Science.gov

Sample records for pathologic gerd diagnosed

  1. GERD

    MedlinePlus

    ... carries food from your mouth to your stomach. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) happens when a muscle at the end of ... more than twice a week, you may have GERD. You can also have GERD without having heartburn. ...

  2. Diagnostic work-up of GERD.

    PubMed

    Vela, Marcelo F

    2014-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is frequently diagnosed by symptoms and good response to acid suppression with proton pump inhibitors. Further work up is required when the diagnosis of GERD is uncertain, for alarm symptoms, PPI-refractoriness, and often for extraesophageal presentations. Useful tools include endoscopy for mucosal assessment and reflux monitoring (pH or impedance-pH) to quantify reflux burden. Objective documentation of pathological reflux is mandatory prior to anti-reflux surgery. In some patients, symptoms that can be attributed to GERD may have other causes; in these patients, testing that excludes GERD helps direct the diagnostic and treatment efforts to other causes. PMID:25216910

  3. Defining GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    "It is not the death of GERD that I seek, but that it turns from its evil ways and follows the path of righteousness." The reflux world is fully aware of what GERD is and what GERD does. What the world does not know, however, is the answer to the most important yet least asked question surrounding GERD's raison-d'etre: Why is GERD here and why do we have it? What GERD is: abnormal gastric reflux into the esophagus that causes any type of mischief. What GERD does: causes discomfort and/or pain with or without destroying the mucosa; causes stricture or stenosis, preventing food from being swallowed; sets the stage for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; invades the surrounding lands to harass the peaceful oropharyngeal, laryngeal and broncho-pulmonary territories; reminds us that we are not only human, but that we are dust and ashes. Why GERD is here: We propose three separate and distinct etiologies of GERD, and we offer the following three hypotheses to explain why, after 1.5 million years of standing erect, we have evolved into a species (specifically Homosapiens sapiens) that is destined to live with the scourge of GERD. Hypothesis 1: congenital. The antireflux barrier, comprising the smooth-muscled lower esophageal sphincter, the skeletal-muscled right crural diaphragm and the phreno-esophageal ligament does not completely develop due to a developmental anomaly or incomplete gestation. Hypothesis 2: acute trauma: The antireflux barrier in adults suffering acute traumatic injury to the abdomen or chest is permanently disrupted by unexpected forces, such as motor vehicle accidents (with steering wheel crush impact), blows to the abdomen (from activities such as boxing, etc.), heavy lifting or moving (e.g., pianos, refrigerators) or stress positions (e.g., hand stands on parallel gym bars). The trauma creates a hiatal hernia that renders the antireflux mechanism useless and incapable of preventing GERD. Hypothesis 3: chronic trauma: The antireflux barrier

  4. Barrett’s esophagus: Prevalence and risk factors in patients with chronic GERD in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser M; Makhlouf, Madiha M; Tawfik, Heba M; Amin, Hussein El; Ghany, Wael Abdel; El-khayat, Hisham R

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and possible risk factors of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in El Minya and Assuit, Upper Egypt. METHODS: One thousand consecutive patients with chronic GERD symptoms were included in the study over 2 years. They were subjected to history taking including a questionnaire for GERD symptoms, clinical examination and upper digestive tract endoscopy. Endoscopic signs suggestive of columnar-lined esophagus (CLE) were defined as mucosal tongues or an upward shift of the squamocolumnar junction. BE was diagnosed by pathological examination when specialized intestinal metaplasia was detected histologically in suspected CLE. pH was monitored in 40 patients. RESULTS: BE was present in 7.3% of patients with chronic GERD symptoms, with a mean age of 48.3 ± 8.2 years, which was significantly higher than patients with GERD without BE (37.4 ± 13.6 years). Adenocarcinoma was detected in eight cases (0.8%), six of them in BE patients. There was no significant difference between patients with BE and GERD regarding sex, smoking, alcohol consumption or symptoms of GERD. Patients with BE had significantly longer esophageal acid exposure time in the supine position, measured by pH monitoring. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of BE in patients with GERD who were referred for endoscopy was 7.3%. BE seems to be associated with older age and more in patients with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:19630106

  5. Diagnosing and treating common oral pathologies.

    PubMed

    Dilley, D C; Siegel, M A; Budnick, S

    1991-10-01

    When the physician is confronted with an oral pathologic condition in a child, the adage "common things happen commonly" should be applied. Congenital lesions such as palatal and alveolar cysts occur in almost 50% of newborns. Developmental conditions such as Fordyce granules and retrocuspid papillae are found in most children. Localized soft-tissue enlargements commonly seen in young children include the parulis, mucocele, papilloma, and inflammatory gingival tumors. In addition, soft-tissue pathologies and discomfort associated with herpesvirus infections or recurrent aphthous ulcerations often present as a chief complaint. The physician's knowledge and treatment recommendations for common oral pathologies should be an integral component to the overall medical management of infants, children, and adolescents. PMID:1886744

  6. Spinocerebellar degeneration: Discrepancies between clinical and pathological diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsunori; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Makifuchi, Takao; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of sporadic spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD), we assessed the clinical and pathological data of 1494 consecutive autopsy cases. The number of patients who received a diagnosis of sporadic SCD (including multiple system atrophy) either clinically or pathologically was 19 (1.3%). We identified six cases with clinical misdiagnoses of SCD that were confirmed pathologically as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, four cases), basilar artery thrombosis (one case) and unclassified tauopathy (one case). The total number of patients who received a clinical diagnosis of sporadic SCD was 93 and the positive predictive value was 93.5%. We also identified 13 autopsy cases that were pathologically confirmed as SCD, but had been clinically misdiagnosed as having other disorders. Their clinical diagnoses comprised progressive supranuclear palsy (five cases) and Parkinson's disease (PD, four cases), as well as parkinsonism with dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, paraneoplastic syndrome and multiple cerebral infarction (one case each). The results indicate that it is often difficult to distinguish PSP and PD from SCD, because of the atypical combination of symptoms or atypical timing of the appearance of symptoms, such as severe autonomic failure, cognitive impairment, poor L-dopa responsiveness, early cerebellar signs and obvious vertical gaze palsy. PMID:26556659

  7. Management of paediatric GERD.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2014-03-01

    Paediatric GERD is complicated to manage, as symptoms are diverse and often difficult to interpret. In infants, regurgitation is a common physiological condition. Nevertheless, when it occurs frequently (>4 times per day) and causes the infant distress, parents often seek medical help. In children 2-10 years of age, GERD is often considered to cause extra-oesophageal symptoms, despite the absence of hard evidence. Diagnostic investigations often lack solid validation and the signs and symptoms of GERD overlap with those of cow's milk protein allergy and eosinophillic oesophagitis. Reassurance, dietary treatment and positional adaptations are recommended for troublesome infant reflux. Anti-acid medication, mainly PPIs, is over-used in infants even though, in many children, reflux is not an acid-related condition. Moreover, evidence is increasing that PPIs cause adverse events such as gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections. Management in children older than 10 years is similar to that in adults. Using prokinetics to treat nonerosive reflux disease remains only a promising theoretical concept, as no such molecule is currently available. Today, the adverse effects of each prokinetic molecule largely outweigh its potential benefit. Laparoscopic surgery is indicated in children who have life-threatening symptoms or in cases of drug dependence. PMID:24126561

  8. Integrated pathology reporting, indexing, and retrieval system using natural language diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Moore, G W; Boitnott, J K; Miller, R E; Eggleston, J C; Hutchins, G M

    1988-01-01

    Pathology computer systems are making increasing use of natural language diagnoses. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions integrated pathology reporting system, a commercial product with extensive, locally added enhancements, covers all information management functions within autopsy and surgical pathology divisions and has on-line linkages to clinical laboratory reports and the medical library's Mini-MEDLINE system. All diagnoses are written in natural language, using a word processor and spelling checker. A security system with personal passwords and different levels of access for different staff members allows reports to be signed out with an electronic signature. The system produces financial reports, overdue case reports, and Boolean searches of the database. Our experience with 128,790 consecutively entered pathology reports suggests that the greater precision of natural language diagnoses makes them the most suitable vehicle for follow-up, retrieval, and systems development functions in pathology. PMID:3070549

  9. Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Share Reflux and GERD : Teen GERD Pediatric Acid Reflux and GERD in Teens If you’re ... And here’s the better news: Most kids with acid reflux are able to lead normal, active, healthy ...

  10. Have You Heard of GERD?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be helpful for some people who have GERD. These work by lowering the amount of acid in the ... the stomach empty more quickly. If nothing else works, a person may need surgery to treat GERD, but this isn't done very often. How ...

  11. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  12. Sixty-five thousand shades of gray: importance of color in surgical pathology diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Campbell, W Scott; Talmon, Geoffrey A; Foster, Kirk W; Lele, Subodh M; Kozel, Jessica A; West, William W

    2015-12-01

    Digital whole slide imaging (WSI) is a diagnostic modality that has gained acceptance as a tool for use in some areas of surgical pathology such as remote consultations. Accurate control of color representation of digitally rendered images of histologic sections is considered an important parameter of WSI. Currently, professional societies, physicians, and other stakeholders are in the process of establishing clinical guidelines outlining the use of these devices, which include color integrity and color calibration of scanners and viewing devices. Although color is a component of surgical pathology diagnoses, it was posited that pathologists could accurately diagnose surgical specimens without color. To test this hypothesis, 5 pathologists were presented breast biopsy specimens from 20 patients consisting of 22 separate tissue specimens and WSI of 158 hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides imaged at ×20. No special stains were included. The pathologists reviewed each case using a 16-bit grayscale monitor and rendered a diagnosis for each case. Diagnoses were compared to the original light microscopy diagnoses and scored for concordance. A 92.7% concordance was observed. Discordant diagnoses represented well-known areas of diagnostic disagreement in breast pathology as well as known limitations of WSI. The research demonstrated that surgical pathologists did not rely primarily on color to render accurate diagnoses of breast biopsy cases but rather used architectural features of tissue and cellular morphology to reach a diagnostic conclusion. This research did not suggest that color is an unimportant factor in pathology diagnosis, but its importance may be overstated. PMID:26482606

  13. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005-2014.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Denise O; Oh, Gi-Taik; O'Donnell, Francis L; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition among adults that can cause symptoms such as frequent heartburn, substernal chest pain, and regurgitation of food. During 2005-2014, a total of 137,081 active component service members had an incident (first-ever) diagnosis of GERD (incidence rate: 101.3 per 10,000 person-years). Incidence rates were higher than their respective counterparts among females, black and white non-Hispanics, service members in the Coast Guard and Air Force, officers, and those in healthcare occupations. Rates increased monotonically with increasing age groups. Most GERD cases (79.2%) were uncomplicated GERD; however, 20.8% were identified as having a symptom or complication linked to their GERD diagnosis. Lifestyle changes, medication, and prevention of serious complications should be emphasized among individuals diagnosed with GERD, particularly those at risk for severe disease. PMID:26207411

  14. Emerging therapeutic options in GERD.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Philip; Amarasinghe, Gehanjali; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a prevalent problem resulting in a high level of healthcare consultation and expenditure in the Western World. Although standard medical therapy (in the form of proton pump inhibitor drugs) is effective in the majority of cases, there remains a significant proportion who are refractory to treatment. In addition, surgical therapy (in the form of laparoscopic fundoplication) is not always effective, and in some can be associated with significant side-effects, particularly gas-bloat, flatulence and dysphagia. As such there remains an unmet need in GERD to develop new therapies for refractory cases, and to develop alternatives to fundoplication with fewer side-effects. This article discusses the current state of pharmacological and non-pharmacological emerging therapies for GERD. PMID:23998982

  15. Neuropsychiatric symptom profile differs based on pathology in patients with clinically diagnosed behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Gabriel C; Banks, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is pathologically heterogeneous. With emerging therapeutics, determining underlying pathology during life is increasingly important. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are prevalent and diagnostic in bvFTD. Methods We assessed the neuropsychiatric profile in patients with clinically diagnosed bvFTD as a function of pathology at autopsy. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of bvFTD at initial visit were selected from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database. Neuropsychiatric symptoms endorsed on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire were analyzed. Results Of 149 patients with clinically diagnosed bvFTD, pathology was primarily Alzheimer's disease in 20.5%. These patients differed from those with underlying frontotemporal lobar degeneration: patients with AD pathology (plaques and tangles) were more likely to have hallucinations, delusions, or agitation. Patients were further differentiated into tau positive (30 % of cases, including Pick's disease, frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism with tau-positive, and other tauopathies) or tau-negative (70% of cases including bvFTD tau-negative ubiquitin-positive inclusions). These patients also differed in some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms seen. Tau-negative cases were more likely to demonstrate depression, delusions, and changes in appetite and eating. Conclusions These preliminary findings contribute to our increasing ability to predict, using simple clinical tools the neuropathological underpinnings of bvFTD during life. PMID:24135712

  16. The Use of Visual Arts as a Window to Diagnosing Medical Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2016-01-01

    Observation is a key step preceding diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment. Careful patient observation is a skill that is learned but rarely explicitly taught. Furthermore, proper clinical observation requires more than a glance; it requires attention to detail. In medical school, the art of learning to look can be taught using the medical humanities and especially visual arts such as paintings and film. Research shows that such training improves not only observation skills but also teamwork, listening skills, and reflective and analytical thinking. Overall, the use of visual arts in medical school curricula can build visual literacy: the capacity to identify and analyze facial features, emotions, and general bodily presentations, including contextual features such as clothing, hair, and body art. With the ability to formulate and convey a detailed "picture" of the patient, clinicians can integrate aesthetic and clinical knowledge, helping facilitate the diagnosing of medical pathologies. PMID:27550570

  17. Management of refractory typical GERD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Emidio; Ang, Daphne; Pauwels, Ans; De Santis, Adriano; Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The management of patients with refractory GERD (rGERD) is a major clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. In up to 30% of patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation), acid-suppressive therapy does not provide clinical benefit. In this Review, we discuss the current management algorithm for GERD and the features and management of patients who do not respond to treatment (such as those individuals with an incorrect diagnosis of GERD, inadequate PPI intake, persisting acid reflux and persisting weakly acidic reflux). Symptom response to existing surgical techniques, novel antireflux procedures, and the value of add-on medical therapies (including prokinetics and reflux inhibitors) for rGERD symptoms are discussed. Pharmaceutical agents targeting oesophageal sensitivity, a condition that can contribute to symptom generation in rGERD, are also discussed. Finally, on the basis of available published data and our expert opinion, we present an outline of a current, usable algorithm for management of patients with rGERD that considers the timing and diagnostic use of pH-impedance monitoring on or off PPI, additional diagnostic tests, the clinical use of baclofen and the use of add-on neuromodulators (tricyclic agents and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). PMID:27075264

  18. Secondary malignancies diagnosed using kidney needle core biopsies: a clinical and pathological study of 75 cases.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Tamboli, Pheroze; Karam, Jose A; Vikram, Raghu; Zhang, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Involvement of the kidney by secondary malignancies is uncommon. Differentiating secondary malignancies from primary kidney/urothelial tumors can be challenging, especially on limited biopsy material. A retrospective search of our institutional archive from January 2002 to May 2015 identified 1572 cases of imaging-guided needle core biopsies of the kidney. Of these, 75 (5%) cases revealed a secondary malignancy; 48 (64%) patients had undergone the biopsy with a primary kidney tumor favored clinically. There were 39 male and 36 female patients with a mean age of 59.4 years (range, 21-83 years). The majority of the cases (n = 55, 73%) were metastases from solid tumors, with lung being the most common primary site (n = 22, 29%). Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common hematological malignancy (n = 6) secondarily involving the kidney. Radiographically, 58 (77%) cases presented as a solitary kidney mass. The primary malignancy was known prior to the kidney biopsy in 66 (88%) cases. The mean interval between diagnoses of the primary tumor and secondary involvement of the kidney was 4.5 years. Immunohistochemical stains were performed in 65 (87%) cases. Follow-up information was available for 73 patients; mean survival was 19.4 months, with 43 patients dead of their disease (mean, 12 months) and 30 patients alive at last follow-up (21 with and 9 without disease; mean, 30 months). Secondary malignancy in the kidney may clinically and pathologically mimic primary kidney tumors. Accurate diagnosis can be rendered by correlating pathological features with clinical and radiographic findings and judicious use of ancillary studies. PMID:26980018

  19. GERD (Gastroesophageal Reflux) and LPR (Laryngopharyngeal Reflux)

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat, it causes a reaction similar to squirting lemon juice in your eye. This is why GERD ... of the stomach. Lifestyle factors include diet (chocolate, citrus, fatty foods, spices), destructive habits (overeating, alcohol and ...

  20. Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Login Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Print PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Surgery for “Heartburn” If you suffer from moderate to ...

  1. Critical diagnoses in surgical pathology: a retrospective single-institution study to monitor guidelines for communication of urgent results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric C; Kuo, Frank C; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Nosé, Vânia

    2009-07-01

    Recent attention has shifted toward defining critical values in surgical pathology, as used in clinical pathology for urgent laboratory results, which require immediate physician notification. The Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology recently proposed a schema for critical values in surgical pathology, better defined as critical diagnoses (CDs). To this end, our department established guidelines defining the timely communication and documentation of urgent findings. To monitor policy effectiveness and to refine a customized list of CDs, we analyzed reports over two identical 6-month periods in 2006 and 2007 for the proper documentation and communication of urgent results. Of all the general surgical pathology cases examined, slightly more than 3% were communicated urgently to the requesting physicians. Approximately 20% of those cases fell into one of the recently proposed CD categories, whereas the remaining cases had conditions that were not specified by the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology, but nonetheless justified immediate notification based on local practice, such as graft-versus-host disease, acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis, and unsuspected amyloidosis. Consecutive cases from a 4-day period reviewed in 2006 showed that 23.5% notified cases were not properly documented in the final report. However, the compliance rate improved to 100% for a similar period in 2007. Our study demonstrates the need for any CD list to be customized at a given institution to address all the potential diagnoses necessary for patient care and management. It further shows that continuous monitoring and education with regard to CDs and timely communication and documentation of unexpected surgical pathology findings are important measures for optimizing patient safety. PMID:19390422

  2. A case of advanced systemic sclerosis with severe GERD successfully treated with acotiamide.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryo; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2016-12-01

    The majority of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients have gastrointestinal tract involvement, but therapies of prokinetic agents are usually unsatisfactory. Patients are often compromised by the use of steroid; therefore, a surgical indication including fundoplication has been controversial. There is no report that advanced SSc with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is successfully treated with acotiamide, which is the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor designed for functional dyspepsia (FD). We report a 44-year-old woman of SSc with severe GERD successfully treated with acotiamide. She had received medical treatment in our hospital since 2003. She had been aware of the significant gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (e.g., heartburn, chest pain, and dysphagia) due to the development of esophageal hardening associated with SSc since 2014. As a result of upper gastrointestinal series, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and 24-h pH monitoring and frequency scale for the symptoms of the GERD (FSSG) scoring, she has been diagnosed with GERD associated with SSc. First of all, she started to take prokinetic agents Rikkunshito and mosapride and proton pump inhibitor; there was no change in reflux symptoms. So, we started to prescribe her the acotiamide.After oral administration started, reflux symptoms have been improved. Five months after oral administration, FSSG score, a questionnaire for evaluation of the symptoms of GERD, was improved. Since its introduction of acotiamide, the patient has kept free from symptoms for 6 months. PMID:27072944

  3. GERD is becoming a challenge for the medical profession: is there any remedy?

    PubMed

    Yasawy, Mohammad Ismail; Randhawa, Mohammad Akram

    2014-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is becoming a common and serious problem. Proton pump inhibitors are considered as drugs of choice however, long term use leads to complications. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation inhibitors, i.e., gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor agonists, baclofen, and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists, ADX10059, were tried in resistant cases, but caused central nervous and hepatic side effects, respectively. Irregular dietary habits possess the strongest association with GERD, because intake of food in between meals aggravates gastric distention in upper stomach and generates TLESRs, triggering reflux. During fasting, migrating myoelectrical complex clears stomach of food. Considering relationship between irregular dietary habits and GERD pathophysiology, it is suggested that two regular meals a day with only fluids in between will reduce reflux and lead to healing of inflammation caused by repeated refluxes. Initially, the suggested regimen eliminated symptoms of GERD in 4 cases in 10 days. Later, in a pilot study on 20 patients of endoscopically diagnosed GERD, it benefitted 15 cases; 100% of Los Angles grade ‘a’, 66% of grade ‘b’ and 33% of grade ‘c’. Long term studies are proposed to confirm usefulness of this dietary regimen for management of GERD, alone and in combination with drugs. PMID:25436353

  4. GERD, Barrett's Esophagus and the Risk for Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts About Common Colon Cancer Screening Tests PATIENTS GERD, Barrett's Esophagus and the Risk for Esophageal Cancer ... commonly in Caucasians as well as people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This cancer is increasing in frequency. ...

  5. Method for detecting and diagnosing disease caused by pathological protein aggregation

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Myatt, Elizabeth A.; Solomon, Alan

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting pathological macromolecules in a patient, comprising obtaining body fluid from the patient, pretreating the body fluid, subjecting the pretreated body fluid to size-exclusion chromatography to create an excluded fluid, and analyzing the excluded fluid to detect macromolecules having a predetermined molecular weight. The method also allows for comparing elution spectra with reference spectra of suspect pathologic proteins.

  6. Method for detecting and diagnosing disease caused by pathological protein aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.

    1994-12-31

    A method is provided for detecting pathological macromolecules in a patient, comprising obtaining body fluid from the patient, pretreating the body fluid, subjecting the pretreated body fluid to size-exclusion chromatography to create an excluded fluid, and analyzing the excluded fluid to detect macromolecules having a predetermined molecular weight. The method also allows for comparing elution spectra with reference spectra of suspect pathologic proteins.

  7. Pharmacological management of GERD: where does it stand now?

    PubMed

    Hershcovici, Tiberiu; Fass, Ronnie

    2011-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is very common and advances in drug development over recent years have markedly improved GERD management. A wide range of medications are currently used in GERD treatment, including antacids, Gaviscon, sucralfate, histamine-2 receptor antagonists and prokinetics. However, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) remain the mainstay of treatment for GERD owing to their profound and consistent inhibitory effect on acid secretion. Despite the presence of a wide armamentarium of therapeutic modalities for GERD, many areas of unmet needs remain. Drug development has focused primarily on improving PPI efficacy, reducing the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation rate, attenuating esophageal sensitivity and developing esophageal mucosal protectants. PMID:21429600

  8. Capabilities of OCT in diagnosing pathological processes, functional states, and treatment adequacy in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Chumakov, Yuri; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Sergeev, Alexander M.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of using the optical coherence tomography (OCT) as one of the diagnostic methods at the Department of Gynecology of the Nizhny Novgorod Regional Hospital. An endoscopic OCT device adjusted for gynecological examinations with colposcopy, hysteroscopy and laparoscopy has been developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. It provides clinicians with sharp (up to 15 - 20 micron resolution) images of 1.5 mm thick superficial mucosa layers in the female genital tract, that are recorded at the 0.83 micron wavelength with approximately 1 frame/second rate for a 200 X 200 pixel image. Data obtained during examination of more than 100 patients demonstrate the capability of OCT in estimation of structural alterations in organs, connected with different types of pathologies and functional states of the female genital system. We present first results of OCT application to assess the adequacy of cervical pathologies treatment (electro-, laser surgery and cryotherapy) and to control the healing process.

  9. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  10. [The experience of usage of alginate contain medication in complex therapy at children with GERD disease].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, P L; Lobanov, Iu F; Fugol, D S; Shilova, A V

    2009-01-01

    GERD Therapy at children is complicated task because of Physiological features of a children's body, which reflects on the processes of acid production, motility in upper gastro-intestinal tract and on the metabolism of pharmaceutical products. Some of these medications have age usage limitations due to lack of investigation of side effects in treatment of children. Usage of alginate contain medication in complex therapy of such pathological condition brings to not only fast and effective relief of such symptoms as heartburn, eructation and in positive endoscopy dynamics. PMID:20201310

  11. Distinguishing GERD from eosinophilic oesophagitis: concepts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the detection of oesophageal mucosal eosinophils has transitioned from a biomarker of GERD to a diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). In GERD, oesophageal eosinophils are considered part of the chronic inflammatory response to acid reflux, whereas the marked eosinophilia in EoE is viewed as a central feature of the immune response to ingested food and/or environmental antigen stimulation. Descriptions of a considerable subset of patients with symptomatic, endoscopic and histological findings of EoE that resolve with PPI therapy has led to confusion and controversy regarding the distinction of EoE from GERD. Study findings indicate that PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) more closely resembles EoE than GERD, both from a clinical and immunological aspect. Although responsiveness to PPI therapy should not be utilized to exclude EoE, PPI therapy is effective at reducing oesophageal eosinophilia in ~40% of patients, and PPI therapy is both a safe and practical initial step in the management of patients with oesophageal eosinophilia. Ongoing studies elucidating the mechanism behind PPI-REE will improve our understanding and management of EoE. In this Review, the mechanisms and evidence that underlie the controversy in the distinction between GERD and EoE are evaluated. PMID:25986303

  12. Diagnostic testing in extraesophageal GERD: another case of "furor medicus"?

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Brennan

    2013-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) work for most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). But when PPIs fail to work, or when there are atypical extra-esophageal symptoms, diagnostic and management decisions become much more difficult. Although atypical GERD is common, there are limited data about how best to approach these patients. The temptation is often to perform extensive diagnostic testing, sometimes to little avail. In this issue of The Journal, Francis et al. present a new study to help close the research gap in understanding the costs and benefits of testing in atypical GERD. The authors conclude that diagnostic testing is very expensive and real-life benefits are modest. This editorial reviews the findings, places them into clinical perspective, and concludes that diagnostic testing in atypical GERD may be another example of "furor medicus" - an old but descriptive term referring to the instinct of doctors to implore "don't just stand there, do something!" The data from Francis et al. suggest we might do the opposite in atypical GERD: "Don't just do something, stand there." PMID:23735914

  13. [Medical data in pathology--evaluation of a large collection. (530,000 diagnoses coded in SNOMED II)].

    PubMed

    Baumann, R P

    1999-10-01

    The paper is describing the design and the performance of the computerized system, from its introduction in 1982 until the present day. The first device, using the MUMPS language on a mini-computer, followed by a VAX computer with terminals have been replaced in 1996 by an application program, using ORACLE, based on the client-server concept. The content and the particularities of the different data groups are discussed, concerning the functional components of the data bank: 'PATIENTS', 'SPECIMEN', 'SENDERS', 'REPORT' and 'DIAGNOSES'. By means of examples, we demonstrate the chronological evolution of the registration of persons, the distribution of the diagnoses according to the organ systems, the possibilities to combine various lesions and an algorithm to assure that a given lesion is registered only once per patient. In first place, the efficiency and the reliability of manual coding by a pathologist using the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED; 2nd edition [1979/1982]) is discussed. The data bank currently contains 530,000 diagnoses, distributed among on SNOMED's five main modules, obtained from 1500 autopsies, 140,000 surgical and 180,000 cytological specimens. Concluding the article, an analysis is made of desirable developments in the future with the aim of a better integration of the acquired information in routine work and an enhanced use of the medical content for epidemiological research or statistical analysis. PMID:10582493

  14. The spectrum of changes in adults with multifocal pulmonary neuroendocrine proliferations: what is the minimum set of pathologic criteria to diagnose DIPNECH?

    PubMed

    Marchevsky, Alberto M; Wirtschafter, Eric; Walts, Ann E

    2015-02-01

    Diffuse idiopathic neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) can be difficult to diagnose in resections for lung tumors and other conditions, as variable diagnostic criteria and definitions of "diffuse" and/or "idiopathic" have been used in the literature. We reviewed 70 consecutive lung wedge biopsies and resection specimens with multifocal neuroendocrine cell proliferations (NEP) including neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NECH) and/or carcinoid tumorlets to identify pathologic findings significantly associated with neuroendocrine neoplasms. The presence of pathologic changes other than NEP (eg, interstitial fibrosis, bronchiectasis, others) and the number of tumorlets were recorded to identify "idiopathic NEP." Cases were classified into 4 groups: A: NECH only, B: >1 tumorlet without NECH, C: NECH + 2 tumorlets, and D: NECH + >2 tumorlets. Proportions of neuroendocrine neoplasms and presence/absence of pathologic changes other than NEP were compared by group with χ(2) statistics. Carcinoids were seen in 8 (22.8%) of 35 and in 21 (72.4%) of 29 groups B and D cases, respectively. Of the 21 group D carcinoids, 18 (85.7%) lacked other associated pathologic changes, and the incidence of these tumors in this group was significantly higher (P < .001) than in group B. Three high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas were seen, 1 each in groups A to C. Because group D cases had a significantly higher proportion of carcinoid tumors and a significant lack of association with conditions that could result in secondary NECH, the presence of multifocal NECH combined with 3 or more carcinoid tumorlets is proposed as minimum pathologic criteria for the diagnosis of DIPNECH. PMID:25532694

  15. A 5-Year Retrospective Review of Avian Diseases Diagnosed at the Department of Pathology, University of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, N M; Gonzalez-Astudillo, V; Oesterle, P T; Howerth, E W

    2016-01-01

    Avian samples (n = 827) submitted to the University of Georgia from 2006 to 2011 were reviewed to determine common disease entities and taxa-specific patterns. The study included 153 species, with 64.5% Psittaciformes, 11.3% Passeriformes, 7.9% Galliformes, 3.8% Columbiformes and 3.5% Anseriformes. Infectious agents were identified in 226 birds (27.3%); bacterial infections (n = 119; 14.4%) were most commonly gram-negative bacilli and Chlamydia psittaci and less commonly Mycoplasma and Mycobacterium spp. Mycotic infections (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Candida spp.) were identified in 66 birds (7.9%), followed by viruses in 30 birds (3.6%), most commonly polyomavirus and poxviruses. Eighteen birds had macroparasite infections, which were most common in Galliformes and most often involved gastrointestinal Capillaria spp. Neoplasia was diagnosed in 76 birds (9.2%) of 25 species, with 79% of the tumours deemed to be malignant. The most common neoplasm was lymphoma (n = 17; 22.4%), which was diagnosed in Psittaciformes, Galliformes and Passeriformes. Adenocarcinoma (n = 9) was found most frequently in the reproductive and gastrointestinal tracts. Haematopoietic neoplasms included myelocytoma and erythroid leucosis. Atherosclerosis was most common in psittacines (23/32; 71.8%) and in raptors and aquatic birds. Seventeen birds, mostly psittacines and aquatic birds, had amyloidosis, most often in the liver, kidney and spleen. Twenty-two birds had gout, most commonly the visceral form. Overall, bacterial infection was the most frequently diagnosed cause of death in captive birds, most commonly in Psittaciformes, followed by Passeriformes and Galliformes. Neoplasia was most common in Psittaciformes, which generally are longer lived than other taxa studied. Some disease entities (e.g. atherosclerosis and aspergillosis) may be associated with captive conditions, and some may involve a genetic predisposition (e.g. atherosclerosis, amyloidosis and haemosiderosis). PMID

  16. In GERD patients, mucosal repair associated genes are upregulated in non-inflamed oesophageal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, D R; Ter Linde, J J M; Van Herwaarden, M A; Schwartz, M P; Shephard, P; Geng, M M; Smout, A J P M; Samsom, M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies addressing the effects of acid reflux and PPI therapy on gene expression in oesophageal epithelium concentrated on inflamed tissue. We aimed to determine changes in gene expression in non-inflamed oesophageal epithelium of GERD patients. Therefore, we included 20 GERD patients with pathological total 24-hr acid exposure of 6–12% and SAP ≥ 95%. Ten patients discontinued PPI treatment (PPI-), 10 took pantoprazole 40 mg bid (PPI+). Ten age/sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. Biopsies were taken from non-inflamed mucosa 6 cm and 16 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). Gene expression profiling of biopsies from 6 cm was performed on Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix). Genes exhibiting a fold change >1.4 (t-test P-value < 1E– 4) were considered differentially expressed. Results were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. In PPI- patients, 92 microarray probesets were deregulated. The majority of the corresponding genes were associated with cell–cell contacts, cytoskeletal reorganization and cellular motility, suggesting facilitation of a migratory phenotype. Genes encoding proteins with anti-apoptotic or anti-proliferative functions or stress-protective functions were also deregulated. No probesets were deregulated in PPI+ patients. QPCR analysis of 20 selected genes confirmed most of the deregulations in PPI- patients, and showed several deregulated genes in PPI+ patients as well. In the biopsies taken at 16 cm QPCR revealed no deregulations of the selected genes. We conclude that upon acid exposure, oesophageal epithelial cells activate a process globally known as epithelial restitution: up-regulation of anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant and migration associated genes. Possibly this process helps maintaining barrier function. PMID:19413890

  17. Analysis of C9orf72 repeat expansions in a large series of clinically and pathologically diagnosed cases with atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Schottlaender, Lucia V; Polke, James M; Ling, Helen; MacDoanld, Nicola D; Tucci, Arianna; Nanji, Tina; Pittman, Alan; de Silva, Rohan; Holton, Janice L; Revesz, Tamas; Sweeney, Mary G; Singleton, Andy B; Lees, Andrew J; Bhatia, Kailash P; Houlden, Henry

    2015-02-01

    A GGGGCC repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene was recently identified as a major cause of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. There is suggestion that these expansions may be a rare cause of parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Screening the C9orf72 gene in 37 patients with features of corticobasal syndrome (CBS) detected an expansion in 3 patients, confirmed by Southern blotting. In a series of 22 patients with clinically diagnosed PSP, we found 1 patient with an intermediate repeat length. We also screened for the C9orf72 expansion in a large series of neuropathologically confirmed samples with MSA (n = 96), PSP (n = 177), and CBD (n = 18). Patients were found with no more than 22 GGGGCC repeats. Although these results still need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of CBS and/or CBD patients, these data suggest that in the presence of a family history and/or motor neuron disease features, patients with CBS or clinical PSP should be screened for the C9orf72 repeat expansion. In addition, we confirm that the C9orf72 expansions are not associated with pathologically confirmed MSA, PSP, or CBD in a large series of cases. PMID:25308964

  18. [Analysis of a series of 44 cases of peritoneal tuberculosis diagnosed in the pathology laboratory of the Tokoin teaching hospital of Lomé (1993-2014)].

    PubMed

    Darré, T; Tchaou, M; Sonhaye, L; Patassi, A A; Kanassoua, K; Tchangai, B; Amegbor, K; Napo-Koura, G

    2015-12-01

    It is a descriptive and cross-sectional study on all issues relating to peritoneal tuberculosis histological diagnosed in the pathology department (LAP) of the Lomé Tokoin CHU from January 1993 to December 2014 (20 years). A total of 44 cases of peritoneal tuberculosis were included. They were 18 women and 26 men, with a mean age of 37.6±0.2 years. The circumstances of discovery were dominated by ascites (84.1%), fever (75%), weight loss (63.6%) and abdominal pain (59.1%). The peritoneal involvement was isolated in 31.8% of cases, and associated with pleuropulmonary tuberculosis in 54.5% of cases. Co-infection with HIV was present in 63.9% of cases. Twenty-five patients (69.4%) with information about their social conditions had low socioeconomic level: unemployed (10 cases; 40%), workers (10 cases; 40%) and retired (5 cases; 20%). An increase in cell count was observed in 94.6% of cases. Histology revealed the epithelial giant cell granuloma associated with caseous necrosis in 38 cases (86.4%) and cheesy isolated in 6 patients. Peritoneal tuberculosis is not exceptional in our country. The diagnosis should be considered in febrile ascites, and will be confirmed by laparoscopy with histological samples for a histological diagnosis. PMID:26608272

  19. The analysis of C9orf72 repeat expansions in a large series of clinically and pathologically diagnosed cases with atypical parkinsonism☆

    PubMed Central

    Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Polke, James M.; Ling, Helen; MacDoanld, Nicola D.; Tucci, Arianna; Nanji, Tina; Pittman, Alan; de Silva, Rohan; Holton, Janice L.; Revesz, Tamas; Sweeney, Mary G.; Singleton, Andy B.; Lees, Andrew J.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    A GGGGCC repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene was recently identified as a major cause of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. There is suggestion that these expansions may be a rare cause of parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Screening the C9orf72 gene in 37 patients with features of corticobasal syndrome (CBS) detected an expansion in 3 patients, confirmed by Southern blotting. In a series of 22 patients with clinically diagnosed PSP, we found 1 patient with an intermediate repeat length. We also screened for the C9orf72 expansion in a large series of neuropathologically confirmed samples with MSA (n = 96), PSP (n = 177), and CBD (n = 18). Patients were found with no more than 22 GGGGCC repeats. Although these results still need to be confirmed in a larger cohort of CBS and/or CBD patients, these data suggest that in the presence of a family history and/or motor neuron disease features, patients with CBS or clinical PSP should be screened for the C9orf72 repeat expansion. In addition, we confirm that the C9orf72 expansions are not associated with pathologically confirmed MSA, PSP, or CBD in a large series of cases. PMID:25308964

  20. Treatment Challenges in the Management of Gastroparesis-Related GERD

    PubMed Central

    Fass, Ronnie; McCallum, Richard W.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between gastroparesis and GERD is multi-factorial. The delay in gastric emptying associated with gastroparesis can lead to prolonged gastric retention of food that may have a propensity to reflux. Because gastroparesis allows material to remain in the stomach, there is an increase in the gastroesophageal pressure gradient, gastric volume, and the volume of potential refluxate. Additionally, the prolonged exposure of material in the stomach can increase gastric acid secretion. The onset of gastroparesis has been attributed to several causes, including comorbidities (mainly diabetes), surgical complications, and the use of specific medications (including anticholinergics, narcotics, tricyclic antidepressants, and calcium channel blockers). The etiology of some cases of gastroparesis remain unclear, a condition termed idiopathic gastroparesis. Symptoms commonly associated with gastroparesis or GERD, including nausea, vomiting, and regurgitation, may delay drug absorption. This has the potential to greatly impact systemic absorption and concentration of drugs. Several patient populations may benefit from the use of medication formulations that offer an alternative to swallowing a traditional tablet. In addition, prokinetic drugs, such as metoclopramide, are used in the first-line treatment of gastroparesis to improve the contractility of the gut muscles, as well as the movement of contents through the gastrointestinal system and regulate drug metabolism and absorption.

  1. Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery might help you. How does surgery for GERD work? In a fundoplication, the top part of your ... how well endoscopic treatments (EndoCinch™, Stretta®, and EsophyX™) work to control the symptoms of GERD. What are the side effects of endoscopic treatments? ...

  2. Structural and functional analysis of the GerD spore germination protein of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Jin, Kai; Ghosh, Sonali; Devarakonda, Parvathimadhavi; Carlson, Kristina; Davis, Andrew; Stewart, Kerry-Ann V; Cammett, Elizabeth; Pelczar Rossi, Patricia; Setlow, Barbara; Lu, Min; Setlow, Peter; Hao, Bing

    2014-05-01

    Spore germination in Bacillus species represents an excellent model system with which to study the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional control of growth and development. Binding of specific chemical nutrients to their cognate receptors located in the spore inner membrane triggers the germination process that leads to a resumption of metabolism in spore outgrowth. Recent studies suggest that the inner membrane GerD lipoprotein plays a critical role in the receptor-mediated activation of downstream germination events. The 121-residue core polypeptide of GerD (GerD⁶⁰⁻¹⁸⁰) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus forms a stable α-helical trimer in aqueous solution. The 2.3-Å-resolution crystal structure of the trimer reveals a neatly twisted superhelical rope, with unusual supercoiling induced by parallel triple-helix interactions. The overall geometry comprises three interleaved hydrophobic screws of interacting helices linked by short turns that have not been seen before. Using complementation analysis in a series of Bacillus subtilis gerD mutants, we demonstrated that alterations in the GerD trimer structure have profound effects on nutrient germination. This important structure-function relationship of trimeric GerD is supported by our identification of a dominant negative gerD mutation in B. subtilis. These results and those of others lead us to propose that GerD mediates clustering of germination proteins in the inner membrane of dormant spores and thus promotes the rapid and cooperative germination response to nutrients. PMID:24530795

  3. A prospective longitudinal cohort study: evolution of GERD symptoms during the course of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in pregnancy are reported with a prevalence of 30–80%. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of GERD symptoms during the course of pregnancy. Furthermore current practice in medical care for GERD during pregnancy was assessed. Methods We performed a prospective longitudinal cohort study on 510 pregnant women (mean age 28.12, SD 5.3). Investigations for reflux symptoms where based on the use of validated reflux-disease questionnaire (RDQ). Additional information was collected about the therapy. A group of non-pregnant women (mean age 24.56, SD 5.7) was included as controls. Frequency and severity of reflux symptoms were recorded in each trimester of pregnancy. Results The prevalence of GERD symptoms in pregnant women increased from the first trimester with 26.1 to 36.1% in the second trimester and to 51.2% in the third trimester of pregnancy. The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the control group was 9.3%. Pregnant women received medication for their GERD symptoms in 12.8% during the first, 9.1% during the second and 15.7% during the third trimester. Medications used >90% antacids, 0% PPI. Conclusion GERD symptoms occur more often in pregnant women than in non-pregnant and the frequency rises in the course of pregnancy. Medical therapy is used in a minority of cases and often with no adequate symptom relief. PMID:23006768

  4. Achalasia Previously Diagnosed as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease by Relying on Esophageal Impedance-pH Monitoring: Use of High-Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Children.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Jung Eun; Choi, Da Min; Lee, Jung Hwa; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Shim, Jung Ok

    2015-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD) is the most common esophageal disorder in children. Achalasia occurs less commonly but has similar symptoms to GERD. A nine-year old boy presented with vomiting, heartburn, and nocturnal cough. The esophageal impedance-pH monitor revealed nonacidic GERD (all-refluxate clearance percent time of 20.9%). His symptoms persisted despite medical treatment for GERD, and he was lost to follow up. Four years later, he presented with heartburn, solid-food dysphagia, daily post-prandial vomiting, and failure to thrive. Endoscopy showed a severely dilated esophagus with candidiasis. High-resolution manometry was performed, and he was diagnosed with classic achalasia (also known as type I). His symptoms resolved after two pneumatic dilatation procedures, and his weight and height began to catch up to his peers. Clinicians might consider using high-resolution manometry in children with atypical GERD even after evaluation with an impedance-pH monitor. PMID:25866734

  5. Diagnosis and Anti-Reflux Therapy for GERD with Respiratory Symptoms: A Study Using Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance-pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jimin; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Gao, Xiang; Liang, Weitao; Liu, Diangang; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhonggao

    2016-01-01

    Stretta procedure (0 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.006). Conclusions MII-pH monitoring effectively detected respiratory-related predictive parameters, including total/proximal reflux episodes and symptom correlations. We found that GERD patients with respiratory symptoms exhibited more proximal and total reflux episodes but not more acid-related episodes, as determined by MII-pH monitoring. Thus, such monitoring could be useful for diagnosing atypical GERD patients with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, LTF exhibited a more significant effect on controlling typical symptoms in all GERD patients and reducing the recurrence rate than the Stretta procedure in patients with respiratory symptoms. PMID:27532103

  6. Hepatic angiomyolipoma: a series of six cases with emphasis on pathological-radiological correlations and unusual variants diagnosed by core needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Agaimy, Abbas; Vassos, Nikolaos; Croner, Roland S; Strobel, Deike; Lell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic angiomyolipoma is rare and may pose differential diagnostic difficulty, particularly if encountered in core needle biopsy. We studied 6 cases from 5 males and one female (median age, 48.6 yrs). All presented with non-specific symptoms or an incidentally discovered tumor mass. Two patients had a remote history of chemotherapy for hematological neoplasms (acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Hodgkin lymphoma respectively) and another had clear cell renal cell carcinoma and anaplastic pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed at autopsy without definable syndrome. None of the patients had evidence of the tuberous sclerosis complex or renal or other extra-renal angiomyolipoma. Three tumors were resected completely and three have been only biopsied and followed up. None of the resected cases recurred at a mean follow-up of 35 months. Histologically, tumors were classified as classical triphasic (1), lipomatous (2), epithelioid/oncocytoid (1), epithelioid trabecular (1) and myelolipoma-like (1). The adjacent liver parenchyma was normal in 3 cases, showed pigment cirrhosis in one case and mild fatty change in another case. One case had clinically diagnosed but histologically unverified cirrhosis. The initial diagnostic impression/frozen section was misleading in 5 of the cases and included vascular lesion, focal fatty change, myelolipoma, hepatocellular tumor and oncocytic neoplasm. All tumors expressed HMB45 and variably desmin. One epithelioid lesion expressed HMB45 and TFE3, but lacked desmin expression. In conclusion, hepatic angiomyolipomas are increasingly recognized as incidental findings during surveillance for cirrhosis or investigations for unrelated conditions. Awareness of their diverse morphological spectrum in liver biopsy is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis as hepatocellular carcinoma, metastatic melanoma or other malignant neoplasms. PMID:22949933

  7. Getting Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in ...

  8. Proton pump inhibitor step-down therapy for GERD: A multi-center study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Takao; Okada, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Takenaka, Ryuta; Nasu, Junichiro; Ishioka, Hidehiko; Fujiwara, Akiko; Yoshinaga, Fumiya; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the predictors of success in step-down of proton pump inhibitor and to assess the quality of life (QOL). METHODS: Patients who had heartburn twice a week or more were treated with 20 mg omeprazole (OPZ) once daily for 8 wk as an initial therapy (study 1). Patients whose heartburn decreased to once a week or less at the end of the initial therapy were enrolled in study 2 and treated with 10 mg OPZ as maintenance therapy for an additional 6 mo (study 2). QOL was investigated using the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale (GSRS) before initial therapy, after both 4 and 8 wk of initial therapy, and at 1, 2, 3, and 6 mo after starting maintenance therapy. RESULTS: In study 1, 108 patients were analyzed. Their characteristics were as follows; median age: 63 (range: 20-88) years, sex: 46 women and 62 men. The success rate of the initial therapy was 76%. In the patients with successful initial therapy, abdominal pain, indigestion and reflux GSRS scores were improved. In study 2, 83 patients were analyzed. Seventy of 83 patients completed the study 2 protocol. In the per-protocol analysis, 80% of 70 patients were successful for step-down. On multivariate analysis of baseline demographic data and clinical information, no previous treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) [odds ratio (OR) 0.255, 95% CI: 0.06-0.98] and a lower indigestion score in GSRS at the beginning of step-down therapy (OR 0.214, 95% CI: 0.06-0.73) were found to be the predictors of successful step-down therapy. The improved GSRS scores by initial therapy were maintained through the step-down therapy. CONCLUSION: OPZ was effective for most GERD patients. However, those who have had previous treatment for GERD and experience dyspepsia before step-down require particular monitoring for relapse. PMID:21472108

  9. Is the advanced age a contraindication to GERD laparoscopic surgery? Results of a long term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this prospective non randomized observational cohort study we have evaluated the influence of age on outcome of laparoscopic total fundoplication for GERD. Methods Six hundred and twenty consecutive patients underwent total laparoscopic fundoplication for GERD. Five hundred and twenty-four patients were younger than 65 years (YG), and 96 patients were 65 years or older (EG). The following parameters were considered in the preoperative and postoperative evaluation: presence, duration, and severity of GERD symptoms, presence of a hiatal hernia, manometric and 24 hour pH-monitoring data, duration of operation, incidence of complications and length of hospital stay. Results Elderly patients more often had atypical symptoms of GERD and at manometric evaluation had a higher rate of impaired esophageal peristalsis in comparison with younger patients. The duration of the operation was similar between the two groups. The incidence of intraoperative and postoperative complications was low and the difference was not statistically significant between the two groups. An excellent outcome was observed in 93.0% of young patients and in 88.9% of elderly patients (p = NS). Conclusions Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is a safe and effective treatment for GERD even in elderly patients, warranting low morbidity and mortality rates and a significant improvement of symptoms comparable to younger patients. PMID:24267613

  10. Understanding GERD

    MedlinePlus

    ... heartburn: chocolate, coffee, peppermint, greasy or spicy foods, tomato products and alcoholic beverages. * Stop smoking. Tobacco inhibits saliva, which is the body’s major buffer. Tobacco may also stimulate stomach acid production and relax the muscle between the esophagus ...

