaches to demonstrate that Trp(136), located at the mouth of the VhChiP pore, plays an essential role in controlling the channel's ion conductivity, chitin affinity, and permeability. Kinetic analysis of sugar translocation obtained from single channel recordings indicated that the Trp(136) mutations W136A, W136D, W136R, and W136F considerably reduce the binding affinity of the protein channel for its best substrate, chitohexaose. Liposome swelling assays confirmed that the Trp(136) mutations decreased the rate of bulk chitohexaose permeation through the VhChiP channel. Notably, all of the mutants show increases in the off-rate for chitohexaose of up to 20-fold compared with that of the native channel. Furthermore, the cation/anion permeability ratio Pc/Pa is decreased in the W136R mutant and increased in the W136D mutant. This demonstrates that the negatively charged surface at the interior of the protein lumen preferentially attracts cationic species, leading to the cation selectivity of this trimeric channel. PMID:26082491

  13. Growth, nonspecific immune characteristics, and survival upon challenge with Vibrio harveyi in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) raised on diets containing algal meal.

    PubMed

    Nonwachai, Thasanee; Purivirojkul, Watchariya; Limsuwan, Chalor; Chuchird, Niti; Velasco, Mario; Dhar, Arun K

    2010-08-01

    A 70-day growth trial was conducted with postlarvae 12 (PL12) Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to study the suitability of soybean meal and oil originating from a single-celled microorganism (thraustochytrid) as fishmeal and fish oil substitutes in practical diets for L. vannamei. The growth, survival rate and immune characteristics were evaluated. Seven experimental diets were designed with soybean meal used as the primary protein source; each formulation contained 33% crude protein and 8% lipid. Fish oil was completely substituted with 3% soybean oil and meals originating from single-celled heterotrophs rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) were added at different concentrations. A commercial shrimp feed was used as the control diet. The final weights and survival rates of the shrimp were not significantly different among all treatments. However, shrimp raised on diets supplemented with marine algal meals rich in DHA and ARA showed significant improvement in immune parameters, such as total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, superoxide dismutase activity, and bactericidal activity. Additionally, the survival rate after challenge with Vibrio harveyi was increased. These findings demonstrated that substitution of thraustochytrid-derived meals as an alternative to fish-based ingredients in shrimp diets provided similar growth rates while increasing the immune parameters and providing vibriosis resistance. PMID:20420922

  14. Citrus limonoids interfere with Vibrio harveyi cell-cell signalling and biofilm formation by modulating the response regulator LuxO.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Amit; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Jayaprakasha, G K; Pillai, Suresh D; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2011-01-01

    Citrus limonoids are unique secondary metabolites, characterized by a triterpenoid skeleton with a furan ring. Studies have demonstrated beneficial health properties of limonoids. In addition, certain citrus limonoids play a role in plant defence against insect pests. In the present study, five limonoids were purified from sour orange and evaluated for their ability to inhibit cell-cell signalling. The purified limonoids were tested for their ability to interfere with cell-cell signalling and biofilm formation in Vibrio harveyi. Isolimonic acid, deacetylnomilinic acid glucoside and ichangin demonstrated significant inhibition of autoinducer-mediated cell-cell signalling and biofilm formation. Furthermore, isolimonic acid and ichangin treatment resulted in induced expression of the response regulator gene luxO. In addition, luxR promoter activity was not affected by isolimonic acid or ichangin. Therefore, the ability of isolimonic acid and ichangin to interfere with cell-cell signalling and biofilm formation seems to stem from the modulation of luxO expression. The results suggest that isolimonic acid and ichangin are potent modulators of bacterial cell-cell signalling. PMID:20864476

  15. The cycle for a Siphoviridae-like phage (VHS1) of Vibrio harveyi is dependent on the physiological state of the host.

    PubMed

    Pasharawipas, Tirasak; Wetchakit, Navin; Sriurairatana, Siriporn

    2008-08-01

    In a previous report, we isolated Vibrio harveyi (VH) 1114 together with its bacteriophage, VHS1, from a black tiger shrimp-rearing pond. The VHS1 has its lysogenic relationship to the VH1114 host as either true lysogen (TL) or pseudolysogen (PL). The characters of TL are based on the extrachromosomal existence of the VHS1 phage genome in the VH host which also simultaneously produces the VHS1 phage particles and is resistant to super-infection. The original VH1114 host exhibits a clear plaque after infection with VHS1 phage. The PL, on the other hand, exhibits a turbid plaque and does not possess the phage genome but shows toleration to the phage infection. Maintaining the PL in artificial seawater (ASW) for 1h causes the PL to be sensitive to VHS1 infection and results in clear plaques as in the original clone. A chloramphenical-added-ASW treated pseudolysogen clone (PLC), however, prevented VHS1 infection. It is postulated that the infection of VHS1 phage is regulated with a phage binding receptor which supposed to be inducible. PMID:18448184

  16. Mortalities of Eastern and Pacific Oyster Larvae Caused by the Pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael A.; Needleman, David S.; Church, Karlee M.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a well-known coral pathogen, has recently been shown to elicit mortality in fish and shellfish. Several strains of V. coralliilyticus, such as ATCC 19105 and Pacific isolates RE22 and RE98, were misidentified as V. tubiashii until recently. We compared the mortalities caused by two V. tubiashii and four V. coralliilyticus strains in Eastern and Pacific oyster larvae. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of V. coralliilyticus in Eastern oysters (defined here as the dose required to kill 50% of the population in 6 days) ranged from 1.1 × 104 to 3.0 × 104 CFU/ml seawater; strains RE98 and RE22 were the most virulent. This study shows that V. coralliilyticus causes mortality in Eastern oyster larvae. Results for Pacific oysters were similar, with LD50s between 1.2 × 104 and 4.0 × 104 CFU/ml. Vibrio tubiashii ATCC 19106 and ATCC 19109 were highly infectious toward Eastern oyster larvae but were essentially nonpathogenic toward healthy Pacific oyster larvae at dosages of ≥1.1 × 104 CFU/ml. These data, coupled with the fact that several isolates originally thought to be V. tubiashii are actually V. coralliilyticus, suggest that V. coralliilyticus has been a more significant pathogen for larval bivalve shellfish than V. tubiashii, particularly on the U.S. West Coast, contributing to substantial hatchery-associated morbidity and mortality in recent years. PMID:25344234

  17. Mortalities of Eastern and Pacific oyster Larvae caused by the pathogens Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gary P; Watson, Michael A; Needleman, David S; Church, Karlee M; Häse, Claudia C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii is reported to be a bacterial pathogen of larval Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and has been associated with major hatchery crashes, causing shortages in seed oysters for commercial shellfish producers. Another bacterium, Vibrio coralliilyticus, a well-known coral pathogen, has recently been shown to elicit mortality in fish and shellfish. Several strains of V. coralliilyticus, such as ATCC 19105 and Pacific isolates RE22 and RE98, were misidentified as V. tubiashii until recently. We compared the mortalities caused by two V. tubiashii and four V. coralliilyticus strains in Eastern and Pacific oyster larvae. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of V. coralliilyticus in Eastern oysters (defined here as the dose required to kill 50% of the population in 6 days) ranged from 1.1 × 10(4) to 3.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml seawater; strains RE98 and RE22 were the most virulent. This study shows that V. coralliilyticus causes mortality in Eastern oyster larvae. Results for Pacific oysters were similar, with LD50s between 1.2 × 10(4) and 4.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml. Vibrio tubiashii ATCC 19106 and ATCC 19109 were highly infectious toward Eastern oyster larvae but were essentially nonpathogenic toward healthy Pacific oyster larvae at dosages of ≥1.1 × 10(4) CFU/ml. These data, coupled with the fact that several isolates originally thought to be V. tubiashii are actually V. coralliilyticus, suggest that V. coralliilyticus has been a more significant pathogen for larval bivalve shellfish than V. tubiashii, particularly on the U.S. West Coast, contributing to substantial hatchery-associated morbidity and mortality in recent years. PMID:25344234

  18. Oxidation of fatty aldehydes to fatty acids by Escherichia coli cells expressing the Vibrio harveyi fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH).

    PubMed

    Buchhaupt, Markus; Guder, Jan; Sporleder, Fenja; Paetzold, Melanie; Schrader, Jens

    2013-03-01

    Fatty acids represent an important renewable feedstock for the chemical industry. To enable biotechnological one carbon truncations of fatty acids, the enzymes α-dioxygenase and fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) have to be combined in a two-step process. We expressed an FALDH from V. harveyi in E. coli and characterized its substrate spectrum with a focus on the number and position of double bonds in the fatty aldehyde molecules. Synthesis of the expected fatty acid products was proven by analysis of whole cell biotransformation products. Coexpression of a H(2)O-forming NADPH oxidase (NOX) from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis led to the implementation of a cofactor regeneration cycle in in vitro oxidation experiments. The presence of NOX in whole cell biotransformations improved reaction velocity but did not result in higher product yields. We could further demonstrate that at least part of the endogenous NAD(P)(+) regeneration capacity in the resting cells results from the respiratory chain. The whole cell catalyst with the high broad range FALDH activity described here is an important biotechnological module for lipid biotransformation processes, especially the shortening of fatty acids. PMID:23180547

  19. Effects of mutations of the alpha His45 residue of Vibrio harveyi luciferase on the yield and reactivity of the flavin peroxide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Ortego, B C; Maillard, K I; Willson, R C; Tu, S C

    1999-04-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the functional consequences of mutations of the essential alpha His45 residue of Vibrio harveyi luciferase, especially with respect to the yield and reactivity of the flavin 4a-hydroperoxide intermediate II. A total of 14 luciferase variants, each with a different single-residue replacement for the alpha His45, were examined. These variants showed changes, mostly slight, in their light decay rates of the nonturnover luminescence reaction and in their Km values for decanal and reduced riboflavin 5'-phosphate (FMNH2). All alpha His45 mutants, however, showed markedly reduced bioluminescence activities, the magnitude of the reduction ranging from about 300-fold to 6 orders of magnitude. Remarkably, a good correlation was obtained for the wild-type luciferase, 12 alpha His45-mutated luciferases, and six additional variants with mutations of other alpha-subunit histidine residues between the degrees of luminescence activity reduction and the dark decay rates of intermediate II. Such a correlation further indicates that the activation of the O-O bond fission is an important function of the flavin 4a-hydroperoxide intermediate II. Both alpha H45G and alpha H45W were found to bind near-stoichiometric amounts of FMNH2. Moreover, each variant catalyzed the oxidation of bound FMNH2 by two mechanisms, with a minor pathway leading to the formation of a luminescence-active intermediate II and a major dark pathway not involving any detectable flavin 4a-hydroperoxide species. This latter pathway mimics that in the normal catalysis by flavooxidases, and its elicitation in luciferase was demonstrated for the first time by single-residue mutations. PMID:10194361

  20. Influence of nitrogen substrates and substrate C:N ratios on the nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, K.; Ohkouchi, N.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Miyajima, T.; Nagata, T.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) isotopic compositions of individual hydrolysable amino acids (δ15NAAs) in N pools have been increasingly used for trophic position assessment and evaluation of sources and transformation processes of organic matter in marine environments. However, there are limited data about variability in δ15NAAs patterns and how this variability influences marine bacteria, an important mediator of trophic transfer and organic matter transformation. We explored whether marine bacterial δ15NAAs profiles change depending on the type and C:N ratio of the substrate. The δ15NAAs profile of a marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, was examined using medium containing either glutamate, alanine or ammonium as the N source [substrate C:N ratios (range, 3 to 20) were adjusted with glucose]. The data were interpreted as a reflection of isotope fractionations associated with de novo synthesis of amino acids by bacteria. Principal component analysis (PCA) using the δ15N offset values normalized to glutamate + glutamine δ15N revealed that δ15NAAs profiles differed depending on the N source and C:N ratio of the substrate. High variability in the δ15N offset of alanine and valine largely explained this bacterial δ15NAAs profile variability. PCA was also conducted using bacterial and phytoplankton (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae) δ15NAAs profile data reported previously. The results revealed that bacterial δ15NAAs patterns were distinct from those of phytoplankton. Therefore, the δ15NAAs profile is a useful indicator of biochemical responses of bacteria to changes in substrate conditions, serving as a potentially useful method for identifying organic matter sources in marine environments.

  1. Phage therapy treatment of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yossi; Joseph Pollock, F; Rosenberg, Eugene; Bourne, David G

    2013-02-01

    Vibrio coralliilyticus is an important coral pathogen demonstrated to cause disease outbreaks worldwide. This study investigated the feasibility of applying bacteriophage therapy to treat the coral pathogen V. coralliilyticus. A specific bacteriophage for V. coralliilyticus strain P1 (LMG23696), referred to here as bacteriophage YC, was isolated from the seawater above corals at Nelly Bay, Magnetic Island, central Great Barrier Reef (GBR), the same location where the bacterium was first isolated. Bacteriophage YC was shown to be a lytic phage belonging to the Myoviridae family, with a rapid replication rate, high burst size, and high affinity to its host. By infecting its host bacterium, bacteriophage YC was able to prevent bacterial-induced photosystem inhibition in pure cultures of Symbiodinium, the photosymbiont partner of coral and a target for virulence factors produced by the bacterial pathogen. Phage therapy experiments using coral juveniles in microtiter plates as a model system revealed that bacteriophage YC was able to prevent V. coralliilyticus-induced photoinactivation and tissue lysis. These results demonstrate that bacteriophage YC has the potential to treat coral disease outbreaks caused by the bacterial pathogen V. coralliilyticus, making it a good candidate for phage therapy treatment of coral disease. PMID:23239510

  2. Aquatic ecology of the oyster pathogens Vibrio splendidus and Vibrio aestuarianus.

    PubMed

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Stauder, Monica; Stagnaro, Laura; Venier, Paola; Pruzzo, Carla

    2015-04-01

    The ecology of the oyster pathogens Vibrio splendidus and Vibrio aestuarianus in the brackish aquatic environment was extensively investigated in this study. By conducting laboratory experiments under natural setting conditions, it was shown that V.?splendidus?LGP32 strain generally exhibits longer persistence in both seawater and sediment than V.?aestuarianus 01/32 strain. Both strains maintained viability and culturability for longer times in the sediment, suggesting that this compartment may represent a suitable niche for their persistence in the environment. In addition, both strains attached to chitin particles and copepods, the efficiency of attachment being higher in V.?splendidus than in V.?aestuarianus. Similarly, LGP32 strain showed a greater capability to form biofilm on poly-vinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces than 01/32 strain. LGP32 and 01/32 strains were also capable of entering a viable but non-culturable state after extended incubation at 5°C, a condition commonly found during cold season in the aquatic brackish environment. These results are consistent with field data collected during a 2-year sampling campaign in the northern Adriatic Sea and provide background information on the mechanisms promoting V.?splendidus and V.?aestuarianus persistence in coastal water, thus contributing to a better understanding of the epidemiology of the associated diseases. PMID:24725454

  3. Complete genome sequence for the shellfish pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 isolated from a shellfish hatchery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp), and two...

  4. Pathogenicity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Different Food Matrices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rundong; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Deng, Yijia; Liu, Ying; Xu, Defeng; Liu, Huanming; Ye, Riying; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenicity and virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in four food matrices-shrimp, freshwater fish, pork, and egg-fried rice-were compared by measuring the thermostable direct hemolysin activity and total hemolytic titer. Significantly high thermostable direct hemolysin and also hemolytic titers (P < 0.05) were produced by V. parahaemolyticus in egg-fried rice > shrimp > freshwater fish > pork. Filtrates of V. parahaemolyticus in shrimp given intraperitoneally induced marked liver and kidney damage and were highly lethal to adult mice compared with filtrates of V. parahaemolyticus in freshwater fish > egg-fried rice > pork. From in vitro and in vivo pathogenicity tests, it seems the type of food matrix has a significant impact on the virulence of V. parahaemolyticus. These results suggest that hemolysin may not necessarily be the only virulence factor for pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus. This is the first report that shows that virulence factors produced by V. parahaemolyticus in seafood such as shrimp are more toxic in vivo than in nonseafood. PMID:26818990

  5. The human pathogenic vibrios--a public health update with environmental perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    West, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio species are naturally-occurring bacteria in freshwater and saline aquatic environments. Counts of free-living bacteria in water are generally less than required to induce disease. Increases in number of organisms towards an infective dose can occur as water temperatures rise seasonally followed by growth and concentration of bacteria on higher animals, such as chitinous plankton, or accumulation by shellfish and seafood. Pathogenic Vibrio species must elaborate a series of virulence factors to elicit disease in humans. Activities which predispose diarrhoeal and extraintestinal infections include ingestion of seafood and shellfish and occupational or recreational exposure to natural aquatic environments, especially those above 20 degrees C. Travel to areas endemic for diseases due to pathogenic Vibrio species may be associated with infections. Host risk factors strongly associated with infections are lack of gastric acid and liver disorders. Involvement of pathogenic Vibrio species in cases of diarrhoea should be suspected especially if infection is associated with ingestion of seafood or shellfish, raw or undercooked, in the previous 72 h. Vibrio species should be suspected in any acute infection associated with wounds sustained or exposed in the marine or estuarine environment. Laboratories serving coastal areas where infection due to pathogenic Vibrio species are most likely to occur should consider routine use of TCBS agar and other detection regimens for culture of Vibrio species from faeces, blood and samples from wound and ear infections. PMID:2673820

  6. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Rita

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2013-02-12

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. Inhibition of Vibrio biofilm formation by a marine actinomycete strain A66.

    PubMed

    You, JianLan; Xue, XiaoLi; Cao, LiXiang; Lu, Xin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, LiXin; Zhou, ShiNing

    2007-10-01

    China remains by far the largest aquaculture producer in the world. However, biofilms formed by pathogenic Vibrio strains pose serious problems to marine aquaculture. To provide a strategy for biofilm prevention, control, and eradication, extracts from 88 marine actinomycetes were screened. Thirty-five inhibited the biofilm formation of Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio anguillarum at a concentration of 2.5% (v/v). Thirty-three of the actinomycete extracts dispersed the mature biofilm. Six extracts inhibited the quorum-sensing system of V. harveyi by attenuating the signal molecules N-acylated homoserine lactones' activity. Strain A66, which was identified as Streptomyces albus, both attenuated the biofilms and inhibited their quorum-sensing system. It is suggested that strain A66 is a promising candidate to be used in future marine aquaculture. PMID:17624525

  9. Impact of milk fish farming in the tropics on potentially pathogenic vibrios.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, W T; Reyes, J M; Pueblos, M J; Lluisma, A O

    2013-12-15

    Ratios of sucrose-negative to sucrose-positive vibrios on TCBS agar (suc-/suc+) indicate the abundance of potential human pathogenic non-cholera vibrios in coastal mariculture environments of the Lingayen Gulf (Philippines. In guts of adult maricultured milkfish (Chanos chanos) of suc- vibrios reached extreme peak values ranging between 2 and 545 million per g wet weight. Suc- vibrios outnumbered suc+ vibrios in anoxic sediments, too, and were rarely predominant in coastal waters or in oxidized sediments. Suc-/suc+ ratios in sediments increased toward the mariculture areas with distance from the open sea at decreasing redox potentials. There is circumstantial evidence that suc- vibrios can be dispersed from mariculture areas to adjacent environments including coral reefs. An immediate human health risk by pathogenic Vibrio species is discounted, since milkfish guts contained mainly members of the Enterovibrio group. A representative isolate of these contained proteolytic and other virulence factors, but no genes encoding toxins characteristic of clinical Vibrio species. PMID:24079922

  10. Prevalences of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in mollusks from the Spanish Mediterranean Coast

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Joven, Carmen; de Blas, Ignacio; Furones, M. Dolores; Roque, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a well-recognized pathogen of humans. To better understand the ecology of the human-pathogenic variants of this bacterium in the environment, a study on the prevalence in bivalves of pathogenic variants (tlh+ and tdh+ and/or trh+) versus a non-pathogenic one (only tlh+ as species marker for V. parahaemolyticus), was performed in two bays in Catalonia, Spain. Environmental factors that might affect dynamics of both variants of V. parahaemolyticus were taken into account. The results showed that the global prevalence of total V. parahaemolyticus found in both bays was 14.2% (207/1459). It was, however, significantly dependent on sampling point, campaign (year) and bivalve species. Pathogenic variants of V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+ and/or trh+) were detected in 3.8% of the samples (56/1459), meaning that the proportion of bivalves who contained tlh gene were contaminated by pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains is 27.1% (56/207). Moreover, the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+) was significantly correlated with water salinity, thus the probability of finding pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus decreased 1.45 times with every salinity unit (ppt) increased. Additionally, data showed that V. parahaemolyticus could establish close associations with Ruditapes spp. (P-value < 0.001), which could enhance the transmission of illness to human by pathogenic variants, when clams were eaten raw or slightly cooked. This study provides information on the abundance, ecology and characteristics of total and human-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus variants associated with bivalves cultured in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast. PMID:26284033

  11. Prevalences of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in mollusks from the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Joven, Carmen; de Blas, Ignacio; Furones, M Dolores; Roque, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a well-recognized pathogen of humans. To better understand the ecology of the human-pathogenic variants of this bacterium in the environment, a study on the prevalence in bivalves of pathogenic variants (tlh+ and tdh+ and/or trh+) versus a non-pathogenic one (only tlh+ as species marker for V. parahaemolyticus), was performed in two bays in Catalonia, Spain. Environmental factors that might affect dynamics of both variants of V. parahaemolyticus were taken into account. The results showed that the global prevalence of total V. parahaemolyticus found in both bays was 14.2% (207/1459). It was, however, significantly dependent on sampling point, campaign (year) and bivalve species. Pathogenic variants of V. parahaemolyticus (tdh+ and/or trh+) were detected in 3.8% of the samples (56/1459), meaning that the proportion of bivalves who contained tlh gene were contaminated by pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains is 27.1% (56/207). Moreover, the presence of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+) was significantly correlated with water salinity, thus the probability of finding pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus decreased 1.45 times with every salinity unit (ppt) increased. Additionally, data showed that V. parahaemolyticus could establish close associations with Ruditapes spp. (P-value < 0.001), which could enhance the transmission of illness to human by pathogenic variants, when clams were eaten raw or slightly cooked. This study provides information on the abundance, ecology and characteristics of total and human-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus variants associated with bivalves cultured in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast. PMID:26284033

  12. Persistence, seasonal dynamics and pathogenic potential of Vibrio communities from Pacific oyster hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Carolin C; Batista, Frederico M; Wegner, K Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

  13. Persistence, Seasonal Dynamics and Pathogenic Potential of Vibrio Communities from Pacific Oyster Hemolymph

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Carolin C.; Batista, Frederico M.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods. PMID:24728233

  14. Challenge of New Zealand Greenshell mussel Perna canaliculus larvae using two Vibrio pathogens: a hatchery study.

    PubMed

    Kesarcodi-Watson, Aditya; Kaspar, Heinrich; Lategan, M Josie; Gibson, Lewis F

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial diseases remain a large problem in aquaculture hatcheries. The successful design and implementation of protective measures in the hatchery depends on an understanding of the dynamics of the infection process. Developing an in situ experimental protocol for pathogen challenge is therefore of paramount importance. Here, we demonstrated the minimum effective pathogenic dose (MEPD) of Vibrio splendidus (10(5) CFU ml(-1)) and a Vibrio coralliilyticus/neptunius-like isolate, Vibrio sp. DO1 (10(6) CFU ml(-1)), for New Zealand Greenshell mussel (GSM, Perna canaliculus) larvae during hatchery production. In a flow-through water hatchery system, larvae given 1 to 2 h of static water exposure to these pathogen doses showed respective average cumulative mortalities of 58 and 69% on the fourth day following pathogen exposure. After the 1 to 2 h static exposure, larvae were returned to flow-through water. Larvae exposed to a dosage one order of magnitude greater than the MEPD had higher mortalities of 73 and 96% for V. splendidus and Vibrio sp. DO1 respectively. These 4 levels of mortality were significantly greater than those of the non-exposed control larvae which respectively averaged 23 and 35% in experiments involving V. splendidus and Vibrio sp. DO1. Experiments were repeated 4 times to confirm reproducibility. After pathogen exposure, pathogens were detected in the larvae and tank water of treatments with dosages of > or =10(5) CFU ml(-1) (V. splendidus) and 10(6) CFU ml(-1) (Vibrio sp. DO1), but not in treatments with lower pathogen dosages. The challenge protocols are reproducible and provide an opportunity to assess measures for the protection of GSM larvae against infection in the hatchery environment. PMID:19899345

  15. Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from biofouling on commercial vessels and harbor structures.

    PubMed

    Revilla-Castellanos, Valeria J; Guerrero, Abraham; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Navarro-Barrón, Erick; Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial L

    2015-01-01

    Ballast water is a significant vector of microbial dissemination; however, biofouling on commercial vessel hulls has been poorly studied with regard to pathogenic bacteria transport. Biofouling on three commercial vessels and seven port structures in Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, was examined by qPCR to identify and quantify Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a worldwide recognized food-borne human pathogen. Pathogenic variants (trh+, tdh+) of V. parahaemolyticus were detected in biofouling homogenates samples from several docks in Ensenada and on the hulls of ships with Japanese and South Korean homeports, but not in reference sampling stations. A total of 26 tdh+ V. parahaemolyticus colonies and 1 ORF8+/O3:K6 strain were also isolated from enriched biofouling homogenate samples confirming the qPCR analysis. Our results suggest that biofouling is an important reservoir of pathogenic vibrios. Thus, ship biofouling might be an overlooked vector with regard to the dissemination of pathogens, primarily pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:25921866

  16. Relationships between Environmental Factors and Pathogenic Vibrios in the Northern Gulf of Mexico ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. N.; Flowers, A. R.; Noriea, N. F.; Zimmerman, A. M.; Bowers, J. C.; DePaola, A.; Grimes, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Although autochthonous vibrio densities are known to be influenced by water temperature and salinity, little is understood about other environmental factors associated with their abundance and distribution. Densities of culturable Vibrio vulnificus containing vvh (V. vulnificus hemolysin gene) and V. parahaemolyticus containing tlh (thermolabile hemolysin gene, ubiquitous in V. parahaemolyticus), tdh (thermostable direct hemolysin gene, V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity factor), and trh (tdh-related hemolysin gene, V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity factor) were measured in coastal waters of Mississippi and Alabama. Over a 19-month sampling period, vibrio densities in water, oysters, and sediment varied significantly with sea surface temperature (SST). On average, tdh-to-tlh ratios were significantly higher than trh-to-tlh ratios in water and oysters but not in sediment. Although tlh densities were lower than vvh densities in water and in oysters, the opposite was true in sediment. Regression analysis indicated that SST had a significant association with vvh and tlh densities in water and oysters, while salinity was significantly related to vibrio densities in the water column. Chlorophyll a levels in the water were correlated significantly with vvh in sediment and oysters and with pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (tdh and trh) in the water column. Furthermore, turbidity was a significant predictor of V. parahaemolyticus density in all sample types (water, oyster, and sediment), and its role in predicting the risk of V. parahaemolyticus illness may be more important than previously realized. This study identified (i) culturable vibrios in winter sediment samples, (ii) niche-based differences in the abundance of vibrios, and (iii) predictive signatures resulting from correlations between environmental parameters and vibrio densities. PMID:20817802

  17. Occurrence and Diversity of Clinically Important Vibrio Species in the Aquatic Environment of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kokashvili, Tamar; Whitehouse, Chris A; Tskhvediani, Ana; Grim, Christopher J; Elbakidze, Tinatin; Mitaishvili, Nino; Janelidze, Nino; Jaiani, Ekaterine; Haley, Bradd J; Lashkhi, Nino; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R; Tediashvili, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n?=?657) and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n?=?938). Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS) detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost 90% of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human-pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus) were detected in 62.8, 37.8, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for Vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii), and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs. PMID:26528464

  18. Occurrence and Diversity of Clinically Important Vibrio Species in the Aquatic Environment of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kokashvili, Tamar; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Tskhvediani, Ana; Grim, Christopher J.; Elbakidze, Tinatin; Mitaishvili, Nino; Janelidze, Nino; Jaiani, Ekaterine; Haley, Bradd J.; Lashkhi, Nino; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.; Tediashvili, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n?=?657) and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n?=?938). Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS) detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost 90% of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human-pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus) were detected in 62.8, 37.8, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for Vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii), and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs. PMID:26528464

  19. Vibrio bivalvicida sp. nov., a novel larval pathogen for bivalve molluscs reared in a hatchery.

    PubMed

    Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Prado, Susana; Barja, Juan L

    2016-02-01

    Three isolates were obtained from cultures of carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus) reared in a bivalve hatchery (Galicia, NW Spain) from different sources: healthy broodstock, moribund larvae and the seawater corresponding to the larval tank. All isolates were studied by a polyphasic approach, including a phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequences of the five housekeeping genes ftsZ, gyrB, pyrH, recA and rpoA. The analysis supported their inclusion in the Orientalis clade of the genus Vibrio, and they formed a tight group separated from the closest relatives: Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaensis, Vibrio tubiashii subsp. tubiashii and Vibrio orientalis. The percentages of genomic resemblance, including average nucleotide identity, DNA-DNA hybridization and in silico genome-to-genome comparison, between the type strain and the closest relatives were below values for species delineation and confirmed the taxonomic position of the new species, which could be differentiated from the related taxa on the basis of several phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, including FAME and MALDI-TOF-MS. The pathogenicity of the new species was demonstrated in larvae of R. decussatus, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ostrea edulis and Donax trunculus. The results demonstrated that the strains analyzed represented a novel species in the Orientalis clade of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio bivalvicida sp. nov. is proposed, with 605(T) (= CECT 8855(T)=CAIM 1904(T)) designated as the type strain. PMID:26654527

  20. Complete genome sequence of the larval shellfish pathogen Vibrio Tubiashii type strain ATCC 19109

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio tubiashii is a larval shellfish pathogen. Here we report the first closed genome sequence for this species (American Type Culture Collection type strain 19109), which has two chromosomes (3,294,490 and 1,766,582 bp), two megaplasmids (251,408 and 122,808 bp) and two plasmids (57,076 and 47,9...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Marine Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE22.

    PubMed

    Spinard, Edward; Kessner, Linda; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Rowley, David C; Nelson, David R

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio coralliilyticus RE22 is a causative agent of vibriosis in larval bivalves. We report here the draft genome sequence of V. coralliilyticus RE22 and describe additional virulence factors that may provide insight into its mechanism of pathogenicity. PMID:26634766

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Marine Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE22

    PubMed Central

    Spinard, Edward; Kessner, Linda; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Rowley, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio coralliilyticus RE22 is a causative agent of vibriosis in larval bivalves. We report here the draft genome sequence of V. coralliilyticus RE22 and describe additional virulence factors that may provide insight into its mechanism of pathogenicity. PMID:26634766

  3. Ocean warming and spread of pathogenic vibrios in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Colwell, Rita R; Pruzzo, Carla

    2013-05-01

    Vibrios are among the most common bacteria that inhabit surface waters throughout the world and are responsible for a number of severe infections both in humans and animals. Several reports recently showed that human Vibrio illnesses are increasing worldwide including fatal acute diarrheal diseases, such as cholera, gastroenteritis, wound infections, and septicemia. Many scientists believe this increase may be associated with global warming and rise in sea surface temperature (SST), although not enough evidence is available to support a causal link between emergence of Vibrio infections and climate warming. The effect of increased SST in promoting spread of vibrios in coastal and brackish waters is considered a causal factor explaining this trend. Field and laboratory studies carried out over the past 40 years supported this hypothesis, clearly showing temperature promotes Vibrio growth and persistence in the aquatic environment. Most recently, a long-term retrospective microbiological study carried out in the coastal waters of the southern North Sea provided the first experimental evidence for a positive and significant relationship between SST and Vibrio occurrence over a multidecadal time scale. As a future challenge, macroecological studies of the effects of ocean warming on Vibrio persistence and spread in the aquatic environment over large spatial and temporal scales would conclusively support evidence acquired to date combined with studies of the impact of global warming on epidemiologically relevant variables, such as host susceptibility and exposure. Assessing a causal link between ongoing climate change and enhanced growth and spread of vibrios and related illness is expected to improve forecast and mitigate future outbreaks associated with these pathogens. PMID:23280498

  4. Vibrio Fluvialis: An Unusual Enteric Pathogen of Increasing Public Health Concern

    PubMed Central

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O.; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2010-01-01

    In developing countries, the fraction of treated wastewater effluents being discharged into watersheds have increased over the period of time, which have led to the deteriorations of the qualities of major rivers in developing nations. Consequently, high densities of disease causing bacteria in the watersheds are regularly reported including incidences of emerging Vibrio fluvialis. Vibrio fluvialis infection remains among those infectious diseases posing a potentially serious threat to public health. This paper addresses the epidemiology of this pathogen; pathogenesis of its disease; and its clinical manifestations in humans. PMID:21139853

  5. Temporal and spatial distribution patterns of potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. at recreational beaches of the German north sea.

    PubMed

    Böer, Simone I; Heinemeyer, Ernst-August; Luden, Katrin; Erler, René; Gerdts, Gunnar; Janssen, Frank; Brennholt, Nicole

    2013-05-01

    The number of reported Vibrio-related wound infections associated with recreational bathing in Northern Europe has increased within the last decades. In order to study the health risk from potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in the central Wadden Sea, the seasonal and spatial distribution of Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio cholerae were investigated at ten recreational beaches in this area over a 2-year period. V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were found to be omnipresent all year round in the study area, while V. vulnificus occurrence was restricted to summer months in the estuaries of the rivers Ems and Weser. Multiple linear regression models revealed that water temperature is the most important determinant of Vibrio spp. occurrence in the area. Differentiated regression models showed a species-specific response to water temperature and revealed a particularly strong effect of even minor temperature increases on the probability of detecting V. vulnificus in summer. In sediments, Vibrio spp. concentrations were up to three orders of magnitude higher than in water. Also, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus were found to be less susceptible towards winter temperatures in the benthic environment than in the water, indicating an important role of sediments for Vibrio ecology. While only a very small percentage of tested V. parahaemolyticus proved to be potentially pathogenic, the presence of V. vulnificus during the summer months should be regarded with care. PMID:23563708

  6. A single regulatory gene is sufficient to alter Vibrio aestuarianus pathogenicity in oysters.

    PubMed

    Goudenège, David; Travers, Marie Agnès; Lemire, Astrid; Petton, Bruno; Haffner, Philippe; Labreuche, Yannick; Tourbiez, Delphine; Mangenot, Sophie; Calteau, Alexandra; Mazel, Didier; Nicolas, Jean Louis; Jacq, Annick; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-11-01

    Oyster diseases caused by pathogenic vibrios pose a major challenge to the sustainability of oyster farming. In France, since 2012 a disease affecting specifically adult oysters has been associated with the presence of Vibrio aestuarianus. Here, by combining genome comparison, phylogenetic analyses and high-throughput infections of strains isolated before or during the recent outbreaks, we show that virulent strains cluster into two V.?aestuarianus lineages independently of the sampling dates. The bacterial lethal dose was not different between strains isolated before or after 2012. Hence, the emergence of a new highly virulent clonal strain is unlikely. Each lineage comprises nearly identical strains, the majority of them being virulent, suggesting that within these phylogenetically coherent virulent lineages a few strains have lost their pathogenicity. Comparative genomics allowed the identification of a single frameshift in a non-virulent strain. This mutation affects the varS gene that codes for a signal transduction histidine-protein kinase. Genetic analyses confirmed that varS is necessary for infection of oysters and for a secreted metalloprotease expression. For the first time in a Vibrio species, we show here that VarS is a key factor of pathogenicity. PMID:25384557

  7. Outcomes of infections of sea anemone Aiptasia pallida with Vibrio spp. pathogenic to corals.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, William J; Krediet, Cory J; Meyer, Julie L; Canas, Gabriela; Ritchie, Kim B; Teplitski, Max

    2014-08-01

    Incidents of coral disease are on the rise. However, in the absence of a surrogate animal host, understanding of the interactions between coral pathogens and their hosts remains relatively limited, compared to other pathosystems of similar global importance. A tropical sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, has been investigated as a surrogate model to study certain aspects of coral biology. Therefore, to test whether the utility of this surrogate model can be extended to study coral diseases, in the present study, we tested its susceptibility to common coral pathogens (Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio shiloi) as well as polymicrobial consortia recovered from the Caribbean Yellow Band Disease (CYBD) lesions. A. pallida was susceptible to each of the tested pathogens. A. pallida responded to the pathogens with darkening of the tissues (associated with an increased melanization) and retraction of tentacles, followed by complete disintegration of polyp tissues. Loss of zooxanthellae was not observed; however, the disease progression pattern is consistent with the behavior of necrotizing pathogens. Virulence of some coral pathogens in Aiptasia was paralleled with their glycosidase activities. PMID:24619233

  8. Role of heme compounds and haptoglobin in Vibrio vulnificus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Helms, S D; Oliver, J D; Travis, J C

    1984-08-01

    An induced peritonitis model was employed in mice to determine whether heme-containing molecules enhance the lethality of infections by Vibrio vulnificus. The lethality of intraperitoneal (ip) inocula of the bacteria was increased by concurrent injections (ip) of hemoglobin, methemoglobin, or hematin, but not by myoglobin. Similar results were obtained in mice with phenylhydrazine-induced hemoglobinemia, in which after ip injections of V. vulnificus, a direct correlation between lethality and levels of plasma hemoglobin was observed. In vitro studies indicated that the growth of V. vulnificus, which was limited in an iron-poor medium, was enhanced by the addition of hemoglobin in a manner similar to an inorganic iron source, ferric ammonium citrate. These results suggest that V. vulnificus is capable of extracting iron from hemoglobin for use as a nutrilite, thereby promoting growth and increased lethality in the in vivo models. Further studies with human serum cultures demonstrated that the growth of V. vulnificus was not decreased when hemoglobin added to the serum was completely complexed with haptoglobin; these results are in opposition to those with cultures of Escherichia coli. These results are discussed relative to the capacity of V. vulnificus to produce fatal human infections. PMID:6746093

  9. Role of heme compounds and haptoglobin in Vibrio vulnificus pathogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Helms, S D; Oliver, J D; Travis, J C

    1984-01-01

    An induced peritonitis model was employed in mice to determine whether heme-containing molecules enhance the lethality of infections by Vibrio vulnificus. The lethality of intraperitoneal (ip) inocula of the bacteria was increased by concurrent injections (ip) of hemoglobin, methemoglobin, or hematin, but not by myoglobin. Similar results were obtained in mice with phenylhydrazine-induced hemoglobinemia, in which after ip injections of V. vulnificus, a direct correlation between lethality and levels of plasma hemoglobin was observed. In vitro studies indicated that the growth of V. vulnificus, which was limited in an iron-poor medium, was enhanced by the addition of hemoglobin in a manner similar to an inorganic iron source, ferric ammonium citrate. These results suggest that V. vulnificus is capable of extracting iron from hemoglobin for use as a nutrilite, thereby promoting growth and increased lethality in the in vivo models. Further studies with human serum cultures demonstrated that the growth of V. vulnificus was not decreased when hemoglobin added to the serum was completely complexed with haptoglobin; these results are in opposition to those with cultures of Escherichia coli. These results are discussed relative to the capacity of V. vulnificus to produce fatal human infections. PMID:6746093

  10. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease. PMID:26496916

  11. Administration of Bacillus subtilis strains in the rearing water enhances the water quality, growth performance, immune response, and resistance against Vibrio harveyi infection in juvenile white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zokaeifar, Hadi; Babaei, Nahid; Saad, Che Roos; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Balcazar, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this study, vegetative cell suspensions of two Bacillus subtilis strains, L10 and G1 in equal proportions, was administered at two different doses 10(5) (BM5) and 10(8) (BM8) CFU ml(-1) in the rearing water of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) for eight weeks. Both probiotic groups showed a significant reduction of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate ions under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In comparison to untreated control group, final weight, weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), food conversion ratio (FCR) and digestive enzymatic activity were significantly greater in the BM5 and BM8 groups. Significant differences for survival were recorded in the BM8 group as compared to the control. Eight weeks after the start of experiment, shrimp were challenged with Vibrio harveyi. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in shrimp survival between probiotic and control groups. Cumulative mortality of the control group was 80%, whereas cumulative mortality of the shrimp that had been given probiotics was 36.7% with MB8 and 50% with MB5. Subsequently, real-time RT-PCR was employed to determine the mRNA levels of prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (PE), lipopolysaccharide- and β-1,3-glucan- binding protein (LGBP) and serine protein (SP). The expression of all immune-related genes studied was only significantly up-regulated in the BM5 group compared to the BM8 and control groups. These results suggest that administration of B. subtilis strains in the rearing water confers beneficial effects for shrimp aquaculture, considering water quality, growth performance, digestive enzymatic activity, immune response and disease resistance. PMID:24161773

  12. Structure, gene regulation and environmental response of flagella in Vibrio.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiwei; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio species are Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that live in aqueous environments. Several species, such as V. harveyi, V. alginotyticus, and V. splendidus, are associated with diseases in fish or shellfish. In addition, a few species, such as V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus, are risky for humans due to infections from eating raw shellfish infected with these bacteria or from exposure of wounds to the marine environment. Bacterial flagella are not essential to live in a culture medium. However, most Vibrio species are motile and have rotating flagella which allow them to move into favorable environments or to escape from unfavorable environments. This review summarizes recent studies about the flagellar structure, function, and regulation of Vibrio species, especially focused on the Na(+)-driven polar flagella that are principally responsible for motility and sensing the surrounding environment, and discusses the relationship between flagella and pathogenicity. PMID:24400002

  13. Serum resistance and hemagglutination ability of marine vibrios pathogenic for fish.

    PubMed Central

    Trust, T J; Courtice, I D; Khouri, A G; Crosa, J H; Schiewe, M H

    1981-01-01

    Representative strains of marine vibrios pathogenic for fish were shown to be resistant to the bactericidal activity of normal (nonimmmune) rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) serum, and loss of this resistance coincided with a marked reduction in virulence. Thermal lability and a requirement for Mg2+, but not for Ca2+, suggested that a mechanism for serum killing was the alternative complement pathway. In the case of Vibrio anguillarum, serum resistance was not coded for by the virulence plasmid pJM1. Additional testing showed that these pathogenic vibrios were able to agglutinate a variety of eucaryotic cells and that selected strains agglutinated trout erythrocytes; however, a correlation between strain virulence and the ability to agglutinate fish erythrocytes was not apparent. Moreover, whereas mannose was found to inhibit the agglutinating activity of several strains, two of the high-virulence strains displayed a transient, mannose-resistant hemagglutinating activity. No relationship between the carriage of pJM1 by the V. anguillarum strains and hemagglutinating activity was demonstrable. PMID:7333667

  14. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment of Pathogenic Vibrios in Marine Recreational Waters of Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Gregory; Lim, Keah-ying

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of three types of vibrios in Southern California recreational beach waters during the peak marine bathing season in 2007. Over 160 water samples were concentrated and enriched for the detection of vibrios. Four sets of PCR primers, specific for Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus species and the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene, respectively, were used for the amplification of bacterial genomic DNA. Of 66 samples from Doheny State Beach, CA, 40.1% were positive for V. cholerae and 27.3% were positive for V. parahaemolyticus, and 1 sample (1.5%) was positive for the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene. Of the 96 samples from Avalon Harbor, CA, 18.7% were positive for V. cholerae, 69.8% were positive for V. parahaemolyticus, and 5.2% were positive for the V. parahaemolyticus toxin gene. The detection of the V. cholerae genetic marker was significantly more frequent at Doheny State Beach, while the detection of the V. parahaemolyticus genetic marker was significantly more frequent at Avalon Harbor. A probability-of-illness model for V. parahaemolyticus was applied to the data. The risk for bathers exposed to recreational waters at two beaches was evaluated through Monte Carlo simulation techniques. The results suggest that the microbial risk from vibrios during beach recreation was below the illness benchmark set by the U.S. EPA. However, the risk varied with location and the type of water recreation activities. Surfers and children were exposed to a higher risk of vibrio diseases. Microbial risk assessment can serve as a useful tool for the management of risk related to opportunistic marine pathogens. PMID:23104412

  15. Effects of Dry Storage and Resubmersion of Oysters on Total Vibrio vulnificus and Total and Pathogenic (tdh+/trh+) Vibrio parahaemolyticus Levels.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Thomas P; Lydon, Keri A; Bowers, John C; Jones, Jessica L

    2015-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are the two leading causes of bacterial illnesses associated with raw shellfish consumption. Levels of these pathogens in oysters can increase during routine antifouling aquaculture practices involving dry storage in ambient air conditions. After storage, common practice is to resubmerge these stored oysters to reduce elevated Vv and Vp levels, but evidence proving the effectiveness of this practice is lacking. This study examined the changes in Vv and in total and pathogenic (thermostable direct hemolysin gene and the tdh-related hemolysin gene, tdh+ and trh+) Vp levels in oysters after 5 or 24 h of dry storage (28 to 32°C), followed by resubmersion (27 to 32°C) for 14 days. For each trial, replicate oyster samples were collected at initial harvest, after dry storage, after 7 days, and after 14 days of resubmersion. Oysters not subjected to dry storage were collected and analyzed to determine natural undisturbed vibrio levels (background control). Vibrio levels were measured using a most-probable-number enrichment followed by real-time PCR. After storage, vibrio levels (excluding tdh+ and trh+ Vp during 5-h storage) increased significantly (P < 0.001) from initial levels. After 7 days of resubmersion, Vv and total Vp levels (excluding total Vp in oysters stored for 5 h) were not significantly different (P < 0.1) from levels in background oysters. Vv and total and pathogenic Vp levels were not significantly different (P > 0.1) from levels in background oysters after 14 days of resubmersion, regardless of dry storage time. These data demonstrate that oyster resubmersion after dry storage at elevated ambient temperatures allows vibrio levels to return to those of background control samples. These results can be used to help minimize the risk of Vv and Vp illnesses and to inform the oyster industry on the effectiveness of routine storing and resubmerging of aquaculture oysters. PMID:26219373

  16. Description of a bacteriocinogenic plasmid in Beneckea harveyi.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, J O; Sizemore, R K

    1979-01-01

    A total of 795 strains of marine Vibrio species and Beneckea harveyi, a luminescent marine bacterium, were isolated from various sources in the area of Galveston Island, Tex., and screened for the production of bacteriocin-like substances. More than 8% of the Vibrio isolates produced low-molecular-weight (dialyzable) substances, which were lethal to a test strain of V. parahaemolyticus. Approximately 5% of the B. harveyi isolates produced higher-molecular-weight (nondialyzable) substances which were lethal to a test strain of B. harveyi. One of the B. harveyi strains (strain SY) produced a nondialyzable substance which was lethal to two of 39 strains of B. harveyi. The substance showed no activity toward 17 test strains drawn from the Vibrionaceae and Enterobacteriaceae. Strain SY showed no sensitivity to its own lethal agent and was shown by agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy to harbor a single plasmid of 38 x 10(6) daltons. Variants of strain SY lacking the plasmid were produced by growth in the presence of the antibiotic novobiocin. These variants lacked both the ability to produce the lethal substance and the ability to survive in its presence. The lethal agent produced by strain SY is the first bacteriocin reported in marine bacteria. The term "harveyicin" is proposed to name this lethal substance. Images PMID:317423

  17. An Improved Detection and Quantification Method for the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Muirhead, Andrew; Bazanella, Monika; Huete-Stauffer, Carla; Vezzulli, Luigi; Bourne, David G.