  11. Adult and paediatric GERD: diagnosis, phenotypes and avoidance of excess treatments.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, Kornilia; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Detailed investigations and objective measurements in patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux should be performed with the intent of making the correct diagnosis, thus enabling choice of appropriate therapy. Establishing the most effective therapy is particularly important in adults who do not respond to standard treatment and in children. The use of PPIs for suspected GERD has increased substantially over the past decade, providing great relief in patients with acid-related symptoms, but also leading to adverse effects and a considerable economic burden. Adults with functional heartburn do not benefit from PPIs, while prolonged PPI use in patients with extraoesophageal symptoms remains a controversial area. Moreover, PPIs are not indicated in infants with GERD unless symptoms are proven to be acid-related. With regard to antireflux surgery, patients must be carefully selected to avoid the need for ongoing PPI treatment postoperatively. Correct diagnosis and phenotyping of patients with symptoms attributed to gastro-oesophageal reflux through detailed investigations is therefore imperative, leading to improved patient outcomes and rationalized use of available treatment options. In this Review, we outline currently available diagnostic tests and discuss approaches to limit any unnecessary medical or surgical interventions. PMID:27485786

  12. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  13. 314 GERD Screening by the Use of F-Scale and Allergy Screening for Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Cough

    PubMed Central

    Nishihira, Ryuichi; Komatsu, Shigeru; Shinohara, Takeshi; Tagawa, Akihiro; Ogura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergy and gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD) are main causes of chronic cough, and simple, easy and rapid screening is desired for diagnosis of these symptoms. We used F-scale (Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD: FSSG) for GERD screening, developed by Japanese gastro-enterologist, did general allergy screenings, and investigated clinical outcome after treatment retrospectively. Methods GERD was screened by F-scale questionnaire, composed in twelve questions concerned with reflux symptoms, and scored 5 grades in each symptom. General allergy screening was defined as asking history of allergy, serum immnogloblin E (IgE) test (total, fourteen kinds of specific allergens) and measuring fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO),its positive range was greater than or equal to 20 ppb. Allergy positive was defined as at least one positive finding of allergy screening test. GERD was treated with proton pump inhibitor (PPI), and allergy was treated with inhaled corticosteroid or histamine H1 receptor blocker or leukotriene receptor antagonist. Results Fifty-four consecutive chronic cough patients were screened in GERD and general allergy screening. Thirty-seven patients (69%) were F-scale positive and 43 patients (80%) were positive in general allergy screening. Thirty patients (56%) were positive in both F-scale and general allergy screening. All patients were treated with allergy medicine or PPI, or both medicines. In all patients screened and treated with both GERD and allergy concurrently, cough improved within 2 weeks, and in patients whose positive finding was either GERD or allergy, cough improved by treatment with PPI or allergy drugs similarly. Delayed screening or treatment of either GERD or allergy was related to delayed improvement of cough. Cough finally improved in all patients in visit within 3 times. Conclusions In examination of chronic cough, adding GERD screening by use of F-scale to general allergy screening is beneficial to proper diagnosis

  14. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  15. Evaluation of anti-GERD activity of gastro retentive drug delivery system of itopride hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Satapathy, Trilochan; Panda, Prasana K; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2010-08-01

    The present work describes the formulation and evaluation of the gastroretentive system of Itopride hydrochloride. In this research, we have formulated floating hydrogel-based microspheres employing calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) as a gas forming agent dispersed in alginate matrix. In vitro characterizations such as drug content, particle size, and drug release were carried out. GI motility was determined by administration of charcoal meal to rats. Results demonstrated that prepared microspheres were spherical in shape with smooth surface, good loading efficiency, and excellent buoyancy. The gastro retentive dosage form of itiopride demonstrated significant antacid, anti-ulcer, and anti-GERD activity after 12 hours in comparison with the conventional dosage form. PMID:20515421

  16. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. PMID:26037607

  17. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  18. Recommendations for pathology peer review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Daniel; Sellers, Rani S; Barale-Thomas, Erio; Bolon, Brad; George, Catherine; Hardisty, Jerry F; Irizarry, Armando; McKay, Jennifer S; Odin, Marielle; Teranishi, Munehiro

    2010-12-01

    Pathology peer review verifies and improves the accuracy and quality of pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Pathology peer review is recommended when important risk assessment or business decisions are based on nonclinical studies. For pathology peer review conducted before study completion, the peer-review pathologist reviews sufficient slides and pathology data to assist the study pathologist in refining pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Materials to be reviewed are selected by the peer-review pathologist. Consultations with additional experts or a formal (documented) pathology working group may be used to resolve discrepancies. The study pathologist is solely responsible for the content of the final pathology data and report, makes changes resulting from peer-review discussions, initiates the audit trail for microscopic observations after all changes resulting from peer-review have been made, and signs the final pathologist's report. The peer-review pathologist creates a signed peer-review memo describing the peer-review process and confirming that the study pathologist's report accurately and appropriately reflects the pathology data. The study pathologist also may sign a statement of consensus. It is not necessary to archive working notes created during the peer-review process. PMID:20924082

  19. Surgical treatment of GERD. Comperative study of WTP vs. Toupet fundoplication – results of 151 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Nowosad, Małgorzata; Krawczyk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is recognized as one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The best choice of management for advanced GERD is laparoscopic surgery. Aim To compare and evaluate the results of surgical treatment of GERD patients operated on using two different techniques. Material and methods Between 2001 and 2012, 353 patients (211 female and 142 male), aged 17–76 years (mean 44), underwent laparoscopic antireflux surgery. The study included patients who underwent a Toupet fundoplication or Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure (WTP). Results The mean age of the group was 47.77 years (17–80 years). Forty-nine (32.45%) patients had severe symptoms, 93 (61.58%) had mild symptoms and 9 (5.96%) had a single mild but intolerable sign of GERD. Eighty-six (56.95%) patients had a Toupet fundoplication and 65 (43.04%) had a WTP. The follow-up period was 18–144 months. The average operating time for Toupet fundoplication and the WTP procedure was 164 min (90–300 min) and 147 min (90–210 min), respectively. The perioperative mortality rate was 0.66%. The average post-operative hospitalization period was 5.4 days (2–16 post-operative days (POD) = Toupet) vs. 4.7 days (2–9 POD = WTP). No reoperations were performed. No major surgical complications were identified. Conclusions Wroblewski Tadeusz procedure due to a low percentage of post-operative complications, good quality of life of patients and a zero recurrence rate of hiatal hernia should be a method of choice. PMID:27458484

  20. Potential mechanism of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in Helicobacter pylori-positive patients with GERD

    PubMed Central

    Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbates corpus atrophic gastritis in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. To identify a potential mechanism for this change, we discuss interactions between pH, bile acids, and H. pylori. Duodenogastric reflux, which includes bile, occurs in healthy individuals, and bile reflux is increased in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diluted human plasma and bile acids have been found to be significant chemoattractants and chemorepellents, respectively, for the bacillus H. pylori. Although only taurine conjugates, with a pKa of 1.8-1.9, are soluble in an acidic environment, glycine conjugates, with a pKa of 4.3-5.2, as well as taurine-conjugated bile acids are soluble in the presence of PPI therapy. Thus, the soluble bile acid concentrations in the gastric contents of patients with GERD after continuous PPI therapy are considerably higher than that in those with intact acid production. In the distal stomach, the high concentration of soluble bile acids is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori. In contrast, the mucous layer in the proximal stomach has an optimal bile concentration that forms chemotactic gradients with plasma components required to direct H. pylori to the epithelial surface. H. pylori may then colonize in the stomach body rather than in the pyloric antrum, which may explain the occurrence of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in H. pylori-positive patients with GERD. PMID:25232231

  1. Partial versus Complete Fundoplication for the Correction of Pediatric GERD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glen, Peter; Chassé, Michaël; Doyle, Mary-Anne; Nasr, Ahmed; Fergusson, Dean A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is no consensus as to what extent of “wrap” is required in a fundoplication for correction of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Objective To evaluate if a complete (360 degree) or partial fundoplication gives better control of GERD. Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE and Scopus identified interventional and observational studies of fundoplication in children. Screening identified those comparing techniques. The primary outcome was recurrence of GERD following surgery. Dysphagia and complications were secondary outcomes of interest. Meta-analysis was performed when appropriate. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Results 2289 abstracts were screened, yielding 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 12 retrospective cohort studies. The RCTs were pooled. There was no difference in surgical success between partial and complete fundoplication, OR 1.33 [0.67,2.66]. In the 12 cohort studies, 3 (25%) used an objective assessment of the surgery, one of which showed improved outcomes with complete fundoplication. Twenty-five different complications were reported; common were dysphagia and gas-bloat syndrome. Overall study quality was poor. Conclusions The comparison of partial fundoplication with complete fundoplication warrants further study. The evidence does not demonstrate superiority of one technique. The lack of high quality RCTs and the methodological heterogeneity of observational studies limits a powerful meta-analysis. PMID:25386679

  2. Autopsy pathology storage and coding by microcomputer.

    PubMed

    Talamo, T S; Losos, F J; Kessler, G F

    1982-02-01

    Storage and coding of anatomic pathology data usually is accomplished by expensive main frame systems. The authors of this article have developed a microcomputer based program package for autopsy pathology which stores patient demographic data, provisional or final anatomic diagnoses, and coded diagnoses obtained from an on-line Systematized Nomenclature of Pathology (SNOP) code lexicon. The system includes limited text editor functions as well as rapid data retrieval with the generation of final reports. Data files containing SNOP codes and diagnoses are searched easily by a variety of parameters, making data retrieval of autopsy material simple and efficient. PMID:10254292

  3. Clinical and pathological correlations in endometrial pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Sajin, M; Furtunescu, F; Bohîlțea, LC; Mihart, A; Baros, A; Anca, AF

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rate of endometrial cancer has been registering an increasing trend both in Romania and in the whole world. The paper’s aim is to analyze the diagnostic approach of endometrial pathology in the University Emergency Hospital Bucharest, on a four years period. The medium age of the patients was of 50.51 ± 10.924 years, and the median age was of 48 years. The youngest patient suffering from endometrial cancer was of 30 years. Dilation and uterine curettage represent the main method used in the performance of endometrial biopsy, based on which the certitude etiologic histopathologic diagnosis was established in 68.4% of the patients with endometrial pathology. Hyperplasias represented half of the pathology (54.9%), most of them being without atypias. Endometrial carcinoma was identified in 19% of the patients. The diagnosis of the disease in IA stage represents 5.5% of the total endometrial cases and the diagnosis of the disease in the stage of its limitation to the uterus (stage IA, IB and IC) was of 64.2%. The endometrioid adenocarcinoma represents the most encountered histopathological form and the degree of tumor differentiation established for 68,15% of the cases was predominantly 1 and 2 (88%). The main symptom, which determines the patients’ decision to go to the physician, is the abnormal uterine bleeding. 66% of the cases of endometrial cancer in the stage of the disease limited to the uterus are diagnosed in Romania based on the abnormal uterine bleeding. However, 34% of the cases are diagnosed in advanced stages, presenting a significantly low life expectancy. PMID:26664489

  4. Gaucher's disease diagnosed by splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Adas, Mine; Adas, Gokhan; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Altiok, Merih; Ozcan, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    Context: Splenectomy continues to find common therapeutic indications for hematologic disorders. In addition, recently it is also performed in surgical clinics to assist diagnose of some illnesses. Gaucher's disease, especially Type I, is the most frequently encountered lysosomal storage disorder in man. Manifestations of it are highly variable. The most frequently found symptoms include splenomegaly with anaemia and thrombocytopenia, mostly due to hypersplenism, hepatomegaly and bone disease. Cases: Four patients were reported in the present study. Three of them were easily diagnosed with Gaucher's disease via bone marrow cytology, and one with Gaucher's disease was detected by pathological examination following the splenectomy. Conclusions: For the pouse of diagnosis of the Gaucher's disease, performing surgery is generally not necessary. However, for the cases of difficult to diagnose by classical methods, the corect diagnosis of Gaucher's disease can only be made by a special operation. PMID:22666685

  5. Time esophageal pH < 4 overestimates the prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Lauren B; Triadafilopoulos, George; Sahbaie, Peyman; Young, Winston; Sloan, Sheldon; Robinson, Malcolm; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2008-01-01

    Background A Stanford University study reported that in asymptomatic GERD patients who were being treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), 50% had pathologic esophageal acid exposure. Aim We considered the possibility that the high prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux might simply have resulted from calculating acidity as time pH < 4. Methods We calculated integrated acidity and time pH < 4 from the 49 recordings of 24-hour gastric and esophageal pH from the Stanford study as well as from another study of 57 GERD subjects, 26 of whom were treated for 8 days with 20 mg omeprazole or 20 mg rabeprazole in a 2-way crossover fashion. Results The prevalence of pathologic 24-hour esophageal reflux in both studies was significantly higher when measured as time pH < 4 than when measured as integrated acidity. This difference was entirely attributable to a difference between the two measures during the nocturnal period. Nocturnal gastric acid breakthrough was not a useful predictor of pathologic nocturnal esophageal reflux. Conclusion In GERD subjects treated with a PPI, measuring time esophageal pH < 4 will significantly overestimate the prevalence of pathologic esophageal acid exposure over 24 hours and during the nocturnal period. PMID:18498663

  6. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics.

  7. Detection of peripheral nerve pathology

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Michael J.; Baker, Jonathan C.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy of ultrasound and MRI for detecting focal peripheral nerve pathology, excluding idiopathic carpal or cubital tunnel syndromes. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients referred for neuromuscular ultrasound to identify patients who had ultrasound and MRI of the same limb for suspected brachial plexopathy or mononeuropathies, excluding carpal/cubital tunnel syndromes. Ultrasound and MRI results were compared to diagnoses determined by surgical or, if not performed, clinical/electrodiagnostic evaluation. Results: We identified 53 patients who had both ultrasound and MRI of whom 46 (87%) had nerve pathology diagnosed by surgical (n = 39) or clinical/electrodiagnostic (n = 14) evaluation. Ultrasound detected the diagnosed nerve pathology (true positive) more often than MRI (43/46 vs 31/46, p < 0.001). Nerve pathology was correctly excluded (true negative) with equal frequency by MRI and ultrasound (both 6/7). In 25% (13/53), ultrasound was accurate (true positive or true negative) when MRI was not. These pathologies were typically (10/13) long (>2 cm) and only occasionally (2/13) outside the MRI field of view. MRI missed multifocal pathology identified with ultrasound in 6 of 7 patients, often (5/7) because pathology was outside the MRI field of view. Conclusions: Imaging frequently detects peripheral nerve pathology and contributes to the differential diagnosis in patients with mononeuropathies and brachial plexopathies. Ultrasound is more sensitive than MRI (93% vs 67%), has equivalent specificity (86%), and better identifies multifocal lesions than MRI. In sonographically accessible regions ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality for anatomic evaluation of suspected peripheral nervous system lesions. PMID:23553474

  8. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  9. Prevalence of gallstones in 1,229 patients submitted to surgical laparoscopic treatment of GERD and esophageal achalasia: associated cholecystectomy was a safe procedure

    PubMed Central

    SALLUM, Rubens Antonio Aissar; PADRÃO, Eduardo Messias Hirano; SZACHNOWICZ, Sergio; SEGURO, Francisco C. B. C.; BIANCHI, Edno Tales; CECCONELLO, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Association between esophageal achalasia/ gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and cholelithiasis is not clear. Epidemiological data are controversial due to different methodologies applied, the regional differences and the number of patients involved. Results of concomitant cholecistectomy associated to surgical treatment of both diseases regarding safety is poorly understood. Aim To analyze the prevalence of cholelithiasis in patients with esophageal achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux submitted to cardiomyotomy or fundoplication. Also, to evaluate the safety of concomitant cholecistectomy. Methods Retrospective analysis of 1410 patients operated from 2000 to 2013. They were divided into two groups: patients with GERD submitted to laparocopic hiatoplasty plus Nissen fundoplication and patients with esophageal achalasia to laparoscopic cardiomyotomy plus partial fundoplication. It was collected epidemiological data, specific diagnosis and subgroups, the presence or absence of gallstones, surgical procedure, operative and clinical complications and mortality. All groups/subgroups were compared. Results From 1,229 patients with GERD or esophageal achalasia, submitted to laparoscopic cardiomyotomy or fundoplication, 138 (11.43%) had cholelitiasis, occurring more in females (2.38:1) with mean age of 50,27 years old. In 604 patients with GERD, 79 (13,08%) had cholelitiasis. Lower prevalence occurred in Barrett's esophagus patients 7/105 (6.67%) (p=0.037). In 625 with esophageal achalasia, 59 (9.44%) had cholelitiasis, with no difference between chagasic and idiopathic forms (p=0.677). Complications of patients with or without cholecystectomy were similar in fundoplication and cardiomyotomy (p=0.78 and p=1.00).There was no mortality or complications related to cholecystectomy in this series. Conclusions Prevalence of cholelithiasis was higher in patients submitted to fundoplication (GERD). Patients with chagasic or idiopatic forms of achalasia had the

  10. [Evaluation of action, efficacy, and onset dynamics of a single dose of alginates in patients with heartburn and GERD].

    PubMed

    Bordin, D S; Masharova, A A; Firsova, L D; Kozhurina, T S; Safonova, O V

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a crossover study, in which the efficacy and the onset of action of a single dose of Gaviscon (suspension) and Gaviscon forte (suspension) in 52 patients with heartburn of moderate intensity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have been investigated. The average age of the patients was 44.0 +/- 17.3-years-old. The patients have undergone clinical evaluation of intensity of GERD symptoms and psychological assessment (questionnaires SF-36, SMOL, LOBI). Alginates' effects and qualities were evaluated using stopwatch technique, clinical examination, and organoleptic assessment. Primary sensation of a cooling (soothing) effect after use of a single dose of Gaviscon has been reported in 65.7 seconds (on average), and Gaviscon forte--in 66.1 seconds. Fourty three (82.7%) patients with heartburn have described the effects of both medications as "instant" cooling effects. Heartburn was relieved in 3.3 minutes in all patients after a single dose of Gaviscon, and in 3.6 minutes in 51 (98.1%) patients who have received a single dose of Gaviscon forte. Organoleptic qualities averaged at 3.6 points (on a scale of 1-5) for Gaviscon, and at 3.5 points for Gaviscon forte. Assessment of mental status of the patients suggested that a "delayed" effect of the medications in relieving heartburn in some patients may have occurred due to possible physical disadaptation. PMID:19960998

  11. Outcome of nonerosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease patients with pathological acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Fabio; Pallotta, Stefano; Manes, Gianpiero; de Leone, Annalisa; Zentilin, Patrizia; Russo, Luigi; Savarino, Vincenzo; Neri, Matteo; Grossi, Enzo; Cuomo, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the management and outcome of nonerosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease (NERD) patients who were identified retrospectively, after a 5-year follow-up. METHODS: We included patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms who had a negative endoscopy result and pathological 24-h esophageal pH-monitoring while off therapy. We interviewed them after an average period of 5 years (range 3.5-7 years) by means of a structured questionnaire to assess presence of GERD symptoms, related therapy, updated endoscopic data and other features. We assessed predictors of esophagitis development by means of univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. RESULTS: 260 patients (137 women) were included. Predominant GERD symptoms were heartburn and regurgitation in 103/260 (40%). 70% received a maintenance treatment, which was proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in 55% of cases. An average number of 1.5 symptomatic relapses per patient/year of follow-up were observed. A progression to erosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease (ERD) was found in 58/193 (30.0%) of patients undergoing repeat endoscopy; 72% of these were Los Angeles grade A-B. CONCLUSION: This study shows that progression to ERD occurs in about 5% of NERD cases per year, despite therapy. Only two factors consistently and independently influence progression: smoking and absence of PPI therapy. PMID:19960567

  12. Practice Pattern of Gastroenterologists for the Management of GERD Under the Minimal Influence of the Insurance Reimbursement Guideline: A Multicenter Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Ju Sang; Moon, Byung Sik; Kim, Sang-Gyun; Chun, Jae Hee; Jung, Hoon-Yong; Choi, Chang Hwan; Chun, Seong Woo; Song, Geun Am; Choi, Myung Gyu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to document practice pattern of gastroenterologists for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) under the minimal influence of the insurance reimbursement guideline. Data on management for 1,197 consecutive patients with typical GERD symptoms were prospectively collected during 16 weeks. In order to minimize the influence of reimbursement guideline on the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), rabeprazole was used for the PPI treatment. A total of 861 patients (72%) underwent endoscopy before the start of treatment. PPIs were most commonly prescribed (87%). At the start of treatment, rabeprazole 20 mg daily was prescribed to 94% of the patients who received PPI treatment and 10 mg daily to the remaining 6%. At the third visits, rabeprazole 20 mg daily was prescribed to 70% of those who were followed and 10 mg daily for the remaining 30%. Continuous PPI treatment during the 16-week period was performed in 63% of the study patients. In conclusion, a full-dose PPI is preferred for the initial and maintenance treatment of GERD under the minimal influence of the insurance reimbursement guideline, which may reflect a high proportion of GERD patients requiring a long-term treatment of a full-dose PPI. PMID:22147999

  13. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose sarcoidosis based on ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  14. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Diagnosing Tic Disorders Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder For a person to be diagnosed with ...

  15. Germination of Individual Bacillus subtilis Spores with Alterations in the GerD and SpoVA Proteins, Which Are Important in Spore Germination▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiwen; Yi, Xuan; Li, Yong-qing; Setlow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Release of Ca2+ with dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) was monitored by Raman spectroscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy during germination of individual spores of Bacillus subtilis strains with alterations in GerD and SpoVA proteins. Notable conclusions about germination after the addition of nutrient were as follows. (i) Following l-alanine addition, wild-type and gerD spores and spores with elevated SpoVA protein levels (↑SpoVA spores) slowly released ∼10% of their CaDPA during a variable (6- to 55-min) period ending at Tlag, the time when faster CaDPA release began. (ii) Tlag times were lower for ↑SpoVA spores than for wild-type spores and were higher for gerD spores. (iii) The long Tlag times of gerD spores were partially due to slow commitment to germinate. (iv) The intervals between the commitment to germinate and CaDPA release were similar for wild-type and ↑SpoVA spores but longer for gerD spores. (v) The times for rapid CaDPA release, ΔTrelease = Trelease − Tlag (with Trelease being the time at which CaDPA release was complete), were similar for wild-type, gerD, and ↑SpoVA spores. (vi) Spores with either one of two point mutations in the spoVA operon (spoVA1 and spoVA2 spores) exhibited a more rapid rate of CaDPA release beginning immediately after l-alanine addition leading to ∼65% CaDPA release prior to Tlag. (vii) Tlag times for spoVA1 and spoVA2 spores were longer than for wild-type spores. (viii) The intervals between spoVA1 and spoVA2 spores' commitment and CaDPA release were similar to those for wild-type spores, but commitment occurred later. In contrast to germination after the addition of nutrient, Tlag and ΔTrelease times were relatively similar during dodecylamine germination of spores of the five strains. These findings suggest the following. (i) GerD plays no role in CaDPA release during spore germination. (ii) SpoVA proteins are involved in CaDPA release during germination with nutrients, and probably with

  16. Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication Effective in Eliminating GERD Symptoms in Partial Responders to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy at 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, William E.; Simoni, Gilbert; Shughoury, Ahmad B.; Mavrelis, Peter G.; Raza, Mamoon; Heise, Jeffrey A.; Turgeon, Daniel G.; Fox, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Incomplete control of troublesome regurgitation and extraesophageal manifestations of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a known limitation of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. This multicenter randomized study compared the efficacy of transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) against PPIs in controlling these symptoms in patients with small hiatal hernias. Methods. Between June and August 2012, 63 patients were randomized at 7 US community hospitals. Patients in the PPI group were placed on maximum standard dose (MSD). Patients in the TIF group underwent esophagogastric fundoplication using the EsophyX2 device. Primary outcome was elimination of daily troublesome regurgitation or extraesophageal symptoms. Secondary outcomes were normalization of esophageal acid exposure (EAE), PPI usage and healing of esophagitis. Results. Of 63 randomized patients (40 TIF and 23 PPI), 3 were lost to follow-up leaving 39 TIF and 21 PPI patients for analysis. At 6-month follow-up, troublesome regurgitation was eliminated in 97% of TIF patients versus 50% of PPI patients, relative risk (RR) = 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-3.11 (P = .006). Globally, 62% of TIF patients experienced elimination of regurgitation and extraesophageal symptoms versus 5% of PPI patients, RR = 12.9, 95% CI = 1.9-88.9 (P = .009). EAE was normalized in 54% of TIF patients (off PPIs) versus 52% of PPI patients (on MSD), RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.6-1.7 (P = .914). Ninety percent of TIF patients were off PPIs. Conclusion. At 6-month follow-up, TIF was more effective than MSD PPI therapy in eliminating troublesome regurgitation and extraesophageal symptoms of GERD. PMID:24756976

  17. Quality Of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) Questionnaire in Iranian Patients with GERD: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Tofangchiha, S; Razjouyan, H; Nasseri-Moghaddam, S

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) affect health-related quality of life (HRQOL). When a questionnaire is translated into a new language, linguistic validation is necessary, yet insufficient, unless the psychometric characteristics have been verified. The aim of this study is to document the translation and psychometric validation of the Persian translation of the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire. METHODS After translation and cultural adaptation of QOLRAD to Persian, fifty patients with clinical GERD from the Prospective Acid Reflux Study of Iran (PARSI) database who had at least one of the symptoms of acid regurgitation, heartburn, non-cardiac chest pain, or dysphagia for at least four weeks over the past three months completed the QOLRAD and Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36). After two weeks, QOLRAD was again completed by the patients. Cronbach alpha and Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were used to test reliability and Pearson correlation was used to compare the dimensions of SF-36 and QOLRAD. RESULTS The translation was approved by MAPI Research Institute. Fifty patients completed the SF-36 and QOLRAD questionnaires at the first visit. Mean (SD) age of the participants was 38.4 (14.6) years and 68% were females. The internal consistency and reliability of QOLRAD ranged from 0.78–0.92. The test-retest reliability of QOLRAD was from 0.87–0.93. Relevant QOLRAD domains significantly correlated with the majority of SF-36 domains, with the exception of sleep disturbance. CONCLUSION The psychometric characteristics of the Persian translation of QOLRAD were found to be good, with satisfactory reliability and validity. PMID:25197518

  18. Pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Hollander, E; Buchalter, A J; DeCaria, C M

    2000-09-01

    With increasing access to gambling facilities through casinos, the Internet, and other venues, PG is a rapidly emerging mental health concern. This impulse-control disorder tends to be comorbid with a wide range of other disorders and is reportedly associated with a high rate of suicide. For most gamblers, gambling is a form of entertainment, but for many individuals, the activity leads to far-reaching disruption of family and work. The personal and societal financial ramifications are severe, and many individuals with PG end up in the criminal justice system. An understanding of the neurobiology of PG is beginning to surface. 5-HT is linked to behavioral initiation and disinhibition, which are important in the onset of the gambling cycle and the difficulty in ceasing the behavior. Norepinephrine is associated with the arousal and risk taking in patients with PG. Dopamine is linked to positive and negative reward, the addictive component of this disorder. Effective treatment strategies for pathological gamblers are emerging. Potentially useful pharmacologic agents include SRIs (clomipramine and fluvoxamine), mood stabilizers for pathological gamblers with comorbid bipolar disorders (lithium), and naltrexone. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies offer promising results in the treatment of patients with this disorder. To devise prevention and early-intervention programs, research is needed to identify specific features of the individuals at risk for gambling problems. Education targeting vulnerable youth that show early signs of gambling behavior may be worthwhile and should be investigated further. Funding is necessary to support these endeavors, so perhaps a portion of tax revenues generated from the gambling industry should go toward specialized treatment facilities, educational efforts, and research into the neurobiology and treatment of PG. PMID:10986732

  19. Imaging of Common Arthroscopic Pathology of the Ankle.

    PubMed

    Grambart, Sean T

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the ankle is used in the treatment and diagnosis of a spectrum of intra-articular pathology including soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, arthrofibrosis, and synovitis. To help identify the correct pathology, imaging techniques are often used to aid the surgeon in diagnosing pathology and determining best treatment options. This article discusses the use of imaging in various ankle pathologies. PMID:27599435

  20. An alginate-antacid formulation (Gaviscon Double Action Liquid®) can eliminate the postprandial “acid pocket” in symptomatic GERD patients

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Monika A.; Roman, Sabine; Fareeduddin, Anita; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Recently, an “acid pocket” has been described in the proximal stomach, particularly evident postprandially in GERD patients, when heartburn is common. By creating a low density gel “raft” that floats on top of gastric contents, alginate-antacid formulations may neutralize the “acid pocket”. AIM We hypothesized that the postprandial “acid pocket” can be displaced distal to the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) by an alginate-antacid formulation. METHODS The “acid pocket” was studied in ten symptomatic GERD patients. Measurements were made using concurrent stepwise pH pull-throughs, high resolution manometry, and fluoroscopy in a semi-recumbent posture. Each subject was studied in three conditions: fasted, 20 min after consuming a high-fat meal and 20 min later after a 20 ml oral dose of an alginate-antacid formulation (Gaviscon Double Action Liquid®). The relative position of pH transition points (pH > 4) to the EGJ high-pressure zone was analyzed. RESULTS Most patients (8/10) exhibited an acidified segment extending from the proximal stomach into the EGJ when fasted that persisted postprandially. Gaviscon neutralized the acidified segment in 6 of the 8 subjects shifting the pH transition point significantly away from the EGJ. The length and pressure of the EGJ high-pressure zone were minimally affected. CONCLUSIONS Gaviscon can eliminate the “acid pocket” in GERD patients. Considering that EGJ length was unchanged throughout, this effect was likely attributable to the alginate “raft” displacing gastric contents away from the EGJ. These findings suggest the alginate-antacid formulation to be a well-targeted postprandial GERD therapy. PMID:21535446

  1. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  2. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  3. How Is Endocarditis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can get detailed pictures of the heart's structures. EKG An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects your ... signals as they pass through your heart. An EKG typically isn't used to diagnose IE. However, ...

  4. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  5. Pathology neoplastic and non-neoplastic.

    PubMed

    Graeme-Cook, F

    1996-07-01

    Polyps of the gastrointestinal tract are common and often hard to diagnose by endoscopic or gross examination. Biopsy or polypectomy enables diagnosis and prognostication. This article is by no means encyclopedic, but attempts to discuss the pathology of the more common intestinal polyps. PMID:8829315

  6. Value of the Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) in predicting the proton pump inhibitor response in coronary artery disease patients with gastroesophageal reflux-related chest pain.

    PubMed

    He, S; Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Tang, Y; Xu, J; Tang, C

    2016-05-01

    Chest pain experienced by patients with coronary artery disease can be partly due to gastroesophageal reflux-induced chest pain (GERP). Empirical proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has been recommended as an initial clinical approach for treating GERP. However, PPI use may lead to some health problems. The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) may represent a noninvasive and cost-effective approach for avoiding PPI misuse and for identifying the appropriate patients for the PPI trial test. The aim of this pilot study was to prospectively evaluate the association between GerdQ scores and PPI response in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and GERP to determine whether the GerdQ predicts the PPI response in patients with CAD and GERP and to further validate the clinical application value of the GerdQ. A total of 154 consecutive patients with potential GERP were recruited to complete a GerdQ with subsequent PPI therapy. Based on the PPI trial result, patients were divided into a PPI-positive response group and a PPI-negative response group. The difference in the GerdQ scores between the two groups was assessed. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of GerdQ score was drawn according to the PPI response as the gold standard. The ability of GerdQ to predict the PPI response was assessed. A total of 96 patients completed the entire study; 62 patients (64.6%) were assigned to the PPI-positive response group, and 34 patients (35.4%) to the PPI-negative response group. The GerdQ score of the PPI-positive response group (8.11 ± 3.315) was significantly higher than that of the PPI-negative response group (4.41 ± 2.743), and the difference was statistically significant (t = 5.863, P = 0.000). The ROC curve was drawn according to a PPI response assessment result with a score above 2 as the gold standard. The area under curve was 0.806. When the critical value of GerdQ score was 7.5, Youden index was up to 0.514, the diagnostic sensitivity

  7. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  8. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  9. Psychological Factors that Promote and Inhibit Pathological Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morasco, Benjamin J.; Weinstock, Jeremiah; Ledgerwood, David M.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes qualitative data regarding psychological factors that may affect gambling behavior among treatment-seeking pathological gamblers. Participants (n = 84) diagnosed with pathological gambling were treated in a clinical trial examining the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Qualitative data were collected from…

  10. Diagnosing ADHD in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Garefino, Allison C.; Kuriyan, Aparajita B.; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines adolescent-specific practical problems associated with current practice parameters for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to inform recommendations for the diagnosis of ADHD in adolescents. Specifically, issues surrounding the use of self- versus informant ratings, diagnostic threshold, and…

  11. Diagnosing gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, E A

    2011-03-01

    The newly proposed criteria for diagnosing gestational diabetes will result in a gestational diabetes prevalence of 17.8%, doubling the numbers of pregnant women currently diagnosed. These new diagnostic criteria are based primarily on the levels of glucose associated with a 1.75-fold increased risk of giving birth to large-for-gestational age infants (LGA) in the Hyperglycemia Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study; they use a single OGTT. Thus, of 23,316 pregnancies, gestational diabetes would be diagnosed in 4,150 women rather than in 2,448 women if a twofold increased risk of LGA were used. It should be recognised that the majority of women with LGA have normal glucose levels during pregnancy by these proposed criteria and that maternal obesity is a stronger predictor of LGA. The expected benefit of a diagnosis of gestational diabetes in these 1,702 additional women would be the prevention of 140 cases of LGA, 21 cases of shoulder dystocia and 16 cases of birth injury. The reproducibility of an OGTT for diagnosing mild hyperglycaemia is poor. Given that (1) glucose is a weak predictor of LGA, (2) treating these extra numbers has a modest outcome benefit and (3) the diagnosis may be based on a single raised OGTT value, further debate should occur before resources are allocated to implementing this change. PMID:21203743

  12. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  13. Medical discourse in pathological anatomy.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, R; Tatsenko, N; Romanyuk, A; Perelomova, O; Moskalenko, Yu

    2012-05-01

    The paper is devoted to the peculiarities of medical discourse in pathological anatomy as coherent speech and as a linguistic correlate of medical practice taking into account the analysis of its strategies and tactics. The purpose of the paper is to provide a multifaceted analysis of the speech strategies and tactics of pathological anatomy discourse and ways of their implementation. The main strategies of medical discourse in pathological anatomy are an anticipating strategy, a diagnosing strategy and an explaining one. The supporting strategies are pragmatic, conversational and a rhetorical one. The pragmatic strategy is implemented through contact establishing tactics, the conversational one - with the help of control tactics, the rhetorical one - with the help of attention correction tactics. The above mentioned tactics and strategies are used in the distinguishing of major, closely interrelated strategies: "the contact strategy" (to establish contact with a patient's relatives - phatic replicas of greeting and addressing) and "the strategy of explanation" (used in the practice of a pathologist for a detailed explanation of the reasons of a patient's death). The ethic aspect of speech conduct of a doctor-pathologist is analyzed. PMID:22870841

  14. Optical coherence tomography in diagnosing cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2000-05-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most significant problem in oncogynecology. It tends towards treatment approaches that provide termination of pathological processes along with preservation of the patient's life quality. There is a need in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pathological states, objective assessment of physiological processes, and adequate monitoring of the course of treatment. In our previous publications we have reported unique capabilities of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to image in vivo the mucosa structure of the cervix and to monitor various physiological and pathological alterations. In this report, we present results of OCT application to diagnose different stages of cervical cancer and to control its treatment at early stages. We have performed OCT-colposcopy in 11 female patients with cervical cancer to derive OCT criteria of this disease, to provide exact demarcation of a pathological area, and to determine a real size of a tumor. We have found that, in general, borders of a tumor, defined visually and detected with OCT by violation of the basement membrane in exocervix, do not coincide. The mismatch depends on a stage of cancer and can be as much as several millimeters. This information is especially important for evaluation of linear dimension of tumors with 3 - 5 mm invasion and also for differential diagnosis between the T1 and T2 stages with cancer extension onto vagina.

  15. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods garlic and onions mint flavorings spicy foods tomato-based foods, like spaghetti sauce, chili, and pizza ... Regurgitation is when food and liquid containing stomach acid comes back up into the throat or mouth.) ...

  16. Primary hyperparathyroidism presenting with pathological fracture.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, R G; Alsagoff, S A; Krishnan, S; Dhillon, K S; Khir, A S

    1998-12-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is an intriguing condition. Routine automated biochemical screening has made the diagnosis commonplace in developed countries and the disease is diagnosed early in its course when it is often asymptomatic. In developing countries or in recent immigrants from these countries, PHPT is often seen in an advanced stage with bone involvement. Associated dietary deficiencies may alter the biochemical profile and cause a diagnostic dilemma. It is important to include it in the differential diagnosis of pathological fractures. We report three cases of PHPT presenting with pathological fractures and discuss their diagnosis and management. PMID:9990797

  17. Association Between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease After Pneumatic Balloon Dilatation and Clinical Course in Patients With Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is known to be associated with lower post-treatment lower esophageal sphincter pressure in patients with achalasia. This study aimed to elucidate whether GERD after pneumatic balloon dilatation (PD) has a prognostic role and to investigate how the clinical course of GERD is. Methods A total of 79 consecutive patients who were first diagnosed with primary achalasia and underwent PD as an initial treatment were included in this retrospective study. Single PD was performed using a 3.0 cm balloon. The patients were divided into two groups: 1) who developed GERD after PD (GERD group) and 2) who did not develop GERD after PD (non-GERD group). GERD was defined as pathological acid exposure, reflux esophagitis or typical reflux symptoms. Results Twenty one patients (26.6%) developed GERD after PD during follow-up. There were no significant differences between the two groups in demographic or clinical factors including pre- and post-treatment manometric results. All patients in GERD group were well responsive to maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy including on demand therapy or did not require maintenance. During a median follow-up of 17.8 months (interquartile range, 7.1–42.7 months), achalasia recurred in 15 patients (19.0%). However, the incidence of recurrence did not differ according to the occurrence of GERD after PD. Conclusions GERD often occurs after even a single PD for achalasia. However, GERD after PD is well responsive to PPI therapy. Our data suggest that GERD after PD during follow-up does not appear to have a prognostic role. PMID:24840373

  18. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  19. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  20. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Kawasaki Disease Diagnosed? Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on your child's signs ... are the first to suspect a child has Kawasaki disease. Pediatricians are doctors who specialize in treating ...

  1. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  2. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  3. Diagnosing a PDS microdensitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanaltena, W.; Lee, J. F.; Wandersee, A.

    1984-01-01

    A number of diagnostic tests are developed for the Photometric Data System PDS 2020G microdensitometer to monitor its performance and to isolate various electromechanical problems. A number of tests which help to diagnose problems with the photometer, positional accuracy and data collection are described. The tests include: (1) scanning a razor blade edge to study the response of the photometer and zero point losses in the coordinate system, (2) scanning a long straight line to evaluate the drunkness of the stage motions, (3) scanning photometric step wedge calibrations to study the response of the photometer, and (4) measurement of a series of high signal to noise plates of the same region of the sky to evaluate the overall performance of the microdensitometer. A variety of electronic tests to isolate electromechanical problems are also performed.

  4. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  5. [Quality Management System in Pathological Laboratory].

    PubMed

    Koyatsu, Junichi; Ueda, Yoshihiko

    2015-07-01

    Even compared to other clinical laboratories, the pathological laboratory conducts troublesome work, and many of the work processes are also manual. Therefore, the introduction of the systematic management of administration is necessary. It will be a shortcut to use existing standards such as ISO 15189 for this purpose. There is no standard specialized for the pathological laboratory, but it is considered to be important to a pathological laboratory in particular. 1. Safety nianagement of the personnel and environmental conditions. Comply with laws and regulations concerning the handling of hazardous materials. 2. Pre-examination processes. The laboratory shall have documented procedures for the proper collection and handling of primary samples. Developed and documented criteria for acceptance or rejection of samples are applied. 3. Examination processes. Selection, verification, and validation of the examination procedures. Devise a system that can constantly monitor the traceability of the sample. 4. Post-examination processes. Storage, retention, and disposal of clinical samples. 5. Release of results. When examination results fall within established alert or critical intervals, immediately notify the physicians. The important point is to recognize the needs of the client and be aware that pathological diagnoses are always "the final diagnoses". PMID:26591432

  6. Multicenter, randomized, double-blind study comparing 20 and 40 mg of pantoprazole for symptom relief in adolescents (12 to 16 years of age) with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An age-appropriate questionnaire (GASP-Q) was used to assess the frequency and severity of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms: abdominal/belly pain, chest pain/heartburn, pain after eating, nausea, burping/belching, vomiting/regurgitation, choking when eating, and difficulty swallow...

  7. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included.

  8. Opportunities in Speech Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Parley W.

    The importance of speech is discussed and speech pathology is described. Types of communication disorders considered are articulation disorders, aphasia, facial deformity, hearing loss, stuttering, delayed speech, voice disorders, and cerebral palsy; examples of five disorders are given. Speech pathology is investigated from these aspects: the…

  9. Gaviscon Double Action Liquid (antacid & alginate) is more effective than antacid in controlling postprandial esophageal acid exposure in GERD patients; a double-blind crossover study

    PubMed Central

    De Ruigh, Annemijn; Roman, Sabine; Chen, Joan; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that Gaviscon Double Action Liquid (a combination alginate-antacid) administered postprandially co-localizes with the acid pocket, the ‘reservoir’ for postprandial acid reflux. Aim This study compared the effectiveness of Gaviscon Double Action Liquid to an equivalent strength antacid without alginate in controlling postprandial acid reflux in GERD patients. Methods 14 GERD patients undertook two 3.5-hour high-resolution manometry/pH-impedance studies during which they ate a standardized meal. In a double-blinded randomized crossover design they then took Gaviscon or CVS brand antacid, each with ~18 mmol/l acid neutralizing capacity. The primary outcome was distal esophageal acid exposure; secondary outcomes were number of reflux events, proximal extent of reflux, nadir pH of the refluxate, mechanism of reflux, and reflux symptoms scored with a validated instrument. Results 10 patients completed the study. Gaviscon studies had significantly less distal esophageal acid exposure and greater nadir refluxate pH in the 30–150 minute postprandial period than antacid studies. There were no differences in the number of reflux events (acid or weakly acidic) or the number of proximal reflux events (15–17 cm above the LES) with either study medication. Conclusions Gaviscon Double Action Liquid was more effective than an antacid without alginate in controlling postprandial esophageal acid exposure. However, the number and spatial distribution of reflux events within the esophagus were similar. This suggests that Gaviscon main effectiveness related to its co-localization with and displacement/neutralization of the post-prandial acid pocket, rather than preventing reflux. PMID:25041141

  10. Clinical governance and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Crook, M

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at clinical governance and pathology. Clinical governance should be an important tool in seeking quality improvement within the Natinal Health Service. But how as pathologists should we go about it? PMID:11896066

  11. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  12. A case of thoracogastropagus diagnosed before delivery.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Tomobe, K; Yaoi, Y

    1998-01-01

    The subject was a 29-year-old pregnant woman whose fetuses were a conjoined twin. We diagnosed the fetuses as a conjoined twin by ultrasonography at the 12th week of gestation. The patient and her family wanted living infants and hoped that they were separated surgically. We consulted with the doctors of pediatric surgery and cardiovascular surgery departments. At the 18th week of gestation, the fetuses died in utero and they were delivered transvaginally by labor induction. Both infants were female with 430 g in total body weight and both of them were 21 cm in length. Pathological findings were thoracogastro-pagus with a single heart, a single pair of liver and a single small intestine. PMID:9704294

  13. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  14. Diagnosing breast cancer by using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Shafer-Peltier, Karen E.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Crowe, Joseph; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2005-08-01

    We employ Raman spectroscopy to diagnose benign and malignant lesions in human breast tissue based on chemical composition. In this study, 130 Raman spectra are acquired from ex vivo samples of human breast tissue (normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma) from 58 patients. Data are fit by using a linear combination model in which nine basis spectra represent the morphologic and chemical features of breast tissue. The resulting fit coefficients provide insight into the chemical/morphological makeup of the tissue and are used to develop diagnostic algorithms. The fit coefficients for fat and collagen are the key parameters in the resulting diagnostic algorithm, which classifies samples according to their specific pathological diagnoses, attaining 94% sensitivity and 96% specificity for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal and benign tissues. The excellent results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo to accurately classify breast lesions, thereby reducing the number of excisional breast biopsies that are performed. Author contributions: M.F., J.C., R.R.D., and M.S.F. designed research; A.S.H. and K.E.S.-P. performed research; A.S.H. and M.F. analyzed data; and A.S.H. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: DEH, ductal epithelial hyperplasia; ROC, receiver operating characteristic; N/C, nuclear-to-cytoplasm.

  15. Incidence and associated pre-morbid diagnoses of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Pollak, Jonathan; Kato, Atsushi; Conley, David B.; Peters, Anju T.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Avila, Pedro C.; Kern, Robert C.; Stewart, Walter F.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Schwartz, Brian S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a prevalent condition with underexplored risk factors. Objectives To determine CRS incidence and evaluate associations with a range of pre-morbid medical conditions for CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) and CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) using real-world clinical practice data. Methods Electronic health record (EHR) data from 446,480 Geisinger Clinic primary care patients was used for a retrospective longitudinal cohort study for data from 2001–2010. Using logistic regression, newly diagnosed CRS cases between 2007-2009 were compared to frequency-matched controls on pre-morbid factors in the immediate (0-6 months), intermediate (7-24 months) and entire observed timeframes prior to diagnosis. Results : The average incidence of CRS was 83 (±13) CRSwNP cases per 100,000 person-years and 1048 (±78) CRSsNP cases per 100,000 person-years. Between 2007-2009, 595 patients with incident CRSwNP and 7523 patients with incident CRSsNP were identified and compared to 8118 controls. Compared to controls and CRSsNP, CRSwNP patients were older and more likely to be male. Prior to diagnosis, CRS patients had a higher prevalence of acute rhinosinusitis, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinitis, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), adenotonsillitis, sleep apnea, anxiety and headaches (all p < 0.001). CRSsNP had a higher pre-morbid prevalence of infections of the upper and lower airway, skin/soft tissue and urinary tract (all p < 0.001). In the immediate and intermediate timeframes analyzed, patients who developed CRS had more outpatient encounters and antibiotic prescriptions (p < 0.001) but guideline-recommended diagnostic testing was performed in a minority of cases. Conclusions Patients who are diagnosed with CRS have a higher pre-morbid prevalence of anxiety, headaches, GERD, sleep apnea and infections of the respiratory system and some non-respiratory sites that results in higher antibiotic, corticosteroid and health care

  16. Detection of environmental effects through anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1985-01-01

    Anatomic pathology has produced considerable knowledge about environmental teratogens and carcinogens. A special disease registry established by a pathologist provided details of the association between oral contraceptives and hepatic neoplams. Pathologists were also involved in establishing in the link between diethylstilbestrol use and clear-cell adenocarcinomas of the vagina. An area of particular interest has been gender and ethnic differences in the incidence of certain diseases. Pathologists further make use of animal studies to investigate the pathogenesis of human tumors. Finally, stored serum or tissue is often used by pathologists to help diagnose diseases retrospectively. Human skin fibroblasts grown in culture and stored have been especially valuable for laboratory research. This chapter briefly highlights some of the milestones in the detection of enviromental effects through anatomic pathology. PMID:2997598

  17. Diagnose human tumors by THz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Tian; Yang, Jinwen

    2014-09-01

    Based on a THz pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrated the capability of THz imaging to diagnose human breast and liver cancers. Through THz near-field mapping of the absorption constants of cancer tissues, the acquired images can not only clearly distinguish cancer from normal tissues fast, automatically, and correctly without pathological H&E staining, but also identify the distribution region of cancer, which matches well with the identification with pathological examination. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations and for quick definition of the tumor margins during the surgical procedure such as breast-conserving surgery. With the help of THz imaging, we can expect to economize the use of hospital and human resources.

  18. Pathologic aspects of skull base tumors.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Andrzej; Szylberg, Łukasz; Wiśniewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Skull base tumors form a highly heterogeneous group. As there are several structures in this anatomical site, a large number of different primary malignancies might develop, as well as a variety of secondary (metastatic) tumors. In this article, the most common malignancies are presented, along with a short histopathologic description. For some entities, an immunohistochemical profile is also given that should be helpful in proper diagnosis. As many pathologic diagnoses nowadays also include genetic studies, the most common genetic abnormalities in skull base tumors are presented. PMID:27330415

  19. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice. PMID:26372537

  20. Molecular Pathology Informatics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak

    2015-06-01

    Molecular informatics (MI) is an evolving discipline that will support the dynamic landscape of molecular pathology and personalized medicine. MI provides a fertile ground for development of clinical solutions to bridge the gap between clinical informatics and bioinformatics. Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical arena has triggered major endeavors in MI that are expected to bring a paradigm shift in the practice of pathology. This brief review presents a broad overview of various aspects of MI, particularly in the context of NGS based testing. PMID:26065793

  1. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  2. Development of an electronic breast pathology database in a community health system

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Heidi D.; Weerasinghe, Roshanthi; Martel, Maritza; Bifulco, Carlo; Assur, Ted; Elmore, Joann G.; Weaver, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health care systems rely on electronic patient data, yet access to breast tissue pathology results continues to depend on interpreting dictated free-text reports. Objective: The objective was to develop a method to electronically search and categorize pathologic diagnoses of patients’ breast tissue specimens from dictated free-text pathology reports in a large health system for multiple users including clinicians. Design: A database integrating existing patient-level administrative and clinical information for breast cancer screening and diagnostic services and a web-based application for comprehensive searching of pathology reports were developed by a health system team led by pathologists. The Breast Pathology Assessment Tool and Hierarchy for Diagnosis (BPATH-Dx) provided search terms and guided electronic transcription of diagnoses from text fields on breast pathology clinical reports to standardized categories. Approach: Breast pathology encounters in the pathology database were matched with administrative data for 7332 women with breast tissue specimens obtained from an initial procedure in the health system from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2011. Sequential queries of the pathology text based on BPATH-Dx categorized biopsies according to their worst pathological diagnosis, as is standard practice. Diagnoses ranged from invasive breast cancer (23.3%), carcinoma in situ (7.8%), atypical lesions (6.39%), proliferative lesions without atypia (27.9%), and nonproliferative lesions (34.7%), and were further classified into subcategories. A random sample of 5% of reports that were manually reviewed indicated 97.5% agreement. Conclusions: Sequential queries of free-text pathology reports guided by a standardized assessment tool in conjunction with a web-based search application provide an efficient and reproducible approach to accessing nonmalignant breast pathology diagnoses. This method advances the use of pathology data and electronic health

  3. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... following tests also can help diagnose lactose intolerance: Hydrogen breath test. For this test, a person drinks ... beverage that has lactose in it. Then, the hydrogen level in the breath is measured at set ...

  4. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much thyroid hormone). Diagnostic Tests and Procedures EKG An EKG is a simple, painless test that records the ... the most useful test for diagnosing AF. An EKG shows how fast your heart is beating and ...

  5. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed Long-term Complications Result from Poor Recovery Mistaking an ankle fracture for an ankle sprain has serious consequences ...

  6. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic How is bone cancer staged? How is bone cancer diagnosed? A patient’s symptoms, physical exam, and results ... and other imaging tests. Imaging tests to detect bone cancer X-rays Most bone cancers show up on ...

  7. How Are Uterine Fibroids Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are uterine fibroids diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... probably won’t know that you have uterine fibroids. Sometimes, health care providers find fibroids during a ...

  8. How Is Penile Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... These might include a biopsy and imaging tests. Biopsy A biopsy is needed to diagnose penile cancer. ... depends on the nature of the abnormality. Incisional biopsy For an incisional biopsy only a part of ...

  9. Pathological fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  10. Is Psychometrics Pathological Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michell, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Pathology of science occurs when the normal processes of scientific investigation break down and a hypothesis is accepted as true within the mainstream of a discipline without a serious attempt being made to test it and without any recognition that this is happening. It is argued that this has happened in psychometrics: The hypothesis upon which…

  11. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  12. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  13. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations. PMID:27265600

  14. Guidelines for resident training in veterinary clinical pathology. III: cytopathology and surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Kidney, Beverly A; Dial, Sharon M; Christopher, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    The Education Committee of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology has identified a need for improved structure and guidance of training residents in clinical pathology. This article is the third in a series of articles that address this need. The goals of this article are to describe learning objectives and competencies in knowledge, abilities, and skills in cytopathology and surgical pathology (CSP); provide options and ideas for training activities; and identify resources in veterinary CSP for faculty, training program coordinators, and residents. Guidelines were developed in consultation with Education Committee members and peer experts and with evaluation of the literature. The primary objectives of training in CSP are: (1) to develop a thorough, extensive, and relevant knowledge base of biomedical and clinical sciences applicable to the practice of CSP in domestic animals, laboratory animals, and other nondomestic animal species; (2) to be able to reason, think critically, investigate, use scientific evidence, and communicate effectively when making diagnoses and consulting and to improve and advance the practice of pathology; and (3) to acquire selected technical skills used in CSP and pathology laboratory management. These guidelines define expected competencies that will help ensure proficiency, leadership, and the advancement of knowledge in veterinary CSP and will provide a useful framework for didactic and clinical activities in resident-training programs. PMID:19619150

  15. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  16. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  17. Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Diagnosing HPS Diagnosing HPS in ... of patients that develop HPS from New World Hantaviruses recover completely. No chronic infection has been detected ...

  18. Masochism and pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    That all pathological gamblers have an "unconscious wish to lose," an idea first expressed by Freud and Bergler, is neither true nor useful; wrong as well, however, are the reasons for neglecting masochism in relation to gambling. There is a small but clinically significant subgroup of pathological gamblers who are masochistic. I present clinical vignettes and a more extended treatment account to illustrate its importance. Masochism has been a confusing concept. As used here it refers to the deliberate seeking of pain, loss, suffering, or humiliation. There may be pleasure in pain, or an obligatory combining of pleasure and pain. A sense of power and control may be achieved through suffering. The case material illustrates clinically useful types (sexual masochism, masochistic personality disorder, moral masochism, relational masochism) as well as some common masochistic dynamics encountered in the treatment of pathological gamblers. These masochistic patterns are often identifiable during the initial evaluation. Distinguishing features may include a reversal of normal attitudes about winning and losing, the absence of an early winning phase, sometimes a memorable early loss. Gamblers may sabotage opportunities for success or create unnecessary obstacles for themselves. Losing may be more comfortable than winning or may be overtly sexualized. PMID:25734872

  19. Harlequin testicle and other uncommon pathologies masquerading at routine scrotal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Medverd, Jonathan R; Peguero, Larissa; Patel, Dhairyasheel P

    2015-06-01

    Many scrotal conditions manifest similarly as pain, swelling, a palpable abnormality, or a combination of these symptoms. Most common scrotal pathologies have characteristic accompanying sonographic findings. Less common pathologies can have similar clinical presentations, and imaging with scrotal ultrasound is required to aid in proper diagnosis. This article focuses on several of these less commonly encountered scrotal pathologies--including testicular segmental infarction, scrotal filariasis, scrotal mesothelioma, seminiferous tubule fibrosis, and scrotal leiomyosarcoma--and compares and contrasts them to more routine diagnoses. Familiarity with both typical and atypical scrotal conditions is necessary to make accurate diagnoses at ultrasound to guide appropriate treatment and avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:25938549

  20. Immunological methods for diagnosing neurocysticercosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.E.; Estrada, J.J.; Grogl, M.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for diagnosing active human neurocysticercosis by detecting the presence of at least one Taenia solium larval antigen in cerebrospinal fluid, which comprises: contacting cerebrospinal fluid from a human to be diagnosed with a solid support, wherein the support binds with a Taenia solium larval antigen if present, contacting the support with a first antibody, wherein the first antibody binds with a larval Taenia solium antigen if present in the cerebrospinal fluid, contacting the solid support with a detectable second antibody which will bind with the first antibody, and detecting the second antibody bound to the support.

  1. Oncologic Care and Pathology Resources in Africa: Survey and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Ann M; Milner, Danny A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Iliyasu, Yawale

    2016-01-01

    The connection of a clinician who identifies a patient with signs and symptoms of malignancy to an oncologist who has the tools to treat a patient's cancer requires a diagnostic pathology laboratory to receive, process, and diagnose the tumor. Without an accurate classification, nothing is known of diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment by the clinical team, and most important, the patient is left scared, confused, and without hope. The vast majority of deaths from malignancies occur in sub-Saharan Africa primarily as a result of lack of public awareness of cancer and how it is diagnosed and treated in the setting of a severe lack of resources (physical and personnel) to actually diagnose tumors. To correct this massive health disparity, a plan of action is required across the continent of Africa to bring diagnostic medicine into the modern era and connect patients with the care they desperately need. We performed a survey of resources in Africa for tissue diagnosis of cancer and asked quantitative questions about tools, personnel, and utilization. We identified a strong correlation between pathology staffing and capacity to provide pathology services. On the basis of this survey and through a congress of concerned pathologists, we propose strategies that will catapult the continent into an era of high-quality pathology services with resultant improvement in cancer outcomes. PMID:26578619

  2. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... With the National Cancer Institute for Inaugural Global Pathology Conference March 2016 OneLab Memo ASCP Action Alert - ... 2016 Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  3. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Science Letter to Council of Deans: State of Pathology Training in Medical School Help Chart the Future ... Need Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  4. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed? If you have an aortic aneurysm but no symptoms, your doctor may find it ... a routine physical exam. More often, doctors find aneurysms during tests done for other reasons, such as ...

  5. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  6. Associations among Major Psychiatric Diagnoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Abraham W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the frequency and associations of multiple diagnoses in 205 psychiatric inpatients, assessing past and current episodes of illness. Over one-half of the sample received more than one diagnosis. Alcoholism, antisocial personality, and drug dependence formed one group; primary depression, primary mania, and secondary affective disorder,…

  7. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2016-03-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. PMID:26851666

  8. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. PMID:26065794

  9. Pathologic and physiologic phimosis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Thomas B.; Pike, John G.; Leonard, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the differences between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, review proper foreskin care, and discuss when it is appropriate to seek consultation regarding a phimotic foreskin. SOURCES OF INFORMATION This paper is based on selected findings from a MEDLINE search for literature on phimosis and circumcision referrals and on our experience at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Urology Clinic. MeSH headings used in our MEDLINE search included “phimosis,” “referral and consultation,” and “circumcision.” Most of the available articles about phimosis and foreskin referrals were retrospective reviews and cohort studies (levels II and III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Phimosis is defined as the inability to retract the foreskin. Differentiating between physiologic and pathologic phimosis is important, as the former is managed conservatively and the latter requires surgical intervention. Great anxiety exists among patients and parentsregarding non-retractile foreskins. Most phimosis referrals seen in pediatric urology clinics are normal physiologically phimotic foreskins. Referrals of patients with physiologic phimosis to urology clinics can create anxiety about the need for surgery among patients and parents, while unnecessarily expanding the waiting list for specialty assessment. Uncircumcised penises require no special care. With normal washing, using soap and water, and gentle retraction during urination and bathing, most foreskins will become retractile over time. CONCLUSION Physiologic phimosis is often seen by family physicians. These patients and their parents require reassurance of normalcy and reinforcement of proper preputial hygiene. Consultation should be sought when evidence of pathologic phimosis is present, as this requires surgical management. PMID:17872680

  10. The College of American Pathologists guidelines for whole slide imaging validation are feasible for pediatric pathology: a pediatric pathology practice experience.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Michael A; Chenever, Emily; Baker, Peter B; Boué, Daniel R; Fung, Bonita; Hammond, Sue; Hendrickson, Brett W; Kahwash, Samir B; Pierson, Christopher R; Prasad, Vinay; Nicol, Kathleen K; Barr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI) is rapidly transforming educational and diagnostic pathology services. Recently, the College of American Pathologists Pathology and Laboratory Quality Center (CAP-PLQC) published recommended guidelines for validating diagnostic WSI. We prospectively evaluated the guidelines to determine their utility in validating pediatric surgical pathology and cytopathology specimens. Our validation included varied pediatric specimen types, including complex or less common diagnoses, in accordance with the guidelines. We completed WSI review of 60 surgical pathology cases and attempted WSI review of 21 cytopathology cases. For surgical pathology cases, WSI diagnoses were highly concordant with glass slide diagnoses; a discordant diagnosis was observed in 1 of 60 cases (98.3% concordance). We found that nucleated red blood cells and eosinophilic granular bodies represented specific challenges to WSI review of pediatric specimens. Cytology specimens were more frequently discordant or failed for technical reasons, with overall concordance of 66.7%. Review of pediatric cytopathology specimens will likely require image capture in multiple focal planes. This study is the first to specifically evaluate WSI review for pediatric specimens and demonstrates that specimens representing the spectrum of pediatric surgical pathology practice can be reviewed using WSI. Our application of the proposed CAP-PLQC guidelines to pediatric surgical pathology specimens is, to our knowledge, the first prospective implementation of the CAP-PLQC guidelines. PMID:25387255

  11. Pathology of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Elder, David E

    2015-04-01

    The pathology of melanoma is discussed in relation to surgical diagnosis and management. Pitfalls that may result in problems of clinicopathologic communication are emphasized. A compelling vision for the future is that all tumors will be characterized by their driving oncogenes, suppressor genes, and other genomic factors. The success of targeted therapy directed against individual oncogenes, despite its limitations, suggests that a repertoire of targeted agents will be developed that can be used against a variety of different tumors, depending on the results of genetic testing. Nevertheless, histopathologic diagnosis and surgical therapy will remain mainstays of management for melanoma. PMID:25769708

  12. Marketing the pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace. PMID:7625911

  13. Pathological and Clinical Spectrum of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: With Special Reference to Astrocytic Tau Pathology.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuichi; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Shiga, Atsushi; Tada, Mari; Kitamura, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Onodera, Osamu; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Someya, Toshiyuki; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a four-repeat tauopathy with tau-positive, argyrophilic tuft-shaped astrocytes (TAs). We performed a pathological and clinical investigation in 40 consecutive autopsied Japanese patients with pathological diagnoses of PSP or PSP-like disease. Unequivocal TAs were present in 22 cases, all of which were confirmed to be PSP. Such TAs were hardly detected in the other 18 cases, which instead exhibited tau-positive, argyrophilic astrocytes, appearing as comparatively small clusters with central nuclei of irregularly shaped, coarse structures (equivocal TAs). Cluster analysis of the distribution pattern of tau-related pathology for these 18 cases identified two subgroups, pallido-nigro-luysian atrophy (PNLA) Type 1 (n = 9) and Type 2 (n = 9), the former being distinguished from the latter by the presence of tau-related lesions in the motor cortex, pontine nucleus and cerebellar dentate nucleus in addition to the severely affected PNL system. The duration from symptom onset until becoming wheelchair-bound was significantly longer in PNLA Type 1. Immunoblotting of samples from the three disease conditions revealed band patterns of low-molecular-mass tau fragments at ∼35 kDa. These findings shed further light on the wide pathological and clinical spectrum of four-repeat tauopathy, representing PSP in the broad sense rather than classical PSP. PMID:25974705

  14. Diagnostics of gastric pathology by means of laser fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysyuk, T. G.

    2012-10-01

    This article presents the principles of laser fluorescence diagnostic method used to diagnose pathological conditions of the stomach. In it, the new criteria are proposed - the total area and integrated fluorescence intensity as the differentiation of pathological conditions. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of intensity and area of laser fluorescence are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of reradiation in the points of polarizationally filtered laser images of stomach histological sections. The criteria of laser polarization fluorescent diagnostics of stomach cancer nascency and its severity degree differentiation are determined.

  15. Diagnoses of corticobasal syndrome and corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Takayoshi; Aiba, Ikuko; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2016-03-30

    Experts use the term corticobasal syndrome (CBS) for patients with a clinical diagnosis of corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and reserve CBD for those whose conditions have been diagnosed on the basis of neuropathological analyses. Several studies demonstrated that patients with CBD may also present with progressive supranuclear syndrome (PSPS), aphasia, Alzheimer disease-like dementia or behavioral change, suggesting that CBS is merely one of the presenting phenotypes of CBD. Although previous CBD diagnostic criteria reflected only CBS, the international consortium proposed new diagnostic criteria for CBD in 2013 (Armstrong's criteria). The new criteria include 4 CBD subtypes; CBS, frontal behavioral-spatial syndrome (FBS), nonfluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (naPPA),and PSPS. These subtypes were combined to create 2 sets of criteria: more specific clinical research criteria for probable CBD (cr-CBD) and broader criteria for possible CBD that are more inclusive but have a higher chance to detect other tau-based pathologies (p-CBD). Two studies have already revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of the criteria were not high. Because therapeutic interventions that target abnormally-phosphorylated tau have started, further refinement of the criteria is needed via biomarker researches with prospective study designs. PMID:26876110

  16. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  17. Exosomes in liver pathology.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisaku; Meng, Fanyin; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are small (∼100nm) membrane-bound extracellular vesicles released by various types of cells into biological fluids. They contain proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs as cargo. Different cell types can take up exosomes by endocytosis and the cargo contained within them can be transferred horizontally to these recipient cells. Exosomal proteins and miRNAs can be functional and regulate physiological cell events modifying the microenvironment in target cells, a key event of liver pathology. Exosome-mediated cell-cell communication can alter tumor growth, cell migration, antiviral infection and hepatocyte regeneration, indicating that exosomes have great potential for development as diagnostic or therapeutic tools. Analyses of circulating total or exosomal miRNAs have identified a large number of candidate miRNAs that are regulated in liver diseases, and the diagnostic testing using single or multiple miRNAs shows good sensitivity and specificity. Some candidate miRNAs have been identified to play an important role in various liver disorders. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in liver diseases and their diagnostic and therapeutic potential, mainly focusing on exosomes but also includes microvesicles in liver pathology. PMID:26988731

  18. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory. PMID:23634908

  19. A Case of Aerophagia Diagnosed by Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Ki Chang; Jeong, Young Hoon; Jo, Dong Ho; Heo, Won Gak; Yeom, Dong Han; Choi, Suck Chei; Ryu, Han Seung

    2015-11-01

    Aerophagia is a disorder caused by abnormal accumulation of air in the gastrointestinal tract as a result of repetitive and frequent inflow of air through the mouth. For the diagnosis of this condition, it is difficult to objectively measure the air swallowing. However, multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring facilitates the differential diagnosis between normal air swallowing and pathologic aerophagia, and can aid in the determination of the frequency and amount of air swallowed. In this report, in addition to a literature review, we describe a case of 36-year-old man with abdominal distension who was diagnosed with aerophagia using esophageal impedance monitoring and was treated with clonazepam. PMID:26586352

  20. The otolaryngologic manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a clinical investigation of 225 patients using ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring and an experimental investigation of the role of acid and pepsin in the development of laryngeal injury.

    PubMed

    Koufman, J A

    1991-04-01

    Occult (silent) gastroesophageal reflux disease (GER, GERD) is believed to be an important etiologic factor in the development of many inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the upper aerodigestive tract. In order ot test this hypothesis, a human study and an animal study were performed. The human study consisted primarily of applying a new diagnostic technique (double-probe pH monitoring) to a population of otolaryngology patients with GERD to determine the incidence of overt and occult GERD. The animal study consisted of experiments to evaluate the potential damaging effects of intermittent GER on the larynx. Two hundred twenty-five consecutive patients with otolaryngologic disorders having suspected GERD evaluated from 1985 through 1988 are reported. Ambulatory 24-hour intraesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 197; of those, 81% underwent double-probe pH monitoring, with the second pH probe being placed in the hypopharynx at the laryngeal inlet. Seventy percent of the patients also underwent barium esophagography with videofluoroscopy. The patient population was divided into seven diagnostic subgroups: carcinoma of the larynx (n = 31), laryngeal and tracheal stenosis (n = 33), reflux laryngitis (n = 61), globus pharyngeus (n = 27), dysphagia (n = 25), chronic cough (n = 30), and a group with miscellaneous disorders (n = 18). The most common symptoms were hoarseness (71%), cough (51%), globus (47%), and throat clearing (42%). Only 43% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms (heartburn or acid regurgitation). Thus, by traditional symptomatology, GER was occult or silent in the majority of the study population. Twenty-eight patients (12%) refused or could not tolerate pH monitoring. Of the patients undergoing diagnostic pH monitoring, 62% had abnormal esophageal pH studies, and 30% demonstrated reflux into the pharynx. The results of diagnostic pH monitoring for each of the subgroups were as follows (percentage with abnormal studies): carcinoma (71

  1. [Cystic renal pathology].

    PubMed

    Rosi, P; Cesaroni, M; Bracarda, S; Rociola, W; Virgili, G

    1993-08-01

    Ultrasonography has a great interest in diagnosis of cystic kidney disorders for typical eco-pattern of this pathology. In this work we show the eco-pattern of the most common cystic kidney disorders. Particularly we examine simple cysts (typical, atypical, complicated), multicystic kidney dysplasia, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (infantile) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (adult age). The so-called neoplastic cysts (multiloculated cysts, multiloculated cysts nephroma, cystic nephroblastoma), medullar cysts (medullary sponge kidney, medullary cystic disease), parapyelic cysts, acquired cystic kidney disease in renal failure patients, parasitic cysts, epidermoid cysts. About this disorders we present the more typical and expressive ultrasonographic appearance and we define the role and the opportunity of diagnostic setting by echography, moreover ultrasonography allows us to make a differential diagnosis between cystic kidney disorders and other kidney disease. PMID:8353538

  2. [Physiological adolescence, pathological adolescence].

    PubMed

    Olié, Jean-Pierre; Gourion, David; Canceil, Olivier; Lôo, Henri

    2006-11-01

    The uncertainties of looming adulthood, nostalgia for childhood, and a general malaise explain the crisis of adolescence. Rebellion, conflict, occasional failure at school or in society, and at-risk behaviors are not always signs of future psychiatric illness. In contrast, the physician must be in a position to identify tell-tale signs such as dysmorphophobia, existential anxiety, a feeling of emptiness, and school or social breakdown. Most psychiatric disorders that begin in adolescence are only diagnosed several years after onset. Yet early diagnosis is of utmost importance, as treatment becomes less effective and the long-term prognosis worsens with time. Suicide is the second cause of death during adolescence. All signs of suicidal behavior require hospitalization and evaluation in a psychiatric unit. Antidepressants may be necessary in adolescence. The recent controversy concerning a possible increase in the suicidal risk during antidepressant treatment should not mask the fact that the real public health issue is depression, and not antidepressants. Eating disorders are especially frequent among adolescent girls; it is important to identify psychiatric comorbidities such as schizophrenia, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, and to assess the vital risk. Illicit drug and alcohol consumption are frequent during adolescence; for example, close to half of all French adolescents have tried cannabis at least once. Once again, it is important to detect psychiatric comorbidities in substance-abusing adolescents. Phobia is an underdiagnosed anxiety disorder among adolescents; it may become chronic if proper treatment is not implemented, leading to suffering and disability. Finally, two major psychiatric disorders--schizophrenia and bipolar disorder--generally begin in adolescence. Treatment efficacy and the long-term prognosis both depend on early diagnosis. Treatment must be tailored to the individual patient. "Borderline" states are over-diagnosed

  3. The chorionic bump: Etiologic insights from two pathologic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Wax, Joseph R; Blaszyk, Hagen; Jones, Michael; Cartin, Angelina; Pinette, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    The clinical significance and etiology of the chorionic bump remain unclear. We describe two pregnancies characterized by chorionic bumps, which subsequently were diagnosed with a complete mole and trisomy 18, respectively. We hypothesize that placental pathology, including edema and hydropic villi, may contribute to or cause the sonographic finding of some chorionic bumps. An association between chorionic bumps and aneuploidy awaits future study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:452-454, 2016. PMID:27220064

  4. [Urination disorders in the man: differential diagnoses and therapy of benign prostate syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Schmid, Hans-Peter

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms in men are highly associated with benign prostate syndrome. Nevertheless, a correct diagnosis is required to exclude other pathologies. In addition to neurogenic causes other urological differential diagnoses can be clarified and treated. If diagnosis of benign prostatic syndrome is confirmed, various medical and surgical treatment options are available. PMID:24088234

  5. Reducing turnaround time of surgical pathology reports in pathology and laboratory medicine departments

    PubMed Central

    Alshieban, Saeed; Al-Surimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Turnaround time is an important quality indicator in surgical pathology. Retrospective analysis of three data points in September 2014, January 2015, and February 2015 showed that on average, about a quarter (24%) of routine surgical pathology cases (26%, 19%, and 27% respectively) are not reported on time and do not meet the accepted level of the College of American Pathologists' (CAP) standard turnaround time, which states at least 90% of routine surgical pathology cases should be reported and verified within two days. Our daily observation supported by a root cause analysis exercise revealed that subprocesses including slide allocation and delivery to pathologists, slide review by pathologists, report editing by transcriptionists, and report verification by pathologists are where most delays occur. Thus, to tackle these process issues we developed a quality improvement project using the model of improvement methods to streamline the sample flow process and avoid unjustified reporting delay. The improvement ideas included developing a time log sheet to be attached with all pathology requests, and sending a daily reminder email followed by a phonecall to all pathologists to verify completed reports on the same day. These intervention elements were tested using multiple PDSA cycles resulting in a very noticeable improvement, with more than 94% of all routine cases reported in less than two days, meeting and exceeding the CAP standards. Such noticeable improvement in turnaround of surgical pathology reports will eventually lead to improving the quality and safety of patient care outcome, including diagnosing patients on time, developing the appropriate treatment plan, and avoiding unjustified complications resulting in morbidity and mortality due to delayed reports. PMID:26734438

  6. Pathology and pathogenesis of Buerger's disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K

    1998-10-01

    Since Buerger's disease, which is also called 'thromboangiitis obliterans', was proposed in 1908 (Buerger, Am J Med Soc 1908;136:567), more cases have been reported from the United States, Europe, and especially from the Orient. However the pathogenesis of this disease remains unclarified, and its acceptance as a specific disease entity has been disputed (Gore and Burrows, Am J Clin Pathol 1958;29:319; Wessler et al., N Engl J Med 1960;262:1149). We histologically examined the surgically resected arterial specimens from 113 cases, 109 males and four females, clinically diagnosed as Buerger's disease in 1975-1976 and reported the results in 1978 (Kurozumi and Tanaka, Vasc Surg 1978;12:63) and proposed that the term 'Buerger's disease' should be replaced by 'Buerger's syndrome'. We reexamined the above-mentioned cases and will report the pathology and propose the possible pathogenesis of Buerger's disease. PMID:9951825

  7. Thermal Injuries in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Wohlsein, P; Peters, M; Schulze, C; Baumgärtner, W

    2016-09-01

    Localized thermal injuries in animals may be caused by exposure to fire and radiant heat, contact with hot items including hot liquids or steam, inhalation of hot air, and exposure to cold temperatures. In addition, animal fire victims may have intoxications caused by smoke gas. This article reviews the causes, pathogenetic aspects, morphological findings, additional investigations, differential diagnoses, and causes of death in various forms of thermal injuries. Since these cases do not occur frequently in diagnostic pathology, they represent a challenging task in general but also with respect to forensic or criminal aspects, such as whether a lesion represents an accidental or nonaccidental effect. Besides detailed information about the circumstances at the location, thermal injuries in animals require a thorough morphological evaluation, including additional investigations in conjunction with a profound knowledge about the possible lesion spectrum and suitable additional investigations. PMID:27106739

  8. New Trends of Emerging Technologies in Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; Fernández-Carrobles, M Milagro; Deniz, Oscar; García-Rojo, Marcial

    2016-01-01

    The future paradigm of pathology will be digital. Instead of conventional microscopy, a pathologist will perform a diagnosis through interacting with images on computer screens and performing quantitative analysis. The fourth generation of virtual slide telepathology systems, so-called virtual microscopy and whole-slide imaging (WSI), has allowed for the storage and fast dissemination of image data in pathology and other biomedical areas. These novel digital imaging modalities encompass high-resolution scanning of tissue slides and derived technologies, including automatic digitization and computational processing of whole microscopic slides. Moreover, automated image analysis with WSI can extract specific diagnostic features of diseases and quantify individual components of these features to support diagnoses and provide informative clinical measures of disease. Therefore, the challenge is to apply information technology and image analysis methods to exploit the new and emerging digital pathology technologies effectively in order to process and model all the data and information contained in WSI. The final objective is to support the complex workflow from specimen receipt to anatomic pathology report transmission, that is, to improve diagnosis both in terms of pathologists' efficiency and with new information. This article reviews the main concerns about and novel methods of digital pathology discussed at the latest workshop in the field carried out within the European project AIDPATH (Academia and Industry Collaboration for Digital Pathology). PMID:27100343

  9. Do Emergency Department Patients Receive a Pathological Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Leana S.; Espinola, Janice A.; Mosowsky, Joshua M.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Understanding the cause of patients’ symptoms often requires identifying a pathological diagnosis. A single-center study found that many patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) do not receive a pathological diagnosis. We analyzed 17 years of data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) to identify the proportion of patients who received a pathological diagnosis at ED discharge. We hypothesized that many patients do not receive a pathological diagnosis, and that the proportion of pathological diagnoses increased between 1993 and 2009. Methods Using the NHAMCS data from 1993–2009, we analyzed visits of patients age ≥18 years, discharged from the ED, who had presented with the three most common chief complaints: chest pain, abdominal pain, and headache. Discharge diagnoses were coded as symptomatic versus pathological based on a pre-defined coding system. We compared weighted annual proportions of pathological discharge diagnoses with 95% CIs and used logistic regression to test for trend. Results Among 299,919 sampled visits, 44,742 met inclusion criteria, allowing us to estimate that there were 164 million adult ED visits presenting with the three chief complaints and then discharged home. Among these visits, the proportions with pathological discharge diagnosis were 55%, 71%, and 70% for chest pain, abdominal pain, and headache, respectively. The total proportion of those with a pathological discharge diagnosis decreased between 1993 and 2009, from 72% (95% CI, 69–75%) to 63% (95% CI, 59–66%). In the multivariable logistic regression model, those more likely to receive pathological diagnoses were females, African-American as compared to Caucasian, and self-pay patients. Those more likely to receive a symptomatic diagnosis were patients aged 30–79 years, with visits to EDs in the South or West regions, and seen by a physician in the ED. Conclusion In this analysis of a nationally

  10. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness. PMID:1654715

  11. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healthcare practices such as radiology where digital adoption is widespread. As devices that generate whole slide images become more practical and affordable, practices will increasingly adopt this technology and eventually produce an explosion of data that will quickly eclipse the already vast quantities of radiology imaging data. These advances are accompanied by significant challenges for data management and storage, but they also introduce new opportunities to improve patient care by streamlining and standardizing diagnostic approaches and uncovering disease mechanisms. Computer-based image analysis is already available in commercial diagnostic systems, but further advances in image analysis algorithms are warranted in order to fully realize the benefits of digital pathology in medical discovery and patient care. In coming decades, pathology image analysis will extend beyond the streamlining of diagnostic workflows and minimizing interobserver variability and will begin to provide diagnostic assistance, identify therapeutic targets, and predict patient outcomes and therapeutic responses. PMID:25328166

  12. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies. PMID:26210152

  13. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  14. How do surgical pathologists evaluate critical diagnoses (critical values)?

    PubMed Central

    Mireskandari, Masoud

    2008-01-01

    Background After introduction of the concept of critical value (CV) in laboratory medicine, some efforts were performed to define possible critical values in surgical pathology. Critical diagnosis (critical value) is a concept recently established in surgical pathology and is a challenging issue among pathologists and clinical specialists. The concept may be the subject of variation according to the geographical or work setting differences. The current study was performed to bring the contribution of the Iranian pathologists to the evolving concept of critical diagnoses (critical values) in surgical pathology. Materials and methods During annual meeting of Iranian Pathologist Society, November 2006, Tehran, Iran, anonymous questionnaires were distributed among participants. They were requested to openly name conditions in which a pathologist should communicate the results immediately with clinicians. Results 147 pathologists completed the questionnaire. They were varied in their level of experience and setting of workplace. Each participant referred to 1–7 (mean 3) conditions as CV. About 90 different conditions which were considered as CV by participants were extracted from the questionnaires. Discussion The list of conditions obtained through this survey as CVs in surgical pathology covered most items previously described in literature. Major differences are low number (or lack) of refers to some relatively routine and potentially important conditions and considering many unimportant conditions as CV by participants of present survey. Almost all conducted surveys have been performed on this issue so far (including the present survey) suffer from lack of supportive scientific evidences and based mainly on experience and common sense of participants in survey. Potential problems with application of CV concept in daily routine work flow of pathology, particularly in developing countries like Iran, were discussed. PMID:18620590

  15. Virtual slides: application in pulmonary pathology consultations.

    PubMed

    Słodkowska, Janina; Chyczewski, Lech; Wojciechowski, Michał

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Slide (VS) is an interactive microscope emulator that presents a complete digitized tissue section via the Internet. A successful implementation of VS has been observed for educational, research venues and quality control. VS acquisition for consultative pathology is not so common. The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy and usability of VS in the consultative pulmonary telepathology. 20 lung tumors entered the study. The performance was programmed for 2 medical centers specialized in pulmonary pathology (beginner and advancer in telepathology). A high-quality VSs were prepared by Coolscope (Nikon, Eclipsnet VSL, Japan), and were evaluated via the Internet. The cases were reviewed for the second time with conventional light microscope. VS diagnostic accuracy and the interobserver variability were evaluated. Also the time taken by examiners to render the diagnoses and time needed to scan the microscopic slide were analyzed. Percentage concordance between original glass-slides diagnosis and diagnosis for VSs was very high. Pathologists found the download speed of VSs adequate; experience in telepathology reduced the time of VS diagnosis. VS implementation suggests advantages for teleconsulation and education but also indicate some technical limitations. This is the first Polish trial of VS implementation in telepathology consultative service. PMID:18296275

  16. Ovarian masses revisited: radiologic and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Sutton, C L; McKinney, C D; Jones, J E; Gay, S B

    1992-09-01

    Diagnosis of ovarian masses can be difficult because many pathologic conditions can affect the ovary and have similar clinical and radiologic manifestations. Knowledge of pathologic, age-specific characteristics can help refine the differential diagnosis. Ovarian masses are nonneoplastic (ovarian functional cysts, polycystic ovary disease, and ovarian torsion) or neoplastic (surface epithelial, sex cord-stromal, germ cell, and metastatic tumors). Functional cysts, if complicated by hemorrhage, can have a confusing ultrasonographic (US) appearance. Polycystic disease and torsion are easily diagnosed with US. Benign and malignant forms of serous and mucinous surface epithelial tumors can usually be differentiated with US. Imaging features of surface epithelial tumors of low malignant potential are nonspecific, resembling those of benign serous and mucinous tumors. Mature (benign) teratomas are usually cystic, with components of fat, soft tissue, and calcium, and are sonographically distinct from immature (malignant) teratomas, which are mostly solid. Sex cord-stromal tumors occur more often in menopausal or postmenopausal women and are typically solid. Metastatic disease is less common than other ovarian tumors; however, its radiologic appearance may resemble those of other masses. PMID:1529129

  17. Toxicologic pathology in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Ettlin, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Toxicology is and will be heavily influenced by advances in many scientific disciplines. For toxicologic pathology, particularly relevant are the increasing array of molecular methods providing deeper insights into toxicity pathways, in vivo imaging techniques visualizing toxicodynamics and more powerful computers anticipated to allow (partly) automated morphological diagnoses. It appears unlikely that, in a foreseeable future, animal studies can be replaced by in silico and in vitro studies or longer term in vivo studies by investigations of biomarkers including toxicogenomics of shorter term studies, though the importance of such approaches will continue to increase. In addition to changes based on scientific progress, the work of toxicopathologists is and will be affected by social and financial factors, among them stagnating budgets, globalization, and outsourcing. The number of toxicopathologists in North America, Europe, and the Far East is not expected to grow. Many toxicopathologists will likely spend less time at the microscope but will be more heavily involved in early research activities, imaging, and as generalists with a broad biological understanding in evaluation and management of toxicity. Toxicologic pathology will remain important and is indispensable for validation of new methods, quality assurance of established methods, and for areas without good alternative methods. PMID:23143188

  18. Pathological gambling: understanding relapses and dropouts.

    PubMed

    Aragay, Núria; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Ramos-Grille, Irene; Cardona, Sara; Garrido, Gemma; Anisul Islam, Mohammed; Menchón, José M; Vallès, Vicenç

    2015-02-01

    There is little available information on the factors that influence relapses and dropouts during therapy for pathological gambling (PG). The aim of this study was to determine socio-demographic, clinical, personality, and psychopathological predictors of relapse and dropout in a sample of pathological gamblers seeking treatment. A total of 566 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with PG according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were included. All patients underwent an individualized cognitive-behavioral treatment program. We analyzed predictors of relapse during 6months of treatment and during the subsequent 6months of follow-up, and predictors of dropout over the entire therapeutic program. Eighty patients (14.1%) experienced at least one relapse during the entire follow-up of the study: 50 (8.8%) within the treatment period and 12 (2.1%) during the subsequent 6-month follow-up period. The main predictors of relapse were single marital status, spending less than 100euros/week on gambling, active gambling behavior at treatment inclusion, and high scores on the TCI-R Harm Avoidance personality dimension. One hundred fifty-seven patients (27.8%) missed 3 or more therapeutic sessions over the entire therapeutic program. The main predictors of dropout were single marital status, younger age, and high scores on the TCI-R Novelty Seeking personality dimension. The presence of these factors at inclusion should be taken into account by physicians dealing with PG patients. PMID:25434846

  19. Is pathological gambling moderated by age?

    PubMed

    Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Stinchfield, Randy; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Savvidou, Lamprini G; Fröberg, Frida; Aymamí, Neus; Gómez-Peña, Mónica; Pérez-Serrano, Miriam; del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Menchón, José M; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana

    2014-06-01

    The age of a patient is a strong moderator of both the course and the evolution of disorders/diseases. However, the effects of current age in pathological gambling (PG) have rarely been examined. The aim of this study is to explore the moderating effects of the patients' current age in relation to personality traits and clinical outcomes of PG. A total sample of 2,309 treatment-seeking patients for PG, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, participated in this study and were assessed with the Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pathological Gambling according to DSM-IV criteria, the South Oaks Gambling Screen, the Symptom Checklist, the Temperament and Character Inventory-R, and other clinical and psychopathological measures. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts showed linear trends in the relationship between age and PG: the older the patient, the more comorbid health problems were visible. The presence of additional quadratic trends also suggests that age plays a significant role in moderating the possibility of existing PG problems and general psychopathology. No interaction term was found between age and sex, but it was present for age and some personality traits: self-transcendence and reward dependence (these two traits were only relevant to the level of impairment due to PG at specific ages). This study suggests that the patients' age influences psychopathological and clinical aspects associated to PG. Intervention in the earliest manifestations of this complex problem is essential in order to better address the need of successful treatment planning. PMID:23494243

  20. How Is Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnosis thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) based on your medical history, a physical exam, and test results. If TTP is suspected or diagnosed, a hematologist will be ...

  1. How Is Long QT Syndrome Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Long QT Syndrome Diagnosed? Cardiologists diagnose and treat long ... or blood levels of potassium. Types of Inherited Long QT Syndrome If you have inherited LQTS, it ...

  2. [Munchausen disease diagnosed ten years after debut].

    PubMed

    Mrgan, Monija; Taasti, Lena Merete

    2013-09-01

    Munchausen disease is difficult to diagnose especially because it is often an exclusion diagnosis. We present a case of skin ulcers in a young woman, who was eventually diagnosed with Munchausen disease. PMID:23992908

  3. Children Diagnosed with Cancer: Returning to School

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spanish) Children Diagnosed With Cancer: Financial and Insurance Issues Children Diagnosed With Cancer: Late Effects of Cancer Treatment Cancer Information on the Internet Coping and emotions What Happened to You, Happened ...

  4. Diagnosing Femoroacetabular Impingement From Plain Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Ayeni, Olufemi R.; Chan, Kevin; Whelan, Daniel B.; Gandhi, Rajiv; Williams, Dale; Harish, Srinivasan; Choudur, Hema; Chiavaras, Mary M.; Karlsson, Jon; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    Background: A diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) requires careful history and physical examination, as well as an accurate and reliable radiologic evaluation using plain radiographs as a screening modality. Radiographic markers in the diagnosis of FAI are numerous and not fully validated. In particular, reliability in their assessment across health care providers is unclear. Purpose: To determine inter- and intraobserver reliability between orthopaedic surgeons and musculoskeletal radiologists. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Six physicians (3 orthopaedic surgeons, 3 musculoskeletal radiologists) independently evaluated a broad spectrum of FAI pathologies across 51 hip radiographs on 2 occasions separated by at least 4 weeks. Reviewers used 8 common criteria to diagnose FAI, including (1) pistol-grip deformity, (2) size of alpha angle, (3) femoral head-neck offset, (4) posterior wall sign abnormality, (5) ischial spine sign abnormality, (6) coxa profunda abnormality, (7) crossover sign abnormality, and (8) acetabular protrusion. Agreement was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: When establishing an FAI diagnosis, there was poor interobserver reliability between the surgeons and radiologists (ICC batch 1 = 0.33; ICC batch 2 = 0.15). In contrast, there was higher interobserver reliability within each specialty, ranging from fair to good (surgeons: ICC batch 1 = 0.72; ICC batch 2 = 0.70 vs radiologists: ICC batch 1 = 0.59; ICC batch 2 = 0.74). Orthopaedic surgeons had the highest interobserver reliability when identifying pistol-grip deformities (ICC = 0.81) or abnormal alpha angles (ICC = 0.81). Similarly, radiologists had the highest agreement for detecting pistol-grip deformities (ICC = 0.75). Conclusion: These results suggest that surgeons and radiologists agree among themselves, but there is a need to improve the reliability of radiographic interpretations for FAI between the

  5. Uncommon Manifestations of Intervertebral Disk Pathologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Diehn, Felix E; Maus, Timothy P; Morris, Jonathan M; Carr, Carrie M; Kotsenas, Amy L; Luetmer, Patrick H; Lehman, Vance T; Thielen, Kent R; Nassr, Ahmad; Wald, John T

    2016-01-01

    Beyond the familiar disk herniations with typical clinical features, intervertebral disk pathologic conditions can have a wide spectrum of imaging and clinical manifestations. The goal of this review is to illustrate and discuss unusual manifestations of intervertebral disk pathologic conditions that radiologists may encounter, including disk herniations in unusual locations, those with atypical imaging features, and those with uncommon pathophysiologic findings. Examples of atypical disk herniations presented include dorsal epidural, intradural, symptomatic thoracic (including giant calcified), extreme lateral (retroperitoneal), fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid, acute intravertebral (Schmorl node), and massive lumbar disk herniations. Examples of atypical pathophysiologic conditions covered are discal cysts, fibrocartilaginous emboli to the spinal cord, tiny calcified disks or disk-level spiculated osteophytes causing spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and intracranial hypotension, and pediatric acute calcific discitis. This broad gamut of disease includes a variety of sizes of disk pathologic conditions, from the tiny (eg, the minuscule calcified disks causing high-flow CSF leaks) to the extremely large (eg, giant calcified thoracic intradural disk herniations causing myelopathy). A spectrum of clinical acuity is represented, from hyperacute fibrocartilaginous emboli causing spinal cord infarct, to acute Schmorl nodes, to chronic intradural herniations. The entities included are characterized by a range of clinical courses, from the typically devastating cord infarct caused by fibrocartilaginous emboli, to the usually spontaneously resolving pediatric acute calcific discitis. Several conditions have important differential diagnostic considerations, and others have relatively diagnostic imaging findings. The pathophysiologic findings are well understood for some of these entities and poorly defined for others. Radiologists' knowledge of this broad scope of

  6. Speech Pathology Assistant. Trainee Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Hearing and Speech Action, Silver Spring, MD.

    Part of an instructional set which includes an instructor's guide, this trainee manual is designed to provide speech pathology students with some basic and essential knowledge about the communication process. The manual contains nine modules: (1) speech pathology assistant, (2) the bases of speech (structure and function of the speech mechanism,…

  7. Pathologies in Living Kidney Donors Diagnosed in the Long-Term Care System.

    PubMed

    Kwapisz, M; Kieszek, R; Jędrzejko, K; Domagała, P; Bieniasz, M; Gozdowska, J; Zygier, D; Drozdowski, J; Zatorski, M; Nowaczyk, M; Palczewski, P; Pączek, L; Durlik, M; Chmura, A; Kwiatkowski, A

    2016-06-01

    Kidney donation should not lead to deterioration of the donor's health condition, both during the perisurgical period and in the long term. Safety of a living kidney donor becomes a prerequisite for his/her qualification. Detailed diagnostic procedures are performed to exclude any abnormalities of his/her health condition. Additionally, a long-term post-donation follow-up system for kidney donors has been set up in Poland besides the restrictive qualification system. Transplantation centers are obligated to provide a diagnostic procedures for living organ donors as a part of the monitoring of their health condition and to ensure them a medical follow-up for 10 years after the donation. A total of 141 cases of unilateral nephroureterectomy performed in 2003-2014 to obtain a kidney for transplantation were considered. Medical files of post-donation diagnostic or therapeutic methods and their outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of monitoring of donors' health condition within the framework of the long-term follow-up system for kidney donors in the aspect of detection of the donation-independent abnormalities. PMID:27496424

  8. Pathology accessioning and retrieval system with encoding by computer (PARSEC). A microcomputer-based system for anatomic pathology featuring automated SNOP coding and multiple administrative functions.

    PubMed

    Foulis, P R; Norbut, A M; Mendelow, H; Kessler, G F

    1980-06-01

    A pathology accessioning and retrieval system with encoding by computer (PARSEC) has been developed, employing a relatively inexpensive microcomputer. PARSEC performs a variety of administrative functions for anatomic pathology, including accessioning of surgical specimens, storage of patient demographic information, editing, retrieval, and archiving of patient data, as well as CAP (college of American Pathologists) workload units, billing, and inventory functions for histopathology. In addition, appropriate gross and microscopic descriptions and pathologic diagnoses can be entered into the system by a text editor. Automatic assignment of SNOP (Systematized Nomenclature of Pathology) codes, is accomplished via an online SNOP lexicon, allowing the ultimate generation of completed surgical pathology reports. The data base management system employed makes optimum use of disk storage space, while permitting rapid data retrieval. Data file maintenance is automatically accomplished by the system, requiring no user intervention. PMID:7395803

  9. Methods of diagnosing alagille syndrome

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy; Krantz, Ian D.; Spinner, Nancy B.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  10. Computed tomography of the anterior mediastinum in myasthemia gravis: a radiologic-pathologic correlative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, G.T.; Bein, M.E.; Mancuso, A.A.; Keesey, J.C.; Lupetin, A.R.; Wong, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the mediastinum were correlated with pathologic findings of the thymus following thymectomy in 57 patients with myasthenia gravis. Based on the patient's age and the overall morphology of the anterior mediastinum, CT scans were assigned one of four grades in an attempt to predict thymus pathologic findings. Using this grading, 14 of 16 cases of thymoma were suspected or definitely diagnosed. One of the two cases not diagnosed on CT was a microscopic tumor. There were no false-positive diagnoses in 11 cases graded as definitely thymoma. We conclude that thymoma can be sensitively diagnosed in patients older than 40 years of age. However, thymoma cannot be predicted with a high level of confidence in patients younger than 40 because of the difficulty in differentiating normal thymus or hyperplasia from thymoma. Recommendations for the use of CT in the preoperative evaluation of myasthenic patients are presented.