    2013-01-01

    DNA- and RNA-based PCR and reverse-transcription real-time PCR assays were developed for diagnostic detection of the vcpA zinc-metalloprotease implicated in the virulence of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. Both PCR methods were highly specific for V. coralliilyticus and failed to amplify strains of closely-related Vibrio species. The assays correctly detected all globally occurring V. coralliilyticus isolates including a newly-described isolate [TAV24] infecting gorgonians in the Mediterranean Sea and highlighted those isolates that had been potentially misidentified, in particular V. tubiashii strains ATCC 19105 and RE22, historically described as important oyster pathogens. The real-time assay is sensitive, detecting 10 gene copies and the relationships between gene copy number and cycle threshold (CT) were highly linear (R2?99.7). The real-time assay was also not affected by interference from non-target DNA. These assays are useful for rapid detection of V. coralliilyticus and monitoring of virulence levels in environmental samples, allowing for implementation of timely management steps to limit and possibly prevent losses due to V. coralliilyticus infection, as well as furthering investigations of factors affecting pathogenesis of this important marine pathogen. PMID:24339968

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Vibrio alginolyticus Strains V1 and V2, Opportunistic Marine Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Daniel; D’Alvise, Paul; Kalatzis, Panos G.; Kokkari, Constantina; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang

    2015-01-01

    We announce the draft genome sequences of Vibrio alginolyticus strains V1 and V2, isolated from juvenile Sparus aurata and Dentex dentex, respectively, during outbreaks of vibriosis. The genome sequences are 5,257,950 bp with a G+C content of 44.5% for V. alginolyticus V1 and 5,068,299 bp with a G+C content of 44.8% for strain V2. These genomes provide further insights into the putative virulence factors, prophage carriage, and evolution of this opportunistic marine pathogen. PMID:26139724

  19. Detection of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster enrichments by real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, George M; Nordstrom, Jessica L; Vickery, Michael C L; Bowen, Michael D; Meyer, Richard F; DePaola, Angelo

    2003-05-01

    A real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed and evaluated to detect the presence of the thermostable direct hemolysin gene (tdh), a current marker of pathogenicity in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The real time PCR fluorogenic probe and primer set was tested against a panel of numerous strains from 13 different bacterial species. Only V. parahaemolyticus strains possessing the tdh gene generated a fluorescent signal, and no cross-reaction was observed with tdh negative Vibrio or non-Vibrio spp. The assay detected a single colony forming unit (CFU) per reaction of a pure culture template. This sensitivity was achieved when the same template amount per reaction was tested in the presence of 2.5 microl of a tdh negative oyster:APW enrichment (oyster homogenate enriched in alkaline peptone water overnight at 35 degrees C). This real time technique was used to test 131 oyster:APW enrichments from an environmental survey of Alabama oysters collected between March 1999 and September 2000. The results were compared to those previously obtained using a streak plate procedure for culture isolation from the oyster:APW enrichment combined with use of a non-radioactive DNA probe for detection of the tdh gene. Real time PCR detected tdh in 61 samples, whereas the streak plate/probe method detected tdh in 15 samples. Only 24 h was required for detection of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in oyster:APW enrichments by real time PCR, whereas the streak plate/probe method required 3 days and was more resource intensive. This study demonstrated that real time PCR is a rapid and reliable technique for detecting V. parahaemolyticus possessing the tdh gene in pure cultures and in oyster enrichments. PMID:12654486

  20. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of Asparagopsis taxiformis from the Straits of Messina against pathogens relevant in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Genovese, G; Faggio, C; Gugliandolo, C; Torre, A; Spanò, A; Morabito, M; Maugeri, T L

    2012-02-01

    Ethanol extracts of Asparagopsis taxiformis collected from the Straits of Messina (Italy) were screened for antibacterial activity against pathogenic shellfish and fish bacteria previously isolated from local marine and brackish environments. Genetic labelling by DNA barcoding allowed us to identify the algal population as a biogeographical strain conspecific to A. taxiformis. The extract obtained in May showed the broadest antibacterial activity against all tested pathogenic bacteria, especially against Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. Moderate activity was observed against Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae and Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida, Salmonella sp., Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The absence of cytotoxic effects of active algal extracts was verified using trypan blue exclusion test on cells of digestive glands of Mytilus galloprovincialis. The results indicated that ethanol extracts of A. taxiformis could represent a source of antibacterial substances with potential use in aquaculture. PMID:22078751

  1. Construction and characterization of a fosmid library for pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yifan; Mo, Zhaolan; Mao, Yunxiang; Xiao, Peng; Li, Jie; Hao, Bin; Guo, Dongsheng

    2009-09-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a common bacterial pathogen in fish. However, little is known about its pathogenic mechanism, in part, because the entire genome has not been completely sequenced. We constructed a fosmid library for V. anguillarum containing 960 clones with an average insert size of 37.7 kb and 8.6-fold genome coverage. We characterized the library by end-sequencing 50 randomly selected clones. This generated 93 sequences with a total length of 57 485 bp covering 1.4% of the whole genome. Of these sequences, 58 (62.4%) were homologous to known genes, 30 (32.3%) were genes with hypothetical functions, and the remaining 5 (5.3%) were unknown genes. We demonstrated the utility of this library by PCR screening of 10 genes. This resulted in an average of 6.2 fosmid clones per screening. This fosmid library offers a new tool for gene screening and cloning of V. anguillarum, and for comparative genomic studies among Vibrio species.

  2. Vibrio cholerae non-O1 as a causal pathogen in cholera patients in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Oo, K N; Than, W M; Win, T; Thida, M; Aung, K S

    1995-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae non-O1 was studied in patients with rice watery diarrhoea admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital, Yangon. The study was conducted during 1993-1994 to determine the association of the pathogen with the disease. Altogether 771 rectal swabs were collected and examined. V. cholerae were isolated by the standard methods. The seasonal, age and sex distribution, serotyping and susceptibility of these isolates to antibiotics were investigated, V. cholerae were isolated from 233 (3O.2%) samples. Among them, V. cholerae O1 were isolated from 117 (5O%) samples and V. cholerae non-O1 from 116 (5O%) samples. The seasonal, age and sex distribution was identical in both V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae non-O1 groups. V. cholerae O139 was isolated during February 1994. Thus V. cholerae non-O1 was also one of the causal pathogens of cholera, like V. cholerae O1 in this community. PMID:8568194

  3. Differential specificity of selective culture media for enumeration of pathogenic vibrios: advantages and limitations of multi-plating methods.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Olivia D; Steward, Grieg F

    2015-04-01

    Plating environmental samples on vibrio-selective chromogenic media is a commonly used technique that allows one to quickly estimate concentrations of putative vibrio pathogens or to isolate them for further study. Although this approach is convenient, its usefulness depends directly on how well the procedure selects against false positives. We tested whether a chromogenic medium, CHROMagar Vibrio (CaV), used alone (single-plating) or in combination (double-plating) with a traditional medium thiosulfate-citrate-bile-salts (TCBS), could improve the discrimination among three pathogenic vibrio species (Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus) and thereby decrease the number of false-positive colonies that must be screened by molecular methods. Assays were conducted on water samples from two estuarine environments (one subtropical, one tropical) in a variety of seasonal conditions. The results of the double-plating method were confirmed by PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. Our data indicate that there is no significant difference in the false-positive rate between CaV and TCBS when using a single-plating technique, but determining color changes on the two media sequentially (double-plating) reduced the rate of false positive identification in most cases. The improvement achieved was about two-fold on average, but varied greatly (from 0- to 5-fold) and depended on the sampling time and location. The double-plating method was most effective for V. vulnificus in warm months, when overall V. vulnificus abundance is high (false positive rates as low as 2%, n=178). Similar results were obtained for V. cholerae (minimum false positive rate of 16%, n=146). In contrast, the false positive rate for V. parahaemolyticus was always high (minimum of 59%, n=109). Sequence analysis of false-positive isolates indicated that the majority of confounding isolates are from the Vibrionaceae family, however, members of distantly related bacterial groups were also able to grow on vibrio-selective media, even when using the double-plating method. In conclusion, the double-plating assay is a simple means to increase the efficiency of identifying pathogenic vibrios in aquatic environments and to reduce the number of molecular assays required for identity confirmation. However, the high spatial and temporal variability in the performance of the media mean that molecular approaches are still essential to obtain the most accurate vibrio abundance estimates from environmental samples. PMID:25602161

  4. Visualization of coral host-pathogen interactions using a stable GFP-labeled Vibrio coralliilyticus strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, F. Joseph; Krediet, Cory J.; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Winn, Karina; Wilson, Bryan; Huete-Stauffer, Carla; Willis, Bette L.; Bourne, David G.

    2015-06-01

    The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus has been implicated as the causative agent of coral tissue loss diseases (collectively known as white syndromes) at sites across the Indo-Pacific and represents an emerging model pathogen for understanding the mechanisms linking bacterial infection and coral disease. In this study, we used a mini-Tn7 transposon delivery system to chromosomally label a strain of V. coralliilyticus isolated from a white syndrome disease lesion with a green fluorescent protein gene (GFP). We then tested the utility of this modified strain as a research tool for studies of coral host-pathogen interactions. A suite of biochemical assays and experimental infection trials in a range of model organisms confirmed that insertion of the GFP gene did not interfere with the labeled strain's virulence. Using epifluorescence video microscopy, the GFP-labeled strain could be reliably distinguished from non-labeled bacteria present in the coral holobiont, and the pathogen's interactions with the coral host could be visualized in real time. This study demonstrates that chromosomal GFP labeling is a useful technique for visualization and tracking of coral pathogens and provides a novel tool to investigate the role of V. coralliilyticus in coral disease pathogenesis.

  5. NMR-based microbial metabolomics and the temperature-dependent coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus.

    PubMed

    Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Vizcaino, Maria I; Meyers, Alexander; Pollock, Elizabeth C; Huynh, Sara Lien; Schock, Tracey B; Morris, Pamela J; Bearden, Daniel W

    2009-10-15

    Coral bleaching occurs when the symbioses between coral animals and their zooxanthellae is disrupted, either as part of a natural cycle or as the result of unusual events. The bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus (type strain ATCC BAA-450) has been linked to coral disease globally (for example in the Mediterranean, Red Sea, Indian Ocean, and Great Barrier Reef) and like many other Vibrio species exhibits a temperature-dependent pathogenicity. The temperature-dependence of V. corallillyticus in regard to its metabolome was investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained of methanol-water extracts of intracellula rmetabolites (endometabolome) from multiple samples of the bacteria cultured into late stationary phase at 27 degrees C (virulent form) and 24 degrees C (avirulent form). The spectra were subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and significant temperature-based separations in PC1, PC2, and PC3 dimensions were observed. Betaine, succinate, and glutamate were identified as metabolites that caused the greatest temperature-based separations in the PC scores plots. With increasing temperature, betaine was shown to be down regulated, while succinate and glutamate were up regulated. PMID:19921875

  6. Genetically divergent Symbiodinium sp. display distinct molecular responses to pathogenic Vibrio and thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Briana; Cervino, James M; Haslun, Joshua A; Krucher, Nancy; Wier, Andrew M; Mannix, Alexandra L; Hughen, Konrad; Strychar, Kevin B

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change and anthropogenic activities are threatening the future survival of coral reef ecosystems. The ability of reef-building zooxanthellate coral to survive these stressors may be determined through fundamental differences within their symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium sp.). We define the in vitro apoptotic response of 2 evolutionarily distant Symbiodinium sp., subtypes B2 and C1, to determine the synergistic effects of disease and temperature on cell viability using flow cytometry. The putative yellow band disease (YBD) consortium of Vibrio spp. bacteria and temperature (33°C) had a positive synergistic effect on C1 apoptosis, while B2 displayed increased apoptosis to elevated temperature (29 and 33°C), the Vibrio consortium, and a lone virulent strain of V. alginolyticus, but no synergistic effects. Additionally, heat shock protein 60 expression revealed differential cell-mediated temperature sensitivity between subtypes via western blotting. This result marks the first evidence of Symbiodinium sp. apoptotic variations to YBD pathogens and emphasizes the potential impact of synergistic stress on globally distributed coral-Symbiodinium symbioses. PMID:25449326

  7. Vibrio vulnificus: death on the half shell. A personal journey with the pathogen and its ecology.

    PubMed

    Oliver, James D

    2013-05-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an estuarine bacterium which occurs in high numbers in filter-feeding molluscan shellfish, such as oysters. In individuals with certain underlying diseases, ingestion of the bacterium, e.g., in raw or undercooked oysters, can lead to a rapid and extremely fatal infection. Indeed, this one bacterium is responsible for 95 % of all seafood-borne deaths. In addition, the bacterium is capable of entering a preexisting lesion or cut obtained during coastal recreational activities, resulting in potentially fatal wound infections. This brief review, which comprised a presentation made at the Gordon Research Conference on "Oceans and Human Health," reflects over 35 years of research on this bacterium in the author's laboratory. It describes some of the known virulence factors and why males account for ca 85 % of all V. vulnificus cases. It notes the two genotypes now known to exist and how this pathogen enters a dormant, "viable but nonculturable" state during the winter months. Finally, the review discusses how global warming may be causing worldwide increases in the frequency and geographical extent of Vibrio infections. PMID:23263234

  8. Chromosome-mediated iron uptake system in pathogenic strains of Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, M L; Salinas, P; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L; Crosa, J H

    1988-01-01

    We describe in this work a new iron uptake system encoded by chromosomal genes in pathogenic strains of Vibrio anguillarum. This iron uptake system differs from the plasmid-encoded anguibactin-mediated system present in certain strains of V. anguillarum in several properties. The siderophore anguibactin is not utilized as an external siderophore, and although characteristic outer membrane proteins are synthesized under iron-limiting conditions, these are not related to the plasmid-mediated outer membrane protein OM2 associated with ferric anguibactin transport. Furthermore, the siderophore produced by the plasmidless strains may be functionally related to enterobactin as demonstrated by bioassays with enterobactin-deficient mutants, although its behavior under various chemical treatments suggested major differences from that siderophore. Hybridization experiments suggested that the V. anguillarum chromosome-mediated iron uptake system is unrelated genetically to either the anguibactin or enterobactin-associated iron assimilation systems. Images PMID:2965144

  9. Infection and immunization trials of Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) against fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, S; Deivasigamani, B; Alagappan, K M; Sakthivel, M

    2010-07-01

    Vibriosis is one of the most prevalent fish diseases caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio sp. Fish disease will be controlled by proper vaccination trials and maintenance of fish form. Pathogenicity for Asian seabass (Lates calcarifer) against V anguillarum results in necrosis and haemorrhagic areas near the base of fins, exopthalmia and ulcers on the skin surface. Around 50, 100, 200 microl of formalin killed bacterial cells were injected (Intraperitoneal) to three different size (5-10, 20-30, 35-50 g) of seabass fishes respectively and control sere as saline were maintained separately. The Relative Percentage Survival (RPS) for vaccinated fishes was 60, 75, and 62.5 respectively and the vaccinations for 20-30 g fishes stay alive. These results stated that the vaccination for fishes with 20-30 g size may fabricate good immune response. PMID:21186732

  10. First evidence for a Vibrio strain pathogenic to Mytilus edulis altering hemocyte immune capacities.

    PubMed

    Ben Cheikh, Yosra; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Morga, Benjamin; Godfrin, Yoann; Rioult, Damien; Le Foll, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial isolates were obtained from mortality events affecting Mytilus edulis and reported by professionals in 2010-2013 or from mussel microflora. Experimental infections allowed the selection of two isolates affiliated to Vibrio splendidus/Vibrio hemicentroti type strains: a virulent 10/068 1T1 (76.6% and 90% mortalities in 24 h and 96 h) and an innocuous 12/056 M24T1 (0% and 23.3% in 24 h and 96 h). These two strains were GFP-tagged and validated for their growth characteristics and virulence as genuine models for exposure. Then, host cellular immune responses to the microbial invaders were assessed. In the presence of the virulent strain, hemocyte motility was instantaneously enhanced but markedly slowed down after 2 h exposure. By contrast, hemocyte velocity increased in the presence of the innocuous 12/056 M24T1. At the same time interval, 10/068 1T1 invaded hemocytes and was more rapidly internalized than the innocuous strain. Extracellular products (ECPs) prepared from 10/068 1T1 cultures significantly inhibited phagocytic activity while 12/056 M24T1 ECPs had no effect. Furthermore, the pathogenic strain and its ECPs inhibited oxidative burst unlike 12/056 M24T1 strain/ECPs which enhanced ROS production. Taken together, our results suggest that the mussel pathogen 10/068 1T1 may escape immune response by altering hemocytes functions. PMID:26719026

  11. Genome anatomy of the gastrointestinal pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus of crustacean origin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an important human pathogen, is associated with gastroenteritis and transmitted through partially cooked seafood. It has become a major concern in the production and trade of marine food products. The prevalence of potentially virulent and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in raw seafood is of public health significance. Here we describe the genome sequence of a V. parahaemolyticus isolate of crustacean origin which was cultured from prawns in 2008 in Selangor, Malaysia (isolate PCV08-7). The next generation sequencing and analysis revealed that the genome of isolate PCV08-7 has closest similarity to that of V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633. However, there are certain unique features of the PCV08-7 genome such as the absence of TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), and the presence of HU-alpha insertion. The genome of isolate PCV08-7 encodes a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), an important virulence factor that classifies PCV08-7 isolate to be a serovariant of O3:K6 strain. Apart from these, we observed that there is certain pattern of genetic rearrangements that makes V. parahaemolyticus PCV08-7 a non-pandemic clone. We present detailed genome statistics and important genetic features of this bacterium and discuss how its survival, adaptation and virulence in marine and terrestrial hosts can be understood through the genomic blueprint and that the availability of genome sequence entailing this important Malaysian isolate would likely enhance our understanding of the epidemiology, evolution and transmission of foodborne Vibrios in Malaysia and elsewhere. PMID:24330647

  12. Ocean acidification and host-pathogen interactions: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, encountering Vibrio tubiashii.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Maria E; Baden, Susanne P; Russ, Sarah; Ellis, Robert P; Gong, Ningping; Hernroth, Bodil E

    2014-04-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) can shift the ecological balance between interacting organisms. In this study, we have used a model system to illustrate the interaction between a calcifying host organism, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and a common bivalve bacterial pathogen, Vibrio tubiashii, with organisms being exposed to a level of acidification projected to occur by the end of the 21st century. OA exposures of the mussels were carried out in relative long-term (4 months) and short-term (4 days) experiments. We found no effect of OA on the culturability of V.?tubiashii, in broth or in seawater. OA inhibited mussel shell growth and impaired crystalline shell structures but did not appear to affect mussel immune parameters (i.e haemocyte counts and phagocytotic capacity). Despite no evident impact on host immunity or growth and virulence of the pathogen, V.?tubiashii was clearly more successful in infecting mussels exposed to long-term OA compared to those maintained under ambient conditions. Moreover, OA exposed V.?tubiashii increased their viability when exposed to haemocytes of OA-treated mussel. Our findings suggest that even though host organisms may have the capacity to cope with periods of OA, these conditions may alter the outcome of host-pathogen interactions, favouring the success of the latter. PMID:24147969

  13. Following the infection process of vibriosis in Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) larvae through GFP-tagged pathogenic Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Dubert, Javier; Nelson, David R; Spinard, Edward J; Kessner, Linda; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Costa, Fiz da; Prado, Susana; Barja, Juan L

    2016-01-01

    Vibriosis represents the main bottleneck for the larval production process in shellfish aquaculture. While the signs of this disease in bivalve larvae are well known, the infection process by pathogenic Vibrio spp. during episodes of vibriosis has not been elucidated. To investigate the infection process in bivalves, the pathogens of larvae as V. tubiashii subsp. europaensis, V. neptunius and V. bivalvicida were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Larvae of Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) were inoculated with the GFP-labeled pathogens in different infection assays and monitored by microscopy. Manila clam larvae infected by distinct GFP-tagged Vibrio spp. in different challenges showed the same progression in the infection process, defining three infection stages. GFP-tagged Vibrio spp. were filtered by the larvae through the vellum and entered in the digestive system through the esophagus and stomach and colonized the digestive gland and particularly the intestine, where they proliferated during the first 2h of contact (Stage I), suggesting a chemotactic response. Then, GFP-tagged Vibrio spp. expanded rapidly to the surrounding organs in the body cavity from the dorsal to ventral region (Stage II; 6-8h), colonizing the larvae completely at the peak of infection (Stage III) (14-24h). Results demonstrated for the first time that the vibriosis is asymptomatic in Manila clam larvae during the early infection stages. Thus, the early colonization and the rapid proliferation of Vibrio pathogens within the body cavity supported the sudden and fatal effect of the vibriosis, since the larvae exhibited the first signs of disease when the infection process is advanced. As a first step in the elucidation of the potential mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis in bivalve larvae the enzymatic activities of the extracellular products released from the wild type V. neptunius, V. tubiashii subsp. europaensis and V. bivalvicida were determined and their cytotoxicity was demonstrated in fish and homeothermic cell lines for the first time. That activity was lost after heat treatment. PMID:26608554

  14. Occurrence of potentially pathogenic vibrios and related environmental factors in Songkhla Lake, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thongchankaew, Uraiwan; Mittraparp-arthorn, Pimonsri; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai; Tansila, Natta; Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2011-11-01

    Vibrios are halophilic bacteria that are ubiquitous in marine environments. Their occurrence in tropical lakes has rarely been investigated. In this study, the predominance and diversity of Vibrio spp. was investigated over a 12-month period in a coastal lagoon, Songkhla Lake, in southern Thailand. Water samples were collected at 2 stations in the estuary near Yor Island in Songkhla Lake. The predominant vibrios were detected by a culture-based method, using thiosulfate-citrate-bile salt-sucrose agar and CHROMagar Vibrio. The diversity of Vibrio spp. was evaluated using denaturant density gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The highest numbers of total vibrios and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in both areas were observed during the summer. There was no significant correlation between the numbers of vibrios, including V. parahaemolyticus, and either the water temperature or plankton density. Variations in Vibrio species were observed with changes in salinity. Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 were detected during the rainy season when the salinity dropped to nearly 0 parts per thousand. In both areas, V. alginolyticus was the most prominent species detected by the culture method, whereas Vibrio parahaemolyticus was detected by DGGE, every month. Other Vibrio spp. of potential public health concern were also detected by the culture method; they included V. vulnificus , V. fluvialis , and V. mimicus . PMID:22014235

  15. An Enriched European Eel Transcriptome Sheds Light upon Host-Pathogen Interactions with Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Callol, Agnès; Reyes-López, Felipe E.; Roig, Francisco J.; Goetz, Giles; Goetz, Frederick W.; Amaro, Carmen; MacKenzie, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are one of the principal bottlenecks for the European eel recovery. The aim of this study was to develop a new molecular tool to be used in host-pathogen interaction experiments in the eel. To this end, we first stimulated adult eels with different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), extracted RNA from the immune-related tissues and sequenced the transcriptome. We obtained more than 2x106 reads that were assembled and annotated into 45,067 new descriptions with a notable representation of novel transcripts related with pathogen recognition, signal transduction and the immune response. Then, we designed a DNA-microarray that was used to analyze the early immune response against Vibrio vulnificus, a septicemic pathogen that uses the gills as the portal of entry into the blood, as well as the role of the main toxin of this species (RtxA13) on this early interaction. The gill transcriptomic profiles obtained after bath infecting eels with the wild type strain or with a mutant deficient in rtxA13 were analyzed and compared. Results demonstrate that eels react rapidly and locally against the pathogen and that this immune-response is rtxA13-dependent as transcripts related with cell destruction were highly up-regulated only in the gills from eels infected with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, significant differences in the immune response against the wild type and the mutant strain also suggest that host survival after V. vulnificus infection could depend on an efficient local phagocytic activity. Finally, we also found evidence of the presence of an interbranchial lymphoid tissue in European eel gills although further experiments will be necessary to identify such tissue. PMID:26207370

  16. Molecular epidemiology and genetic variation of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Peru.

    PubMed

    Gavilan, Ronnie G; Zamudio, Maria L; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a foodborne pathogen that has become a public health concern at the global scale. The epidemiological significance of V. parahaemolyticus infections in Latin America received little attention until the winter of 1997 when cases related to the pandemic clone were detected in the region, changing the epidemic dynamics of this pathogen in Peru. With the aim to assess the impact of the arrival of the pandemic clone on local populations of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in Peru, we investigated the population genetics and genomic variation in a complete collection of non-pandemic strains recovered from clinical sources in Peru during the pre- and post-emergence periods of the pandemic clone. A total of 56 clinical strains isolated in Peru during the period 1994 to 2007, 13 strains from Chile and 20 strains from Asia were characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and checked for the presence of Variable Genomic Regions (VGRs). The emergence of O3:K6 cases in Peru implied a drastic disruption of the seasonal dynamics of infections and a shift in the serotype dominance of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. After the arrival of the pandemic clone, a great diversity of serovars not previously reported was detected in the country, which supports the introduction of additional populations cohabitating with the pandemic group. Moreover, the presence of genomic regions characteristic of the pandemic clone in other non-pandemic strains may represent early evidence of genetic transfer from the introduced population to the local communities. Finally, the results of this study stress the importance of population admixture, horizontal genetic transfer and homologous recombination as major events shaping the structure and diversity of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23696906

  17. The emergence of Vibrio pathogens in Europe: ecology, evolution, and pathogenesis (Paris, 11-12th March 2015).

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Wegner, K Mathias; Baker-Austin, Craig; Vezzulli, Luigi; Osorio, Carlos R; Amaro, Carmen; Ritchie, Jennifer M; Defoirdt, Tom; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Blokesch, Melanie; Mazel, Didier; Jacq, Annick; Cava, Felipe; Gram, Lone; Wendling, Carolin C; Strauch, Eckhard; Kirschner, Alexander; Huehn, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Global change has caused a worldwide increase in reports of Vibrio-associated diseases with ecosystem-wide impacts on humans and marine animals. In Europe, higher prevalence of human infections followed regional climatic trends with outbreaks occurring during episodes of unusually warm weather. Similar patterns were also observed in Vibrio-associated diseases affecting marine organisms such as fish, bivalves and corals. Basic knowledge is still lacking on the ecology and evolutionary biology of these bacteria as well as on their virulence mechanisms. Current limitations in experimental systems to study infection and the lack of diagnostic tools still prevent a better understanding of Vibrio emergence. A major challenge is to foster cooperation between fundamental and applied research in order to investigate the consequences of pathogen emergence in natural Vibrio populations and answer federative questions that meet societal needs. Here we report the proceedings of the first European workshop dedicated to these specific goals of the Vibrio research community by connecting current knowledge to societal issues related to ocean health and food security. PMID:26322036

  18. The emergence of Vibrio pathogens in Europe: ecology, evolution, and pathogenesis (Paris, 11–12th March 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Frédérique Le; Wegner, K. Mathias; Baker-Austin, Craig; Vezzulli, Luigi; Osorio, Carlos R.; Amaro, Carmen; Ritchie, Jennifer M.; Defoirdt, Tom; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Blokesch, Melanie; Mazel, Didier; Jacq, Annick; Cava, Felipe; Gram, Lone; Wendling, Carolin C.; Strauch, Eckhard; Kirschner, Alexander; Huehn, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Global change has caused a worldwide increase in reports of Vibrio-associated diseases with ecosystem-wide impacts on humans and marine animals. In Europe, higher prevalence of human infections followed regional climatic trends with outbreaks occurring during episodes of unusually warm weather. Similar patterns were also observed in Vibrio-associated diseases affecting marine organisms such as fish, bivalves and corals. Basic knowledge is still lacking on the ecology and evolutionary biology of these bacteria as well as on their virulence mechanisms. Current limitations in experimental systems to study infection and the lack of diagnostic tools still prevent a better understanding of Vibrio emergence. A major challenge is to foster cooperation between fundamental and applied research in order to investigate the consequences of pathogen emergence in natural Vibrio populations and answer federative questions that meet societal needs. Here we report the proceedings of the first European workshop dedicated to these specific goals of the Vibrio research community by connecting current knowledge to societal issues related to ocean health and food security. PMID:26322036

  19. Characterization of pathogenic vibrios isolated from bivalve hatcheries in Galicia, NW Atlantic coast of Spain. Description of Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaensis subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Prado, Susana; Dubert, Javier; Barja, Juan L

    2015-02-01

    The taxonomic position of the bivalve pathogen PP-638 was studied together with five similar isolates. The strains were isolated from flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum) cultures during outbreaks of disease in two shellfish hatcheries (Galicia, NW Spain). The pathogenicity, previously established for PP-638, was demonstrated with all isolates and for several bivalve species, including the original hosts. On the basis of phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequences, a tight group was defined within the genus Vibrio. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on concatenated sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and the five housekeeping genes recA, rpoA, pyrH, gyrB and ftsZ revealed that these strains form a cluster within the Orientalis clade, close to the species Vibrio tubiashii. The results of MLSA, the DDH rate and the phenotypic differences with the type strain of V. tubiashii supported the differentiation of the Galician isolates as a new subspecies within V. tubiashii, for which the name V. tubiashii subsp. europaensis subsp. nov. is proposed (type strain PP-638(T)=CECT 8136(T)=DSM 7349(T)) The emended description of V. tubiashii is included. The pathogenicity assays widen the host range of V. tubiashii to add two unreported species, Venerupis decussata and Donax trunculus, and the described as relatively resistant species V. philippinarum. PMID:25555343

  20. Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens. PMID:21314902

  1. The MSHA pilus of Vibrio parahaemolyticus has lectin functionality and enables TTSS-mediated pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Nicky; Houeix, Benoit; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Joshi, Lokesh; Boyd, Aoife

    2013-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a seafood-borne pathogen which causes acute inflammatory gastroenteritis--a process which is mediated by the translocation of type three secretion system effector proteins. The molecular interactions governing colonization of the intestinal epithelium by this pathogen remain poorly understood. The mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin (MSHA) pilus was identified in this study as a significant factor in bacterial-host cell adherence and subsequent pathogenesis towards Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells. Deletion of essential components of the MSHA pilus resulted in a 60% decrease in adherence and a similar reduction in bacterial uptake by human intestinal cells. The diminished adherence of MSHA mutants correlated with significant decreases in V. parahaemolyticus-induced Caco-2 cell lysis, cell rounding and IL-8 secretion. Glycan array comparison between the V. parahaemolyticus wild type and MSHA deficient mutants identified lectin functionality for the MSHA pilus with specificity towards the fucosylated blood group oligosaccharide antigens Lewis A and X and blood groups A and B. The MSHA pilus also exhibited high affinity for the structurally related asialo-GM1 ganglioside, lacto-N-fucopentaose I and lacto-N-difucohexaose I. We hypothesize that these glycans act as receptors for the MSHA pilus in the gastrointestinal tract, thereby facilitating efficient colonization of the intestinal epithelium by V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23981476

  2. Non-coding sRNAs regulate virulence in the bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Bardill, J. Patrick; Hammer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the waterborne bacterium responsible for worldwide outbreaks of the acute, potentially fatal cholera diarrhea. The primary factors this human pathogen uses to cause the disease are controlled by a complex regulatory program linking extracellular signaling inputs to changes in expression of several critical virulence genes. Recently it has been uncovered that many non-coding regulatory sRNAs are important components of the V. cholerae virulence regulon. Most of these sRNAs appear to require the RNA-binding protein, Hfq, to interact with and alter the expression of target genes, while a few sRNAs appear to function by an Hfq-independent mechanism. Direct base-pairing between the sRNAs and putative target mRNAs has been shown in a few cases but the extent of each sRNAs regulon is not fully known. Genetic and biochemical methods, coupled with computational and genomics approaches, are being used to validate known sRNAs and also to identify many additional putative sRNAs that may play a role in the pathogenic lifestyle of V. cholerae. PMID:22546941

  3. Detection, Identification, and Prevalence of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Fish and Coastal Environment in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Alaboudi, Akram R; Ababneh, Mustafa; Osaili, Tareq M; Shloul, Khalaf Al

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is widely distributed in the marine environments and considered the leading cause of human gastroenteritis in Asian countries. A total of 150 marketed fish and 50 water and sediment samples from the Gulf of Aqaba were examined for the prevalence of pathogenic strains of V. parahaemolyticus. A total of 132 typical isolates obtained from the primary selective medium (thiosulfate-citrate bile salt sucrose agar) and showed positive biochemical properties were subjected to confirmation by polymerase chain reaction targeting the gyrB and toxR genes. These genes were confirmed at rates of 82% (108 isolates) and 72% (95 isolates), respectively. The toxR positive isolates were tested for the presence of thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) virulence genes. Accordingly, the prevalence rates of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were 4%, 8%, and 12% in sediment, water, and fish samples, respectively. The 16S rRNA amplification and sequences were conducted for confirmation of the isolates and showing the relatedness among these isolates. The results showed that both 16S rRNA and toxR assays had same sensitivity and tested isolates had high nucleotide similarity irrespective of their sources. PMID:26554333

  4. Pathogenicity of Vibrio alginolyticus for Cultured Gilt-Head Sea Bream (Sparus aurata L.)

    PubMed Central

    Balebona, M. Carmen; Andreu, Manuel J.; Bordas, M. Angeles; Zorrilla, Irene; Moriñigo, Miguel A.; Borrego, Juan J.

    1998-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro pathogenic activities of whole cells and extracellular products of Vibrio alginolyticus for cultured gilt-head sea bream were evaluated. The 50% lethal doses ranged from 5.4 × 104 to 1.0 × 106 CFU/g of body weight. The strains examined had the ability to adhere to skin, gill, and intestinal mucus of sea bream and to cultured cells of a chinook salmon embryo cell line. In addition, the in vitro ability of V. alginolyticus to adhere to mucus and skin cells of sea bream was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. The biological activities of extracellular products of V. alginolyticus were hydrolytic activities; the products were able to degrade sea bream mucus. V. alginolyticus was cytotoxic for fish cell lines and lethal for sea bream. Moreover, the extracellular products could degrade sea bream tissues. However, experiments performed with the bath immersion inoculation technique demonstrated that V. alginolyticus should be considered a pathogen for sea bream only when the mucus layer is removed and the skin is damaged. PMID:9797276

  5. Refined identification of Vibrio bacterial flora from Acanthasther planci based on biochemical profiling and analysis of housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Posada, J A; Pratchett, M; Cano-Gomez, A; Arango-Gomez, J D; Owens, L

    2011-09-01

    We used a polyphasic approach for precise identification of bacterial flora (Vibrionaceae) isolated from crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) from Lizard Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia) and Guam (U.S.A., Western Pacific Ocean). Previous 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis was useful to allocate and identify isolates within the Photobacterium, Splendidus and Harveyi clades but failed in the identification of Vibrio harveyi-like isolates. Species of the V harveyi group have almost indistinguishable phenotypes and genotypes, and thus, identification by standard biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene analysis is commonly inaccurate. Biochemical profiling and sequence analysis of additional topA and mreB housekeeping genes were carried out for definitive identification of 19 bacterial isolates recovered from sick and wild COTS. For 8 isolates, biochemical profiles and topA and mreB gene sequence alignments with the closest relatives (GenBank) confirmed previous 16S rRNA-based identification: V. fortis and Photobacterium eurosenbergii species (from wild COTS), and V natriegens (from diseased COTS). Further phylogenetic analysis based on topA and mreB concatenated sequences served to identify the remaining 11 V harveyi-like isolates: V. owensii and V. rotiferianus (from wild COTS), and V. owensii, V. rotiferianus, and V. harveyi (from diseased COTS). This study further confirms the reliability of topA-mreB gene sequence analysis for identification of these close species, and it reveals a wider distribution range of the potentially pathogenic V. harveyi group. PMID:22013751

  6. A highly sensitive and flexible magnetic nanoprobe labeled immunochromatographic assay platform for pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Yong; Lu, Ying; Xu, Xiaowei; Yan, Jun; Pan, Yingjie

    2015-10-15

    A magnetic nanoprobe labeled immunochromatographic test strip (MNP/ICTS) was developed to detect food-borne pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Specific antibody against V. parahaemolyticus was used as test line by coating onto the nitrocellulose membrane. Magnetic nanoprobe was prepared by immobilizing the specific antibody onto the surface of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Specificity and sensitivity of the MNP/ICTS system were verified by artificially contaminated shrimp homogenate samples. Reliability and application feasibility of the MNP/ICTS system were demonstrated by using seafood samples (n=36). Comparing with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and traditional culture methods, the MNP/ICTS system is found to be not only a rapid qualitative analysis (~10 min), but also an accurately quantitative detection platform. Through its rapid magnetic separation property, the MNP/ICTS system is capable to flexibly combine with a sample enrichment and pre-incubation process. This combination makes the qualitative sensitivity for the food samples surged more than 100-fold. A naked-eye observation of 1.58×10(2) CFU/g V. parahaemolyticus was realized. This sensitivity could meet the V. parahaemolyticus test threshold value in many countries. Also, the total sample pre-treatment plus MNP/ICTS assay only needs about 4.5h. Namely, we can get test results in a day. Hence, the developed MNP/ICTS assay platform is simple, rapid and highly sensitive. It is a flexible test platform for pathogen detection. The favorable comparison with PCR and culture methods further proves that the developed MNP/ICTS is applicable into food-borne pathogen or other areas where a simple, rapid, sensitive and point-of-care analysis is desirable. PMID:26188497

  7. First description of 'Chalky back' phenomenon in banana prawns (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) and its possible association with Vibrio and Photobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Hatje, Eva; Minniti, Giusi; Stewart, Michael J; Neuman, Christina; Knibb, Wayne; Katouli, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Here we report a newly identified 'Chalky back' phenomenon in banana prawns (Fenneropenaeus merguiensis) farmed in North Queensland, Australia. This was characterized by localized white discoloured segmentation of the cervical groove, moreover, after cooking the prawns exploded, making them unfit for commercial sale. Histological examination revealed breakdown of gut and abdominal muscle tissue in some moribund specimens. We selectively isolated Vibrio spp., which are known prawn pathogens, from healthy and Chalky back specimens. Isolated bacteria were identified, typed and tested for the presence of eight virulence genes (VGs), biofilm formation, adherence and cytotoxicity to fish cells. In all, 32 isolates were recovered and identified as Vibrio harveyi, V. owensii, V. sinaloensis-like, V. campbellii, V. shilonii, Vibrio sp. and Photobacterium damselae using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. All V. harveyi carried VGs coding for haemolysin, toxR and flagella; formed biofilm; and adhered to both cell lines. This was similar to the V. sinaloensis-like strains that were only isolated from Chalky back specimens. Our data suggest that Vibrio spp. may play a role in the pathogenesis of Chalky back. This study is the first report of Chalky back phenomenon in farmed banana prawns that needs to be closely monitored by the industry. PMID:26825678

  8. Interaction of Vibrio spp. with the Inner Surface of the Digestive Tract of Penaeus monodon

    PubMed Central

    Soonthornchai, Wipasiri; Chaiyapechara, Sage; Jarayabhand, Padermsak; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2015-01-01

    Several species of Vibrio are the causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. In aquaculture, Vibrio harveyi (Vh) and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp) have long been considered as shrimp pathogens in freshwater, brackish and marine environments. Here we show by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that Penaeus monodon orally inoculated with each of these two pathogens via an Artemia diet had numerous bacteria attached randomly across the stomach surface, in single and in large biofilm-like clusters 6 h post-infection. A subsequent marked proliferation in the number of V. harveyi within the biofilm-like formations resulted in the development of infections in the stomach, the upper and middle midgut, but neither in the posterior midgut nor the hindgut. SEM also revealed the induced production of peritrichous pili-like structures by the Vp attaching to the stomach lining, whilst only a single polar fibre was seen forming an apparent physical bridge between Vh and the host’s epithelium. In contrast to these observations, no such adherences or linkages were seen when trials were conducted with non-pathogenic Vibrio spp. or with Micrococcus luteus, with no obvious resultant changes to the host’s gut surface. In naive shrimp, the hindgut was found to be a favorable site for bacteria notably curved, short-rod shaped bacteria which probably belong to Vibrio spp. Data from the current study suggests that pathogens of P. monodon must be able to colonize the digestive tract, particularly the stomach, where chitin is present, and then they use an array of virulent factors and enzymes to infect their host resulting in disease. Oral infection is a better way of mimicking natural routes of infection; investigating the host-bacteria interactions occurring in the digestive tract may lead to new strategies for the prevention or control of bacterial infections in penaeids. PMID:26285030

  9. Interaction of Vibrio spp. with the Inner Surface of the Digestive Tract of Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Soonthornchai, Wipasiri; Chaiyapechara, Sage; Jarayabhand, Padermsak; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2015-01-01

    Several species of Vibrio are the causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. In aquaculture, Vibrio harveyi (Vh) and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp) have long been considered as shrimp pathogens in freshwater, brackish and marine environments. Here we show by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that Penaeus monodon orally inoculated with each of these two pathogens via an Artemia diet had numerous bacteria attached randomly across the stomach surface, in single and in large biofilm-like clusters 6 h post-infection. A subsequent marked proliferation in the number of V. harveyi within the biofilm-like formations resulted in the development of infections in the stomach, the upper and middle midgut, but neither in the posterior midgut nor the hindgut. SEM also revealed the induced production of peritrichous pili-like structures by the Vp attaching to the stomach lining, whilst only a single polar fibre was seen forming an apparent physical bridge between Vh and the host's epithelium. In contrast to these observations, no such adherences or linkages were seen when trials were conducted with non-pathogenic Vibrio spp. or with Micrococcus luteus, with no obvious resultant changes to the host's gut surface. In naive shrimp, the hindgut was found to be a favorable site for bacteria notably curved, short-rod shaped bacteria which probably belong to Vibrio spp. Data from the current study suggests that pathogens of P. monodon must be able to colonize the digestive tract, particularly the stomach, where chitin is present, and then they use an array of virulent factors and enzymes to infect their host resulting in disease. Oral infection is a better way of mimicking natural routes of infection; investigating the host-bacteria interactions occurring in the digestive tract may lead to new strategies for the prevention or control of bacterial infections in penaeids. PMID:26285030

  10. The role of type III secretion system 2 in Vibrio parahaemolyticus pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Hyeilin; Orth, Kim

    2012-10-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterial pathogen, is emerging as a major cause of food-borne illnesses worldwide due to the consumption of raw seafood leading to diseases including gastroenteritis, wound infection, and septicemia. The bacteria utilize toxins and type III secretion system (T3SS) to trigger virulence. T3SS is a multi-subunit needle-like apparatus used to deliver bacterial proteins, termed effectors, into the host cytoplasm which then target various eukaryotic signaling pathways. V. parahaemolyticus carries two T3SSs in each of its two chromosomes, named T3SS1 and T3SS2, both of which play crucial yet distinct roles during infection: T3SS1 causes cytotoxicity whereas T3SS2 is mainly associated with enterotoxicity. Each T3SS secretes a unique set of effectors that contribute to virulence by acting on different host targets and serving different functions. Emerging studies on T3SS2 of V. parahaemolyticus, reveal its regulation, translocation, discovery, characterization of its effectors, and development of animal models to understand the enterotoxicity. This review on recent findings for T3SS2 of V. parahaemolyticus highlights a novel mechanism of invasion that appears to be conserved by other marine bacteria. PMID:23124738

  11. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the ?-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the ?-, ?- and ?-classes. VchCA, the ?-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the ?-class enzyme, VchCA? was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCA? inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCA?, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57?M). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCA? over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes. PMID:26850377

  12. Anion inhibition studies of the ?-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Dedeoglu, Nurcan; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the ?-, ?- and ?-classes. Here we report and anion inhibition study of the ?-CA, VchCA? with anions and other small molecules which inhibit metalloenzymes. The best VchCA? anion inhibitors were sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid, which showed KIs in the range of 54-86?M. Diethyldithiocarbonate was also an effective VchCA? inhibitor, with an inhibition constant of 0.73mM. The halides, cyanate, thiocyanate, cyanide, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, stannate, selenate, tellurate, divanadate, tetraborate, perrhenate, perruthenate, peroxydisulfate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, and fluorosulfonate showed affinity in the low millimolar range, with KIs of 2.3-9.5mM. Identification of selective inhibitors of VchCA? (over the human CA isoforms) may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzyme. PMID:26853167

  13. Genomic Science in Understanding Cholera Outbreaks and Evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX–? prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core- and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

  14. Insights into the environmental reservoir of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus using comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Lafon, Patricia C.; Garrett, Nancy M.; Lowe, Tiffany M.; Silberger, Daniel J.; Rowe, Lori A.; Frace, Michael; Parsons, Michele B.; Bopp, Cheryl A.; Rasko, David A.; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an aquatic halophilic bacterium that occupies estuarine and coastal marine environments, and is a leading cause of seafood-borne food poisoning cases. To investigate the environmental reservoir and potential gene flow that occurs among V. parahaemolyticus isolates, the virulence-associated gene content and genome diversity of a collection of 133 V. parahaemolyticus isolates were analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, demonstrated that there is genetic similarity among V. parahaemolyticus clinical and environmental isolates. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis of six representative V. parahaemolyticus isolates was used to identify genes that are unique to the clinical and environmental isolates examined. Comparative genomics demonstrated an O3:K6 environmental isolate, AF91, which was cultured from sediment collected in Florida in 2006, has significant genomic similarity to the post-1995 O3:K6 isolates. However, AF91 lacks the majority of the virulence-associated genes and genomic islands associated with these highly virulent post-1995 O3:K6 genomes. These findings demonstrate that although they do not contain most of the known virulence-associated regions, some V. parahaemolyticus environmental isolates exhibit significant genetic similarity to clinical isolates. This highlights the dynamic nature of the V. parahaemolyticus genome allowing them to transition between aquatic and host-pathogen states. PMID:25852665

  15. Interactions between the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus and red-tide dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Kyeong Ah; Jeong, Hae Jin

    2011-06-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogenic bacterium in marine and estuarine waters. To investigate interactions between V. parahaemolyticus and co-occurring redtide dinoflagellates, we monitored the daily abundance of 5 common red tide dinoflagellates in laboratory culture; Amphidinium carterae, Cochlodinium ploykrikoides, Gymnodinium impudicum, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Additionally, we measured the ingestion rate of each dinoflagellate on V. parahaemolyticus as a function of prey concentration. Each of the dinoflagellates responded differently to the abundance of V. parahaemolyticus. The abundances of A. carterae and P. micans were not lowered by V. parahaemolyticus, whereas that of C. polykrikodes was lowered considerably. The harmful effect depended on bacterial concentration and incubation time. Most C. polykrikoides cells died after 1 hour incubation when the V. parahaemolyticus concentration was 1.4×107 cells ml-1, while cells died within 2 days of incubation when the bacterial concentration was 1.5×106 cells ml-1. With increasing V. parahaemolyticus concentration, ingestion rates of P. micans, P. minimum, and A. carterae on the prey increased, whereas that on C. polykrikoides decreased. The maximum or highest ingestion rates of P. micans, P. minimum, and A. carterae on V. parahaemolyticus were 55, 5, and 2 cells alga-1 h-1, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that V. parahaemolyticus can be both the killer and prey for some red tide dinoflagellates.

  16. Vibrio cholerae pathogen from the freshwater-cultured whiteleg shrimp Penaeus vannamei and control with Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haipeng; An, Jian; Zheng, Weidong; He, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Vibriosis has become a major global economic problem in freshwater-farmed whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus vannamei). The prevention and control of vibriosis are now priority research topics. In this study, a pathogenic strain (QH) was isolated from vibriosis-infected freshwater-farmed P. vannamei that resulted in leg yellowing and was identified as a Vibrio cholerae isolate through phylogenetic analysis and the API 32GN system. A phylogenetic tree that was constructed using the neighbor-joining method further confirmed the QH isolate as a V. cholerae strain. A virulent outer membrane protein (ompU) gene was found to be present in the QH isolate, which further confirmed its pathogenicity. In addition, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus conferred significant protection against V. cholerae: B. bacteriovorus exhibited significant bacteriolytic effects on the V. cholerae pathogen, possessed a wide prey range that included Vibrio pathogens, and displayed a positive protective efficacy against experimental V. cholerae infection in P. vannamei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the control of shrimp pathogen V. cholerae with B. bacteriovorus. PMID:26146226

  17. Zebrafish as a useful model for zoonotic Vibrio parahaemolyticus pathogenicity in fish and human.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Dong, Xuehong; Chen, Biao; Zhang, Yonghua; Zu, Yao; Li, Weiming

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important aquatic zoonotic pathogen worldwide that causes vibriosis in many marine fish, and sepsis, gastroenteritis and wound infection in humans. However, the pathogenesis of different sources of V. parahaemolyticus is not fully understood. Here, we examined the pathogenicity and histopathology of fish (V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164) and human (V. parahaemolyticus 17) strains in a zebrafish (Danio rerio). We found that different infection routes resulted in different mortality in zebrafish. Moreover, death due to V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164 infection occurred quicker than that caused by V. parahaemolyticus 17 infection. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of liver, kidney and intestine sections showed histological lesions in all three organs after infection with either strain. V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164 caused more severe damage than V. parahaemolyticus 17. In particular, V. parahaemolyticus 1.2164 treatment induced more serious hydropic degeneration and venous sinus necrosis in the liver than V. parahaemolyticus 17 treatment. The expression levels of three proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1β (il1β), interferon phi 1 (ifnϕ1) and tumor necrosis factor α (tnfα), as determined by quantitative real-time PCR, were upregulated in all examined tissues of infected fish. Notably, the peak levels of tnfα were significantly higher than those of il1β and ifnϕ1, suggesting, together with pathological results, that tnfα and il1β play an important role in acute sepsis. High amounts of tnfα may be related to acute liver necrosis, while ifnϕ1 may respond to V. parahaemolyticus and play an antibacterial role for chronically infected adult zebrafish. Taken together, our results suggest that the zebrafish model of V. parahaemolyticus infection is useful for studying strain differences in V. parahaemolyticus pathogenesis. PMID:26519599

  18. Two pathogens of Greenshell mussel larvae, Perna canaliculus: Vibrio splendidus and a V. coralliilyticus/neptunius-like isolate.