  11. CBT for eating disorders: The impact of early changes in eating pathology on later changes in personality pathology, anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Turner, Hannah; Marshall, Emily; Wood, Francesca; Stopa, Lusia; Waller, Glenn

    2016-02-01

    Whilst studies have consistently identified early symptom reduction as an important predictor of treatment outcome, the impact of early change on common comorbid features has not been investigated. This study of CBT for eating disorders explored patterns of early change in eating pathology and longer-term change in personality pathology, anxiety and depression. It also explored the impact of early change in eating pathology on overall change in personality pathology, anxiety and depression. Participants were 179 adults diagnosed with eating disorders who were offered a course of CBT in an out-patient community eating disorders service in the UK. Patients completed a measure of eating disorder psychopathology at the start of treatment and following the 6th session. They also completed measures of personality disorder cognitions, anxiety and depression at the start and end of treatment. There were significant changes in eating pathology over the first six sessions of treatment. Significant improvements were also seen in personality disorder pathology, anxiety and depression by the end of therapy. Effect sizes were medium to large for both completer and intention to treat analyses. Early changes in eating pathology were associated with later changes in common comorbid features, with early reduction in restraint being a key predictor. These findings demonstrate that early symptom change can be achieved in CBT for eating disorders when delivered in routine clinical practice. Such change has long-term benefits that go beyond the domain of eating pathology, enhancing change in personality pathology, anxiety and depression. PMID:26690743

  12. Prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in the pediatric emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Luiz Gabriel; Mendes, Elaine de Abreu

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Fever and pain, which are very common in ear, nose, and throat pathologies, are among the most frequent complaints recorded during emergency room pediatric patient treatment. Most of time, the pediatricians are called on to evaluate otorhinolaryngology disorders that requires specialist assessment. Aim: To determine the prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in a pediatric population in a reference hospital in the city of Itatiba, São Paulo. Methods: We evaluated 2,054 pediatric patients (age range, 0–12 years, 11 months) in this descriptive, transversal observational (survey) study. Data collection was performed by a single observer during 103 night shifts (07:00 p.m. to 07:00 a.m.) between January and December 2011, and included documentation of the main diagnosis, and patient age and sex. The ethics committee and research institution approved study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on diagnosis: Group A otorhinolaryngology disease and Group B included diagnoses not contained in Group A. Results: Of the total enrolled patients, 52.2% corresponded to Group A and 47.8% to Group B; 51.9% were male and 48.1% were female. The average age was 4.5 years (Group A, 3.93 years; Group B, 5.03 years). We compared the prevalence of the diagnostic hypotheses of the 2 groups. Conclusion: A large number of patients sought treatment at pediatric emergency rooms for otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses. PMID:25991987

  13. Histogram and gray level co-occurrence matrix on gray-scale ultrasound images for diagnosing lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Gyung; Yoo, Jaeheung; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Hong, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hye Sun; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Han, Kyunghwa; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether texture analysis using histogram and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) parameters can help clinicians diagnose lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT) and differentiate LT according to pathologic grade. The background thyroid pathology of 441 patients was classified into no evidence of LT, chronic LT (CLT), and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Histogram and GLCM parameters were extracted from the regions of interest on ultrasound. The diagnostic performances of the parameters for diagnosing and differentiating LT were calculated. Of the histogram and GLCM parameters, the mean on histogram had the highest Az (0.63) and VUS (0.303). As the degrees of LT increased, the mean decreased and the standard deviation and entropy increased. The mean on histogram from gray-scale ultrasound showed the best diagnostic performance as a single parameter in differentiating LT according to pathologic grade as well as in diagnosing LT. PMID:27336835

  14. Digital pathology and anatomic pathology laboratory information system integration to support digital pathology sign-out

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huazhang; Birsa, Joe; Farahani, Navid; Hartman, Douglas J.; Piccoli, Anthony; O’Leary, Matthew; McHugh, Jeffrey; Nyman, Mark; Stratman, Curtis; Kvarnstrom, Vanja; Yousem, Samuel; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Background: The adoption of digital pathology offers benefits over labor-intensive, time-consuming, and error-prone manual processes. However, because most workflow and laboratory transactions are centered around the anatomical pathology laboratory information system (APLIS), adoption of digital pathology ideally requires integration with the APLIS. A digital pathology system (DPS) integrated with the APLIS was recently implemented at our institution for diagnostic use. We demonstrate how such integration supports digital workflow to sign-out anatomical pathology cases. Methods: Workflow begins when pathology cases get accessioned into the APLIS (CoPathPlus). Glass slides from these cases are then digitized (Omnyx VL120 scanner) and automatically uploaded into the DPS (Omnyx® Integrated Digital Pathology (IDP) software v.1.3). The APLIS transmits case data to the DPS via a publishing web service. The DPS associates scanned images with the correct case using barcode labels on slides and information received from the APLIS. When pathologists remotely open a case in the DPS, additional information (e.g. gross pathology details, prior cases) gets retrieved from the APLIS through a query web service. Results: Following validation of this integration, pathologists at our institution have signed out more than 1000 surgical pathology cases in a production environment. Integration between the APLIS and DPS enabled pathologists to review digital slides while simultaneously having access to pertinent case metadata. The introduction of a digital workflow eliminated costly manual tasks involving matching of glass slides and avoided delays waiting for glass slides to be delivered. Conclusion: Integrating the DPS and APLIS were instrumental for successfully implementing a digital solution at our institution for pathology sign-out. The integration streamlined our digital sign-out workflow, diminished the potential for human error related to matching slides, and improved the sign

  15. Investigating facets of personality in adult pathological gamblers with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Davtian, Margarit; Reid, Rory C; Fong, Timothy W

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study explored facets of personality in a sample of pathological gamblers with ADHD (n = 52) and without ADHD (n = 43). Participants were assessed for psychopathology and gambling disorders using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the National Opinion Research Center DSM Screen for Gambling Problems, and the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale. Facets of personality were assessed using the NEO Personality Inventory–Revised. Group differences emerged across several facets of personality when analyzed using multivariate statistics. Although both groups experienced difficulties in several areas compared with norming data (e.g., greater depression, higher impulsivity, lower self-esteem and lower self-discipline), these facets of personality were more pronounced in pathological gamblers with ADHD. Most notable among these differences are tendencies for gamblers with ADHD to experience greater levels of emotional instability, interpersonal sensitivity and stress proneness. Pathological gamblers with ADHD also appear to experience lower self-esteem, greater difficulty being assertive and lower levels of self-discipline. Surprisingly, both groups were comparable on facets of impulsivity. These findings suggest that pathological gamblers diagnosed with adult ADHD may experience additional challenges compared with pathological gamblers without ADHD. PMID:22815658

  16. Image Analysis in Surgical Pathology.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Mark C; Monaco, James P; Bui, Marilyn M

    2016-06-01

    Digitization of glass slides of surgical pathology samples facilitates a number of value-added capabilities beyond what a pathologist could previously do with a microscope. Image analysis is one of the most fundamental opportunities to leverage the advantages that digital pathology provides. The ability to quantify aspects of a digital image is an extraordinary opportunity to collect data with exquisite accuracy and reliability. In this review, we describe the history of image analysis in pathology and the present state of technology processes as well as examples of research and clinical use. PMID:27241112

  17. Cue reactivity in active pathological, abstinent pathological, and regular gamblers.

    PubMed

    Sodano, Ruthlyn; Wulfert, Edelgard

    2010-03-01

    Twenty-one treatment-seeking pathological gamblers, 21 pathological gamblers in recovery, and 21 recreational gamblers watched two video-taped exciting gambling scenarios and an exciting roller-coaster control scenario while their arousal (heart rate and subjective excitement) and urge to gamble were being measured. The gamblers did not differ significantly in cue-elicited heart rate elevations or excitement. However, the active pathological gamblers reported significantly greater urges to gamble across all cues compared to the abstinent pathological gamblers and, with marginal significance (p = 0.06), also compared to the social gamblers. Further exploration of these findings revealed that active pathological gamblers experience urges to gamble in response to exciting situations, whether or not they are gambling related, whereas abstinent and social gamblers only report urges to an exciting gambling-related cue. This suggests that for pathological gamblers excitement itself, irrespective of its source, may become a conditioned stimulus capable of triggering gambling behavior. Implications for treatment and future research are discussed. PMID:19662519

  18. Expertise in clinical pathology: combining the visual and cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Thomas; Jarodzka, Halszka; Nap, Marius; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G; Boshuizen, Henny P A

    2015-10-01

    Expertise studies in the medical domain often focus on either visual or cognitive aspects of expertise. As a result, characteristics of expert behaviour are often described as either cognitive or visual abilities. This study focuses on both aspects of expertise and analyses them along three overarching constructs: (1) encapsulations, (2) efficiency, and (3) hypothesis testing. This study was carried out among clinical pathologists performing an authentic task: diagnosing microscopic slides. Participants were 13 clinical pathologists (experts), 12 residents in pathology (intermediates), and 13 medical students (novices). They all diagnosed seven cases in a virtual microscope and gave post hoc explanations for their diagnoses. The collected data included eye movements, microscope navigation, and verbal protocols. Results showed that experts used lower magnifications and verbalized their findings as diagnoses. Also, their diagnostic paths were more efficient, including fewer microscope movements and shorter reasoning chains. Experts entered relevant areas later in their diagnostic process, and visited fewer of them. Intermediates used relatively high magnifications and based their diagnoses on specific abnormalities. Also, they took longer to reach their diagnosis and checked more relevant areas. Novices searched in detail, described findings by their appearances, and uttered long reasoning chains. These results indicate that overarching constructs can justly be identified: encapsulations and efficiency are apparent in both visual and cognitive aspects of expertise. PMID:25677013

  19. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  20. [Diagnosing and therapy of gout].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Karel

    2015-06-01

    Gout is an inflammatory, metabolically conditioned crystal-induced disease. Prevalence of gout is on the increase. In clinical practice it is frequently wrongly diagnosed and the therapy of acute attacks in particular is not adequate. The first part of the publication discusses diagnostic possibilities of gouty arthritis. First of all the advantage of the analysis of synovial exudate and of direct evidence of crystals in the polarization microscope is emphasized. If the material for crystallographic analysis is not available, it is necessary to use a combination of clinical criteria as specified e.g. in the recommendations of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). The second part focuses on the therapy of gout which is divided into the periods of asymptomatic hyperuricemia, acute gouty attack, intercritical and chronic tophaceous gout. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is only treated when uricemia greater than 540 µmol/l occur repeatedly, or when other risk factors and comorbidities are present. In the treatment of acute gouty attack its early start is more important than the choice of a preparation. Alternatives are NSA, colchicine or glucocorticoids. A newly regist-ered medicine for the treatment of refractory acute inflammation is the IL-1 inhibitor canakinumab. The treatment of hyperuricemia involves regimen and diet measures, abstinence and hypouricemic therapy. Available are the xanthine oxidase inhibitors, allopurinol and febuxostat; the latter is better suited for patients with moderate renal insufficiency. A new medicine for the treatment of severe refractory tophaceous gout is pegloticase.Key words: gouty arthritis - colchicine - nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs. PMID:26258966

  1. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  2. Soft Tissue Masses of Hand: A Radio-Pathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aditi; Prakash, Mahesh; Gupta, Pankaj; Tripathy, Satyaswarup; Kakkar, Nandita; Srinivasan, Radhika; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate soft tissue masses of the hand with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (USG) and to correlate imaging findings with pathological findings. Material and Methods. Thirty-five patients with soft tissue masses of the hand were evaluated with high resolution USG and contrast enhanced MRI of the hand, prospectively over a period of 2.5 years. The radiological diagnosis was then compared with cytology/histopathology. Results. There were a total of 19 (55%) females. The mean age was 27.45 ± 14.7 years. Majority (45%) of cases were heteroechoic. Four cases were predominantly hyperechoic. These were later diagnosed as lipomas. Four cases were anechoic (diagnosed as ganglions). Only four lesions showed hyperintense signal on T1-weighted images. Out of these, 3 were lipomas and one was cavernous haemangioma. Three lesions were hypointense on T2-weighted images. All these lesions were diagnosed as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. A correct diagnosis was possible on MRI in 80% of cases (n = 28). Conclusion. MRI provides specific findings for diagnosis of certain soft tissue lesions of the hand. Ultrasonography allows accurate diagnosis of hemangioma/vascular malformations. However, in most conditions, imaging findings are nonspecific and diagnosis rests on pathologic evaluation. PMID:26421187

  3. [One of the variants of larvate cyclothymic disorder simulating pathology of the locomotor system].

    PubMed

    Lisina, M A

    1990-01-01

    Based on the reported data and the authors' findings 40 cases of larvate cyclothymia are described. The pivotal symptomatology of the disease involved masked hypochondriac subdepressions that imitated pathology of the bones and joints. In view of this fact the mental disease could not be recognized by the physicians and was diagnosed erroneously as a pathology of the bones and joints. The author provides a 3-component structure of the given hypochondriac depressions and differential diagnostic criteria for their separation from genuine pathology of the bones and joints. PMID:2163178

  4. Novel approaches in diagnosing tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; Dang, Ngoc A.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Gibson, Tim; Anthony, Richard; Claassens, Mareli M.; Kaal, Erwin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2011-06-01

    The WHO declared tuberculosis (TB) a global emergency. An estimated 8-9 million new cases occur each year with 2-3 million deaths. Currently, TB is diagnosed mostly by chest-X ray and staining of the mycobacteria in sputum with a detection limit of 1x104 bacteria /ml. There is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools for TB especially for developing countries. We have validated the electronic nose from TD Technology for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by headspace analysis of 284 sputum samples from TB patients. We used linear discriminant function analysis resulting in a sensitivity of 75% a specificity of 67% and an accuracy of 69%. Further research is still required to improve the results by choosing more selective sensors and sampling techniques. We used a fast gas chromatography- mass spectrometry method (GC-MS). The automated procedure is based on the injection of sputum samples which are methylated inside the GC injector using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-GC-MS). Hexacosanoic acid in combination with tuberculostearic acid was found to be specific for the presence of M. tuberculosis. The detection limit was similar to microscopy. We found no false positives, all microscopy and culture positive samples were also found positive with the THM-GC-MS method. The detection of ribosomal RNA from the infecting organism offers great potential since rRNA molecules outnumber chromosomal DNA by a factor 1000. It thus may possible to detect the organism without amplification of the nucleic acids (NA). We used a capture and a tagged detector probe for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis in sputum. So far the detection limit is 1x106 bacteria / ml. Currently we are testing a Lab-On-A-Chip Interferometer detection system.

  5. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  6. A case of giant mediastinal cyst initially detected and diagnosed by echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Li, XiaoDong; Wang, XiaoCong; Duan, XiuMei; Xu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mediastinal cysts are a group of benign mediastinal lesions, and their diagnoses are primarily depended on x-ray and computed tomography. The development of ultrasound instruments and inspection techniques in recent years has led to the ability to use transthoracic echocardiography to clearly display structures surrounding the heart according to the dark fluid space (blood) of the atrium, ventricles, and large vessels as an acoustic window. This technique offers improved detection rates of mediastinal lesions. We report a case of a mediastinal cyst that was first detected and diagnosed on thoracic echocardiography examination and then confirmed by thoracoscopic surgery and pathological analysis. PMID:25640147

  7. Pathologic Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma in the United States: Its Status and Prognostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Miaozhen; Qiu, Huijuan; Jin, Ying; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhou, Yixin; Wang, Zixian; Wang, Deshen; Ren, Chao; Luo, Huiyan; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Fenghua; Li, Yuhong; Yang, Dajun; Xu, Ruihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Even with the development of new biopsy methods, diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is sometimes without histological evidence. The aim of our study is to find out the status of pancreatic cancer patients who are diagnosed without pathologic confirm and the prognostic value of pathologic diagnosis. Methods: We identified 52,759 pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Logistic regression model was used to identify factors relating to no pathologic diagnosis. Multivariable Cox regression model identified potential prognostic factors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: There were 6206 (11.76%) patients without pathologic diagnosis. Older age, reported from nursing/convalescent home/hospice or physician's office/private medical practitioner, early year of diagnosis, larger tumor size, pancreatic head cancer, unmarried patients, uninsured and stage I disease all contributed to no pathologic diagnosis. Median cause specific-survival for patients with and without pathologic diagnosis were 7.72 and 3.52 months, respectively. The HR for pathologic diagnosis was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89-0.95), P<0.001. Conclusions: Pathologic diagnosis was an independent prognostic factor for pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. New diagnostic methods are needed to get the pathologic diagnosis. PMID:27076851

  8. Comprehensive capture of cutaneous melanoma by the Ontario Cancer Registry: validation study using community pathology reports.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jennifer M; Schwartz, Rodrigo; Fung, Kinwah; Rochon, Paula; Chan, An-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is often managed outside hospital settings, creating the potential for underreporting to cancer registries. To our knowledge, completeness of melanoma capture in cancer registries has not been assessed using external data sources since the 1980s. We evaluated the melanoma capture rate from 1993 to 2009 in a provincial cancer registry. We identified all melanoma diagnoses in pathology reports from a major community laboratory in Ontario, Canada. Pathologically confirmed diagnoses were linked to Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) records using health insurance numbers. We calculated capture rates as the proportion of patients with melanoma confirmed by a pathology report, with a corresponding melanoma diagnosis in OCR. OCR captured 3,798 of 4,275 (88.8, 95 % confidence interval: 87.9, 89.8 %) invasive melanoma diagnoses over the 17-year period. Annual capture rates of 94 % or higher were found for over half the study period. Among all 29,133 melanoma diagnoses in OCR, 27.6 % were registered based on a pathology report alone, compared with 3.4 % for non-cutaneous malignancies. This suggests that comprehensive capture of melanoma cases by a provincial cancer registry is achievable using source data from community laboratories. There is a need for ongoing validation to ensure data remain accurate and complete to reliably inform clinical care, research, and policy. PMID:26537120

  9. A Proposed Model for Diagnosing Information Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Explains the concept of diagnosing information needs as part of the role of the school library media specialist. Topics discussed include the diagnostic process, i.e., the reference interview; information psychology; theories of information transfer; a model for diagnosing information needs; and implications for practitioners and for research. (19…

  10. [Diagnosing and expertizing asbestos-induced occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Schneider, J; Woitowitz, H-J

    2011-11-01

    Due to latency periods that can last for decades, asbestos-related diseases show 18 years after the enforcement of the prohibition of asbestos application in Germany their highest numbers. In the centre of attention are asbestos-induced pleural fibroses, mesotheliomas, asbestoses, lung and laryngeal cancer. Diagnosing and expertizing these diseases causes difficulties, is hitherto non-uniform and does frequently not correspond to the current medico-scientific expertise. This induced the German Respiratory Society as well as the German Society of Occupational and Environmental Medicine in cooperation with the German Society of Pathology, the German Radiology Society and the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Cervical Surgery, to develop the above mentioned guideline during seven meetings moderated by AWMF. The required thorough diagnosis is based on the detailed recording of a qualified occupational history. Since the sole radiological and pathological-anatomical findings cannot sufficiently contribute to the causal relationship the occupational history recorded by a general physician and a specialist is of decisive importance. These physicians have to report suspected occupational diseases and to advise patients on social and medical questions. Frequently, problems occur if the recognition of an occupational disease is neglected due to a supposedly too low exposure or too few ferruginous bodies or low fibre concentrations in lung tissue. The new S2k directive summarizing the current medico-scientific knowledge is for this reason, for diagnoses and expert opinions as well as for the determination of a reduced capacity for work a very important source of information. PMID:22048939

  11. [Postural imbalance in patients with vascular brain pathology].

    PubMed

    Kononova, E L; Balunov, O A; Anan'eva, N I; Sitnik, L I

    2004-01-01

    Using MRI survey, 163 patients with various brain pathology of vascular genesis were studied. Vascular dementia according to NINDS-AIREN classification was diagnosed in 15% of patients. Cognitive disturbances in other patients did not reach a level of dementia. A control group comprised 61 subjects without rough structural changes on MRI and cognitive dysfunction. Motor disorders were estimated according to classification of J. Nutt et al. (1993), quantitative static changes were registered using computer stabilography. The results of the study showed that postural instability occurs in 100% of patients with vascular brain pathology. A degree of its expression elevated in direct proportion to the expression of cognitive disturbances, reaching a maximum in patients with dementia. PMID:15581031

  12. [Pathology of the vitreomacular interface].

    PubMed

    Pop, Monica; Gheorghe, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Vitreous role in the pathophysiology of retinal diseases has increased importantly over the recent years. This was possible using Optical Coherence Tomography which reviewed the way the vitreoretinal interface should be looked at and defined and classified new pathologies such as Vitreoretinal Traction Syndrome. Vitreous is not an empty space but an important anatomical structure with role in ocular physiology. With age biochemical changes occur so that vitreous starts to liquefy. Once the vitreous is liquefied (sinchisis) it collapses and passes in the retrohialoid space (sineresis). In complete PVD besides sinchisis there is a weakness of the adherence between the posterior cortex and ILM with total detachment of posterior cortex. Abnormal adhesions are associated with incomplete PVD. The definition and understanting of vitreoretinal pathology is an active and continuous process, PVD being the trigger of a lot of retinal pathologies: epiretinal membrane, macular hole, tractional macular oedema, VMTS, myopic traction maculopathy, exacerbations of exudative ARMD. PMID:25300121

  13. Paediatric brainstem: A comprehensive review of pathologies on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Chandan; Kakkar, Shruti; Saggar, Kavita; Goraya, Jatinder S; Ahluwalia, Archana; Arora, Ankur

    2016-08-01

    The brainstem is a midline structure formed by the midbrain, pons and medulla and is a home for various vital neurological centres of the human body. A diverse spectrum of disease entities can involve the brainstem, which includes infections, metabolic disorders, demyelination, vascular conditions, neurodegenerative disorders and tumours. Brainstem involvement can be primary or secondary, i.e., as part of systemic disorders. Due to the overlapping clinical presentation and symptomatology, imaging plays a decisive role in the detection, localisation and characterisation of brainstem pathologies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice and the use of advanced MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy can be especially helpful in providing a tenable diagnoses. This article is a compilation of the MR imaging manifestations of a spectrum of common and uncommon brainstem pathologies that can be encountered in the paediatric age group. Teaching Points • The paediatric brainstem can be afflicted by many pathologies that may overlap clinico-radiologically. • MRI is the best modality for the localisation and diagnosis of brainstem pathologies. • Diffusion-weighted imaging is useful in the diagnosis of vascular and metabolic disorders. • Occasionally, demyelination and neoplasms can be indistinguishable on imaging. PMID:27216793

  14. [What place and what future for the pathology of infectious and tropical diseases in France?].

    PubMed

    Hofman, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The management of tissues and cellular samples by the pathologists in the infectious and tropical diseases pathology field in 2014 needs a strong knowledge of both morphological and molecular domains which includes the good control: (i) of the taxonomy of infectious and tropical diseases pathology leading to the pathogens identification and (ii) of the ancillary methods which can be used in fixed samples in order to detect or better identify these pathogens. There is a recent paradox in France concerning the frequency of infectious diseases to be diagnosed in pathology laboratories and the progressive loss of pathologist's expertise in this domain. Different reasons could explain this statement including the omnipresence of the tumour lesions to be managed in a pathology laboratory as well as the recent constraints associated with the different biomarkers that are mandatory to be detected by immunohistochemistry and/or by molecular biology. Even if the microbiologists play a pivotal role for identifying the different pathogens as well as for the assessment of their sensitivity to the anti-microbial drugs, a large number of infectious diseases can be diagnosed only on fixed tissue and/or cells by the pathologists. The purpose of this review is to describe the current and future issues of infectious and tropical diseases diagnoses in pathology laboratories, in particular in France. PMID:24950861

  15. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  16. Whole slide images for primary diagnostics of urinary system pathology: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Huisman, André; Jonges, Geertruida N.; ten Kate, Fiebo J.W.; Goldschmeding, Roel; van Diest, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: During the last decade, whole slide images (WSI) have been used in many areas of pathology such as teaching, research, digital archiving, teleconsultation and quality assurance testing. However, WSI have as yet not much been used for upfront diagnostics because of the lack of validation studies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of WSI for primary diagnosis of urinary tract pathology. Materials and Methods: 100 consecutive urinary tract biopsies and resections which had been diagnosed conventionally between the years 2008-2009 were scanned at 20× magnification, and rediagnosed by two pathologists on WSI, having the original clinical information available, but blinded to the original diagnoses. Original and WSI diagnoses were compared and classified as concordant, slightly discordant (without clinical consequences) and discordant. Results: Original and WSI based rediagnosis were concordant in 87% of the cases. Original and WSI diagnosis were slightly discordant in 8% of cases. Major discrepancies with clinical or prognostic implications were founded in only 5 cases. However, for 6 out of the 13 discrepancies, WSI based diagnoses were considered to be better than the original diagnoses. Conclusion: Primary diagnostics of urinary tract specimens can be reliably done on WSI. Further improvements of image resolution may help to increase diagnostic accuracy and WSI acceptance in routine pathology. PMID:25610886

  17. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  18. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  19. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  20. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  1. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  2. 27 CFR 22.107 - Pathological laboratories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pathological laboratories... Pathological laboratories. (a) Pathological laboratories, not operated by a hospital or sanitarium, may... sanitariums. If a pathological laboratory does not exclusively conduct analyses or tests for hospitals...

  3. Primary hydatid cyst of the gallbladder: an unusual localization diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Noomene, Rabii; Maamer, Anis Ben; Bouhafa, Ahmed; Haoues, Noomen; Oueslati, Abdelaziz; Cherif, Abderraouf

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid disease is endemic in Tunisia and has been considered as one of the most common surgical pathology. Several localizations have been described, but hydatidosis of the liver is the most frequent clinical entity. Primary hydatid cyst of the gallbladder is very rare. We report in this observation a new case of primary hydatid cyst of the gallbladder diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). PMID:23504393

  4. Molecular genetics of sarcomas: applications to diagnoses and therapy.

    PubMed

    Toguchida, Junya; Nakayama, Tomitaka

    2009-09-01

    Sarcomas are mesenchymal cancers consisting of tumors with various clinical and pathological features. Some of them compel affected individuals to lose important musculoskeletal functions, and some of them are highly malignant and life-threatening. A great amount of genetic information for sarcomas has accumulated during the past two decades, contributing diagnoses and treatments. From the standpoint of molecular genetics, sarcomas are classified into two groups: those with defined genetic alterations and those with various genetic alterations. The genetic alterations in the first group include reciprocal translocations resulting in fusion oncoproteins and oncogenic mutations of defined genes such as those of the c-kit gene in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The function of fusion proteins includes transcription regulator, signal transducer, chromatic remodeling factor, and growth factor, some of which are suitable targets for the molecular therapy. In tumors belonging to the second group, the number of which is far larger than those of the first group, considerable genetic heterogeneity was found even among tumors with same pathological diagnosis. The disruption of the RB and p53 pathways was frequently found, resulting in the dysregulation of cell cycle and the genomic instability. The application of molecular target therapy for tumors in this group requires novel strategies to overcome cross talk between different signal pathways. Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments has indicated that the cells of origin of sarcomas are tissue stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells, and the application of stem cell biology holds the promise of novel treatment options. PMID:19555393

  5. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing “landscape”

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  6. The practice of pathology in Africa.

    PubMed

    Kaschula, Ronald Otto Christian

    2013-06-01

    In attempting to advance the health of women and children in Africa, practitioners should be cognizant of the history of health care delivery in the continent and the nature of the existing systems. Although autopsies began in Africa several millennia ago, traditional healers have held sway for many centuries and continue to do so for most of Africa's people. The role of laboratory medicine in advancing modern health care has been impeded by its ever-increasing high cost, lack of confidence in the system, lack of adequately trained personnel, and inadequate provision of facilities and training opportunities. This is partly caused by the continent having the highest proportion of young children in the world, an exceptionally heavy disease burden, and a low proportion of tax payers. For laboratory medicine to have its intended effect in making accurate diagnoses, national, minimal standards for certification and practice should be formulated. There should be periodic inspections, rewards for excellence, and opportunities for professional development. It is recommended that laboratory medicine be practiced in a 4-tier system, with the highest in teaching hospitals, and the lowest in primary health care clinics. For the practice of anatomic pathology to advance, an effective referral system and an equitable minimal and maximal workload for each pathologist are needed. The changing dynamics of urbanization, with massive unemployment rates, unhealthy life styles, and the continued role of traditional healers calls for gifted leaders to come to the fore and facilitate internal and external cooperation with diverse health care agencies. PMID:23721269

  7. Parenting styles and eating disorder pathology.

    PubMed

    Enten, Roni S; Golan, Moria

    2009-06-01

    Our objective was to investigate the association between parenting style and eating disorder symptoms in patients treated in an intensive outpatient center for eating disorders. The study design is a cross-sectional survey set in a community-based facility for eating disorders. Participants included 53 families, including 32 with a child meeting the DSM-IV criteria for anorexia nervosa, 18 for bulimia nervosa, and 3 diagnosed ED-NOS. Data was collected using the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ), the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). Significant, negative correlations were found between drive for thinness scores and body dissatisfaction scores and the patient's perception of the father as authoritative. Total patient EDI score was significantly and positively correlated with patient's perception of the father as authoritarian and inversely correlated with her perception of him as authoritative. These results emphasize the importance of fathers' role in the eating disorder pathology, a relatively untapped area of research. PMID:19501782

  8. Sonography of pathological changes in the hand.

    PubMed

    Dębek, Anna; Czyrny, Zbigniew; Nowicki, Paweł

    2014-03-01

    Everyday medical practice shows that most common problems within the hand result from overload, injuries and degeneration. Dorsal side pathologies such as de Quervain's and Wartenberg's disease, intersection syndrome or degenerative lesions of carpometa-carpal joint of the thumb discussed in the paper can be accurately diagnosed and differentiated by means of ultrasound examination. Ultrasound is similarly powerful in detection and grading of traumatic lesions involving extensor tendons and their sagittal bands or the flexor tendons and their pulleys. In the case of carpal tunnel syndrome one can not only visualize the median nerve but also other structures of the tunnel that may cause compression. Similarly ulnar nerve compression within the Guyon's canal can be well evaluated. In cases of nerve trauma one can precisely define the level, and in cases of nerve discontinuity, the distance between stumps can be measured which is important in surgery planning. Often nerve trauma is a sequelae of tendon reconstruction. In such cases scars and nerve entrapment can be depicted. Tumors within a hand are usually benign, of which the most common are ganglia. On ultrasound examination a connection between a ganglion and its source (usually a joint or sheath) can frequently be defined. The relationship of tumors to nerves, tendon sheaths or vessels may suggest their nature. Ultrasound with dynamic tissue assessment is a very valuable adjunct to clinical examination. PMID:26675521

  9. Sonography of pathological changes in the hand

    PubMed Central

    Czyrny, Zbigniew; Nowicki, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Everyday medical practice shows that most common problems within the hand result from overload, injuries and degeneration. Dorsal side pathologies such as de Quervain's and Wartenberg's disease, intersection syndrome or degenerative lesions of carpometa-carpal joint of the thumb discussed in the paper can be accurately diagnosed and differentiated by means of ultrasound examination. Ultrasound is similarly powerful in detection and grading of traumatic lesions involving extensor tendons and their sagittal bands or the flexor tendons and their pulleys. In the case of carpal tunnel syndrome one can not only visualize the median nerve but also other structures of the tunnel that may cause compression. Similarly ulnar nerve compression within the Guyon's canal can be well evaluated. In cases of nerve trauma one can precisely define the level, and in cases of nerve discontinuity, the distance between stumps can be measured which is important in surgery planning. Often nerve trauma is a sequelae of tendon reconstruction. In such cases scars and nerve entrapment can be depicted. Tumors within a hand are usually benign, of which the most common are ganglia. On ultrasound examination a connection between a ganglion and its source (usually a joint or sheath) can frequently be defined. The relationship of tumors to nerves, tendon sheaths or vessels may suggest their nature. Ultrasound with dynamic tissue assessment is a very valuable adjunct to clinical examination. PMID:26675521

  10. Voice Pathologies and the 'Hippocratic Triangle'.

    PubMed

    Webster, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Hippocratic authors frequently utilise silence, babbling, lisping and otherverbal signs to diagnose a variety of physical illnesses and predict theircourse. This chapter examines these 'voice pathologies' and evaluatestheir impact on the dialogue between patients and Hippocratic physicians. In short, Hippocratic authors treat patients' voices in two dissonant ways. On the one hand, physicians promote some form of discourse,implicitly relying on patients to report internal sensations resulting fromillnesses. On the other hand, they develop extensive techniques to diminish and downplay this reliance. As a result, Hippocratic authors treatpatients' mouths not so much as the loci of potential subjective expression, but as orifices secreting verbal discharges. They weaken the distinction between the (sonic) effluvia of the mouth and those of other bodilyoutlets, thus bringing verbal output into close conceptual proximity withother types of discharge. Words come to be scrutinised for their quantity,quality and consistency as though they were quasi-excreta of the mouth. (see text). Announce what has happened, discern what is happening and foretellwhat will happen; attend to these things. Practice two things concerningdiseases: help or do no harm. The art consists of three parts: the disease,the diseased and the physician; the physician is the servant of the art; thediseased fights against the disease with the physician (Hipp., Epid.1.5L. 2.634.6-636.4 = Kiülewein 189,24-190, 6). PMID:26946677

  11. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  12. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  13. THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CROME, L.; STERN, J.

    DATA FROM RECENT COMPREHENSIVE STUDIES OF THE PATHOLOGY OF MENTAL RETARDATION ARE ASSEMBLED, INCLUDING MATERIAL ON ETIOLOGY, MORPHOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. AREAS COVERED ARE (1) GENETIC CAUSES OF MENTAL RETARDATION, (2) DISORDERS OF GESTATION, (3) BIRTH INJURY, (4) GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS OF POSTNATAL CAUSES OF MENTAL…

  14. [An elderly man presenting polyarthritis diagnosed as chronic tophaceous gout].

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Misa; Aoki, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    An 85-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for swollen and painful bilateral lower legs and a high fever. He was initially diagnosed with acute cellulitis and treated with antibiotics. Several days after the improvement of his swollen legs, he complained of both shoulder and arm pain. The laboratory data at this time were as follow: C-reactive protein 10.7 mg/dL, uric acid 8.7 mg/dL, and creatinine 1.07 mg/dL. Both rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibody were negative. Whole-body gallium scintigraphy showed a high pathological accumulation in both the shoulders and left wrist. As polymyalgia rheumatica was suspected, oral prednisolone (PSL) of 10 mg/day was started. The patient's shoulder pain improved and he was discharged. However, he was hospitalized twice in the next month because of left shoulder, left knee, right arm, and right wrist pain. During the third hospitalization, we found a subcutaneous nodule on right toe. Aspiration material from the nodule was a white paste, showing acicular crystals under the microscope. According to these findings, the nodule was diagnosed as a tophaceous nodule, and recurrent episodes of polyarthritis were diagnosed as chronic tophaceous gout. Low-dose PSL was continued and febuxostat was added. This patient had multiple risk factors for chronic tophaceous gout: obesity, a habit of drinking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, and interruption of allopurinol treatment. We herein discuss the clinical course of the patient, the interruption of allopurinol treatment and polypharmacy in elderly patients. PMID:26700782

  15. Histological examination has a major impact on macroscopic necropsy diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, F D C; Saldiva, P H N; Mauad, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Necropsy is the gold standard for clinicopathological discrepancy studies and epidemiological surveys. Inadequate sampling or lack of tissue may hamper the final interpretation and quality of the necropsy. Aim: To compare the histological and gross necropsy diagnoses of different organs. Methods: A retrospective comparison of the provisional reports (gross findings only) and the final reports (after histological examination) of the necropsies performed at the department of pathology of the Hospital das Clínicas, Sao Paulo University, Brazil, a large tertiary care complex, in 2001. The total number of diagnoses listed for the lungs, heart, liver, pancreas, kidneys, and spleen were calculated. Findings were categorised into concordant/refined diagnosis, discordant/additional diagnosis, histology needed, and inconclusive. Results: Three hundred and seventy one postmortem reports were analysed. There were 214 men and 157 women, with a mean age of 50.3 years, ranging from 1 to 92. The lung received the highest number (954) and the pancreas the lowest number (390) of diagnoses. The highest frequencies of discrepancies between the gross and microscopic findings were found in the lung and the liver: 38.7% and 35.1%, respectively. The brain had the lowest frequency of discrepancies. In a small number of cases, the final diagnosis could only be achieved through microscopic analysis, with the highest frequency being found in the kidneys (8.5%). Conclusions: Histological analysis has a major impact on previously performed gross diagnosis at necropsy, especially in the lungs, liver, and kidneys. Adequate sampling and histological analysis are important for necropsy quality. PMID:16311344

  16. Time Devours Things: How Impulsivity and Time Affect Temporal Decisions in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Rattin, Andrea; Guerreschi, Cesare; Sanfey, Alan G.; Bonini, Nicolao

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with several psychiatric disorders in which the loss of control of a specific behavior determines the syndrome itself. One particularly interesting population characterized by reported high impulsivity and problematic decision-making are those diagnosed with pathological gambling. However the association between impulsivity and decision making in pathological gambling has been only partially confirmed until now. We tested 23 normal controls and 23 diagnosed pathological gamblers in an intertemporal choice task, as well as other personality trait measurements. Results showed that gamblers scored higher on impulsivity questionnaires, and selected a higher percentage of impatient choices (higher percentage of smaller, sooner rewards), when compared to normal controls. Moreover, gamblers were faster in terms of reaction times at selecting the smaller, sooner options and discounted rewards more rapidly over time. Importantly, regression analyses clarified that self-reported measures of impulsivity played a significant role in biasing decisions towards small but more rapidly available rewards. In the present study we found evidence for impulsivity in personality traits and decisions in pathological gamblers relative to controls. We conclude by speculating on the need to incorporate impulsivity and decision biases in the conceptualization of pathological gambling for a better understanding and treatment of this pathology. PMID:25296184

  17. Macroscopic Anomalies and Pathological Findings in and Around the Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Kristian; Lempainen, Lasse; Sarimo, Janne; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Orava, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nonsurgical treatments for chronic Achilles tendinopathy (AT) results in unpredictable success rates. Surgical treatment may be chosen as reports show mostly encouraging but variable success rates depending on the pathology. The distribution of surgically confirmed pathologies in AT is largely unknown. Purpose: To ascertain the distributions of macroscopically observed anomalies in participants undergoing surgical treatment for chronic AT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The main macroscopic pathologies of 1661 chronic Achilles tendon overuse injuries, which were diagnosed and surgically treated by a single surgeon, were reviewed. The surgeries were performed on professional and recreational athletes during the years 1976-1980, 1986-1990, 1996-2000, and 2006-2010. Surgical diagnoses, along with age- and sport-specific characteristics, were collected retrospectively from patient records. Results: The relative proportion of tendinosis increased during the study period from 4.2% to 21%, and paratenonitis decreased from 50% to 26%. Retrocalcaneal pathologies were the most common surgically confirmed lesions at 30%, while the mean age at surgery increased by 11 years over the entire study period. Conclusion: Surgically confirmed pathologies in and around the Achilles tendon showed coherent changes, chronic paratenonitis, and retrocalcaneal problems as the most prevalent findings. The classification of midportion and insertional tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis in AT should strictly be used as a clinical diagnosis. During surgical evaluations, the diagnosis is further clarified as more specific pathologies may be identified. PMID:26535293

  18. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Mitral Valve Prolapse Diagnosed? Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) most often is detected during a ... a clicking sound as they shut. If the mitral valve is leaking blood back into the left atrium, ...

  19. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Lung Carcinoid Tumor » Detailed Guide » How are lung carcinoid tumors diagnosed? Share this Page Close Push escape to close share window. Print ...

  20. How Can Dyslexia Be Objectively Diagnosed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlidis, George Th.

    1979-01-01

    Describes experiments showing that the eye movement patterns of dyslexic children differed from those of normal and backward readers during both a reading and a nonreading task. Discusses possible causes of dyslexia and ways of diagnosing it. (GT)

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  4. Children Diagnosed with Cancer: Returning to School

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the child and the whole family. Good communication starts early. After your child is diagnosed and ... or comments. Every child has their own coping style. Helping them figure out what feels best for ...

  5. How Is von Willebrand Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your von Willebrand factor. The test helps your doctor diagnose what type of VWD you have. Platelet function test. This test measures how well your platelets are working. You may have these tests ...

  6. Diagnosing Asthma in Very Young Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Diagnosing Asthma in Babies & Toddlers Page Content Article Body One ... family with recurrent bronchitis or sinus problems. When Asthma is Not the Cause Your pediatrician will listen ...

  7. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes There are several ways ... mg/dl – 199 mg/dl Preventing Type 2 Diabetes You will not develop type 2 diabetes automatically ...

  8. Tips to diagnose uncommon nail disorders.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Samantha L; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-04-01

    This article reviews 6 nail disorders that, although easy to diagnose, are misdiagnosed frequently by dermatologists and general practitioners. Diagnostic clues are emphasized to familiarize readers with features that indicate the correct diagnosis. We focus on two common tumors (onychomatricoma and onychopapilloma), two rare genetic conditions that can be diagnosed owing to nail changes (Darier disease and nail patella syndrome), and two uncommon acquired disorders (the yellow nail syndrome and lichen striatus). PMID:25828712

  9. The mouse pathology ontology, MPATH; structure and applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The capture and use of disease-related anatomic pathology data for both model organism phenotyping and human clinical practice requires a relatively simple nomenclature and coding system that can be integrated into data collection platforms (such as computerized medical record-keeping systems) to enable the pathologist to rapidly screen and accurately record observations. The MPATH ontology was originally constructed in 2,000 by a committee of pathologists for the annotation of rodent histopathology images, but is now widely used for coding and analysis of disease and phenotype data for rodents, humans and zebrafish. Construction and content MPATH is divided into two main branches describing pathological processes and structures based on traditional histopathological principles. It does not aim to include definitive diagnoses, which would generally be regarded as disease concepts. It contains 888 core pathology terms in an almost exclusively is_a hierarchy nine layers deep. Currently, 86% of the terms have textual definitions and contain relationships as well as logical axioms to other ontologies such the Gene Ontology. Application and utility MPATH was originally devised for the annotation of histopathological images from mice but is now being used much more widely in the recording of diagnostic and phenotypic data from both mice and humans, and in the construction of logical definitions for phenotype and disease ontologies. We discuss the use of MPATH to generate cross-products with qualifiers derived from a subset of the Phenotype and Trait Ontology (PATO) and its application to large-scale high-throughput phenotyping studies. MPATH provides a largely species-agnostic ontology for the descriptions of anatomic pathology, which can be applied to most amniotes and is now finding extensive use in species other than mice. It enables investigators to interrogate large datasets at a variety of depths, use semantic analysis to identify the relations between

  10. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment. PMID:7670717

  11. α-Synuclein: Experimental Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masato; Nonaka, Takashi; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein, which is present as a small, soluble, cytosolic protein in healthy subjects, is converted to amyloid-like fibrils in diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Bulk synthesis of purified α-synuclein has made it more convenient to study the nature of the normal protein and the mechanism of its conversion to an abnormal form in vitro and in vivo. Synthetic α-synuclein fibrils and pathological α-synuclein from diseased brains can act as triggers to convert normal α-synuclein to an abnormal form via prion-like mechanisms. In this article, we describe the experimental pathologies of α-synuclein both in vitro and in vivo in human and animal models. Prion-like spreading of abnormal α-synuclein from cell to cell can account for the progression of these α-synucleinopathies. PMID:27481772

  12. Pathological Significance of Mitochondrial Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Murphy, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Glycation, the nonenzymatic glycosylation of biomolecules, is commonly observed in diabetes and ageing. Reactive dicarbonyl species such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal are thought to be major physiological precursors of glycation. Because these dicarbonyls tend to be formed intracellularly, the levels of advanced glycation end products on cellular proteins are higher than on extracellular ones. The formation of glycation adducts within cells can have severe functional consequences such as inhibition of protein activity and promotion of DNA mutations. Although several lines of evidence suggest that there are specific mitochondrial targets of glycation, and mitochondrial dysfunction itself has been implicated in disease and ageing, it is unclear if glycation of biomolecules specifically within mitochondria induces dysfunction and contributes to disease pathology. We discuss here the possibility that mitochondrial glycation contributes to disease, focussing on diabetes, ageing, cancer, and neurodegeneration, and highlight the current limitations in our understanding of the pathological significance of mitochondrial glycation. PMID:22778743

  13. Interleukin-22: immunobiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a recently described IL-10 family cytokine that is produced by T-helper (Th)-17 cells, γδ T cells, NKT cells and newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Knowledge of IL-22 biology has rapidly evolved since its discovery in 2000, and a role for IL-22 has been identified in numerous tissues including the intestines, lung, liver, kidney, thymus, pancreas and skin. IL-22 primarily targets non-hematopoietic epithelial and stromal cells where it can promote proliferation and play a role in tissue regeneration. In addition, IL-22 regulates host defense at barrier surfaces. However, IL-22 has also been linked to several conditions involving inflammatory tissue pathology. In this review, we will assess the current understanding of this cytokine, including its physiologic and pathologic effects on epithelial cell function. PMID:25706098

  14. Pathology of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Finnie, John W

    2014-12-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently encountered in veterinary practice in companion animals, livestock and horses, inflicted head injury is a common method of euthanasia in domestic livestock, and malicious head trauma can lead to forensic investigation, the pathology of TBI has generally received little attention in the veterinary literature. This review highlights the pathology and pathogenesis of cerebral lesions produced by blunt, non-missile and penetrating, missile head injuries as an aid to the more accurate diagnosis of neurotrauma cases. If more cases of TBI in animals that result in fatality or euthanasia are subjected to rigorous neuropathological examination, this will lead to a better understanding of the nature and development of brain lesions in these species, rather than extrapolating data from human studies. PMID:25178417

  15. Digital photography in anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F J; Leong, A S

    2004-01-01

    Digital imaging has made major inroads into the routine practice of anatomical pathology and replaces photographic prints and Kodachromes for reporting and conference purposes. More advanced systems coupled to computers allow greater versatility and speed of turnaround as well as lower costs of incorporating macroscopic and microscopic pictures into pathology reports and publications. Digital images allow transmission to remote sites via the Internet for consultation, quality assurance and educational purposes, and can be stored on and disseminated by CD-ROM. Total slide digitisation is now a reality and will replace glass slides to a large extent. Three-dimensional images of gross specimens can be assembled and posted on websites for interactive educational programmes. There are also applications in research, allowing more objective and automated quantitation of a variety of morphological and immunohistological parameters. Early reports indicate that medical vision systems are a reality and can provide for automated computer-generated histopathological diagnosis and quality assurance. PMID:15048004

  16. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  17. Digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M J; Sotnikov, A V

    1996-10-01

    Advances in computer technology continue to bring new innovations to departments of anatomic pathology. This article briefly reviews the present status of digital optical imaging, and explores the directions that this technology may lead over the next several years. Technical requirements for digital microscopic and gross imaging, and the available options for image archival and retrieval are summarized. The advantages of digital images over conventional photography in the conference room, and the usefulness of digital imaging in the frozen section suite and gross room, as an adjunct to surgical signout and as a resource for training and education, are discussed. An approach to the future construction of digital histologic sections and the computer as microscope is described. The digital technologic applications that are now available as components of the surgical pathologist's workstation are enumerated. These include laboratory information systems, computerized voice recognition, and on-line or CD-based literature searching, texts and atlases and, in some departments, on-line image databases. The authors suggest that, in addition to these resources that are already available, tomorrow's surgical pathology workstation will include network-linked digital histologic databases, on-line software for image analysis and 3-D image enhancement, expert systems, and ultimately, advanced pattern recognition capabilities. In conclusion, the authors submit that digital optical imaging is likely to have a significant and positive impact on the future development of anatomic pathology. PMID:8853053

  18. A New Pathologic Assessment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: The Squamo-Oxyntic Gap.

    PubMed

    Chandrasoma, Parakrama; DeMeester, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is delayed by the lack of uniform histopathologic criteria for diagnosis. The only practical value of pathology is the assessment of columnar lined esophagus (CLO). As a result, GORD is treated with acid suppressive drug therapy until there is a failure to control symptoms and/or advanced adenocarcinoma develops. The reasons why there is a failure of pathologic diagnosis are two false dogmas that result in two widely believed fundamental errors. These are the belief that cardiac epithelium normally lines the proximal stomach (1) and that the gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) is defined by the proximal limit of rugal folds (2). When these false dogmas are eradicated by existing powerful evidence, the pathology of GERD falls into the following stages, all defined by histology: (a) The normal state where the esophageal squamous epithelium transitions at the GOJ to gastric oxyntic epithelium with no intervening cardiac epithelium; (b) cardiac metaplasia of the squamous epithelium due to exposure to gastric juice results in cephalad movement of the squamo-columnar junction (SCJ). This creates the squamo-oxyntic gap and the dilated distal esophagus, which is distal to the endoscopic GOJ. The length of the squamo-oxyntic gap in the dilated distal esophagus is concordant with the shortening of the abdominal segment of the lower esophageal sphincter (LOS); (c) in the early stages, the gap is <5 mm and the LOS retains its competence. Reflux is uncommon and patients are asymptomatic; (d) the squamo-oxyntic gap increases in length, concordant with the amount of shortening of the LOS, which becomes increasingly incompetent. At a gap length of 5-15 mm, reflux is sufficient to cause symptoms, but in most patients, symptoms are controllable and the patients are normal at endoscopy. The gap is entirely within the dilated distal esophagus, which is mistaken by present criteria for proximal stomach. (e) The last stage of GORD is when

  19. A new feature constituting approach to detection of vocal fold pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, M.; Polat, Kemal; Yaacob, Sazali

    2014-08-01

    In the last two decades, non-invasive methods through acoustic analysis of voice signal have been proved to be excellent and reliable tool to diagnose vocal fold pathologies. This paper proposes a new feature vector based on the wavelet packet transform and singular value decomposition for the detection of vocal fold pathology. k-means clustering based feature weighting is proposed to increase the distinguishing performance of the proposed features. In this work, two databases Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) voice disorders database and MAPACI speech pathology database are used. Four different supervised classifiers such as k-nearest neighbour (k-NN), least-square support vector machine, probabilistic neural network and general regression neural network are employed for testing the proposed features. The experimental results uncover that the proposed features give very promising classification accuracy of 100% for both MEEI database and MAPACI speech pathology database.

  20. Influence of proton pump inhibitors on gastritis diagnosis and pathologic gastric changes

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Soumana C; Slim, Mahmoud; Nassif, Jeanette G; Nasser, Selim M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exposure on the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. METHODS: Chronic PPI use is associated with masking of H. pylori infection. Patients with H. pylori infection are predisposed to gastric and duodenal ulcers, and long-term infection with this organism has been associated with gastric mucosal atrophy and serious long-term complications, such as gastric lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Three hundred patients diagnosed with gastritis between January 2008 and April 2010 were included in our study. The computerized medical database of these patients was reviewed retrospectively in order to assess whether the type of gastritis diagnosed (H. pylori vs non-H. pylori gastritis) is influenced by PPI exposure. H. pylori density was graded as low, if corresponding to mild density following the Updated Sydney System, or high, if corresponding to moderate or severe densities in the Updated Sydney System. RESULTS: Patients were equally distributed between males and females with a median age at the time of diagnosis of 50 years old (range: 20-87). The histological types of gastritis were classified as H. pylori gastritis (n = 156, 52%) and non-H. pylori gastritis (n = 144, 48%). All patients with non-H. pylori gastritis had inactive chronic gastritis. Patients with no previous PPI exposure were more likely to be diagnosed with H. pylori gastritis than those with previous PPI exposure (71% vs 34.2%, P < 0.001). Intestinal metaplasia was more likely to be detected in the latter patients (1.4% vs 6.5%, P = 0.023). Multivariate analysis has also demonstrated that in the presence of previous PPI exposure (OR = 0.217, 95%CI: 0.123-0.385), GERD (OR = 0.317, 95%CI: 0.132-0.763, P = 0.01), alcohol intake (OR = 0.396, 95%CI: 0.195-0.804, P = 0.01), the detection of H. pylori was less likely. Chronic use of PPIs may mask H. pylori infections promoting the diagnosis of non-H. pylori

  1. Congruence Couple Therapy for Pathological Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    Couple therapy models for pathological gambling are limited. Congruence Couple Therapy is an integrative, humanistic, systems model that addresses intrapsychic, interpersonal, intergenerational, and universal-spiritual disconnections of pathological gamblers and their spouses to shift towards congruence. Specifically, CCT's theoretical…

  2. General pathology teaching at the University of Washington.

    PubMed

    Monnat, R J

    1989-12-01

    I have provided a brief overview of our experience teaching undergraduate general pathology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Our course is part of a pathology curriculum that is somewhat unusual in light of the amount of time we devote to general, as opposed to organ system pathology. We think this makes sense in relation to the way medical teaching and practice are changing. Resources and curriculum time needed to teach an extensive, morphology-based organ system pathology curriculum are no longer available. In addition, experimental biology and medicine are beginning to improve the way human diseases are diagnosed and treated. Many of these advances are the result of new information on disease aetiology and pathogenesis. Students and practitioners of medicine need an understanding of disease processes that will allow them to rapidly assimilate and rationally apply this new information. The particular strengths of our course, as we view them, are an opportunity to discuss the small number of processes that underlie most human disease in some depth, and thus to emphasize general pathology as a conceptual and practical foundation for the practice of medicine; our laboratory sessions, which in a sense illustrate and summarize the course; and early placement of the course in the curriculum, which allows us to capitalize on concurrent basic science courses and a high level of interest among students in applying basic science knowledge to understanding human disease. Problems we face include the need for more 'active' learning exercises in the lecture and laboratory format we are bound to; the need, given the scope of general pathology, to present more 'take home messages' and fewer systematic reviews of evidence than we would like; the limited clinical knowledge of first year students, which restricts the scope of our laboratory and disease example presentations; and an inability to consistently challenge the abilities of the best students in each

  3. Clinical, pathological and sonographic characteristics of unexpected gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Huan; Liu, Bo-Ji; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Sun, Li-Ping; Li, Dan-Dan; Guo, Le-Hang; Liu, Lin-Na; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the clinical, pathological, and sonographic characteristics of unexpected gallbladder carcinoma (UGC). Methods: Of 5424 patients who had undergone cholecystectomy from December 2006 to October 2013, 54 patients with primary gallbladder carcinomas confirmed by pathological diagnosis were identified. The patients were divided into two groups: diagnosed before operation (n=34) and UGC groups (n=20), of whom the clinical, pathological, and sonographic characteristics were compared. Results: No significant differences in age, gender, location of lesion, histological type, length of the gallbladder, existence of biliary sludge, and intestinal gas interference between the two groups were found (all P>0.05). The clinical symptoms, laboratory abnormalities, tumor markers, coexisting gallbladder stones, lesion size, lesion type, degree of differentiation, and tumor staging showed statistically significant differences between the two groups (all P<0.05). On ultrasound, the width of the gallbladder, gallbladder wall thickness, vascularity on color Doppler ultrasound, and bile volume in the gallbladder showed significant differences (all P<0.05). Conclusions: UGCs are commonly found at an early stage, often well-differentiated, wall thickened, and are generally accompanied with cholelithiasis. UGCs should be taken into consideration in cases with cholelithiasis or small gallbladder on ultrasound. PMID:26379911

  4. [Radiographic and pathological findings in 4 patients with pulmonary cryptococcosis].

    PubMed

    Hidaka, T; Ichinose, I; Tamura, K

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed the records of 4 patients with pathologically diagnosed pulmonary cryptococcosis to determine whether there was any relationship between radiographic and pathological findings. The underlying disease were diabetes mellitus (patient 1), rheumatoid arthritis treated with glucocorticoids (patient 2), and adultonset T cell leukemia (patients 3 and 4). All radiographs showed multiple nodules, and patchy and localized infiltrates, which progressed to diffuse interstitial infiltration. According to Mark's classification, the pathological findings in patients 1 and 2 showed granulomatous pneumonia, those in patient 3 showed histiocytic pneumonia, and patient 4 had intercapillary cryptococci with no inflammatory response. The granuloma appeared larger in patient 1 than in patient 2. This concurred with the clinical findings, i.e. large granulomas formed in immunocompetent patients, and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates developed in those whose immune systems had been compromised. When a granuloma formed, roentgenograms showed a well defined nodular shadow, with some nodules developing in the cavity. When granuloma formation became unclear, roentgenograms tended to show localized-to-diffuse infiltration, or interstitial shadows. PMID:9071170

  5. Pathologic aerophagia: a rare cause of chronic abdominal distension

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Cestari, Ana Beatriz C.S.S.; da Silva, Orli Carvalho; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Firme, Livia Honorato

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adolescent with pathologic aerophagia, a rare condition caused by excessive and inappropriate swallowing of air and to review its treatment and differential diagnoses. Case description: An 11-year-old mentally impaired blind girl presenting serious behavior problems and severe developmental delay with abdominal distension from the last 8 months. Her past history included a Nissen fundoplication. Abdominal CT and abdominal radiographs showed diffuse gas distension of the small bowel and colon. Hirschsprung's disease was excluded. The distention was minimal at the moment the child awoke and maximal at evening, and persisted after control of constipation. Audible repetitive and frequent movements of air swallowing were observed. The diagnosis of pathologic aerophagia associated to obsessive-compulsive disorder and developmental delay was made, but pharmacological treatment was unsuccessful. The patient was submitted to an endoscopic gastrostomy, permanently opened and elevated relative to the stomach. The distention was resolved, while maintaining oral nutrition. Comments: Pathologic aerophagia is a rare self-limiting condition in normal children exposed to high levels of stress and may be a persisting problem in children with psychiatric or neurologic disease. In this last group, the disease may cause serious complications. Pharmacological and behavioral treatments are ill-defined. Severe cases may demand surgical strategies, mainly decompressive gastrostomy. PMID:26100594

  6. [Documented nursing diagnoses for medical clinic patients].

    PubMed

    Fontes, Cassiana Mendes Bertoncello; da Cruz, Diná Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a descriptive study, based on nursing records, of nursing diagnoses documented three months after the implementation of the NANDA-I classification at the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário (HU-USP) and proposes outcomes and interventions for the 3 most frequent diagnoses. The convenience sample (34% of the month's admissions) consisted of 30 charts of patients admitted in the Medical Clinic in August of 2004 (60% female, average age 60.9 +/- 23.1 years, mean length of stay = 5.8 +/- 2.7 days). The diagnoses documented on the admission day were manually transcribed from the charts and analyzed according to their frequency. There were 144 diagnoses (31 categories), with an average of 4.8 +/- 4.0 diagnoses per patient (range = 1-10). The most frequent were: acute pain (66.7%), impaired tissue integrity (63.3%), ineffective airway clearance (43.3%), risk of impaired skin integrity (36.7%), and impaired skin integrity (33.3%). The proposed outcomes and interventions are presented. PMID:17977375

  7. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  8. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  9. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  10. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  11. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes...

  12. Pathological conditions re-shape physiological Tregs into pathological Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William Y.; Shao, Ying; Lopez-Pastrana, Jahaira; Mai, Jietang; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2015-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4 T cells that play an essential role in maintaining peripheral immune tolerance, controlling acute and chronic inflammation, allergy, autoimmune diseases, and anti-cancer immune responses. Over the past 20 years, significant progress has been made since Tregs were first characterized in 1995. Many concepts and principles regarding Tregs generation, phenotypic features, subsets (tTregs, pTregs, iTregs, and iTreg35), tissue specificity (central Tregs, effector Tregs, and tissue resident Tregs), homeostasis (highly dynamic and apoptotic), regulation of Tregs by receptors for PAMPs and DAMPs, Treg plasticity (re-differentiation to other CD4 T helper cell subsets, Th1, Th2, Tfh and Th17), and epigenetic regulation of Tregs phenotypes and functions have been innovated. In this concise review, we want to briefly analyze these eight new progresses in the study of Tregs. We have also proposed for the first time a novel concept that “physiological Tregs” have been re-shaped into “pathological Tregs” in various pathological environments. Continuing of the improvement in our understanding on this important cellular component about the immune tolerance and immune suppression, would lead to the future development of novel therapeutics approaches for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, allergy, allogeneic transplantation-related immunity, sepsis, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. PMID:26623425

  13. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  14. The ICD diagnoses of fetishism and sadomasochism.

    PubMed

    Reiersøl, Odd; Skeid, Svein

    2006-01-01

    In this article we discuss psychiatric diagnoses of sexual deviation as they appear in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), the internationally accepted classification and diagnostic system of the World Health Organization (WHO). Namely, we discuss the background of three diagnostic categories: Fetishism (F65.0), Fetishistic Transvestism (F65.1), and Sadomasochism (F65.5). Pertinent background issues regarding the above categories are followed by a critique of the usefulness of diagnosing these phenomena today. Specifically, we argue that Fetishism, Fetishistic Transvestism, and Sadomasochism, also labeled Paraphilia or perversion, should not be considered illnesses. Finally, we present the efforts of an initiative known as ReviseF65, which was established in 1997, to abolish these diagnoses. PMID:16803767

  15. [Nursing diagnoses of the elderly at home].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Maria do Livramento Fortes; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; de Brito, Cleidiane Maria Sales; Sousa, Suéli Nolêto Silva; da Silva, Dâmaris Rebeca Soares

    2008-01-01

    The descriptive study, with quantitative approach, that has had as objective to do the characterization of ill elderly at home attended by the ESF teams of the Satellite's District in Teresina - PI and to collect Nursing Diagnoses and it respective interventions. This descriptive study was constituted by 50 seniors interviewed at home, the results showed that most of the women in age between of 60 and 79 years were ill at home for one or five years at least. There were eight Nursing Diagnoses (ND) prevalent, in which 98% of the seniors were identified with the ND - Inadequate Control of Therapeutic Regime, and in 72% the deambulation was prejudiced with mobility's limitation and, for all diagnoses were proposed nursing interventions objectifying the conquest of autonomy and independence of these seniors. PMID:18797782

  16. Interactions of Pathological Hallmark Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Judit; Vincze, Orsolya; Virók, Dezső; Simon, Dóra; Bozsó, Zsolt; Tőkési, Natália; Horváth, István; Hlavanda, Emma; Kovács, János; Magyar, Anna; Szűcs, Mária; Orosz, Ferenc; Penke, Botond; Ovádi, Judit

    2011-01-01

    The disordered tubulin polymerization promoting protein (TPPP/p25) was found to be co-enriched in neuronal and glial inclusions with α-synuclein in Parkinson disease and multiple system atrophy, respectively; however, co-occurrence of α-synuclein with β-amyloid (Aβ) in human brain inclusions has been recently reported, suggesting the existence of mixed type pathologies that could result in obstacles in the correct diagnosis and treatment. Here we identified TPPP/p25 as an interacting partner of the soluble Aβ oligomers as major risk factors for Alzheimer disease using ProtoArray human protein microarray. The interactions of oligomeric Aβ with proteins involved in the etiology of neurological disorders were characterized by ELISA, surface plasmon resonance, pelleting experiments, and tubulin polymerization assay. We showed that the Aβ42 tightly bound to TPPP/p25 (Kd = 85 nm) and caused aberrant protein aggregation by inhibiting the physiologically relevant TPPP/p25-derived microtubule assembly. The pair-wise interactions of Aβ42, α-synuclein, and tubulin were found to be relatively weak; however, these three components formed soluble ternary complex exclusively in the absence of TPPP/p25. The aggregation-facilitating activity of TPPP/p25 and its interaction with Aβ was monitored by electron microscopy with purified proteins by pelleting experiments with cell-free extracts as well as by confocal microscopy with CHO cells expressing TPPP/p25 or amyloid. The finding that the interaction of TPPP/p25 with Aβ can produce pathological-like aggregates is tightly coupled with unusual pathology of the Alzheimer disease revealed previously; that is, partial co-localization of Aβ and TPPP/p25 in the case of diffuse Lewy body disease with Alzheimer disease. PMID:21832049

  17. The feasibility of using natural language processing to extract clinical information from breast pathology reports

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Julliette M.; Coopey, Suzanne B.; Sharko, John; Polubriaginof, Fernanda; Drohan, Brian; Belli, Ahmet K.; Kim, Elizabeth M. H.; Garber, Judy E.; Smith, Barbara L.; Gadd, Michele A.; Specht, Michelle C.; Roche, Constance A.; Gudewicz, Thomas M.; Hughes, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The opportunity to integrate clinical decision support systems into clinical practice is limited due to the lack of structured, machine readable data in the current format of the electronic health record. Natural language processing has been designed to convert free text into machine readable data. The aim of the current study was to ascertain the feasibility of using natural language processing to extract clinical information from >76,000 breast pathology reports. Approach and Procedure: Breast pathology reports from three institutions were analyzed using natural language processing software (Clearforest, Waltham, MA) to extract information on a variety of pathologic diagnoses of interest. Data tables were created from the extracted information according to date of surgery, side of surgery, and medical record number. The variety of ways in which each diagnosis could be represented was recorded, as a means of demonstrating the complexity of machine interpretation of free text. Results: There was widespread variation in how pathologists reported common pathologic diagnoses. We report, for example, 124 ways of saying invasive ductal carcinoma and 95 ways of saying invasive lobular carcinoma. There were >4000 ways of saying invasive ductal carcinoma was not present. Natural language processor sensitivity and specificity were 99.1% and 96.5% when compared to expert human coders. Conclusion: We have demonstrated how a large body of free text medical information such as seen in breast pathology reports, can be converted to a machine readable format using natural language processing, and described the inherent complexities of the task. PMID:22934236

  18. Hyperthyroidism Presenting With Pathologic Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sarezky, Margaret D.; Corwin, Daniel J.; Harrison, Victor S.; Jacobstein, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that thyroid hormone directly stimulates bone resorption in in vitro organ culture, and in adults excess thyroid hormone is associated with decreased bone mineral density. There are limited data in children regarding the effect of hyperthyroidism on bone metabolism and even fewer instances in the literature of hyperthyroidism presenting with bone demineralization and fracture. We report a case of an 11-year-old boy with undiagnosed hyperthyroidism presenting with fractures and osteoporosis. This case emphasizes the importance of maintaining a broad differential diagnosis when a patient presents with a pathologic fracture. PMID:26746406

  19. Pathological gambling and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, S; Halpern, A L; Portnow, S L

    1986-01-01

    There exists significant interdisciplinary support for eliminating the volitional component of the insanity defense. Somewhat in contrast to this trend is the presentation of pathological gambling as a potentially exculpatory condition in criminal trials. The authors discuss three federal appellate court decisions on this attempted inappropriate usage of psychiatric diagnostic nomenclature. All have upheld convictions, and thereby rejected contentions that such an impulse disorder can form the basis for a valid plea of lack of criminal responsibility. It is suggested that the public interest will be served by statutorily making disturbances of behavioral control insufficient to raise a defense of insanity. PMID:3944564

  20. Automated Classification of Pathology Reports.

    PubMed

    Oleynik, Michel; Finger, Marcelo; Patrão, Diogo F C

    2015-01-01

    This work develops an automated classifier of pathology reports which infers the topography and the morphology classes of a tumor using codes from the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O). Data from 94,980 patients of the A.C. Camargo Cancer Center was used for training and validation of Naive Bayes classifiers, evaluated by the F1-score. Measures greater than 74% in the topographic group and 61% in the morphologic group are reported. Our work provides a successful baseline for future research for the classification of medical documents written in Portuguese and in other domains. PMID:26262339

  1. Iliopsoas: Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christian N

    2016-07-01

    Disorders of the iliopsoas can be a significant source of groin pain in the athletic population. Commonly described pathologic conditions include iliopsoas bursitis, tendonitis, impingement, and snapping. The first-line treatment for iliopsoas disorders is typically conservative, including activity modification, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections. Surgical treatment can be considered if the patient fails conservative measures and typically involves arthroscopic lengthening of the musculotendinous unit and treatment of concomitant intra-articular abnormality. Tendon release has been described: in the central compartment, in the peripheral compartment, and at the lesser trochanter, with similar outcomes observed between the techniques. PMID:27343394

  2. Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

    2013-08-06

    A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

  3. The DIAGNOSER project: combining assessment and learning.

    PubMed

    Thissen-Roe, Anne; Hunt, Earl; Minstrell, Jim

    2004-05-01

    DIAGNOSER is an Internet-based tool for classroom instruction. It delivers continuous formative assessment and feedback to high school physics students and their teachers about the correct and incorrect concepts and ideas the students may hold regarding physical situations. That is, it diagnoses misconceptions that underlie wrong answers of students, such as a confusion of velocity with acceleration. We use data about patterns of student responses, particularly consistency of errors from question to question, to improve the system's understanding of student concepts. PMID:15354688

  4. Asymmetry and heterogeneity of Alzheimer’s and frontotemporal pathology in primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily J.; Wieneke, Christina; Geula, Changiz; Bigio, Eileen H.

    2014-01-01

    Fifty-eight autopsies of patients with primary progressive aphasia are reported. Twenty-three of these were previously described (Mesulam et al., 2008) but had their neuropathological diagnoses updated to fit current criteria. Thirty-five of the cases are new. Their clinical classification was guided as closely as possible by the 2011 consensus guidelines (Gorno-Tempini et al., 2011). Tissue diagnoses included Alzheimer’s disease in 45% and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in the others, with an approximately equal split between TAR DNA binding protein 43 proteinopathies and tauopathies. The most common and distinctive feature for all pathologies associated with primary progressive aphasia was the asymmetric prominence of atrophy, neuronal loss, and disease-specific proteinopathy in the language-dominant (mostly left) hemisphere. The Alzheimer’s disease pathology in primary progressive aphasia displayed multiple atypical features. Males tended to predominate, the neurofibrillary pathology was more intense in the language-dominant hemisphere, the Braak pattern of hippocampo-entorhinal prominence was tilted in favour of the neocortex, and the APOE e4 allele was not a risk factor. Mean onset age was under 65 in the FTLD as well as Alzheimer’s disease groups. The FTLD-TAR DNA binding protein 43 group had the youngest onset and fastest progression whereas the Alzheimer’s disease and FTLD-tau groups did not differ from each other in either onset age or progression rate. Each cellular pathology type had a preferred but not invariant clinical presentation. The most common aphasic manifestation was of the logopenic type for Alzheimer pathology and of the agrammatic type for FTLD-tau. The progressive supranuclear palsy subtype of FTLD-tau consistently caused prominent speech abnormality together with agrammatism whereas FTLD-TAR DNA binding protein 43 of type C consistently led to semantic primary progressive aphasia. The presence of agrammatism made

  5. Subclassification of Newly Diagnosed Glioblastomas through an Immunohistochemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Siobhan; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Joseph, Justin V.; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Bhat, Krishna P.; Wagemakers, Michiel; Enting, Roelien H.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular signatures in Glioblastoma (GBM) have been described that correlate with clinical outcome and response to therapy. The Proneural (PN) and Mesenchymal (MES) signatures have been identified most consistently, but others including Classical (CLAS) have also been reported. The molecular signatures have been detected by array techniques at RNA and DNA level, but these methods are costly and cannot take into account individual contributions of different cells within a tumor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether subclasses of newly diagnosed GBMs could be assessed and assigned by application of standard pathology laboratory procedures. 123 newly diagnosed GBMs were analyzed for the tumor cell expression of 23 pre-identified proteins and EGFR amplification, together allowing for the subclassification of 65% of the tumors. Immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based profiling was found to be analogous to transcription-based profiling using a 9-gene transcriptional signature for PN and MES subclasses. Based on these data a novel, minimal IHC-based scheme for subclass assignment for GBMs is proposed. Positive staining for IDH1R132H can be used for PN subclass assignment, high EGFR expression for the CLAS subtype and a combined high expression of PTEN, VIM and/or YKL40 for the MES subclass. The application of the proposed scheme was evaluated in an independent tumor set, which resulted in similar subclass assignment rates as those observed in the training set. The IHC-based subclassification scheme proposed in this study therefore could provide very useful in future studies for stratification of individual patient samples. PMID:25546404

  6. Colonoscopy after CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis: Is it really necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Rosenfeld, Greg; Brown, Jacqueline; Chan, Nathan; Hong, Thomas; Lim, Howard; Bressler, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly used to diagnose acute diverticulitis, but there are overlapping features between diverticulitis and colorectal cancer (CRC) on imaging studies. Hence, colonoscopy is typically recommended after an episode of acute diverticulitis to rule out underlying malignancy. Currently, 64-slice multidetector CT scanners are capable of providing higher-resolution images and may be able to distinguish malignancy from diverticular inflammation. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CRC among patients with CT-diagnosed acute diverticulitis. Methods We performed a retrospective study of patients with acute diverticulitis diagnosed on CT scan between December 2005 and December 2010 at St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Nonresidents were excluded. We reviewed CT scan reports that included the term “diverticulitis,” reports of follow-up colonic evaluation within 1 year of diagnosis and pathology results. We queried the provincial cancer registry to ensure no cases of CRC were missed. Results A total of 293 patients had acute diverticulitis diagnosed on CT scan, but 8 were nonresidents and were excluded. Of the 285 included in the analysis, the mean age was 59.4 ± 15.1 years, and 167 (58.6%) were men. Among the 114 patients who underwent follow-up evaluation, malignancy was diagnosed in 4 (3.5%). The overall prevalence of malignancy among patients with CT-diagnosed diverticulitis was 1.4%. Conclusion Routine endoscopic evaluation after an episode of diverticulitis diagnosed with high-resolution CT scan does not appear to be necessary. Selective approach in patients with protracted clinical course or those with mass lesion/obstruction on CT scan may be of benefit. PMID:26022155

  7. [Cartilage tumors : Pathology and radiomorphology].

    PubMed

    Uhl, M; Herget, G; Kurz, P

    2016-06-01

    Primary cartilage-forming tumors of the bone are frequent entities in the daily work of skeletal radiologists. This article describes the correlation of pathology and radiology in cartilage-forming skeletal tumors, in particular, enchondroma, osteochondroma, periosteal chondromas, chondroblastoma and various forms of chondrosarcoma. After reading, the radiologist should be able to deduce the different patterns of cartilage tumors on radiographs, CT, and MRI from the pathological aspects. Differentiation of enchondroma and chondrosarcoma is a frequent diagnostic challenge. Some imaging parameters, e. g., deep cortical scalloping (more than two thirds of the cortical thickness), cortical destruction, or a soft-tissue mass, are features of a sarcoma. Osteochondromas are bony protrusions with a continuous extension of bone marrow from the parent bone, the host cortical bone runs continuously from the osseous surface of the tumor into the shaft of the osteochondroma and the osteochondroma has a cartilage cap. Chondromyxoid fibromas are well-defined lytic and eccentric lesions of the metaphysis of the long bones, with nonspecific MRI findings. Chondroblastomas have a strong predilection for the epiphysis of long tubular bones and develop an intense perifocal bone marrow edema. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas are bimorphic lesions with a low-grade chondrogenic component and a high-grade noncartilaginous component. Most chondrogenic tumors have a predilection with regard to site and age at manifestation. PMID:27233920

  8. Training pathologists in mouse pathology.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Ward, J M; HogenEsch, H; Nikitin, A Yu; Treuting, P M; Macauley, J B; Schofield, P N

    2012-03-01

    Expertise in the pathology of mice has expanded from traditional regulatory and drug safety screening (toxicologic pathology) primarily performed by veterinary pathologists to the highly specialized area of mouse research pathobiology performed by veterinary and medical pathologists encompassing phenotyping of mutant mice and analysis of research experiments exploiting inbred mouse strains and genetically engineered lines. With increasing use of genetically modified mice in research, mouse pathobiology and, by extension, expert mouse research-oriented pathologists have become integral to the success of basic and translational biomedical research. Training for today's research-oriented mouse pathologist must go beyond knowledge of anatomic features of mice and strain-specific background diseases to the specialized genetic nomenclature, husbandry, and genetics, including the methodology of genetic engineering and complex trait analysis. While training can be accomplished through apprenticeships in formal programs, these are often heavily service related and do not provide the necessary comprehensive training. Specialty courses and short-term mentoring with expert specialists are opportunities that, when combined with active practice and publication, will lead to acquisition of the skills required for cutting-edge mouse-based experimental science. PMID:20817889

  9. 100 years of Lewy pathology.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    In 1817, James Parkinson described the symptoms of the shaking palsy, a disease that was subsequently defined in greater detail, and named after Parkinson, by Jean-Martin Charcot. Parkinson expected that the publication of his monograph would lead to a rapid elucidation of the anatomical substrate of the shaking palsy; in the event, this process took almost a century. In 1912, Fritz Heinrich Lewy identified the protein aggregates that define Parkinson disease (PD) in some brain regions outside the substantia nigra. In 1919, Konstantin Nikolaevich Tretiakoff found similar aggregates in the substantia nigra and named them after Lewy. In the 1990s, α-synuclein was identified as the main constituent of the Lewy pathology, and its aggregation was shown to be central to PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. In 2003, a staging scheme for idiopathic PD was introduced, according to which α-synuclein pathology originates in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve and progresses from there to other brain regions, including the substantia nigra. In this article, we review the relevance of Lewy's discovery 100 years ago for the current understanding of PD and related disorders. PMID:23183883

  10. Chronic Cough and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: An Uncommon Association

    PubMed Central

    Orizio, Paolo; Cinquini, Massimo; Minetti, Stefano; Alberti, Daniele; Paolo, Camilla Di; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Torri, Fabio; Crispino, Paola; Facchetti, Susanna; Rizzini, Fabio Lodi; Bassotti, Gabrio; Tosoni, Cinzia

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of children, usually with gastrointestinal symptoms, is diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (EE), and a particular subset of these patients complains of airway manifestations. We present the case of a 2-year-old child with chronic dry cough in whom EE was found after a first diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) due to pathological 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Traditional allergologic tests were negative, while patch tests were diagnostic for cow's milk allergy. We discuss the intriguing relationship between GERD and EE and the use of patch test for the allergologic screening of patients. PMID:21960955

  11. Anatomical pathology is dead? Long live anatomical pathology.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, John M; Francis, Glenn D

    2011-10-01

    The standard diagnostic instrument used for over 150 years by anatomical pathologists has been the optical microscope and glass slide. The advent of immunohistochemistry in the routine laboratory in the 1980s, followed by in situ hybridisation in the 1990s, has increased the armamentaria available to the diagnostic pathologist, and this technology has led to changed patient management in a limited number of neoplastic diseases. The first decade of the 21 century has seen an increasing number of publications using proteomic technologies that promise to change disease diagnosis and management, the traditional role of an anatomical pathologist. Despite the plethora of publications on proteomics and pathology, to date there are actually limited data where proteomic technologies do appear to be of greater diagnostic value than the standard histological slide. Though proteomic techniques will become more prevalent in the future, it will need the expertise of an anatomical pathologist to dissect out and validate this added information. PMID:21876472

  12. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV.

    PubMed

    Soza, Gabriela M; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison; Ryan, Caitriona

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4(+) count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  13. Diagnosing and treating respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria B

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes of respiratory tract illness in children and can lead to significant infection and death. This article discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis, current treatment, and prevention options to successfully diagnose and treat infections caused by RSV. PMID:27552683

  14. Bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis diagnosed during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Maldonado Cid, P; Sendagorta Cudós, E; Noguera Morel, L; Beato Merino, M J

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis is a rare subtype of neurofibromatosis type 1 defined by lesions affecting a single segment of the body and crossing the midline, with no systemic involvement. We present a case diagnosed during pregnancy because of the characteristic increase in size of the lesions during this period. PMID:21635828

  15. Eating Disorder Diagnoses: Empirical Approaches to Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Keel, Pamela K.; Williamson, Donald A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2007-01-01

    Decisions about the classification of eating disorders have significant scientific and clinical implications. The eating disorder diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) reflect the collective wisdom of experts in the field but are frequently not supported in…

  16. Pediatricians Vary Widely in Diagnosing ADHD, Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... often U.S. pediatricians diagnose and prescribe drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other mental health conditions, a new ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ... Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  17. DIAGNOSING CAUSES OF IMPAIRMENT IN COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engle, Virginia D. and Stephen J. Jordan. In press. Diagnosing Causes of Impairment in Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1008).

    Estuarine and coastal ecosystems are challenge...

  18. Remembering and diagnosing clients: does experience matter?

    PubMed

    Witteman, Cilia L M; Tollenaar, Marieke S

    2012-01-01

    Experienced mental health clinicians often do not outperform novices in diagnostic decision making. In this paper we look for an explanation of this phenomenon by testing differences in memory processes. In two studies we aimed to look at differences in accuracy of diagnoses in relation to free recall of client information between mental health clinicians with different levels of experience. Clinicians were presented with two cases, and were asked afterwards, either directly (Study 1) or after 1 week (Study 2), to give the appropriate diagnoses and to write down what they remembered of the cases. We found in Study 1 that the accuracy of the diagnoses was the same for all levels of experience, as was the amount of details recalled. Very experienced clinicians did remember more higher-order concepts, that is, abstractions from the presented information. In Study 2 we found that the very experienced clinicians were less accurate in their diagnoses and remembered fewer details than the novices. In response to these findings we further discuss their implications for psychodiagnostic practice. PMID:22360789

  19. Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnoses in Stockholm Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernell, Elisabeth; Gillberg, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate prevalence rates of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnoses in a cohort of 6-year-old children with birth year 2002, referred to the Autism Centre for Young Children, serving the whole of Stockholm county and on the basis of the available data discuss clinical aspects of assessment,…

  20. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4+ count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  1. Accuracy of Burkitt lymphoma diagnosis in constrained pathology settings: Importance to epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Ogwang, Martin D.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Ayers, Leona W.; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

    2010-01-01

    Context Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is endemic in Uganda and because of the high incidence, diagnosis is often presumed during clinical care and epidemiological studies. Objective To assess the accuracy of the clinical and the local pathology diagnosis of BL as assessed by an outside pathology review diagnosis, and to understand the limitations on histopathology practice in a resource-constrained setting at one hospital in Uganda. Design Clinically presumed pediatric (< 15 years) BL cases with biopsies and pathology reports, from 1993 - 2007 were identified at St. Mary’s Hospital, Lacor (Gulu, Uganda). Local histopathology procedures, hematoxylyn and eosin stained tissue sections and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blocks were reviewed onsite by an outside pathologist, followed by outside study that included tissue microarray (TMA) immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Results Local pathology laboratory procedures were inconsistent and suboptimal, especially for tissue fixation. There were 88 clinically presumed BL cases. 63 could be reviewed by outside pathology (25 cases of lost blocks or no remaining tumor) and showed a clinical diagnostic accuracy of 75% (47 confirmed out of 63), with a possible range of 62-85%, depending on the actual diagnosis of the 25 non-evaluable cases. There were 64 BL diagnosed by local pathology. 45 could be reviewed by outside pathology (19 cases of lost blocks or no remaining tumor), and showed a local pathology diagnostic accuracy of 82% (37 confirmed out of 45), with a possible range of 58%- 88%, depending on the actual diagnosis of the 19 non-evaluable cases. Non BL diagnoses included other non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Hodgkin’s lymphoma and benign infectious lymphadenopathy. Conclusions Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma was reduced by inclusion of other diseases with similar clinical presentations. Local pathology, using morphology alone, only marginally improved clinical accuracy and often could not support

  2. Surgical pathology in the 20th century at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York.

    PubMed

    Geller, Stephen A

    2008-08-01

    How did the education of surgical pathology, and pathology in general, differ at Mount Sinai? Passing the examination of the American Board of Pathology was never the focus of the department. Learning criteria or quoting references was de-emphasized, but mastery of macroscopic pathology was required, supported in both word and action by two brilliant surgical pathologists, Otani and Kaneko, and by two extraordinary medical pathologists, Klemperer and Popper. Meticulous microscopy emphasized pattern rather than reliance on lists of discrete features. Otani developed a regular "problem case" meeting for a community of pathologists, made up of alumni and other interested pathologists, as well as active department members. These monthly sessions provided the highest level of "continuing medical education." Otani and Kaneko unequivocally believed in learning from cases, and Mount Sinai residents were fortunate both in the one-to-one teaching and in the wealth of material, in all systems, that came to surgical pathology. Outstanding pathologists who came from Mount Sinai settled throughout the country and provided the highest level of diagnoses, but, with the exception of Bernard Wagner, Emanuel Rubin, Fiorenzo Paronetto, Richard Horowitz, Michael Gerber, Marc Rosenblum, Bruce Wenig, Jaishree Jagirdar, Swan Thung, Cesar Moran, Hideko Kamino, Philip LeBoit, Alberto Marchevsky, and others, there were relatively few academic leaders. Otani and Kaneko did not have national reputations. Klemperer, although world renowned, was relatively unassuming, and his disciples numbered almost as many nonpathologists as pathologists. Popper did establish a major center for liver pathology, with students coming from around the world, but did not particularly promote general surgical pathology. Can the Mount Sinai approach still be applied? The decline in the numbers of autopsies performed, the demands for rapid turnaround time, the de-emphasis of gross pathology as newer technologies (eg

  3. Bioactive lipids in pathological retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qi; Shen, Jun-Hui; Shen, Sheng-Rong; Das, Undurti N

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common condition that occurs in patients with diabetes with long-standing hyperglycemia that is characterized by inappropriate angiogenesis. This pathological angiogenesis could be a sort of physiological proliferative response to injury by the endothelium. Recent studies suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a significant role in this angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic growth factor that plays a significant role in diabetic retinopathy. The interaction between VEGF and ROS, and theirs in turn with pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory bioactive lipid molecules such as lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and maresins is particularly relevant to understand the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy and develop future therapeutic interventions. PMID:24188230

  4. [Cellular pathology of neurodegenerative disorders].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Common cellular and molecular mechanisms including protein aggregation and inclusion body formation are involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. α-Synuclein is a major component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as in glial cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Tau is a principal component of neurofibrillary and glial tangles in tauopathies. Recently, TDP-43 was identified as a component of ubiquitinated inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. PD is traditionally considered a movement disorder with hallmark lesions in the brainstem pigmented nuclei. However, pathological changes occur in widespread regions of the central and peripheral nervous systems in this disease. Furthermore, primary glial involvement ("gliodegeneration") can be observed in PD and MSA as well as in tauopathy. The present article reviews abnormal protein accumulation and inclusion body formation inside and outside the central nervous system. PMID:23965852

  5. Cerebral pathology post heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peteghem, S Van; Pauw, M De

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral pathology is frequently encountered post heart transplantation with a cumulative incidence of about 80% after 15 years. A broad spectrum of disease entities is reported, from minor abnormalities to life-threatening diseases. Although cerebral infections and malignancies are rare in this patient population, they have a high mortality rate. Since 1991, 171 orthotopic heart transplantations were performed at the Ghent University Hospital with a 10-year survival rate of 75%. Severe cerebral complications occurred in 10 patients, with epilepsy in 2 patients, cerebrovascular accidents in 4 patients, cerebral infections in 3 patients and a cerebral malignancy in 1 patient, resulting in a fatal outcome in 7 patients. We present four of these cases. PMID:25292206

  6. Glomerular disease: looking beyond pathology.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Roger C; Alpers, Charles E; Holzman, Lawrence B; He, John C; Salant, David J; Chugh, Sumant S; Natarajan, Rama; Trachtman, Howard; Brasile, Lauren; Star, Robert A; Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E; Moxey-Mims, Marva M; Flessner, Michael F

    2014-06-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-supported Kidney Research National Dialogue asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives aimed at improved understanding of kidney function and disease progression. Over the past 2 years, 1600 participants posted almost 300 ideas covering all areas of kidney disease. An overriding theme that evolved through these discussions is the need to move beyond pathology to take advantage of basic science and clinical research opportunities to improve diagnostic classification and therapeutic options for people with primary glomerular disease. High-priority research areas included focus on therapeutic targets in glomerular endothelium and podocytes, regenerating podocytes through developmental pathways, use of longitudinal phenotypically defined disease cohorts to improve classification schemes, identifying biomarkers, disease-specific therapeutics, autoantibody triggers, and changing the clinical research culture to promote participation in clinical trials. Together, these objectives provide a path forward for improving clinical outcomes of glomerular disease. PMID:24700796

  7. Glomerular Disease: Looking beyond Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Roger C.; Alpers, Charles E.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; He, John C.; Salant, David J.; Chugh, Sumant S.; Natarajan, Rama; Trachtman, Howard; Brasile, Lauren; Star, Robert A.; Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E.; Moxey-Mims, Marva M.

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases–supported Kidney Research National Dialogue asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives aimed at improved understanding of kidney function and disease progression. Over the past 2 years, 1600 participants posted almost 300 ideas covering all areas of kidney disease. An overriding theme that evolved through these discussions is the need to move beyond pathology to take advantage of basic science and clinical research opportunities to improve diagnostic classification and therapeutic options for people with primary glomerular disease. High-priority research areas included focus on therapeutic targets in glomerular endothelium and podocytes, regenerating podocytes through developmental pathways, use of longitudinal phenotypically defined disease cohorts to improve classification schemes, identifying biomarkers, disease-specific therapeutics, autoantibody triggers, and changing the clinical research culture to promote participation in clinical trials. Together, these objectives provide a path forward for improving clinical outcomes of glomerular disease. PMID:24700796

  8. Molecular pathology in real time.

    PubMed

    Ryška, Aleš

    2016-03-01

    With the development of sophisticated individualized therapeutic approaches, the role of pathology in classification of tumors is enormously increasing. The solely morphological characterization of neoplastic process is no more sufficient for qualified decision on optimal therapeutic approach. Thus, morphologic diagnosis must be supplemented by molecular analysis of the lesion with emphasis on the detection of status of certain markers used as predictive factors for targeted therapy. Both intrinsic and acquired types of intratumor heterogeneity have an impact at various moments of cancer diagnostics and therapy. The primary heterogeneity of neoplastic tissue represents a significant problem in patients, where only limited biopsy samples from the primary tumor are available for diagnosis, such as core needle biopsy specimens in breast cancer, transthoracic or endobronchial biopsies in lung cancer, or endoscopic biopsies in gastric cancer. Detection of predictive markers may be influenced by this heterogeneity, and the marker detection may be falsely negative or (less probably) falsely positive. In addition, as these markers are often detected in the tissue samples from primary tumor, the differences between molecular features of the primary lesion and its metastases may be responsible for failure of systemic therapy in patients with discordant phenotype between primary and metastatic disease. The fact of tumor heterogeneity must be taken into consideration already in establishing pathological diagnosis. One has to be aware that limited biopsy specimen must not always be fully representative of the entire tumor volume. To overcome these limitations, there does not exist one single simple solution. Examination of more tissue (preference of surgical resection specimens over biopsies, whenever possible), use of ultra-sensitive methods able to identify the minute subclones as a source of possible resistance to treatment, and detection of secondary molecular events from

  9. Syphilitic lymphadenitis diagnosed via fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jang, David W; Khan, Alifia; Genden, Eric M; Wu, Maoxin

    2011-08-01

    Syphilis is coming back in the recent a few decades especially in the gay and HIV populations. Since syphilis can be "the great mimic" clinically and pathologically, a case report with updated review can be helpful to the medical community. We report, a case of syphilitic lymphadenitis diagnosed via fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). The pitfalls associated with the diagnosis of syphilitic lymphadenitis will be discussed. The patient's medical records were reviewed. The pertinent history, clinical course, and ancillary studies including FNAB cytology with special stains are presented. In addition to the case report, we discuss the diagnosis of syphilitic lymphadenitis and the role of FNAB cytology. This was a 37-year-old man presenting with a two-month history of a growing neck mass, night sweats, and a ten pound weight loss. The patient had been treated one month earlier for primary syphilis. Examination of the head and neck revealed a 3 cm right level II mass. FNAB cytology showed heterogeneous population of lymphocytes and plasma cells suggesting reactive changes. Modified silver staining of the cell block slide was performed and revealed spirochetes, consistent with syphilis. The patient's lymphadenitis resolved with a course of antibiotic treatment. Although lymphadenopathy is a rare presentation of syphilis, it should be included in the differential diagnosis for patients who offer a suspect history. FNAB with silver staining is an effective, minimally invasive way to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:21761579

  10. Two case reports indicating the dilemma in diagnosing lupus cerebritis.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dharitri; Chatterjee, Shuddhosatta; Ahmad, Bashar Imam; Das, Shantanu

    2013-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a connective-tissue disorder commonly affecting females of reproductive age group. Lupus Cerebritis is a serious neurological complication encountered in a good percentage of SLE cases. In this report, we discuss two Lupus Cerebritis patients, who were successfully diagnosed and treated. The first case, presented with generalized seizure, severe metabolic acidosis, and shock, with a history of fever of one-month duration. The second case manifested with an attack of generalized seizure after suffering from low-grade intermittent fever and joint pains for a duration of one-and-a-half months. Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement in SLE is caused by an inflammatory response of the autoimmune system, precipitated by an increased concentration of cytokines. Prompt identification of Lupus Cerebritis is extremely difficult, mainly because there is no single laboratory or radiological confirmatory test. Assessment of the clinical features and neurological signs, along with detection of antibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid are necessary to arrive at a diagnosis. Lupus Cerebritis should be included in the provisional diagnosis of a female patient of reproductive age group, who presents with complicated neurological manifestations and with no clear-cut clinical, pathological, or image finding. PMID:24479062

  11. General pathologist-helper: The new medical app about general pathology

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Vega, Iván

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Smartphone applications (apps) have become increasingly prevalent in medicine. Due to most pathologists, pathology trainees, technicians, and medical students use smartphones; apps can be a different way for general pathology education. “General pathologist-helper (GP-HELPER)” is a novel app developed as a reference tool in general pathology and especially for general pathologists, developed for Android and iOS platforms. Materials and Methods: “GP-HELPER,” was created using Mobincube website platform. This tool also integrates “FORUM GP-HELPER,” an external website created using Miarroba website (http://forum-gp-helper.mboards.com) and “COMMUNITY GP-HELPER” a multichannel chat created using Chatango website platform. Results: The application was released in July 2015, and it is been periodically updated since then. The app has permanent information (offline data) about different pathology protocols (TNM latest edition, protocols regarding management of tumors of unknown primary origin, and flowcharts for some of the most difficult tumors to diagnose) and a database with more than 5000 immunohistochemistry results from different tumors. Online data have links to more than 1100 reference pathology video lectures, 250 antibodies information, more than 70 pathology association websites, 46 pathology providers, and 78 outstanding pathology journal websites. Besides this information, the app has two interactive places such as “FORUM GP-HELPER” and “COMMUNITY GP-HELPER” that let users to stay in touch everywhere and every time. Expert consult section is also available. Conclusions: “GP-HELPER” pretends to integrate offline and online data about pathology with two interactive external places in order to represent a reference tool for general pathologists and associate members. PMID:26730351

  12. A Suggested Molecular Pathology Curriculum for Residents: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aisner, Dara L; Berry, Anna; Dawson, D Brian; Hayden, Randall T; Joseph, Loren; Hill, Charles E

    2016-03-01

    Molecular pathology is an essential element of pathology training. As more molecular tests have become available, there is an increasing need for pathology trainees to receive a strong foundation in molecular pathology. Appointed by the Training and Education Committee of the Association for Molecular Pathology, the Molecular Curriculum Task Force has developed a suggested curriculum in molecular pathology for residents. The foundations of molecular pathology are presented as a series of goals and objectives that residency programs can use to develop their educational programs. As pathologists continue to expand their roles to include regular clinical consultations in the realm of molecular testing, a strong foundation in molecular pathology and genomic medicine has become essential to the practice of pathology. PMID:26857063

  13. [Nursing diagnoses in cardiac surgery patients].