    PubMed

    Kesarcodi-Watson, A; Kaspar, H; Lategan, M J; Gibson, L

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial pathogens of Greenshell mussel (GSM) larvae can cause batch losses during hatchery production. Twenty-two isolates were screened using a larval bioassay. Two strains were identified as potential pathogens. Phenotypic identification of these strains revealed two non-reactive Gram-negative, oxidase positive rods. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Vibrio splendidus and a V. coralliilyticus/neptunius-like isolate as pathogens of GSM larvae, with an ability to cause 83% and 75% larval mortality in vitro, respectively, at a concentration of 10(2) CFU mL(-1). Histopathology indicated that the route of infection was via the digestive system. Using healthy larvae as target hosts, Koch's postulates were confirmed for the two isolates. This is the first report on pathogens of GSM larvae. PMID:19538643

  19. Characterization and pathogenicity of the zinc metalloprotease empA of Vibrio anguillarum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Chen, Jixiang; Yang, Guanpin; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Yun; Wang, Min

    2007-03-01

    The extracellular zinc metalloprotease (EmpA) is a putative pathogenic factor involved in the invasive process of the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. It is synthesized as a 611-amino-acid preproprotease. The gene encoding EmpA (empA) has already been cloned and sequenced. In this study, empA was inserted into pET24d(+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Recombinant EmpA with His-tag was purified in a single step with a His-binding Ni-affinity column to a purity >95%. In addition, proteolytic activity, cytotoxicity, fish pathogenicity, and solubility of the recombinant protein were determined. PMID:17262176

  20. Temporal and Spatial Variability in Culturable Pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Olivia D.; Hou, Aixin; Vithanage, Gayatri; Fujioka, Roger S.; Steward, Grieg F.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the abundance, distribution, and virulence gene content of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus in the waters of southern Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana on four occasions from October 2005 to September 2006, using selective cultivation and molecular assays. The three targeted pathogenic vibrios were generally below the detection level in January 2006, when the water was cold (13°C), and most abundant in September 2006, when the lake water was warmest (30°C). The maximum values for these species were higher than reported previously for the lake by severalfold to orders of magnitude. The only variable consistently correlated with total vibrio abundance within a single sampling was distance from shore (P = 0.000). Multiple linear regression of the entire data set revealed that distance from shore, temperature, and turbidity together explained 82.1% of the variability in total vibrio CFU. The log-transformed mean abundance of V. vulnificus CFU in the lake was significantly correlated with temperature (P = 0.014), but not salinity (P = 0.625). Virulence-associated genes of V. cholerae (ctx) and V. parahaemolyticus (trh and tdh) were not detected in any isolates of these species (n = 128 and n = 20, respectively). In contrast, 16S rRNA typing of V. vulnificus (n = 298) revealed the presence of both environmental (type A) and clinical (type B) strains. The percentage of the B-type V. vulnificus was significantly higher in the lake in October 2005 (35.8% of the total) than at other sampling times (P ≤ 0.004), consistent with the view that these strains represent distinct ecotypes. PMID:21642406

  1. Vibrio infections triggering mass mortality events in a warming Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Previati, Monica; Pruzzo, Carla; Marchese, Anna; Bourne, David G; Cerrano, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    Mass mortality events of benthic invertebrates in the temperate north-western (NW) Mediterranean Sea have been observed in recent seasons. A 16 month in situ study in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea) demonstrated that the occurrence of Paramuricea clavata mortality episodes were concomitant to a condition of prolonged high sea surface temperatures, low chlorophyll concentrations and the presence of culturable Vibrio spp. in seawater. The occurrence of Vibrio spp. at the seasonal scale was correlated with temperature; with few vibrios retrieved on specific media when the temperature dropped below 18 degrees C and a sharp increase of vibrios abundance (up to 3.4 x 10(4) MPN l(-1)) when the temperature was greater than or equal to 22 degrees C. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analysis of Vibrio isolates associated with healthy and diseased P. clavata colonies collected during a mortality episode showed that these bacteria were significantly more abundant in diseased than in healthy corals and were related to the V. harveyi, V. splendidus and V. coralliilyticus groups, the latter only identified in diseased organisms. Inoculation of bacterial isolates from these groups onto healthy P. clavata in aquaria caused disease signs and death in a range of Vibrio concentrations, temperature values and trophic conditions consistent with those recorded in the field. It is concluded that Vibrio infections may act as an additional triggering mechanism of mass mortality events in the coastal Mediterranean Sea and that their occurrence is climate-linked. Predicted global warming leading to long-lasting hot summer periods together with stratification resulting in energetic constraints represent a major threat to the survival of benthic invertebrates in the temperate NW Mediterranean Sea due to potential disease outbreak associated with Vibrio pathogens. PMID:20370818

  2. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  3. Exposure to the Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Producer Alexandrium catenella Increases the Susceptibility of the Oyster Crassostrea gigas to Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Khalil, Celina; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Abadie, Eric; Savar, Veronique; Amzil, Zouher; Laabir, Mohamed; Rolland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of massive Crassostrea gigas summer mortalities results from complex interactions between oysters, opportunistic pathogens and environmental factors. In a field survey conducted in 2014 in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), we evidenced that the development of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella, which produces paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), was concomitant with the accumulation of PSTs in oyster flesh and the occurrence of C. gigas mortalities. In order to investigate the possible role of toxic algae in this complex disease, we experimentally infected C. gigas oyster juveniles with Vibrio tasmaniensis strain LGP32, a strain associated with oyster summer mortalities, after oysters were exposed to Alexandrium catenella. Exposure of oysters to A. catenella significantly increased the susceptibility of oysters to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. On the contrary, exposure to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense or to the haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea used as a foraging alga did not increase susceptibility to V. tasmaniensis LGP32. This study shows for the first time that A. catenella increases the susceptibility of Crassostrea gigas to pathogenic vibrios. Therefore, in addition to complex environmental factors explaining the mass mortalities of bivalve mollusks, feeding on neurotoxic dinoflagellates should now be considered as an environmental factor that potentially increases the severity of oyster mortality events. PMID:26784228

  4. Is Vibrio fluvialis Emerging As a Pathogen with Epidemic Potential in Coastal Region of Eastern India Following Cyclone Aila?

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Subhajit; Bhattacharjee, Sayantani; Bal, Baishali; Pal, Reshmi; Niyogi, Swapan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    An isolated area with diarrhoea epidemic was explored at Pakhirala village of the Sundarbans, a coastal region of South 24 Parganas district of West Bengal, eastern India. The Pakhirala village was surrounded by other villages affected by a similar epidemic. The affected villages experienced this epidemic following the cyclone Aila, which had hit the coastal region of the Sundarbans in eastern India. In Pakhirala, the situation was the worst. Within a span of six weeks (5 June–20 July 2009), 3,529 (91.2%) of 3,871 residents were affected by watery diarrhoea. Of all the cases (n=3,529), 918 (26%) were affected by moderate to severe diarrhoea. In other villages, 28,550 (70%) of the 40,786 people were affected; of them, 3,997 (14%) had moderate to severe watery diarrhoea. The attack rate and the severity of the cases were significantly higher in Pakhirala village compared to other affected villages. The laboratory results revealed that Vibrio fluvialis was the predominant pathogen in Pakhirala village (5 of 6 laboratory-confirmed organisms) whereas Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa was the predominant pathogen in other villages of Gosaba block (7 of 9 bacteriologically-confirmed organisms). This result indicates that V. fluvialis behaves more aggressively than V. cholerae O1 in an epidemic situation with a higher attack rate and a different clinical picture. An in-depth study is required to explore its pathogenicity in detail, geographical distribution, and possible control measures, including development of specific vaccine preparation and determination of its efficacy. PMID:20824973

  5. Antibiofilm activity of Dendrophthoe falcata against different bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Rameshkumar, Ramakrishnan; Sivakumar, Nallusamy; Al Amri, Issa S; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah; Ramesh, Manikandan

    2012-12-01

    Dendrophthoe falcata is a hemiparasitic plant commonly used for ailments such as ulcers, asthma, impotence, paralysis, skin diseases, menstrual troubles, pulmonary tuberculosis, and wounds. In this context, the validations of the traditional claim that the leaf extract of D. falcata possesses antibiofilm and anti-quorum sensing activity against different bacterial pathogens were assessed. The bacterial biofilms were quantified by crystal violet staining. Among the 17 bacterial pathogens screened, the methanolic fraction of the leaf extract clearly demonstrated antibiofilm activity for Proteus mirabilis, Vibrio vulnificus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Shigella sonnei, Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, and Proteus vulgaris. At biofilm inhibitory concentrations, biofilm formation was reduced by up to 70-90?%. Furthermore, the potential quorum-sensing activity of the leaf extract was tested by agar well diffusion using Chromobacterium violaceum (ATCC 12472 & CV O26) reporter strains. The inhibition of violacein production may be due to direct or indirect interference on QS by active constituents or the interactive effect of different phytocompounds present in the extracts. This is the first report on antibiofilm and QS activity of D. falcata leaf extracts, signifying the scope for development of complementary medicine for biofilm-associated infections. PMID:23115018

  6. The Phytoplankton Nannochloropsis oculata Enhances the Ability of Roseobacter Clade Bacteria to Inhibit the Growth of Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, Emilia Noor; Eguchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytoplankton cultures are widely used in aquaculture for a variety of applications, especially as feed for fish larvae. Phytoplankton cultures are usually grown in outdoor tanks using natural seawater and contain probiotic or potentially pathogenic bacteria. Some Roseobacter clade isolates suppress growth of the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. However, most published information concerns interactions between probiotic and pathogenic bacteria, and little information is available regarding the importance of phytoplankton in these interactions. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to identify probiotic Roseobacter clade members in phytoplankton cultures used for rearing fish larvae and to investigate their inhibitory activity towards bacterial fish pathogens in the presence of the phytoplankton Nannochloropsis oculata. Methodology/Principal Findings The fish pathogen V. anguillarum, was challenged with 6 Roseobacter clade isolates (Sulfitobacter sp. (2 strains), Thalassobius sp., Stappia sp., Rhodobacter sp., and Antarctobacter sp.) from phytoplankton cultures under 3 different nutritional conditions. In an organic nutrient-rich medium (VNSS), 6 Roseobacter clade isolates, as well as V. anguillarum, grew well (109 CFU/ml), even when cocultured. In contrast, in a phytoplankton culture medium (ESM) based on artificial seawater, coculture with the 6 isolates decreased the viability of V. anguillarum by approximately more than 10-fold. Excreted substances in media conditioned by growth of the phytoplankton N. oculata (NCF medium) resulted in the complete eradication of V. anguillarum when cocultured with the roseobacters. Autoclaved NCF had the same inhibitory effect. Furthermore, Sulfitobacter sp. much more efficiently incorporated 14C- photosynthetic metabolites (14C-EPM) excreted by N. oculata than did V. anguillarum. Conclusion/Significance Cocultures of a phytoplankton species and Roseobacter clade members exhibited a greater antibacterial effect against an important fish pathogen (V. anguillarum) than roseobacters alone. Thus, cooperation of N. oculata, and perhaps other phytoplankton species, with certain roseobacters might provide a powerful tool for eliminating fish pathogens from fish-rearing tanks. PMID:22053210

  7. Selected Bacterial Strains Protect Artemia spp. from the Pathogenic Effects of Vibrio proteolyticus CW8T2

    PubMed Central

    Verschuere, Laurent; Heang, Hanglamong; Criel, Godelieve; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy

    2000-01-01

    In this study Vibrio proteolyticus CW8T2 has been identified as a virulent pathogen for Artemia spp. Its infection route has been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. The pathogen affected microvilli and gut epithelial cells, disrupted epithelial cell junctions, and reached the body cavity, where it devastated cells and tissues. In vivo antagonism tests showed that preemptive colonization of the culture water with nine selected bacterial strains protected Artemia juveniles against the pathogenic effects. Two categories of the selected strains could be distinguished: (i) strains providing total protection, as no mortality occurred 2 days after the experimental infection with V. proteolyticus CW8T2, with strain LVS8 as a representative, and (ii) strains providing partial protection, as significant but not total mortality was observed, with strain LVS2 as a representative. The growth of V. proteolyticus CW8T2 in the culture medium was slowed down in the presence of strains LVS2 and LVS8, but growth suppression was distinctly higher with LVS8 than with LVS2. It was striking that the strains that gave only partial protection against the pathogen in the in vivo antagonism test showed also a restricted capability to colonize the Artemia compared to the strains providing total protection. The in vivo antagonism tests and the filtrate experiments showed that probably no extracellular bacterial compounds were involved in the protective action but that the living cells were required to protect Artemia against V. proteolyticus CW8T2. PMID:10698783

  8. Molecular cloning of the recA analog from the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, J.T. )

    1989-11-01

    The recA analog from Vibrio anguillarum 775 was isolated by complementation of recA mutations in Escherichia coli, and its protein product was identified. The recA analog promoted recombination between two partially deleted lactose operons, stimulated both spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced phage production in RecA- lambda lysogens, and restored near wild-type levels of resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate.

  9. Molecular cloning of the recA analog from the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J T

    1989-01-01

    The recA analog from Vibrio anguillarum 775 was isolated by complementation of recA mutations in Escherichia coli, and its protein product was identified. The recA analog promoted recombination between two partially deleted lactose operons, stimulated both spontaneous and mitomycin C-induced phage production in RecA- lambda lysogens, and restored near wild-type levels of resistance to UV radiation and methyl methanesulfonate. PMID:2681167

  10. Crystal structure and kinetic studies of a tetrameric type II ?-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ferraroni, Marta; Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a zinc enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate (hydrogen carbonate) and a proton. CAs have been extensively investigated owing to their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Currently, CA inhibitors are widely used as antiglaucoma, anticancer and anti-obesity drugs and for the treatment of neurological disorders. Recently, the potential use of CA inhibitors to fight infections caused by protozoa, fungi and bacteria has emerged as a new research direction. In this article, the cloning and kinetic characterization of the ?-CA from Vibrio cholerae (VchCA?) are reported. The X-ray crystal structure of this new enzyme was solved at 1.9?Å resolution from a crystal that was perfectly merohedrally twinned, revealing a tetrameric type II ?-CA with a closed active site in which the zinc is tetrahedrally coordinated to Cys42, Asp44, His98 and Cys101. The substrate bicarbonate was found bound in a noncatalytic binding pocket close to the zinc ion, as reported for a few other ?-CAs, such as those from Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. At pH 8.3, the enzyme showed a significant catalytic activity for the physiological reaction of the hydration of CO2 to bicarbonate and protons, with the following kinetic parameters: a kcat of 3.34 × 10(5)?s(-1) and a kcat/Km of 4.1 × 10(7)?M(-1)?s(-1). The new enzyme, on the other hand, was poorly inhibited by acetazolamide (Ki of 4.5?µM). As this bacterial pathogen encodes at least three CAs, an ?-CA, a ?-CA and a ?-CA, these enzymes probably play an important role in the life cycle and pathogenicity of Vibrio, and it cannot be excluded that interference with their activity may be exploited therapeutically to obtain antibiotics with a different mechanism of action. PMID:26627652

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hidehiro; Van, Phan Thi; Dang, Lua T.

    2015-01-01

    A strain of Vibrio (KC13.17.5) causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp in northern Vietnam was isolated. Normally, AHPND is caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but the genomic sequence of the strain indicated that it belonged to Vibrio harveyi. The sequence data included plasmid-like sequences and putative virulence genes. PMID:26383659

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hidehiro; Van, Phan Thi; Dang, Lua T; Hirono, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    A strain of Vibrio (KC13.17.5) causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp in northern Vietnam was isolated. Normally, AHPND is caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but the genomic sequence of the strain indicated that it belonged to Vibrio harveyi. The sequence data included plasmid-like sequences and putative virulence genes. PMID:26383659

  13. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  14. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  15. Selection and identification of non-pathogenic bacteria isolated from fermented pickles with antagonistic properties against two shrimp pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zokaeifar, Hadi; Balcázar, José Luis; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Arshad, Aziz; Saad, Che Roos

    2012-06-01

    In this study, potential probiotic strains were isolated from fermented pickles based on antagonistic activity against two shrimp pathogens (Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). Two strains L10 and G1 were identified by biochemical tests, followed by16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis as Bacillus subtilis, and characterized by PCR amplification of repetitive bacterial DNA elements (Rep-PCR). Subsequently, B. subtilis L10 and G1 strains were tested for antibacterial activity under different physical conditions, including culture medium, salinity, pH and temperature using the agar well diffusion assay. Among the different culture media, LB broth was the most suitable medium for antibacterial production. Both strains showed the highest level of antibacterial activity against two pathogens at 30 °C and 1.0% NaCl. Under the pH conditions, strain G1 showed the greatest activity against V. harveyi at pH 7.3-8.0 and against V. parahaemolyticus at pH 6.0-8.0, whereas strain L10 showed the greatest activity against two pathogens at pH 7.3. The cell-free supernatants of both strains were treated with four different enzymes in order to characterize the antibacterial substances against V. harveyi. The result showed considerable reduction of antibacterial activity for both strains, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the antibacterial substances. A wide range of tolerance to NaCl, pH and temperature was also recorded for both strains. In addition, both strains showed no virulence effect in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. On the basis of these results and safety of strains to L. vannamei, they may be considered for future challenge experiments in shrimp as a very promising alternative to the use of antibiotics. PMID:22491136

  16. Enzymatic characterization of Vibrio alginolyticus strains isolated from bivalves harvested at Venice Lagoon (Italy) and Guanabara Bay (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Lafisca, Andrea; Pereira, Christiane Soares; Giaccone, Valério; Rodrigues, Dalia dos Prazeres

    2008-01-01

    The aquatic ecosystem is the natural habitat of microorganisms including Vibrio and Aeromonas genus which are pathogenic to human and animals. In the present investigation the frequency of these bacteria and the enzymatic characteristics of 34 Vibrio alginolyticus strains isolated from bivalves harvested in Venice Lagoon (Italy) and Guanabara Bay (Brazil) were carried out from November 2003 to February 2004. The mussels' samples were submitted to enrichment in Alkaline Peptone Water (APW) added with 1% of sodium chloride (NaCl) and APW plus 3% NaCl incubated at 37 degrees C for 18-24 h. Following the samples were streaked onto TCBS Agar (Thiossulfate Citrate Bile Sucrose Agar) and the suspected colonies were submitted to biochemical characterization. Also, the Vibrio alginolyticus strains were evaluated to collagenase, elastase and chondroitinase production. The results showed the isolation of 127 microorganisms distributed as follows: 105 Vibrio strains such as V. alginolyticus (32.4%), V. harveyi (19%) and V. parahaemolyticus (7.6%), 20 Aeromonas strains and two Plesiomonas shigelloides were the main pathogens isolated. We observed the production of the three enzymes from V. alginolyticus strains considered as the main virulence factors of the bacteria, especially in cases of human dermatological infection. PMID:18813756

  17. Immersion vaccination of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) with two pathogenic strains of Vibrio anguillarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, R.W.; Antipa, R.; Amend, D.F.

    1979-01-01

    Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were immersion-vaccinated in suspensions containing 5 × 107, 5 × 106, 5 × 105, or 5 × 104 bacteria/mL of bivalent or monovalent, formalin-killedVibrio anguillarum, Types I and II. The fish were split into two lots and held for 54 d. At that time one lot was challenged with living, virulent V. anguillarum, Type I, and one with living, virulent V.anguillarum, Type II. Immunization with bivalent bacterin effectively protected the fish from vibriosis, but monovalent vaccine was effective only against the homologous challenge. Immunization with the highest concentration of Type I monovalent bacterin resulted in 0% Type I and 58% Type II challenge mortality. Immunization with the highest concentration of Type II monovalent bacterin resulted in 41% Type I and 0% Type II challenge mortality. Immunization with the highest concentration of bivalent Type I/Type II bacterin resulted in 2% mortality in both challenges. Protective bacterins were effective at concentrations down to 5 × 105 bacteria/mL.Key words: immersion vaccination, bivalent vaccines, Vibrio anguillarum, vibriosis.

  18. [Pathogenic Vibrios in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) served at restaurants in Rio de Janeiro: a public health warning].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Christiane Soares; Viana, Célio Mauro; Rodrigues, Dália dos Prazeres

    2007-01-01

    Forty oyster samples (Crassostrea rhizophorae) served raw in 15 restaurants in the city of Rio de Janeiro were evaluated in order to investigate the presence of Vibrio spp. The oyster samples were analyzed and subjected to enrichment in alkaline peptone water with the addition of 1 and 3% NaCl and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Following this, the cultures were seeded onto thiosulfate citrate bile sucrose agar (TCBS) and the suspected colonies were subjected to biochemical characterization. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio carchariae, Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus were the main species (> 60%) isolated from raw oysters. PMID:17653465

  19. Facile synthesis of multifunctional multi-walled carbon nanotube for pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus detection in fishery and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Hu, Jia; Sun, Jin-Sheng; Li, Yan; Xue, Shu-Xia; Chen, Xiao-Qin; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Du, Gui-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Interest in carbon nanotubes for detecting the presence of pathogens arises because of developments in chemical vapor deposition synthesis and progresses in biomolecular modification. Here we reported the facile synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which functioned as immuno-, magnetic, fluorescent sensors in detecting Vibrio alginolyticus (Va). The structures and properties of functionalized MWCNTs were characterized by ultraviolet (UV), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), magnetic property measurement system (MPMS) and fluorescent spectra (FL). It was found that the functionalized MWCNTs showed: (1) low nonspecific adsorption for antibody-antigen, (2) strong interaction with antibody, and (3) high immune-magnetic activity for pathogenic cells. Further investigations revealed a strong positive linear relationship (R=0.9912) between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Va in the range of 9.0 × 10(2) to 1.5 × 10(6) cfum L(-1). Moreover, the relative standard deviation for 11 replicate detections of 1.0 × 10(4) cfum L(-1) Va was 2.4%, and no cross-reaction with the other four strains was found, indicating a good specificity for Va detection. These results demonstrated the remarkable advantages of the multifunctional MWCNTs, which offer great potential for the rapid, sensitive and quantitative detection of Va in fishery and environmental samples. PMID:25059166

  20. Screening of marine fungus from Nanji Island and activity of their metabolites against pathogenic Vibrio from Pseudosciaena crocea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shujiang; Li, Shuping; Liu, Huihui; Zhao, Qian; Wang, Jieyou; Yan, Maocang

    2012-09-01

    Seventy-eight marine fungal strains were isolated from sediment samples collected off the coast of Nanji Island, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. Antibacterial screening using the agar disc method showed that 19 of the isolated strains could inhibit at least one pathogenic V ibrio from P seudosciaena crocea. Subsequent screening confirmed that nine strains produced antibacterial metabolites that had activity against one or several types of pathogenic V ibrio. Strain NJ0104 had the widest antimicrobial spectrum and strong activity, particularly against Vibrio parahaemolyticus-MM0810072. A preliminary study of NJ0104 antibacterial metabolites demonstrated that they had thermal stability up to 80°C, ultraviolet stability up to 40 min and pH stability between 4.0-7.0. In addition, the antibacterial metabolites were readily soluble in butanol. To identify the specific strain, the ITS-5.8S rDNA regions of NJ0104 were PCR amplified and sequenced. Based on the combination of phenotypic and genotypic data, the strain was identified as Arthrinium sp.

  1. Seasonal variation in abundance of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacteria in oysters along the southwest coast of India.

    PubMed

    Deepanjali, A; Kumar, H Sanath; Karunasagar, I; Karunasagar, I

    2005-07-01

    The seasonal abundance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oysters from two estuaries along the southwest coast of India was studied by colony hybridization using nonradioactive labeled oligonucleotide probes. The density of total V. parahaemolyticus bacteria was determined using a probe binding to the tlh (thermolabile hemolysin) gene, and the density of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus bacteria was determined by using a probe binding to the tdh (thermostable direct hemolysin) gene. Furthermore, the prevalence of V. parahaemolyticus was studied by PCR amplification of the toxR, tdh, and trh genes. PCR was performed directly with oyster homogenates and also following enrichment in alkaline peptone water for 6 and 18 h. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 93.87% of the samples, and the densities ranged from <10 to 10(4) organisms per g. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus could be detected in 5 of 49 samples (10.2%) by colony hybridization using the tdh probe and in 3 of 49 samples (6.1%) by PCR. Isolates from one of the samples belonged to the pandemic serotype O3:K6. Twenty-nine of the 49 samples analyzed (59.3%) were positive as determined by PCR for the presence of the trh gene in the enrichment broth media. trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus was frequently found in oysters from India. PMID:16000764

  2. Temporal and Spatial Variation in the Abundance of Total and Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Shellfish in China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Haihong; Li, Fengqin; Yan, Weixing; Guo, Yunchang; Li, Ning; Liu, Xiumei; Zhu, Jianghui; Xu, Jin; Chen, Yan; Li, Xiugui; Lv, Hong; Zhang, Yiqian; Cai, Te; Chen, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the abundance of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shellfish sampled from four provinces in China during May 2013 and March 2014 using the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR) method. Total V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 67.7% of 496 samples. A total of 38.1% and 10.1% of samples exceeded 1,000 MPN g-1 and 10,000 MPN g-1, respectively. V. parahaemolyticus densities followed a seasonal and geographical trend, with Guangxi and Sichuan shellfish possessing total V. parahaemolyticus levels that were 100-fold higher than those of the Liaoning and Shandong regions. Moreover, the levels of V. parahaemolyticus were at least 10-fold higher in the summer and autumn than in the cooler seasons. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels were generally lower than total V. parahaemolyticus levels by several log units and tended to be high in samples contaminated with high total V. parahaemolyticus levels. The aqua farms had a lower prevalence but higher abundance of total V. parahaemolyticus compared to retail markets. The catering markets showed the lowest levels of total V. parahaemolyticus, but 20.0% of samples exceeded 1,000 MPN g-1. The levels of both total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in oysters were higher than in clams. The log-transformed abundance of V. parahaemolyticus was significantly correlated with both water temperature and air temperature but not water salinity. These results provide baseline contamination data of V. parahaemolyticus in shellfish in China, which can be applied to local risk assessments to prioritize risk control to key sectors and evaluate the effectiveness of future control measures. PMID:26061712

  3. Complete genome sequence of a giant Vibrio bacteriophage VH7D.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhu-Hua; Yu, Yan-Ping; Jost, Günter; Xu, Wei; Huang, Xiang-Ling

    2015-12-01

    A Vibrio sp. lytic phage VH7D was isolated from seawater of an abalone farm in Xiamen, China. The phage was capable of lysing Vibrio rotiferianus DSM 17186(T) and Vibrio harveyi DSM 19623(T). The complete genome of this phage consists of 246,964 nucleotides with a GC content of 41.31%, which characterized it as a giant vibriophage. Here we report the complete genome sequence and major findings from the genomic annotation. PMID:26476690

  4. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  5. Pathogenicity and Infection Cycle of Vibrio owensii in Larviculture of the Ornate Spiny Lobster (Panulirus ornatus)

    PubMed Central

    Goulden, Evan F.; Hall, Michael R.; Bourne, David G.; Pereg, Lily L.

    2012-01-01

    The type strain of Vibrio owensii (DY05) was isolated during an epizootic of aquaculture-reared larvae (phyllosomas) of the ornate spiny lobster (Panulirus ornatus). V. owensii DY05 was formally demonstrated to be the etiological agent of a disease causing rapid and reproducible larval mortality with pathologies similar to those seen during disease epizootics. Vectored challenge via the aquaculture live feed organism Artemia (brine shrimp) caused consistent cumulative mortality rates of 84 to 89% after 72 h, in contrast to variable mortality rates seen after immersion challenge. Histopathological examination of vector-challenged phyllosomas revealed bacterial proliferation in the midgut gland (hepatopancreas) concomitant with epithelial cell necrosis. A fluorescent-protein-labeled V. owensii DY05 transconjugant showed dispersal of single cells in the foregut and hepatopancreas 6 h postexposure, leading to colonization of the entire hepatopancreas within 18 h and eventually systemic infection. V. owensii DY05 is a marine enteropathogen highly virulent to P. ornatus phyllosoma that uses vector-mediated transmission and release from host association to a planktonic existence to perpetuate transfer. This understanding of the infection process will improve targeted biocontrol strategies and enhance the prospects of commercially viable larviculture for this valuable spiny lobster species. PMID:22307306

  6. Multidrug efflux pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jody L; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; K C, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F

    2015-02-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  7. Two replication regions in the pJM1 virulence plasmid of the marine pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Naka, Hiroaki; Chen, Qian; Mitoma, Yasutami; Nakamura, Yusuke; McIntosh-Tolle, Daniel; Gammie, Alison E; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Crosa, Jorge H

    2012-03-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a fish pathogen that causes vibriosis, a serious hemorrhagic septicemia, in wild and cultured fish. Many serotype O1 strains of this bacterium harbor the 65kb plasmid pJM1 carrying the majority of genes encoding the siderophore anguibactin iron transport system that is one of the most important virulence factors of this bacterium. We previously identified a replication region of the pJM1 plasmid named ori1. In this work we determined that ori1 can replicate in Escherichia coli and that the chromosome-encoded proteins DnaB, DnaC and DnaG are essential for its replication whereas PolI, IHF and DnaA are not required. The copy number of the pJM1 plasmid is 1-2, albeit cloned smaller fragments of the ori1 region replicate with higher copy numbers in V. anguillarum while in E. coli we did not observe an obvious difference of the copy numbers of these constructs which were all high. Furthermore, we were able to delete the ori1 region from the pJM1 plasmid and identified a second replication region in pJM1 that we named ori2. This second replication region is located on ORF25 that is within the trans-acting factor (TAFr) region, and showed that it can only replicate in V. anguillarum. PMID:22239981

  8. Two replication regions in the pJM1 virulence plasmid of the marine pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Hiroaki; Chen, Qian; Mitoma, Yasutami; Nakamura, Yusuke; McIntosh-Tolle, Daniel; Gammie, Alison E.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Crosa, Jorge H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a fish pathogen that causes vibriosis, a serious hemorrhagic septicemia, in wild and cultured fish. Many serotype O1 strains of this bacterium harbor the 65kb plasmid pJM1 carrying the majority of genes encoding the siderophore anguibactin iron transport system that is one of the most important virulence factors of this bacterium. We previously identified a replication region of the pJM1 plasmid named ori1. In this work we determined that ori1 can replicate in E. coli and that the chromosome-encoded proteins DnaB, DnaC and DnaG are essential for its replication whereas PolI, IHF and DnaA are not required. The copy number of the pJM1 plasmid is 1–2, albeit cloned smaller fragments of the ori1 region replicate with higher copy numbers in V. anguillarum while in E. coli we did not observe an obvious difference of the copy numbers of these constructs which were all high. Furthermore, we were able to delete the ori1 region from the pJM1 plasmid and identified a second replication region in pJM1 that we named ori2. This second replication region is located on ORF25 that is within the trans-acting factor (TAFr) region, and showed that it can only replicate in V. anguillarum. PMID:22239981

  9. Predatory bacteria as natural modulators of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in seawater and oysters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study shows that naturally occurring Vibrio predatory bacteria (VPB) exert a major role in controlling pathogenic vibrios in seawater and shellfish. The growth and persistence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) and Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) were assessed in natural seawater and in the Eastern oyster...

  10. Plasmid- and chromosome-encoded siderophore anguibactin systems found in marine vibrios: biosynthesis, transport and evolution.

    PubMed

    Naka, Hiroaki; Liu, Moqing; Actis, Luis A; Crosa, Jorge H

    2013-08-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is a marine pathogen that causes vibriosis, a hemorrhagic septicemia in aquatic invertebrate as well as vertebrate animals. The siderophore anguibactin system is one of the most important virulence factors of this bacterium. Most of the anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes are located in the 65-kb pJM1 virulence plasmid although some of them are found in the chromosome of this fish pathogen. Over 30 years of research unveiled the role numerous chromosomal and pJM1 genes play in the synthesis of anguibactin and the transport of cognate ferric complexes into the bacterial cell. Furthermore, these studies showed that pJM1-carrying strains might be originated from pJM1-less strains producing the chromosome-mediated siderophore vanchrobactin. Additionally, we recently identified a chromosome-mediated anguibactin system in V. harveyi suggesting the possible evolutional origin of the V. anguillarum anguibactin system. In this review, we present our current understanding of the mechanisms and evolution hypothesis of the anguibactin system that might have occurred in these pathogenic vibrios. PMID:23660776

  11. Purification, characterization and production optimization of a vibriocin produced by mangrove associated Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Baskar; Ranishree, Jayappriyan Kothilmozhian; Thadikamala, Sathish; Panchatcharam, Prabakaran

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify a potential bacterium which produces antimicrobial peptide (vibriocin), and its purification, characterization and production optimization. The bacteria subjected in the study were isolated from a highly competitive ecological niche of mangrove ecosystem. Methods The bacterium was characterized by phenotype besides 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The antibacterial activity was recognised by using agar well diffusion method. The vibriocin was purified using ammonium sulphate precipitation, butanol extraction, gel filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and subsequently, by HPLC. Molecular weight of the substance identified in SDS-PAGE. Production optimization performed according to Taguchi's mathematical model using 6 different nutritional parameters as variables. Results The objective bacterium was identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The vibriocin showed 18 KDa of molecular mass with mono peptide in nature and highest activity against pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. The peptide act stable in a wide range of pH, temperature, UV radiation, solvents and chemicals utilized. An overall ∼20% of vibriocin production was improved, and was noticed that NaCl and agitation speed played a vital role in secretion of vibriocin. Conclusion The vibriocin identified here would be an effective alternative for chemically synthesized drugs for the management of Vibrio infections in mariculture industry. PMID:25182547

  12. Periodontal Pathogens Produce Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Jorge; Olle, Ester; Alsina, Merce

    2001-01-01

    Different species of bacteria important in the composition of dental plaque were tested for production of extracellular autoinducer-like activities that stimulate the expression of the luminescence genes in Vibrio harveyi. Several strains of Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were found to produce such activities. Interestingly, these bacteria belong to the same phylogenetic group, and they are periodontal pathogens important in the development of periodontal disease. They specifically produce extracellular signaling molecule related autoinducer-2 from V. haveyi. Nevertheless, they seem to be unable to produce homologues of acyl-homoserine lactones. Furthermore, Escherichia coli DH5? can be complemented by the introduction of a P. gingivalis gene with high homology to the luxS gene, which has been called luxSP.g.. PMID:11292769

  13. Implications of Chitin Attachment for the Environmental Persistence and Clinical Nature of the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tiffany C.; Ayrapetyan, Mesrop

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus naturally inhabits a variety of aquatic organisms, including oysters, and is the leading cause of seafood-related death in the United States. Strains of this bacterium are genetically classified into environmental (E) and clinical (C) genotypes, which correlate with source of isolation. E-genotype strains integrate into marine aggregates more efficiently than do C-genotype strains, leading to a greater uptake of strains of this genotype by oysters feeding on these aggregates. The causes of this increased integration of E-type strains into marine “snow” have not been demonstrated. Here, we further investigate the physiological and genetic causalities for this genotypic heterogeneity by examining the ability of strains of each genotype to attach to chitin, a major constituent of marine snow. We found that E-genotype strains attach to chitin with significantly greater efficiency than do C-genotype strains when incubated at 20°C. Type IV pili were implicated in chitin adherence, and even in the absence of chitin, the expression level of type IV pilin genes (pilA, pilD, and mshA) was found to be inherently higher by E genotypes than by C genotypes. In contrast, the level of expression of N-acetylglucosamine binding protein A (gbpA) was significantly higher in C-genotype strains. Interestingly, incubation at a clinically relevant temperature (37°C) resulted in a significant increase in C-genotype attachment to chitin, which subsequently provided a protective effect against exposure to acid or bile, thus offering a clue into their increased incidence in human infections. This study suggests that C- and E-genotype strains have intrinsically divergent physiological programs, which may help explain the observed differences in the ecology and pathogenic potential between these two genotypes. PMID:24362430

  14. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  15. Multiple Regulators Control Capsular Polysaccharide Production in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Güvener, Zehra Tüzün; McCarter, Linda L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a biofouling marine bacterium and human pathogen, undergoes phase variation displaying translucent (TR) and opaque (OP) colony morphologies. Prior studies demonstrated that OP colonies produce more capsular polysaccharide (CPS) than TR colonies and that opacity is controlled by the Vibrio harveyi LuxR-type transcriptional activator OpaR. CPS has also been shown to be regulated by the scrABC signaling pathway, which involves a GGDEF-EAL motif-containing sensory protein. The present study identifies cps genes and examines their regulation. Transposon insertions in the cps locus, which contains 11 genes, abolished opacity. Such mutants failed to produce CPS and were defective in pellicle formation in microtiter wells and in a biofilm attachment assay. Reporter fusions to cpsA, the first gene in the locus, showed ?10-fold-enhanced transcription in the OP (opaR+) strain compared to a TR (?opaR) strain. Two additional transcriptional regulators were discovered. One potential activator, CpsR, participates in the scrABC GGDEF-EAL-signaling pathway; CpsR was required for the increased cps expression observed in scrA ?opaR strains. CpsR, which contains a conserved module found in members of the AAA+ superfamily of ATP-interacting proteins, is homologous to Vibrio cholerae VpsR; however, unlike VpsR, CpsR was not essential for cps expression. CpsS, the second newly identified regulator, contains a CsgD-type DNA-binding domain and appears to act as a repressor. Mutants with cpsS defects have greatly elevated cps transcription; their high level of cpsA expression was CpsR dependent in ?R strains and primarily OpaR dependent in OP strains. Thus, a network of positive and negative regulators modulates CPS production in V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:12949095

  16. Defences against oxidative stress in vibrios associated with corals.

    PubMed

    Munn, Colin B; Marchant, Hannah K; Moody, A John

    2008-04-01

    Bacteria colonizing healthy coral tissue may produce enzymes capable of overcoming the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Significant differences in the activities of these enzymes were observed in cultures of Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio coralliilyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio mediterranei, Vibrio pelagius, Vibrio rotiferanus, Vibrio tasmaniensis, and Photobacterium eurosenbergii isolated from healthy, bleached or necrotic tropical and cold water corals. Levels of SOD in exponential phase cultures of V. coralliilyticus grown at 28 degrees C were only slightly higher than those grown at 16 degrees C whereas the levels in stationary phase cultures at 28 degrees C were 7.3 x higher than those at 16 degrees C. The increase in catalase activity of V. coralliilyticus and V. harveyi upon entry to stationary phase conferred protection against killing by oxidative stress. Increased temperature affected up-regulation of enzymes in stationary phase cultures, but pretreatment of cultures with hydrogen peroxide had no significant effect on induction of catalase or SOD. The increased activities appear to be due to up-regulation of gene expression rather than induction of different forms of the enzymes. We suggest that SOD and catalase are unlikely to be major factors in the virulence of these bacteria for corals and that their main function may be to protect against endogenous superoxide. PMID:18279336

  17. Differences in uptake and killing of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria by haemocyte subpopulations of penaeid shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, (Boone).

    PubMed

    Tuan, V V; Dantas-Lima, J J; Thuong, K V; Li, W; Grauwet, K; Bossier, P; Nauwynck, H J

    2016-02-01

    Phagocytosis is an important function of both invertebrate and vertebrate blood cells. In this study, the phagocytic activity of haemocyte subpopulations of penaeid shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, (Boone), against pathogenic and non-pathogenic particles was investigated in vitro. The haemocytes of penaeid shrimp were firstly separated by centrifugation on a continuous density gradient of iodixanol into four fractions with five subpopulations (sub), of which sub 1 (hyalinocytes) and sub 4 (semi-granulocytes) have the main function in phagocytosis of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria as well as fluorescent polystyrene beads. It was found that these haemocyte subpopulations engulfed virulent Vibrio campbellii and Vibrio harveyi at a higher rate than non-virulent Escherichia coli and polystyrene beads. When these bacteria were mixed with shrimp haemocyte subpopulations and incubated for 180 min, the percentage of viable intracellular V. campbellii (25.5 ± 6.0%) recovered was significantly higher than the percentage recovered from V. harveyi (13.5 ± 1.1%). No viable intracellular E. coli was observed in this study. In contrast to V. harveyi and E. coli, V. campbellii containing endosomes did not acidify in time. Incubation of haemocyte subpopulations with the most virulent V. campbellii strain resulted in a significant drop in haemocyte viability (41.4 ± 6.3% in sub 1 and 30.2 ± 15.1% in sub 4) after 180 min post-inoculation in comparison with the less virulent V. harveyi (84.1 ± 5.6% in sub 1 and 83.4 ± 4.1% in sub 4) and non-virulent E. coli (92.7 ± 2.8% in sub 1 and 92.3 ± 5.6% in sub 4) and polystyrene beads (91.9 ± 1.6% in sub 1 and 84.4 ± 3.4% in sub 4). These findings may be a valuable tool for monitoring shrimp health and immunological studies. PMID:25643807

  18. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Mass Production of the Probiotics Pseudomonas MCCB 102 and 103 Antagonistic to Pathogenic Vibrios in Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Preetha, R; Vijayan, K K; Jayapraksh, N S; Alavandi, S V; Santiago, T C; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-06-01

    Rapid growth of shrimp farming industry is affected by the recurrence of diverse diseases, among which vibriosis is predominant. Eco-friendly disease management strategy by the application of antagonistic probiotics is widely accepted. In the present study, culture conditions of antagonistic probiotics, Pseudomonas MCCB 102 and 103, were optimized to enhance their biomass production and antagonistic activity against the shrimp pathogen V. harveyi MCCB 111. Primarily, one-dimensional screening was carried out to fix the optimum range of sodium chloride concentration, pH and temperature. The second step optimization was done using a full-factorial central composite design of response surface methodology. As per the model, 12.9 g/L sodium chloride and pH 6.5 for Pseudomonas MCCB 102, and 5 g/L sodium chloride and pH 7 for Pseudomonas MCCB 103 were found to be ideal to maximize antagonistic activity. However, optimum temperature was the same (25 °C) for both isolates. Finally, the models were experimentally validated for enhanced biomass production and antagonistic activity. The optima for biomass and antagonistic activity were more or less the same, suggesting the possible influence of biomass on antagonistic activity. PMID:25644493

  19. Grimontia indica AK16T, sp. nov., Isolated from a Seawater Sample Reports the Presence of Pathogenic Genes Similar to Vibrio Genus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aditya; Vaidya, Bhumika; Khatri, Indu; Srinivas, T. N. R.; Subramanian, Srikrishna; Korpole, Suresh; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Grimontia indica strain AK16T sp. nov. is the type strain of G. indica sp. nov. a new species within the genus Grimontia. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from seawater sample collected from southeast coast of Palk Bay, India. G. indica AK16T is a Gram-negative, facultative aerobic rod shaped bacterium. There are only two other strains in the genus Grimontia one of which, Grimontia hollisae CIP 101886T, is a reported human pathogen isolated from human stool sample while the other, ‘Grimontia marina IMCC5001T’, was isolated from a seawater sample. As compared to the pathogenic strain Grimontia hollisae CIP 101886T, the strain AK16T lacks some genes for pathogenesis like the accessory colonization factors AcfA and AcfD, which are required for the colonization of the bacterium in the host body. While it carries some pathogenesis genes like OmpU, which are related to pathogenesis of Vibrio strains. This suggests that the life cycle of AK16T may include some pathogenic interactions with marine animal(s), or it may be an opportunistic pathogen. Study of the Grimontia genus is important because of the severe pathogenic traits exhibited by a member of the genus with only three species reported in total. The study will provide some vital information which may be useful in future clinical studies on the genus. PMID:24465608

  20. Development and evaluation of a real-time fluorogenic loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay integrated on a microfluidic disc chip (on-chip LAMP) for rapid and simultaneous detection of ten pathogenic bacteria in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian-Jin; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jiong; Wang, Rui-Na; Shi, Yu-Hong; Li, Chang-Hong; Zhang, De-Min; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Rapid, low-cost, and user-friendly strategies are urgently needed for early disease diagnosis and timely treatment, particularly for on-site screening of pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we successfully developed a real-time fluorogenic loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay integrated on a microfluidic disc chip (on-chip LAMP), which was capable of simultaneously detecting 10 pathogenic bacteria in aquatic animals, i.e., Nocardia seriolae, Pseudomonas putida, Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio rotiferianus, and Vibrio vulnificus. The assay provided a nearly-automated approach, with only a single pipetting step per chip for sample dispensing. This technique could achieve limits of detection (LOD) ranging from 0.40 to 6.42pg per 1.414?L reaction in less than 30 min. The robust reproducibility was demonstrated by a little variation among duplications for each bacterium with the coefficient of variation (CV) for time to positive (Tp) value less than 0.10. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of this on-chip LAMP assay in detecting field samples were 96.2% and 93.8% by comparison with conventional microbiological methods. Compared with other well-known techniques, on-chip LAMP assay provides low sample and reagent consumption, ease-of-use, accelerated analysis, multiple bacteria and on-site detection, and high reproducibility, indicating that such a technique would be applicable for on-site detection and routine monitoring of multiple pathogens in aquaculture. PMID:24954661

  1. [Vibrio infections from food and sea water. Introducing the "VibrioNet"].

    PubMed

    Alter, T; Appel, B; Bartelt, E; Dieckmann, R; Eichhorn, C; Erler, R; Frank, C; Gerdts, G; Gunzer, F; Hühn, S; Neifer, J; Oberheitmann, B; Strauch, E

    2011-11-01

    Vibrio is a genus of bacteria present in surface and coastal waters as well as in marine organisms worldwide. In many countries, pathogenic Vibrio species are a main cause of bacterial diarrhea, which may result from comsumption of contaminated seafood and fish products or from drinking contaminated water. Vibrio infections may also gain in importance in our regions due to global warming and the increase in the world trade of seafood. The research network "VibrioNet" studies pathogenic Vibrios in the marine environment and in seafood consumed by humans as a potential, new emerging zoonotic agent. An assessment of the risk arising from pathogenic non-cholera-vibrios in central Europe is the target of a multidisciplinary research effort. The research network will be strengthened by cooperations with international partners from countries in which Vibrio infections play a major role (Bangladesh, Chile, India, Thailand, and Vietnam). PMID:22015796

  2. Probing the protective mechanism of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate against vibriosis by using gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana and Vibrio campbellii as host-pathogen model.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Huy, Tran T; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Niu, Yufeng; Gupta, Sanjay K; De Schryver, Peter; Bossier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The compound poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), a polymer of the short chain fatty acid ß-hydroxybutyrate, was shown to protect experimental animals against a variety of bacterial diseases, (including vibriosis in farmed aquatic animals), albeit through undefined mechanisms. Here we aimed at unraveling the underlying mechanism behind the protective effect of PHB against bacterial disease using gnotobiotically-cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and pathogenic Vibrio campbellii as host-pathogen model. The gnotobiotic model system is crucial for such studies because it eliminates any possible microbial interference (naturally present in any type of aquatic environment) in these mechanistic studies and furthermore facilitates the interpretation of the results in terms of a cause effect relationship. We showed clear evidences indicating that PHB conferred protection to Artemia host against V. campbellii by a mechanism of inducing heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. Additionally, our results also showed that this salutary effect of PHB was associated with the generation of protective innate immune responses, especially the prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase immune systems - phenomena possibly mediated by PHB-induced Hsp70. From overall results, we conclude that PHB induces Hsp70 and this induced Hsp70 might contribute in part to the protection of Artemia against pathogenic V. campbellii. PMID:25822312

  3. Probing the protective mechanism of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate against vibriosis by using gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana and Vibrio campbellii as host-pathogen model

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Kartik; Huy, Tran T.; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Niu, Yufeng; Gupta, Sanjay K.; De Schryver, Peter; Bossier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The compound poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), a polymer of the short chain fatty acid ß-hydroxybutyrate, was shown to protect experimental animals against a variety of bacterial diseases, (including vibriosis in farmed aquatic animals), albeit through undefined mechanisms. Here we aimed at unraveling the underlying mechanism behind the protective effect of PHB against bacterial disease using gnotobiotically-cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and pathogenic Vibrio campbellii as host-pathogen model. The gnotobiotic model system is crucial for such studies because it eliminates any possible microbial interference (naturally present in any type of aquatic environment) in these mechanistic studies and furthermore facilitates the interpretation of the results in terms of a cause effect relationship. We showed clear evidences indicating that PHB conferred protection to Artemia host against V. campbellii by a mechanism of inducing heat shock protein (Hsp) 70. Additionally, our results also showed that this salutary effect of PHB was associated with the generation of protective innate immune responses, especially the prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase immune systems – phenomena possibly mediated by PHB-induced Hsp70. From overall results, we conclude that PHB induces Hsp70 and this induced Hsp70 might contribute in part to the protection of Artemia against pathogenic V. campbellii. PMID:25822312

  4. Genetic characterization of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus from the Northeast USA reveals emerging resident and non-indigenous pathogen lineages

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Ilyas, Saba; Hall, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Stephen H.; Cooper, Vaughn S.; Whistler, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric infections caused by the environmentally transmitted pathogen, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, have increased over the last two decades, including in many parts of the United States (US). However, until recently, infections linked to shellfish from the cool northeastern US waters were rare. Cases have risen in the Northeast, consistent with changes in local V. parahaemolyticus populations toward greater abundance or a shift in constituent pathogens. We examined 94 clinical isolates from a period of increasing disease in the region and compared them to 200 environmental counterparts to identify resident and non-indigenous lineages and to gain insight into the emergence of pathogenic types. Genotyping and multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of clinical isolates collected from 2010 to 2013 in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine revealed their polyphyletic nature. Although 80% of the clinical isolates harbored the trh hemolysin either alone or with tdh, and were urease positive, 14% harbored neither hemolysin exposing a limitation for these traits in pathogen detection. Resident sequence type (ST) 631 strains caused seven infections, and show a relatively recent history of recombination with other clinical and environmental lineages present in the region. ST34 and ST674 strains were each linked to a single infection and these strain types were also identified from the environment as isolates harboring hemolysin genes. Forty-two ST36 isolates were identified from the clinical collection, consistent with reports that this strain type caused a rise in regional infections starting in 2012. Whole-genome phylogenies that included three ST36 outbreak isolates traced to at least two local sources demonstrated that the US Atlantic coastal population of this strain type was indeed derived from the Pacific population. This study lays the foundation for understanding dynamics within natural populations associated with emergence and invasion of pathogenic strain types in the region. PMID:25904905

  5. [Acute gastroenteritis caused by a Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 strain harboring a genetic region homologous to the VpaI-7 pathogenicity island].