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Luciana Alves; Maia, Ticiane Fernandes; da Silva, Lúcia de Fátima

    2006-01-01

    Exploratory and transversal research accomplished with postoperative patients outgoing coronary bypass. It was aimed at identifying nursing diagnoses according to Taxonomy II of NANDA and nursing interventions according to Nursing Interventions Classification, associating with the results of Nursing Outcomes Classification. The data were collected fom 22 patients using formularies and physical examination. The information made possible the identification of fifteen nursing diagnosis, according to Taxonomy II of NANDA. Among them, stand out: risk of infection; Risk of constipation; Deficit in self-care intimate hygiene and integrity of harmed skin. The study revealed being fundamental to develop studies about nursing diagnoses to direct analyses of problems that concern to the demanding patients of specific nursing actions, that contribute to the devepoment of the profession. PMID:17175721

  14. Anorexia and attachment: dysregulated defense and pathological mourning

    PubMed Central

    Delvecchio, Elisa; Di Riso, Daniela; Salcuni, Silvia; Lis, Adriana; George, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The role of defensive exclusion (Deactivation and Segregated Systems) in the development of early relationships and related to subsequent manifestations of symptoms of eating disorders was assessed using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP). Fifty-one DSM-IV diagnosed women with anorexia participated in the study. Anorexic patients were primarily classified as dismissing or unresolved. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of defensive exclusion were carried out. Results showed potential benefits of using the AAP defense exclusion coding system, in addition to the main attachment classifications, in order to better understand the developmental issues involved in anorexia. Discussion concerned the processes, such as pathological mourning, that may underlie the associations between dismissing and unresolved attachment and anorexia. Implications for developmental research and clinical nosology are discussed. PMID:25389412

  15. Sports-related brain injuries: connecting pathology to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, James; Connolly, Ian D; Dangelmajer, Sean; Kintzing, James; Ho, Allen L; Grant, Gerald

    2016-04-01

    Brain injuries are becoming increasingly common in athletes and represent an important diagnostic challenge. Early detection and management of brain injuries in sports are of utmost importance in preventing chronic neurological and psychiatric decline. These types of injuries incurred during sports are referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries, which represent a heterogeneous spectrum of disease. The most dramatic manifestation of chronic mild traumatic brain injuries is termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is associated with profound neuropsychiatric deficits. Because chronic traumatic encephalopathy can only be diagnosed by postmortem examination, new diagnostic methodologies are needed for early detection and amelioration of disease burden. This review examines the pathology driving changes in athletes participating in high-impact sports and how this understanding can lead to innovations in neuroimaging and biomarker discovery. PMID:27032917

  16. Craniocervical junction tuberculosis: Usual pathology at an unusual site

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Biswaranjan; Patnaik, Sanjeev; Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Biswal, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) of the craniocervical junction is rare even where the condition is endemic. It poses problems in both diagnosis and management if not managed in time it may cause life-threatening complications. Case Description: An 18-year-old male patient presented with pain in the nape of the neck since 12 months duration which was not improving with medication. After magnetic resonance imaging of cervical spine, he was diagnosed as craniocervical junction TB. We did a transoral decompression of abscess with biopsy along with posterior decompression of cord and occipitocervical fusion. Biopsy of pathological material came as TB. He was advised for anti-tubercular therapy for 18 months. Conclusion: Although craniocervical junction TB is a rare disease, the outcome of treatment is good. Antituberculous drug therapy remains the mainstay of treatment after confirming the diagnosis. The surgical management options include transoral decompression with or without posterior fusion, depending upon the presence and persistence of atlantoaxial instability. PMID:26229730

  17. Steroid-responsive Encephalopathy Subsequently Associated with Alzheimer Disease Pathology: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.; Josephs, Keith A.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Drubach, Daniel A.; Caselli, Richard J.; Kantarci, Kejal; Lennon, Vanda; Jack, Clifford; Boeve, Bradley F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Steroid-responsive encephalopathies can considered vasculitic or nonvasculitic. Clinicopathological studies of nonvasculitic steroid-responsive encephalopathy are unusual, but can explain the range of diagnoses consistent with a steroid responsive presentation in life. Objective To extend the range of clinical features and pathological findings consistent with steroid-responsive encephalopathy. Design, Methods, and Patients A clinicopathological case series of four patients (ages 54–71 years, 2 women) with steroid-responsive encephalopathy followed at this institution until the time of death. Results Clinical features were suggestive of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies, and parkinsonism, but pathological examination revealed only Alzheimer’s Disease-related findings without evidence of Lewy bodies or prion disease in all cases. All patients demonstrated marked, sustained improvement following steroid treatment, based on clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or electroencephalogram studiesAlzheimer’s Disease was not diagnosed in life due to a lack of hippocampal atrophy on brain imaging and a dramatic symptomatic response to steroids. Conclusions Steroid-responsive encephalopathy is the clinical presentation of some patients with Alzheimer’s Disease related pathology at autopsy, and can be consistent with the clinical diagnoses of parkisonism, dementia with Lewy Bodies, or Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease in life. PMID:21714739

  18. Posterior ankle impingement in athletes: Pathogenesis, imaging features and differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daichi; Roemer, Frank W; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Posterior ankle impingement is a clinical diagnosis which can be seen following a traumatic hyper-plantar flexion event and may lead to painful symptoms in athletes such as female dancers ('en pointe'), football players, javelin throwers and gymnasts. Symptoms of posterior ankle impingement are due to failure to accommodate the reduced interval between the posterosuperior aspect of the talus and tibial plafond during plantar flexion, and can be due to osseous or soft tissue lesions. There are multiple causes of posterior ankle impingement. Most commonly, the structural correlates of impingement relate to post-traumatic synovitis and intra-articular fibrous bands-scar tissue, capsular scarring, or bony prominences. The aims of this pictorial review article is to describe different types of posterior ankle impingement due to traumatic and non-traumatic osseous and soft tissue pathology in athletes, to describe diagnostic imaging strategies of these pathologies, and illustrate their imaging features, including relevant differential diagnoses. PMID:26239710

  19. An Investigation of Vocal Tract Characteristics for Acoustic Discrimination of Pathological Voices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Won; Kang, Hong-Goo; Choi, Jeung-Yoon; Son, Young-Ik

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of measures related to vocal tract characteristics in classifying normal and pathological speech. Unlike conventional approaches that mainly focus on features related to the vocal source, vocal tract characteristics are examined to determine if interaction effects between vocal folds and the vocal tract can be used to detect pathological speech. Especially, this paper examines features related to formant frequencies to see if vocal tract characteristics are affected by the nature of the vocal fold-related pathology. To test this hypothesis, stationary fragments of vowel /aa/ produced by 223 normal subjects, 472 vocal fold polyp subjects, and 195 unilateral vocal cord paralysis subjects are analyzed. Based on the acoustic-articulatory relationships, phonation for pathological subjects is found to be associated with measures correlated with a raised tongue body or an advanced tongue root. Vocal tract-related features are also found to be statistically significant from the Kruskal-Wallis test in distinguishing normal and pathological speech. Classification results demonstrate that combining the formant measurements with vocal fold-related features results in improved performance in differentiating vocal pathologies including vocal polyps and unilateral vocal cord paralysis, which suggests that measures related to vocal tract characteristics may provide additional information in diagnosing vocal disorders. PMID:24288686

  20. Research In Diagnosing Bearing Defects From Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes research in bearing-defect signature analysis - use of vibration-signal analysis to diagnose defects in roller and ball bearings. Experiments performed on bearings in good condition and other bearings in which various parts scratched to provide known defects correlated with vibration signals. Experiments performed on highly instrumented motor-driven rotor assembly at speeds up to 10,050 r/min, using accelerometers, velocity probes, and proximity sensors mounted at various locations on assembly to measure vibrations.

  1. Thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pragnesh; Guider, Julie; Rahimi, Erik; Guha, Sushovan; Zhang, Songlin; Thosani, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluating superior mediastinal structures, especially the thymus gland. We report a case of thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using EUS elastography with strain ratio and fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 64-year-old woman presented with altered mental status and was diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis. Further work-up suggested a superior mediastinal mass, for which she underwent EUS. A hypoechoic mass was found in the superior mediastinum at the level of the aortic arch. Real-time EUS elastography showed a predominantly blue hue to the mass concerning for malignancy. FNA of the mass was performed, which revealed numerous large neoplastic cells under a background of a small lymphoid infiltrate. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for PAX8, pancytokeratin, and CAM5.2. The pathologic and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with thymic carcinoma. PMID:27386480

  2. Thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pragnesh; Guider, Julie; Rahimi, Erik; Guha, Sushovan; Zhang, Songlin; Thosani, Nirav

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for evaluating superior mediastinal structures, especially the thymus gland. We report a case of thymic carcinoma diagnosed by using EUS elastography with strain ratio and fine-needle aspiration (FNA). A 64-year-old woman presented with altered mental status and was diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis. Further work-up suggested a superior mediastinal mass, for which she underwent EUS. A hypoechoic mass was found in the superior mediastinum at the level of the aortic arch. Real-time EUS elastography showed a predominantly blue hue to the mass concerning for malignancy. FNA of the mass was performed, which revealed numerous large neoplastic cells under a background of a small lymphoid infiltrate. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for PAX8, pancytokeratin, and CAM5.2. The pathologic and immunohistochemical stains were consistent with thymic carcinoma. PMID:27386480

  3. Peripheral pulmonary carcinoid tumor diagnosed by endobronchial-ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ayaka; Akamatsu, Hiroaki; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old Japanese woman complained of uncontrolled hypertension and face swelling. She was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome with secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed a 2 × 2 cm mass in her left lung, with high standardized maximum uptake value. She underwent bronchoscopy with endobronchial ultrasound via a guide-sheath. Surgical resection of her left upper lung was performed, and pathological examination showed a typical carcinoid tumor. After lung resection, she recovered from her subjective symptoms. Diagnosis of peripheral carcinoid tumor of the lung is generally difficult. Here, we introduce a case of peripheral pulmonary carcinoid tumor diagnosed by endobronchial-ultrasound-guided bronchoscopy. PMID:26839693

  4. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease versus frontotemporal dementia: resolution with genetic diagnoses?

    PubMed

    Sha, Sharon J; Khazenzon, Anna M; Ghosh, Pia M; Rankin, Katherine P; Pribadi, Mochtar; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Rabinovici, Gil D; Miller, Bruce L; Lee, Suzee E

    2016-01-01

    We report a diagnostically challenging case of a 64-year-old man with a history of remote head trauma who developed mild behavioral changes and dyscalculia. He was diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), with additional features consistent with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed atrophy in bilateral frontal and parietal cortices and hippocampi on visual inspection and left frontal pole and bilateral anterior temporal encephalomalacia, suspected to be due to head trauma. Consistent with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's pathology, positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh compound B suggested the presence of beta-amyloid. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET demonstrated hypometabolism in bilateral frontal and temporoparietal cortices. Voxel-based morphometry showed atrophy predominant in ventral frontal regions (bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, pregenual anterior cingulate/medial superior frontal gyrus), bilateral mid cingulate, bilateral lateral temporal cortex, and posterior insula. Bilateral caudate, thalamus, hippocampi, and cerebellum were prominently atrophied. Unexpectedly, a pathologic hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 was identified in this patient. This report underscores the clinical variability in C9ORF72 expansion carriers and the need to consider mixed pathologies, particularly when imaging studies are inconsistent with a single syndrome or pathology. PMID:26304661

  5. Are all patients diagnosed with tuberculosis in Indian medical colleges referred to the RNTCP?

    PubMed

    Quazi, T A; Sarkar, S; Borgohain, G; Sreenivas, A; Harries, A D; Srinath, S; Khan, K; Bishnu, B; Tapadar, S; Phukan, A C; Kabir, A; Chaddha, V; Paul, D; Dewan, P

    2012-08-01

    To assess the proportion of tuberculosis (TB) patients diagnosed in three medical colleges in the states of West Bengal and Meghalaya who benefited from the services provided under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP), a line list of patients with reports of investigations suggesting probable or confirmed TB was prepared from the records of the pathology, radiology and microbiology departments. This was compared with another line list prepared using RNTCP records. Only 150 (36%) of 420 probable or confirmed TB patients were referred to the RNTCP services. This suggests a need for more intensive supervision and training of medical college faculty. PMID:22668522

  6. An unusual pediatric case of chronic constipation and rectosigmoid prolapse diagnosed by video defecography.

    PubMed

    Lesher, Aaron P; Hill, Jeanne G; Schabel, Stephen I; Morgan, Katharine A; Hebra, Andre

    2010-05-01

    Rectal prolapse is a relatively common, benign condition in the pediatric population. Conservative management usually results in resolution of the problem. Persistent rectal prolapse with chronic constipation suggests more serious underlying pathologic condition that may be challenging to diagnose. We present a case of severe recurrent rectal prolapse with chronic constipation in a 13-year-old boy. Using video defecography, an unusual radiographic modality in children, a functional sigmoid obstruction was observed that was not found on more routine imaging studies. Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy provided an excellent outcome in this patient who previously had a lifestyle-limiting, chronic condition. PMID:20438953

  7. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Urethral Stricture Disease and Urethral Pathology for Operative Planning.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Katherine M; Kadow, Brian T; Rusilko, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosing urethral pathology can prove difficult, as clinically, the presentation is often nonspecific and may be suggestive of multiple etiologies. Therefore, detailed and accurate urethral imaging in both males and females is critical. Since the early 1900s, conventional imaging studies including RUG and VCUG, with adjunct cystourethroscopy, have remained the gold standard diagnostic techniques to evaluate urethral pathology. However, limitations of conventional imaging have generated interest in finding alternative imaging modalities with comparable, if not superior, diagnostic accuracy, the goal being a more complete assessment of urethral pathology and anatomy that would allow for appropriate surgical planning. Imaging modalities with three-dimensional (3D) capabilities may provide more comprehensive information regarding urethral diseases through a more detailed illustration of periurethral soft tissue structures. Whether or not these imaging modalities will replace conventional studies is unclear, though there is an increasing body of literature that support their use. PMID:27278565

  8. Integrating Mouse Anatomy and Pathology Ontologies into a Phenotyping Database: Tools for Data Capture and Training

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, John P.; Sundberg, Beth A.; Schofield, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Mouse Disease Information System (MoDIS) is a data capture system for pathology data from laboratory mice designed to support phenotyping studies. The system integrates the mouse anatomy (MA) and mouse pathology (MPATH) ontologies into a Microsoft Access database facilitating the coding of organ, tissue, and disease process to recognized semantic standards. Grading of disease severity provides scores for all lesions that can then be used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses and haplotype association gene mapping. Direct linkage to the Pathbase on line database provides reference definitions for disease terms and access to photomicrographic images of similar diagnoses in other mutant mice. MoDIS is an open source and freely available program (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME; http://research.jax.org/faculty/sundberg/index.html). This provides a valuable tool for setting up a mouse pathology phenotyping program. PMID:18797968

  9. Multimodal neuroimaging as a window into the pathological physiology of schizophrenia: Current trends and issues.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Masanori; Miyata, Jun; Hazama, Masaaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Visualizing the detailed brain anatomy of individuals with schizophrenia has been made possible by recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although structural MRI cannot be currently used to diagnose schizophrenia, multimodal MRI can reveal insightful information on key clinical aspects of the pathological physiology of schizophrenia. However, in this regard, the number of multimodal MRI studies is still limited and definitely required. In this review, we discuss how classical and popular theories on the pathological physiology of schizophrenia can be re-examined using neuroimaging studies, and also discuss how multimodal MRI studies may provide additional findings. The pathological hypotheses examined include the "progressive brain disease hypothesis" and "disconnection hypothesis". This article is discussed mainly based on recent findings published by our research group. PMID:26235681

  10. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  11. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  12. Automatic detection of age-related macular degeneration pathologies in retinal fundus images.

    PubMed

    Güven, Ayşegül

    2013-04-01

    Advanced techniques in image processing and analysis are being extensively studied to assist clinical diagnoses. Digital colour retinal fundus images are widely utilised to investigate various eye diseases. In this paper, we describe the detection of optic disc (OD), macula and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) pathologies of the macular regions in colour fundus images. ARMD causes the loss of central vision in older adults. If the disease is detected early and treated promptly, much of the vision loss can be prevented. Eighty colour retinal fundus images were tested using our proposed algorithm. The Hough transform was employed for OD determination. A fundus coordinate system was established based on the macula location. An ARMD pathology detection methodology using a subtraction process after contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalisation operations was proposed. The accuracies of the automated segmentations of the OD, macula and ARMD pathologies obtained were 100%, 100% and 95.49%, respectively. These results show that our algorithm is a useful tool for detecting ARMD in retinal fundus images. The application of our method may reduce the time needed by ophthalmologists to diagnose ARMD pathology while providing dependable detection precision. Integration of our technique into traditional software could be used in clinical implementations as an aid in disease diagnosis and as a tool for quantitative evaluation of treatment effectiveness. PMID:22372623

  13. Misdiagnosis of pathological femoral fracture in a patient with intramuscular hemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XIAOLONG; NIE, TAO; ZHANG, BIN; DAI, MIN; LIU, HUCHENG; ZOU, FAN

    2016-01-01

    Hemangioma is a common disease; however, intramuscular hemangioma (IH) presenting with a pathological fracture is extremely rare. The present study reports a case of a 46-year-old male patient that suffered from IH of the right thigh, presenting with a pathological femoral fracture. The patient was initially diagnosed with a traumatic femoral fracture, and routine open reduction and internal fixation were performed at a local hospital. However, 20 days subsequent to surgery, gradual swelling and soreness around the incision were observed. The incision eventually ruptured during squatting for bowel movement, which led to extensive blood loss. Based on computed tomography (CT) and deep femoral artery arteriography, IH presenting with a pathological femoral fracture was diagnosed. The patient underwent artery embolization, from which he recovered well. At the 6-month follow-up, the femoral fracture was revealed to have healed, and a CT scan demonstrated no evidence of recurrence; however, continuous observation using CT is required in order to determine the long-term outcome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a misdiagnosed pathological femoral fracture in a patient with IH reported in the English literature. PMID:27347124

  14. Review of the current state of whole slide imaging in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Valenstein, Paul N.; Evans, Andrew J.; Kaplan, Keith J.; Pfeifer, John D.; Wilbur, David C.; Collins, Laura C.; Colgan, Terence J.

    2011-01-01

    Whole slide imaging (WSI), or “virtual” microscopy, involves the scanning (digitization) of glass slides to produce “digital slides”. WSI has been advocated for diagnostic, educational and research purposes. When used for remote frozen section diagnosis, WSI requires a thorough implementation period coupled with trained support personnel. Adoption of WSI for rendering pathologic diagnoses on a routine basis has been shown to be successful in only a few “niche” applications. Wider adoption will most likely require full integration with the laboratory information system, continuous automated scanning, high-bandwidth connectivity, massive storage capacity, and more intuitive user interfaces. Nevertheless, WSI has been reported to enhance specific pathology practices, such as scanning slides received in consultation or of legal cases, of slides to be used for patient care conferences, for quality assurance purposes, to retain records of slides to be sent out or destroyed by ancillary testing, and for performing digital image analysis. In addition to technical issues, regulatory and validation requirements related to WSI have yet to be adequately addressed. Although limited validation studies have been published using WSI there are currently no standard guidelines for validating WSI for diagnostic use in the clinical laboratory. This review addresses the current status of WSI in pathology related to regulation and validation, the provision of remote and routine pathologic diagnoses, educational uses, implementation issues, and the cost-benefit analysis of adopting WSI in routine clinical practice. PMID:21886892

  15. Quinoxalines Potential to Target Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Tristán-Manzano, María; Guirado, Antonio; Martínez-Esparza, María; Gálvez, Jesús; García-Peñarrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J

    2015-01-01

    The study of quinoxalines has increased immeasurably during the last two decades, due firstly to their relatively simple chemical synthesis, which has generated a vast variety of compounds with diverse structural modifications, and secondly, to the wide therapeutic potential and biological activities exhibited by this family of compounds. Quinoxalines constitute a rising biomedical class of low-molecular weight heterocyclic compounds with potential functions as antitumour, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic and antidiabetic agents, as well as being of interest for the potential treatment of glaucoma, insomnia, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, among others. However, a deeper knowledge of the molecular targets of quinoxalines that fulfil a key role in certain pathologies is required for the development of new and more specific drugs through a rational design strategy to avoid undesirable side effects. In the present review, we summarize the most important molecular targets of the quinoxaline derivatives discovered to date, thus providing a first reference index for researchers to identify the potential targets of their quinoxalines derived collections, which could facilitate the development of new quinoxaline- based therapies. PMID:26264925

  16. Pathological Gambling: Neuropsychopharmacology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Scott A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) affects about 0.2–2% of adults and the impact extends to family members, employers and society as a whole. Recent research has identified similarities in the pathophysiologies of PG and substance use disorders (SUDs). As such, findings regarding SUDs provide a framework for investigating PG. The aims of the manuscript are two-fold. First, we will briefly revivew neural systems implicated in PG. Cortico-limbic circuitry involving the ventral striatum, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are discussed as are the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine, opioids, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This background will provide a framework for reviewing the psychopharmacological treatments that have been tested for efficacy and safety in treating PG. Of medications, the strongest data suggest the efficacy and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of PG, and other agents have varying degree of empirical support. As behavioral therapies have also shown efficacy, they will be briefly considered as well. Future research is needed to understand how treatments work in PG and for whom specific treatments might work best. PMID:24349964

  17. Pathologizing sexual deviance: a history.

    PubMed

    De Block, Andreas; Adriaens, Pieter R

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a historical perspective on how both American and European psychiatrists have conceptualized and categorized sexual deviance throughout the past 150 years. During this time, quite a number of sexual preferences, desires, and behaviors have been pathologized and depathologized at will, thus revealing psychiatry's constant struggle to distinguish mental disorder--in other words, the "perversions," "sexual deviations," or "paraphilias"--from immoral, unethical, or illegal behavior. This struggle is apparent in the works of 19th- and early-20th-century psychiatrists and sexologists, but it is also present in the more recent psychiatric textbooks and diagnostic manuals, such as the consecutive editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). While much of the historical literature revolves around the controversy over homosexuality, this article also reviews the recent medicohistorical and sociohistorical work on other forms of sexual deviance, including the diagnostic categories listed in the latest edition, the DSM-IV-TR: exhibitionism, voyeurism, fetishism, frotteurism, pedophilia, sexual masochism, sexual sadism, and transvestic fetishism. PMID:23480073

  18. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  19. Practical pathology of aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M.

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  20. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  1. Practical pathology of aging mice.

    PubMed

    Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Treuting, Piper M

    2011-01-01

    Old mice will have a subset of lesions as part of the progressive decline in organ function that defines aging. External and palpable lesions will be noted by the research, husbandry, or veterinary staff during testing, cage changing, or physical exams. While these readily observable lesions may cause alarm, not all cause undue distress or are life-threatening. In aging research, mice are maintained until near end of life that, depending on strain and genetic manipulation, can be upwards of 33 months. Aging research has unique welfare issues related to age-related decline, debilitation, fragility, and associated pain of chronic diseases. An effective aging research program includes the collaboration and education of the research, husbandry, and veterinary staff, and of the members of the institution animal care and use committee. This collaborative effort is critical to humanely maintaining older mice and preventing excessive censorship due to non-lethal diseases. Part of the educational process is becoming familiar with how old mice appear clinically, at necropsy and histopathologically. This baseline knowledge is important in making the determination of humane end points, defining health span, contributing causes of death and effects of interventions. The goal of this paper is to introduce investigators to age-associated diseases and lesion patterns in mice from clinical presentation to pathologic assessment. To do so, we present and illustrate the common clinical appearances, necropsy and histopathological lesions seen in subsets of the aging colonies maintained at the University of Washington. PMID:22953032

  2. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  3. Ultrasound Dopplerography of abdomen pathology using statistical computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, Irina V.; Arakelian, Sergei M.; Wapota, Alberto R. W.

    1998-04-01

    The modern ultrasound dopplerography give us the big possibilities in investigation of gemodynamical changes in all stages of abdomen pathology. Many of researches devoted to using of noninvasive methods in practical medicine. Now ultrasound Dopplerography is one of the basic one. We investigated 250 patients from 30 to 77 ages, including 149 men and 101 women. The basic diagnosis of all patients was the Ischaemic Pancreatitis. The Second diagnoses of pathology were the Ischaemic Disease of Heart, Gypertension, Atherosclerosis, Diabet, Vascular Disease of Extremities. We researched the abdominal aorta and her branches: Arteria Mesenterica Superior (AMS), truncus coeliacus (TC), arteria hepatica communis (AHC), arteria lienalis (AL). For investigation we use the following equipment: ACUSON 128 XP/10c, BIOMEDIC, GENERAL ELECTRIC (USA, Japan). We analyzed the following componetns of gemodynamical changes of abdominal vessels: index of pulsation, index of resistance, ratio of systol-dystol, speed of blood circulation. Statistical program included the following one: 'basic statistic's,' 'analytic program.' In conclusion we determined that the all gemodynamical components of abdominal vessels had considerable changes in abdominal ischaemia than in normal situation. Using the computer's program for definition degree of gemodynamical changes, we can recommend the individual plan of diagnostical and treatment program.

  4. Is polysomnographic examination necessary for subjects with diaphragm pathologies?

    PubMed Central

    Oruc, Ozlem; Sarac, Sema; Afsar, Gulgun Cetintas; Topcuoglu, Ozgur Bilgin; Kanbur, Serda; Yalcinkaya, Irfan; Tepetam, Fatma Merve; Kirbas, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: While respiratory distress is accepted as the only indication for diaphragmatic plication surgery, sleep disorders have been underestimated. In this study, we aimed to detect the sleep disorders that accompany diaphragm pathologies. Specifically, the association of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with diaphragm eventration and diaphragm paralysis was evaluated. METHODS: This study was performed in Süreyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital between 2014–2016. All patients had symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (snoring and/or cessation of breath during sleep and/or daytime sleepiness) and underwent diaphragmatic plication via video-assisted mini-thoracotomy. Additionally, all patients underwent pre- and postoperative full-night polysomnography. Pre- and postoperative clinical findings, polysomnography results, Epworth sleepiness scale scores and pulmonary function test results were compared. RESULTS: Twelve patients (7 males) with a mean age of 48 (range, 27-60) years and a mean body mass index of 25 (range, 20-30) kg/m2 were included in the study. Preoperative polysomnography showed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in 9 of the 12 patients (75%), while 3 of the patients (25%) were regarded as normal. Postoperatively, patient complaints, apnea hypopnea indices, Epworth sleepiness scale scores and pulmonary function test results all demonstrated remarkable improvement. CONCLUSION: All patients suffering from diaphragm pathologies with symptoms should undergo polysomnography, and patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome should be operated on. In this way, long-term comorbidities of sleep disorders may be prevented.

  5. Can Digital Pathology Result In Cost Savings? A Financial Projection For Digital Pathology Implementation At A Large Integrated Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jonhan; Ahlers, Stefan M.; Stratman, Curtis; Aridor, Orly; Pantanowitz, Liron; Fine, Jeffrey L.; Kuzmishin, John A.; Montalto, Michael C.; Parwani, Anil V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Digital pathology offers potential improvements in workflow and interpretive accuracy. Although currently digital pathology is commonly used for research and education, its clinical use has been limited to niche applications such as frozen sections and remote second opinion consultations. This is mainly due to regulatory hurdles, but also to a dearth of data supporting a positive economic cost-benefit. Large scale adoption of digital pathology and the integration of digital slides into the routine anatomic/surgical pathology “slide less” clinical workflow will occur only if digital pathology will offer a quantifiable benefit, which could come in the form of more efficient and/or higher quality care. Aim: As a large academic-based health care organization expecting to adopt digital pathology for primary diagnosis upon its regulatory approval, our institution estimated potential operational cost savings offered by the implementation of an enterprise-wide digital pathology system (DPS). Methods: Projected cost savings were calculated for the first 5 years following implementation of a DPS based on operational data collected from the pathology department. Projected savings were based on two factors: (1) Productivity and lab consolidation savings; and (2) avoided treatment costs due to improvements in the accuracy of cancer diagnoses among nonsubspecialty pathologists. Detailed analyses of incremental treatment costs due to interpretive errors, resulting in either a false positive or false negative diagnosis, was performed for melanoma and breast cancer and extrapolated to 10 other common cancers. Results: When phased in over 5-years, total cost savings based on anticipated improvements in pathology productivity and histology lab consolidation were estimated at $12.4 million for an institution with 219,000 annual accessions. The main contributing factors to these savings were gains in pathologist clinical full-time equivalent capacity impacted by

  6. Fatal Granulomatous Acanthamoeba Encephalitis Mimicking a Stroke, Diagnosed by Correlation of Results of Sequential Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Biopsy, In Vitro Culture, Immunofluorescence Analysis, and Molecular Analysis▿

    PubMed Central

    McKellar, Mehri S.; Mehta, Lahar R.; Greenlee, John E.; Hale, Devon C.; Booton, Gregory C.; Kelly, Daryl J.; Fuerst, Paul A.; Sriram, Rama; Visvesvara, Govinda S.

    2006-01-01

    Amebic infections involving the central nervous system are rare and difficult to diagnose. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at timed intervals may be helpful, where scans reveal enhancing lesions and increased signal. We report a unique case of granulomatous amebic encephalitis that was proven pathologically with progressive radiological findings on MRI. PMID:16988022

  7. Coexistent ganglioglioma, focal cortical dysplasia, and hippocampal sclerosis (triple pathology) in chronic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Prayson, Richard A; Gales, Jordan M

    2015-10-01

    The most commonly identified pathologies in patients with medically intractable epilepsy include focal cortical dysplasia, hippocampal sclerosis, tumors, and remote ischemic damage. Surgery has proven to be an effective therapeutic modality in most of such patients. The coexistence of multiple pathologies in resected tissues is well documented, particularly ganglioglioma and focal cortical dysplasia. Cases of triple pathology are, however, extraordinarily unusual. We report 2 cases of triple pathology including hippocampal sclerosis, ganglioglioma, and focal cortical dysplasia. Cases of pathologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis diagnosed between January 2000 to December 2012 (n= 349) were reviewed, and only 2 cases (0.6%) with triple pathology were identified. The histopathologic and clinical features of these 2 cases are reviewed. The patients included a 6-year-old girl and 10-year-old boy. The former patient presented with a 4-year history of epilepsy and oppositional defiant disorder. Imaging identified a lesion in the left parahippocampal gyrus and posterior hippocampus. The latter patient presented with an 8-year history of epilepsy, attention deficient hyperactivity disease, and a pervasive developmental disorder. Imaging identified a lesion in the left posterior temporal and occipital region. Resected tissues in both patients showed a ganglioglioma (World Health Organization grade I) with accompanying focal cortical dysplasia and hippocampal sclerosis. Both patients were seizure free on antiepileptic medication at last follow-up at 20 and 38 months, respectively. The prevalence of triple pathology including hippocampal sclerosis is low (<1% in the current study). Surgical intervention for triple pathology cases anecdotally appears effective in achieving seizure control. PMID:26235882

  8. TissueCypher™: A systems biology approach to anatomic pathology

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Jeffrey W.; Davison, Jon M.; Campbell, Bruce B.; Repa, Kathleen A.; Reese, Lia M.; Nguyen, Xuan M.; Li, Jinhong; Foxwell, Tyler; Taylor, D. Lansing; Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current histologic methods for diagnosis are limited by intra- and inter-observer variability. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods are frequently used to assess biomarkers to aid diagnoses, however, IHC staining is variable and nonlinear and the manual interpretation is subjective. Furthermore, the biomarkers assessed clinically are typically biomarkers of epithelial cell processes. Tumors and premalignant tissues are not composed only of epithelial cells but are interacting systems of multiple cell types, including various stromal cell types that are involved in cancer development. The complex network of the tissue system highlights the need for a systems biology approach to anatomic pathology, in which quantification of system processes is combined with informatics tools to produce actionable scores to aid clinical decision-making. Aims: Here, we describe a quantitative, multiplexed biomarker imaging approach termed TissueCypher™ that applies systems biology to anatomic pathology. Applications of TissueCypher™ in understanding the tissue system of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the potential use as an adjunctive tool in the diagnosis of BE are described. Patients and Methods: The TissueCypher™ Image Analysis Platform was used to assess 14 epithelial and stromal biomarkers with known diagnostic significance in BE in a set of BE biopsies with nondysplastic BE with reactive atypia (RA, n = 22) and Barrett's with high-grade dysplasia (HGD, n = 17). Biomarker and morphology features were extracted and evaluated in the confirmed BE HGD cases versus the nondysplastic BE cases with RA. Results: Multiple image analysis features derived from epithelial and stromal biomarkers, including immune biomarkers and morphology, showed significant differences between HGD and RA. Conclusions: The assessment of epithelial cell abnormalities combined with an assessment of cellular changes in the lamina propria may serve as an adjunct to conventional pathology in the

  9. 30 years of lymph node pathology: biomarkers and other advances.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Alan D

    2013-03-01

    Over the last 30 years there has been a massive change in both the clinical and pathologic aspects of malignant lymphomas. Pathologists are now able to evaluate cellular phenotypes and lineages of tumor cells using a wide variety of biomarkers and molecular techniques. The ability to identify tumor cell phenotypes has revolutionized the classification of lymphomas, leading to an internationally agreed system based on the reliable recognition of specific clinico-pathologic entities. The World Health Organization classification combines clinical features, histomorphology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular and genetic marker data to precisely categorize lymphomas. On the clinical front the increasing use of needle core biopsies has made it easier and quicker to obtain tissue samples, and the development of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography has revolutionized the assessment of patients both at presentation and after treatment. To improve overall outcomes for lymphoma patients there have been advances in the UK organization of cancer services. Cancer networks have been established, often with network multidisciplinary team meetings, and new diagnoses of lymphoma are reviewed on a network basis by pathologists specializing in the field. National and supranational quality control systems are in place for immunohistochemistry and for molecular techniques and multicenter clinical trials provide information about the efficacy of treatment regimens. The outcome of these advances is that a patient presenting in 2012 with suspected lymphoma can expect to be biopsied rapidly, to receive an accurate pathologic diagnosis by an expert hematopathologist, which will include prognostic marker information, and to have comprehensive disease assessment and discussion by a multidisciplinary team before embarking on the most appropriate treatment for his or her clinical situation. PMID:23417072

  10. Diagnosis and pathology of endocrine diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 22 papers under the headings of Diagnosis and Pathology of endocrine diseases. Topics covered include: Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and management of thyroid disorders, Pathology of thyroid diseases, Diagnosis of adrenourtical disease, Radiologic techniques in evaluating endocrine disorders; and the Pituitary and adrenal glands.

  11. [Biliary pathology. Key aspects of the problem].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A A

    2011-01-01

    Based on the clinical experience gained in the Department of Pathology biliary tract, Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology, were reviewed key aspects of biliary pathology on the issues of classification, diagnosis, treatment, and tactics for management of patients with various diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:21560643

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pathological Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Ammerman, Yola; Bohl, Jaime; Doersch, Anne; Gay, Heather; Kadden, Ronald; Molina, Cheryl; Steinberg, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated efficacy of psychotherapies for pathological gambling. Pathological gamblers (N = 231) were randomly assigned to (a) referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA), (b) GA referral plus a cognitive-behavioral (CB) workbook, or (c) GA referral plus 8 sessions of individual CB therapy. Gambling and related problems were assessed…

  13. Abdominal wall herniae and their underlying pathology

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Emma; Al-Akash, Musallam

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of pseudomyxoma peritonei presenting as a strangulated inguinal hernia. We review the current literature regarding the incidence of underlying pathology in patients presenting with abdominal wall herniae and discuss the need for histological assessment of the hernia sac in selected patients. We highlight the importance of assessing for and being aware of significant underlying pathology in certain patients. PMID:26855074

  14. Computer Assisted Learning Systems in Pathology Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkin, P. J. R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instructional systems in the teaching of pathology. Explains the components of a typical computer-based system and compares interactive systems which use visual displays ranging from microfiche projectors to video discs. Discusses computer programs prepared for courses in general pathology and systemic…

  15. Pathological Gambling and Related Problems among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Robert; Boudreault, Normand; Jacques, Christian; Vitaro, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates the prevalence of pathological gambling and related problems among 3,426 students in junior and senior high schools in Quebec City. Results indicate that 77% have gambled in the last twelve months and 13% gamble at least once a week. Results also reveal that pathological gambling is associated with drug and alcohol use, poor grades, and…

  16. [Computer technologies in teaching pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A B; Fedorov, D N

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives experience with personal computers used at the Academician A.L. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy for more than 20 years. It shows the objective necessity of introducing computer technologies at all stages of acquiring skills in anatomical pathology, including lectures, students' free work, test check, etc. PMID:26027397

  17. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  18. [Hydatid disease diagnosed following a pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Menassa-Moussa, L; Braidy, C; Riachy, M; Tabet, G; Smayra, T; Haddad-Zebouni, S; Ghossain, M; Aoun, N

    2009-11-01

    Hydatidosis is a parasitic disease found worldwide, particularly in Mediterranean countries, caused by Echinococcus granulosis infection. Humans are an intermediate and accidental host in the cycle of this parasite. The hydatid pulmonary arterial embolism is extremely rare, usually arising in the heart or the liver. We report a case of hydatid pulmonary embolism explored with multidetector scanner and MRI, and confirmed at pathology of the operative specimen. To our knowledge, this is the first case of inaugural hydatid pulmonary arterial embolism found on CT scan establishing the diagnosis of the disease in a patient who had no other location of hydatid cyst. PMID:19615835

  19. Glial Tau Pathology in Tauopathies: Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kahlson, Martha A.; Colodner, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the presence of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau pathology in neuronal and glial cells. Though the ratio of neuronal and glial tau aggregates varies across diseases, glial tau aggregates can populate the same degenerating brain regions as neuronal tau aggregates. While much is known about the deleterious consequences of tau pathology in neurons, the relative contribution of glial tau pathology to these diseases is less clear. Recent studies using a number of model systems implicate glial tau pathology in contributing to tauopathy pathogenesis. This review aims to highlight the functional consequences of tau overexpression in glial cells and explore the potential contribution of glial tau pathology in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:26884683

  20. Integrating anatomical pathology to the healthcare enterprise.

    PubMed

    Daniel-Le Bozec, Christel; Henin, Dominique; Fabiani, Bettina; Bourquard, Karima; Ouagne, David; Degoulet, Patrice; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    For medical decisions, healthcare professionals need that all required information is both correct and easily available. We address the issue of integrating anatomical pathology department to the healthcare enterprise. The pathology workflow from order to report, including specimen process and image acquisition was modeled. Corresponding integration profiles were addressed by expansion of the IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) initiative. Implementation using respectively DICOM Structured Report (SR) and DICOM Slide-Coordinate Microscopy (SM) was tested. The two main integration profiles--pathology general workflow and pathology image workflow--rely on 13 transactions based on HL7 or DICOM standard. We propose a model of the case in anatomical pathology and of other information entities (orders, image folders and reports) and real-world objects (specimen, tissue samples, slides, etc). Cases representation in XML schemas, based on DICOM specification, allows producing DICOM image files and reports to be stored into a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System. PMID:17108550

  1. An attempt to diagnose cancer by PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uda, M.; Maeda, K.; Sasa, Y.; Kusuyama, H.; Yokode, Y.

    1987-03-01

    PIXE is suitable especially for trace elemental analysis for atoms with high atomic numbers, which are contained in matrices composed mainly of light elements such as biological materials. An attempt has been made to distinguish elemental concentrations of cancer tissues from those of normal ones. Kidney, testis and urinary bladder cancer tissues were examined by PIXE. Key elements to diagnose these cancers were Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe and Zn. Enrichment of Fe and Ti, and deficiency of Zn could be seen in the kidney cancer. An opposite tendency was observed in the testicular cancer. Imbalance of these elemental concentrations in characteristic organs might give us a possibility for cancer diagnosis.

  2. Problems in diagnosing odontogenic myxoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Butt, F M A; Chindia, M L; Wakoli, K A

    2007-03-01

    Tumours and tumour-like growths arising from odontogenic tissues constitute a heterogenous group of lesions whose diagnosis can be particularly challenging on the part of both surgeons and pathologists. In children, these lesions are even more difficult to clinically and histopathologically diagnose definitively because of the concurrent diverse embryologic differentiation of dental tissues. A case is presented of a 12 year-old boy who was subjected to inappropriate primary management of a left mandibular mass, due apparently to inadequate consultation to establish an accurate diagnosis. PMID:17600984

  3. Psychotherapy Techniques for Patients Diagnosed with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lotterman, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes how standard psychotherapy techniques need to be modified to suit the specialized needs of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Patients with psychosis often have lost their ability to use words to describe their inner states. As a result, traditional forms of psychotherapy which depend so crucially on the use of language are compromised. The goal of treatment at the start is to help the patient recover his ability to use language to describe his inner life. Eventually, this enables the patient to make use of more traditional forms of psychodynamic treatment. PMID:27052606

  4. Hippocampal sclerosis of aging is a key Alzheimer's disease mimic: clinical-pathologic correlations and comparisons with both alzheimer's disease and non-tauopathic frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Brenowitz, Willa D; Monsell, Sarah E; Schmitt, Frederick A; Kukull, Walter A; Nelson, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) neuropathology was observed in more than 15% of aged individuals in prior studies. However, much remains unknown about the clinical correlates of HS-Aging pathology or the association(s) between HS-Aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) pathology. Clinical and comorbid pathological features linked to HS-Aging pathology were analyzed using National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) data. From autopsy data extending back to 1990 (n = 9,817 participants), the neuropathological diagnoses were evaluated from American AD Centers (ADCs). Among participants who died between 2005-2012 (n = 1,422), additional analyses identified clinical and pathological features associated with HS-Aging pathology. We also compared cognitive testing and longevity outcomes between HS-Aging cases and a subsample with non-tauopathy FTLD (n = 210). Reporting of HS-Aging pathology increased dramatically among ADCs in recent years, to nearly 20% of autopsies in 2012. Participants with relatively "pure" HS-Aging pathology were often diagnosed clinically as having probable (68%) or possible (15%) AD. However, the co-occurrence of HS-Aging pathology and AD neuropathology (AD-NP) did not indicate any pattern of correlation between the two pathologies. Compared with other pathologies, participants with HS-Aging pathology had higher overall cognitive/functional ability (versus AD-NP) and verbal fluency (versus both AD-NP and FTLD) but similar episodic memory impairment at one clinic visit 2-5 years prior to death. Patients with HS-Aging live considerably longer than patients with non-tauopathy FTLD. We conclude that the manifestations of HS-Aging, increasingly recognized in recent years, probably indicate a separate disease process of direct relevance to patient care, dementia research, and clinical trials. PMID:24270205

  5. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency diagnosed in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozlem; Buyuktas, Deram; Aydin, Ahmet; Acbay, Ozer

    2011-12-01

    Urea cycle enzymes deficiencies are rare metabolic disorders. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common type. The syndrome results from a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme OTC which catalyses the conversion of ornithine and carbamoyl phosphate to citrulline. It shows X-linked inheritance and typically remains asymptomatic until late infancy or early childhood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the age of the patient and the duration of hyperammonemia. Female heterozygotes are more difficult to diagnose. They suffer from hyperammonemic periods which can be triggered by trauma, infections, surgery, childbirth, parenteral nutrition, and by the initiation of sodium valproate therapy. The prognosis of OTC deficiency is better for those with an onset after infancy, but morbidity from brain damage does not appear to be linked to the number of episodes of hyperammonemia that have occurred. However, early diagnosis and prompt initiation of ammonia-lowering treatment are essential for survival of these patients. This case presents a patient who was diagnosed with OTC deficiency following mental confusion during pregnancy. PMID:21736537

  6. Pitfalls in diagnosing mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Filosto, Massimiliano; Scarpelli, Mauro; Tonin, Paola; Testi, Silvia; Cotelli, Maria Sofia; Rossi, Mara; Salvi, Andrea; Grottolo, Alberto; Vielmi, Valentina; Todeschini, Alice; Fabrizi, Gian Maria; Padovani, Alessandro; Tomelleri, Giuliano

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase and is characterized by external ophthalmoparesis, gastrointestinal dysmotility, leukoencephalopathy, and neuropathy. The availability of new therapeutic options (peritoneal dialysis, allogeneic stem cell transplantation, enzyme replacement) makes it necessary to diagnose the disease early, which is not always achieved due to the difficulty in recognizing this disorder, especially in case of atypical presentation. We describe three MNGIE patients with atypical onset of the disease. In the first patient the main symptoms were long-standing chronic fever, recurrent acute migrant arthritis, and gastrointestinal disorders mimicking autoimmune or inflammatory intestinal diseases; the second patient complained only of exercise intolerance and muscle cramps, and the third patient had a CIDP-like polyneuropathy. This study stresses the insidious heterogeneous clinical onset of some cases of MNGIE, expands the spectrum of the phenotype, and suggests considering MNGIE in the differential diagnosis of enteropathic arthritis, isolated exercise intolerance, and inflammatory polyneuropathies not responsive to the usual treatment. A better understanding of the clinical heterogeneity of MNGIE is necessary in order to diagnose atypical cases and promote early diagnosis, which is now absolutely necessary in view of the new available therapies. PMID:21503690

  7. Diagnosing faults in autonomous robot plan execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Raymond K.; Doshi, Rajkumar S.; Atkinson, David J.; Lawson, Denise M.

    1989-01-01

    A major requirement for an autonomous robot is the capability to diagnose faults during plan execution in an uncertain environment. Many diagnostic researches concentrate only on hardware failures within an autonomous robot. Taking a different approach, the implementation of a Telerobot Diagnostic System that addresses, in addition to the hardware failures, failures caused by unexpected event changes in the environment or failures due to plan errors, is described. One feature of the system is the utilization of task-plan knowledge and context information to deduce fault symptoms. This forward deduction provides valuable information on past activities and the current expectations of a robotic event, both of which can guide the plan-execution inference process. The inference process adopts a model-based technique to recreate the plan-execution process and to confirm fault-source hypotheses. This technique allows the system to diagnose multiple faults due to either unexpected plan failures or hardware errors. This research initiates a major effort to investigate relationships between hardware faults and plan errors, relationships which were not addressed in the past. The results of this research will provide a clear understanding of how to generate a better task planner for an autonomous robot and how to recover the robot from faults in a critical environment.

  8. Learning and diagnosing faults using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Bruce A.; Kiech, Earl L.; Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks have been employed for learning fault behavior from rocket engine simulator parameters and for diagnosing faults on the basis of the learned behavior. Two problems in applying neural networks to learning and diagnosing faults are (1) the complexity of the sensor data to fault mapping to be modeled by the neural network, which implies difficult and lengthy training procedures; and (2) the lack of sufficient training data to adequately represent the very large number of different types of faults which might occur. Methods are derived and tested in an architecture which addresses these two problems. First, the sensor data to fault mapping is decomposed into three simpler mappings which perform sensor data compression, hypothesis generation, and sensor fusion. Efficient training is performed for each mapping separately. Secondly, the neural network which performs sensor fusion is structured to detect new unknown faults for which training examples were not presented during training. These methods were tested on a task of fault diagnosis by employing rocket engine simulator data. Results indicate that the decomposed neural network architecture can be trained efficiently, can identify faults for which it has been trained, and can detect the occurrence of faults for which it has not been trained.

  9. Diagnosing sepsis - The role of laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shu-Ling; Miller, Nancy S; Lee, John; Remick, Daniel G

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is the host response to microbial pathogens resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. An accurate and timely diagnosis of sepsis allows prompt and appropriate treatment. This review discusses laboratory testing for sepsis because differentiating systemic inflammation from infection is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT) is currently an FDA approved test to aid in the diagnosis of sepsis but with questionable efficacy. However, studies support the use of PCT for antibiotic de-escalation. Serial lactate measurements have been recommended for monitoring treatment efficacy as part of sepsis bundles. The 2016 sepsis consensus definitions include lactate concentrations >2mmol/L (>18mg/dL) as part of the definition of septic shock. Also included in the 2016 definitions are measuring bilirubin and creatinine to determine progression of organ failure indicating worse prognosis. Hematologic parameters, including a simple white blood cell count and differential, are frequently part of the initial sepsis diagnostic protocols. Several new biomarkers have been proposed to diagnose sepsis or to predict mortality, but they currently lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be considered as stand-alone testing. If sepsis is suspected, new technologies and microbiologic assays allow rapid and specific identification of pathogens. In 2016 there is no single laboratory test that accurately diagnoses sepsis. PMID:27387712

  10. Diagnose of occult bronchial foreign body

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wang, Xue-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Occult bronchial foreign body can be very difficult to diagnose early in an adult patient without acute symptoms. This report describes a rare case of undetected Chinese medicine “Coptis chinensis” aspiration for 10 long years. Methods: A case was reported that a female patient complained of a 10-year history of productive cough. A battery of tests were given to confirm the diagnosis. Results: Chest computed tomography (CT) showed extensive bronchiectasis and multiple nodules, along with stenosis of left lower lobar bronchus. An extensive solid lesion with surrounding inflammatory granulation tissue was seen on her first bronchoscopy and biopsy revealed chronic mucosal inflammation. A neglected history of Coptis chinensis regularly kept in-mouth while sleeping for the last 10 years in this patient provided clues for a final diagnosis. Confirmatory diagnosis of bilateral tracheobronchial foreign bodies caused by recurrent inhalation of Coptis chinensis was made by a second bronchoscopy. Conclusions: This case clearly demonstrates that a precise medical history is often overlooked. A high index of suspicion, a precise medical history, radiographic features of chronic respiratory symptoms not explained by other conditions were keys to diagnosing this case. PMID:27495017

  11. Diagnosing faults in autonomous robot plan execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Raymond K.; Doshi, Rajkumar S.; Atkinson, David J.; Lawson, Denise M.

    1988-01-01

    A major requirement for an autonomous robot is the capability to diagnose faults during plan execution in an uncertain environment. Many diagnostic researches concentrate only on hardware failures within an autonomous robot. Taking a different approach, the implementation of a Telerobot Diagnostic System that addresses, in addition to the hardware failures, failures caused by unexpected event changes in the environment or failures due to plan errors, is described. One feature of the system is the utilization of task-plan knowledge and context information to deduce fault symptoms. This forward deduction provides valuable information on past activities and the current expectations of a robotic event, both of which can guide the plan-execution inference process. The inference process adopts a model-based technique to recreate the plan-execution process and to confirm fault-source hypotheses. This technique allows the system to diagnose multiple faults due to either unexpected plan failures or hardware errors. This research initiates a major effort to investigate relationships between hardware faults and plan errors, relationships which were not addressed in the past. The results of this research will provide a clear understanding of how to generate a better task planner for an autonomous robot and how to recover the robot from faults in a critical environment.

  12. Vehicle Fault Diagnose Based on Smart Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhining, Li; Peng, Wang; Jianmin, Mei; Jianwei, Li; Fei, Teng

    In the vehicle's traditional fault diagnose system, we usually use a computer system with a A/D card and with many sensors connected to it. The disadvantage of this system is that these sensor can hardly be shared with control system and other systems, there are too many connect lines and the electro magnetic compatibility(EMC) will be affected. In this paper, smart speed sensor, smart acoustic press sensor, smart oil press sensor, smart acceleration sensor and smart order tracking sensor were designed to solve this problem. With the CAN BUS these smart sensors, fault diagnose computer and other computer could be connected together to establish a network system which can monitor and control the vehicle's diesel and other system without any duplicate sensor. The hard and soft ware of the smart sensor system was introduced, the oil press, vibration and acoustic signal are resampled by constant angle increment to eliminate the influence of the rotate speed. After the resample, the signal in every working cycle could be averaged in angle domain and do other analysis like order spectrum.

  13. High-throughput profiling of tissue and tissue model microarrays: Combined transmitted light and 3-color fluorescence digital pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nederlof, Michel; Watanabe, Shigeo; Burnip, Bill; Taylor, D. Lansing; Critchley-Thorne, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    For many years pathologists have used Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E), single marker immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization with manual analysis by microscopy or at best simple digital imaging. There is a growing trend to update pathology to a digital workflow to improve objectivity and productivity, as has been done in radiology. There is also a need for tissue-based multivariate biomarker assays to improve the accuracy of diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive testing. Multivariate tests are not compatible with the traditional single marker, manual analysis pathology methods but instead require a digital platform with brightfield and fluorescence imaging, quantitative image analysis, and informatics. Here we describe the use of the Hamamatsu NanoZoomer Digital Pathology slide scanner with HCImage software for combined brightfield and multiplexed fluorescence biomarker analysis and highlight its applications in biomarker research and pathology testing. This combined approach will be an important aid to pathologists in making critical diagnoses. PMID:22200032

  14. Paracoccidioidomycosis in southern Rio Grande do Sul: A retrospective study of histopathologically diagnosed cases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Silvana Pereira; Jorge, Valéria Magalhães; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski

    2014-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and is endemic to Brazil. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective analysis of the PCM cases in the countryside south of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The files from four histopathology laboratories located in the city of Pelotas were obtained, and all of the epidemiological and clinical data from the PCM diagnosed cases were collected for analysis. A total of 123 PCM cases diagnosed between 1966 and 2009 were selected. Of these patients, 104 (84.5%) were male, and 17 were female. The patients ranged from 02 to 92 years of age. Fifty-two cases (41.9%) were obtained from the oral pathology laboratory, and the remaining 71 cases (58.1%) were obtained from the three general pathology laboratories. Of all of the patients studied, 65.2% lived in rural zones and worked in agriculture or other related fields. Data on the evolution of this disease was available for 43 cases, and the time frame ranged from 20 to 2920 days (mean = 572.3 days). An accurate diagnosis performed in less than 30 days only occurred in 21% of the cases. PCM is endemic to the countryside of Rio Grande do Sul. Therefore, it is recommended that PCM be included as a differential diagnosis, mainly for individuals between 30 and 60 years of age, living in rural zones and who have respiratory signs and associated-oropharyngeal lesions. PMID:24948940

  15. Prostatic Stromal Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential Which Was Difficult to Diagnose

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoko; Nohara, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Uchiyama, Akio; Ishizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a case of stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) that was difficult to diagnose. A 53-year-old male was found to have a hard nodule on digital rectal examination; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large nodule on the left side of the prostate, indicating prostate cancer. However, pathological diagnosis of the biopsy specimen was benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although a papillary tumor in the prostatic urethra was also seen on urethrocystoscopy, the tumor specimen obtained from transurethral resection was not malignant. The tumor in the prostatic urethra recurred only 3 months after transurethral resection, and pathological findings revealed benign hyperplasia not only in the stromal tissue but also in the epithelium; therefore, the prostate tumor was suspected to be STUMP. It took many prostate pathologists a long time to reach the final diagnosis of STUMP. STUMP is a rare benign tumor, difficult to diagnose, and sometimes transforms into stromal sarcoma. Thus, we should consider radical resection in such cases. PMID:26839730

  16. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... easily recognized when it is fully developed, but health care providers try to diagnose and treat it well ...

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers often use a blood sample to diagnose ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menkes Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Menkes disease? Skip sharing on social ... 3 months old. To diagnose Menkes disease, a health care provider will order blood tests to measure the ...

  3. Diagnosing Sleep Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Sleep Disorders Diagnosing Sleep Disorders Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... tests when trying to diagnose a sleep disorder: Sleep history and sleep log If you believe you ...

  4. Diagnosing Sleep Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Are You Sleep-Deprived? Diagnosing Sleep Disorders Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents At ... several possible tests when trying to diagnose a sleep disorder: Sleep history and sleep log. If you believe ...

  5. Central Causes of Foot Drop: Rare and Underappreciated Differential Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Westhout, Franklin D; Paré, Laura S; Linskey, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Peripheral causes of foot drop are well recognized. However, causes stemming from the central nervous system represent rare, important, and underappreciated differential etiologies. Methods: Two cases of foot drop stemming from central causes are described. Patients: The first patient, a 46-year-old man with a remote history of lumbar spine fracture and L4-L5 instrumentation/fusion, presented with progressive weakness and numbness of the left foot, followed within 3 months by similar symptoms in the right foot. Lumbar spine imaging failed to reveal compressive nerve root pathology. Electromyography, nerve conduction studies, and muscle and nerve biopsy suggested a preganglionic lesion and ruled out a peripheral cause. Upper spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed significant spinal stenosis at C4-C7 and T11-T12. Patient 2 was a 66-year-old man with a known left parasagittal convex meningioma diagnosed 2 years prior presented with a progressive right foot drop over 2 months. Spine imaging was normal, and serial brain MRI confirmed a slowly enlarging parasagittal meningioma. Results: Following decompressive laminectomies at C4-C7 and T11-T12, patient 1's gait improved, with marked resolution of his right foot drop and significant improvement on the left. Patient 2 underwent craniotomy for microsurgical tumor resection. At the 2-week follow-up examination, he was taking daily walks. Conclusions: Central causes, although rare, need to be considered in the differential diagnosis of foot drop. Central causative lesions usually occur at locations where pyramidal tract connections are condensed and specific and the function is somatotopically organized. These cases confirm that good results can be achieved when correctable central causes of foot drop are recognized. PMID:17385271

  6. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  7. Mulberry hypertrophy and accompanying sinonasal pathologies: A review of 68 cases.

    PubMed

    Akduman, Davut; Haksever, Mehmet; Yanilmaz, Muhammed; Solmaz, Fevzi

    2016-08-01

    Mulberry hypertrophy occasionally coexists with sinonasal pathologies. There are very few reports in the literature on this clinical entity. We conducted a retrospective study to draw attention to this condition in the context of accompanying sinonasal pathologies. Our study group was made up of 68 patients-51 males and 17 females, aged 13 to 57 years (mean: 34.9)-who had been diagnosed with mulberry hypertrophy and at least one accompanying sinonasal pathology. All patients had a long-standing chronic discharge. Forty-nine of these patients (72.1%) had unilateral mulberry hypertrophy. The most common concomitant pathologies were chronic rhinosinusitis and ostiomeatal complex disease; others included septal deviation, nasal polyposis, allergic rhinitis, and concha bullosa. Thirty-six patients (52.9%) with varying degrees of choanal/nasal obstruction were operated on with endoscopic excision to treat the mulberry hypertrophy. In all, most patients underwent some sort of surgery to treat either the mulberry hypertrophy or the accompanying sinonasal pathology. Based on our findings, we suggest a clinical staging system to serve as a way to standardize management and guide future basic and clinical research. PMID:27551846

  8. Interpreting pathologies in extant and extinct archosaurs using micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Garwood, Russell J.; Lowe, Tristan; Withers, Philip J.; Manning, Phillip L.

    2015-01-01

    Palaeopathology offers unique insight to the healing strategies of extinct organisms, permitting questions concerning bone physiology to be answered in greater depth. Unfortunately, most palaeopathological studies are confined to external morphological interpretations due to the destructive nature of traditional methods of study. This limits the degree of reliable diagnosis and interpretation possible. X-ray MicroTomography (micro-CT, XMT) provides a non-destructive means of analysing the internal three-dimensional structure of pathologies in both extant and extinct individuals, at higher resolutions than possible with medical scanners. In this study, we present external and internal descriptions of pathologies in extant and extinct archosaurs using XMT. This work demonstrates that the combination of external/internal diagnosis that X-ray microtomography facilitates is crucial when differentiating between pathological conditions. Furthermore, we show that the use of comparative species, both through direct analysis and from the literature, provides key information for diagnosing between vertebrate groups in the typical pathological conditions and physiological processes. Micro-CT imaging, combined with comparative observations of extant species, provides more detailed and reliable interpretation of palaeopathologies. Micro-CT is an increasingly accessible tool, which will provide key insights for correctly interpreting vertebrate pathologies in the future. PMID:26246971

  9. Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to report on a family with pathologically and genetically diagnosed autosomal dominant inherited centronuclear myopathy (CNM). In addition, this study aimed to investigate the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of the disease. This pedigree was traced back three generations, four patients underwent neurological examination, two patients underwent muscle biopsy, and eight family members were subjected to dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene mutation analysis. DNM2 mutations were detected in seven family members, of which four patients exhibited DNM2 mutation‑specific clinical and pathological features. Lower extremity weakness was the predominant symptom of these patients, however, proximal and distal lower extremity involvement was inconsistent. All patients exhibited marked systematic muscle atrophy and various degrees of facial muscle involvement. The patients presented the typical pathological changes of CNM, and their muscle tissues were heavily replaced by adipose tissue, with clustered distribution of muscle fibers as another notable feature. DNM2‑CNM patients of this pedigree exhibited heterogeneous clinical and pathological features, providing a basis for further molecular genetic analysis. PMID:27035234

  10. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-06-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology. PMID:26065787

  11. "Slide less pathology": Fairy tale or reality?

    PubMed

    Indu, M; Rathy, R; Binu, M P

    2016-01-01

    Pathology practice is significantly advanced in various frontiers. Therefore, "slide less digital" pathology will not be a mere imagination in near future. Digitalization of histopathological slides (whole slide imaging [WSI]) is possible with the help of whole slide scanner. The WSI has a positive impact not only in routine practice but also in research field, medical education and bioindustry. Even if digital pathology has definitive advantages, its widespread use is not yet possible. As it is an upcoming technology in our field, this article is aimed to discussessential aspects of WSI. PMID:27601824

  12. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-03-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology. PMID:26851661

  13. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (and Asthma)

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  14. The role of hiatus hernia in GERD.

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Increased esophageal acid exposure in gastroesophageal reflux disease has several potential causes, some related primarily to physiological dysfunction of the LES and others related to anatomic distortion of the gastroesophageal junction as occurs with hiatus hernia. One attractive feature of implicating hiatal hernias in the pathogenesis of reflux disease is that, like reflux disease, axial hernias become more common with age and obesity. However, the importance of hiatus hernia is obscured by imprecise definition and an all-or-none conceptualization that has led to wide variation in estimates of prevalence among normal or diseased populations. There are at least three potentially significant radiographic features of a hiatus hernia: axial length during distention, axial length at rest, and competence of the diaphragmatic hiatus. Although any or all of these features may be abnormal in a particular instance of hiatus hernia, each is of different functional significance. Grouping all abnormalities of the gastroesophageal junction as "hiatus hernia" without detailing the specifics of each case defies logic. Mechanistically, the gastroesophageal junction must protect against reflux both in static and dynamic conditions. During abrupt increases in intra-abdominal pressure, the crural diaphragm normally serves as a "second sphincter," and this mechanism is substantially impaired in individuals with a gaping hiatus. Large, non-reducing hernias also impair the process of esophageal emptying, thereby prolonging acid clearance time following a reflux event (especially while in the supine posture). These anatomically-determined functional impairments of the gastroesophageal junction lead to increased esophageal acid exposure. Thus, although hiatus hernia may or may not be an initiating factor at the inception of reflux disease, it clearly can act as a sustaining factor accounting for the frequently observed chronicity of the disease. PMID:10780571

  15. Antenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis: current postnatal management.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Michael T; Merguerian, Paul A; Koyle, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The issue of antenatal hydronephrosis has become a routine component for the care of a pregnant woman despite limited evidence of a clinical benefit. The genitourinary tract represents the most commonly detected organ system with identified abnormalities, with antenatal hydronephrosis (ANH), being the most notable and common finding. ANH represents a spectrum, with most cases being a trivial and inconsequential finding on maternal fetal ultrasound. However, there is a correlation with increased grades of ANH being associated with increased severity of urinary tract pathology. Most patients can be managed expectantly with appropriate evaluation commenced postnatally based on severity of ANH and proper parental counseling and education. The purpose of this review was to assess current literature and guidelines pertaining to ANH and incorporate our practical interpretations of their significance. PMID:23325322

  16. The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbles, J A; Cohen, M M

    1986-01-01

    Sir Frederick Treves first showed Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, to the Pathological Society of London in 1884. A diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was suggested in 1909 and was widely accepted. There is no evidence, however, of café au lait spots or histological proof of neurofibromas. It is also clear that Joseph Merrick's manifestations were much more bizarre than those commonly seen in neurofibromatosis. Evidence indicates that Merrick suffered from the Proteus syndrome and had the following features compatible with this diagnosis: macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the skull; hypertrophy of long bones; and thickened skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly of the hands and feet, including plantar hyperplasia, lipomas, and other unspecified subcutaneous masses. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:3092979

  17. The role of Alzheimer’s and cerebrovascular pathology in mediating the effects of age, race, and apolipoprotein E genotype on dementia severity in pathologically confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Brandon E.; John, Samantha E.; Gurnani, Ashita S.; Bussell, Cara A.; Saurman, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dementia severity can be modeled as the construct δ, representing the “cognitive correlates of functional status.” Objective We recently validated a model for estimating δ in the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set; however, δ’s association with neuropathology remains untested. Methods We used data from 727 decedents evaluated at Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Centers nationwide. Participants spoke English, had no genetic abnormalities, and were pathologically diagnosed with AD as a primary or contributing etiology. Clinical data from participants’ last visit prior to death were used to estimate dementia severity (δ). Results A structural equation model using age, education, race, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype (number of ε2 and ε4 alleles) as predictors and latent AD pathology and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) pathology as mediators fit the data well (RMSEA = 0.031; CFI = .957). AD pathology mediated the effects of age and APOE genotype on dementia severity. An older age at death and more ε2 alleles were associated with less AD pathology and, in turn, with less severe dementia. In contrast, more ε4 alleles were associated with more pathology and more severe dementia. Although age and race contributed to differences in CVD pathology, CVD pathology was not related to dementia severity in this sample of decedents with pathologically confirmed AD. Conclusions Using δ as an estimate of dementia severity fits well within a structural model in which AD pathology directly affects dementia severity and mediates the relationship between age and APOE genotype on dementia severity. PMID:26444761

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux diagnosed by occlusal splint tintion.

    PubMed

    Cebrián-Carretero, José Luis; López-Arcas-Calleja, José María

    2006-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is a very frequent digestive disorder, mainly characterised by the reflux of the gastric acidic content to the esophage in abnormal quantities. There are different situations that favour this situation but almost in all of them rely an incompetence of the esophagic sphincter. The clinical consequences are many, including oral manifestations. Among all of them the most frequent is the esophagitis followed by symptoms at the pharynx or larynx and finally, the oral cavity. At this level fundamentally we will find enamel and oral mucosa erosions. We report the case of a patient who was indirectly diagnosed of her esophague disease by the observation of the alterations in the occlusal splint induced by the gastric reflux. We review the literature concerning the above topic and its possible association with the miofascial syndrome. PMID:16388289

  19. Automated diagnostic kiosk for diagnosing diseases

    DOEpatents

    Regan, John Frederick; Birch, James Michael

    2014-02-11

    An automated and autonomous diagnostic apparatus that is capable of dispensing collection vials and collections kits to users interesting in collecting a biological sample and submitting their collected sample contained within a collection vial into the apparatus for automated diagnostic services. The user communicates with the apparatus through a touch-screen monitor. A user is able to enter personnel information into the apparatus including medical history, insurance information, co-payment, and answer a series of questions regarding their illness, which is used to determine the assay most likely to yield a positive result. Remotely-located physicians can communicate with users of the apparatus using video tele-medicine and request specific assays to be performed. The apparatus archives submitted samples for additional testing. Users may receive their assay results electronically. Users may allow the uploading of their diagnoses into a central databank for disease surveillance purposes.

  20. Diagnosing ancient diphyllobothriasis from Chinchorro mummies.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Karl; Urban, Otto

    2003-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium pacificum has been reported as a human parasite from coprolites and skeletons in Peru and Chile. Our analysis of Chinchorro mummies from Chile provides the oldest evidence of D. pacificum directly associated with human mummies. These mummies date between 4,000 and 5,000 years ago. The basis for our diagnosis is presented. We find that the size of the eggs in the mummies is smaller than other discoveries of D. pacificum. We suggest that this is due to the peculiar circumstances of preservation of parasite eggs within mummies and the release of immature eggs into the intestinal tract as the tapeworms decompose after the death of the host. This information is important to consider when making diagnoses from mummies. PMID:12687781

  1. Diagnosing Parkinson's Diseases Using Fuzzy Neural System

    PubMed Central

    Abiyev, Rahib H.; Abizade, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the design of the recognition system that will discriminate between healthy people and people with Parkinson's disease. A diagnosing of Parkinson's diseases is performed using fusion of the fuzzy system and neural networks. The structure and learning algorithms of the proposed fuzzy neural system (FNS) are presented. The approach described in this paper allows enhancing the capability of the designed system and efficiently distinguishing healthy individuals. It was proved through simulation of the system that has been performed using data obtained from UCI machine learning repository. A comparative study was carried out and the simulation results demonstrated that the proposed fuzzy neural system improves the recognition rate of the designed system. PMID:26881009

  2. Optical coherence tomography for diagnosing periodontal disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Everett, Matthew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Otis, Linda L.; Nathel, Howard

    1997-05-01

    We have, in this preliminary study, investigated the use of optical coherence tomography for diagnosis of periodontal disease. We took in vitro OCT images of the dental and periodontal tissues from a young pig and compared them to histological sections. These images distinguish tooth and soft tissue relationships that are important in diagnosing and assessing periodontal disease. We have imaged the attachment of gingiva to the tooth surface and located the cemento-enamel junction. This junction is an important reference point for defining attachment level in the diagnosis of periodontal disease. the boundary between enamel and dentin is also visible for most of the length of the anatomical crown, allowing quantitation of enamel thickness and character.

  3. Scheie syndrome diagnosed after cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Daiki; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Kono, Syoichiro; Sakai, Yasuko; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko; Furujyo, Mahoko; Abe, Koji

    2012-05-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman with Scheie syndrome diagnosed after cerebral infarction. She presented with acute onset dysarthria and right upper limb weakness. The neurologic findings revealed dysarthria, right central facial paralysis, mild right hemiparesis, and mild sensory impairment in the right arm and leg. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed subtle high signal lesions in the left corona radiata and posterior limb of the internal capsule. The diagnosis was made by a coarse facial appearance, claw hands, pigmentary degeneration of the bilateral retinas, and a deficiency of the enzymatic activity of lysosomal α-L-iduronidase. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) followed by enzyme replacement therapy. The prognosis of this disease would improve with enzyme replacement therapy. It is necessary to be aware of cerebral infarction in patients with Scheie syndrome. PMID:21167740

  4. Postnatal Treatment in Antenatally Diagnosed Meconium Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, S; Andrei, B; Oancea, M; Licsandru, E; Ivanov, M; Marcu, V; Popa-Stanila, R; Mocanu, M

    2015-01-01

    Meconium peritonitis is a rare prenatal disease with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Distinctive features revealed by prenatal and postnatal ultrasoundmay be present: abdominal calcifications, ascites, polyhydramnios, meconium pseudocyst, echogenic mass and dilated bowel or intestinal obstruction. Establishing clear postnatal treatment and prognosis is difficult because of the heterogeneity of the results obtained by ultrasound. The aim of the study is to determine how prenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis is associated with perinatal management and further evolution. Clinical results are different depending on the presence of antenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis and its form, which can be mild or severe. Surgical treatment and management of meconium peritonitis depend on the clinical presentation of the newborn. Meconium peritonitis diagnosed prenatally differs from that of the newborn, not only concerning the mortality rates but also through reduced morbidity and overall better prognosis. PMID:26713828

  5. Diagnosing pseudobulbar affect in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, William; Hammond, Flora M; Malec, James F

    2014-01-01

    Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) is defined by episodes of involuntary crying and/or laughing as a result of brain injury or other neurological disease. Epidemiology studies show that 5.3%–48.2% of people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have symptoms consistent with (or suggestive of) PBA. Yet it is a difficult and often overlooked condition in individuals with TBI, and is easily confused with depression or other mood disorders. As a result, it may be undertreated and persist for longer than it should. This review presents the signs and symptoms of PBA in patients with existing TBI and outlines how to distinguish PBA from other similar conditions. It also compares and contrasts the different diagnostic criteria found in the literature and briefly mentions appropriate treatments. This review follows a composite case with respect to the clinical course and treatment for PBA and presents typical challenges posed to a provider when diagnosing PBA. PMID:25336956

  6. Diagnosing overflow waters in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chuncheng; Ilicak, Mehmet; Bentsen, Mats; Fer, Ilker

    2015-04-01

    Danmark Strait overflow water (DSOW) and Iceland Faroe overflow water (ISOW) are important for the formation and transformation of deep waters in the North Atlantic. In this work the volume transport, variability, and pathways of DSOW and ISOW are diagnosed using the one degree ocean-ice coupled Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) that is forced by CORE2 inter-annual forcing. The oceanic component (MICOM) features an isopycnal coordinate that is referenced to 2000 db. The issues related to the coarse resolution such as the southward transport of ISOW to the western European Basin, the lack of overflow water in the western North Atlantic, and the western boundary detachment of the deep western boundary current are addressed. The effects of diapycnal mixing on the behavior of overflow descent at Denmark Strait and Faroe Bank Channel and its downstream evolution are examined.

  7. Diagnosing autism in neurobiological research studies

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rebecca M.; Lord, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is by definition a complex and heterogeneous disorder. Variation in factors such as developmental level, language ability and IQ further complicate the presentation of symptoms. Clinical research and basic science must continue to inform each other’s questions to help address the heterogeneity inherent to the disorder. This review uses a clinical perspective to outline the common tools and best practices for diagnosing and characterizing ASD in a research setting. We discuss considerations for classifying research populations, including language ability and IQ and examine the advantages and disadvantages of different psychometric measurements. Ultimately, the contribution of multiple sources of data representing different perspectives is crucial for interpreting and understanding the ASD phenotype. PMID:23153932

  8. Utility of PCR in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bennedsen, J; Thomsen, V O; Pfyffer, G E; Funke, G; Feldmann, K; Beneke, A; Jenkins, P A; Hegginbothom, M; Fahr, A; Hengstler, M; Cleator, G; Klapper, P; Wilkins, E G

    1996-01-01

    At present, the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis rests with microscopy. However, this technique is insensitive and many cases of pulmonary tuberculosis cannot be initially confirmed. Nucleic acid amplification techniques are extremely sensitive, but when they are applied to tuberculosis diagnosis, they have given variable results. Investigators at six centers in Europe compared a standardized PCR system (Amplicor; Roche) against conventional culture methods. Defined clinical information was collected. Discrepant samples were retested, and inhibition assays and backup amplification with a separate primer pair were performed. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms were recovered from 654 (9.1%) of 7,194 samples and 293 (7.8%) of 3,738 patients. Four hundred fifty-two of the M. tuberculosis isolates from 204 patients were smear positive and culture positive. Among the culture-positive specimens, PCR had a sensitivity of 91.4% for smear-positive specimens and 60.9% for smear-negative specimens, with a specificity of 96.1%. Analysis of 254 PCR-positive, culture-negative specimens with discrepant results revealed that 130 were from patients with recently diagnosed tuberculosis and 94 represented a presumed laboratory error. Similar analysis of 118 PCR-negative, culture-positive specimens demonstrated that 27 discrepancies were due to presumed uneven aliquot distribution and 11 were due to presumed laboratory error; PCR inhibitors were detected in 8 specimens. Amplicor enables laboratories with little previous experience with nucleic acid amplification to perform PCR. Disease in more than 60% of the patients with tuberculosis with smear-negative, culture-positive specimens can be diagnosed at the time of admission, and potentially all patients with smear-positive specimens can immediately be confirmed as being infected with M. tuberculosis, leading to improved clinical management. PMID:8735089

  9. Causes and outcome of prenatally diagnosed hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Ali; Tahmasebi, Morteza; Gharibvand, Mohammad Momen

    2009-03-01

    Hydronephrosis is the most common abnormal finding in the urinary tract on prenatal screening with ultrasonography (U/S). Hydronephrosis may be obstructive or non-obstructive; obstructive lesions are more harmful to the developing kidneys. The aim of the study was to evaluate the causes of renal pelvic dilatation and the outcome of postnatal treatment in infants with hydronephrosis diagnosed prenatally with U/S. We prospectively studied 67 (60 males) newborns with hydronephrosis diagnosed prenatally and confirmed postnatally with U/S from Sept. 2005 to Oct. 2007. The patients were allocated to three groups based on the mea-surement of the anteroposterior renal pelvic diameter (APRPD) in transverse plane: mild (6-9.9 mm), moderate (10-14.9 mm) and severe (> or =15 mm) hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) was obtained in all of the patients to rule out vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). In cases with negative VUR, Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) scan with diuretic renography was performed to detect ureteropelvic joint obstruction (UPJO). Twenty two cases (32.8%) had mild, 20 (29.9%) had moderate, and 25 (37.3%) had severe hydronephrosis. The causes of hydroneph-rosis were VUR (40.2%), UPJO (32.8%), posterior urethral valves (PUVs) (13.4 %), and transient hydronephrosis (13.4 %). The lesion was obstructive in 37 (55.2%) infants. Totally, 33 (49.2%) patients with hydronephrosis (9 mild, 9 moderate, and 15 severe) subsequently developed com-plications such as UTI and renal insufficiency, or required surgery. Associated abnormalities were observed in 15 (22.4%) patients. We conclude that every newborn with any degree of hydro-nephrosis should be assessed postnatally for specific diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19237812

  10. Hierarchical Distribution of the Tau Cytoskeletal Pathology in the Thalamus of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rüb, Udo; Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Del Turco, Domenico; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    In spite of considerable progress in neuropathological research on Alzheimer's disease (AD), knowledge regarding the exact pathoanatomical distribution of the tau cytoskeletal pathology in the thalamus of AD patients in the advanced Braak and Braak AD stages V or VI of the cortical cytoskeletal pathology is still fragmentary. Investigation of serial 100 μm-thick brain tissue sections through the thalamus of clinically diagnosed AD patients with Braak and Braak AD stage V or VI cytoskeletal pathologies immunostained with the anti-tau AT8 antibody, along with the affection of the extraterritorial reticular nucleus of the thalamus, reveals a consistent and severe tau immunoreactive cytoskeletal pathology in the limbic nuclei of the thalamus (e.g., paraventricular, anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei, limitans-suprageniculate complex). The thalamic nuclei integrated into the associative networks of the human brain (e.g., ventral anterior and mediodorsal nuclei) are only mildly affected, while its motor precerebellar (ventral lateral nucleus) and sensory nuclei (e.g., lateral and medial geniculate bodies, ventral posterior medial and lateral nuclei, parvocellular part of the ventral posterior medial nucleus) are more or less spared. The highly stereotypical and characteristic thalamic distribution pattern of the AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology represents an anatomical mirror of the hierarchical topographic distribution of the cytoskeletal pathology in the interconnected regions of the cerebral cortex of AD patients. These pathoanatomical parallels support the pathophysiological concept of a transneuronal spread of the disease process of AD along anatomical pathways. The AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology in the thalamus most likely contributes substantially to the neuropsychiatric disease symptoms (e.g., dementia), attention deficits, oculomotor dysfunctions, altered non-discriminative aspects of pain experience of AD patients, and the disruption of their

  11. Overview of Glutamatergic Dysregulation in Central Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Miladinovic, Tanya; Nashed, Mina G.; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate plays a key role in many central pathologies, including gliomas, psychiatric, neurodevelopmental, and neurodegenerative disorders. Post-mortem and serological studies have implicated glutamatergic dysregulation in these pathologies, and pharmacological modulation of glutamate receptors and transporters has provided further validation for the involvement of glutamate. Furthermore, efforts from genetic, in vitro, and animal studies are actively elucidating the specific glutamatergic mechanisms that contribute to the aetiology of central pathologies. However, details regarding specific mechanisms remain sparse and progress in effectively modulating glutamate to alleviate symptoms or inhibit disease states has been relatively slow. In this report, we review what is currently known about glutamate signalling in central pathologies. We also discuss glutamate’s mediating role in comorbidities, specifically cancer-induced bone pain and depression. PMID:26569330

  12. The Vulnerable Faces of Pathological Gambling

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Pathological gambling is an emerging psychiatric disorder that has medical, psychiatric, and social consequences. Recently, research has been focusing on identifying which portions of the population are most vulnerable to developing problems related to ongoing gambling. Specific populations of interest have included adolescents, elderly, minorities, those with comorbid psychiatric or substance use disorders, and gender differences. Each group possesses unique biological, psychological, and/or social characteristics that confer a vulnerability to develop pathological gambling behaviors. Being able to recognize those who are at risk to become pathological gamblers is the first step toward developing effective prevention and early intervention programs. This is Part Two of a three-part series on pathological gambling. Part One appeared in the March issue of Psychiatry 2005. PMID:21179650

  13. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology for Dental Hygienists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Guidelines for structuring a pathology curriculum for dental hygienists include: definition of the field and its subfields; relationships with other fields; primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives; and suggestions for sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational safety. (MSE)

  14. Problem and Pathological Gambling among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Randy; Hanson, William E.; Olson, Douglas H.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter examines problem and pathological gambling among college students and reports on prevalence rate, risk and protective factors, prevention and intervention, and recommendations for college student personnel and other university administrators.

  15. Anatomic pathology laboratory information systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Lyung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-03-01

    The modern anatomic pathology laboratory depends on a reliable information infrastructure to register specimens, record gross and microscopic findings, regulate laboratory workflow, formulate and sign out report(s), disseminate them to the intended recipients across the whole health system, and support quality assurance measures. This infrastructure is provided by the Anatomical Pathology Laboratory Information Systems (APLIS), which have evolved over decades and now are beginning to support evolving technologies like asset tracking and digital imaging. As digital pathology transitions from "the way of the future" to "the way of the present," the APLIS continues to be one of the key effective enablers of the scope and practice of pathology. In this review, we discuss the evolution, necessary components, architecture and functionality of the APLIS that are crucial to today's practicing pathologist and address the demands of emerging trends on the future APLIS. PMID:22313836

  16. The plant pathology of native plant restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of ecologically degraded sites will benefit from the convergence of knowledge drawn from such disparate and often compartmentalized (and heretofore not widely considered) areas of research as soil microbial ecology, plant pathology and agronomy. Restoration following biological control w...

  17. Pathological Grief: Causes, Recognition, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gort, George

    1984-01-01

    Although the incidence of pathological grief does not appear to be high, the morbidity and mortality of sufferers is significant. Because of attitudes about grieving and the reluctance to experience grief, patients may avoid sharing grief with the family physician, who may then fail to recognize pathological grief. This article discusses clinical manifestations and situations which can lead to pathological grief. The types of pathological grief—chronic, inhibited, delayed, and atypical—are also discussed, along with personality variables which predispose some people to difficult grieving. Failure to grieve may also lead to a higher incidence of physical disease and various forms of mental illness. In order to manage grief, the physician must encourage the patient to express all his feelings of sadness, anger, and guilt; reassure him that his anger and guilt are a normal reaction to loss; and later, give him permission to stop grieving. PMID:21279045

  18. Application value of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing central nervous system lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shanhua; Li, Hongjun; Zhu, Rongguang; Zhang, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of central nervous system lymphoma. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed MRI images of 40 patients who had pathologically proven primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and received treatment in Binzhou People’s Hospital, Shandong, China from January to December in 2014. Location, size and form of tumor was observed and relevant data were recorded for analysis. Results: Foci of 40 cases of PCNSL all located in brain, among which. 18 cases were single (45.0%) and 22 cases were multiple (55.5%). Of 96 Foci, 84 were supratentorial, 12 were subtentorial. Enhanced MRI scanning showed that, most Foci had significant homogenous enhancement, shaping as multiple nodular or lumpy, and few had ring-enhancement. MRI suggested that, T1 signal of most Foci concentrated on low signal segment and T2 signal gathered on high signal segment, suggesting a significant homogeneous enhancement; moreover, mild and medium edema surrounded the tumor. They were pathologically confirmed as B cell derived non-hodgkin lymphoma. Except one case of Burkitt lymphoma, the others were all diffuse large B cell lymphoma which was observed with diffuse distribution of cancer cells (little cytoplasm, large nucleus, rough perichromatin granule) in same size. Fifteen cases were observed with sleeve-like infiltration of cancer cells around blood vessels. No case was found with hemorrhage, necrosis or calcification. Conclusion: Pathological foundation of PCNSL determines its characteristic MRI performance. Typical case of PCNSL can be diagnosed accurately by MRI. PMID:27182246

  19. Assessment of the Relationship between Diagnoses of ASD and Caregiver Symptom Endorsement in Adults Diagnosed with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Hess, Julie A.; Mahan, Sara; Fodstad, Jill C.; Neal, Daniene

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with an intellectual disability (ID) share overlapping traits with those diagnosed with both ID and an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if caregivers' reports of symptoms of ASD are of value (i.e., when comparing them to clinical diagnoses of ASD) and to determine which…

  20. Human Vision Pathology Diagnostics by Photogrammetrics Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murynin, A.; Knyaz, V.; Mateev, I.

    2014-06-01

    One of the reasons of such vision pathology as human stereoscopic vision capability dysfunction is an asymmetry of a human face. As a rule, such dysfunctions occur as early as in the babyhood, when diagnostic methods applied for adults are ineffective. Early diagnostics and prophylaxis could help in treatment of such pathology and face 3D modeling is one of the promising ways to solve this problem.

  1. Endothelial TWIST1 Promotes Pathological Ocular Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Chi-Hsiu; Sun, Ye; Gong, Yan; Fu, Zhongjie; Evans, Lucy P.; Tian, Katherine T.; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Pathological neovessel formation impacts many blinding vascular eye diseases. Identification of molecular signatures distinguishing pathological neovascularization from normal quiescent vessels is critical for developing new interventions. Twist-related protein 1 (TWIST1) is a transcription factor important in tumor and pulmonary angiogenesis. This study investigated the potential role of TWIST1 in modulating pathological ocular angiogenesis in mice. Methods. Twist1 expression and localization were analyzed in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Pathological ocular angiogenesis in Tie2-driven conditional Twist1 knockout mice were evaluated in both OIR and laser-induced choroidal neovascularization models. In addition, the effects of TWIST1 on angiogenesis and endothelial cell function were analyzed in sprouting assays of aortic rings and choroidal explants isolated from Twist1 knockout mice, and in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells treated with TWIST1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Results. TWIST1 is highly enriched in pathological neovessels in OIR retinas. Conditional Tie2-driven depletion of Twist1 significantly suppressed pathological neovessels in OIR without impacting developmental retinal angiogenesis. In a laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model, Twist1 deficiency also resulted in significantly smaller lesions with decreased vascular leakage. In addition, loss of Twist1 significantly decreased vascular sprouting in both aortic ring and choroid explants. Knockdown of TWIST1 in endothelial cells led to dampened expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and decreased endothelial cell proliferation. Conclusions. Our study suggests that TWIST1 is a novel regulator of pathologic ocular angiogenesis and may represent a new molecular target for developing potential therapeutic treatments to suppress pathological neovascularization in vascular eye diseases. PMID:25414194

  2. Demystified … Molecular pathology in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, J

    2002-01-01

    In the past 10 years, molecular biology has found major applications in pathology, particularly in oncology. This has been a field of enormous expansion, where pure science has found a place in clinical practice and is now of everyday use in any academic unit. This demystified review will discuss the techniques used in molecular pathology and then provide examples of how these can be used in oncology. PMID:12456768

  3. Induction process of trainees in pathology residency

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Imran; Ali, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the induction process of pathology residency at The Aga Khan University hospital. The Department of Postgraduate Medical Education was established in 1985. The induction process is an exhaustive exercise that includes an admission test held simultaneously in Karachi, Hyderabad, Lahore, and Rawalpindi, followed by an interview of the shortlisted candidates. The pathology residency program was started 25 years ago and since then the induction process has undergone major changes with the course of time. PMID:27313487

  4. [Pathowiki. A free expert database for pathology].

    PubMed

    Rossner, M; Rossner, F; Zwönitzer, R; Süss, T; Hofmann, H; Roessner, A; Kalinski, T

    2012-03-01

    The project Pathowiki (www.pathowiki.org) is a free expert database for texts, images, virtual slides and links to all subject areas of pathology in the internet. The aim of this project is to integrate all available information and media, in particular virtual microscopy, to achieve a fast overview of a relevant subject area. Here we present the project’s basic functions and applications and evaluate the project with respect to the ongoing digital developments in pathology. PMID:22315102

  5. Pathology Features in Bethesda Guidelines Predict Colorectal Cancer Microsatellite Instability: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark A.; Hayashi, Shinichi; O’shea, Anne-Marie; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Smyrk, Tom C.; Shimizu, David; Waring, Paul M.; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R.; Pollett, Aaron F.; Redston, Mark; Barker, Melissa A.; Baron, John A.; Casey, Graham R.; Dowty, James G.; Giles, Graham G.; Limburg, Paul; Newcomb, Polly; Young, Joanne P.; Walsh, Michael D.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Lemarchand, Loïc; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Potter, John D.; Hopper, John L.; Jass, Jeremy R.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The revised Bethesda guidelines for Lynch syndrome recommend microsatellite instability (MSI) testing all colorectal cancers in patients diagnosed before age 50 years and colorectal cancers diagnosed in patients between ages 50 and 59 years with particular pathology features. Our aim was to identify pathology and other features that independently predict high MSI (MSI-H). Methods Archival tissue from 1098 population-based colorectal cancers diagnosed before age 60 years was tested for MSI. Pathology features, site, and age at diagnosis were obtained. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine the predictive value of each feature, as measured by an odds ratio (OR), from which a scoring system (MsPath) was developed to estimate the probability a colorectal cancer is MSI-H. Results Fifteen percent of tumors (162) were MSI-H. Independent predictors were tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (OR, 9.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9 –14.1), proximal subsite (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.1–7.3), mucinous histology (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7– 4.8), poor differentiation (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2–3.1), Crohn’s-like reaction (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2–2.9), and diagnosis before age 50 years (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3–2.9). MsPath score ≥ 1.0 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 55% for MSI-H. Conclusions The probability an individual colorectal cancer is MSI-H is predicted well by the MsPath score. There is little value in testing for DNA mismatch repair loss in tumors, or for germline mismatch repair mutations, for colorectal cancers diagnosed in patients before age 60 years with an MSPath score <1 (approximately 50%). Pathology can identify almost all MSI-H colorectal cancers diagnosed before age 60 years. PMID:17631130

  6. [Uncommon mycobacterial infections in domestic and zoo animals: four cases with special emphasis on pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiger, K; Ellenberger, C; Schüppel, K F; Richter, E; Schmerbach, K; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E; Wünnemann, K; Eulenberger, K; Schoon, H A

    2003-09-01

    Infections caused by classical tubercle bacilli are rare during the last years. Nevertheless, diseases caused by other mycobacteria have to be considered clinically and in diagnostic pathology especially in cases of immunosuppression and due to their potential zoonosis risk. An infection by mycobacteria was diagnosed in four animals (Mayotte Maki, Blue-headed Parrot, Patagonian sealion, Beagle) necropsied between 1995 and 2002 in the Institute of Veterinary-Pathology of the University of Leipzig. The Maki, the blue-headed parrot and the dog showed a disseminated character of the disease caused by Mycobacterium genavense (monkey and bird) resp. Mycobacterium avium (dog), while an open chronical tuberculosis of the lungs due to a pathogenic member of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was observed in the seal. All these bacteria are potential causes of zoonoses. So, if granulomatous or disseminated histiocytic alterations are detected in diagnostic pathology, mycobacterial infections should always be included in differential diagnoses and require careful aetiological investigations by histopathological and bacteriological methods. PMID:14560447

  7. Pathology and emerging infections--quo vadimus?

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, D. A.; Bryan, R. T.; Hughes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    There have been dramatic changes in the occurrence of infectious diseases throughout the world in the previous two decades. The emergence of new microbial agents, and the reemergence of infections previously believed to be controlled, threatens the health of all populations. The emergence of these infectious diseases has occurred during a period of breakdown in the capabilities of the public health surveillance systems, prevention programs, and disease control efforts. Expertise in pathology is critical to provide a strong national control program for emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Despite the many significant achievements made by pathologists in improving understanding of the pathogenesis and diagnosis of infectious diseases, the field of pathology remains largely oriented toward neoplastic diseases, and has not yet identified infectious disease diagnosis as an important component of anatomic pathology training and research, even in the face of the current threats posed by microbial agents. In addition, there is currently a dearth of infectious disease pathologists in the United States and elsewhere in the world, and the use of the autopsy, a prime pathological tool for diagnosis of emerging infections, is on the wane. The most serious problem is that no formal training program for infectious disease pathology currently exists in the United States or elsewhere in the world. As a consequence of this lack of training opportunities, there is a severe deficiency of young, well-educated pathologists with infectious disease expertise. This article explores the historical linkages between the disciplines of infectious diseases and pathology, and suggests that infectious disease pathology as a subspecialty be strengthened and training programs be initiated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495275

  8. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro-Poças, F; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests. PMID:27446863

  9. Hydatid Cyst Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Poças, F.; Araújo, Tarcísio; Coelho, André; Silva, Donzilia; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with unremarkable past history underwent endoscopy for dyspepsia. She denied weight loss or anorexia. Upper endoscopy revealed a bulge in the lesser curvature and posterior wall of the stomach with 4-5 cm. Endoscopic ultrasound was performed which showed a heterogeneous lesion, anechogenic in the major part, with a floating membrane inside, the greatest diameter of 90.8 × 17.2 mm, originated in the left liver lobe. Surgical resection was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a cystic lesion with an acellular thick fibrous wall, surrounded by a conspicuous inflammatory reaction. The cyst wall revealed a characteristic lamellar pattern of the fibers. In the internal surface of the lesion, there were remains of membranous structures, amidst which a vestigial Protoscolex was noted. In the presented case, a floating membrane was observed, which is a pathognomonic feature, establishing the diagnosis of hydatid cyst type 3. Fine needle aspiration guided by ultrasound was not performed due to the certainty in the diagnosis. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first images by endoscopic ultrasound of hydatid cyst of liver presented as a bulge in the stomach with pathognomonic features, which allowed the definitive diagnosis with no need for further diagnostic tests. PMID:27446863

  10. Urinary biomarkers in prenatally diagnosed unilateral hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mia Gebauer; Nørregaard, Rikke; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jørgensen, Troels Munch

    2011-04-01

    The introduction of prenatal ultrasonography as a screening method entails an increasing number of infants diagnosed with prenatal hydronephrosis. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction accounts for 35% of prenatal hydronephrotic cases. Urinary tract obstruction that occurs during early kidney development affects renal morphogenesis, maturation and growth, and in the most severe cases this will ultimately cause renal insufficiency. A major challenge in the clinical management of these patients is to preserve renal function by selection of the 15%-20% who require early surgical intervention, leaving those for whom watchful waiting may be appropriate because of spontaneous resolution/stabilization without significant loss of renal function. Today, this requires medical surveillance, including repetitive invasive diuretic renograms relying on arbitrary threshold values, and therefore there is a need for non-arbitrary, non-invasive urinary biomarkers that may be used as predictors for renal structural changes and/or decreasing renal function, and thereby provide the surgeon with more clear indications for surgical intervention. In this review, we summarize the currently well-known facts about urinary biomarkers in ureteropelvic junction obstruction concerning renal function, and we also suggest potential novel urinary biomarkers. PMID:21220211

  11. Service integration for the dually diagnosed.

    PubMed

    Edward, Karen-leigh; Hearity, Rhonda Nelson; Felstead, Boyce

    2012-01-01

    The needs of dually diagnosed clients in mental health services have been and remain a focus for service development and improvement in Australia. The Council of Australian Governments committed to a five-year National Action Plan on Mental Health with a $1.8 billion injection into mental health services. In Australia there have been great advances in the service initiatives and service deliverables to those clients who experience a dual diagnosis. These advances include that dual diagnosis is systematically identified and responded to in a timely, evidence-based manner as a core business in mental health and alcohol and other drug services. These advances are brought to life by specialist mental health and alcohol and other drug services that establish effective partnerships and agreed mechanisms to support integrated care and collaborative practice. Here, four case studies are offered as a means of illustrating the ways in which projects undertaken in local community health services have approached dual diagnosis treatment for clients. These case studies reflect how cooperation and cross-referral between services, as well as effective management of dual diagnosis clients by suitably qualified staff can produce benefits to clients who use the service. PMID:22394658