    PubMed

    Ulloa F, María T; Porte, Lorena; Braun J, Stephanie; Dabanch P, Jeannette; Fica C, Alberto; Henríquez A, Tania; Osorio A, Carlos G

    2011-10-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio cholerae isolates, the etiologic agents of cholera, generally express one of two O antigens (O1 or O139). Most environmental isolates are nonpathogenic and are referred to as "non-O1, non-O139". However some V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 strains are clearly pathogenic and have caused outbreaks or sporadic cases of gastroenteritis and extraintestinal infections in humans. We report a case of acute gastroenteritis by a V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 harboring a genetic region homologous to a segment of the VpaI-7 V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity island. PMID:22051624

  6. Environmental parameters influence on the dynamics of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus densities in Crassostrea virginica harvested from Mexico's Gulf coast.

    PubMed

    López-Hernández, Karla M; Pardío-Sedas, Violeta T; Lizárraga-Partida, Leonardo; Williams, José de J; Martínez-Herrera, David; Flores-Primo, Argel; Uscanga-Serrano, Roxana; Rendón-Castro, Karla

    2015-02-15

    The influence of environmental parameters on the total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus seasonal densities in American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) was evaluated for 1 year. Harvesting site A yielded the highest mean densities of V. parahaemolyticus tlh+, tdh+/trh-, tdh-/trh+ and tdh+/trh+ during spring season at 2.57, 1.74, 0.36, and -0.40 log10 MPN/g, respectively, and tdh+/orf8+ during winter season (0.90 log10 MPN/g). V. parahaemolyticus tlh+ densities were associated to salinity (R(2)=0.372, P<0.022), tdh+/trh+ to turbidity (R(2)=0.597, P<0.035), and orf8+ to temperature, salinity, and pH (R(2)=0.964, P<0.001). The exposure to salinity and temperature conditions during winter and spring seasons regulated the dynamics of V. parahaemolyticus harboring potentially pathogenic genotypes within the oyster. The adaptive response of V. parahaemolyticus to seasonal environmental changes may lead to an increase in survival and virulence, threatening the seafood safety and increasing the risk of illness. PMID:25510545

  7. Hatchery mortalities of larval oysters caused by Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio coralliilyticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hatchery production of bivalve shellfish has been hampered by the occasional presence of opportunistic pathogens, particularly Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii. The present study reports the results of several avenues of research to better define these pathogens and the roles they play i...

  8. Characterization and pathogenicity of Vibrio splendidus strains associated with massive mortalities of commercial hatchery-reared larvae of scallop Argopecten purpuratus (Lamarck, 1819).

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rodrigo; Miranda, Claudio D; Opazo, Rafael; Romero, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Three strains (VPAP16, VPAP18 and VPAP23 strains) were isolated as the most predominant organisms from 3 different episodes of massive mortalities of larval cultures of the Chilean scallop Argopecten purpuratus occurred in different commercial hatcheries located in northern Chile. The main aims of this study were to identify the pathogenic strains and investigate their pathogenic activity. Based on selected phenotypic features and sequence identity of the 16S rRNA gene and the housekeeping gene, RNA polymerase ?-chain rpoA, all pathogenic strains were identified as Vibrio splendidus. Healthy 10-day-old scallop larvae cultures exhibited mortality percentages of 69.61±3.35%, 79.78±6.11% and 61.73±3.71% after 48 h when were inoculated with 1×10(6) CFU (colony forming units)mL(-1) of VPAP16, VPAP18 and VPAP23 strains, respectively, and evidenced that concentrations ?10(4) CFU mL(-1) would probably be detrimental for the larval culture. The main clinical signs observed in challenged larvae for 24h were bacterial swarms on the margins of the larvae, extension and disruption of the velum, detachment of velum cilia cells and digestive tissue necrosis. Otherwise, challenge assays using pathogenic strains stained with 5-([4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl]amino)fluorescein hydrochloride (5-DTAF)evidenced that after 1h stained bacteria were detected in high density in the digestive gland and the margin of the shell. When larval cultures were inoculated with cell-free extracellular products (ECP) of V. splendidus strains, exhibited larval mortalities higher than 70% (VPAP16), 80% (VPAP18) and 50% (VPAP23) after 24 h, even when ECP were treated with proteinase K or heat, indicating that extracellular pathogenic activity is mainly mediated by non-proteic thermostable compounds. In this study all Koch's postulates were fulfilled and it was demonstrated for the first time the pathogenic activity of V. splendidus strains on reared-larvae of scallop A. purpuratus and prompt the necessity to maintain this species at concentrations lower than 10(4) CFU mL(-1) to avoid episodes of mass mortalities in scallop hatcheries. PMID:25450196

  9. Bacteriophage remediation of bacterial pathogens in aquaculture: a review of the technology

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been proposed as an alternative to antibiotic usage and several studies on their application in aquaculture have been reported. This review highlights progress to date on phage therapies for the following fish and shellfish diseases and associated pathogens: hemorrhagic septicemia (Aeromonas hydrophila) in loaches, furunculosis (Aeromonas salmonicida) in trout and salmon, edwardsiellosis (Edwardsiella tarda) in eel, columnaris disease (Flavobacterium columnare) in catfish, rainbow trout fry syndrome or cold water disease (Flavobacterium psychrophilum) in trout and salmon, lactococcosis (Lactococcus spp.) in yellowtail, ulcerative skin lesions (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in freshwater catfish, bacterial hemorrhagic ascites disease (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida) in ayu fish, streptococcosis (Streptococcus iniae) in flounder, and luminescent vibriosis (Vibrio harveyi) in shrimp. Information is reviewed on phage specificity, host resistance, routes of administration, and dosing of fish and shellfish. Limitations in phage research are described and recommended guidelines are provided for conducting future phage studies involving fish and shellfish. PMID:26713223

  10. The opportunistic marine pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus becomes virulent by acquiring a plasmid that expresses a deadly toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Yang, Yi-Ting; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Huang, Ming-Fen; Lin, Shin-Jen; Chen, Chien-Yu; Lin, Shih-Shun; Lightner, Donald V.; Wang, Han-Ching; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Wang, Hao-Ching; Hor, Lien-I; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a severe, newly emergent penaeid shrimp disease caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus that has already led to tremendous losses in the cultured shrimp industry. Until now, its disease-causing mechanism has remained unclear. Here we show that an AHPND-causing strain of V. parahaemolyticus contains a 70-kbp plasmid (pVA1) with a postsegregational killing system, and that the ability to cause disease is abolished by the natural absence or experimental deletion of the plasmid-encoded homologs of the Photorhabdus insect-related (Pir) toxins PirA and PirB. We determined the crystal structure of the V. parahaemolyticus PirA and PirB (PirAvp and PirBvp) proteins and found that the overall structural topology of PirAvp/PirBvp is very similar to that of the Bacillus Cry insecticidal toxin-like proteins, despite the low sequence identity (<10%). This structural similarity suggests that the putative PirABvp heterodimer might emulate the functional domains of the Cry protein, and in particular its pore-forming activity. The gene organization of pVA1 further suggested that pirABvp may be lost or acquired by horizontal gene transfer via transposition or homologous recombination. PMID:26261348

  11. Microcystin-producing and non-producing cyanobacterial blooms collected from the Central India harbor potentially pathogenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Prashant; Kumar Agrawal, Manish; Nath Bagchi, Suvendra

    2015-05-01

    On the basis of relative abundance, frequency and biovolume, the important value index ranks were assigned to individual cyanobacteria in phytoplankton samples collected from fourteen water resources of Central India. The mcyABDE genes were detected in all the blooms with Microcystis (-aeruginosa, -viridis, -panniformis, -botrys) as being the major constituent morphospecies. On the other hand, blooms composed of primarily Oscillatoria (-limosa,-agardhii, -laetevirens) along with Anabaena, Nostoc, Phormidium and Spirulina as sub-dominant forms exhibited quite a patchy distribution of one or the other mcy genes. Fifty percent of Microcystis- but none of the Oscillatoria dominant blooms produced microcystins-RR and desmethyl-RR at 0.03-0.41mgg(-1) bloom dry mass. Traces of dissolved microcystin was detected in lake water, which is well below the WHO guideline. Irrespective of cyanobacterial composition and microcystin production ability, during the study period 43-64% of the cyanobacterial bloom samples exhibited association of viable but nonculturable forms of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, as evident from amplification of the antigen genes. We believe that spread of endemic cholera is the major threat associated with harmful algal blooms. PMID:25682583

  12. Alleviating effects of Lactobacillus strains on pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus-induced intestinal fluid accumulation in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen-Quan; Jin, Cai-Juan; Gao, Lu; Fang, Wei-Ming; Gu, Rui-Xia; Qian, Jian-Ya; Jiao, Xin-An

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the probiotic effects of Lactobacillus strains against Vibrio parahaemolyticus causing gastroenteritis. Six-week-old ICR mice were pretreated with four Lactobacillus strains at three dosages, and then challenged with V. parahaemolyticus TGqx01 (serotype O3:K6). The results showed that V. parahaemolyticus TGqx01 caused severe intestinal fluid accumulation (FA) and villi damage in control mice which were pretreated with phosphate-buffered saline. In contrast, significant alleviation of FA was seen in mice pretreated by with a high dose of Lactobacillus strains (P < 0.05, n = 6) but not in mice that received low-dose pretreatments. Among middle-dose treatments, two highly adhesive strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus H15 and Lactobacillus brevis Y29-4, significantly decreased intestinal FA and villi damage in treated mice (P < 0.05). Two low-adhesive strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus Y14-3 and Lactobacillus fermentum F16-6, had no significant alleviating effects. At the same dosing levels, no significant differences in FA were observed in mice pretreated with strains with similar adhesive abilities but different antagonistic activities. Our findings suggest that Lactobacillus strains can alleviate V. parahaemolyticus-induced intestinal FA in mice, and the doses required for in vivo efficacy depend more on adhesive ability than on the antibacterial activity of strains. PMID:23210909

  13. The opportunistic marine pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus becomes virulent by acquiring a plasmid that expresses a deadly toxin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Te; Chen, I-Tung; Yang, Yi-Ting; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Huang, Jiun-Yan; Huang, Ming-Fen; Lin, Shin-Jen; Chen, Chien-Yu; Lin, Shih-Shuen; Lightner, Donald V; Wang, Han-Ching; Wang, Andrew H-J; Wang, Hao-Ching; Hor, Lien-I; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-08-25

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a severe, newly emergent penaeid shrimp disease caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus that has already led to tremendous losses in the cultured shrimp industry. Until now, its disease-causing mechanism has remained unclear. Here we show that an AHPND-causing strain of V. parahaemolyticus contains a 70-kbp plasmid (pVA1) with a postsegregational killing system, and that the ability to cause disease is abolished by the natural absence or experimental deletion of the plasmid-encoded homologs of the Photorhabdus insect-related (Pir) toxins PirA and PirB. We determined the crystal structure of the V. parahaemolyticus PirA and PirB (PirA(vp) and PirB(vp)) proteins and found that the overall structural topology of PirA(vp)/PirB(vp) is very similar to that of the Bacillus Cry insecticidal toxin-like proteins, despite the low sequence identity (<10%). This structural similarity suggests that the putative PirAB(vp) heterodimer might emulate the functional domains of the Cry protein, and in particular its pore-forming activity. The gene organization of pVA1 further suggested that pirAB(vp) may be lost or acquired by horizontal gene transfer via transposition or homologous recombination. PMID:26261348

  14. Transcriptomic and cellular response to bacterial challenge (pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus) in farmed juvenile Haliotis rufescens fed with or without probiotic diet.

    PubMed

    Silva-Aciares, Fernando; Moraga, Dario; Auffret, Michel; Tanguy, Arnaud; Riquelme, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    The abalone production in Chile has increased considerably in recent years with no sign of tapering off. Open and semi-closed circuits in the marine water zones in the north and south of Chile are the preferred areas of culture. Coastal ecosystems are subjected to a wide variety of contaminants that generate stress that affects populations via their impacts to individuals at both physiological and genetic levels. This work investigated the genomic and cellular response of post-weaning juvenile Haliotis rufescens abalone under hatchery conditions, fed with probiotic diets, and subsequently challenged with Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The expression patterns of 16 selected genes associated with different metabolic pathways were analyzed using Real-Time PCR. Gene expression was then compared to immunological response parameters in the abalone and quantification of V. parahaemolyticus during the experimental period. Both transcriptomic and immunological analyses indicated significant alteration of physiological processes in H. rufescens correlated to exposure to the pathogenic bacteria, as well as to probiotic nutrition. PMID:23535139

  15. Overcoming a defect in generalized recombination in the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775: construction of a recA mutant by marker exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J T; Ma, C; Boettcher, K J

    1996-01-01

    A defect in generalized recombination has prevented the use of marker exchange for the construction of specific chromosomal mutations in the marine fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum 775. Through the use of large segments of homologous DNA, we were successful in overcoming this defect and used marker exchange to construct a recA mutant of V. anguillarum H775-3. A recombinant cosmid carrying the recA gene of V. anguillarum 775 in the center of a 25-kb cloned DNA insert was isolated by complementation of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity in Escherichia coli HB101. The recA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene into recA, and the mutant gene was subsequently introduced into V. anguillarum H775-3 by conjugal mobilization. Isolation of recombinants between cosmid-borne recA::kan sequences and chromosomal DNA was facilitated by the introduction of an incompatible plasmid, and Southern hybridization was used to verify the presence of recA::kan in the chromosomal DNA of the recA mutant. V. anguillarum carrying recA::kan was considerably more sensitive to UV radiation and to MMS than was its parent, and near wild-type levels of resistance to MMS and UV light were restored by introduction of cloned recA genes from both E. coli and V. anguillarum. These results indicate that recA is required for DNA repair in V. anguillarum and demonstrate the utility of this modified marker exchange technique for the construction of mutations in this economically important fish pathogen. PMID:8837428

  16. Epidemic Clones, Oceanic Gene Pools, and Eco-LD in the Free Living Marine Pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yujun; Yang, Xianwei; Didelot, Xavier; Guo, Chenyi; Li, Dongfang; Yan, Yanfeng; Zhang, Yiquan; Yuan, Yanting; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Song, Yajun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Falush, Daniel; Yang, Ruifu

    2015-06-01

    We investigated global patterns of variation in 157 whole-genome sequences of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a free-living and seafood associated marine bacterium. Pandemic clones, responsible for recent outbreaks of gastroenteritis in humans, have spread globally. However, there are oceanic gene pools, one located in the oceans surrounding Asia and another in the Mexican Gulf. Frequent recombination means that most isolates have acquired the genetic profile of their current location. We investigated the genetic structure in the Asian gene pool by calculating the effective population size in two different ways. Under standard neutral models, the two estimates should give similar answers but we found a 27-fold difference. We propose that this discrepancy is caused by the subdivision of the species into a hundred or more ecotypes which are maintained stably in the population. To investigate the genetic factors involved, we used 51 unrelated isolates to conduct a genome-wide scan for epistatically interacting loci. We found a single example of strong epistasis between distant genome regions. A majority of strains had a type VI secretion system associated with bacterial killing. The remaining strains had genes associated with biofilm formation and regulated by cyclic dimeric GMP signaling. All strains had one or other of the two systems and none of isolate had complete complements of both systems, although several strains had remnants. Further "top down" analysis of patterns of linkage disequilibrium within frequently recombining species will allow a detailed understanding of how selection acts to structure the pattern of variation within natural bacterial populations. PMID:25605790

  17. The ecology of Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio cholerae, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in North Carolina estuaries.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Karen Dyer; Oliver, James D

    2008-04-01

    While numerous studies have characterized the distribution and/or ecology of various pathogenic Vibrio spp., here we have simultaneously examined several estuarine sites for Vibrio vulnificus, V. cholerae, and V. parahaemolyticus. For a one year period, waters and sediment were monitored for the presence of these three pathogens at six different sites on the east coast of North Carolina in the United States. All three pathogens, identified using colony hybridization and PCR methods, occurred in these estuarine environments, although V. cholerae occurred only infrequently and at very low levels. Seventeen chemical, physical, and biological parameters were investigated, including salinity, water temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, levels of various inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon, as well as total vibrios, total coliforms, and E. coli. We found each of the Vibrio spp. in water and sediment to correlate to several of these environmental measurements, with water temperature and total Vibrio levels correlating highly (P<0.0001) with occurrence of the three pathogens. Thus, these two parameters may represent simple assays for characterizing the potential public health hazard of estuarine waters. PMID:18545963

  18. Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... commonly found in warm marine and estuarine environments. Incidence Nationwide, an average of 215 culture-confirmed cases, ... Team CDC Features : includes information about Vibrio illness Incidence and Trends in Foodborne Illness, 2012 Incidence and ...

  19. Improvement of innate immune responses and defense activity in tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon Fab.) by intramuscular administration of the outer membrane protein Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Maftuch; Prasetio, E; Sudianto, A; Rozik, M; Nurdiyani, R; Sanusi, E; Nursyam, H; Fariedah, F; Marsoedi; Murachman

    2013-01-01

    The Outer Membrane Protein (OMP) of Vibrio alginolyticus cell wall was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon Fab.) at 10, 20, 30 ?g/kg bw. After 14 days infection, the tiger shrimps were challenged with 10(7) bacterial density of Vibrio harveyi for 24 hours. The total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC) and amount of total protein plasma (TPP), superoxide dismutase and protease enzyme activity were monitored. The results showed that intramuscular administration of OMP enhanced an immunomodulatory effect and protection against V. harveyi. The beneficial effect of OMP on the tiger shrimp is dose-dependent and OMP-20 ?g/kg bw is an optimal dose after two times of boosters for 14 days against V. harveyi infection. PMID:24058892

  20. Comparison of the sulfonamide inhibition profiles of the α-, β- and γ-carbonic anhydrases from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-04-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes, which catalyze the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) and protons (H(+)). In prokaryotes, the existence of genes encoding for α-, β- and γ-classes suggests that these enzymes play an important role in the prokaryotic physiology. It has been demonstrated, in fact, that their inhibition in vivo leads to growth impairment or growth defects of the microorganism. Ultimately, we started to investigate the biochemical properties and the inhibitory profiles of the α- and β-CAs identified in the genome of Vibrio cholerae, which is the causative agent of cholera. The genome of this pathogen encodes for CAs belonging to α, β and γ classes. Here, we report a sulfonamide inhibition study of the γ-CA (named VchCAγ) comparing it with data obtained for the α- and β-CA enzymes. VchCAγ activity (kcat=7.39×10(5)s(-1)) was significantly higher than the other γ-CAs. The inhibition study with a panel of sulfonamides and one sulfamate led to the detection of a large number of nanomolar VchCAγ inhibitors, including simple aromatic/heterocyclic sulfonamides (compounds 2-9, 11, 13-15, 24) as well as EZA, DZA, BRZ, BZA, TPM, ZNS, SLP, IND (KIs in the range of 66.2-95.3nM). As it was proven that bicarbonate is a virulence factor of this bacterium and since ethoxzolamide was shown to inhibit this virulence in vivo, we propose that VchCA, VchCAβ and VchCAγ may be a target for antibiotic development, exploiting a mechanism of action rarely considered up until now, i.e., interference with bicarbonate supply as a virulence factor. PMID:26972117

  1. The TonB3 System in the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus Is under the Control of the Global Regulators Lrp and Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, Jorge H.

    2012-01-01

    TonB systems transduce the proton motive force of the cytoplasmic membrane to energize substrate transport through a specific TonB-dependent transporter across the outer membrane. Vibrio vulnificus, an opportunistic marine pathogen that can cause a fatal septicemic disease in humans and eels, possesses three TonB systems. While the TonB1 and TonB2 systems are iron regulated, the TonB3 system is induced when the bacterium grows in human serum. In this work we have determined the essential roles of the leucine-responsive protein (Lrp) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) in the transcriptional activation of this system. Whereas Lrp shows at least four very distinctive DNA binding regions spread out from position ?59 to ?509, cAMP-CRP binds exclusively in a region centered at position ?122.5 from the start point of the transcription. Our results suggest that both proteins bind simultaneously to the region closer to the RNA polymerase binding site. Importantly, we report that the TonB3 system is induced not only by serum but also during growth in minimal medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source and low concentrations of Casamino Acids. In addition to catabolite repression by glucose, l-leucine acts by inhibiting the binding of Lrp to the promoter region, hence preventing transcription of the TonB3 operon. Thus, this TonB system is under the direct control of two global regulators that can integrate different environmental signals (i.e., glucose starvation and the transition between “feast” and “famine”). These results shed light on new mechanisms of regulation for a TonB system that could be widespread in other organisms. PMID:22307757

  2. The TonB3 system in the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus is under the control of the global regulators Lrp and cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Alice, Alejandro F; Crosa, Jorge H

    2012-04-01

    TonB systems transduce the proton motive force of the cytoplasmic membrane to energize substrate transport through a specific TonB-dependent transporter across the outer membrane. Vibrio vulnificus, an opportunistic marine pathogen that can cause a fatal septicemic disease in humans and eels, possesses three TonB systems. While the TonB1 and TonB2 systems are iron regulated, the TonB3 system is induced when the bacterium grows in human serum. In this work we have determined the essential roles of the leucine-responsive protein (Lrp) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) in the transcriptional activation of this system. Whereas Lrp shows at least four very distinctive DNA binding regions spread out from position -59 to -509, cAMP-CRP binds exclusively in a region centered at position -122.5 from the start point of the transcription. Our results suggest that both proteins bind simultaneously to the region closer to the RNA polymerase binding site. Importantly, we report that the TonB3 system is induced not only by serum but also during growth in minimal medium with glycerol as the sole carbon source and low concentrations of Casamino Acids. In addition to catabolite repression by glucose, l-leucine acts by inhibiting the binding of Lrp to the promoter region, hence preventing transcription of the TonB3 operon. Thus, this TonB system is under the direct control of two global regulators that can integrate different environmental signals (i.e., glucose starvation and the transition between "feast" and "famine"). These results shed light on new mechanisms of regulation for a TonB system that could be widespread in other organisms. PMID:22307757

  3. Quantification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Cantet, Franck; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Caro, Audrey; Le Mennec, Cécile; Monteil, Caroline; Quéméré, Catherine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Colwell, Rita R.; Monfort, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae are human pathogens. Little is known about these Vibrio spp. in the coastal lagoons of France. The purpose of this study was to investigate their incidence in water, shellfish and sediment of three French Mediterranean coastal lagoons using the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR). In summer, the total number of V. parahaemolyticus in water, sediment, mussels and clams collected from the three lagoons varied from 1 to >1.1 × 103 MPN/l, 0.09 to 1.1 × 103 MPN/ml, 9 to 210 MPN/g and 1.5 to 2.1 MPN/g, respectively. In winter, all samples except mussels contained V. parahaemolyticus, but at very low concentrations. Pathogenic (tdh- or trh2-positive) V. parahaemolyticus were present in water, sediment and shellfish samples collected from these lagoons. The number of V. vulnificus in water, sediment and shellfish samples ranged from 1 to 1.1 × 103 MPN/l, 0.07 to 110 MPN/ml and 0.04 to 15 MPN/g, respectively, during summer. V. vulnificus was not detected during winter. V. cholerae was rarely detected in water and sediment during summer. In summary, results of this study highlight the finding that the three human pathogenic Vibrio spp. are present in the lagoons and constitute a potential public health hazard. PMID:23770313

  4. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  5. Identification of DLD, by immunoproteomic analysis and evaluation as a potential vaccine antigen against three Vibrio species in Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huanying; Chen, Liming; Hoare, Rowena; Huang, Yucong; ZaoheWu; Jian, Jichang

    2016-02-24

    Vibrio spp. represent a serious threat to the culture of Epinephelus coioides (Orange-spotted Grouper) in Southeast Asia. In this study we used two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting to identify common immunogenic proteins of Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Membranes were probed with orange-spotted grouper anti-V. alginolyticus sera and accordingly 60, 58 and 48 immunogenic protein spots were detected. By matching analysis for the three Western blotting membranes, 6 cross immunogenic spots for the three Vibrio species were identified. They were Outer membrane protein W (OmpW), dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), succinate dehydrogenase flavoprotein subunit(SDHA), elongation factor Ts(Ts), peptide ABC transporter periplasmic peptide-binding protein and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase(PEPCK). One of the proteins, DLD, was used to evaluate the cross protective function for E. coioides with a bacterial immunization and challenge method. The relative percent survival rate of E. coioides against V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi and V. parahaemolyticus was 90%, 86% and 80%, respectively. This work may provide potential cross protective vaccine candidate antigens for three Vibrio species, and DLD may be considered as an effective cross-protective immunogen against three Vibrio species. PMID:26562319

  6. Biodiversity of Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Fabiano L.; Iida, Tetsuya; Swings, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Vibrios are ubiquitous and abundant in the aquatic environment. A high abundance of vibrios is also detected in tissues and/or organs of various marine algae and animals, e.g., abalones, bivalves, corals, fish, shrimp, sponges, squid, and zooplankton. Vibrios harbour a wealth of diverse genomes as revealed by different genomic techniques including amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing, repetetive extragenic palindrome PCR, ribotyping, and whole-genome sequencing. The 74 species of this group are distributed among four different families, i.e., Enterovibrionaceae, Photobacteriaceae, Salinivibrionaceae, and Vibrionaceae. Two new genera, i.e., Enterovibrio norvegicus and Grimontia hollisae, and 20 novel species, i.e., Enterovibrio coralii, Photobacterium eurosenbergii, V. brasiliensis, V. chagasii, V. coralliillyticus, V. crassostreae, V. fortis, V. gallicus, V. hepatarius, V. hispanicus, V. kanaloaei, V. neonatus, V. neptunius, V. pomeroyi, V. pacinii, V. rotiferianus, V. superstes, V. tasmaniensis, V. ezurae, and V. xuii, have been described in the last few years. Comparative genome analyses have already revealed a variety of genomic events, including mutations, chromosomal rearrangements, loss of genes by decay or deletion, and gene acquisitions through duplication or horizontal transfer (e.g., in the acquisition of bacteriophages, pathogenicity islands, and super-integrons), that are probably important driving forces in the evolution and speciation of vibrios. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics through the application of, e.g., microarrays will facilitate the investigation of the gene repertoire at the species level. Based on such new genomic information, the taxonomy and the species concept for vibrios will be reviewed in the next years. PMID:15353563

  7. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  8. Enhancement of UV light sensitivity of a Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 pandemic strain due to natural lysogenization by a telomeric phage.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Beatriz; García, Katherine; Espejo, Romilio T

    2009-03-01

    The Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 pandemic clonal strain was first observed in southern Chile in 2004 and has since caused approximately 8,000 seafood-related diarrhea cases in this region. The massive proliferation of the original clonal population offers a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a bacterial pathogen in its natural environment by detection and characterization of emerging bacterial variants. Here, we describe a group of pandemic variants characterized by the presence of a 42-kb extrachromosomal DNA that can be recovered by alkaline extraction. Upon treatment with mitomycin C, these variants lyse with production of a myovirus containing DNA of equal size to the plasmid but which cannot be recovered by alkaline extraction. Plasmid and phage DNAs show similar restriction patterns corresponding to enzyme sites in a circular permutation. Sequenced regions showed 81 to 99% nucleotide similarity to bacteriophage VHML of Vibrio harveyi. Altogether these observations indicate that the 42-kb plasmid corresponds to a prophage, consisting of a linear DNA with terminal hairpins of a telomeric temperate phage with a linear genome. Bacteria containing the prophage were 7 to 15 times more sensitive to UV radiation, likely due to phage induction by UV irradiation as plasmid curing restored the original sensitivity. The enhanced UV sensitivity could have a significant role in reducing the survival and propagation capability of the V. parahaemolyticus pandemic strain in the ocean. PMID:19151181

  9. Rapid identification and differentiation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus from Vibrio spp. in seafood samples using developed monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Prompamorn, Piyanuch; Longyant, Siwaporn; Pengsuk, Chalinan; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to Vibrio parahaemolyticus were successfully generated. According to the specificity of V. parahaemolyticus, MAbs can be classified into 5 groups. The MAbs VP-2D and VP-11H were specific to the O2 and O4 groups of V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. The MAb VP-11B reacted with 11 out of 30 isolates of V. parahaemolyticus used in this study. The MAb VP-516 bound to 27 out of 30 isolates of V. parahaemolyticus and cross reacted with all 10 isolates of V. alginolyticus. The MAb VP-618 demonstrated positive reactivity to 29 out of 30 isolates of V. parahaemolyticus and demonstrated slight cross reactivity to 3 out of 30 isolates of V. harveyi. The sensitivity of the MAbs ranged from 10(8) to 10(7) c.f.u. ml(-1) for V. parahaemolyticus obtained from pure cultures and depended on the group of MAbs. However, the detection capability could be improved to be equivalent to that of the PCR technique following pre-incubation of the samples in alkaline peptone water (APW). Using these MAbs along with MAbs specific to V. alginolyticus (VA-165), V. cholerae (VC-63), V. harveyi (VH-9B and VH-20C) and Vibrio spp. (VC-201) from previous studies, V. parahaemolyticus could be identified and differentiated from Vibrio spp. in various seafood samples including shrimp, green mussels, blood clams and oysters by a simple dot blot immunoassay without the requirement for bacterial isolation or biochemical characterization. PMID:23233121

  10. Description of a novel marine bacterium, Vibrio hyugaensis sp. nov., based on genomic and phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk, Yoshiko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Urbanczyk, Henryk

    2015-07-01

    Three luminous bacteria strains have been isolated from seawater samples collected in the coastal regions of the Miyazaki prefecture in Japan. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences identified the three strains as members of the genus Vibrio (Vibrionaceae, Gammaproteobacteria), closely related to bacteria in the so-called 'Harveyi clade.' The genomes of the three strains were estimated to be between 5.49Mbp and 5.95Mbp, with average G+C of 43.91%. The genome sequence data was used to estimate relatedness of the three strains to related Vibrio bacteria, including estimation of frequency of recombination events, calculation of average nucleotide identity (ANI), and a phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated alignment of nucleotide sequences of 135 protein coding genes. Results of these analyses in all cases showed the three strains forming a group clearly separate from previously described Vibrio species. A phenotypic analysis revealed that the three strains have character similar to Vibrio bacteria in the 'Harveyi clade', but can be differentiated from previously described species by testing for hydrolysis of esculin. Based on results of genomic, phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses presented in this study, it can be concluded that the three strains represent a novel species, for which the name Vibrio hyugaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 090810a(T) (=LMG 28466(T)=NBRC 110633(T)). PMID:25952324

  11. Occurrence of the three major Vibrio species pathogenic for human in seafood products consumed in France using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Robert-Pillot, Annick; Copin, Stéphanie; Himber, Charlotte; Gay, Mélanie; Quilici, Marie-Laure

    2014-10-17

    Vibrio spp. have emerged as a serious threat to human health worldwide. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus are of particular concern as they have been linked to gastrointestinal infections and septicemia associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. We developed hydrolysis probe-based real-time PCR systems with an internal amplification control for the detection of these species. We applied these systems to a total of 167 fresh or frozen crustacean, fish and shellfish samples consumed in France. Of them, 34.7% (n=58) were positive for Vibrio. V. parahaemolyticus was the most common, in 31.1% of samples, followed by V. vulnificus in 12.6% and V. cholerae in 0.6%. Furthermore, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus were present simultaneously in 9.6% of samples. Virulence genes (tdh and trh sequences) were present in 25% of the V. parahaemolyticus-positive samples. The V. cholerae strain detected was non toxigenic. The densities of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae ranged from <10(2) to 10(4)bacteria/g of seafood. All samples positive for V. vulnificus displayed low-level contamination with fewer than 10(2)bacteria/g. Our findings indicate that seafood consumption presents a potential risk to human health in France and highlight the importance of tools for a preventive consumer protection policy. PMID:25128747

  12. Occurrence of virulence genes among Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from treated wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Khouadja, Sadok; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Baccouche, Besma; Croci, Luciana; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2014-10-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio species are an important cause of foodborne illnesses. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species in the final effluents of a wastewater treatment plant and the risk that they may pose to public health. During the 1-year monitoring, a total of 43 Vibrio strains were isolated: 23 Vibrio alginolyticus, 1 Vibrio cholerae, 4 Vibrio vulnificus, and 15 Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The PCR investigation of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae virulence genes (tlh, trh, tdh, toxR, toxS, toxRS, toxT, zot, ctxAB, tcp, ace, vpi, nanH) revealed the presence of some of these genes in a significant number of strains. Intraspecies variability and genetic relationships among the environmental isolates were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR). We report the results of the first isolation and characterization of an environmental V. cholerae non-O1 non-O139 and of a toxigenic V. parahaemolyticus strain in Tunisia. We suggest that non-pathogenic Vibrio might represent a marine reservoir of virulence genes that can be transmitted between strains by horizontal transfer. PMID:25023745

  13. Reactive oxygen species generated by a heat shock protein (Hsp) inducing product contributes to Hsp70 production and Hsp70-mediated protective immunity in Artemia franciscana against pathogenic vibrios.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Linayati, Linayati; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The cytoprotective role of heat shock protein (Hsp70) described in a variety of animal disease models, including vibriosis in farmed aquatic animals, suggests that new protective strategies relying upon the use of compounds that selectively turn on Hsp genes could be developed. The product Tex-OE® (hereafter referred to as Hspi), an extract from the skin of the prickly pear fruit, Opuntia ficus indica, was previously shown to trigger Hsp70 synthesis in a non-stressful situation in a variety of animals, including in a gnotobiotically (germ-free) cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana model system. This model system offers great potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of compounds that have health benefit effects. By using this model system, we aimed to disclose the underlying cause behind the induction of Hsp70 by Hspi in the shrimp host, and to determine whether the product affects the shrimp in inducing resistance towards pathogenic vibrios. We provide unequivocal evidences indicating that during the pretreatment period with Hspi, there is an initial release of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide anion), generated by the added product, in the rearing water and associated with the host. The reactive molecules generated are the triggering factors responsible for causing Hsp70 induction within Artemia. We have also shown that Hspi acts prophylactically at an optimum dose regimen to confer protection against pathogenic vibrios. This salutary effect was associated with upregulation of two important immune genes, prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase of the innate immune system. These findings suggest that inducers of stress protein (e.g. Hsp70) are potentially important modulator of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to cultured shrimp against Vibrio infection. PMID:24950414

  14. Predatory Bacteria as Natural Modulators of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in Seawater and Oysters

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Johnna P.; Dickens, Keyana A.; Parent, Michelle A.; Soroka, Douglas S.; Boyd, E. Fidelma

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that naturally occurring Vibrio predatory bacteria (VPB) exert a major role in controlling pathogenic vibrios in seawater and shellfish. The growth and persistence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus were assessed in natural seawater and in the Eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica. The pathogens examined were V. vulnificus strain VV1003, V. parahaemolyticus O1:KUT (KUT stands for K untypeable), and V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 and corresponding O3:K6 mutants deficient in the toxRS virulence regulatory gene or the rpoS alternative stress response sigma factor gene. Vibrios were selected for streptomycin resistance, which facilitated their enumeration. In natural seawater, oysters bioconcentrated each Vibrio strain for 24 h at 22°C; however, counts rapidly declined to near negligible levels by 72 h. In natural seawater with or without oysters, vibrios decreased more than 3 log units to near negligible levels within 72 h. Neither toxRS nor rpoS had a significant effect on Vibrio levels. In autoclaved seawater, V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 counts increased 1,000-fold over 72 h. Failure of the vibrios to persist in natural seawater and oysters led to screening of the water samples for VPB on lawns of V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 host cells. Many VPB, including Bdellovibrio and like organisms (BALOs; Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and Bacteriovorax stolpii) and Micavibrio aeruginosavorus-like predators, were detected by plaque assay and electron microscopic analysis of plaque-purified isolates from Atlantic, Gulf Coast, and Hawaiian seawater. When V. parahaemolyticus O3:K6 was added to natural seawater containing trace amounts of VPB, Vibrio counts diminished 3 log units to nondetectable levels, while VPB increased 3 log units within 48 h. We propose a new paradigm that VPB are important modulators of pathogenic vibrios in seawater and oysters. PMID:22904049

  15. Ethanolamine utilization in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Ethanolamine is used as an energy source by phylogenetically diverse bacteria including pathogens, by the concerted action of proteins from the eut-operon. Previous studies have revealed the presence of eutBC genes encoding ethanolamine-ammonia lyase, a key enzyme that breaks ethanolamine into acetaldehyde and ammonia, in about 100 bacterial genomes including members of gamma-proteobacteria. However, ethanolamine utilization has not been reported for any member of the Vibrio genus. Our comparative genomics study reveals the presence of genes that are involved in ethanolamine utilization in several Vibrio species. Using Vibrio alginolyticus as a model system we demonstrate that ethanolamine is better utilized as a nitrogen source than as a carbon source. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Lakshminarayan Iyer and Dr. Vivek Anantharaman (nominated by Dr. L Aravind). PMID:23234435

  16. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries. PMID:23394143

  17. Disruption of Cell-to-Cell Signaling Does Not Abolish the Antagonism of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis toward the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum in Algal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prol García, M. J.; D'Alvise, P. W.

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic Phaeobacter and QS inhibitors is a feasible strategy for aquaculture disease control. PMID:23811510

  18. PCR and molecular detection for differentiating Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Sparagano, O A E; Robertson, P A W; Purdom, I; McInnes, J; Li, Y; Yu, D-H; Du, Z-J; Xu, H-S; Austin, B

    2002-10-01

    Vibriosis is an economically important disease of fish, marine invertebrates (particularly penaeid shrimps), and large marine mammals and is responsible for high mortality rates in aquaculture worldwide. Some Vibrio species are also responsible for zoonoses, whereas others are relatively nonpathogenic. Using 16S- and 23S-based PCR reactions, we obtained species-specific patterns and a 470-bp band, respectively. DNA sequences obtained on the 23S rRNA gene allowed us to identify species-specific probes for Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. anguillarum and for a cluster of taxonomically related species: V. carchariae/harveyi/campbelii. A phylogenetic tree based on the 23S sequences confirmed previous results obtained by Western blotting. PMID:12381564

  19. Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Brazilian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Franca, S M; Gibbs, D L; Samuels, P; Johnson, W D

    1980-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus has been increasingly recognized as an important cause of acute diarrheal illness in Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia, and North America. We investigated whether this pathogen was also present in Brazil and found that 10% of the fish samples studied were contaminated with this halophilic vibrio. Positive cultures were obtained in three of 64 fish (5%) and in seven of 36 shell fish (19%). PMID:7190196

  20. The international standard ISO/TS 21872-1 to study the occurence of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae in seafood: ITS improvement by use of a chromogenic medium and PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosec, Jean-Philippe; Causse, Véronique; Cruz, Barbara; Rauzier, Jean; Carnat, Laurence

    2012-07-01

    During two surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009, the culture method described in the international standard ISO/TS 21872-1 was applied to the detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae in 112 living bivalve mollusc samples, with a chromogenic medium used in addition to the TCBS agar, as second selective isolation medium and for enumeration of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae by surface inoculation. A PCR method for detection of these 2 Vibrio species and the hemolysin genes tdh and trh, was applied in parallel. In 2009, the survey was extended to finfish fillets and crustaceans. PCR was also used for species confirmation of characteristic colonies. The identity of the PCR products, specifically targeting V. parahaemolyticus, was checked by sequencing. Occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae isolates in living bivalve molluscs ranged from 30.4% to 32.6% and from 1.4% to 4.7% respectively. In frozen crustaceans (2009 survey) V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae isolates were respectively found in 45% and 10% of the samples. No V. parahaemolyticus or V. cholerae was detected in frozen fish fillets, neither by the ISO method nor by PCR. In 2009, enteropathogenic V. parahaemolyticus (trh+) was isolated from 4 out of 43 oyster samples while the trh gene was present in V. alginolyticus strains and in samples where V. parahaemolyticus was not detected (9 over 112 samples). The ISO method failed to isolate V. parahaemolyticus in 44% to 53% of the living bivalve molluscs where PCR detected the toxR gene specific of V. parahaemolyticus (Vp-toxR). Our results highlighted the need for a revision of the ISO/TS 21872-1 standard, at least, for analysis of living bivalve molluscs, and confirmed the increasing concern of enteropathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in French bivalve molluscs. Enrichment at 41.5°C was questioned and some reliable solutions for the improvement of the ISO/TS 21872-1 method, such as the PCR method for screening of positive samples and confirmation of colonies, were pointed out. PMID:22682545

  1. Occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, and Vibrio vulnificus in the Aquacultural Environments of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tey, Yao Hsien; Jong, Koa-Jen; Fen, Shin-Yuan; Wong, Hin-Chung

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae in a total of 72 samples from six aquaculture ponds for groupers, milk fish, and tilapia in southern Taiwan was examined by the membrane filtration and colony hybridization method. The halophilic V. parahaemolyticus was only recovered in seawater ponds, with a high isolation frequency of 86.1% and a mean density of 2.6 log CFU/g. V. cholerae was found in both the seawater and freshwater ponds but preferentially in freshwater ponds, with a frequency of 72.2% and a mean density of 1.65 log CFU/g. V. vulnificus was identified mainly in seawater ponds, with an isolation frequency of 27.8%. The density of V. parahaemolyticus in seawater ponds was positively related to water temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.555) and negatively related to salinity (r = 2 0.333). The density of V. cholerae in all six ponds was positively related to water temperature (r = 0.342) and negatively related to salinity (r = 2 0.432). Two putatively pathogenic tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus isolates (1.4% of the samples) and no ctx(+) V. cholerae isolates were identified. The experimental results may facilitate assessments of the risk posed by these pathogenic Vibrio species in Taiwan, where aquaculture provides a large part of the seafood supply. PMID:25951392

  2. Mixed diarrhoeal infection caused by Vibrio cholerae and several other enteric pathogens in a 4-year-old child returning to Germany from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Enzensberger, Ruxandra; Besier, Silke; Baumgärtner, Nicole; Brade, Volker

    2005-01-01

    We report a mixed enteric infection in a 4-y-old child who returned from Pakistan with fever, vomiting and profuse diarrhoea leading to severe dehydration. Vibrio cholerae O1, Salmonella paratyphi A and Campylobacter coli were cultured from stool. Furthermore, Giardia lamblia antigen and hepatitis A RNA were detected. This is the first paediatric cholera case seen in Frankfurt/Main. PMID:15764195

  3. The Biology of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Oliver, James D

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, carrying a 50% fatality rate, is the most deadly of the foodborne pathogens. It occurs in estuarine and coastal waters and it is found in especially high numbers in oysters and other molluscan shellfish. The biology of V. vulnificus, including its ecology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics, has been described in numerous reviews. This article provides a brief summary of some of the key aspects of this important human pathogen, including information on biotypes and genotypes, virulence factors, risk factor requirements and the role of iron in disease, association with oysters, geographic distribution, importance of salinity and water temperature, increasing incidence associated with global warming. This article includes some of our findings as presented at the "Vibrios in the Environment 2010" conference held in Biloxi, MS. PMID:26185084

  4. Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde derivatives reduce virulence in Vibrio spp. by decreasing the DNA-binding activity of the quorum sensing response regulator LuxR

    PubMed Central

    Brackman, Gilles; Defoirdt, Tom; Miyamoto, Carol; Bossier, Peter; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Nelis, Hans; Coenye, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Background To date, only few compounds targeting the AI-2 based quorum sensing (QS) system are known. In the present study, we screened cinnamaldehyde and substituted cinnamaldehydes for their ability to interfere with AI-2 based QS. The mechanism of QS inhibition was elucidated by measuring the effect on bioluminescence in several Vibrio harveyi mutants. We also studied in vitro the ability of these compounds to interfere with biofilm formation, stress response and virulence of Vibrio spp. The compounds were also evaluated in an in vivo assay measuring the reduction of Vibrio harveyi virulence towards Artemia shrimp. Results Our results indicate that cinnamaldehyde and several substituted derivatives interfere with AI-2 based QS without inhibiting bacterial growth. The active compounds neither interfered with the bioluminescence system as such, nor with the production of AI-2. Study of the effect in various mutants suggested that the target protein is LuxR. Mobility shift assays revealed a decreased DNA-binding ability of LuxR. The compounds were further shown to (i) inhibit biofilm formation in several Vibrio spp., (ii) result in a reduced ability to survive starvation and antibiotic treatment, (iii) reduce pigment and protease production in Vibrio anguillarum and (iv) protect gnotobiotic Artemia shrimp against virulent Vibrio harveyi BB120. Conclusion Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde derivatives interfere with AI-2 based QS in various Vibrio spp. by decreasing the DNA-binding ability of LuxR. The use of these compounds resulted in several marked phenotypic changes, including reduced virulence and increased susceptibility to stress. Since inhibitors of AI-2 based quorum sensing are rare, and considering the role of AI-2 in several processes these compounds may be useful leads towards antipathogenic drugs. PMID:18793453

  5. Genome sequence of Vibrio diabolicus and identification of the exopolysaccharide HE800 biosynthesis locus.

    PubMed

    Goudenège, David; Boursicot, Vincent; Versigny, Typhaine; Bonnetot, Sandrine; Ratiskol, Jacqueline; Sinquin, Corinne; LaPointe, Gisèle; Le Rous, Frédérique; Roux, Frédérique Le; Delbarre-Ladrat, Christine

    2014-12-01

    Vibrio diabolicus, a marine bacterium originating from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, produces the HE800 exopolysaccharide with high value for biotechnological purposes, especially for human health. Its genome was sequenced and analyzed; phylogenetic analysis using the core genome revealed V. diabolicus is close to another deep-sea Vibrio sp. (Ex25) within the Harveyi clade and Alginolyticus group. A genetic locus homologous to the syp cluster from Vibrio fischeri was demonstrated to be involved in the HE800 production. However, few genetic particularities suggest that the regulation of syp expression may be different in V. diabolicus. The presence of several types of glycosyltransferases within the locus indicates a capacity to generate diversity in the glycosidic structure, which may confer an adaptability to environmental conditions. These results contribute to better understanding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and for developing new efficient processes to produce this molecule for biotechnological applications. PMID:25273176

  6. [The interrelationships between Vibrio cholerae and the infusorian Tetrahymena pyriformis].

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, V I; Pinigin, A F; Maramovich, A S; Pushkareva, V I; Litvin, V Iu; Lykova, M V; Kapustin, Iu M

    1995-01-01

    The results of the study of interaction between V. cholerae of different virulence and T. pyriformis are presented. The study has revealed the heterogeneity of V. cholerae population: alongside easily phagocytized vibrios, there are vibrios resistant to the digestive action of T. pyriformis. An increase in the number of V. cholerae in association with T. pyriformis has been evaluated, taking into account the selective multiplication of vibrios resistant to phagocytosis. The data on changes in the agglutinative, phagolytic and virulent properties of V. cholerae cultivated together with T. pyriformis are presented. The suggestion has been made that protozoa can function as hosts of pathogenic vibrios supporting their existence in water. PMID:7653129

  7. Occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio alginolyticus in the German Bight over a seasonal cycle.

    PubMed

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Wichels, Antje; Wiltshire, Karen H; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2011-08-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio are an important component of marine ecosystems worldwide. The genus harbors several human pathogens, for instance the species Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a main cause for foodborne gastroenteritis in Asia and the USA. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus strains emerged also in Europe, but little is known about the abundance, pathogenicity and ecology of V. parahaemolyticus especially in Northern European waters. This study focuses on V. parahaemolyticus and its close relative Vibrio alginolyticus in the North Sea (Helgoland Roads, Germany). Free-living, plankton-attached and shellfish-associated Vibrio spp. were quantified between May 2008 and January 2010. CFUs up to 4.3 × 10(3) N l(-1) and MPNs up to 240 N g(-1) were determined. Phylogenetic classification based on rpoB gene sequencing revealed V. alginolyticus as the dominant Vibrio species at Helgoland Roads, followed by V. parahaemolyticus. We investigated the intraspecific diversity of V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus using ERIC-PCR. The fingerprinting disclosed three distinct groups at Helgoland Roads, representing V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus and one group in between. The species V. parahaemolyticus occurred mainly in summer months. None of the strains carried the virulence-associated genes tdh or trh. We further analyzed the influence of nutrients, secchi depth, temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a and phytoplankton on the abundance of Vibrio spp. and the population structure of V. parahaemolyticus. Spearman Rank analysis revealed that particularly temperature correlated significantly with Vibrio spp. numbers. Based on multivariate statistical analyses we report that the V. parahaemolyticus population was structured by a complex combination of environmental parameters. To further investigate these influences is the key to understanding the dynamics of Vibrio spp. in temperate European waters, where this microbial group and especially the pathogenic species, are likely to gain in importance. PMID:21598011

  8. Glucose- but Not Rice-Based Oral Rehydration Therapy Enhances the Production of Virulence Determinants in the Human Pathogen Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Juliane; Finger, Flavio; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Blokesch, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings. PMID:25474211

  9. Antibiotic resistance and plasmid profiling of Vibrio spp. in tropical waters of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    You, K G; Bong, C W; Lee, C W

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio species isolated from four different sampling stations in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia were screened for their antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profiles. A total of 138 isolates belonging to 15 different species were identified. Vibrio campbellii, V. parahaemolyticus, V. harveyi, and V. tubiashii were found to predominance species at all stations. High incidence of erythromycin, ampicillin, and mecillinam resistance was observed among the Vibrio isolates. In contrast, resistance against aztreonam, cefepime, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfonamides was low. All the Vibrio isolates in this study were found to be susceptible to imipenem, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and oxytetracycline. Ninety-five percent of the Vibrio isolates were resistant to one or more different classes of antibiotic, and 20 different resistance antibiograms were identified. Thirty-two distinct plasmid profiles with molecular weight ranging from 2.2 to 24.8 kb were detected among the resistance isolates. This study showed that multidrug-resistant Vibrio spp. were common in the aquatic environments of west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:26884358

  10. Genetic diversity of culturable Vibrio in an Australian blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis hatchery.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Tzu Nin; Bolch, Christopher J S

    2015-09-17

    Bacillary necrosis associated with Vibrio species is the common cause of larval and spat mortality during commercial production of Australian blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. A total of 87 randomly selected Vibrio isolates from various stages of rearing in a commercial mussel hatchery were characterised using partial sequences of the ATP synthase alpha subunit gene (atpA). The sequenced isolates represented 40 unique atpA genotypes, overwhelmingly dominated (98%) by V. splendidus group genotypes, with 1 V. harveyi group genotype also detected. The V. splendidus group sequences formed 5 moderately supported clusters allied with V. splendidus/V. lentus, V. atlanticus, V. tasmaniensis, V. cyclitrophicus and V. toranzoniae. All water sources showed considerable atpA gene diversity among Vibrio isolates, with 30 to 60% of unique isolates recovered from each source. Over half (53%) of Vibrio atpA genotypes were detected only once, and only 7 genotypes were recovered from multiple sources. Comparisons of phylogenetic diversity using UniFrac analysis showed that the culturable Vibrio community from intake, header, broodstock and larval tanks were phylogenetically similar, while spat tank communities were different. Culturable Vibrio associated with spat tank seawater differed in being dominated by V. toranzoniae-affiliated genotypes. The high diversity of V. splendidus group genotypes detected in this study reinforces the dynamic nature of microbial communities associated with hatchery culture and complicates our efforts to elucidate the role of V. splendidus group bacteria in vibriosis. PMID:26378406

  11. The ttpC Gene Is Contained in Two of Three TonB Systems in the Human Pathogen Vibrio vulnificus, but Only One Is Active in Iron Transport and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kustusch, Ryan J.; Kuehl, Carole J.

    2012-01-01

    The TonB system of proteins is required for the energy-dependent active transport of iron-bound substrates across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. We have identified three TonB systems within the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. The TonB1 system contains the TonB1, ExbD1, and ExbB1 proteins, whereas both the TtpC2-TonB2 and TtpC3-TonB3 systems contain an additional fourth protein, TtpC. Here we report that TtpC3, although highly related to TtpC2, is inactive in iron transport, whereas TtpC2 is essential for the function of the TtpC2-TonB2 system in V. vulnificus. This protein, together with TonB2, is absolutely required for both the uptake of endogenously produced iron-bound siderophores as well as siderophores produced from other organisms. Through complementation we show that V. vulnificus is capable of using different TtpC2 proteins from other Vibrio species to drive the uptake of multiple siderophores. We have also determined that aerobactin, a common bacterial siderophore involved in virulence of enteric bacteria, can only be brought into the cell using the TtpC2-TonB2 system, indicating an important evolutionary adaptation of TtpC2 and TonB2. Furthermore, in the absence of TonB1, TtpC2 is essential for a fully virulent phenotype as demonstrated using 50% lethal dose (LD50) experiments in mice. PMID:22505675

  12. Copper homeostasis at the host vibrio interface: lessons from intracellular vibrio transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Vanhove, Audrey S; Rubio, Tristan P; Nguyen, An N; Lemire, Astrid; Roche, David; Nicod, Julie; Vergnes, Agnès; Poirier, Aurore C; Disconzi, Elena; Bachère, Evelyne; Le Roux, Frédérique; Jacq, Annick; Charrière, Guillaume M; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies revealed that several vibrio species have evolved the capacity to survive inside host cells. However, it is still often ignored if intracellular stages are required for pathogenicity. Virulence of Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32, a strain pathogenic for Crassostrea gigas oysters, depends on entry into hemocytes, the oyster immune cells. We investigated here the mechanisms of LGP32 intracellular survival and their consequences on the host-pathogen interaction. Entry and survival inside hemocytes were required for LGP32-driven cytolysis of hemocytes, both in vivo and in vitro. LGP32 intracellular stages showed a profound boost in metabolic activity and a major transcription of antioxidant and copper detoxification genes, as revealed by RNA sequencing. LGP32 isogenic mutants showed that resistance to oxidative stress and copper efflux are two main functions required for vibrio intracellular stages and cytotoxicity to hemocytes. Copper efflux was also essential for host colonization and virulence in vivo. Altogether, our results identify copper resistance as a major mechanism to resist killing by phagocytes, induce cytolysis of immune cells and colonize oysters. Selection of such resistance traits could arise from vibrio interactions with copper-rich environmental niches including marine invertebrates, which favour the emergence of pathogenic vibrios resistant to intraphagosomal killing across animal species. PMID:26472275

  13. Current perspectives on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of clinically significant Vibrio spp.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M; Powers, C; Bryant, R G; Abbott, S L

    1988-01-01

    Recent taxonomic advances have now implicated several different Vibrio species as human pathogens. While the most common clinical presentation of Vibrio infection continues to be gastroenteritis, an increasing number of extraintestinal infections are being reported, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Detection of Vibrio infections requires a good clinical history and the use of appropriate isolation and identification procedures by the laboratory to confirm illnesses attributed to Vibrio species. Except for Vibrio cholerae O1 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, there is little direct evidence linking the production of a myriad of cell-associated or extracellular factors produced by each species with human disease and pathogenesis. Many questions regarding pathogenic Vibrio species remain unanswered, including their frequency and distribution in environmental specimens (water, shellfish), infective doses, virulence potential of individual isolates, and markers associated with such strains. Images PMID:3058295

  14. Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides in Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Duperthuy, Marylise; Vanhove, Audrey Sophie; Schmitt, Paulina; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2014-01-01

    Vibrios are associated with a broad diversity of hosts that produce antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as part of their defense against microbial infections. In particular, vibrios colonize epithelia, which function as protective barriers and express AMPs as a first line of chemical defense against pathogens. Recent studies have shown they can also colonize phagocytes, key components of the animal immune system. Phagocytes infiltrate infected tissues and use AMPs to kill the phagocytosed microorganisms intracellularly, or deliver their antimicrobial content extracellularly to circumvent tissue infection. We review here the mechanisms by which vibrios have evolved the capacity to evade or resist the potent antimicrobial defenses of the immune cells or tissues they colonize. Among their strategies to resist killing by AMPs, primarily vibrios use membrane remodeling mechanisms. In particular, some highly resistant strains substitute hexaacylated Lipid A with a diglycine residue to reduce their negative surface charge, thereby lowering their electrostatic interactions with cationic AMPs. As a response to envelope stress, which can be induced by membrane-active agents including AMPs, vibrios also release outer membrane vesicles to create a protective membranous shield that traps extracellular AMPs and prevents interaction of the peptides with their own membranes. Finally, once AMPs have breached the bacterial membrane barriers, vibrios use RND efflux pumps, similar to those of other species, to transport AMPs out of their cytoplasmic space.

  15. Genomic and functional analysis of Vibrio phage SIO-2 reveals novel insights into ecology and evolution of marine siphoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Baudoux, A-C.; Hendrix, R.W.; Lander, G.C.; Bailly, X.; Podell, S.; Paillard, C.; Johnson, J.E.; Potter, C.S.; Carragher, B.; Azam, F.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a genomic and functional analysis of a novel marine siphovirus, the Vibrio phage SIO-2. This phage is lytic for related Vibrio species of great ecological interest including the broadly antagonistic bacterium Vibrio sp. SWAT3 as well as notable members of the Harveyi clade (V. harveyi ATTC BAA-1116 and V. campbellii ATCC 25920). Vibrio phage SIO-2 has a circularly permuted genome of 80,598 bp, which displays unusual features. This genome is larger than that of most known siphoviruses and only 38 of the 116 predicted proteins had homologues in databases. Another divergence is manifest by the origin of core genes, most of which share robust similarities with unrelated viruses and bacteria spanning a wide range of phyla. These core genes are arranged in the same order as in most bacteriophages but they are unusually interspaced at two places with insertions of DNA comprising a high density of uncharacterized genes. The acquisition of these DNA inserts is associated with morphological variation of SIO-2 capsid, which assembles as a large (80 nm) shell with a novel T=12 symmetry. These atypical structural features confer on SIO-2 a remarkable stability to a variety of physical, chemical and environmental factors. Given this high level of functional and genomic novelty, SIO-2 emerges as a model of considerable interest in ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:22225728

  16. A novel C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) protein from Mytilus coruscus with the transcriptional analysis against marine pathogens and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hui; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2014-05-01

    The C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins, which are involved in various processes of vertebrates, are important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity of invertebrates. In present study, a novel C1qDC was identified from Mytilus coruscus (designated as McC1qDC), which was 917 bp in length encoding 236 amino acids with a typical signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues in N-terminus. Based on its conserved C1q domain and molecular architecture of 10 ?-strand jelly-roll folding topology structure, McC1qDC might be classified as a member of the C1q family. The mRNA transcript of McC1qDC was predominantly detectable in the hemocytes, and a less degree in gill, gonad and mantle, but trace in foot, adductor and digestive gland. Upon induction by Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio alginolyticus, McC1qDC expression was significantly up-regulated. Time-dependent mRNA expression of McC1qDC was found during copper and cadmium exposure for its heavy metal-binding domain. These results indicated that McC1qDC was a novel member of the C1qDC protein family as a pattern recognition receptor against pathogens, and might be developed as a potential indicator for monitoring heavy metals pollution. PMID:24296435

  17. Predicting the Distribution of Vibrio spp. in the Chesapeake Bay: A Vibrio cholerae Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Magny, Guillaume Constantin de; Long, Wen; Brown, Christopher W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Huq, Anwar; Murtugudde, Raghu; Colwell, Rita R.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a naturally occurring inhabitant of the Chesapeake Bay and serves as a predictor for other clinically important vibrios, including Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. A system was constructed to predict the likelihood of the presence of V. cholerae in surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay, with the goal to provide forecasts of the occurrence of this and related pathogenic Vibrio spp. Prediction was achieved by driving an available multivariate empirical habitat model estimating the probability of V. cholerae within a range of temperatures and salinities in the Bay, with hydrodynamically generated predictions of ambient temperature and salinity. The experimental predictions provided both an improved understanding of the in situ variability of V. cholerae, including identification of potential hotspots of occurrence, and usefulness as an early warning system. With further development of the system, prediction of the probability of the occurrence of related pathogenic vibrios in the Chesapeake Bay, notably V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, will be possible, as well as its transport to any geographical location where sufficient relevant data are available. PMID:20145974

  18. Enumeration of Gut-Homing ?7-Positive, Pathogen-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cells in Whole Blood from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli- and Vibrio cholerae-Infected Patients, Determined Using an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Spot Assay Technique.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Nishat, Naoshin Sharmin; Al Mahbuba, Deena; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Islam, Kamrul; Hossain, Lazina; Dey, Ayan; Harris, Jason B; Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are noninvasive mucosal pathogens that cause acute watery diarrhea in people in developing countries. Direct assessment of the mucosal immune responses to these pathogens is problematic. Surrogate markers of local mucosal responses in blood are increasingly being studied to determine the mucosal immune responses after infection. However, the volume of blood available in children and infants has limited this approach. We assessed whether an approach that first isolates ?7-positive cells from a small volume of blood would allow measurement of the antigen-specific immune responses in patients with cholera and ETEC infection. ?7 is a cell surface marker associated with mucosal homing. We isolated ?7-expressing cells from blood on days 2, 7, and 30 and used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay to assess the gut-homing antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) specific to pathogen antigens. Patients with ETEC diarrhea showed a significant increase in toxin-specific gut-homing ASCs at day 7 compared to the levels at days 2 and 30 after onset of illness and to the levels in healthy controls. Similar elevations of responses to the ETEC colonization factors (CFs) CS6 and CFA/I were observed in patients infected with CS6- and CFA/I-positive ETEC strains. Antigen-specific gut-homing ASCs to the B subunit of cholera toxin and cholera-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were also observed on day 7 after the onset of cholera using this approach. This study demonstrates that a simple ELISPOT assay can be used to study the mucosal immunity to specific antigens using a cell-sorting protocol to isolate mucosal homing cells, facilitating measurement of mucosal responses in children following infection or vaccination. PMID:26512047

  19. Vibrio parahaemolyticus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    TAKEDA, Yoshifumi

    2011-01-01

    This review highlighted the following: (i) pathogenic mechanism of the thermostable direct hemolysin produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, especially on its cardiotoxicity, (ii) heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, especially structure–activity relationship of heat-stable enterotoxin, (iii) RNA N-glycosidase activity of Vero toxins (VT1 and VT2) produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, (iv) discovery of Vibrio cholerae O139, (v) isolation of new variant of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor that carries classical ctxB, and production of high concentration of cholera toxin by these strains, and (vi) conversion of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae to culturable state by co-culture with eukaryotic cells. PMID:21233598

  20. Reducing Vibrio load in Artemia nauplii using antimicrobial photodynamic therapy: a promising strategy to reduce antibiotic application in shrimp larviculture

    PubMed Central

    Asok, Aparna; Arshad, Esha; Jasmin, C.; Somnath Pai, S.; Bright Singh, I. S.; Mohandas, A.; Anas, Abdulaziz

    2012-01-01

    Summary We propose antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an alternative strategy to reduce the use of antibiotics in shrimp larviculture systems. The growth of a multiple antibiotic resistant Vibrio harveyi strain was effectively controlled by treating the cells with Rose Bengal and photosensitizing for 30 min using a halogen lamp. This resulted in the death of > 50% of the cells within the first 10 min of exposure and the 50% reduction in the cell wall integrity after 30 min could be attributed to the destruction of outer membrane protein of V. harveyi by reactive oxygen intermediates produced during the photosensitization. Further, mesocosm experiments with V. harveyi and Artemia nauplii demonstrated that in 30 min, the aPDT could kill 78.9% and 91.2% of heterotrophic bacterial and Vibrio population respectively. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that aPDT with its rapid action and as yet unreported resistance development possibilities could be a propitious strategy to reduce the use of antibiotics in shrimp larviculture systems and thereby, avoid their hazardous effects on human health and the ecosystem at large. PMID:21951316

  1. Vibrios adhere to epithelial cells in the intestinal tract of red sea bream, Pagrus major, utilizing GM4 as an attachment site.

    PubMed

    Chisada, Shin-ichi; Shimizu, Kohei; Kamada, Haruna; Matsunaga, Naoyuki; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Vibrios, distributed in marine and brackish environments, can cause vibriosis in fish and shellfish under appropriate conditions. Previously, we clarified by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) overlay assay that (35)S-labeled Vibrio trachuri adhered to GM4 isolated from red sea bream intestine. However, whether GM4 actually functions on epithelial cells as an attachment site for vibrios still remains to be uncovered. We found that six isolates, classified as V. harveyi, V. campbellii, and V. splendidus, from intestinal microflora of red sea bream adhered to GM4 but not galactosylceramide (GalCer) by TLC-overlay assay. Tissue-overlay assays revealed that V. harveyi labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) adhered to epithelial cells of red sea bream intestine where GM4 and GalCer were found to be distributed on the top layer of actin filaments by immunohistochemical analysis using corresponding antibodies. The number of adhering vibrios was diminished by pretreatment with anti-GM4 antibody, but not anti-GalCer antibody. These results clearly indicate that vibrios adhere to epithelial cells of red sea bream intestine utilizing GM4 as an attachment site. PMID:23320941

  2. The Role of Vibrios in Diseases of Corals.

    PubMed

    Munn, Colin B

    2015-08-01

    The tissue, skeleton, and secreted mucus of corals supports a highly dynamic and diverse community of microbes, which play a major role in the health status of corals such as the provision of essential nutrients or the metabolism of waste products. However, members of the Vibrio genus are prominent as causative agents of disease in corals. The aim of this chapter is to review our understanding of the spectrum of disease effects displayed by coral-associated vibrios, with a particular emphasis on the few species where detailed studies of pathogenicity have been conducted. The role of Vibrio shilonii in seasonal bleaching of Oculina patagonica and the development of the coral probiotic hypothesis is reviewed, pointing to unanswered questions about this phenomenon. Detailed consideration is given to studies of V. coralliilyticus and related pathogens and changes in the dominance of vibrios associated with coral bleaching. Other Vibrio-associated disease syndromes discussed include yellow band/blotch disease and tissue necrosis in temperate gorgonian corals. The review includes analysis of the role of enzymes, resistance to oxidative stress, and quorum sensing in virulence of coral-associated vibrios. The review concludes that we should probably regard most-possibly all-vibrios as "opportunistic" pathogens which, under certain environmental conditions, are capable of overwhelming the defense mechanisms of appropriate hosts, leading to rapid growth and tissue destruction. PMID:26350314

  3. Role of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae and coral mucus in the adhesion of the coral-bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi to its host.

    PubMed

    Banin, E; Israely, T; Fine, M; Loya, Y; Rosenberg, E

    2001-05-15

    Vibrio shiloi, the causative agent of bleaching the coral Oculina patagonica in the Mediterranean Sea, adheres to its coral host by a beta-D-galactopyranoside-containing receptor on the coral surface. The receptor is present in the coral mucus, since V. shiloi adhered avidly to mucus-coated ELISA plates. Adhesion was inhibited by methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside. Removal of the mucus from O. patagonica resulted in a delay in adhesion of V. shiloi to the coral, corresponding to regeneration of the mucus. DCMU inhibited the recovery of adhesion of the bacteria to the mucus-depleted corals, indicating that active photosynthesis by the endosymbiotic zooxanthellae was necessary for the synthesis or secretion of the receptor. Further evidence of the role of the zooxanthellae in producing the receptor came from a study of adhesion of V. shiloi to different species of corals. The bacteria failed to adhere to bleached corals and white (azooxanthellate) O. patagonica cave corals, both of which lacked the algae. In addition, V. shiloi adhered to two Mediterranean corals (Madracis and Cladocora) that contained zooxanthellae and did not adhere to two azooxanthellate Mediterranean corals (Phyllangia and Polycyathus). V. shiloi demonstrated positive chemotaxis towards the mucus of O. patagonica. The data demonstrate that endosymbiotic zooxanthellae contribute to the production of coral mucus and that V. shiloi infects only mucus-containing, zooxanthellate corals. PMID:11356564

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum Harboring the pJM1 Virulence Plasmid and Genomic Comparison with Other Virulent Strains of V. anguillarum and V. ordalii ? †

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Hiroaki; Dias, Graciela M.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Dubay, Christopher; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Crosa, Jorge H.

    2011-01-01

    We dissected the complete genome sequence of the O1 serotype strain Vibrio anguillarum 775(pJM1) and determined the draft genomic sequences of plasmidless strains of serotype O1 (strain 96F) and O2? (strain RV22) and V. ordalii. All strains harbor two chromosomes, but 775 also harbors the virulence plasmid pJM1, which carries the anguibactin-producing and cognate transport genes, one of the main virulence factors of V. anguillarum. Genomic analysis identified eight genomic islands in chromosome 1 of V. anguillarum 775(pJM1) and two in chromosome 2. Some of them carried potential virulence genes for the biosynthesis of O antigens, hemolysins, and exonucleases as well as others for sugar transport and metabolism. The majority of genes for essential cell functions and pathogenicity are located on chromosome 1. In contrast, chromosome 2 contains a larger fraction (59%) of hypothetical genes than does chromosome 1 (42%). Chromosome 2 also harbors a superintegron, as well as host “addiction” genes that are typically found on plasmids. Unique distinctive properties include homologues of type III secretion system genes in 96F, homologues of V. cholerae zot and ace toxin genes in RV22, and the biofilm formation syp genes in V. ordalii. Mobile genetic elements, some of them possibly originated in the pJM1 plasmid, were very abundant in 775, resulting in the silencing of specific genes, with only few insertions in the 96F and RV22 chromosomes. PMID:21576332

  5. Illuminating Cell Signaling: Using "Vibrio harveyi" in an Introductory Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrizo, Stacy L.; Kaufmann, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling is an essential cellular process that is performed by all living organisms. Bacteria communicate with each other using a chemical language in a signaling pathway that allows bacteria to evaluate the size of their population, determine when they have reached a critical mass (quorum sensing), and then change their behavior in unison…

  6. Illuminating Cell Signaling: Using "Vibrio harveyi" in an Introductory Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrizo, Stacy L.; Kaufmann, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling is an essential cellular process that is performed by all living organisms. Bacteria communicate with each other using a chemical language in a signaling pathway that allows bacteria to evaluate the size of their population, determine when they have reached a critical mass (quorum sensing), and then change their behavior in unison…

  7. Rapid proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae during freshwater flash floods in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Kevin; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Mosser, Thomas; Rodier, Claire; Tournoud, Marie-George; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae of the non-O1/non-O139 serotype are present in coastal lagoons of southern France. In these Mediterranean regions, the rivers have long low-flow periods followed by short-duration or flash floods during and after heavy intense rainstorms, particularly at the end of the summer and in autumn. These floods bring large volumes of freshwater into the lagoons, reducing their salinity. Water temperatures recorded during sampling (15 to 24°C) were favorable for the presence and multiplication of vibrios. In autumn 2011, before heavy rainfalls and flash floods, salinities ranged from 31.4 to 36.1‰ and concentrations of V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae varied from 0 to 1.5 × 10(3) most probable number (MPN)/liter, 0.7 to 2.1 × 10(3) MPN/liter, and 0 to 93 MPN/liter, respectively. Following heavy rainstorms that generated severe flash flooding and heavy discharge of freshwater, salinity decreased, reaching 2.2 to 16.4‰ within 15 days, depending on the site, with a concomitant increase in Vibrio concentration to ca. 10(4) MPN/liter. The highest concentrations were reached with salinities between 10 and 20‰ for V. parahaemolyticus, 10 and 15‰ for V. vulnificus, and 5 and 12‰ for V. cholerae. Thus, an abrupt decrease in salinity caused by heavy rainfall and major flooding favored growth of human-pathogenic Vibrio spp. and their proliferation in the Languedocian lagoons. Based on these results, it is recommended that temperature and salinity monitoring be done to predict the presence of these Vibrio spp. in shellfish-harvesting areas of the lagoons. PMID:26319881

  8. Autoinduction in Erwinia amylovora: Evidence of an Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Signal in the Fire Blight Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Rezzonico, Fabio; Défago, Geneviève; Duffy, Brion

    2005-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight disease of apple, pear, and other members of the Rosaceae. Here we present the first evidence for autoinduction in E. amylovora and a role for an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-type signal. Two major plant virulence traits, production of extracellular polysaccharides (amylovoran and levan) and tolerance to free oxygen radicals, were controlled in a bacterial-cell-density-dependent manner. Two standard autoinducer biosensors, Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 and Vibrio harveyi BB886, detected AHL in stationary-phase cultures of E. amylovora. A putative AHL synthase gene, eamI, was partially sequenced, which revealed homology with autoinducer genes from other bacterial pathogens (e.g., carI, esaI, expI, hsII, yenI, and luxI). E. amylovora was also found to carry eamR, a convergently transcribed gene with homology to luxR AHL activator genes in pathogens such as Erwinia carotovora. Heterologous expression of the Bacillus sp. strain A24 acyl-homoserine lactonase gene aiiA in E. amylovora abolished induction of AHL biosensors, impaired extracellular polysaccharide production and tolerance to hydrogen peroxide, and reduced virulence on apple leaves. PMID:15838048

  9. Effects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology.

    PubMed

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Pruzzo, Carla

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio-related infections are increasing worldwide both in humans and aquatic animals. Rise in global sea surface temperature (SST), which is approximately 1 °C higher now than 140 years ago and is one of the primary physical impacts of global warming, has been linked to such increases. In this chapter, major known effects of increasing SST on the biology and ecology of vibrios are described. They include the effects on bacterial growth rate, both in the field and in laboratory, culturability, expression of pathogenicity traits, and interactions with aquatic organisms and abiotic surfaces. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ocean warming on Vibrio interactions with zooplankters, which represent one of the most important aquatic reservoirs for these bacteria. The reported findings highlight the biocomplexity of the interactions between vibrios and their natural environment in a climate change scenario, posing the need for interdisciplinary studies to properly understand the connection between ocean warming and persistence and spread of vibrios in sea waters and the epidemiology of the diseases they cause. PMID:26185070

  10. Environmental occurrence and clinical impact of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Baker-Austin, Craig; Stockley, Louise; Rangdale, Rachel; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2010-02-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterial pathogens found naturally in marine and estuarine waters, and are a leading cause of seafood-associated bacterial illness. These pathogens are commonly reported in the USA and in many Asian countries, including China, Japan and Taiwan; however, there is growing concern that V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus may represent an important and increasing clinical problem in Europe. Several factors underlie the need for a greater understanding of these non-cholera vibrios within a European context. First, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus infections are increasing, and tend to follow regional climatic trends, with outbreaks typically following episodes of unusually warm weather. Such findings are especially alarming given current predictions regarding warming of marine waters as a result of global climatic change. Second, a myriad of epidemiological factors may greatly increase the incidence as well as clinical burden of these pathogens - including increasing global consumption and trade of seafood produce coupled to an increase in the number of susceptible individuals consuming seafood produce. Finally, there is currently a lack of detailed surveillance information regarding non-cholerae Vibrio infections in Europe, as these pathogens are not notifiable in many countries, which probably masks the true clinical burden of many human infections. This review will present a pertinent overview of both the environmental occurrence and clinical impact of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in Europe. PMID:23765993

  11. Fimbrolide Natural Products Disrupt Bioluminescence of Vibrio By Targeting Autoinducer Biosynthesis and Luciferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weining; Lorenz, Nicola; Jung, Kirsten; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio is a model organism for the study of quorum sensing (QS) signaling and is used to identify QS-interfering drugs. Naturally occurring fimbrolides are important tool compounds known to affect QS in various organisms; however, their cellular targets have so far remained elusive. Here we identify the irreversible fimbrolide targets in the proteome of living V.?harveyi and V.?campbellii via quantitative mass spectrometry utilizing customized probes. Among the major hits are two protein targets with essential roles in Vibrio QS and bioluminescence. LuxS, responsible for autoinducer?2 biosynthesis, and LuxE, a subunit of the luciferase complex, were both covalently modified at their active-site cysteines leading to inhibition of activity. The identification of LuxE unifies previous reports suggesting inhibition of bioluminescence downstream of the signaling cascade and thus contributes to a better mechanistic understanding of these QS tool compounds. PMID:26609793

  12. Light?scattering sensor for real?time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae colonies on solid agar plate

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Karleigh; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Littlejohn, Amy E. Fleishman; Rajwa, Bartek; Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Patsekin, Valery; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Robinson, J. Paul; Richards, Gary P.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, are of major concerns due to increased incidence of water? and seafood?related outbreaks and illness worldwide. Current methods are lengthy and require biochemical and molecular confirmation. A novel label?free forward light?scattering sensor was developed to detect and identify colonies of these three pathogens in real time in the presence of other vibrios in food or water samples. Vibrio colonies grown on agar plates were illuminated by a 635?nm laser beam and scatter?image signatures were acquired using a CCD (charge?coupled device) camera in an automated BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical light?scattering Technology) system. Although a limited number of Vibrio species was tested, each produced a unique light?scattering signature that is consistent from colony to colony. Subsequently a pattern recognition system analysing the collected light?scatter information provided classification in 1?2?min with an accuracy of 99%. The light?scattering signatures were unaffected by subjecting the bacteria to physiological stressors: osmotic imbalance, acid, heat and recovery from a viable but non?culturable state. Furthermore, employing a standard sample enrichment in alkaline peptone water for 6?h followed by plating on selective thiosulphate citrate bile salts sucrose agar at 30°C for ??12?h, the light?scattering sensor successfully detected V.?cholerae, V.?parahaemolyticus and V.?vulnificus present in oyster or water samples in 18?h even in the presence of other vibrios or other bacteria, indicating the suitability of the sensor as a powerful screening tool for pathogens on agar plates. PMID:22613192

  13. Light-scattering sensor for real-time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae colonies on solid agar plate.

    PubMed

    Huff, Karleigh; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Littlejohn, Amy E Fleishman; Rajwa, Bartek; Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P; Patsekin, Valery; Hirleman, E Daniel; Robinson, J Paul; Richards, Gary P; Bhunia, Arun K

    2012-09-01

    The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, are of major concerns due to increased incidence of water- and seafood-related outbreaks and illness worldwide. Current methods are lengthy and require biochemical and molecular confirmation. A novel label-free forward light-scattering sensor was developed to detect and identify colonies of these three pathogens in real time in the presence of other vibrios in food or water samples. Vibrio colonies grown on agar plates were illuminated by a 635?nm laser beam and scatter-image signatures were acquired using a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera in an automated BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical light-scattering Technology) system. Although a limited number of Vibrio species was tested, each produced a unique light-scattering signature that is consistent from colony to colony. Subsequently a pattern recognition system analysing the collected light-scatter information provided classification in 1-2?min with an accuracy of 99%. The light-scattering signatures were unaffected by subjecting the bacteria to physiological stressors: osmotic imbalance, acid, heat and recovery from a viable but non-culturable state. Furthermore, employing a standard sample enrichment in alkaline peptone water for 6?h followed by plating on selective thiosulphate citrate bile salts sucrose agar at 30°C for ??12?h, the light-scattering sensor successfully detected V.?cholerae, V.?parahaemolyticus and V.?vulnificus present in oyster or water samples in 18?h even in the presence of other vibrios or other bacteria, indicating the suitability of the sensor as a powerful screening tool for pathogens on agar plates. PMID:22613192

  14. Vibrio species as agents of elasmobranch disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, D. J.; Colwell, R. R.; Stemmler, J.; Hada, H.; Maneval, D.; Hetrick, F. M.; May, E. B.; Jones, R. T.; Stoskopf, M.

    1984-03-01

    Two Vibrio species identified as V. damsela and a new sucrose-positive Vibrio sp., V. carchariae sp. nov., were simultaneously isolated from a brown shark which died while being held in captivity at a large aquarium. Pathogenicity studies were subsequently conducted using a variety of elasmobranchs, including smooth dogfish and lemon sharks. Both bacterial strains proved pathogenic, causing death in nearly all of the elasmobranch hosts challenged. Virulence studies revealed that both bacterial strains were cytotoxic for Y-1 mouse adrenal cells. The V. damsela strain was highly cytotoxic causing Y-1 cellular damage at culture supernatant dilutions up to 1 : 128. Both strains were hemolytic, but neither exhibited the Kanagawa phenomenon. They were both capable of urea hydrolysis, an interesting trait, considering that elasmobranchs retain large (ca 300 milliosmolal) urea concentration in their tissue.

  15. Nontoxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus Strains Causing Acute Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Francesca; Serra, Roberto; Serracca, Laura; Decastelli, Lucia; Rocchegiani, Elena; Masini, Laura; Canonico, Cristina; Talevi, Giulia; Carraturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the virulence properties of four Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains causing acute gastroenteritis following consumption of indigenous mussels in Italy. The isolated strains were cytotoxic and adhesive but, surprisingly, lacked tdh, trh, and type three secretion system 2 (T3SS2) genes. We emphasize that nontoxigenic V. parahaemolyticus can induce acute gastroenteritis, highlighting the need for more investigation of the pathogenicity of this microorganism. PMID:23052317

  16. Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kristi S; Sapkota, Amy R; Jacobs, John M; He, Xin; Crump, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous in the marine-estuarine environment, but the magnitude of human non-ingestion exposure to these waterborne pathogens is largely unknown. We evaluated the magnitude of dermal exposure to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus among swimmers recreating in Vibrio-populated waters by conducting swim studies at four swimming locations in the Chesapeake Bay in 2009 and 2011. Volunteers (n=31) swam for set time periods, and surface water (n=25) and handwash (n=250) samples were collected. Samples were analyzed for Vibrio concentrations using quantitative PCR. Linear and logistic regressions were used to evaluate factors associated with recreational exposures. Mean surface water V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus concentrations were 1128CFUmL(-1) (95% confidence interval (CI): 665.6, 1591.4) and 18CFUmL(-1) (95% CI: 9.8, 26.1), respectively, across all sampling locations. Mean Vibrio concentrations in handwash samples (V. vulnificus, 180CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 136.6, 222.5); V. parahaemolyticus, 3CFUcm(-2) (95% CI: 2.4, 3.7)) were significantly associated with Vibrio concentrations in surface water (V. vulnificus, p<0.01; V. parahaemolyticus, p<0.01), but not with salinity or temperature (V. vulnificus, p=0.52, p=0.17; V. parahaemolyticus, p=0.82, p=0.06). Handwashing reduced V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus on subjects' hands by approximately one log (93.9%, 89.4%, respectively). It can be concluded that when Chesapeake Bay surface waters are characterized by elevated concentrations of Vibrio, swimmers and individuals working in those waters could experience significant dermal exposures to V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, increasing their risk of infection. PMID:25454225

  17. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Kévin; Mosser, Thomas; Aujoulat, Fabien; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Monfort, Patrick; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species found in Mediterranean coastal systems can induce infections in humans. Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n = 109) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 89) sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA). V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemolyticus displayed trh2 gene. Most Sequence Types (ST) corresponded to unique ST isolated at one date or one station. Frequent recombination events were detected among different pathogenic species, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, and Vibrio metoecus. Recombination had a major impact on the diversification of lineages. The genetic diversity assessed by the number of ST/strain was higher in low salinity condition for V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae whereas the frequency of recombination events in V. cholerae was lower in low salinity condition. Mediterranean coastal lagoon systems housed V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus with genetic diversities equivalent to the worldwide diversity described so far. The presence of STs found in human infections as well as the frequency of recombination events in environmental vibrios populations could predict a potential epidemiological risk. PMID:26236294

  18. Cloning and the mRNA expression of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate recognition domain from Fenneropenaeus merguiensis in response to pathogenic inoculation.

    PubMed

    Runsaeng, Phanthipha; Thepnarong, Supattra; Rattanaporn, Onnicha; Utarabhand, Prapaporn

    2015-12-01

    Crustaceans are deficient in an adaptive immune system and depend solely on their innate immunity. One kind of pattern recognition proteins which plays an important role in the shrimp immunity is lectin. A new C-type lectin called FmLC2 was cloned from the stomach of the banana shrimp Fenneropenaeus merguiensis by means of RT-PCR and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Its full-length cDNA contains 1098 bp with a single open reading frame of 738 bp, encoding a peptide of 245 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of FmLC2 consists of a signal peptide of 17 amino acids with a molecular mass of 28,115 Da and an isoelectric point of 6.94. The primary structure of FmLC2 comprises a single carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) with a QPD (Gln-Pro-Asp) motif and one Ca(2+) binding site. Like other C-type lectins, its CRD structure contains a double-loop characteristic being stabilized by two conserved disulfide linkages. The mRNA expression of FmLC2 was detected specifically in the stomach and gills, less was found in the hepatopancreas. Upon inoculation of shrimp with Vibrio harveyi or white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), the FmLC2 expression either in stomach or gills was higher than in the hepatopancreas. Besides, its expression in these tissues was up-regulated to reach the highest levels at 12 or 18 h for V. harveyi or WSSV stimulation, respectively. RNAi-based silencing of FmLC2 resulted in suppression of its expression, increases in mortality when the shrimp were challenged with V. harveyi or WSSV, and the median lethal time was reduced compared with controls. These results suggest that FmLC2 may serve as receptor molecules which recognize invading bacterial and viral pathogens and thus contribute a role in the shrimp immune response. PMID:26408076

  19. Isolation of a novel strain of Bacillus pumilus from penaeid shrimp that is inhibitory against marine pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hill, J E; Baiano, J C F; Barnes, A C

    2009-12-01

    A bacterium was isolated from the mid-gut of healthy black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, based on a large zone of inhibition in mixed culture on solid medium. The isolate was a Gram-positive, motile spore former, with an optimum pH range for growth in tryptone soya broth containing 2% NaCl of between pH 6 and 9. The bacterium was highly salt tolerant with concentrations between 0% and 8% having no detrimental effect on growth. The isolate was identified as Bacillus pumilus based on physiological capabilities using the API50CHB and Biolog systems. Amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene followed by phylogenetic analysis confirmed its identity. The Bacillus pumilus isolate was strongly inhibitory against the marine bacterial pathogens Vibrio alginolyticus, V. mimicus and V. harveyi, and weakly inhibitory against V. parahaemolyticus in cross-streaking assays on solid medium. The organism was marginally self-inhibitory, and inhibited B. licheniformis and B. subtilis. The suitability of the B. pumilus isolate for use as a probiotic in farmed shrimp was further supported by the absence of any of the known B. cereus enterotoxin genes. Based on these in vitro results, in vivo safety and efficacy trials are underway to determine suitability of the novel strain as a commercial probiotic. PMID:19573134

  20. Vibrio and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... takes over an area after a hurricane or flood may contain Vibrio bacteria. You should try to ... from the wound can enter the blood and cause fevers, chills, and blisters. If this infection is ...

  1. [Establishment of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of Vibrio alginolyticus].

    PubMed

    Ding, Wen Chao; Hu, Jian Rao; Shi, Yu Hong; Li, Ming Yun; Chen, Jiong

    2009-02-01

    Vibrio alginolyticus is the main Vibrio pathogen in aquaculture in the south of China. A one step loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was developed for detection of Vibrio alginolyticus. A set of primers were designed from the OmpK sequence of Vibrio alginolyticus. The assay was optimised to amplify Vibrio alginolyticus DNA by incubation at 65 degrees C for only 1 h, and required only a simple water bath or heating block to provide a constant temperature of 65 degrees C. LAMP amplification products had a ladder-like appearance when electrophoresed on an agarose gel. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was n(cell) = 38/mL which was found to be higher than the commonly used PCR method. The assay was evaluated using clinical samples and the results indicated the suitability and simplicity of the test as a rapid, field diagnostic tool for Vibrio alginolyticus. PMID:19306691

  2. Seasonal dynamics and modeling of a Vibrio community in coastal waters of the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Meiners, Mirja; Wichels, Antje; Wiltshire, Karen H; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2012-04-01

    Vibrio species are ubiquitously distributed in marine waters all over the world. High genome plasticity due to frequent mutation, recombination, and lateral gene transfer enables Vibrio to adapt rapidly to environmental changes. The genus Vibrio comprises several human pathogens, which commonly cause outbreaks of severe diarrhea in tropical regions. In recent years, pathogenic Vibrio emerged also in coastal European waters. Little is known about factors driving the proliferation of Vibrio spp. in temperate waters such as the North Sea. In this study a quantification of Vibrio in the North Sea and their response to biotic and abiotic parameters were assessed. Between January and December 2009, Vibrio at Helgoland Roads (North Sea, Germany) were quantified using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Vibrio numbers up to 3.4 × 10(4) cells × mL(-1) (2.2% of total microbial counts) were determined in summer, but their abundance was significantly lower in winter (5 × 10(2) cells × mL(-1)). Correlations between Vibrio and nutrients (SiO(2), PO(4) (3-), DIN), Secchi depth, temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll a were calculated using Spearman rank analysis. Multiple stepwise regression analysis was carried out to analyze the additive influence of multiple factors on Vibrio. Based on these calculations, we found that high water temperature and low salinity best explained the increase of Vibrio cell numbers. Other environmental parameters, especially nutrients and chlorophyll a, also had an influence. All variables were shown to be subject to the overall seasonal dynamics at Helgoland Roads. Multiple regression models could represent an efficient and reliable tool to predict Vibrio abundances in response to the climate change in European waters. PMID:22202887

  3. Siderophore production by Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, L M; Oliver, J D

    1983-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory, as well as clinical evidence, have suggested that increased iron levels in the host may be important in infections caused by the halophilic pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. To study iron acquisition, we induced siderophore production by growth in a low-iron medium, and biochemical testing indicated the production of both hydroxamate- and phenolate-type siderophores. The siderophores were extracted from growth filtrates with ethyl acetate (for phenolates) and phenol-chloroform-ether (for hydroxamates). These extracts enhanced the growth of V. vulnificus when the bacterium was grown in iron-limited medium. The ability of these siderophores to stimulate the growth of Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 enb-7 (a mutant deficient in the biosynthesis of enterochelin) and Arthrobacter flavescens JG-9 (a hydroxamate auxotroph) supported the conclusion that V. vulnificus produces both hydroxamate- and phenolate-type siderophores. PMID:6223882

  4. Oleic Acid Produced by a Marine Vibrio spp. Acts as an Anti-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Agent

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Yanett; Borquez, Jorge; Darias, José; Cueto, Mercedes; Díaz-Marrero, Ana R.; Riquelme, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    It is known that some strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus are responsible for gastroenteric diseases caused by the ingestion of marine organisms contaminated with these bacterial strains. Organic products that show inhibitory activity on the growth of the pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were extracted from a Vibrio native in the north of Chile. The inhibitory organic products were isolated by reverse phase chromatography and permeation by Sephadex LH20, and were characterized by spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques. The results showed that the prevailing active product is oleic acid, which was compared with standards by gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These active products might be useful for controlling the proliferation of pathogenic clones of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:22073014

  5. Vibrio cholerae: Measuring Natural Transformation Frequency.

    PubMed

    Watve, Samit S; Bernardy, Eryn E; Hammer, Brian K

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria can become naturally competent to take up extracellular DNA across their outer and inner membranes by a dedicated competence apparatus. Whereas some studies show that the DNA delivered to the cytoplasm may be used for genome repair or for nutrition, it can also be recombined onto the chromosome by homologous recombination: a process called natural transformation. Along with conjugation and transduction, natural transformation represents a mechanism for horizontal transfer of genetic material, e.g., antibiotic resistance genes, which can confer new beneficial characteristics onto the recipient bacteria. Described here are protocols for quantifying the frequency of transformation for the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, one of several Vibrio species recently shown to be capable of natural transformation. PMID:25367272

  6. Identification of the target DNA sequence and characterization of DNA binding features of HlyU, and suggestion of a redox switch for hlyA expression in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae from in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Debadrita; Pal, Aritrika; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-01-01

    HlyU, a transcriptional regulator common in many Vibrio species, activates the hemolysin gene hlyA in Vibrio cholerae, the rtxA1 operon in Vibrio vulnificus and the genes of plp-vah1 and rtxACHBDE gene clusters in Vibrio anguillarum. The protein is also proposed to be a potential global virulence regulator for V. cholerae and V. vulnificus. Mechanisms of gene control by HlyU in V. vulnificus and V. anguillarum are reported. However, detailed elucidation of the interaction of HlyU in V. cholerae with its target DNA at the molecular level is not available. Here we report a 17-bp imperfect palindrome sequence, 5′-TAATTCAGACTAAATTA-3′, 173 bp upstream of hlyA promoter, as the binding site of HlyU. This winged helix-turn-helix protein binds necessarily as a dimer with the recognition helices contacting the major grooves and the β-sheet wings, the minor grooves. Such interactions enhance hlyA promoter activity in vivo. Mutations affecting dimerization as well as those in the DNA–protein interface hamper DNA binding and transcription regulation. Molecular dynamic simulations show hydrogen bonding patterns involving residues at the mutation sites and confirmed their importance in DNA binding. On binding to HlyU, DNA deviates by ∼68º from linearity. Dynamics also suggest a possible redox control in HlyU. PMID:25605793

  7. A prebiotic effect of Ecklonia cava on the growth and mortality of olive flounder infected with pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, WonWoo; Ahn, Ginnae; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Seung Min; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Kil-Nam; Jeong, Joon Bum; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), also known as the Japanese flounder in Japan, is one of the most important commercial marine finfish species cultured in Korea and Japan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how a species of brown algae (Ecklonia cava, E. cava) affects the growth rate of olive flounder and its immune response to pathogenic bacteria. First, the experimental fish were divided into four groups: the control group was fed the diet containing only 1.0% Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum), group I was fed 1.0% L. plantarum and 1.0% E. cava (EC), group II was fed 1.0% L. plantarum and 0.1% ethanol extract of EC (EE), and group III was fed 1.0% L. plantarum and 0.5% EE. The diets fed to the fish twice a day for 16 weeks. The results indicated that supplementation with 1.0% EC and 0.1% EE improved the growth and body weight of olive flounder, and decreased its mortality. This diet, however, did not significantly affect the biochemical profiles of the experimental flounder. The supplementation of 1.0% EC also enhanced the innate immune response of the fish, as evidenced by the high respiratory burst, and increased serum lysozyme and myeloperoxidase activity. The addition of 1.0% EC and either 0.1% or 0.5% EE also decreased the accumulative mortality of olive flounder infected by pathogenic bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, and Vibrio harveyi). Overall, these results suggest that E. cava can act as a prebiotic by improving the innate immune response in fish infected with pathogenic bacteria as increased the growth of the probiotic. PMID:26921543

  8. Oligotyping reveals community level habitat selection within the genus Vibrio

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Victor T.; Reveillaud, Julie; Zettler, Erik; Mincer, Tracy J.; Murphy, Leslie; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Vibrio is a metabolically diverse group of facultative anaerobic bacteria, common in aquatic environments and marine hosts. The genus contains several species of importance to human health and aquaculture, including the causative agents of human cholera and fish vibriosis. Vibrios display a wide variety of known life histories, from opportunistic pathogens to long-standing symbionts with individual host species. Studying Vibrio ecology has been challenging as individual species often display a wide range of habitat preferences, and groups of vibrios can act as socially cohesive groups. Although strong associations with salinity, temperature and other environmental variables have been established, the degree of habitat or host specificity at both the individual and community levels is unknown. Here we use oligotyping analyses in combination with a large collection of existing Vibrio 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence data to reveal patterns of Vibrio ecology across a wide range of environmental, host, and abiotic substrate associated habitats. Our data show that individual taxa often display a wide range of habitat preferences yet tend to be highly abundant in either substrate-associated or free-living environments. Our analyses show that Vibrio communities share considerable overlap between two distinct hosts (i.e., sponge and fish), yet are distinct from the abiotic plastic substrates. Lastly, evidence for habitat specificity at the community level exists in some habitats, despite considerable stochasticity in others. In addition to providing insights into Vibrio ecology across a broad range of habitats, our study shows the utility of oligotyping as a facile, high-throughput and unbiased method for large-scale analyses of publically available sequence data repositories and suggests its wide application could greatly extend the range of possibilities to explore microbial ecology. PMID:25431569

  9. New Vibrio species associated to molluscan microbiota: a review

    PubMed Central

    Romalde, Jesús L.; Dieguez, Ana L.; Lasa, Aide; Balboa, Sabela

    2014-01-01

    The genus Vibrio consists of more than 100 species grouped in 14 clades that are widely distributed in aquatic environments such as estuarine, coastal waters, and sediments. A large number of species of this genus are associated with marine organisms like fish, molluscs and crustaceans, in commensal or pathogenic relations. In the last decade, more than 50 new species have been described in the genus Vibrio, due to the introduction of new molecular techniques in bacterial taxonomy, such as multilocus sequence analysis or fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism. On the other hand, the increasing number of environmental studies has contributed to improve the knowledge about the family Vibrionaceae and its phylogeny. Vibrio crassostreae, V. breoganii, V. celticus are some of the new Vibrio species described as forming part of the molluscan microbiota. Some of them have been associated with mortalities of different molluscan species, seriously affecting their culture and causing high losses in hatcheries as well as in natural beds. For other species, ecological importance has been demonstrated being highly abundant in different marine habitats and geographical regions. The present work provides an updated overview of the recently characterized Vibrio species isolated from molluscs. In addition, their pathogenic potential and/or environmental importance is discussed. PMID:24427157

  10. New insights into Oculina patagonica coral diseases and their associated Vibrio spp. communities

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Yarza, Pablo; Peñalver, Cindy; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A; Antón, Josefa

    2014-01-01

    Bleaching of Oculina patagonica has been extensively studied in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, although no studies have been carried out in the Western basin. In 1996 Vibrio mediterranei was reported as the causative agent of bleaching in O. patagonica but it has not been related to bleached or healthy corals since 2003, suggesting that it was no longer involved in bleaching of O. patagonica. In an attempt to clarify the relationship between Vibrio spp., seawater temperature and coral diseases, as well as to investigate the putative differences between Eastern and Western Mediterranean basins, we have analysed the seasonal patterns of the culturable Vibrio spp. assemblages associated with healthy and diseased O. patagonica colonies. Two sampling points located in the Spanish Mediterranean coast were chosen for this study: Alicante Harbour and the Marine Reserve of Tabarca. A complex and dynamic assemblage of Vibrio spp. was present in O. patagonica along the whole year and under different environmental conditions and coral health status. While some Vibrio spp. were detected all year around in corals, the known pathogens V. mediteranei and V. coralliilyticus were only present in diseased specimens. The pathogenic potential of these bacteria was studied by experimental infection under laboratory conditions. Both vibrios caused diseased signs from 24?°C, being higher and faster at 28?°C. Unexpectedly, the co-inoculation of these two Vibrio species seemed to have a synergistic pathogenic effect over O. patagonica, as disease signs were readily observed at temperatures at which bleaching is not normally observed. PMID:24621525

  11. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  12. Vibrio fischeri metabolism: symbiosis and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri is a bioluminescent, Gram-negative marine bacterium that can be found free living and in a mutualistic association with certain squids and fishes. Over the past decades, the study of V. fischeri has led to important discoveries about bioluminescence, quorum sensing, and the mechanisms that underlie beneficial host-microbe interactions. This chapter highlights what has been learned about metabolic pathways in V. fischeri, and how this information contributes to a broader understanding of the role of bacterial metabolism in host colonization by both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, as well as in the growth and survival of free-living bacteria. PMID:23046951

  13. Chitin induces natural competence in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Meibom, Karin L; Blokesch, Melanie; Dolganov, Nadia A; Wu, Cheng-Yen; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2005-12-16

    The mosaic-structured Vibrio cholerae genome points to the importance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the evolution of this human pathogen. We showed that V. cholerae can acquire new genetic material by natural transformation during growth on chitin, a biopolymer that is abundant in aquatic habitats (e.g., from crustacean exoskeletons), where it lives as an autochthonous microbe. Transformation competence was found to require a type IV pilus assembly complex, a putative DNA binding protein, and three convergent regulatory cascades, which are activated by chitin, increasing cell density, and nutrient limitation, a decline in growth rate, or stress. PMID:16357262

  14. Comparison of molecular detection methods for Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica L; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Krantz, Jeffrey A; Benner, Ronald A; Smith, Amy B; Dambaugh, Timothy R; Bowers, John C; Depaola, Angelo

    2012-05-01

    Pathogenic vibrios are a global concern for seafood safety and many molecular methods have been developed for their detection. This study compares several molecular methods for detection of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, in MPN enrichments from oysters and fish intestine samples. This study employed the DuPont Qualicon BAX® System Real-Time PCR assay for detection of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Multiplex real-time PCR detection of total (tlh+), tdh+, and trh+V. parahaemolyticus was conducted on the Cepheid SmartCycler II. Total (rpoD) and tdh+V. parahaemolyticus were also detected using LAMP. V. vulnificus detection was performed using real-time PCR methods developed for the SmartCycler and the AB 7500 Fast. Recommended template preparations were compared to BAX® lysis samples for suitability. There was no significant difference in detection of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus using the BAX® or SmartCycler assays. The AB assay showed no difference from other methods in detection of V. vulnificus unless boiled templates were utilized. There was a significant difference in detection of tdh+V. parahaemolyticus between SmartCycler and LAMP assays unless the total (tlh+) V. parahaemolyticus gene target was omitted from the SmartCycler assay; a similar trend was observed for trh+V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:22265290

  15. Three vibrio-resistance related EST-SSR markers revealed by selective genotyping in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing; Yue, Xin; Chai, Xueliang; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Baozhong

    2013-08-01

    The clam Meretrix meretrix is an important commercial bivalve distributed in the coastal areas of South and Southeast Asia. In this study, marker-trait association analyses were performed based on the stock materials of M. meretrix with different vibrio-resistance profile obtained by selective breeding. Forty-eight EST-SSR markers were screened and 27 polymorphic SSRs of them were genotyped in the clam stocks with different resistance to Vibrio parahaemolyticus (11-R and 11-S) and to Vibrio harveyi (09-R and 09-C). Allele frequency distributions of the SSRs among different stocks were compared using Pearson's Chi-square test, and three functional EST-SSR markers (MM959, MM4765 and MM8364) were found to be associated with vibrio-resistance trait. The 140-bp allele of MM959 and 128-bp allele of MM4765 had significantly higher frequencies in resistant groups (11-R and 09-R) than in susceptive/control groups (11-S and 09-C) (P < 0.01), which suggested that the clams carrying these two alleles have stronger resistance against vibrio. Clam individuals of 11-S were divided into three subgroups based on the survival time post-challenge, and the multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) analysis showed that clusters generated by genetic similarity revealed by the three SSR markers were consistent with the three subgroups distinctions. The putative functions of contig959, contig4765 and contig8364 also suggested that the three SSR-involved genes might play important roles in immunity of M. meretrix. All these results supported that EST-SSR markers MM959, MM4765 and MM8364 were associated with vibrio-resistance and would be useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in M. meretrix genetic breeding. PMID:23707743

  16. Substrate specificity and function of the pheromone receptor AinR in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-11-01

    Two distinct but interrelated pheromone-signaling systems, LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR, positively control bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri. Although each system generates an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, the protein sequences of LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR are unrelated. AinS and LuxI generate the pheromones N-octanoyl-AHL (C8-AHL) and N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-AHL (3OC6-AHL), respectively. LuxR is a transcriptional activator that responds to 3OC6-AHL, and to a lesser extent to C8-AHL. AinR is hypothesized to respond to C8-AHL and, based on homology to Vibrio harveyi LuxN, to mediate the repression of a Qrr regulatory RNA. However, a ?ainR mutation decreased luminescence, which was not predicted based on V. harveyi LuxN, raising the possibility of a distinct regulatory mechanism for AinR. Here we show that ainR can complement a luxN mutant, suggesting functional similarity. Moreover, in V. fischeri, we observed ainR-dependent repression of a Pqrr-lacZ transcriptional reporter in the presence of C8-AHL, consistent with its hypothesized regulatory role. The system appears quite sensitive, with a half-maximal effect on a Pqrr reporter at 140 pM C8-AHL. Several other AHLs with substituted and unsubstituted acyl chains between 6 and 10 carbons also displayed an AinR-dependent effect on Pqrr-lacZ; however, AHLs with acyl chains of four carbons or 12 or more carbons lacked activity. Interestingly, 3OC6-AHL also affected expression from the qrr promoter, but this effect was largely luxR dependent, indicating a previously unknown connection between these systems. Finally, we propose a preliminary explanation for the unexpected luminescence phenotype of the ?ainR mutant. PMID:24056099

  17. Adherence assays and Slime production of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Fethi; Chaieb, Kamel; Zmantar, Tarek; Kallel, Hela; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2009-04-01

    In this study we investigated the phenotypic slime production of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains, food-borne pathogens, using a Congo red agar plate assay. Furthermore, we studied their ability to adhere to abiotic surfaces and Vero cells line. Our results showed that only V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749 was a slime-producer developing almost black colonies on Congo red agar plate. Adherence to glace tube showed that all V. alginolyticus strains were more adherent than V. parahaemolyticus. Only V. alginolyticus ATCC 17749 was found to be able to form biofilm on polystyrene microplate wells (OD570 = 0.532). Adherence to Vero cells showed that all tested strains were non adherent after 30 min, however after 60 min all the studied strains become adherent. The percentage of adherence ranged from1.23% to 4.66%. PMID:24031378

  18. Occurrence of Vibrio vulnificus and toxigenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus on sea catfishes from Galveston Bay, Texas.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Leslie; Hochman, Mona E; Schwarz, John R; Brinkmeyer, Robin

    2014-10-01

    Dorsal and pectoral fin spines from two species of sea catfishes (Bagre marinus and Ariopsis felis) landed at 54 sites in Galveston Bay, Texas, and its sub-bays from June to October 2005 were screened with traditional cultivation-based assays and quantitative PCR assays for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. vulnificus was present on 51.2% of fish (n = 247), with an average of 403 ± 337 SD cells g(-1). V. parahaemolyticus was present on 94.2% (n = 247); 12.8% tested positive for the virulence-conferring tdh gene, having an average 2,039 ± 2,171 SD cells g(-1). The increasing trend in seafood consumption of "trash fishes" from lower trophic levels, such as sea catfishes, warrants evaluation of their life histories for association with pathogens of concern for human consumption. PMID:25285498

  19. Genotype to phenotype: identification of diagnostic vibrio phenotypes using whole genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Gilda Rose S; Dias, Graciela M; Wellington-Oguri, Michiyo; Chimetto, Luciane; Campeão, Mariana E; Thompson, Fabiano L; Thompson, Cristiane C

    2014-02-01

    Vibrios are ubiquitous in the aquatic environment and can be found in association with animal or plant hosts. The range of ecological relationships includes pathogenic and mutualistic associations. To gain a better understanding of the ecology of these microbes, it is important to determine their phenotypic features. However, the traditional phenotypic characterization of vibrios has been expensive, time-consuming and restricted in scope to a limited number of features. In addition, most of the commercial systems applied for phenotypic characterization cannot characterize the broad spectrum of environmental strains. A reliable and possible alternative is to obtain phenotypic information directly from whole genome sequences. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of whole genome sequences as a source of phenotypic information. We performed a comparison of the vibrio phenotypes obtained from the literature with the phenotypes obtained from whole genome sequences. We observed a significant correlation between the previously published phenotypic data and the phenotypic data retrieved from whole genome sequences of vibrios. Analysis of 26 vibrio genomes revealed that all genes coding for the specific proteins involved in the metabolic pathways responsible for positive phenotypes of the 14 diagnostic features (Voges-Proskauer reaction, indole production, arginine dihydrolase, ornithine decarboxylase, utilization of myo-inositol, sucrose and L-leucine, and fermentation of D-mannitol, D-sorbitol, L-arabinose, trehalose, cellobiose, D-mannose and D-galactose) were found in the majority of the vibrios genomes. Vibrio species that were negative for a given phenotype revealed the absence of all or several genes involved in the respective biochemical pathways, indicating the utility of this approach to characterize the phenotypes of vibrios. The absence of the global regulation and regulatory proteins in the Vibrio parahaemolyticus genome indicated a non-vibrio phenotype. Whole genome sequences represent an important source for the phenotypic identification of vibrios. PMID:24505074

  20. Diversity and Dynamics of a North Atlantic Coastal Vibrio Community

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Janelle R.; Randa, Mark A.; Marcelino, Luisa A.; Tomita-Mitchell, Aoy; Lim, Eelin; Polz, Martin F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrios are ubiquitous marine bacteria that have long served as models for heterotrophic processes and have received renewed attention because of the discovery of increasing numbers of facultatively pathogenic strains. Because the occurrence of specific vibrios has frequently been linked to the temperature, salinity, and nutrient status of water, we hypothesized that seasonal changes in coastal water bodies lead to distinct vibrio communities and sought to characterize their level of differentiation. A novel technique was used to quantify shifts in 16S rRNA gene abundance in samples from Barnegat Bay, N.J., collected over a 15-month period. Quantitative PCR (QPCR) with primers specific for the genus Vibrio was combined with separation and quantification of amplicons by constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (CDCE). Vibrio populations identified by QPCR-CDCE varied between summer and winter samples, suggesting distinct warm-water and year-round populations. Identification of the CDCE populations by cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from two summer and two winter samples confirmed this distinction. It further showed that CDCE populations corresponded in most cases to ?98% rRNA similarity groups and suggested that the abundance of these follows temperature trends. Phylogenetic comparison yielded closely related cultured and often pathogenic representatives for most sequences, and the temperature ranges of these isolates confirmed the trends seen in the environmental samples. Overall, this suggests that temperature is a good predictor of the occurrence of closely related vibrios but that considerable microdiversity of unknown significance coexists within this trend. PMID:15240289

  1. Sixty years from the discovery of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and some recollections.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Sumio

    2011-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus was discovered by Tsunesaburo Fujino after a shirasu food poisoning outbreak in 1950, but at that time the isolate was named Pasteurella parahaemolytica, not Vibrio. Although the isolate resembled Vibrio, some properties did not correspond with those of Vibrio. For example, the curved cell form of the cell was one of the important taxonomical indicators of the genus, but the isolate was straight in form. After 5 years, Iwao Takikawa isolated a similar bacterium from a food poisoning case and found the halophilic property of the isolate. He named the isolate Pseudomonas enteritis. In 1960, due to the progress of taxonomy, various scientific indices were adjusted, and Davis and Parks defined the taxonomical position of the genus Vibrio, and Fujino et al. and Sakazaki et al. reexamined the above isolates and confirmed that those were the same species in the genus Vibrio and proposed the new scientific name Vibrio parahaemolyticus.Last year was the 60th year since the discovery of the bacterium, and the discoverer was the first president of our organization, the Society for Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents, Japan. Some recollections including the correlation between the Kanagawa phenomenon and human pathogenicity, the major pathogenic factor TDH (thermostable direct hemolysin) and its related hemolysin (TRH: TDH related hemolysin) are also summarized. PMID:22190435

  2. Population dynamics of vibrio species in the river Narmada at Jabalpur.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjana; Chaturvedi, Animesh Navin

    2007-10-01

    Several studies on the presence and ecology of various Vibrio sp have been reported in coastal and estuarine waters throughout the world, but there is trifling information available on the distribution of this organism of colossal pathogenic potential in the fresh water riverine environment. Thus, we conducted a multiyearenvironmental study to scrutinize the occurrence of members of genus Vibrio in the largest west flowing river of the Indian subcontinent, which is also the largest river of central India, the Narmada. Statistical analysis was done to reveal major environmental factors controlling the presence of Vibrio sp in the river Narmada. Monthly field samplings were conducted between January 2002 and December 2003 at four different sites in Jabalpur (MP), India. At each site, water samples were taken and physicochemical and bacteriological parameters were measured. The identity of the isolates was confirmed by employing 16S rRNA analysis. The organisms were found to be widely distributed in the river with regular seasonal variations. The density of Vibrio was found to be correlated with temperature, coliforms and other heterotrophic bacteria. Water temperature accounted for most of the variability in the concentration of Vibrio spAs typical fecal pollution indicators may not access public health risk from potential pathogens such as vibrios, hence special monitoring programme for vibrios may adequately be included in the water quality management. PMID:18405107

  3. An insight of traditional plasmid curing in Vibrio species.

    PubMed

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    As the causative agent of foodborne related illness, Vibrio species causes a huge impact on the public health and management. Vibrio species is often associated with seafood as the latter plays a role as a vehicle to transmit bacterial infections. Hence, antibiotics are used not to promote growth but rather to prevent and treat bacterial infections. The extensive use of antibiotics in the aquaculture industry and environment has led to the emerging of antibiotic resistant strains. This phenomenon has triggered an alarming public health concern due to the increase number of pathogenic Vibrio strains that are resistant to clinically used antibiotics and is found in the environment. Antibiotic resistance and the genes location in the strains can be detected through plasmid curing assay. The results derived from plasmid curing assay is fast, cost effective, sufficient in providing insights, and influence the antibiotic management policies in the aquaculture industry. This presentation aims in discussing and providing insights on various curing agents in Vibrio species. To our best of knowledge, this is a first review written discussing on plasmid curing in Vibrio species. PMID:26347714

  4. Edema and hemoconcentration in mice experimentally infected with Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Bowdre, J H; Poole, M D; Oliver, J D

    1981-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus (lactose-positive Vibrio), a recently recognized pathogenic marine species, produced extreme hemoconcentration and death within 3 to 6 h after subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 10(8) viable cells into mice; hemotocrit values approached 70% (normal, 45%). About 1 ml of edema fluid accumulated at the site of each subcutaneous injection, and locally increased vascular permeability was demonstrated by a skin bluing assay, using Evans blue dye. A corresponding fluid accumulation did not occur in the peritoneal cavity after an intraperitoneal injection. Filter-sterilized supernatants of cultures grown under a variety of conditions did not produce local edema or lethality, nor did whole Vibrio cells killed by a variety of methods or disrupted by sonic oscillation. Edema fluids collected from infected mice and sterilized by filtration had no effect when they were injected subcutaneously or intraperitoneally into mice. Inocula of 10(9) viable cells of V. vulnificus contained within a diffusion chamber implanted subcutaneously did not produce skin bluing, edema, or lethality; Vibrio cells remained viable and virulent within these chambers for at least 2 weeks. These experiments suggested that vascular permeability changes in V. vulnificus infections may not be attributable to a diffusible toxin and may require direct contact between host cells and viable Vibrio cells. PMID:7251164

  5. An insight of traditional plasmid curing in Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    As the causative agent of foodborne related illness, Vibrio species causes a huge impact on the public health and management. Vibrio species is often associated with seafood as the latter plays a role as a vehicle to transmit bacterial infections. Hence, antibiotics are used not to promote growth but rather to prevent and treat bacterial infections. The extensive use of antibiotics in the aquaculture industry and environment has led to the emerging of antibiotic resistant strains. This phenomenon has triggered an alarming public health concern due to the increase number of pathogenic Vibrio strains that are resistant to clinically used antibiotics and is found in the environment. Antibiotic resistance and the genes location in the strains can be detected through plasmid curing assay. The results derived from plasmid curing assay is fast, cost effective, sufficient in providing insights, and influence the antibiotic management policies in the aquaculture industry. This presentation aims in discussing and providing insights on various curing agents in Vibrio species. To our best of knowledge, this is a first review written discussing on plasmid curing in Vibrio species. PMID:26347714

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VH3, Isolated from an Aquaculture Environment in Greece.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Daniel; Jun, Jin Woo; D'Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang; Katharios, Pantelis

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. It has also been identified as an important pathogen in aquatic organisms. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus, strain VH3, isolated from farmed juvenile greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili, in Greece. PMID:26139725

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VH3, Isolated from an Aquaculture Environment in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Daniel; Jun, Jin Woo; D’Alvise, Paul; Middelboe, Mathias; Gram, Lone; Liu, Siyang

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important foodborne pathogen responsible for gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. It has also been identified as an important pathogen in aquatic organisms. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus, strain VH3, isolated from farmed juvenile greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili, in Greece. PMID:26139725

  8. Characterization of toxigenic vibrios isolated from the freshwater environment of Hiroshima, Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, K; Kiiyukia, C; Takaki, M; Nakano, H; Matsuda, H; Kawakami, H; Hashimoto, H

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence and characterization of toxigenic vibrios in surface water and sediment samples of the fresh water environment of the Ohta River were studied. The membrane filter, pad preenrichment technique, followed by the placement of membranes onto thiosulfate citrate-bile salt-sucrose agar, was used for the enumeration of total vibrios. Qualitative examination of pathogenic vibrios was also attempted. In addition, a survey was conducted to determine the incidence of Clostridium botulinum in sediment samples of the Ohta River and the Hiroshima coast. In the identification of 361 strains, 12 species of Vibrio and two species of Listonella were observed. Non-01 Vibrio cholerae was prevalent among the members of the genus Vibrio. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (serotype 04:K34), isolated in fresh water, is significant and suggests that some still unknown conditions promote the survival of these organisms in fresh water. An estimated 132 strains were hemolytic by a simple agar method, and further characterization revealed that 82% of the hemolytic vibrios (107 strains) produced various toxins. About 71% (93 strains) elaborated cytotoxin, 55% (72 strains) produced hemolysin, and 44% (58 strains) responded for both cytotoxin and hemolysin in the crude toxin extracts. All the non-01 V. cholerae showed cytotoxic activity, and the virulent strains of Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio spp. showed cytotonic responses in RK-13 cells. Of 36 sediment samples tested, 10 harbored C. botulinum spores (28%) and were isolated invariably in all the regions of the Hiroshima coast and in the Ohta River, except the upper region of the Ohta River. PMID:2690736

  9. Evaluation of molecular methods to discriminate the closely related species Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio furnissii.

    PubMed

    Schirmeister, Falko; Wieczorek, Angelina; Dieckmann, Ralf; Taureck, Karin; Strauch, Eckhard

    2014-10-01

    Vibrio furnissii and Vibrio fluvialis are two closely related species which are regarded as emerging human pathogens. Human infections have been mainly associated with consumption of seafood or drinking of contaminated water. V. furnissii strains can be distinguished from V. fluvialis by their ability to produce gas from fermentation of carbohydrates. In this study, we compare two phenotypic (biochemical testing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry, MALDI-TOF MS) and three genotypic techniques (rpoB sequencing, conventional PCR and real-time PCR) for determination of the two species. The methods were evaluated on a collection of 42 V. furnissii and 32 V. fluvialis strains, which were isolated from marine environments and from animals intended for food production. Four of the applied methods allowed the unambiguous discrimination of the two species, while the biochemical testing was the least reliable technique, due to a high variation in the phenotype of gas production from carbohydrates. In view of the One Health concept reliable diagnostic techniques are a prerequisite for preventive public health measurements, as pathogens isolated from animals can cross species borders and methods for detection of sources, reservoirs and ways of transmission of pathogenic bacteria are indispensable for the prevention of infectious diseases in humans and animals. PMID:25242722

  10. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2-3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  11. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F.; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S.; Ralph, Peter J.; Seymour, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2–3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2–3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  12. [Phages of halophilic vibrios].

    PubMed

    Libinzon, A E; Us, Z I; Gal'tseva, G V; Degtiareva, B M; Golkovski?, G M

    1995-01-01

    The morphology and antigenic properties of 34 phages of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus strains isolated from Black Sea water, as well as their range of lytic activity and specificity of action, have been studied. Most of these phages have been found to lyze both V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus strains. In addition, highly specific phages capable of lyzing only V. parahaemolyticus serotype O5:K15, have been detected. The latter fact is a precedent indicating the possibility of search for other typing phages and the development of the scheme for the phage typing of V. parahaemolyticus in future. PMID:7778366

  13. Identification of capsule, biofilm, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili in Vibrio mimicus strains.

    PubMed

    Tercero-Alburo, J J; González-Márquez, H; Bonilla-González, E; Quiñones-Ramírez, E I; Vázquez-Salinas, C

    2014-11-01

    Vibrio mimicus is a bacterium that causes gastroenteritis; it is closely related to Vibrio cholerae, and can cause acute diarrhea like cholera- or dysentery-type diarrhea. It is distributed worldwide. Factors associated with virulence (such as hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases, phospholipases, aerobactin, and hemagglutinin) have been identified; however, its pathogenicity mechanism is still unknown. In pathogenic Vibrio species such as V. cholerae, Vibrio. parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, capsule, biofilms, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili are structures described as essential for pathogenicity. These structures had not been described in V. mimicus until this work. We used 20 V. mimicus strains isolated from water (6), oyster (9), and fish (5) samples and we were able to identify the capsule, biofilm, lateral flagellum, and type IV pili through phenotypic tests, electron microscopy, PCR, and sequencing. In all tested strains, we observed and identified the presence of capsular exopolysaccharide, biofilm formation in an in vitro model, as well as swarming, multiple flagellation, and pili. In addition, we identified homologous genes to those described in other bacteria of the genus in which these structures have been found. Identification of these structures in V. mimicus is a contribution to the biology of this organism and can help to reveal its pathogenic behavior. PMID:25246027

  14. Two novel antimicrobial peptides, arasin-likeSp and GRPSp, from the mud crab Scylla paramamosain, exhibit the activity against some crustacean pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Imjongjirak, Chanprapa; Amparyup, Piti; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are some of the important host molecules required to resist pathogen infection. Two novel AMPs (arasin-likeSp and GRPSp) were identified from the hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, by analysis of a hemocyte expressed sequence tag library. The deduced open reading frames of the arasin-likeSp and GRPSp cDNAs are 198 and 168 bp, and encode for predicted peptides of 65 and 55 amino acid residues, respectively. The calculated molecular mass of the mature peptides was 4373 and 2995 Da with an estimated isoelectric point (pI) of 11.03 and 9.66, respectively. The mature peptide of arasin-likeSp is predicted to contain an N-terminal region rich in glycine and arginine and a C-terminal region containing four cysteine residues. Its amino acid sequence has an overall sequence identity of 53% to arasin-2 from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. The mature protein of GRPSp contains two cysteine residues at the C-terminus and two glycine-rich repeats (GGYG and GYGG). In healthy crabs, both arasin-likeSp and GRPSp transcript levels were found to be high in the hemocytes and were further increased at 3 h after challenge with the bacterium, Aerococcus viridans. A synthetic arasin-likeSp peptide revealed the antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria including some crustacean pathogens (A. viridans, Vibrio harveyi and V. anguillarum), whilst the synthetic GRPSp peptide exhibited antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive (A. viridans and Micrococcus luteus), but not Gram-negative, bacteria. These results indicate that arasin-likeSp and GRPSp are potentially novel AMPs involved in the immune responses of mud crab, S. paramamosain. PMID:21220028

  15. Prevalence of listeria, Aeromonas, and Vibrio species in fish used for human consumption in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Nihal; Balci, Senay

    2010-02-01

    A total of 78 raw retail fish samples from 30 freshwater and 48 marine fish were examined for the presence of Listeria, Aeromonas, and Vibrio species. The overall incidence of Listeria spp. was 30% in freshwater samples and 10.4% in marine fish samples. Listeria monocytogenes (44.5%) was the most commonly isolated species in freshwater fish, and Listeria murrayi (83.5%) was the most commonly isolated species in marine fish samples. Motile aeromonads were more common in marine fish samples (93.7%) than in freshwater fish samples (10%). Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, and Vibrio damsela were isolated only in marine fish samples, representing 40.9, 38.6, and 36.3% of Vibrio isolates, respectively. In freshwater and marine fish, the highest incidences of Listeria and Aeromonas were found in skin samples; the highest incidence of Vibrio in marine fish was found in gill samples. The location of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in a fish was significantly different among freshwater fish. A high incidence of these bacterial pathogens was found in the brown trout (Salmo trutta) and horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus). Handling of contaminated fish, cross-contamination, or eating raw fish might pose a health hazard, especially in immunosuppressed individuals, elderly people, and children. This study highlights the importance of bacterial pathogens in fish intended for human consumption, but more study is needed. PMID:20132688

  16. Vibrio vulnificus Phage PV94 Is Closely Related to Temperate Phages of V. cholerae and Other Vibrio Species

    PubMed Central

    Reetz, Jochen; Strauch, Eckhard; Hertwig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1) infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. Results In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5?-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. Conclusion We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species. PMID:24732980

  17. A Foodborne Outbreak of Gastroenteritis Caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Norovirus through Non-Seafood Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenfeng; Liu, Jianping; Ma, Xiaowei; Xie, Chaojun; Zheng, Chuangliang; Zhuo, Li; Cao, Xianbang; Tan, Hailing; Li, Baisheng; Xie, Huaping; Liu, Yufei; Ip, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne outbreaks caused by a mixed infection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and norovirus have rarely been described. We reported a mixed outbreak of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and norovirus causing acute gastroenteritis in 99 staff members of a company in Guangdong, China, in May 2013, following consumption of roasted duck, an uncommon non-seafood vehicle for such mixed infection, in one meal served in the company's catering service. Epidemiological and laboratory findings indicated that a single asymptomatic food handler was the source of both pathogens, and the high rate of infection of both pathogens was exacerbated by the setting’s suboptimal food hygiene practice. PMID:26376317

  18. Long-term effects of ocean warming on vibrios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruzzo, C.; Pezzati, E.; Brettar, I.; Reid, P. C.; Colwell, R.; Höfle, M. G.; vezzulli, L.

    2012-12-01

    Vibrios are a major source of human disease, play an important role in the ecology and health of marine animals and are regarded as an abundant fraction of culturable bacteria of the ocean. There has been a considerable global effort to reduce the risk of Vibrio infections and yet in most countries both human and non-human illnesses associated with these bacteria are increasing. The cause of this increase is not known, but since vibrios are strongly thermodependant there is good reason to believe that global warming may have contributed. To investigate this possibility we examined historical samples from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) archive using advanced molecular analysis and pyrosequencing. For the first time we were able to recover environmental DNA from CPR samples that had been stored for up to ~50 years in a formalin-fixed format, which is suitable for molecular analyses of the associated prokaryotic community. To overcome the problem of DNA degradation due to the sample age and storage in formalin we develop an unbiased index of abundance for Vibrio quantification in CPR samples termed a 'relative Vibrio Abundance Index' (VAI). VAI is defined as the ratio of Vibrio spp. cells to total bacterial cells assessed by Real-Time PCR using genus-specific and universal primers, respectively, producing small amplicons of similar size (~100bp). We assessed VAI index on 55 samples (each representing 10 nautical miles tow equal to 3 m3 of filtered sewater) collected in August by the CPR survey in the North Sea from off the Rhine and Humber estuaries between 1961 to 2005 showing that the genus Vibrio has increased in prevalence in the last 44 years and that this increase is correlated significantly, during the same period, with warming sea surface temperature. In addition, by applying deep sequencing analysis of a subset of these samples we provide evidence that bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio, including the human pathogen V. cholerae, not only increased in occurrence over the last half century in the southern North Sea, but also prevailed within the particle associated bacterial community of coastal marine waters. These findings provide support for the view that global warming may have a strong impact on the composition of marine bacterial communities with important implications for human and animal health into the future.

  19. Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in the Coastal and Estuarine Waters of Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, and Washington (United States)

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, John C.; Griffitt, Kimberly J.; Molina, Vanessa; Clostio, Rachel W.; Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward; Paranjpye, Rohinee N.; Strom, Mark S.; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Huq, Anwar; Noriea, Nicholas F.; Grimes, D. Jay; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, which are native to estuaries globally, are agents of seafood-borne or wound infections, both potentially fatal. Like all vibrios autochthonous to coastal regions, their abundance varies with changes in environmental parameters. Sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), and chlorophyll have been shown to be predictors of zooplankton and thus factors linked to vibrio populations. The contribution of salinity, conductivity, turbidity, and dissolved organic carbon to the incidence and distribution of Vibrio spp. has also been reported. Here, a multicoastal, 21-month study was conducted to determine relationships between environmental parameters and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus populations in water, oysters, and sediment in three coastal areas of the United States. Because ecologically unique sites were included in the study, it was possible to analyze individual parameters over wide ranges. Molecular methods were used to detect genes for thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) as indicators of V. parahaemolyticus and the hemolysin gene vvhA for V. vulnificus. SST and suspended particulate matter were found to be strong predictors of total and potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Other predictors included chlorophyll a, salinity, and dissolved organic carbon. For the ecologically unique sites included in the study, SST was confirmed as an effective predictor of annual variation in vibrio abundance, with other parameters explaining a portion of the variation not attributable to SST. PMID:22865080

  20. Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in the coastal and estuarine waters of Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, and Washington (United States).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Crystal N; Bowers, John C; Griffitt, Kimberly J; Molina, Vanessa; Clostio, Rachel W; Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward; Paranjpye, Rohinee N; Strom, Mark S; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A; Huq, Anwar; Noriea, Nicholas F; Grimes, D Jay; Colwell, Rita R

    2012-10-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, which are native to estuaries globally, are agents of seafood-borne or wound infections, both potentially fatal. Like all vibrios autochthonous to coastal regions, their abundance varies with changes in environmental parameters. Sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), and chlorophyll have been shown to be predictors of zooplankton and thus factors linked to vibrio populations. The contribution of salinity, conductivity, turbidity, and dissolved organic carbon to the incidence and distribution of Vibrio spp. has also been reported. Here, a multicoastal, 21-month study was conducted to determine relationships between environmental parameters and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus populations in water, oysters, and sediment in three coastal areas of the United States. Because ecologically unique sites were included in the study, it was possible to analyze individual parameters over wide ranges. Molecular methods were used to detect genes for thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) as indicators of V. parahaemolyticus and the hemolysin gene vvhA for V. vulnificus. SST and suspended particulate matter were found to be strong predictors of total and potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. Other predictors included chlorophyll a, salinity, and dissolved organic carbon. For the ecologically unique sites included in the study, SST was confirmed as an effective predictor of annual variation in vibrio abundance, with other parameters explaining a portion of the variation not attributable to SST. PMID:22865080

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus recovered from recreational and commercial areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kristi S; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M; Crump, Byron C; Sapkota, Amy R

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n = 120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p = 0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial susceptibility data of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus recovered from the Chesapeake Bay. These data can serve as a baseline against which future studies can be compared to evaluate whether susceptibilities change over time. PMID:24586914

  2. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Recovered from Recreational and Commercial Areas of Chesapeake Bay and Maryland Coastal Bays

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Kristi S.; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E.; He, Xin; Jacobs, John M.; Crump, Byron C.; Sapkota, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine-marine environment are of human health significance and may be increasing in pathogenicity and abundance. Vibrio illness originating from dermal contact with Vibrio laden waters or through ingestion of seafood originating from such waters can cause deleterious health effects, particularly if the strains involved are resistant to clinically important antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility among these pathogens. Surface-water samples were collected from three sites of recreational and commercial importance from July to September 2009. Samples were plated onto species-specific media and resulting V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus strains were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction assays and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using the Sensititre® microbroth dilution system. Descriptive statistics, Friedman two-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Vibrio vulnificus (n?=?120) and V. parahaemolyticus (n?=?77) were isolated from all sampling sites. Most isolates were susceptible to antibiotics recommended for treating Vibrio infections, although the majority of isolates expressed intermediate resistance to chloramphenicol (78% of V. vulnificus, 96% of V. parahaemolyticus). Vibrio parahaemolyticus also demonstrated resistance to penicillin (68%). Sampling location or month did not significantly impact V. parahaemolyticus resistance patterns, but V. vulnificus isolates from St. Martin's River had lower overall intermediate resistance than that of the other two sampling sites during the month of July (p?=?0.0166). Antibiotics recommended to treat adult Vibrio infections were effective in suppressing bacterial growth, while some antibiotics recommended for pediatric treatment were not effective against some of the recovered isolates. To our knowledge, these are the first antimicrobial susceptibility data of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus recovered from the Chesapeake Bay. These data can serve as a baseline against which future studies can be compared to evaluate whether susceptibilities change over time. PMID:24586914

  3. Occurrence, seasonality and infectivity of Vibrio strains in natural populations of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Alejandro; Costa, María del; Forn-Cuni, Gabriel; Balseiro, Pablo; Chamorro, Rubén; Dios, Sonia; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-02-19

    Widespread and large-scale mortalities of bivalve molluscs significantly affect their production. A number of pathogens have been identified as the primary causes of death in oysters or clams, especially bacteria of the genus Vibrio. We evaluated the occurrence, seasonality and infectivity of Vibrio strains associated with natural mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) populations. In particular, different isolates of V. splendidus and V. aestuarianus were analysed because they were associated with major oyster mortalities in areas where mussels are cultured without presenting mortalities. The presence of both Vibrio spp. was analysed bimonthly in mussels, water, sediment, plankton and other associated fauna from 2 sites in Galicia (NW Spain), the region with the highest mussel production in Europe. Environmental factors were also considered. The pathogenicity of different Vibrio isolates was analysed by performing experimental infections in mussels with strains isolated from the field. Results showed that Vibrio populations were mainly influenced by changes in water temperature and salinity. V. splendidus was dominant during the warm months and V. aestuarianus was predominant throughout the cold season. The sediment was the most important natural reservoir for bacteria. Experimental infections showed the extreme resistance of mussels to bacterial pathogens. Isolates of V. splendidus and V. aestuarianus were only moderately pathogenic for mussels in intramuscular infections and bath infections, and mortalities only occurred when animals were infected with a high bacterial concentration in adverse environmental conditions (hypoxia and 25°C). Although the pathogenicity of the Vibrio strains isolated from the wild was low for mussels, their potential risk for other bivalves cannot be ignored. PMID:24553420

  4. New insights into Oculina patagonica coral diseases and their associated Vibrio spp. communities.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Yarza, Pablo; Peñalver, Cindy; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A; Antón, Josefa

    2014-09-01

    Bleaching of Oculina patagonica has been extensively studied in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, although no studies have been carried out in the Western basin. In 1996 Vibrio mediterranei was reported as the causative agent of bleaching in O. patagonica but it has not been related to bleached or healthy corals since 2003, suggesting that it was no longer involved in bleaching of O. patagonica. In an attempt to clarify the relationship between Vibrio spp., seawater temperature and coral diseases, as well as to investigate the putative differences between Eastern and Western Mediterranean basins, we have analysed the seasonal patterns of the culturable Vibrio spp. assemblages associated with healthy and diseased O. patagonica colonies. Two sampling points located in the Spanish Mediterranean coast were chosen for this study: Alicante Harbour and the Marine Reserve of Tabarca. A complex and dynamic assemblage of Vibrio spp. was present in O. patagonica along the whole year and under different environmental conditions and coral health status. While some Vibrio spp. were detected all year around in corals, the known pathogens V. mediteranei and V. coralliilyticus were only present in diseased specimens. The pathogenic potential of these bacteria was studied by experimental infection under laboratory conditions. Both vibrios caused diseased signs from 24 °C, being higher and faster at 28 °C. Unexpectedly, the co-inoculation of these two Vibrio species seemed to have a synergistic pathogenic effect over O. patagonica, as disease signs were readily observed at temperatures at which bleaching is not normally observed. PMID:24621525

  5. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  6. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  7. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  8. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Orata, Fabini D.; Kirchberger, Paul C.; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E. Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Boucher, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86–87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93–94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:26454015

  9. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Orata, Fabini D; Kirchberger, Paul C; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L; Boucher, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86-87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93-94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:26454015

  10. Abundance and distribution of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus following a major freshwater intrusion into the Mississippi Sound.

    PubMed

    Griffitt, Kimberly J; Grimes, D Jay

    2013-04-01

    In response to a major influx of freshwater to the Mississippi Sound following the opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway, water samples were collected from three sites along the Mississippi shoreline to assess the impact of altered salinity on three pathogenic Vibrio species. Salinity readings across the affected area during the 2011 sample period ranged from 1.4 to 12.9 ppt (mean = 7.0) and for the 2012 sample period from 14.1 to 23.6 ppt (mean = 19.8). Analyses of the data collected in 2011 showed a reduction in densities of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus with a concurrent increase of Vibrio cholerae numbers, with V. cholerae becoming the only Vibrio detected once salinity readings dropped to 6 ppt. Follow-up samples taken in 2012 after recovery of the salinity in the sound showed that the relative densities of the three pathogenic vibrios had reverted back to normal levels. This study shows that although the spillway was open but a few weeks and the effects were therefore time limited, the Mississippi River water had a profound, if temporary, effect on Vibrio ecology in the Mississippi Sound. PMID:23494573

  11. [The vibrio-static test with niclosamide to identify bacteria of genus Vibrio].

    PubMed

    Sivolodskiy, E P

    2014-05-01

    The new vibrio-static niclosamide (CAS No 50-65-7) is revealed. The vibrio-static test with niclosamide (10 mkg/disc) to identify bacteria of genus Vibrio is developed. This test by its diagnostic sensitivity surpasses the vibrio-static test with vibrio-static O129 since it suppresses growth of vibrios having cross resistance to O129 and co-trimoxazole. The vibrio-static test with niclosamide made it possible to identify all examined strains of V. metschnikovii, V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae non O1/non O139. PMID:25338465

  12. Catechol Siderophore Transport by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Payne, Shelley M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Siderophores, small iron-binding molecules secreted by many microbial species, capture environmental iron for transport back into the cell. Vibrio cholerae synthesizes and uses the catechol siderophore vibriobactin and also uses siderophores secreted by other species, including enterobactin produced by Escherichia coli. E. coli secretes both canonical cyclic enterobactin and linear enterobactin derivatives likely derived from its cleavage by the enterobactin esterase Fes. We show here that V. cholerae does not use cyclic enterobactin but instead uses its linear derivatives. V. cholerae lacked both a receptor for efficient transport of cyclic enterobactin and enterobactin esterase to promote removal of iron from the ferrisiderophore complex. To further characterize the transport of catechol siderophores, we show that the linear enterobactin derivatives were transported into V. cholerae by either of the catechol siderophore receptors IrgA and VctA, which also transported the synthetic siderophore MECAM [1,3,5-N,N′,N″-tris-(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-triaminomethylbenzene]. Vibriobactin is transported via the additional catechol siderophore receptor ViuA, while the Vibrio fluvialis siderophore fluvibactin was transported by all three catechol receptors. ViuB, a putative V. cholerae siderophore-interacting protein (SIP), functionally substituted for the E. coli ferric reductase YqjH, which promotes the release of iron from the siderophore in the bacterial cytoplasm. In V. cholerae, ViuB was required for the use of vibriobactin but was not required for the use of MECAM, fluvibactin, ferrichrome, or the linear derivatives of enterobactin. This suggests the presence of another protein in V. cholerae capable of promoting the release of iron from these siderophores. IMPORTANCE Vibrio cholerae is a major human pathogen and also serves as a model for the Vibrionaceae, which include other serious human and fish pathogens. The ability of these species to persist and acquire essential nutrients, including iron, in the environment is epidemiologically important but not well understood. In this work, we characterize the ability of V. cholerae to acquire iron by using siderophores produced by other organisms. We resolve confusion in the literature regarding its ability to use the Escherichia coli siderophore enterobactin and identify the receptor and TonB system used for the transport of several siderophores. The use of some siderophores did not require the ferric reductase ViuB, suggesting that an uncharacterized ferric reductase is present in V. cholerae. PMID:26100039

  13. Occurrence of Vibrio pathotypes in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Okoh, Anthony I

    2014-08-01

    We assessed the occurrence of Vibrio pathogens in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa over a 12 months period between September 2012 and August 2013 using standard membrane filtration technique followed by cultivation on thiosulphate citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar. The identities of the presumptive Vibrio isolates were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including delineation into V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. fluvialis pathotypes. The counts of Vibrio spp. varied with months in all the study sites and ranged in the order of 101 and 104 CFU/100mL. Vibrio distribution also showed seasonality with high counts being obtained in autumn and spring (p < 0.05). Prevalence of Vibrio spp. among the five WWTPs also differed significantly (p < 0.05). Of the 300 isolates that were confirmed as belonging to the Vibrio genus, 29% (86) were V. fluvialis, 28% (84) were V. vulnificus and 12% (35) were V. parahaemolyticus. The isolation of Vibrio pathogens from the final effluent suggests that this pathogen is in circulation in some pockets of the population and that the WWTPs under study do not efficiently remove bacterial pathogens from the wastewater and consequently are threats to public health. PMID:25093653

  14. Diversity and dynamics of the Vibrio community in well water used for drinking in Guinea-Bissau (West Africa).

    PubMed

    Machado, A; Bordalo, A A

    2014-09-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio are ubiquitous in aquatic environments and can be found either in culturable or in a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. The genus comprises many pathogenic species accountable for water and food-borne diseases that prove to be fatal, especially in developing countries, as in Guinea-Bissau (West Africa), where cholera is endemic. In order to ascertain the abundance and structure of Vibrio spp. community in well waters that serve as the sole source of water for the population, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), PCR-denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and cloning approaches were used. Results suggest that Vibrio spp. were present throughout the year in acidic, freshwater wells with a seasonal community composition shift. Vibrio spp. abundance was in accordance with the abundance found in coastal environments. Sequences closely related to pathogenic Vibrio species were retrieved from well water revealing exposure of the population to such pathogens. pH, ammonium, and turbidity, regulated by the rain pattern, seem to be the variables that contributed mostly to the shaping and selection of the Vibrio spp. community. These results reinforce the evidence for water monitoring with culture-independent methods and the clear need to create/recover water infrastructures and a proper water resources management in West African countries with similar environmental conditions. PMID:24859857

  15. Vibrio bacteria in raw oysters: managing risks to human health.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

    2016-03-01

    The human-pathogenic marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus are strongly correlated with water temperature, with concentrations increasing as waters warm seasonally. Both of these bacteria can be concentrated in filter-feeding shellfish, especially oysters. Because oysters are often consumed raw, this exposes people to large doses of potentially harmful bacteria. Various models are used to predict the abundance of these bacteria in oysters, which guide shellfish harvest policy meant to reduce human health risk. Vibrio abundance and behaviour varies from site to site, suggesting that location-specific studies are needed to establish targeted risk reduction strategies. Moreover, virulence potential, rather than simple abundance, should be also be included in future modeling efforts. PMID:26880841

  16. Prevalence and characterisation of non-cholerae Vibrio spp. in final effluents of wastewater treatment facilities in two districts of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa: implications for public health.

    PubMed

    Okoh, Anthony I; Sibanda, Timothy; Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Adefisoye, Martins; Olayemi, Osuolale O; Nontongana, Nolonwabo

    2015-02-01

    Vibrios and other enteric pathogens can be found in wastewater effluents of a healthy population. We assessed the prevalence of three non-cholerae vibrios in wastewater effluents of 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chris Hani and Amathole district municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa for a period of 12 months. With the exception of WWTP10 where presumptive vibrios were not detected in summer and spring, presumptive vibrios were detected in all seasons in other WWTP effluents. When a sample of 1,000 presumptive Vibrio isolates taken from across all sampling sites were subjected to molecular confirmation for Vibrio, 668 were confirmed to belong to the genus Vibrio, giving a prevalence rate of 66.8 %. Further, molecular characterisation of 300 confirmed Vibrio isolates revealed that 11.6 % (35) were Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 28.6 % (86) were Vibrio fluvialis and 28 % (84) were Vibrio vulnificus while 31.8 % (95) belonged to other Vibrio spp. not assayed for in this study. Antibiogram profiling of the three Vibrio species showed that V. parahaemolyticus was ?50 % susceptible to 8 of the test antibiotics and ?50 % resistant to only 5 of the 13 test antibiotics, while V. vulnificus showed a susceptibility profile of ?50 % to 7 of the test antibiotics and a resistance profile of ?50 % to 6 of the 13 test antibiotics. V. fluvialis showed ?50 % resistance to 8 of the 13 antibiotics used while showing ?50 % susceptibility to only 4 antibiotics used. All three Vibrio species were susceptible to gentamycin, cefuroxime, meropenem and imipenem. Multiple antibiotic resistance patterns were also evident especially against such antibiotics as tetracyclin, polymixin B, penicillin G, sulfamethazole and erythromycin against which all Vibrio species were resistant. These results indicate a significant threat to public health, more so in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa which is characterised by widespread poverty, with more than a third of the population directly relying on surface water sources for drinking and daily use. PMID:25167817

  17. Seasonal Prevalence of Enteropathogenic Vibrio and Their Phages in the Riverine Estuarine Ecosystem of South Bengal

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee, Subham; Batabyal, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Madhumanti Halder; Palit, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal disease remains an unsolved problem in developing countries. The emergence of new etiological agents (non-cholera vibrios) is a major cause of concern for health planners. We attempted to unveil the seasonal dynamics of entero-pathogenic Vibrios in Gangetic riverine-estuarine ecosystem. 120 surface water samples were collected for a period of one year from 3 sampling sites on the Hooghly river. Five enteropathogenic Vibrio species, V. cholerae (35%), V. parahaemolyticus (22.5%), V. mimicus (19.1%), V. alginolyticus (15.8%) and V. vulnificus (11.6%), were present in the water samples. The vibriophages, V. vulnificus ɸ (17.5%), V. alginolyticus ɸ (17.5%), V. parahaemolyticus ɸ (10%), V. cholerae non-O1/O139 ɸ (26.6%) and V. mimicus ɸ (9.1%), were also detected in these samples. The highest number of Vibrios were noted in the monsoon (20–34°C), and to a lesser extent, in the summer (24–36°C) seasons. Samples positive for phages for any of the identified Vibrio species were mostly devoid of that particular bacterial organism and vice versa. The detection of toxin genes and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in some environmental enteropathogenic Vibrio species in the aquatic niches is a significant outcome. This finding is instrumental in the south Bengal diarrhoeal incidence. PMID:26340543

  18. UPTAKE, PERSISTENCE, AND LOCALIZATION OF VIRULENT AND AVIRULENT VIBRIO VULNIFICUS IN THE EASTERN OYSTER, CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio vulnificus is a human pathogen commonly found in estuarine environments. Foodborne illness is associated with the consumption of raw oysters and can produce gastroenteritis and life-threatening septicemia. Depuration is one of the common methods to purge microbial contaminants from oysters....

  19. Evaluation of reference genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for gene expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize the viru...

  20. Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

  1. Vibrio natriegens: A Rapidly Growing Micro-Organism Ideally Suited for Class Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullenger, L.; Gill, Nijole R.

    1973-01-01

    Describes five microbiological experiments using the marine organism Vibrio natriegens. This organism is highly suitable for laboratory work because it is non-pathogenic and grows extremely rapidly, having the distinction of the lowest mean generation time yet recorded (9.8 minutes). (JR)

  2. Ecology of Vibrio vulnificus in Estuarine Waters of Eastern North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Courtney S.; Hite, M. Frances; Oliver, James D.

    2003-01-01

    While several studies on the ecology of Vibrio vulnificus in Gulf Coast environments have been reported, there is little information on the distribution of this pathogen in East Coast waters. Thus, we conducted a multiyear study on the ecology of V. vulnificus in estuarine waters of the eastern United States, employing extensive multiple regression analyses to reveal the major environmental factors controlling the presence of this pathogen, and of Vibrio spp., in these environments. Monthly field samplings were conducted between July 2000 and April 2002 at six different estuarine sites along the eastern coast of North Carolina. At each site, water samples were taken and nine physicochemical parameters were measured. V. vulnificus isolates, along with estuarine bacteria, Vibrio spp., Escherichia coli organisms, and total coliforms, were enumerated in samples from each site by using selective media. During the last 6 months of the study, sediment samples were also analyzed for the presence of vibrios, including V. vulnificus. Isolates were confirmed as V. vulnificus by using hemolysin gene PCR or colony hybridization. V. vulnificus was isolated only when water temperatures were between 15 and 27°C, and its presence correlated with water temperature and dissolved oxygen and vibrio levels. Levels of V. vulnificus in sediments were low, and no evidence for an overwintering in this environment was found. Multiple regression analysis indicated that vibrio levels were controlled primarily by temperature, turbidity, and levels of dissolved oxygen, estuarine bacteria, and coliforms. Water temperature accounted for most of the variability in the concentrations of both V. vulnificus (47%) and Vibrio spp. (48%). PMID:12788759

  3. Coral-mucus-associated Vibrio integrons in the Great Barrier Reef: genomic hotspots for environmental adaptation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jeremy E; Bourne, David G; Curtis, Bruce; Dlutek, Marlena; Stokes, H W; Doolittle, W Ford; Boucher, Yan

    2011-06-01

    Integron cassette arrays in a dozen cultivars of the most prevalent group of Vibrio isolates obtained from mucus expelled by a scleractinian coral (Pocillopora damicornis) colony living on the Great Barrier Reef were sequenced and compared. Although all cultivars showed >99% identity across recA, pyrH and rpoB genes, no two had more than 10% of their integron-associated gene cassettes in common, and some individuals shared cassettes exclusively with distantly-related members of the genus. Of cassettes shared within the population, a number appear to have been transferred between Vibrio isolates, as assessed by phylogenetic analysis. Prominent among the mucus Vibrio cassettes with potentially inferable functions are acetyltransferases, some with close similarity to known antibiotic-resistance determinants. A subset of these potential resistance cassettes were shared exclusively between the mucus Vibrio cultivars, Vibrio coral pathogens and human pathogens, thus illustrating a direct link between these microbial niches through exchange of integron-associated gene cassettes. PMID:21270840

  4. Isolation and molecular identification of Vibrio spp. by sequencing of 16S rDNA from seafood, meat and meat products in Libya

    PubMed Central

    Azwai, S.M.; Alfallani, E.A.; Abolghait, S.K.; Garbaj, A.M.; Naas, H.T.; Moawad, A.A.; Gammoudi, F.T.; Rayes, H.M.; Barbieri, I.; Eldaghayes, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vibrio includes several food-borne pathogens that cause a spectrum of clinical conditions including septicemia, cholera and milder forms of gastroenteritis. Several Vibrio spp. are commonly associated with food-borne transmission including Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. Microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of Vibrio spp. were carried out for a total of 93 samples of seafood, meat and meat products from different geographic localities in Libya (Tripoli, Regdalin, Janzour and Tobruk). Vibrio spp. were detected by conventional cultural and molecular method using PCR and sequencing of 16S rDNA. Out of the 93 cultured samples only 48 (51.6%) yielded colonies on Thiosulfate Citrate Bile Salt agar (TCBS) with culture characteristics of Vibrio spp. More than half (n=27) of processed seafood samples (n=46) yielded colonies on TCBS, while only 44.6 % of samples of meat and meat products showed colonies on TCBS. Among cultured seafood samples, the highest bacterial count was recorded in clam with a count of 3.8 ×104 CFU\\g. Chicken burger samples showed the highest bacterial count with 6.5 ×104 CFU\\g. Molecular analysis of the isolates obtained in this study, showed that 11 samples out of 48 (22.9%) were Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahemolyticus was isolated from camel meat for the first time. This study is an initial step to provide a baseline for future molecular research targeting Vibrio spp. foodborne illnesses. This data will be used to provide information on the magnitude of such pathogens in Libyan seafood, meat and meat products. PMID:27004169

  5. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the Genus Vibrio: Numerical Taxonomy of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Related Vibrio Species

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.

    1970-01-01

    A set of 86 bacterial cultures, including 30 strains of Vibrio cholerae, 35 strains of V. parahaemolyticus, and 21 representative strains of Pseudomonas, Spirillum, Achromobacter, Arthrobacter, and marine Vibrio species were tested for a total of 200 characteristics. Morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics were included in the analysis. Overall deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base compositions and ultrastructure, under the electron microscope, were also examined. The taxonomic data were analyzed by computer by using numerical taxonomy programs designed to sort and cluster strains related phenetically. The V. cholerae strains formed an homogeneous cluster, sharing overall S values of ?75%. Two strains, V. cholerae NCTC 30 and NCTC 8042, did not fall into the V. cholerae species group when tested by the hypothetical median organism calculation. No separation of “classic” V. cholerae, El Tor vibrios, and nonagglutinable vibrios was observed. These all fell into a single, relatively homogeneous, V. cholerae species cluster. V. parahaemolyticus strains, excepting 5144, 5146, and 5162, designated members of the species V. alginolyticus, clustered at S ?80%. Characteristics uniformly present in all the Vibrio species examined are given, as are also characteristics and frequency of occurrence for V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus. The clusters formed in the numerical taxonomy analyses revealed similar overall DNA base compositions, with the range for the Vibrio species of 40 to 48% guanine plus cytosine. Generic level of relationship of V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus is considered dubious. Intra- and intergroup relationships obtained from the numerical taxonomy studies showed highly significant correlation with DNA/DNA reassociation data. Images PMID:5473901

  6. Development of Vibrio spp. infection resistance related SNP markers using multiplex SNaPshot genotyping method in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing; Yue, Xin; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-04-01

    The clam Meretrix meretrix is a commercially important mollusc species in the coastal areas of South and Southeast Asia. In the present study, large-scale SNPs were genotyped by the Multiplex SNaPshot genotyping method among the stocks of M. meretrix with different Vibrio spp. infection resistance profile. Firstly, the AUTOSNP software was applied to mine SNPs from M. meretrix transcriptome, and 323 SNP loci (including 120 indels) located on 64 contigs were selected based on Uniprot-GO associations. Then, 38 polymorphic SNP loci located on 15 contigs were genotyped successfully in the clam stocks with different resistance to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection (11-R and 11-S groups). Pearson's Chi-square test was applied to compare the allele and genotype frequency distributions of the SNPs between the different stocks, and seven SNP markers located on three contigs were found to be associated with V. parahaemolyticus infection resistance trait. Haplotype-association analysis showed that six haplotypes had significantly different frequency distributions in 11-S and 11-R (P < 0.05). With selective genotyping between 09-R and 09-C populations, which had different resistance to Vibrio harveyi infection, four out of the seven selected SNPs had significantly different distributions (P < 0.05) and therefore they were considered to be associated with Vibrio spp. infection resistance. Sequence alignments and annotations indicated that the contigs containing the associated SNPs had high similarity to the immune related genes. All these results would be useful for the future marker-assisted selection of M. meretrix strains with high Vibrio spp. infection resistance. PMID:25655323

  7. Distribution of the Luminous Bacterium Beneckea harveyi in a Semitropical Estuarine Environment

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Catherine H.; Sizemore, Ronald K.

    1979-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria were found in the water column, sediment, shrimp, and gastrointestinal tract of marine fishes from the semitropical estuarine environment of the East Lagoon, Galveston Island, Tex. Populations in the water column decreased during cold weather while sedimentary populations persisted. The highest percentages of luminous organisms were isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of marine fishes, where they persisted during 5 days of starvation. The presence of chitin temporarily increased intestinal populations. All isolates were Beneckea harveyi, whose natural habitat appears to be the gut of fishes and whose free-living reservoir appears to be marine sediments. PMID:16345465

  8. VIBRIO VULNIFICUS EDUCATION WORKSHOPS / MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will promote Vibrio vulnificus education on-line continuing medical education units to health care professionals that counsel and care for at-risk individuals. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will purchase advertisement and promotion in me...

  9. The interactions of Vibrio vulnificus and the oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett; Oliver, James D

    2013-05-01

    The human bacterial pathogen, Vibrio vulnificus, is found in brackish waters and is concentrated by filter-feeding molluscan shellfish, especially oysters, which inhabit those waters. Ingestion of raw or undercooked oysters containing virulent strains of V. vulnificus can result in rapid septicemia and death in 50 % of victims. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the environmental interactions between these two organisms, including the effects of salinity and temperature on colonization, uptake, and depuration rates of various phenotypes and genotypes of the bacterium, and host-microbe immunological interactions. PMID:23280497

  10. Effect of Temperature on Growth of Vibrio paraphemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in Flounder, Salmon Sashimi and Oyster Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo Won; Lee, Soon Ho; Hwang, In Gun; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus are the major pathogenic Vibrio species which contaminate ready-to-eat seafood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk of human illness resulting from consumption of ready-to-eat seafood such as sashimi and raw oyster meat due to the presence of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. We compared the growth kinetics of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus strains in broth and ready-to-eat seafood, including flounder and salmon sashimi, as a function of temperature. The growth kinetics of naturally occurring V. vulnificus in raw oyster meat was also evaluated. The minimum growth temperatures of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in broth were 13 °C and 11 °C, respectively. Overall, significant differences in lag time (LT) and specific growth rate (SGR) values between flounder and salmon sashimi were observed at temperatures ranging from 13 °C to 30 °C (p < 0.05). The growth of naturally occurring V. vulnificus reached stationary phase at ~4 log CFU/g in oysters, regardless of the storage temperature. This data indicates that the population of V. vulnificus in oysters did not reach the maximum population density as observed in the broth, where growth of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus isolated from oysters grew up to >8 log CFU/mL. PMID:23330227

  11. Survey on antimicrobial resistance patterns in Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 in Germany reveals carbapenemase-producing Vibrio cholerae in coastal waters

    PubMed Central

    Bier, Nadja; Schwartz, Keike; Guerra, Beatriz; Strauch, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species is expected for waters in Northern Europe as a consequence of global warming. In this context, a higher incidence of Vibrio infections is predicted for the future and forecasts suggest that people visiting and living at the Baltic Sea are at particular risk. This study aimed to investigate antimicrobial resistance patterns among Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 isolates that could pose a public health risk. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 141 V. vulnificus and 184 V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains isolated from German coastal waters (Baltic Sea and North Sea) as well as from patients and retail seafood was assessed by broth microdilution and disk diffusion. Both species were susceptible to most of the agents tested (12 subclasses) and no multidrug-resistance was observed. Among V. vulnificus isolates, non-susceptibility was exclusively found toward aminoglycosides. In case of V. cholerae, a noticeable proportion of strains was non-susceptible to aminopenicillins and aminoglycosides. In addition, resistance toward carbapenems, quinolones, and folate pathway inhibitors was sporadically observed. Biochemical testing indicated the production of carbapenemases with unusual substrate specificity in four environmental V. cholerae strains. Most antimicrobial agents recommended for treatment of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 infections were found to be effective in vitro. However, the occurrence of putative carbapenemase producing V. cholerae in German coastal waters is of concern and highlights the need for systematic monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility in potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Europe. PMID:26579088

  12. Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Colwell, Rita R.

    1973-01-01

    A study of the ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and related vibrios in the Rhode River area of Chesapeake Bay was carried out over the period December 1970 through August 1971. The incidence of V. parahaemolyticus and related vibrios was found to be correlated with water temperature. The vibrios could not be detected in the water column during the winter months, although they were present in sediment. From late spring to early summer, when water temperatures were 14 ± 1 C, vibrios over-wintering in sediment were released from the bottom communities and attached to zooplankton, proliferating as the temperature rose. The number of vibrios in and on plankton was reflected in the water column bacterial population densities at water temperatures of ca. 19 C. Thus, temperature of the water column in the range of 14 to 19 C was found to be critical in the annual cycle of the vibrios. Interaction between sediment, water, and zooplankton was found to be essential in the natural estuarine ecosystem. Bacterial counts of zooplankton were found to be temperature dependent. The bacterial population associated with zooplankton was found to be predominantly on external surfaces and was specific, differing from that of the sediment. Vibrio spp. and related organisms comprised the total bacterial population associated with zooplankton in summer months. The ecological role of Vibrio spp., including V. parahaemolyticus, was found to be significant, with respect to their property of chitin digestion and in relation to the population dynamics of zooplankton in Chesapeake Bay. PMID:4567138

  13. Increases in the Amounts of Vibrio spp. in Oysters upon Addition of Exogenous Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, James

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus is found naturally in brackish coastal waters but can be greatly concentrated by filter-feeding organisms such as shellfish. Numerous experiments in which exogenous V. vulnificus cells are added to oysters in an attempt to measure uptake and depuration have been performed. In nearly all cases, results have shown that laboratory-grown bacteria are rapidly taken up by the oysters but ultimately eliminated, while naturally present Vibrio populations in oysters are resistant to depuration. In this study, oysters harvested during winter months, with low culturable Vibrio concentrations, were incubated in aquaria supplemented with strains of V. vulnificus that were either genotypically or phenotypically distinct from the background bacteria. These exogenous cells were eliminated from the oysters, as previously seen, but other vibrios already inhabiting the oysters responded to the V. vulnificus inoculum by rapidly increasing in number and maintaining a large stable population. The presence of such an oyster-adapted Vibrio population would be expected to prevent colonization by exogenous V. vulnificus cells, thus explaining the rapid depuration of these added bacteria. PMID:23793640

  14. T lymphocytes control microbial composition by regulating the abundance of Vibrio in the zebrafish gut

    PubMed Central

    Brugman, Sylvia; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Witte, Merlijn; Klein, Mark R; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Boes, Marianne L; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Nieuwenhuis, Edward ES

    2014-01-01

    Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbial community is considered a risk factor for development of chronic intestinal inflammation as well as other diseases such as diabetes, obesity and even cancer. Study of the innate and adaptive immune pathways controlling bacterial colonization has however proven difficult in rodents, considering the extensive cross-talk between bacteria and innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we used the zebrafish to study innate and adaptive immune processes controlling the microbial community. Zebrafish lack a functional adaptive immune system in the first weeks of life, enabling study of the innate immune system in the absence of adaptive immunity. We show that in wild type zebrafish, the initial lack of adaptive immunity associates with overgrowth of Vibrio species (a group encompassing fish and human pathogens), which is overcome upon adaptive immune development. In Rag1-deficient zebrafish (lacking adaptive immunity) Vibrio abundance remains high, suggesting that adaptive immune processes indeed control Vibrio species. Using cell transfer experiments, we confirm that adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes, but not B lymphocytes into Rag1-deficient recipients suppresses outgrowth of Vibrio. In addition, ex vivo exposure of intestinal T lymphocytes to Rag1-deficient microbiota results in increased interferon-gamma expression by these T lymphocytes, compared to exposure to wild type microbiota. In conclusion, we show that T lymphocytes control microbial composition by effectively suppressing the outgrowth of Vibrio species in the zebrafish intestine. PMID:25536157

  15. Occurrence of Vibrio and Salmonella species in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) collected along the Moroccan Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Mannas, Hasna; Mimouni, Rachida; Chaouqy, Noureddine; Hamadi, Fatima; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the occurrence of different Vibrio and Salmonella species in 52 samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis collected from four sites along the Atlantic coast between Agadir and Essaouira (Anza, Cap Ghir, Imssouane and Essaouira). The level of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was also determined to evaluate the degree of microbial pollution in the investigated areas. In this study three methods were used : AFNOR NF EN ISO 6579 V08-013 for Salmonella spp., the provisional method routinely used by several laboratories (Institut Pasteur, Paris,…) for Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the seafood, and the most probable number method (MPN) using Norm ISO/TS 16649-3 (2005) for E. coli. The most frequently isolated Vibrios were Vibrio alginolyticus (90.4% of samples), followed by V. cholerae non O1 non O139 (15.4%) and V. parahaemolyticus (7.7%). Salmonella spp. was found in 15% of the samples. The number of E. coli ranged between 0.2/100 g and 1.8 10(3) /100 g of mussel soft tissues. This study indicates the potential sanitary risk associated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in cultivated mussels in the two populous regions of southern Morocco, where shellfish production and maritime tourism are important to the local economy. PMID:24936389

  16. Increases in the amounts of Vibrio spp. in oysters upon addition of exogenous bacteria.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett; Oliver, James

    2013-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus is found naturally in brackish coastal waters but can be greatly concentrated by filter-feeding organisms such as shellfish. Numerous experiments in which exogenous V. vulnificus cells are added to oysters in an attempt to measure uptake and depuration have been performed. In nearly all cases, results have shown that laboratory-grown bacteria are rapidly taken up by the oysters but ultimately eliminated, while naturally present Vibrio populations in oysters are resistant to depuration. In this study, oysters harvested during winter months, with low culturable Vibrio concentrations, were incubated in aquaria supplemented with strains of V. vulnificus that were either genotypically or phenotypically distinct from the background bacteria. These exogenous cells were eliminated from the oysters, as previously seen, but other vibrios already inhabiting the oysters responded to the V. vulnificus inoculum by rapidly increasing in number and maintaining a large stable population. The presence of such an oyster-adapted Vibrio population would be expected to prevent colonization by exogenous V. vulnificus cells, thus explaining the rapid depuration of these added bacteria. PMID:23793640

  17. Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae inguinal skin and soft tissue infection with bullous skin lesions in a patient with a penis squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aguinaga, Aitziber; Portillo, María E; Yuste, Jose R; del Pozo, Jose L; García-Tutor, Emilio; Pérez-Gracia, Jose L; Leiva, José

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio spp. is a pathogen rarely isolated in cancer patients, and in most cases it is associated with haematological diseases. Cutaneous manifestations of this organism are even rarer. We report a case of Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae inguinal skin and soft tissue infection presenting bullous skin lesions in a young type II diabetic patient with a penis squamous cell carcinoma having a seawater exposure history. PMID:19454006

  18. Light scattering sensor for real-time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholera colonies on solid agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, V. cholerae, V. parahemolyticus and V. vulnificus, are of major concern as water- and food-borne pathogens because of an increasing incidence of water and seafood related outbreaks and illnesses worldwide. Current methods are time-consuming and req...

  19. Relationship of aquatic environmental factors with the abundance of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio mimicus and Vibrio vulnificus in the coastal area of Guaymas, Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    León Robles, A; Acedo Félix, E; Gomez-Gil, B; Quiñones Ramírez, E I; Nevárez-Martínez, M; Noriega-Orozco, L

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Vibrio are common in aquatic environments. Among them are V. cholerae, V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. mimicus. Several studies have shown that environmental factors, such as temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen, are involved in their epidemiology. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between the presence/amount of V. cholerae, V, vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. mimicus and the environmental conditions of the seawater off the coast of Guaymas, México. Quantification of all four pathogenic bacteria was performed using the most probable number method, and suspected colonies were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations were found using principal component analysis. V. parahaemolyticus was the most abundant and widely distributed bacteria, followed by V. vulnificus, V. mimicus and V. cholerae. Positive correlations between V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. mimicus with temperature, salinity, electric conductivity, and total dissolved solids were found. The abundance of V. cholerae was mainly affected by the sampling site and not by physicochemical parameters. PMID:24334844

  20. Lower extremity manifestations of Vibrio vulnificus infection.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, T J; Lavery, L A

    1995-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a potentially lethal marine bacterium that has not been previously described in podiatric literature. A review of the microorganism's characteristics, susceptible patient population, and lower extremity manifestations of infection is presented. V. vulnificus is found as part of the normal flora of the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic, and Pacific coastal waters and is often isolated from the filter feeding shellfish of these regions. Its pathogenicity is generally reserved for the immunocompromised host, and is specifically related to disease states which exhibit high serum iron levels. V. vulnificus infections present in two distinct clinical syndromes: primary sepsis secondary to raw oyster ingestion, or localized infection from wound exposure to V. vulnificus-inhabited salt water. Both syndromes demonstrate characteristic skin lesions of the trunk and extremities that present as hemorrhagic bullae and progress to necrotic ulcerations. Although V. vulnificus infection is rare, its extreme virulence in patients suffering from a chronic disease process and its manifestation of characteristic lower-extremity lesions require the podiatric physician to be able to recognize and treat such a condition. PMID:7488992

  1. Whole Transcriptome Profiling of Successful Immune Response to Vibrio Infections in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas by Digital Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Lorgeril, Julien; Zenagui, Reda; Rosa, Rafael D.; Piquemal, David; Bachère, Evelyne

    2011-01-01

    The cultivated Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has suffered for decades large scale summer mortality phenomenon resulting from the interaction between the environment parameters, the oyster physiological and/or genetic status and the presence of pathogenic microorganisms including Vibrio species. To obtain a general picture of the molecular mechanisms implicated in C. gigas immune responsiveness to circumvent Vibrio infections, we have developed the first deep sequencing study of the transcriptome of hemocytes, the immunocompetent cells. Using Digital Gene Expression (DGE), we generated a transcript catalog of up-regulated genes from oysters surviving infection with virulent Vibrio strains (Vibrio splendidus LGP32 and V. aestuarianus LPi 02/41) compared to an avirulent one, V. tasmaniensis LMG 20012T. For that an original experimental infection protocol was developed in which only animals that were able to survive infections were considered for the DGE approach. We report the identification of cellular and immune functions that characterize the oyster capability to survive pathogenic Vibrio infections. Functional annotations highlight genes related to signal transduction of immune response, cell adhesion and communication as well as cellular processes and defence mechanisms of phagocytosis, actin cytosqueleton reorganization, cell trafficking and autophagy, but also antioxidant and anti-apoptotic reactions. In addition, quantitative PCR analysis reveals the first identification of pathogen-specific signatures in oyster gene regulation, which opens the way for in depth molecular studies of oyster-pathogen interaction and pathogenesis. This work is a prerequisite for the identification of those physiological traits controlling oyster capacity to survive a Vibrio infection and, subsequently, for a better understanding of the phenomenon of summer mortality. PMID:21829707

  2. Virulence of Vibrio vulnificus strains from marine environments.

    PubMed Central

    Tison, D L; Kelly, M T

    1986-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus strains isolated from geographically diverse marine sources were compared with clinical isolates for phenotype and in vitro and in vivo production of virulence factors. There were no differences between environmental and clinical strains on the basis of biochemical characteristics or antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Cytolysin and cytotoxin titers produced by environmental strains were generally comparable to those of clinical strains. Of 29 environmental isolates tested, 25 were pathogenic for mice. These data show that environmental V. vulnificus strains are phenotypically indistinguishable from clinical isolates and that approximately 90% of the environmental strains tested produced in vitro virulence factors and in vivo pathogenicity for mice comparable to those produced by clinical V. vulnificus isolates. PMID:3729387

  3. Chitin and Products of Its Hydrolysis in Vibrio cholerae Ecology.

    PubMed

    Markov, E Yu; Kulikalova, E S; Urbanovich, L Ya; Vishnyakov, V S; Balakhonov, S V

    2015-09-01

    The role of chitin and its hydrolysis products generated by Vibrio cholerae chitinases in mechanisms of its adaptation in water environments, metabolism, preservation, acquisition of pathogenic potential, and its epidemiological value are reviewed. Chitin utilization by V. cholerae as a source of energy, carbon, and nitrogen is described. Chitin association promotes biofilm formation on natural chitinous surfaces, increasing V. cholerae resistance to adverse factors in ecological niches: the human body and water environments with its inhabitants. Hydrolytic enzymes regulated by the corresponding genes result in complete chitin biodegradation by a chitinolytic catabolic cascade. Consequences of V. cholerae cell and chitin interaction at different hierarchical levels include metabolic and physiological cell reactions such as chemotaxis, cell division, biofilm formation, induction of genetic competence, and commensalic and symbiotic mutual relations with higher organisms, nutrient cycle, pathogenicity for humans, and water organisms that is an example of successful interrelation of bacteria and substratum in the ecology of the microorganism. PMID:26555464

  4. Adaptation to enemy shifts: rapid resistance evolution to local Vibrio spp. in invasive Pacific oysters.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Carolin C; Wegner, K Mathias

    2015-04-01

    One hypothesis for the success of invasive species is reduced pathogen burden, resulting from a release from infections or high immunological fitness of invaders. Despite strong selection exerted on the host, the evolutionary response of invaders to newly acquired pathogens has rarely been considered. The two independent and genetically distinct invasions of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas into the North Sea represent an ideal model system to study fast evolutionary responses of invasive populations. By exposing both invasion sources to ubiquitous and phylogenetically diverse pathogens (Vibrio spp.), we demonstrate that within a few generations hosts adapted to newly encountered pathogen communities. However, local adaptation only became apparent in selective environments, i.e. at elevated temperatures reflecting patterns of disease outbreaks in natural populations. Resistance against sympatric and allopatric Vibrio spp. strains was dominantly inherited in crosses between both invasion sources, resulting in an overall higher resistance of admixed individuals than pure lines. Therefore, we suggest that a simple genetic resistance mechanism of the host is matched to a common virulence mechanism shared by local Vibrio strains. This combination might have facilitated a fast evolutionary response that can explain another dimension of why invasive species can be so successful in newly invaded ranges. PMID:25716784

  5. Multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae with an internal amplification control.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuang; Zhao, Hui; Xian, Yuyin; Hussain, Malik A; Wu, Xiyang

    2014-06-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay that can simultaneously detect 4 major Vibrio spp., Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae, in the presence of an internal amplification control (IAC) was developed. Species-specific PCR primers were designed based on the gyrB gene for V. alginolyticus, the collagenase gene for V. parahaemolyticus, the vvhA gene for V. vulnificus, and the ompW gene for V. cholerae. Additionally, an IAC primer pair was designed in conserved regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene that is used to indicate false-negative results. A multiplex PCR method was developed after optimization of the reaction conditions. The specificity of the PCR was validated by using 83 Vibrio strains and 10 other non-Vibrio bacterial species. The detection limit of the PCR was 10 CFU per tube for V. alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and 10(5) CFU per tube for V. cholerae in mixed conditions. This method was used to identify 69 suspicious Vibrio isolates, and the results were consistent with physiological and biochemical tests. This multiplex PCR method proved to be rapid, sensitive, and specific. The existence of IAC could successfully eliminate false-negative results for the detection of V. alginolyticus, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae. PMID:24731836

  6. Radiofrequency transmission line for bioluminescent Vibrio sp. irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassisi, V.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Velardi, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the study and the analyses of a transmission line for radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of bacteria belonging to Vibrio harveyi-related strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with many marine organisms. The bioluminescence represents a new biologic indicator which is useful for studying the behaviour of living samples in the presence of RF waves due to the modern communication systems. A suitable transmission line, used as an irradiating cell and tested up to the maximum frequency used by the global system for mobile communications and universal mobile telecommunications system transmissions, was characterized. In this experiment, the RF voltage applied to the transmission line was 1 V. Due to short dimensions of the line and the applied high frequencies, standing waves were produced in addition to progressing waves and the electric field strength varies particularly along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic field map was not strongly linked to the electric one due to the presence of standing waves and of the outgoing irradiation. RF fields were measured by two homemade suitable probes able to diagnostic fields of high frequency. The field measurements were performed without any specimens inside the line. Being our sample made of living matter, the real field was modified and its value was estimated by a simulation code. The bioluminescence experiments were performed only at 900 MHz for two different measured electric fields, 53 and 140 V/m. The light emission was measured right from the beginning and after 7 and 25 h. Under RF irradiation, we found that the bioluminescence activity decreased. Compared with the control sample, the diminution was 6.8% and 44% after 7 and 25 h of irradiation, respectively, both with the low or high field. No changes of the survival factor for all the samples were observed. Besides, to understand the emission processes, we operated the deconvolution of the spectra by two Gaussian curves. The Gaussian peaks were approximately centered at 460 nm and 490 nm. The 490 nm peak was higher than the control one. Under RF, the 490 nm peak decreased compared to the 460 nm one. The decreasing was stronger for the sample in the higher field. The ratio of the emission area of the 490 nm to 460 nm was 5 for the control sample. It decreased up to 1.6 for the samples under RF. The bioluminescence improves the DNA repair by photoreactivation, and there is evidence that photolyase is preferentially activated by blue/violet light. Our finding suggests that RF exposure may stimulate DNA repair by shifting the emission spectra from blue/green (490 nm) to blue/violet (460 nm).

  7. RAPID TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY TO ASSESS THE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES AGAINST VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assay was developed to assess the ability of oyster, Crassostrea virginica, hemocytes to kill the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (ATCC 17802). Bacterial killing was estimated colorimetrically by the enzymatic reduction of a tetrazolium dye, 3-(4,5-dimethyl...

  8. Development of a two-step, non-probed multiplex real-time PCR for surveilling Vibrio anguillarum in seawater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio anguillarum is an aggressive and halophilic bacterial pathogen commonly found in seawater. Its presence in aquaculture facilities causes significant morbidity and mortality among aquaculture species primarily from hemorrhaging of the body and skin of the infected fish that eventually leads t...

  9. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagella synthesis as well as a wide range of ...

  10. Vaccination of sex reversed hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus X O. aureus) with an inactivated Vibrio vulnificus vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio vulnificus causes disease in economically important aquaculture raised fish and is an opportunistic human pathogen. This study reports on the isolation of V. vulnificus from diseased hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus X O. aureus) cultured in a North American water reuse facility. Our ob...

  11. Occurrence and molecular characterisation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in crustaceans commercialised in Venice area, Italy.

    PubMed

    Caburlotto, Greta; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Toson, Marica; Fasolato, Luca; Antonetti, Paolo; Zambon, Michela; Manfrin, Amedeo

    2016-03-01

    Infections due to the pathogenic human vibrios, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus, are mainly associated with consumption of raw or partially cooked bivalve molluscs. At present, little is known about the presence of Vibrio species in crustaceans and the risk of vibriosis associated with the consumption of these products. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and concentration of the main pathogenic Vibrio spp. in samples of crustaceans (n=143) commonly eaten in Italy, taking into account the effects of different variables such as crustacean species, storage conditions and geographic origin. Subsequently, the potential pathogenicity of V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from crustaceans (n=88) was investigated, considering the classic virulence factors (tdh and trh genes) and four genes coding for relevant proteins of the type III secretion systems 2 (T3SS2α and T3SS2β). In this study, the presence of V. cholerae and V. vulnificus was never detected, whereas 40 samples (28%) were positive for V. parahaemolyticus with an overall prevalence of 41% in refrigerated products and 8% in frozen products. The highest prevalence and average contamination levels were detected in Crangon crangon (prevalence 58% and median value 3400MPN/g) and in products from the northern Adriatic Sea (35%), with the samples from the northern Venetian Lagoon reaching a median value of 1375MPN/g. While genetic analysis confirmed absence of the tdh gene, three of the isolates contained the trh gene and, simultaneously, the T3SS2β genes. Moreover three possibly clonal tdh-negative/trh-negative isolates carried the T3SS2α apparatus. The detection of both T3SS2α and T3SS2β apparatuses in V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from crustaceans emphasised the importance of considering new genetic markers associated with virulence besides the classical factors. Moreover this study represents the first report dealing with Vibrio spp. in crustaceans in Italy, and it may provide useful information for the development of sanitary surveillance plans to prevent the risk of vibriosis in seafood consumers. PMID:26773255

  12. Complete genome sequence of bacteriophage VvAW1, which infects Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Culley, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the bacteriophages of vibrios has led to significant insights into the evolution and pathogenicity of their host strains. This report presents the first complete genome sequence of a bacteriophage that infects the deadly human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. The phage was isolated from the surface waters of the Ala Wai Canal, which is part of an urban watershed in eastern Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. The phage particle is icosahedral, with a diameter of 35-40 nm, and a small non-contractile tail. The genome was sequenced in its entirety, rendering a 38 kb sequence located on a single, linear, circularly permuted chromosome. Here, we present the annotation and genomic features of the bacteriophage, VvAW1. PMID:23408718

  13. Vibrio parahaemolyticus Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis: An Atypical Organism Causing an Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asim; Brumble, Lisa; Maniaci, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background necrotizing fasciitis (NF) represents a life-threatening bacterial infection characterized by a rapid necrosis of deep subcutaneous tissue and facia underlying the skin. Despite its lethal nature, NF occurs infrequently, leaving many physicians unfamiliar with the disease process, common pathogens, and treatment strategies. Here we present a case of NF caused by an unlikely organism, Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We highlight the innocuous nature of initial presentation and the potentially devastating sequela. PMID:24455339

  14. Sialic Acid Catabolism and Transport Gene Clusters Are Lineage Specific in Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Jean-Bernard; Kingston, Joseph J.; Chowdhury, Nityananda

    2012-01-01

    Sialic or nonulosonic acids are nine-carbon alpha ketosugars that are present in all vertebrate mucous membranes. Among bacteria, the ability to catabolize sialic acid as a carbon source is present mainly in pathogenic and commensal species of animals. Previously, it was shown that several Vibrio species carry homologues of the genes required for sialic acid transport and catabolism, which are genetically linked. In Vibrio cholerae on chromosome I, these genes are carried on the Vibrio pathogenicity island-2 region, which is confined to pathogenic isolates. We found that among the three sequenced Vibrio vulnificus clinical strains, these genes are present on chromosome II and are not associated with a pathogenicity island. To determine whether the sialic acid transport (SAT) and catabolism (SAC) region is universally present within V. vulnificus, we examined 67 natural isolates whose phylogenetic relationships are known. We found that the region was present predominantly among lineage I of V. vulnificus, which is comprised mainly of clinical isolates. We demonstrate that the isolates that contain this region can catabolize sialic acid as a sole carbon source. Two putative transporters are genetically linked to the region in V. vulnificus, the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter SiaPQM and a component of an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in siaM, a component of the TRAP transporter, and demonstrate that this transporter is essential for sialic acid uptake in this species. Expression analysis of the SAT and SAC genes indicates that sialic acid is an inducer of expression. Overall, our study demonstrates that the ability to catabolize and transport sialic acid is predominately lineage specific in V. vulnificus and that the TRAP transporter is essential for sialic acid uptake. PMID:22344665

  15. The effect of storage time on Vibrio spp. and fecal indicator bacteria in an Isco autosampler.

    PubMed

    Ghazaleh, Maite N; Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

    2014-09-01

    Monitoring concentrations of bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination in coastal and estuarine ecosystems is critical to reduce adverse effects to public health. During storm events, particularly hurricanes, floods, Nor'easters, and tropical cyclones, sampling of coastal and estuarine waters is not generally possible due to safety concerns. It is particularly important to monitor waters during these periods as it is at precisely these times that pathogenic bacteria such as Vibrio spp. and fecal indicator bacteria concentrations fluctuate, potentially posing significant risks to public health. Automated samplers, such as the Isco sampler, are commonly used to conduct remote sample collection. Remote sampling is employed during severe storm periods, thereby reducing risk to researchers. Water samples are then stored until conditions are safe enough to retrieve them, typically in less than 21h, to collect the samples. Concerns exist regarding potential "bottle effects", whereby containment of sample might result in altered results. While these effects are well documented in samples being held for 24h or more, there is little data on bottle effects occurring during the first 24h of containment, and less still on the specific effects related to this type of sampling regime. Estuarine water samples were collected in the fall of 2013, placed into an Isco autosampler and subsampled over time to determine the effects of storage within this type of autosampling device. Vibrio spp. and fecal indicator bacteria were quantified using replicated culture-based methods, including Enterolert™ and membrane filtration. The experiments demonstrated no significant impact of storage time when comparing concentrations of total Vibrio spp., Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, or Enterococcus spp. after storage compared to original concentrations. However, the findings also suggested that increased variability and growth can occur during the middle of the day. Therefore, if at all possible, analysis schedules should be modified to account for this variability, e.g. collection of samples after overnight storage should occur as early in the morning as practicable. PMID:25008356

  16. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Vibrio, salmonella, and Aeromonas isolates from various uncooked seafoods in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Woodring, Joseph; Srijan, Apichai; Puripunyakom, Paksathorn; Oransathid, Wilawan; Wongstitwilairoong, Boonchai; Mason, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Uncooked seafood samples were collected from open markets and supermarkets in Bangkok, Thailand, and were examined for the presence of Vibrio, Salmonella, and Aeromonas species from January to February 2008. From 120 samples, 272 bacterial isolates were identified through biochemical testing. Of all sea bass, shrimp, oyster, and blood cockle samples (30 of each) that were processed for culture, 114 (95%) samples had at least one detectable isolate of Vibrio, Salmonella, or Aeromonas, leaving only 6 (5%) samples free of them. All oyster sample (100%) had at least one pathogen, followed by sea bass (97%), blood cockles (97%), and shrimp (90%). Overall, 111 (92%) of all samples had detectable Vibrio spp., 32 (27%) had detectable Aeromonas spp., and 25 (21%) had detectable Salmonella enterica. There was no overall difference between positive samples collected from fresh markets versus supermarkets (relative risk, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.05). Resistance to ampicillin among isolated pathogens was relatively high (56%), while resistance to 12 other antibiotics, including azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was relatively low (0, 0, and 3%, respectively). Study results indicate that uncooked seafood in Bangkok, Thailand, commonly harbors enteric pathogens and that consumption of uncooked seafood should be avoided to reduce foodborne illnesses. PMID:22221354

  17. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection.

    PubMed

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2015-10-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  18. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  19. Surface Immuno-Functionalisation for the Capture and Detection of Vibrio Species in the Marine Environment: A New Management Tool for Industrial Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Laczka, Olivier F.; Labbate, Maurizio; Seymour, Justin R.; Bourne, David G.; Fielder, Stewart S.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Vibrio are a common and environmentally important group of bacteria within coastal environments and include species pathogenic to aquaculture organisms. Their distribution and abundance are linked to specific environmental parameters, including temperature, salinity and nutrient enrichment. Accurate and efficient detection of Vibrios in environmental samples provides a potential important indicator of overall ecosystem health while also allowing rapid management responses for species pathogenic to humans or species implicated in disease of economically important aquacultured fish and invertebrates. In this study, we developed a surface immuno-functionalisation protocol, based on an avidin-biotin type covalent binding strategy, allowing specific sandwich-type detection of bacteria from the Vibrio genus. The assay was optimized on 12 diverse Vibrio strains, including species that have implications for aquaculture industries, reaching detection limits between 7×103 to 3×104 cells mL?1. Current techniques for the detection of total Vibrios rely on laborious or inefficient analyses resulting in delayed management decisions. This work represents a novel approach for a rapid, accurate, sensitive and robust tool for quantifying Vibrios directly in industrial systems and in the environment, thereby facilitating rapid management responses. PMID:25310801

  20. Detection, Isolation, and Identification of Vibrio cholerae from the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Huq, Anwar; Haley, Bradd J.; Taviani, Elisa; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent molecular advances in microbiology have greatly improved the detection of bacterial pathogens in the environment. Improvement and a downward trend in the cost of molecular detection methods have contributed to increased frequency of detection of pathogenic microorganisms where traditional culture-based detection methods have failed. Culture methods also have been greatly improved and the confluence of the two suites of methods provides a powerful tool for detection, isolation, and characterization of pathogens. While molecular detection provides data on the presence and type of pathogens, culturing methods allow a researcher to preserve the organism of interest for “–omics” studies, such as genomic, metabolomic, secretomic, and transcriptomic analysis, which are rapidly becoming more affordable. This has yielded a clearer understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of microorganisms that cause disease. Specifically, important advances have been made over the past several years on isolation, detection, and identification of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera in humans. In this unit, we present commonly accepted methods for isolation, detection, and characterization of V. cholerae, providing more extensive knowledge of the ecology and epidemiology of this organism. This unit has been fully revised and updated from the earlier unit (Huq, Grim et al. 2006) with the latest knowledge and additional information not previously included. We have also taken into account of cost of reagents and equipment that may be prohibitive for many researchers and have, therefore, included protocols for all laboratories, including those with limited resources, likely to be located in regions of cholera endemicity. PMID:22875567

  1. The effect of ? radiation on the expression of the virulence genes of Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo; Kim, Dongho

    2007-11-01

    The principle benefit of food irradiation is the reduction of food-borne bacteria in food products. However, the microbiological safety with respect to increased virulence of surviving pathogens after irradiation remains an important issue with regard to the effectiveness of food irradiation. In this study, the transcriptional changes of virulence genes of Salmonella and Vibrio spp. after ? radiation were investigated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Samonella typhimurium is dependent upon the products of a large number of genes located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) on the chromosome. The expressions of seven genes including four SPI genes, hilD, ssrB, pipB, and sopD, were measured at 1 h after 1 kGy irradiation. Compared with non-irradiated controls, the expression of hilD encoded within SPI1 and sopD encoding SPI1-related effector proteins was reduced about 4- and 16-fold, respectively. The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes, vvhA, ctxA, and tdh, were also monitored during the course of a growth cycle after re-inoculation of irradiated Vibrio spp. (0.5 and 1.0 kGy). The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes tested did not increase compared with non-irradiated counterparts. Results from this study indicate that ? radiation is much more likely to reduce the virulence gene expression of surviving pathogens.

  2. Detection and identification of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Vibrio cholerae O139 using oligonucleotide microarray

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Da-Zhi; Xu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Su-Hong; Wen, Si-Yuan; Ma, Xue-En; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Feng; Wang, Sheng-Qi

    2007-01-01

    Background The rapid and accurate detection and identification of the new subtype of the pathogens is crucial for diagnosis, treatment and control of the contagious disease outbreak. Here, in this study, an approach to detect and identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Vibrio cholerae O139 was established using oligonucleotide microarray. We coupled multiplex PCR with oligonucleotide microarray to construct an assay suitable for simultaneous identification of two subtypes of the pathogens. Results The stx1, stx2 gene and uidA gene having the specific mutant spot were chosen as the targets for Escherichia coli O157:H7, and meanwhile the ctxA, tcpA, and LPSgt gene for Vibrio cholerae O139. The oligonucleotide microarray was composed of eight probes including negative control and positive control from 16S rDNA gene. The six primers were designed to amplify target fragments in two triplex PCR, and then hybridized with oligonucleotide microarray. An internal control would be to run a PCR reaction in parallel. Multiplex PCR did not produce any non-specific amplicons when 149 related species or genera of standard bacteria were tested (100% specificity). In addition, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Escherichia coli O157:non-H7, Vibrio cholerae O139 and Vibrio cholerae O1 had been discriminated respectively. Using recombinant plasmid and target pathogens, we were able to detect positive hybridization signals with 102 copies/?L and 103 cfu/mL per reaction. Conclusion The DNA microarray assay reported here could detect and identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Vibrio cholerae O139, and furthermore the subtype was distinguished. This assay was a specific and sensitive tool for simultaneous detection and identification of the new subtype of two pathogens causing diarrhea in human. PMID:18154687

  3. Subversion of the cytoskeleton by intracellular bacteria: lessons from Listeria, Salmonella and Vibrio.

    PubMed

    de Souza Santos, Marcela; Orth, Kim

    2015-02-01

    Entry into host cells and intracellular persistence by invasive bacteria are tightly coupled to the ability of the bacterium to disrupt the eukaryotic cytoskeletal machinery. Herein we review the main strategies used by three intracellular pathogens to harness key modulators of the cytoskeleton. Two of these bacteria, namely Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, exhibit quite distinct intracellular lifestyles and therefore provide a comprehensive panel for the understanding of the intricate bacteria-cytoskeleton interplay during infections. The emerging intracellular pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus is depicted as a developing model for the uncovering of novel mechanisms used to hijack the cytoskeleton. PMID:25440316

  4. Identification of Genetic Bases of Vibrio fluvialis Species-Specific Biochemical Pathways and Potential Virulence Factors by Comparative Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Liang, Weili; Wang, Yunduan; Xu, Jialiang

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio fluvialis is an important food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we sequenced the genome of a clinical V. fluvialis strain and determined its phylogenetic relationships with other Vibrio species by comparative genomic analysis. We found that the closest relationship was between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii, followed by those with V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Moreover, based on genome comparisons and gene complementation experiments, we revealed genetic mechanisms of the biochemical tests that differentiate V. fluvialis from closely related species. Importantly, we identified a variety of genes encoding potential virulence factors, including multiple hemolysins, transcriptional regulators, and environmental survival and adaptation apparatuses, and the type VI secretion system, which is indicative of complex regulatory pathways modulating pathogenesis in this organism. The availability of V. fluvialis genome sequences may promote our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms for this emerging pathogen. PMID:24441165

  5. Pathogen-pathogen interaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There is growing awareness of the health implications of the fact that infectious agents often do not act independently; rather their disease potential is mediated in diverse and significant ways by their relationships with other pathogens. Pathogen-pathogen interaction (PPI), for example, impacts various virulence factors in human infection. Although still in its infancy, the study of PPI, a form of epidemiological synergism, is emerging as an important arena of new research and new understanding in health and clinical care. The aims of this paper are to: (1) draw attention to the role of PPI in human disease patterns; (2) present the syndemics model as a biosocial approach for examining the nature, pathways, contexts, and health implications of PPI and (3) suggest the utility of this approach to PPI. Toward these ends, this paper (a) reviews three case examples of alternative PPIs, (b) describes the development and key concepts and components of the syndemics model with specific reference to interacting infectious agents, (c) contextualizes this discussion with a brief review of broader syndemics disease processes (not necessarily involving infections disease) and (d) comments on the research, treatment and prevention implications of syndemic interaction among pathogens. PMID:21178409

  6. From cholera to corals: Viruses as drivers of virulence in a major coral bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Weynberg, Karen D.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Neave, Matthew J.; Buerger, Patrick; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Disease is an increasing threat to reef-building corals. One of the few identified pathogens of coral disease is the bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus. In Vibrio cholerae, infection by a bacterial virus (bacteriophage) results in the conversion of non-pathogenic strains to pathogenic strains and this can lead to cholera pandemics. Pathogenicity islands encoded in the V. cholerae genome play an important role in pathogenesis. Here we analyse five whole genome sequences of V. coralliilyticus to examine whether virulence is similarly driven by horizontally acquired elements. We demonstrate that bacteriophage genomes encoding toxin genes with homology to those found in pathogenic V. cholerae are integrated in V. coralliilyticus genomes. Virulence factors located on chromosomal pathogenicity islands also exist in some strains of V. coralliilyticus. The presence of these genetic signatures indicates virulence in V. coralliilyticus is driven by prophages and other horizontally acquired elements. Screening for pathogens of coral disease should target conserved regions in these elements. PMID:26644037

  7. From cholera to corals: Viruses as drivers of virulence in a major coral bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Weynberg, Karen D; Voolstra, Christian R; Neave, Matthew J; Buerger, Patrick; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2015-01-01

    Disease is an increasing threat to reef-building corals. One of the few identified pathogens of coral disease is the bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus. In Vibrio cholerae, infection by a bacterial virus (bacteriophage) results in the conversion of non-pathogenic strains to pathogenic strains and this can lead to cholera pandemics. Pathogenicity islands encoded in the V. cholerae genome play an important role in pathogenesis. Here we analyse five whole genome sequences of V. coralliilyticus to examine whether virulence is similarly driven by horizontally acquired elements. We demonstrate that bacteriophage genomes encoding toxin genes with homology to those found in pathogenic V. cholerae are integrated in V. coralliilyticus genomes. Virulence factors located on chromosomal pathogenicity islands also exist in some strains of V. coralliilyticus. The presence of these genetic signatures indicates virulence in V. coralliilyticus is driven by prophages and other horizontally acquired elements. Screening for pathogens of coral disease should target conserved regions in these elements. PMID:26644037

  8. Diversity of bacteria isolated from crustacea larvae and their rearing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryanti; Sugama, Ketut; Nishijima, Toshitaka

    2003-04-01

    The bacteria in the genus Vibrio are heterothrophic, which exist in the larval rearing water of Crustacea and often show diverse pathogenicities to marine animals. In order to assess the bacterial diversity associated with Crustacean seed production, 32 strains were isolated from black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and mangrove crab (Scylla paramamosain) larvae and their rearing-water and characterized using biochemical and molecular approaches. Two or more genotypically different species were identified. The vibriosis of black tiger shrimp was causes by V. harveyi, V. alginolyticus and Vibrio spp. predominantly, while that of crab by V. harveyi and V. alginolyticus only.

  9. VIBRIO VULNIFICUS EDUCATION WORKSHOP FOR THE FLORIDA MEDICAL COMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vibrio vulnificus is a naturally occurring microorganism that occurs warm marine and estuarine waters. The bacteria are concentrated by filter feeding shellfish. Certain immunocompromised individuals and those with liver disease can be adversely, even fatally affected by Vibrio...

  10. Phage Therapy as an Approach to Prevent Vibrio anguillarum Infections in Fish Larvae Production

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Yolanda J.; Costa, Liliana; Pereira, Carla; Mateus, Cristiana; Cunha, Ângela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C. M.; Pardo, Miguel A.; Hernandez, Igor; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-01-01

    Fish larvae in aquaculture have high mortality rates due to pathogenic bacteria, especially the Vibrio species, and ineffective prophylactic strategies. Vaccination is not feasible in larvae and antibiotics have reduced efficacy against multidrug resistant bacteria. A novel approach to controlling Vibrio infections in aquaculture is needed. The potential of phage therapy to combat vibriosis in fish larvae production has not yet been examined. We describe the isolation and characterization of two bacteriophages capable of infecting pathogenic Vibrio and their application to prevent bacterial infection in fish larvae. Two groups of zebrafish larvae were infected with V. anguillarum (∼106 CFU mL−1) and one was later treated with a phage lysate (∼108 PFU mL−1). A third group was only added with phages. A fourth group received neither bacteria nor phages (fish control). Larvae mortality, after 72 h, in the infected and treated group was similar to normal levels and significantly lower than that of the infected but not treated group, indicating that phage treatment was effective. Thus, directly supplying phages to the culture water could be an effective and inexpensive approach toward reducing the negative impact of vibriosis in larviculture. PMID:25464504

  11. An intracellular replication niche for Vibrio cholerae in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Van der Henst, Charles; Scrignari, Tiziana; Maclachlan, Catherine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogen and the causative agent of cholera. The persistence of this bacterium in aquatic environments is a key epidemiological concern, as cholera is transmitted through contaminated water. Predatory protists, such as amoebae, are major regulators of bacterial populations in such environments. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between V. cholerae and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at the single-cell level. We observed that V. cholerae can resist intracellular killing. The non-digested bacteria were either released or, alternatively, established a replication niche within the contractile vacuole of A. castellanii. V. cholerae was maintained within this compartment even upon encystment. The pathogen ultimately returned to its aquatic habitat through lysis of A. castellanii, a process that was dependent on the production of extracellular polysaccharide by the pathogen. This study reinforces the concept that V. cholerae is a facultative intracellular bacterium and describes a new host-pathogen interaction. PMID:26394005

  12. Glycan Specificity of the Vibrio vulnificus Hemolysin Lectin Outlines Evolutionary History of Membrane Targeting by a Toxin Family

    PubMed Central

    Kaus, Katherine; Lary, Jeffrey W.; Cole, James L.; Olson, Rich

    2014-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are a class of pathogen-secreted molecules that oligomerize to form transmembrane channels in cellular membranes. Determining the mechanism for how PFTs bind membranes is key to understanding their role in disease and possible ways to block their action. Vibrio vulnificus, an aquatic pathogen responsible for severe food poisoning and septicemia in humans, secretes a PFT called Vibrio vulnificus hemolysin (VVH), which contains a single C-terminal targeting domain predicted to resemble a ?-trefoil lectin fold. In order to understand the selectivity of the lectin for glycan motifs, we expressed the isolated VVH ?-trefoil domain and used glycan-chip screening to identify that VVH displays a preference for terminal galactosyl groups including N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) and N-acetyl-D-lactosamine (LacNAc). The X-ray crystal structure of the VVH lectin domain solved to 2.0 Å resolution reveals a heptameric ring arrangement similar to the oligomeric form of the related, but inactive, lectin from Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Structures bound to glycerol, GalNAc, and LacNAc outline a common and versatile mode of recognition allowing VVH to target a wide variety of cell-surface ligands. Sequence analysis in light of our structural and functional data suggests that VVH may represent an earlier step in the evolution of Vibrio PFTs. PMID:24862282

  13. Non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae bacteraemia in a cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Petsaris, O; Nousbaum, J B; Quilici, M L; Le Coadou, G; Payan, C; Abalain, M L

    2010-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 or O139 are the aetiological agents of cholera. The pathogenicity of non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae is less well known. These worldwide bacteria are responsible for gastrointestinal infections or, more rarely, bacteraemia in patients with an underlying disease, leading to life-threatening complications. We report a case of non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae bacteraemia due to a haemolytic strain in a cirrhotic patient. Early antibiotherapy allowed a good outcome. The aim of this case report is to underline the virulence of non-choleragenic Vibrio strains, possibly linked to haemolysin production, and the potential danger of consuming undercooked seafood or exposing wounds to sea water in cirrhotic patients. PMID:20616193

  14. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant flagellin A from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Liu, Yang; Ge, Hui; Qiu, Xuemei

    2010-11-01

    The Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. Bacteria flagellins play an important role during infection and induction of the host immune response. Thus, flagellin proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified the complete flagellin subunit gene ( flaA) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 62.78 kDa. We purified and characterized the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for further studies into the utility of the FlaA protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified FlaA protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  15. Quorum-quenching activity of the AHL-lactonase from Bacillus licheniformis DAHB1 inhibits Vibrio biofilm formation in vitro and reduces shrimp intestinal colonisation and mortality.

    PubMed

    Vinoj, G; Vaseeharan, B; Thomas, S; Spiers, A J; Shanthi, S

    2014-12-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant cause of gastroenteritis resulting from the consumption of undercooked sea foods and often cause significant infections in shrimp aquaculture. Vibrio virulence is associated with biofilm formation and is regulated by N-acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing. In an attempt to reduce vibrio colonisation of shrimps and mortality, we screened native intestinal bacilli from Indian white shrimps (Fenneropenaeus indicus) for an isolate which showed biofilm-inhibitory activity (quorum quenching) against the pathogen V. parahaemolyticus DAHP1. The AHL-lactonase (AiiA) expressed by one of these, Bacillus licheniformis DAHB1, was characterised as having a broad-spectrum AHL substrate specificity and intrinsic resistance to the acid conditions of the shrimp intestine. Purified recombinant AiiA inhibited vibrio biofilm development in a cover slip assay and significantly attenuated infection and mortality in shrimps reared in a recirculation aquaculture system. Investigation of intestinal samples also showed that AiiA treatment also reduced vibrio viable counts and biofilm development as determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging. These findings suggest that the B. licheniformis DAHB1 quorum-quenching AiiA might be developed for use as a prophylactic treatment to inhibit or reduce vibrio colonisation and mortality of shrimps in aquaculture. PMID:25060960

  16. Evaluation of bactericidal activity of weakly acidic electrolyzed water (WAEW) against Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yaru; Choi, Kyoo-Duck; Chung, Donghwa; Shin, Il-Shik

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibriovulnificus cause severe foodborne illness in humans; thus, to reduce outbreaks of disease, it is clearly important to reduce food contamination by these pathogens. Although electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water has been reported to exhibit strong bactericidal activities against many pathogens, it has never been tested against V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of weakly acidic electrolyzed water (WAEW), a type of EO water, against V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. Cell suspensions and cell cultures of both pathogens were treated for 30s with sodium hypochlorite solution containing 35mg/L available chlorine concentration (ACC) or WAEW containing 35mg/L ACC. After an initial inoculum of 5.7logCFU/mL, the number of viable V. vulnificus cells was reduced by 2.2 logs after treatment for 60s with sodium hypochlorite solution containing 35mg/L ACC, while no cells survived treatment with WAEW for 30s. Similar results were obtained for V. parahaemolyticus. Under open storage conditions, WAEW maintained bactericidal activities against cell suspensions of both strains after 5weeks but disappeared against cell cultures of the two strains after 5weeks. Under closed storage conditions, however, WAEW maintained bactericidal activities against both cell suspensions and cell cultures of each strain after 5weeks. No cells were detected in the cell suspensions and cultures when the ACC of WAEW was more than 20mg/L and treatment time was greater than 15s. Bactericidal activity of WAEW against V. vulnificus cell culture was reduced when the ACC of WAEW was less than 15mg/L but was maintained in the V. vulnificus cell suspension when the ACC of WAEW was 0.5mg/L. Thus, the bactericidal activity of WAEW was primarily affected by ACC rather than treatment time. Similar results were obtained for V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that WAEW kills these microorganisms more quickly than a chemical product such as sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), even at equivalent ACCs. PMID:20004034

  17. Insights into Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 Response to Artificial Gastric Fluid Stress by Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuejiao; Liu, Taigang; Peng, Xu; Chen, Lanming

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis disease. Once consumed, human acid gastric fluid is perhaps one of the most important environmental stresses imposed on the bacterium. Herein, for the first time, we investigated Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 response to artificial gastric fluid (AGF) stress by transcriptomic analysis. The bacterium at logarithmic growth phase (LGP) displayed lower survival rates than that at stationary growth phase (SGP) under a sub-lethal acid condition (pH 4.9). Transcriptome data revealed that 11.6% of the expressed genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 was up-regulated in LGP cells after exposed to AGF (pH 4.9) for 30 min, including those involved in sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, energy production and protein biosynthesis, whereas 14.0% of the genes was down-regulated, such as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and flagellar biosynthesis genes. In contrast, the AGF stress only elicited 3.4% of the genes from SGP cells, the majority of which were attenuated in expression. Moreover, the number of expressed regulator genes was also substantially reduced in SGP cells. Comparison of transcriptome profiles further revealed forty-one growth-phase independent genes in the AGF stress, however, half of which displayed distinct expression features between the two growth phases. Vibrio parahaemolyticus seemed to have evolved a number of molecular strategies for coping with the acid stress. The data here will facilitate future studies for environmental stresses and pathogenicity of the leading seafood-borne pathogen worldwide. PMID:25490137

  18. Modified a colony forming unit microbial adherence to hydrocarbons assay and evaluated cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm production of Vibrio scophthalmi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio scophthalmi has been considered as an opportunistic pathogen of the flat fish. There is little information available on V. scophthalmi adhesion to the host, an important step in the initial infection process. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a modified Microbial Adherence to H...

  19. Cholera and other vibrio-associated diarrhoeas.

    PubMed

    1980-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in knowledge of Vibrio species and related organisms that are responsible for diarrhoeal diseases, particularly V. cholerae O-Group 1 (epidemic strains), atypical V. cholerae O-Group 1, non-O-Group 1 V. cholerae (non-epidemic strains), V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, and "Group F vibrios". This article reviews the important new information, and identifies gaps in our knowledge, on aspects such as the epidemiology and bacteriology of vibrios, environmental surveillance for V. cholerae O-Group 1, phage and vibriocin typing of V. cholerae, and cholera enterotoxin, and its relevance to pathogenesis, immunity, and vaccine development. In each of these areas priorities for further research are recommended. PMID:6968251

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Vibrios in Farmed Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque Costa, Renata; Araújo, Rayza Lima; Souza, Oscarina Viana; Vieira, Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was determined in 100 strains of Vibrio isolated from the Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp and identified phenotypically. A high antibiotic-resistance index (75%) was observed, with the following phenotypic profiles: monoresistance (n = 42), cross-resistance to ?-lactams (n = 20) and multiple resistance (n = 13). Plasmid resistance was characterized for penicillin (n = 11), penicillin + ampicillin (n = 1), penicillin + aztreonam (n = 1), and ampicillin (n = 1). Resistance to antimicrobial drugs by the other strains (n = 86) was possibly mediated by chromosomal genes. The findings of this study support the conclusion that the cultured shrimps can be vehicles of vibrios resistant to ?-lactam and tetracycline. PMID:25918714

  1. Exposure of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, to antimicrobial compounds affects associated Vibrio bacterial density and development of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    DeLorenzo, M E; Brooker, J; Chung, K W; Kelly, M; Martinez, J; Moore, J G; Thomas, M

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial compounds are widespread, emerging contaminants in the aquatic environment and may threaten ecosystem and human health. This study characterized effects of antimicrobial compounds common to human and veterinary medicine, aquaculture, and consumer personal care products [erythromycin (ERY), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), oxytetracycline (OTC), and triclosan (TCS)] in the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. The effects of antimicrobial treatments on grass shrimp mortality and lipid peroxidation activity were measured. The effects of antimicrobial treatments on the bacterial community of the shrimp were then assessed by measuring Vibrio density and testing bacterial isolates for antibiotic resistance. TCS (0.33 mg/L) increased shrimp mortality by 37% and increased lipid peroxidation activity by 63%. A mixture of 0.33 mg/L TCS and 60 mg/L SMX caused a 47% increase in shrimp mortality and an 88% increase in lipid peroxidation activity. Exposure to SMX (30 mg/L or 60 mg/L) alone and to a mixture of SMX/ERY/OTC did not significantly affect shrimp survival or lipid peroxidation activity. Shrimp exposure to 0.33 mg/L TCS increased Vibrio density 350% as compared to the control whereas SMX, the SMX/TCS mixture, and the mixture of SMX/ERY/OTC decreased Vibrio density 78-94%. Increased Vibrio antibiotic resistance was observed for all shrimp antimicrobial treatments except for the mixture of SMX/ERY/OTC. Approximately 87% of grass shrimp Vibrio isolates displayed resistance to TCS in the control treatment suggesting a high level of TCS resistance in environmental Vibrio populations. The presence of TCS in coastal waters may preferentially increase the resistance and abundance of pathogenic bacteria. These results indicate the need for further study into the potential interactions between antimicrobials, aquatic organisms, and associated bacterial communities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 469-477, 2016. PMID:25348372

  2. Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains

    SciTech Connect

    Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David C; Challacombe, Jean F; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Munik, A C; Chertkov, Olga; Meincke, Linda; Saunders, Elizabeth; Choi, Seon Y; Haley, Bradd J; Taviani, Elisa; Jeon, Yoon - Seong; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jae - Hak; Walters, Ronald A; Hug, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to define pathogenic V. cholerae clones.

  3. In silico prediction of drug targets in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Katara, Pramod; Grover, Atul; Kuntal, Himani; Sharma, Vinay

    2011-10-01

    Identification of potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery, subjected to their validation and drug development. Whole genome sequences of a number of organisms allow prediction of potential drug targets using sequence comparison approaches. Here, we present a subtractive approach exploiting the knowledge of global gene expression along with sequence comparisons to predict the potential drug targets more efficiently. Based on the knowledge of 155 known virulence and their coexpressed genes mined from microarray database in the public domain, 357 coexpressed probable virulence genes for Vibrio cholerae were predicted. Based on screening of Database of Essential Genes using blastn, a total of 102 genes out of these 357 were enlisted as vitally essential genes, and hence good putative drug targets. As the effective drug target is a protein which is only present in the pathogen, similarity search of these 102 essential genes against human genome sequence led to subtraction of 66 genes, thus leaving behind a subset of 36 genes whose products have been called as potential drug targets. The gene ontology analysis using Blast2GO of these 36 genes revealed their roles in important metabolic pathways of V. cholerae or on the surface of the pathogen. Thus, we propose that the products of these genes be evaluated as target sites of drugs against V. cholerae in future investigations. PMID:21174131

  4. The pathogenesis, detection, and prevention of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongzhi; Zhong, Yanfang; Gu, Xiaosong; Yuan, Jun; Saeed, Abdullah F; Wang, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a Gram-negative motile bacterium that inhabits marine and estuarine environments throughout the world, is a major food-borne pathogen that causes life-threatening diseases in humans after the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. The global occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus accentuates the importance of investigating its virulence factors and their effects on the human host. This review describes the virulence factors of V. parahaemolyticus reported to date, including hemolysin, urease, two type III secretion systems and two type VI secretion systems, which both cause both cytotoxicity in cultured cells and enterotoxicity in animal models. We describe various types of detection methods, based on virulence factors, that are used for quantitative detection of V. parahaemolyticus in seafood. We also discuss some useful preventive measures and therapeutic strategies for the diseases mediated by V. parahaemolyticus, which can reduce, to some extent, the damage to humans and aquatic animals attributable to V. parahaemolyticus. This review extends our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of V. parahaemolyticus mediated by virulence factors and the diseases it causes in its human host. It should provide new insights for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of V. parahaemolyticus infection. PMID:25798132

  5. Differential thiol-based switches jumpstart Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Zhigang; Naseer, Nawar; Xiang, Fu; Kan, Biao; Goulian, Mark; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize gene expression versatility to adapt to environmental changes. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, encounters redox potential changes when it transitions from oxygen-rich aquatic reservoirs to the oxygen-limiting human gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that the virulence regulator AphB uses thiol-based switches to sense the anoxic host environment and transcriptionally activate the key virulence activator tcpP. Here, by performing a high-throughput transposon sequencing screen in vivo, we identified OhrR as another regulator that enables V. cholerae rapid anoxic adaptation. Like AphB, reduced OhrR binds to and regulates the tcpP promoter. OhrR and AphB displayed differential dynamics in response to redox potential changes: OhrR is reduced more rapidly than AphB. Furthermore, OhrR thiol modification is required for rapid activation of virulence and successful colonization. This reveals a mechanism whereby bacterial pathogens employ posttranslational modifications of multiple transcription factors to sense and adapt to dynamic environmental changes. PMID:26748713

  6. Genetic characterization of trh positive Vibrio spp. isolated from Norway

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Anette B.; Olsen, Jaran S.; Granum, Per E.; Rørvik, Liv M.; González-Escalona, Narjol

    2013-01-01

    The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) genes are carried by most virulent Vibrio parahaemolyticus serovars. In Norway, trh+ V. parahaemolyticus constitute 4.4 and 4.5% of the total number of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and water, respectively. The trh gene is located in a region close to the gene cluster for urease production (ure). This region was characterized in V. parahaemolyticus strain TH3996 and it was found that a nickel transport operon (nik) was located between the first gene (ureR) and the rest of the ure cluster genes. The organization of the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster in the Norwegian trh+ isolates was unknown. In this study, we explore the gene organization within the trh-ureR-nik-ure cluster for these isolates. PCR analyses revealed that the genes within the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster of Norwegian trh+ isolates were organized in a similar fashion as reported previously for TH33996. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationship among these trh+ isolates was investigated using Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST). Analysis by MLST or ureR-trh sequences generated two different phylogenetic trees for the same strains analyzed, suggesting that ureR-trh genes have been acquired at different times in Norwegian V. parahaemolyticus isolates. MLST results revealed that some pathogenic and non-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates in Norway appear to be highly genetically related. PMID:24400227

  7. Vibrio cholerae Hemagglutinin/Protease Degrades Chironomid Egg Masses

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Malka; Gancz, Hanan; Broza, Meir; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2003-01-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by specific serogroups of Vibrio cholerae that are pathogenic to humans. The disease does not persist in a chronic state in humans or animals. The pathogen is naturally present as a free-living organism in the environment. Recently, it was suggested that egg masses of the nonbiting midge Chironomus sp. (Diptera) harbor and serve as a nutritive source for V. cholerae, thereby providing a natural reservoir for the organism. Here we report that V. cholerae O9, O1, and O139 supernatants lysed the gelatinous matrix of the chironomid egg mass and inhibited eggs from hatching. The extracellular factor responsible for the degradation of chironomid egg masses (egg mass degrading factor) was purified from V. cholerae O9 and O139 and was identified as the major secreted hemagglutinin/protease (HA/P) of V. cholerae. The substrate in the egg mass was characterized as a glycoprotein. These findings show that HA/P plays an important role in the interaction of V. cholerae and chironomid egg masses. PMID:12839800

  8. ?-Hydroxyketone Synthesis and Sensing by Legionella and Vibrio

    PubMed Central

    Tiaden, André; Hilbi, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria synthesize and sense low molecular weight signaling molecules, termed autoinducers, to measure their population density and community complexity. One class of autoinducers, the ?-hydroxyketones (AHKs), is produced and detected by the water-borne opportunistic pathogens Legionella pneumophila and Vibrio cholerae, which cause Legionnaires’ disease and cholera, respectively. The “Legionella quorum sensing” (lqs) or “cholera quorum sensing” (cqs) genes encode enzymes that produce and sense the AHK molecules “Legionella autoinducer-1” (LAI-1; 3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) or cholera autoinducer-1 (CAI-1; 3-hydroxytridecane-4-one). AHK signaling regulates the virulence of L. pneumophila and V. cholerae, pathogen-host cell interactions, formation of biofilms or extracellular filaments, expression of a genomic “fitness island” and competence. Here, we outline the processes, wherein AHK signaling plays a role, and review recent insights into the function of proteins encoded by the lqs and cqs gene clusters. To this end, we will focus on the autoinducer synthases catalysing the biosynthesis of AHKs, on the cognate trans-membrane sensor kinases detecting the signals, and on components of the down-stream phosphorelay cascade that promote the transmission and integration of signaling events regulating gene expression. PMID:22736983

  9. The pathogenesis, detection, and prevention of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongzhi; Zhong, Yanfang; Gu, Xiaosong; Yuan, Jun; Saeed, Abdullah F.; Wang, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a Gram-negative motile bacterium that inhabits marine and estuarine environments throughout the world, is a major food-borne pathogen that causes life-threatening diseases in humans after the consumption of raw or undercooked seafood. The global occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus accentuates the importance of investigating its virulence factors and their effects on the human host. This review describes the virulence factors of V. parahaemolyticus reported to date, including hemolysin, urease, two type III secretion systems and two type VI secretion systems, which both cause both cytotoxicity in cultured cells and enterotoxicity in animal models. We describe various types of detection methods, based on virulence factors, that are used for quantitative detection of V. parahaemolyticus in seafood. We also discuss some useful preventive measures and therapeutic strategies for the diseases mediated by V. parahaemolyticus, which can reduce, to some extent, the damage to humans and aquatic animals attributable to V. parahaemolyticus. This review extends our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of V. parahaemolyticus mediated by virulence factors and the diseases it causes in its human host. It should provide new insights for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of V. parahaemolyticus infection. PMID:25798132

  10. Protein A-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for separation of Vibrio cholerae from water samples.

    PubMed

    Huy, Tran Quang; Van Chung, Pham; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Thanh, Nguyen Th Kim

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen separation is of great significance for precise detection and prevention of disease outbreaks. For the first time, protein A conjugated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was prepared for pathogen separation at low concentrations from liquid samples. Vibrio cholerae O1 (VO1) bacteria were used for testing the effectiveness of this conjugate. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to confirm the presence of captured VO1. The results showed that, after binding with a specific antibody, the conjugate allows separation of VO1 bacteria from water samples at a concentration as low as 10 cfu mL(-1). Moreover, the conjugate can be used in parallel with conventional or modern diagnostic tests for quick and accurate detection of pathogens. PMID:25421572

  11. Inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in oysters by high-hydrostatic pressure and mild heat.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mu; Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2012-10-01

    Several recent outbreaks associated with oysters have heightened safety concerns of raw shellfish consumptions, with the majority being attributed to Vibrio spp. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) followed by mild heating on the inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in live oysters. Inoculated oysters were randomly subjected to: a) pressurization at 200-300 MPa for 2 min at 21 °C, b) mild heat treatment at 40, 45 or 50 °C for up to 20 min and c) pressure treatment of 200-300 MPa for 2 min at 21 °C followed by heat treatment at 40-50 °C. Counts of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus were then determined using the most probable number (MPN) method. Pressurization at 200-300 MPa for 2 min resulted in various degrees of inactivation, from 1.2 to >7 log MPN/g reductions. Heat treatment at 40 and 45 °C for 20 min only reduced V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus by 0.7-2.5 log MPN/g while at 50 °C for 15 min achieved >7 log MPN/g reduction. HHP and mild heat had synergistic effects. Combinations such as HHP at 250 MPa for 2 min followed by heat treatment at 45 °C for 15 min and HHP at 200 MPa for 2 min followed by heat treatment at 50 °C for 5 min reduced both V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus to non-detectable levels by the MPN method (<3 MPN/g). HHP at ?275 MPa for 2 min followed by heat treatment at 45 °C for 20 min and HHP at ?200 MPa for 2 min followed by heat treatment at 50 °C for 15 min completely eliminated both pathogens in oysters (negative enrichment results). This study demonstrated the efficiency of HHP followed by mild heat treatments on inactivation of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus and could help the industry to establish parameters for processing oysters. PMID:22850390

  12. Effect of the addition of four potential probiotic strains on the survival of pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) following immersion challenge with Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; Rojas-Luna, Tyrone; Cunningham, David P

    2007-10-01

    Four bacterial strains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of adult shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, Vibrio alginolyticus UTM 102, Bacillus subtilis UTM 126, Roseobacter gallaeciensis SLV03, and Pseudomonas aestumarina SLV22, were evaluated for potential use as probiotics for shrimp. In vitro studies demonstrated antagonism against the shrimp-pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus PS-017. Feeding shrimp with diets containing the potential probiotics showed the best feed conversion ratio in comparison with the control groups. After feeding with the potential probiotics for 28 days, challenge by immersion indicated effectiveness at reducing disease caused by V. parahaemolyticus in shrimp. PMID:17544437

  13. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERAE INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association, or modification of antecedent growth conditions. During the course of investigating a major water-borne Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA inv...

  14. Occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus in retail raw oysters from the eastern coast of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Changchai, Nuttawee; Saunjit, Sudarat

    2014-05-01

    Occurrence, population density and virulence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in 240 retail raw oysters collected monthly between March 2010 and February 2011 from Ang Sila coast, Chon Buri Province, Thailand were determined using most probable number (MPN) multiplex PCR. Multiplex PCR detected V. parahaemolyticus in 219 raw oyster samples, of which 29 samples contained the virulence tdh. MPN values for V. parahaemolyticus and pathogenic strains in most samples ranged from 10 to 10(2) and from 3 to 10 MPN/g, respectively. The presence of V. vulnificus was found in 53 oyster samples in amounts between 10 and 10(2) MPN/g. Of 1,087 V. parahaemolyticus isolates, 14 and 2 isolates carried tdh and virulence trh, respectively but none with both genes. However, none of the presumptive isolates was shown to be V. vulnificus. The detection of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus in raw oysters has rendered high awareness of risk in consumption of raw or undercooked oysters. PMID:24974651

  15. Prevalence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oyster and clam culturing environments in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Ting; Jong, Koa-Jen; Lin, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Shing-en; Tey, Yao Hsien; Wong, Hin-chung

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most prevalent gastroenteritis pathogen in Taiwan and some other Asian countries, and it frequently occurs in oysters and other seafood. This study monitors changes in the density of V. parahaemolyticus and environmental parameters in oyster and hard clam aquacultural environments in Taiwan. Water, sediment and shellfish samples were collected from five sampling sites in 2008-2010, and analyzed for environmental physiochemical parameters, numbers of indicator bacteria (total aerobic counts, total coliforms and fecal coliforms), Vibrio and V. parahaemolyticus present. The results for open oyster farms and hard clam ponds did not differ significantly. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 77.5, 77.5, 70.8 and 68.8% of the water, sediment, oyster and clam samples, respectively. The densities of V. parahaemolyticus were significantly higher in shellfish than in sediment or water samples, with mean values of 1.33, 1.04 and -0.02 Log CFU/g, respectively. Among these five sampling sites, Shengang and Fangyuan yielded significantly different data from those obtained at the other three sites. As determined by linear multiple regression, V. parahaemolyticus density in water samples depended significantly on the precipitation and Vibrio count, while the V. parahaemolyticus density in the sediment or shellfish samples depended significantly on the salinity of the seawater. Among 1076 isolates examined, a total of three putative pathogenic isolates were identified from 2.5% of the examined samples, and these isolates exhibited hemolytic or urease activities and the presence of gene markers for tdh, trh, type III secretion system (T3SS) 1 (vcrD1) or T3SS2? (vcrD2). The results herein may facilitate the assessment of risk associated with this pathogen in Taiwan and other geographically similar regions. PMID:23290223

  16. Temperature affects c-di-GMP signalling and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Loni; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-11-01

    Biofilm formation is crucial to the environmental survival and transmission of Vibrio cholerae, the facultative human pathogen responsible for the disease cholera. During its infectious cycle, V.?cholerae experiences fluctuations in temperature within the aquatic environment and during the transition between human host and aquatic reservoirs. In this study, we report that biofilm formation is induced at low temperatures through increased levels of the signalling molecule, cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP). Strains harbouring in frame deletions of all V.?cholerae genes that are predicted to encode diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) were screened for their involvement in low-temperature-induced biofilm formation and Vibrio polysaccharide gene expression. Of the 52 mutants tested, deletions of six DGCs and three PDEs were found to affect these phenotypes at low temperatures. Unlike wild type, a strain lacking all six DGCs did not exhibit a low-temperature-dependent increase in c-di-GMP, indicating that these DGCs are required for temperature modulation of c-di-GMP levels. We also show that temperature modulates c-di-GMP levels in a similar fashion in the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not in the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. This study uncovers the role of temperature in environmental regulation of biofilm formation and c-di-GMP signalling. PMID:25684220

  17. Probiont niche specialization contributes to additive protection against Vibrio owensii in spiny lobster larvae.

    PubMed

    Goulden, Evan F; Hall, Michael R; Pereg, Lily L; Baillie, Brett K; Høj, Lone

    2013-02-01

    The development of efficient probiotic application protocols for use in marine larviculture relies on comprehensive understanding of pathogen-probiont-host interactions. The probiont combination of Pseudoalteromonas sp. PP107 and Vibrio sp. PP05 provides additive protection against vectored Vibrio owensii DY05 infection in larvae (phyllosomas) of ornate spiny lobster, Panulirus ornatus. Here, fluorescently tagged strains were used to demonstrate niche specialization of these probionts in both the live feed vector organism Artemia and in phyllosomas. The pathogen was vulnerable to direct interaction with PP05 in the bacterioplankton as well as in the Artemia gut and the phyllosoma foregut and midgut gland. In contrast, PP107 was localized on external surfaces of Artemia and phyllosomas, and direct interaction with the pathogen was limited to the bacterioplankton. While PP107 was the overall dominant ectobiont on the phyllosoma cephalothorax and inner leg segments, PP05 was the primary colonizer of outer leg segments, nutrient-rich locales that may promote ingestion during feeding. This study shows that niche specialization can contribute to the additive probiotic effect of a probiotic mixture and highlights that probiotic enrichment of Artemia cultures can intercept the infection cycle of V. owensii DY05 in early-stage P. ornatus phyllosomas. PMID:23757129

  18. Ingestion of bacteria overproducing DnaK attenuates Vibrio infection of Artemia franciscana larvae.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yeong Yik; Dhaene, Till; Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; MacRae, Thomas H; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Feeding of bacterially encapsulated heat shock proteins (Hsps) to invertebrates is a novel way to limit Vibrio infection. As an example, ingestion of Escherichia coli overproducing prokaryotic Hsps significantly improves survival of gnotobiotically cultured Artemia larvae upon challenge with pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. The relationship between Hsp accumulation and enhanced resistance to infection may involve DnaK, the prokaryotic equivalent to Hsp70, a major molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells. In support of this proposal, heat-stressed bacterial strains LVS 2 (Bacillus sp.), LVS 3 (Aeromonas hydrophila), LVS 8 (Vibrio sp.), GR 8 (Cytophaga sp.), and GR 10 (Roseobacter sp.) were shown in this work to be more effective than nonheated bacteria in protecting gnotobiotic Artemia larvae against V. campbellii challenge. Immunoprobing of Western blots and quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the amount of DnaK in bacteria and their ability to enhance larval resistance to infection by V. campbellii are correlated. Although the function of DnaK is uncertain, it may improve tolerance to V. campbellii via immune stimulation, a possibility of significance from a fundamental perspective and also because it could be applied in aquaculture, a major method of food production. PMID:19373565

  19. Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

  20. Ingestion of bacteria overproducing DnaK attenuates Vibrio infection of Artemia franciscana larvae

    PubMed Central

    Dhaene, Till; Defoirdt, Tom; Boon, Nico; MacRae, Thomas H.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Feeding of bacterially encapsulated heat shock proteins (Hsps) to invertebrates is a novel way to limit Vibrio infection. As an example, ingestion of Escherichia coli overproducing prokaryotic Hsps significantly improves survival of gnotobiotically cultured Artemia larvae upon challenge with pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. The relationship between Hsp accumulation and enhanced resistance to infection may involve DnaK, the prokaryotic equivalent to Hsp70, a major molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells. In support of this proposal, heat-stressed bacterial strains LVS 2 (Bacillus sp.), LVS 3 (Aeromonas hydrophila), LVS 8 (Vibrio sp.), GR 8 (Cytophaga sp.), and GR 10 (Roseobacter sp.) were shown in this work to be more effective than nonheated bacteria in protecting gnotobiotic Artemia larvae against V. campbellii challenge. Immunoprobing of Western blots and quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the amount of DnaK in bacteria and their ability to enhance larval resistance to infection by V. campbellii are correlated. Although the function of DnaK is uncertain, it may improve tolerance to V. campbellii via immune stimulation, a possibility of significance from a fundamental perspective and also because it could be applied in aquaculture, a major method of food production. PMID:19373565

  1. Development of a rapid and simple immunochromatographic assay to identify Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Junko; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Iwasaki, Tadashi; Kumeda, Yuko

    2015-09-01

    To rapidly and simply determine whether or not bacterial colonies growing on agar were Vibrio parahaemolyticus, we developed an immunochromatographic assay (VP-ICA) using two different monoclonal antibodies (designated mAb-VP34 and mAb-VP109) against the delta subunit of V. parahaemolyticus-F0F1 ATP synthase. The epitopes recognized by mAb-VP34 and mAb-VP109 were mapped to sequences of eight ((47)LLTSSFSA(54)) and six amino acid residues ((16)FDFAVD(21)), respectively. An amino acid sequence similarity search of the NCBI database using BLASTP showed that both epitopic amino acid sequences were present together only in V. parahaemolyticus. When 124 V. parahaemolyticus strains and 94 strains of 27 other Vibrio species or 35 non-Vibrio species were tested using the VP-ICA, the VP-ICA identified V. parahaemolyticus with 100% accuracy. The VP-ICA rapidly and simply identified the pathogen directly from a single agar colony within 30 min, indicating that VP-ICA will greatly reduce labor and time required to identify V. parahaemolyticus compared with conventional biochemical tests. PMID:26093260

  2. The Outer Surface Lipoprotein VolA Mediates Utilization of Exogenous Lipids by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Pride, Aaron C.; Herrera, Carmen M.; Guan, Ziqiang; Giles, David K.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous work from our laboratory showed that the Gram-negative aquatic pathogen Vibrio cholerae can take up a much wider repertoire of fatty acids than other Gram-negative organisms. The current work elaborated on the ability of V. cholerae to exploit an even more diverse pool of lipid nutrients from its environment. We have demonstrated that the bacterium can use lysophosphatidylcholine as a metabolite for growth. Using a combination of thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, we also showed that lysophosphatidylcholine-derived fatty acid moieties can be used for remodeling the V. cholerae membrane architecture. Furthermore, we have identified a lysophospholipase, VolA (Vibrio outer membrane lysophospholipase A), required for these activities. The enzyme is well conserved in Vibrio species, is coexpressed with the outer membrane fatty acid transporter FadL, is one of very few surface-exposed lipoprotein enzymes to be identified in Gram-negative bacteria and the first instance of a surface lipoprotein phospholipase. We propose a model whereby the bacterium efficiently couples the liberation of fatty acid from lysophosphatidylcholine to its subsequent metabolic uptake. An expanded ability to scavenge diverse environmental lipids at the bacterial surface increases overall bacterial fitness and promotes homeoviscous adaptation through membrane remodeling. PMID:23674613

  3. Extracellular nucleases and extracellular DNA play important roles in Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Fengler, Vera H I; Roier, Sandro; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are a preferred mode of survival for many microorganisms including Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe secretory diarrhoeal disease cholera. The ability of the facultative human pathogen V. cholerae to form biofilms is a key factor for persistence in aquatic ecosystems and biofilms act as a source for new outbreaks. Thus, a better understanding of biofilm formation and transmission of V. cholerae is an important target to control the disease. So far the Vibrio exopolysaccharide was the only known constituent of the biofilm matrix. In this study we identify and characterize extracellular DNA as a component of the Vibrio biofilm matrix. Furthermore, we show that extracellular DNA is modulated and controlled by the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. Our results indicate that extracellular DNA and the extracellular nucleases are involved in diverse processes including the development of a typical biofilm architecture, nutrient acquisition, detachment from biofilms and the colonization fitness of biofilm clumps after ingestion by the host. This study provides new insights into biofilm development and transmission of biofilm-derived V. cholerae. PMID:22032623

  4. Essential role for estrogen in protection against Vibrio vulnificus-induced endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Merkel, S M; Alexander, S; Zufall, E; Oliver, J D; Huet-Hudson, Y M

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the underlying mechanisms that result in a sexually dimorphic response to Vibrio vulnificus endotoxic shock. V. vulnificus is a gram-negative bacterium, considered one of the most invasive and rapidly fatal human pathogens known. However, 85% of individuals that develop endotoxic shock from V. vulnificus are males. Using the rat, we have developed a model for V. vulnificus endotoxic shock that mimics the sexually dimorphic response in humans. Gonadectomy in females results in increased mortality, and estrogen replacement results in decreased mortality in both gonadectomized males and females. These results demonstrate that estrogen is providing protection against V. vulnificus lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock. PMID:11553550

  5. Sulfonamides with Potent Inhibitory Action and Selectivity against the ?-Carbonic Anhydrase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    By using N-?-acetyl-l-lysine or GABA scaffolds and the conversion of the terminal amino group to the guanidine one, benzenesulfonamides incorporating water solubilizing moieties were synthesized. The new compounds were medium potency inhibitors of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms I and II, and highly effective, nanomolar inhibitors of the pathogenic bacterial ?-CA from Vibrio cholerae. These sulfonamides possess good selectivity for inhibiting the bacterial over the mammalian isoforms and may be used as tools to understand the role of bacterial CAs in pathogenesis. PMID:25050173

  6. Invasive Vibrio cholerae non-O1 non-0139 infection in a thalassemic child.

    PubMed

    Punpanich, Warunee; Sirikutt, Pugpen; Waranawat, Naris

    2011-08-01

    Invasive, extra-intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 is rare especially among children. Herein the authors report a 12-year-old girl with underlying beta-thalassemia status post-splenectomy presenting with V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 gastroenteritis with concomitant septicemia. The pathogen was identified from stool and blood culture and the patient recovered uneventfully after antimicrobial and supportive therapy. A review and comparison of clinical manifestations and outcomes with the previous four cases of invasive V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 in postsplenectomy thalassemic pediatric patients is reported. PMID:22043781

  7. Permanent draft genome sequence of Vibrio tubiashii strain NCIMB 1337 (ATCC19106).

    SciTech Connect

    Temperton, B.; Thomas, S.; Tait, K.; Parry, H.; Emery, M.; Allen, M.; Quinn, J.; McGrath, J.; Gilbert, J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii NCIMB 1337 is a major and increasingly prevalent pathogen of bivalve mollusks, and shares a close phylogenetic relationship with both V. orientalis and V. coralliilyticus. It is a Gram-negative, curved rod-shaped bacterium, originally isolated from a moribund juvenile oyster, and is both oxidase and catalase positive. It is capable of growth under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome and annotation. The genome is 5,353,266 bp long, consisting of two chromosomes, and contains 4,864 protein-coding and 86 RNA genes.

  8. Subversion of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Larissa D.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to a notably high number of pathogenic microbes and is a broad innate immune response that effectively contributes to restriction of pathogen replication and generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of these platforms leads to caspase-1- and/or caspase-11-dependent secretion of proteins, including cytokines, and induction of a specific form of cell death called pyroptosis, which directly or indirectly contribute for restriction of pathogen replication. Not surprisingly, bona fide intracellular pathogens developed strategies for manipulation of cell death to guarantee intracellular replication. In this sense, the remarkable advances in the knowledge of the inflammasome field have been accompanied by several reports characterizing the inhibition of this platform by several pathogenic bacteria. Herein, we review some processes used by pathogenic bacteria, including Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Francisella tularensis, Shigella flexneri, Legionella pneumophila, and Coxiella burnetii to evade the activation of the inflammasome and the induction of pyroptosis. PMID:24324933

  9. A medium for presumptive identification of Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, M; Martínez-Picado, J; Jofre, J; Blanch, A R

    1994-01-01

    A medium (VAM) for differentiation of Vibrio anguillarum is described. The presence of bile salts, the high pH, and the high NaCl concentration select mainly for Vibrio species. The high salinity and the ampicillin select for a fraction of Vibrio species, and sorbitol fermentation differentiates among those vibrios still able to grow. One hundred ninety-seven of 227 strains of V. anguillarum were identified with this medium. Only 3 of 66 strains of Vibrio that were not V. anguillarum or V. anguillarum-like were recognized with this medium, and any of 7 non-Vibrio strains related to fish diseases or Escherichia coli grew on the medium. It is our contention that the medium described here constitutes an efficient instrument for presumptive detection of V. anguillarum in pathological and environmental samples. PMID:8017947

  10. Daily variations in pathogenic bacterial populations in a monsoon influenced tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Khandeparker, Lidita; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar; Naik, Sneha D; Gaonkar, Chetan C

    2015-07-15

    Changing climatic conditions have influenced the monsoon pattern in recent years. Variations in bacterial population in one such tropical environment were observed everyday over two years and point out intra and inter annual changes driven by the intensity of rainfall. Vibrio spp. were abundant during the monsoon and so were faecal coliforms. Vibrio alginolyticus were negatively influenced by nitrate, whereas, silicate and rainfall positively influenced Vibrio parahaemolyticus numbers. It is also known that pathogenic bacteria are associated with the plankton. Changes in the abundance of plankton, which are governed mainly by environmental changes, could be responsible for variation in pathogenic bacterial abundance during monsoon, other than the land runoff due to precipitation and influx of fresh water. PMID:25956443

  11. Freshwater non-O1 Vibrio cholerae infection.

    PubMed

    Walker, Eric; Carpenter, John; Plemmons, Robert; Fader, Robert

    2010-10-01

    It is not appreciated by most physicians that vibrio infections can be acquired from freshwater exposure. A case of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae urinary tract infection associated with freshwater exposure is reported. The potential for vibrios to grow in brachish water and for summer heat to cause evaporation leading to relative increased salinity in freshwater bodies and the broad geographic range of these occurrences to include North American and both eastern and western Europe is noted. A literature review of vibrio infection acquired from freshwater exposure and the relationship to these epidemiologic and pathophysiologic events is discussed. PMID:20818301

  12. Applied studies on the viability of El Tor vibrios*

    PubMed Central

    Pesigan, T. P.; Plantilla, J.; Rolda, M.

    1967-01-01

    The viability of El Tor vibrios was tested at various temperatures in foodstuffs, kitchen utensils, and water after these materials had been directly contaminated with stools of cholera patients or carriers from the Philippines, collected in 1963-64. The period of survival of vibrios in foodstuffs was 2-5 days at room temperature (30°C-32°C) and as long as 9 days under refrigeration (5°C-10°C). Vibrios survived even longer in refrigerated water. The period of survival was shorter for all materials contaminated with carriers' stools, which contain fewer vibrios. Chlorinated lime was more effective than potassium permanganate as a decontaminant. PMID:4870081

  13. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cholera caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cholera caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  15. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  16. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  17. Studies on diseased freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii infected with Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Sharshar, Kh M; Azab, E A

    2008-09-01

    The present study was aimed at isolation and characterization of the pathogenic bacterium from diseased freshwater prawn. The effect of the bacterial pathogen on hepatopancreas, gills and exoskeleton was also investigated. Diseased freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii were collected from commercial hatchery in Behera Governorate, Egypt. The diseased prawn showed dark brown focal lesions and necrosis of appendage tips. The causative bacterial pathogen was isolated from haemolymph and hepatopancreas of the diseased prawn. Based on the morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics, in addition EPI 20E test, the isolated pathogen was characterized as Vibrio vulnificus. Histopathology, hepatopancreas showed haemocytic infiltration in the interstitial sinuses, thickening and ruptures of the basal lamina and necrosis of its tubules. Similarly, the accumulation of haemocytes in the haemocoelic space, swelling, fusion of lamellae and abnormal gill tips. Also, the cuticular layers of the exoskeleton of diseased prawn had a rough or wrinkled surface and were disrupted and separated from the epidermis. The pathogen, V. vulnificus showed different degrees of sensitivity to different antimicrobial agents. It was highly sensitive to each of the antibiotics rifadin, virbamycin, oflaxcin, garamycin, flummox and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxzole) and resistant to nalidixic acid, unasyn, velosef, claforan, negram and amoxicillin. The minimal inhibitory concentration of trimethoprin/sulfamethoxzole for the studied pathogen, V. vulnificus was 0.31/5.93 microg. PMID:19266922

  18. Effect of water treatment on the growth potential of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, Aina Charlotte; Tryland, Ingun; Østensvik, Øyvin; Secic, Indira; Monshaugen, Marte; Liltved, Helge

    2013-02-01

    In laboratory experiments we added Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus to bottles with seawater previously treated by filtration, UV, chlorine or ozone. The purpose was to investigate the influence of different treatment techniques on the growth potential of these bacteria in simulated ballast water tanks. Residual oxidants were removed before inoculation, and the bottles were incubated at 21 ± 1 °C. The growth potential of the vibrios was investigated in two different experimental setups, i.e. in presence and absence of added natural microorganisms. In general, V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus rapidly lost their culturability after inoculation and storage in untreated seawater, but showed increased survival or growth in the treated water. Highest growth was observed in water previously exposed to high concentrations of ozone. Addition of natural microorganisms reduced the growth of V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23127287

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  20. Infections caused by halophilic marine Vibrio bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R J; Bennett, N T

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors reviewed patients who developed sepsis or soft tissue infections caused by marine Vibrio bacteria in Florida. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Marine Vibrio bacteria are the most common bacteria found in seawater. They are concentrated in marine animals that feed by filtration such as oysters and clams. These bacteria can cause gastroenteritis, sepsis, cellulitis leading to necrotizing soft tissue infection after exposure to seawater or consumption of raw seafood. METHODS: The authors received 182 systemic infections that occurred in Florida between January 1, 1979, and December 31, 1991, which were treated by the authors or were reported to the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they presented with primary bacteremia or soft tissue infection. RESULTS: Seventy-one patients had been exposed to these bacteria by eating raw seafood, 94 had direct exposure to seawater, and exposure was uncertain in 27 patients. Vibrio species were cultured from the blood of 103 patients and from wounds or soft tissues of 113. An additional 5 patients had cellulitis but bacteria were not cultured from these sites. In patients in whom it could be determined, 93 had primary soft tissue infections and 82 had primary bacteremia. Twenty-four patients had necrotizing soft tissue infections and required surgical debridement. Three of these 24 patients required amputation. Thirty-seven (20.3%) patients died. Severe liver disease occurred in 54 patients and 25 of these patients died. CONCLUSIONS: Marine Vibrio bacteria can cause sepsis and soft tissue infections, especially in individuals with severe liver disease and other chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. The authors believe all individuals, especially those with systemic illness, should be warned against eating raw seafood. Images Figure 1. PMID:8489315

  1. Antimicrobial Effects of Blueberry, Raspberry, and Strawberry Aqueous Extracts and their Effects on Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Hazim O; Kamimoto, Maki; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial effects of aqueous extracts of blueberry, raspberry, and strawberry on 13 pathogenic bacteria were evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the extracts were determined before and after neutralization to pH?7.03 ± 0.15. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria were selectively inhibited by the non-neutralized berries. Blueberry was the best inhibitor, and Vibrio and Listeria were the most sensitive bacteria. After neutralization, blueberry affected only Vibrio and Listeria, whereas the antimicrobial activities of raspberry and strawberry were abolished. The total contents of phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins in the extracts were measured with colorimetric methods and were highest in strawberry, followed by raspberry, and then blueberry. We also studied the effects of sub-bactericidal concentrations of the three berry extracts on virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the three berry extracts effectively repressed the transcription of the tcpA gene. Raspberry also repressed the transcription of the ctxA gene, whereas blueberry and strawberry did not. However, the three berry extracts did not affect the transcription of toxT. These results suggest that the three berry extracts exert potent antimicrobial effects and inhibit the expression of the virulence factors of V. cholerae. PMID:26292998

  2. Characterization of htrB and msbB mutants of the light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Adin, Dawn M; Phillips, Nancy J; Gibson, Bradford W; Apicella, Michael A; Ruby, Edward G; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Hall, Daniel B; Stabb, Eric V

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial lipid A is an important mediator of bacterium-host interactions, and secondary acylations added by HtrB and MsbB can be critical for colonization and virulence in pathogenic infections. In contrast, Vibrio fischeri lipid A stimulates normal developmental processes in this bacterium's mutualistic host, Euprymna scolopes, although the importance of lipid A structure in this symbiosis is unknown. To further examine V. fischeri lipid A and its symbiotic function, we identified two paralogs of htrB (designated htrB1 and htrB2) and an msbB gene in V. fischeri ES114 and demonstrated that these genes encode lipid A secondary acyltransferases. htrB2 and msbB are found on the Vibrio "housekeeping" chromosome 1 and are conserved in other Vibrio species. Mutations in htrB2 and msbB did not impair symbiotic colonization but resulted in phenotypic alterations in culture, including reduced motility and increased luminescence. These mutations also affected sensitivity to sodium dodecyl sulfate, kanamycin, and polymyxin, consistent with changes in membrane permeability. Conversely, htrB1 is located on the smaller, more variable vibrio chromosome 2, and an htrB1 mutant was wild-type-like in culture but appeared attenuated in initiating the symbiosis and was outcompeted 2.7-fold during colonization when mixed with the parent. These data suggest that htrB2 and msbB play conserved general roles in vibrio biology, whereas htrB1 plays a more symbiosis-specific role in V. fischeri. PMID:18065606

  3. Assessing the function of STAS domain protein SypA in Vibrio fischeri using a comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Cecilia M.; Visick, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the squid Euprymna scolopes by Vibrio fischeri requires biofilm formation dependent on the 18-gene symbiosis polysaccharide locus, syp. One key regulator, SypA, controls biofilm formation by an as-yet unknown mechanism; however, it is known that SypA itself is regulated by SypE. Biofilm-proficient strains form wrinkled colonies on solid media, while sypA mutants form biofilm-defective smooth colonies. To begin to understand the function of SypA, we used comparative analyses and mutagenesis approaches. sypA (and the syp locus) is conserved in other Vibrios, including two food-borne human pathogens, Vibrio vulnificus (rbdA) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (sypAVP). We found that both homologs could complement the biofilm defect of the V. fischeri sypA mutant, but their phenotypes varied depending on the biofilm-inducing conditions used. Furthermore, while SypAVP retained an ability to be regulated by SypE, RbdA was resistant to this control. To better understand SypA function, we examined the biofilm-promoting ability of a number of mutant SypA proteins with substitutions in conserved residues, and found many that were biofilm-defective. The most severe biofilm-defective phenotypes occurred when changes were made to a conserved stretch of amino acids within a predicted ?-helix of SypA; we hypothesize that this region of SypA may interact with another protein to promote biofilm formation. Finally, we identified a residue required for negative control by SypE. Together, our data provide insights into the function of this key biofilm regulator and suggest that the SypA orthologs may play similar roles in their native Vibrio species. PMID:26284045