  12. Neuroferritinopathy: Pathophysiology, Presentation, Differential Diagnoses and Management

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Rizek, Philippe; Jog, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroferritinopathy (NF) is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the ferritin light chain 1 (FTL1) gene leading to abnormal excessive iron accumulation in the brain, predominantly in the basal ganglia. Methods A literature search was performed on Pubmed, for English-language articles, utilizing the terms iron metabolism, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, and NF. The relevant articles were reviewed with a focus on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnoses, and management of NF. Results There have been nine reported mutations worldwide in the FTL1 gene in 90 patients, the most common mutation being 460InsA. Chorea and dystonia are the most common presenting symptoms in NF. There are specific features, which appear to depend upon the genetic mutation. We discuss the occurrence of specific mutations in various regions along with their associated presenting phenomenology. We have compared and contrasted the commonly occurring syndromes in the differential diagnosis of NF to guide the clinician. Discussion NF must be considered in patients presenting clinically as a progressive movement disorder with variable phenotype and imaging evidence of iron deposition within the brain, decreased serum ferritin, and negative genetic testing for other more common movement disorders such as Huntington’s disease. In the absence of a disease-specific treatment, symptomatic drug therapy for specific movement disorders may be used, although with variable success. PMID:27022507

  13. Using saccades to diagnose covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Nicholas; Munby, Henry; Chan, Shona; Saatci, Defne; Edison, Eric; Carpenter, R H S; Massey, Dunecan

    2015-06-01

    Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy (CHE), previously known as Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy, is a subtle cognitive defect found in 30-70 % of cirrhosis patients. It has been linked to poor quality of life, impaired fitness to drive, and increased mortality: treatment is possible. Despite its clinical significance, diagnosis relies on psychometric tests that have proved unsuitable for use in a clinical setting. We investigated whether measurement of saccadic latency distributions might be a viable alternative. We collected data on 35 cirrhosis patients at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, with no evidence of clinically overt encephalopathy, and 36 age-matched healthy controls. Performance on standard psychometric tests was evaluated to determine those patients with CHE as defined by the World Congress of Gastroenterology. We then compared visually-evoked saccades between those with CHE and those without, as well as reviewing blood test results and correlating saccadic latencies with biochemical parameters and prognostic scores. Cirrhosis patients have significantly longer median saccadic latencies than healthy controls. Those with CHE had significantly prolonged saccadic latencies when compared with those without CHE. Analysis of a cirrhosis patient's saccades can diagnose CHE with a sensitivity of 75 % and a specificity of 75 %. We concluded that analysis of a cirrhosis patient's saccadic latency distributions is a fast and objective measure that can be used as a diagnostic tool for CHE. This improved early diagnosis could direct avoidance of high-risk activities such as driving, and better inform treatment strategies. PMID:25586511

  14. Diagnosing young onset dementia can be challenging.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Samrah; Baker, Ian; Butler, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Although the risk of developing dementia increases with age, onset can be as early as the third or fourth decade of life. Genetic influences play a more important role in younger than in older people with dementia, so young onset dementia may cluster in families. Diagnosing young onset dementia is challenging. The range of possible presenting features is broad, encompassing behavioural, cognitive, psychiatric and neurological domains, and symptoms are often subtle initially. Frequently the complaints are misattributed to stress or depression, and the patient is falsely reassured that they are too young to have dementia. The most common causes of young onset dementia are early onset forms of adult neurodegenerative conditions and alcohol. Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of young onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease. Conventional vascular risk factors may be absent and diagnosis relies on imaging evidence of cerebrovascular disease. Obtaining a detailed history remains the most important part of the workup and usually requires corroboration by a third party. Undertaking a basic neurological examination is also important. Those with suspected young onset dementia should be referred to a neurology-led cognitive disorders clinic where available as the differenti diagnosis is considerably broader tha in older adults and requires specialist investigation. PMID:27382914

  15. Incidentally diagnosed pulmonary nodule: a diagnostic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Rzyman, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Asymptomatic solitary pulmonary nodules incidentally revealed by computed tomography has become a serious medical problem. Depending on their diameter, solid, part-solid, or pure ground-glass pulmonary nodules may be observed, diagnosed radiologically/invasively, or resected in accordance with international guidelines. Pure ground-glass nodules, semi-solid lesions, or solid lesions smaller than 8 mm should be monitored by serial low-dose computed tomography. In the case of solid nodules greater than 8 mm, the assessment of the risk of malignancy is recommended. Patients at high risk of lung cancer with pulmonary lesions should undergo diagnostic investigation, or the nodule should be resected. If the risk of lung cancer is low, the patients may be monitored. Needle aspiration biopsy is the most important invasive method of tumor diagnosis. Cytological or histopathological diagnosis is helpful in appropriate clinical decision making that reduces the risk of unnecessary surgery, decreasing the rate of benign nodule resections and thus reducing the costs of medical treatment. PMID:26336456

  16. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect

    Settlemyer, Bradley W; Hodson, Stephen W; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  17. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis diagnosed after traumatic subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Arpa, J; Sánchez, C; Vega, A; Cruz-Martínez, A; Ferrer, T; López-Pajares, R; Muñoz, J; Barreiro, P

    1995-01-01

    We report the case of a 34-year old man, who, after presenting with subacute traumatic subdural haematoma, was diagnosed as CTX. He presented a ten year history of progressive deterioration of cognitive functions, unsteadiness of gait and surgery for bilateral cataracts at age 21. Cholestanol level in serum was 120.7 mmol/liter, and cholestanol/cholesterol ratio 2.52%. Bile alcohols in urine were 23, 25-pentol: 2.2665 mg/mmol creatinine, 24, 25-pentol: 1.3226 mg/mmol creatinine, and 27-nor-24, 25-pentol: 0.7363 mg/mmol creatinine. Electrophysiological study was consistent with a mixed demyelinating and axonal neuropathy. The assessment of autonomic nervous system (ANS) showed a postganglionic cholinergic failure accompanying somatic peripheral neuropathy. Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) demonstrated markedly low amplitude and poorly defined waves, and almost symmetrical peak V and I to V interpeak latency (IPL) slight delays. Two nodular, bilateral, symmetrical lesions, strongly suggestive of calcifications, in the cerebellar white matter on CT and MRI were noted. On T2-weighted images diffuse high signal lesions were found in the cerebellar white matter, and multiple, hyperintense cerebral foci of demyelination or gliosis. MRI study of the Achilles tendon showed neither enlargement of the tendon, nor areas of lipid deposits. After ten months of treatment with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (750 mg/d) the clinical course was unaffected and the neurophysiological measures, CT and MRI remained unchanged. PMID:8597991

  18. Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Diagnosed following Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zvijac, John E.; Ammus, Sharhabil S.; Aran, Fernando; Kiebzak, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man with an unremarkable medical history presented with a painful knee after a sports injury. He was diagnosed with a medial meniscal tear. Symptoms did not abate after 6 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy. A week after beginning physical therapy he experienced a knee effusion, decreased ROM, and inability to flex his quadriceps. His knee was aspirated. Blood tests were ordered and his complete blood count, liver functions tests, and INR/PTT were normal. The patient had recurrent effusions requiring three additional joint aspirations. Ten weeks after the initial surgery, the patient underwent a second arthroscopy, during which a hematoma was removed and a synovectomy performed. The patient continued bleeding from the incisions after portals were sutured, and he was admitted to the hospital. A hematologist was consulted and comprehensive platelet aggregation testing revealed previously undiagnosed Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. The patient began treatment with platelet infusions and desmopressin and progressed to a full recovery. Clinical suspicion for surgical patients with unusual repetitive postoperative bleeding should include previously undetected rare bleeding disorders even in adults. PMID:26000186

  19. MacDoctor: The Macintosh diagnoser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, David B.; Brooks, William D.

    1990-01-01

    When the Macintosh computer was first released, the primary user was a computer hobbyist who typically had a significant technical background and was highly motivated to understand the internal structure and operational intricacies of the computer. In recent years the Macintosh computer has become a widely-accepted general purpose computer which is being used by an ever-increasing non-technical audience. This has lead to a large base of users which has neither the interest nor the background to understand what is happening 'behind the scenes' when the Macintosh is put to use - or what should be happening when something goes wrong. Additionally, the Macintosh itself has evolved from a simple closed design to a complete family of processor platforms and peripherals with a tremendous number of possible configurations. With the increasing popularity of the Macintosh series, software and hardware developers are producing a product for every user's need. As the complexity of configuration possibilities grows, the need for experienced or even expert knowledge is required to diagnose problems. This presents a problem to uneducated or casual users. This problem indicates a new Macintosh consumer need; that is, a diagnostic tool able to determine the problem for the user. As the volume of Macintosh products has increased, this need has also increased.

  20. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Maat, Peter; de Beukelaar, Janet W.; Jansen, Casper; Schuur, Maaike; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Coevorden, Marleen H.; de Graaff, Esther; Titulaer, Maarten; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases performed 384 autopsies on patients with suspected CJD over a 14-year period (1998–2011). Clinical information was collected from treating physicians. Antineuronal antibodies were tested in CSF obtained postmortem by immunohistochemistry on fresh frozen rat brain sections, by Luminex assay for the presence of well-characterized onconeural antibodies, and by cell-based assays for antibodies against NMDAR, GABABR1/2, GABAAR GLUR1/2, LGI1, Caspr2, and DPPX. Results: In 203 patients, a diagnosis of definite CJD was made, while in 181 a variety of other conditions were diagnosed, mainly neurodegenerative. In 22 of these 181, the neuropathologist diagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. One patient was excluded because of lack of clinical information. Inflammatory infiltrates were predominantly perivascular and consisted mainly of T cells. The predominant locations were basal ganglia and thalamus (90%) and temporal lobes and hippocampus (81%). In 6 patients (29%), antineuronal antibodies were detected in postmortem CSF, directed against Hu, NMDAR, GABABR1/2, Caspr2, and an unidentified synaptic antigen in 2. The most frequent symptoms were dementia (90%), gait disturbance (86%), cerebellar signs (67%), and neuropsychiatric symptoms (67%). Immunopathologic and clinical findings did not differ between autoantibody-negative patients and patients with antineuronal antibodies. Conclusions: It is important to consider immune-mediated disorders in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:26601117

  1. Veterinary Forensic Pathology: The Search for Truth.

    PubMed

    McDonough, S P; McEwen, B J

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary forensic pathology is emerging as a distinct discipline, and this special issue is a major step forward in establishing the scientific basis of the discipline. A forensic necropsy uses the same skill set needed for investigations of natural disease, but the analytical framework and purpose of forensic pathology differ significantly. The requirement of legal credibility and all that it entails distinguishes the forensic from routine diagnostic cases. Despite the extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge afforded by their training, almost 75% of veterinary pathologists report that their training has not adequately prepared them to handle forensic cases. Many veterinary pathologists, however, are interested and willing to develop expertise in the discipline. Lessons learned from tragic examples of wrongful convictions in medical forensic pathology indicate that a solid foundation for the evolving discipline of veterinary forensic pathology requires a commitment to education, training, and certification. The overarching theme of this issue is that the forensic necropsy is just one aspect in the investigation of a case of suspected animal abuse or neglect. As veterinary pathologists, we must be aware of the roles filled by other veterinary forensic experts involved in these cases and how our findings are an integral part of an investigation. We hope that the outcome of this special issue of the journal is that veterinary pathologists begin to familiarize themselves with not only forensic pathology but also all aspects of veterinary forensic science. PMID:27515387

  2. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology. PMID:12605090

  3. Widespread cytoskeletal pathology characterizes corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Feany, M. B.; Dickson, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial pathology. Using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the nonamyloid cortical plaques of CBD are actually collections of abnormal tau in the distal processes of astrocytes. These glial cells express both vimentin and CD44, markers of astrocyte activation. Glial pathology also includes tau-positive cytoplasmic inclusions, here localized to Leu 7-expressing oligodendrocytes. In addition, a wide array of neuronal pathology is defined with tau-positive inclusions in multiple domains of a variety of cortical neurons. CBD thus exhibits widespread glial and neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, including a novel structure, the astrocytic plaque. CBD is a disease of generalized cytoskeletal disruption affecting several cell types and multiple domains of these cells. The further definition of CBD pathology refines the diagnosis and pathophysiological understanding of this unique disease and has important implications for other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, characterized by abnormal tau deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7778678

  4. Adolescent pathological gambling in Kaunas, Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Skokauskas, Norbertas; Satkeviciute, Regina

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the first survey of pathological gambling among adolescents in Kaunas, Lithuania. The results indicated that a large majority of adolescent (82.6%) have engaged in a variety of gambling activities. Although most respondents were classified as "occasional gamblers", there were significantly more females than males who were occasional gamblers and non-gamblers, and significantly more males than females who were regular gamblers. More adolescents surveyed had gambled on Tele-Lotto than on any other gambling activity. Based on Diagnostic statistical manual-IV-Multiple Response-Adapted for Juveniles, 4.2% of participants were categorized as pathological gamblers, with a further 9.1% classified as at-risk gamblers, 69.4% as social gamblers, and 17.3% as non-gamblers. Based on South Oaks Gambling Screen-Revised for Adolescents, 5.2% (n = 43) of participants were categorized as pathological gamblers, with a further 10.5% (n = 88) classified as at-risk gamblers, 67% (n = 559) as social gamblers, and 17.3% (n = 145) as non-gamblers. The commonest reason given by adolescents for gambling were "enjoyment", "a chance to try luck" and "to win money"; however, the top reasons reported for pathological gambling were "to relax", "to distract myself from problems" and "to improve mood". Male gender, cognitive distortions regarding gambling, having parents who gamble and gamble too excess, using alcohol regularly, and smoking regularly were characteristics significantly associated with pathological gambling in adolescence. PMID:17454722

  5. Diagnosing cardiac disease during pregnancy: imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Ntusi, Ntobeko A; Samuels, Petronella; Moosa, Sulaiman; Mocumbi, Ana O

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD) often require cardiovascular imaging during pregnancy. The accepted maximum limit of ionising radiation exposure to the foetus during pregnancy is a cumulative dose of 5 rad. Concerns related to imaging modalities that involve ionising radiation include teratogenesis, mutagenesis and childhood malignancy. Importantly, no single imaging study approaches this cautionary dose of 5 rad (50 mSv or 50 mGy). Diagnostic imaging procedures that may be used in pregnancy include chest radiography, fluoroscopy, echocardiography, invasive angiography, cardiovascular computed tomography, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques. Echocardiography and CMR appear to be completely safe in pregnancy and are not associated with any adverse foetal effects, provided there are no general contra-indications to MR imaging. Concerns related to safety of imaging tests must be balanced against the importance of accurate diagnosis and thorough assessment of the pathological condition. Decisions about imaging in pregnancy are premised on understanding the physiology of pregnancy, understanding basic concepts of ionising radiation, the clinical manifestations of existent CVD in pregnancy and features of new CVD. The cardiologist/physician must understand the indications for and limitations of, and the potential harmful effects of each test during pregnancy. Current evidence suggests that a single cardiovascular radiological study during pregnancy is safe and should be undertaken at all times when clinically justified. In this article, the different imaging modalities are reviewed in terms of how they work, how safe they are and what their clinical utility in pregnancy is. Furthermore, the safety of contrast agents in pregnancy is also reviewed. PMID:27213857

  6. Proposal for a Standardized Pathology Report of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Prognostic Significance of Pathological Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Mee-Yon; Jin, So Young; Kim, Hyunki; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Joon Mee; Kang, Yun Kyung; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kang, Dae Young; Kim, Youn Wha; Choi, Eun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background There is confusion in the diagnosis and biological behaviors of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), because of independently proposed nomenclatures and classifications. A standardized form of pathology report is required for the proper management of patients. Methods We discussed the proper pathological evaluation of GEP-NET at the consensus conference of the subcommittee meeting for the Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists. We then verified the prognostic significance of pathological parameters from our previous nationwide collection of pathological data from 28 hospitals in Korea to determine the essential data set for a pathology report. Results Histological classification, grading (mitosis and/or Ki-67 labeling index), T staging (extent, size), lymph node metastasis, and lymphovascular and perineural invasion were significant prognostic factors and essential for the pathology report of GEP-NET, while immunostaining such as synaptophysin and chromogranin may be optional. Furthermore, the staging system, either that of the 2010 American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) or the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS), should be specified, especially for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. Conclusions A standardized pathology report is crucial for the proper management and prediction of prognosis of patients with GEP-NET. PMID:23837015

  7. Understanding and diagnosing shift work disorder.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A significant proportion of the workforce in industrialized countries (16%) are employed as shift workers. These workers may be susceptible to shift work disorder (SWD), a circadian rhythm sleep disorder, particularly those who work at night or on early-morning shifts. Shift work disorder remains an underdiagnosed and undertreated problem among this population. Patients with SWD have difficulty initiating sleep and waking up. Often, these patients have excessive sleepiness during their work shift. Shift work disorder has been associated with decreased productivity, impaired safety, diminished quality of life, and adverse effects on health. Several tools have been validated to assess excessive daytime sleepiness and are often used to assess excessive nighttime sleepiness, such as that experienced in patients with SWD, including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. The criteria for diagnosing SWD as established by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and published in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-Second Edition (ICSD-2) were most recently updated in 2005 and thus do not contain newer agents approved for use in patients with SWD. The symptoms of SWD can be treated using behavioral, prescription, and nonprescription therapies. Current treatment guidelines suggest nonpharmacologic interventions, such as exercise and exposure to light. In addition, medications that contain melatonin or caffeine may have clinical benefits in some patients with SWD. However, modafinil and armodafinil are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to improve wakefulness in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with SWD, and recent data suggest a clinical benefit. The use of these therapies can significantly improve sleep, performance, and quality of life for patients with SWD. PMID:21904091

  8. Pitfalls in diagnosing diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Peters, Edgar J

    2016-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a diabetic foot infection is made based on clinical symptoms and signs, we also use blood laboratory, microbiological and radiological studies to make treatment decisions. All of these diagnostic studies have pitfalls that can lead to a delay in diagnosis. Such delays will likely lead to further tissue damage and to a higher chance of amputation. One of these pitfalls is that some clinicians rely on microbiological, rather than clinical data, to diagnose infection. Though subjective by nature, clinical signs predict outcome of foot infections accurately. Another pitfall is that microbiological data can be misleading. All wounds harbour microorganisms; therefore, a positive wound culture does not mean that a wound is infected. Furthermore, the outcome of cultures of wound swabs does not correlate well with culture results of tissue biopsies. Therapy guidance by wound swab will likely lead to overtreatment of non-pathogenic organisms. Genotyping might have a role in identifying previously unrecognized (combinations of) pathogens in diabetic foot infection, bacteria in sessile phenotype and non-culturable pathogens, e.g. in cases where antibiotics have already been administered. One more pitfall is that the diagnosis of osteomyelitis remains difficult. Although the result of percutaneous bone biopsy is the reference standard for osteomyelitis, some other diagnostic modalities can aid in the diagnosis. A combination of several of these diagnostic tests is probably a good strategy to achieve a higher diagnostic accuracy. Relying on a single test will likely lead to misidentification of patients with osteomyelitis with associated overtreatment and undertreatment. PMID:26813617

  9. Incarcerated diaphragmatic hernia--differential diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Bukvić, Nado; Versić, Ana Bosak; Bacić, Giordano; Gusić, Nadomir; Nikolić, Harry; Bukvić, Frane

    2014-12-01

    The incarceration of diaphragmatic hernia is very rare. We present a case of a four-year-old girl who developed the incarceration of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, who, until then, was completely asymptomatic. This incarceration of the hernia represented a surgical emergency presenting as obstructive ileus and a severe respiratory distress which developed from what appeared to be full health. During a brief pre-operative examination a number of differential diagnoses were suggested. Along with the laboratory blood analysis (complete blood count and acid-base balance) a plain thoracic and abdominal radiography was done (babygram). After that, through an inserted nasal-gastric tube, barium meal of the upper gastrointestinal tract was done, showing abdominal organs in the left half of the thorax and a significant shift of the mediastinum to the right. With an urgent upper medial laparotomy we accessed the abdominal cavity and made the correct diagnosis. An opening was shown in the rear part of the left hemi-diaphragm with thickened and edematous edges, approx. 6 cm in diameter with incarcerated content. The incarcerated abdominal organs (stomach, transversal colon, small intestine and spleen) gradually moved into the abdominal cavity. The opening was closed with nonresorptive sutures (TiCron) size 2-0 with aprevious control and ventilated expansion of the well-developed left lung. In postoperative course the acid-base balance quickly recovered, as well as the general state of the patient and radiography showed a good expansion and lucency of the lung parenchyma and a return of the mediastinum into the middle part of the thorax. PMID:25842758

  10. Diagnosing delayed ettringite formation in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Michael Folliard, Kevin Drimalas, Thano Ramlochan, Terry

    2008-06-15

    There has been a number of cases involving deteriorated concrete structures in North America where there has been considerable controversy surrounding the respective contributions of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and delayed ettringite formation (DEF) to the observed damage. The problem arises because the macroscopic symptoms of distress are not unequivocal and microscopical examinations of field samples often reveal evidence of both processes making it difficult to separate the individual contributions. This paper presents the results of an investigation of a number of concrete columns carrying a raised expressway in North America; prior studies had implicated both DEF and ASR as possible causes of deterioration. Although the columns were not deliberately heat-cured, it is estimated that the peak internal temperature would have exceeded 70 deg. C and perhaps even 80 deg. C, in some cases. The forensic investigation included scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and expansion testing of cores extracted from the structure. Small-diameter cores stored in limewater expanded significantly (0.3 to 1.3%) and on the basis of supplementary tests on laboratory-produced concrete specimens it was concluded that expansion under such conditions is caused by DEF as the conditions of the test will not sustain ASR. In at least one column, DEF was diagnosed as the sole contributory cause of damage with no evidence of any contribution from ASR or any other deterioration process. In other cases, both ASR and DEF were observed to have contributed to the apparent damage. Of the columns examined, only concrete containing fly ash appeared to be undamaged. The results of this study confirm that, under certain conditions, the process of DEF (acting in isolation of other processes) can result in significant deterioration of cast-in-place reinforced concrete structures.

  11. Vitamin C nutriture in newly diagnosed diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae Eun; Paik, Hee Young; Shin, Chan Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between serum L-ascorbic acid, vitamin C intake, and diabetes in a nested case-control study. A cross-sectional survey of diet and health was conducted in 2,048 adults with an age of 30 y or older in Yonchon County, Korea. An oral glucose tolerance test was administered to all participants. One hundred cases of newly diagnosed diabetes were identified. Two healthy controls for each case matched with age, gender, drinking status, and smoking status were selected among the survey participants. L-Ascorbic acid levels were analyzed in fasting serum samples and one 24-h dietary recall was performed. Dietary vitamin C intake of persons with diabetes was 50.1±47.6 mg/d and that of controls was 55.1±41.1 mg/d. People with diabetes (22.3±16.8 µmol/L) have lower serum ascorbic acid levels than their controls (26.3±17.0 µmol/L) and the difference was significant by paired t-test (p<0.01). The association between diabetes and serum ascorbic acid level was still significant in non-smokers (24.2±17.8 µmol/L for the diabetes group and 29.5±16.7 µmol/L for the control group, p<0.01) but not in smokers (19.4±15.7 µmol/L for the diabetes group and 21.2±16.0 µmol/L for the control group). Our results suggest that diabetes and smoking interactively affect serum ascorbic acid levels. Since this population had poor nutritional status of vitamin C, further investigation of association between serum ascorbic acid level and diabetes and smoking by the level of vitamin C consumption is warranted. PMID:20924142

  12. How to Diagnose Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    de Alwis, Nimantha M W; Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are asymptomatic and present with either unexplained abnormal liver blood tests or a bright liver on ultrasonography. Some patients will have normal liver blood tests raising the issue of whether patients with risk factors for NAFLD (diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome [MS]) should be screened for its presence with biomarkers, such as the fatty liver index (FLI). The diagnosis of NAFLD requires the exclusion of other causes of chronic liver disease and steatosis, especially heavy alcohol consumption and viral hepatitis particularly HCV genotype 3. Diagnostic work-up should include evaluation of family and personal history of components of the MS and assessment of liver tests, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and HDL levels. A drug history is important due to a number being associated with steatosis. To confirm the diagnosis of NAFLD and quantify steatosis, ultrasound (US) and MRI-based techniques are available but none are in routine use outside clinical trials. Standard US is no more accurate than biomarkers such as FLI. The accurate staging of NAFLD requires liver biopsy; however, this is clearly impractical for such a prevalent disease. Accordingly, a number of imaging and blood-based biomarker tests have been evaluated. While none have proved reliable for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, several have proved accurate in diagnosing the presence of stage 3 or 4 fibrosis, including the NAFLD fibrosis score, fibrosis-4 and the enhanced liver fibrosis test. Of the imaging techniques, elastography has received the most attention and is being used in routine clinical practice. US acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and MR-based elastography have recently been described but none are sufficiently accurate to replace liver biopsy for clinical trials as yet or are cost effective for use in routine clinical settings. PMID:27547937

  13. Pathological evidence of the cause of spontaneous regression in a case of resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Shunichi; Tamura, Akinori; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Fujikawa, Hirotoshi; Mimatsu, Kenji; Oida, Takatsugu; Sugitani, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented for an evaluation after experiencing right hypochondrial pain lasting for two months. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a hepatic tumor in the right liver and extremely mild hepatic steatosis. The imaging findings indicated that the tumor (43 mm in size) was ischemic, and the lesion was surgically resected and examined. The histopathological findings demonstrated 95% necrosis with moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The diagnosis was HCC with spontaneous regression. There was also pathological evidence of thrombus formation in the peripheral arteries and portal veins. In addition, the non-cancerous regions of the liver were diagnosed as exhibiting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The pathological findings obtained after resection of the HCC lesion showed spontaneous regression. PMID:25742889

  14. Review of the principal extra spinal pathologies causing sciatica and new MRI approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ailianou, A; Fitsiori, A; Syrogiannopoulou, A; Toso, S; Viallon, M; Merlini, L; Beaulieu, J Y; Vargas, M I

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate the principal extraspinal pathologies causing sciatica and new approaches for the study of structures such as the lumbosacral plexus (LSP). Visualisation of the LSP in its entirety is difficult with conventional two-dimensional MRI sequences owing to its oblique orientation. In our institution, we have found that the utilisation of three-dimensional short tau inversion-recovery sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolutions sequence is helpful, allowing multiplanar and maximum intensity projection reconstructions in the coronal oblique plane and curvilinear reformats through the plexus. Diffusion tensor imaging enables the observation of microstructural changes and can be useful in surgical planning. The normal anatomy of the LSP, its different extraspinal pathologies and differential diagnoses are thoroughly presented. PMID:22374280

  15. Recent developments in preclinical toxicological pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, John M. . E-mail: john.finch@eur.crl

    2005-09-01

    In the late nineteenth century, microscopists developed a quaint method for examining the fine structure of biological specimens: paraffin embedding and staining with hematoxylin and eosin. This ancient technology is here to stay for the foreseeable future, because it can and does reveal the truth about biological processes. However, the role of pathology is developing with ever greater worldwide interaction between pathologists, and better communication and agreeing of international standards. Furthermore, recent techniques including immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and image analysis complement the traditional tried and tested tools. There is also in toxicologic pathology a willingness to use pathology methods and skills in new contexts, drug discovery in particular. But even in these days of genetic modification, proteomics and high throughput screening, pathologists continue to rely on dyes extracted from a Central American logwood used in Mexico before the Spanish invasion in 1520.

  16. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  17. Personality Pathology and Interpersonal Problem Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) are often described as stable, which ignores the important dynamic processes and shifts that are observed clinically in individuals with PD. The current study examined patterns of variability in problematic interpersonal functioning, a core feature of personality pathology. Participants (N=150) were assessed for personality pathology at baseline and also completed the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems–Circumplex Scales at baseline and every three months over the course of a year. Baseline PD was used to predict individual means and variability parameters in generalized interpersonal distress, agentic problems, and communal problems across repeated assessments. Disorders associated with disinhibition predicted variability in generalized distress and agentic problems, whereas only antagonism related disorders predicted variability in communal problems. These associations reveal dynamic processes involved in multiple dimensions of personality pathology and suggest that future research on instability is needed that expands beyond the historical focus on borderline PD. PMID:25562539

  18. Pathological tau disrupts ongoing network activity.

    PubMed

    Menkes-Caspi, Noa; Yamin, Hagar G; Kellner, Vered; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Cohen, Dana; Stern, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Pathological tau leads to dementia and neurodegeneration in tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown to disrupt cellular and synaptic functions, yet its effects on the function of the intact neocortical network remain unknown. Using in vivo intracellular and extracellular recordings, we measured ongoing activity of neocortical pyramidal cells during various arousal states in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, prior to significant cell death, when only a fraction of the neurons show pathological tau. In transgenic mice, membrane potential oscillations are slower during slow-wave sleep and under anesthesia. Intracellular recordings revealed that these changes are due to longer Down states and state transitions of membrane potentials. Firing rates of transgenic neurons are reduced, and firing patterns within Up states are altered, with longer latencies and inter-spike intervals. By changing the activity patterns of a subpopulation of affected neurons, pathological tau reduces the activity of the neocortical network. PMID:25704951

  19. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  20. Power loss mechanisms in pathological tracheas.

    PubMed

    Bates, A J; Comerford, A; Cetto, R; Schroter, R C; Tolley, N S; Doorly, D J

    2016-07-26

    The effort required to inhale a breath of air is a critically important measure in assessing airway function. Although the contribution of the trachea to the total flow resistance of the airways is generally modest, pathological alterations in tracheal geometry can have a significant negative effect. This study investigates the mechanisms of flow energy loss in a healthy trachea and in four geometries affected by retrosternal goitre which can cause significant distortions of tracheal geometry including constriction and deviation with abnormal curvature. By separating out the component of energy loss related to the wall shear (frictional loss), striking differences are found between the patterns of energy dissipation in the normal and pathological tracheas. Furthermore the ratio of frictional to total loss is dramatically reduced in the pathological geometries. PMID:26686396

  1. Investigation of spinal pathology in notalgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Savk, Oner; Savk, Ekin

    2005-06-01

    A possible association of spinal pathology with notalgia paresthetica (NP) was investigated through clinical and radiographic evaluation. Forty-three NP patients underwent dermatologic and orthopedic examination accompanied by radiography of the spine. Sixty-one lesions in 43 patients were evaluated. In 34 patients, various vertebral pathologies were observed radiographically by a blinded investigator, and in 28 of these cases these changes were most prominent in the vertebrae which corresponded to a lesional dermatome. Thirty-seven lesions were accompanied by spinal changes decided to be relevant (60.7%). The striking correlation of NP localization with spinal pathology suggests that spinal nerve impingement may contribute to the pathogenesis of this entity. PMID:15928634

  2. Dressing up nursing diagnoses: a critical-thinking strategy.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, C A; Ludwick, R

    1996-01-01

    Teaching nursing diagnoses to beginning students who have no clinical experiences challenges educators to use their creative energies in developing strategies that facilitate students' critical-thinking skills. Dressing Up Nursing Diagnoses is a fun and creative classroom teaching strategy you can use during the Halloween season to help beginning students formulate nursing diagnoses. Two nurse educators describe their successful experiences with this unique teaching strategy. PMID:8718155

  3. Pathological crying and emotional vasovagal syncope as symptoms of a dorsally exophytic medullary tumor.

    PubMed

    Yuge, Kotaro; Ohya, Takashi; Shibuya, Ikuhiko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro

    2016-06-01

    A 3-year-old boy with a dorsally exophytic tumor arising from the rostral medulla presented with a chief complaint of a change in his emotional behavior, most notably anxiety and paroxysmal crying often followed by syncope. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the tumor pushed on the dorsal surface of the medulla and displaced the medulla anteriorly, and also displaced the cerebellar vermis upward and slightly posteriorly. Tissue from a partial resection was diagnosed as a pilocytic astrocytoma. The symptoms did not improved after surgery, but did improve clinically after chemotherapy with vincristine and carboplatin, at which time MR showed a reduction in tumor size. We diagnosed the paroxysmal crying as 'pathological crying' and the syncope with increased anxiety as 'emotional vasovagal syncope'. This case stresses the importance of recognition of this rare presentation as an indication of a medullary tumor. PMID:26740075

  4. Fetal hydronephrosis: optimal renal pelvic measurement to increase detection rate for renal pathology.

    PubMed

    Leader, J; Letshwiti, J; Stuart, B; Turner, M J; White, M; Kennelly, M

    2012-06-01

    We reviewed the outcome of fetal hydronephrosis with a renal pelvic dilatation (RPD) of 4-7 mm to assess whether a RPD > 7 mm had a higher predictive value for renal pathology. 373 fetuses were diagnosed with hydronephrosis giving an incidence of 2.2%. The male: female ratio was 1.8:1. 5(1.34%) fetuses with antenatal hydronephrosis were diagnosed with Down Syndrome. 299 (91.7% fetuses with an RPD of 4-7 mm had resolved by 34 weeks gestation with 10 (3.1%) having moderate to severe hydronephrosis. The resolution rate for RPD > 7 mm was 60.7% (17) with 11 fetuses (39.3%) requiring long term follow up. PMID:22973656

  5. Exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for graduating medical students: the Canadian approach.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jason; Pambrun, Chantale

    2015-05-01

    Physicians in every medical and surgical field must be able to use pathology concepts and skills in their practice: for example, they must order and interpret the correct laboratory tests, they must use their understanding of pathogenesis to diagnose and treat, and they must work with the laboratory to care for their patients. These important concepts and skills may be ignored by medical schools and even national/international organizations setting graduation expectations for medical students. There is an evolving international consensus about the importance of exit competencies for medical school graduates, which define the measurable or observable behaviors each graduate must be able to demonstrate. The Canadian Association of Pathologists (CAP) Education Group set out to establish the basic competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine which should be expected of every medical graduate: not competencies for pathologists, but for medical graduates who intend to enter any residency program. We defined 4 targets for pathology and laboratory medicine exit competencies: that they represent only measurable behaviors, that they be clinically focused, that they be generalizable to every medical graduate, and that the final competency document be user-friendly. A set of competencies was developed iteratively and underwent final revision at the 2012 CAP annual meeting. These competencies were subsequently endorsed by the CAP executive and the Canadian Leadership Council on Laboratory Medicine. This clinically focused consensus document provides the first comprehensive list of exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for undergraduate medical education. PMID:25776028

  6. Dental pathology in dolphins (Cetacea: Delphinidae) from the southern coast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Loch, Carolina; Grando, Liliane J; Kieser, Jules A; Simões-Lopes, Paulo C

    2011-05-01

    Pathological processes observed in the stomatognathic systems of mammalian species are a useful source of information about the habits, evolution and general health of such animals. Studies of pathological conditions on teeth are common in humans and other primates, but rare in wild animals in general and marine mammals in particular. For cetaceans, previous studies provided scanty records of dental anomalies in a few species. This is the first broad and systematic inventory of dental pathology in dolphins. Specimens stored at scientific collections from the southern coast of Brazil were visually inspected under a stereoscopic microscope using a dental explorer. Diagnosis of lesions and anomalies followed literature descriptions. Abnormalities such as caries-like lesions, mineralized calculus deposits, dental erosion, enamel anomalies (hypoplasia and exogenous pigmentation), root resorption, germination and other shape anomalies, were diagnosed in the delphinids Sotalia guianensis, Delphinus capensis, Stenella frontalis, Stenella coeruleoalba, Lagenodelphis hosei, Pseudorca crassidens, Orcinus orca, Steno bredanensis and Tursiops truncatus. Endogenous causes may be related to the occurrence of certain conditions, but the aetiology of caries-like lesions and calculus accumulation is still unknown for cetaceans. The diagnosis of alveolar anomalies and other bone lesions in specimens with dental pathology lead us to believe these lesions modify the integrity of the periodontal ligament and bony tissues, adding to the burden of morbidity of affected animals. PMID:21790069

  7. Pathology Imaging Informatics for Clinical Practice and Investigative and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Sadimin, Evita T.; Foran, David J

    2012-01-01

    Pathologists routinely interpret gross and microscopic specimens to render diagnoses and to engage in a broad spectrum of investigative research. Multiple studies have demonstrated that imaging technologies have progressed to a level at which properly digitized specimens provide sufficient quality comparable to the traditional glass slides examinations. Continued advancements in this area will have a profound impact on the manner in which pathology is conducted from this point on. Several leading institutions have already undertaken ambitious projects directed toward digitally imaging, archiving, and sharing pathology specimens. As a result of these advances, the use of informatics in diagnostic and investigative pathology applications is expanding rapidly. In addition, the advent of novel technologies such as multispectral imaging makes it possible to visualize and analyze imaged specimens using multiple wavelengths simultaneously. As these powerful technologies become increasingly accepted and adopted, the opportunities for gaining new insight into the underlying mechanisms of diseases as well as the potential for discriminating among subtypes of pathologies are growing accordingly. PMID:22855694

  8. Clinical and pathologic diagnosis and different diagnosis of syphilis cervical lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yufen; Zhang, Xinlian; Xu, Nan; Wang, Libo; Li, Fangchao; Zhang, Ping; Miao, Lanfang; Yang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical pathologic characteristics and differential diagnosis of syphilitic cervical lymphadenitis, and to improve the rate of its diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Retrospectively analyzed the clinical history, Trepone pallidum-ELISA (TP-ELISA), rapid plasma regain test (RPR) and routine pathological examination of the patient diagnosed as syphilis lymphadenitis. And review related literatures. Results: The main clinical presentation was multiple palpable cervical lymph nodes. The multiple nodes were hard, fixed, and the major diameter of the larger one was 2 cm. The main pathological changes included: the capsule was significantly thickened; reactive hyperplasia of lymphoid follicular with sky star phenomenon; occlusive endovasculitis; perivascular inflammation; the proliferation of epithelioid histiocytes can form granulomas with few multinucleated giant cells; few necrosis. TP-ELISA and RPR were positive. Conclusions: The pathological changes of syphilitic lymphadenitis have a variety of performance with relatively specific and suggestive alterations which requires a combination of clinical history and laboratory test before the diagnosis, and the clinicians can reduce misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis of the disease by increasing vigilance of it. PMID:26722588

  9. Cognitive-behavioural treatment of pathological gambling in individuals with chronic schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Echeburúa, Enrique; Gómez, Montserrat; Freixa, Montserrat

    2011-11-01

    The current study aimed to test the clinical effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural program (CBT) specifically adapted for pathological gamblers with chronic schizophrenia, carried out in a naturalistic setting of community Mental Health Centres. Forty-four pathological gamblers with chronic schizophrenia were assigned either to a standard drug therapy for schizophrenia (control group) or to cognitive-behavioural therapy for pathological gambling plus a standard drug therapy for schizophrenia (experimental group). Psychological treatment comprised a 20-session program including psychoeducation, stimulus control, gradual exposure and relapse prevention. Therapeutic success was defined as abstinence or the occurrence of only 1 or 2 episodes of gambling during the follow-up period. While the patients treated in the experimental group showed a rate of success of 73.9%, only 19% of the participants belonging to the control group gave up gambling at the 3-month follow-up. The CBT group also did better than the control group in the number of gambling episodes and in the amount of money spent on gambling. However, the improvement of the experimental group was weaker at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. These findings support the beneficial effects of CBT as adjunctive therapy for patients with dual diagnoses (schizophrenia and pathological gambling). PMID:21920501

  10. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  11. What nursing diagnoses do nurses use in long term care?

    PubMed

    Daly, J M; Maas, M; Buckwalter, K

    1995-01-01

    The results of this survey validate that the NANDA nursing diagnoses classification is appropriate for use in long term care. Although ninety three percent of the current NANDA nursing diagnoses are used in practice, there remains a need for the development and testing of additional nursing diagnoses to describe patient problems encountered in long term care. Nurses in education and practice settings must work collaboratively to continue to identify, refine and validate the nursing diagnoses that are most appropriate for frail, older and/or chronically ill residents of long term care facilities. PMID:7648273

  12. Herpes Zoster of the Third Division of the Trigeminal Nerve. A Clinical Pathologic Conference.

    PubMed

    Doan, Karen; Stoler, Kenneth; Logan, Keri

    2015-11-01

    Herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is a disease that often challenges dentists and dental specialists trying to make the proper diagnosis, as many ulcerative and vesiculobullous diseases of the mouth have a similar clinical appearance. We report a clinical case in which a 27-year-old patient sought care for this vesicular lesion. Included are the differential diagnosis and treatment modalities that we used to diagnose the disease. A clinical pathologic conference is provided to highlight the appropriate courses of action in the management of herpes zoster. PMID:26749785

  13. Update on the Pathology and Diagnosis of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is characterized by bladder discomfort, urinary frequency, urgency, and pelvic pain. The etiology and pathogenesis of this condition is still unknown and remains diagnosed by exclusion. The histologic findings are also neither specific for diagnosis nor correlated with symptoms. However, the definition and diagnostic criteria for the condition was established in the last decade. In this paper, we review the changes in the definition, terminology, and diagnostic scheme of IC/BPS, and summarize the histologic findings. We also briefly discuss some new pathologic suggestions and new urinary markers, focusing on the most promising ones. PMID:27032552

  14. Laparoscopic Treatment of Ovarian Retention Pathology

    PubMed

    Dionisi; Dionisi; Dionisi

    1996-08-01

    We define ovarian retention pathology as the complications (cystic, degenerative, adhesions, endometriosis, pain, etc.) attributed to ovaries deliberately retained at the time of hysterectomy. We established a protocol for laparoscopy in these women. During 14 laparoscopic procedures for ovarian retention pathology, only one intraoperative complication occurred, a small bowel injury requiring minilaparotomy. One woman required repeat surgery for ovarian remnant syndrome. Published experience with laparotomy suggests that significant injuries to or resections of bowel, bladder, or ureters can occur, but the limited experience with laparoscopic surgery has not shown significant complications. PMID:9074105

  15. Exhaustion and the Pathologization of Modernity.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Anna Katharina

    2016-09-01

    This essay analyses six case studies of theories of exhaustion-related conditions from the early eighteenth century to the present day. It explores the ways in which George Cheyne, George Beard, Richard von Krafft-Ebing, Sigmund Freud, Alain Ehrenberg and Jonathan Crary use medical ideas about exhaustion as a starting point for more wide-ranging cultural critiques related to specific social and technological transformations. In these accounts, physical and psychological symptoms are associated with particular external developments, which are thus not just construed as pathology-generators but also pathologized. The essay challenges some of the persistently repeated claims about exhaustion and its unhappy relationship with modernity. PMID:25096856

  16. The interscrotal approach to inguinoscrotal pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Soualili, Zineddine; Achouri, Djelloul; Haif, Assia; Touabti, Souhem; Yahia, Smain Ait; Benmahmoud, Mahmoud; Choutri, Hichem; Nedjar, Sameh; Mimoune, Malika; Chouaib, Sayah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficiency of the interscrotal approach to inguinoscrotal pathologies. Patients and methods We report the use of the interscrotal approach in 21 boys, from September 2012 to November 2013, operated using an interscrotal access through a vertical incision on the median raphe. Results The approach was used for bilateral inguinal hernia (48%), bilateral ectopic testis (19%), torsion of the spermatic cord (19%), testicular biopsy (10%) and webbing of the penis (5%). Conclusion Inter-scrotal access is an option for inguinoscrotal pathologies, with the advantages of a single incision, much less dissection and disruption of tissue, and greater comfort for the ‘day-case’ child. PMID:26413342

  17. Pathology-designed custom molded foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with custom foot orthoses for common pathologies is a rewarding experience when the proper steps are taken during foot casting and custom-orthosis prescription writing. This article describes successful methods for orthoses casting and prescription writing for custom-molded orthoses for Achilles tendonitis, pes planus, hallux limitus, plantar fasciitis/heel spurs, lateral ankle instability, metatarsalgia, and pes cavus. In addition, a summary of orthotic laboratory instructions for each pathology-designed custom orthosis is provided, which should be considered by orthotic laboratories. PMID:21276525

  18. Anatomical variants and pathologies of the vermix

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Swati; Verde, Franco; Johnson, Pamela T.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    The appendix may demonstrate a perplexing range of normal and abnormal appearances on imaging exams. Familiarity with the anatomy and anatomical variants of the appendix is helpful in identifying the appendix on ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Knowledge of the variety of pathologies afflicting the appendix and of the spectrum of imaging findings may be particularly useful to the emergency radiologist for accurate diagnosis and appropriate guidance regarding clinical and surgical management. In this pictorial essay, we review appendiceal embryology, anatomical variants such as Amyand hernias, and pathologies from appendicitis to carcinoid, mucinous, and nonmucinous epithelial neoplasms. PMID:24570122

  19. Laser polarimetry tomography of biotissue pathological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, Serhiy B.; Angelsky, Oleg V.; Ushenko, Alexander G.; Pishak, Vasyl P.; Pishak, Olga V.

    2001-06-01

    Recently the photometric and spectrophotometric methods of biotissue diagnostics, based on searching interrelation of scalar characteristics of optical radiation field with their structural parameters. The complex of investigation of transformation processes of linear-polarized radiation in biotissues has demonstrated the new possibilities of diagnostics of their pathological biotissues (human skin derma, the whit matter and tissues of the gray matter, tissue of aorta side, necrotic ulcer, bone tissue, etc.). The report presented deals with researching possibilities of laser polarized diagnostics of arising and proceeding of pathological changes of biotissue morphological structure.

  20. Familial Prion Disease with Alzheimer Disease-Like Tau Pathology and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nochlin, David; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Mastrianni, James A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the Alzheimer disease (AD)-like clinical and pathological features, including marked neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) pathology, of a familial prion disease due to a rare nonsense mutation of the prion gene (PRNP). Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments were available for the proband and her mother. After death, both underwent neuropathological evaluation. PRNP was sequenced after failure to find immunopositive Aβ deposits in the proband and the documentation of prion protein (PrP) immunopositive pathology. Results The proband presented at age 42 years with a 3-year history of progressive short-term memory impairment and depression. Neuropsychological testing found impaired memory performance, with relatively preserved attention and construction. She was diagnosed with AD and died at age 47 years. Neuropathologic evaluation revealed extensive limbic and neocortical NFT formation and neuritic plaques consistent with a Braak stage of VI. The NFTs were immunopositive, with multiple tau antibodies, and electron microscopy revealed paired helical filaments. However, the neuritic plaques were immunonegative for Aβ, whereas immunostaining for PrP was positive. The mother of the proband had a similar presentation, including depression, and had been diagnosed clinically and pathologically as AD. Reevaluation of her brain tissue confirmed similar tau and PrP immunostaining findings. Genetic analysis revealed that both the proband and her mother had a rare PRNP mutation (Q160X) that resulted in the production of truncated PrP. Interpretation We suggest that PRNP mutations that result in a truncation of PrP lead to a prolonged clinical course consistent with a clinical diagnosis of AD and severe AD-like NFTs. PMID:21416485

  1. Infant gastroesophageal reflux disease score: reproducibility and validity in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Sandeep; Mittal, Santosh K; Kalra, Krishan K; Rajeshwari, Krishnan; Gondal, Ranjana

    2004-01-01

    A 25-point infant gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) score based on 11 signs and symptoms of gastrooesophageal reflux (GER), to diagnose GERD has been suggested in infant. We carried out this study to test the reproducibility and validity of this scoring system in the cross-cultural settings of Indian infants. Caretakers of 610 apparently healthy infants, between the ages of 1 month and 24 months were administered the Orenstein's infant GER questionnaire and assigned a GERD score. Of these, 95 infants were taken up for a 24-hours oesophageal pH monitoring study. Before the pH study, each subject was again tested by the infant GER questionnaire by another independent observer and assigned an infant GERD score. The 24-hours oesophageal pH study was done using the Synectics Digitrapper MK III portable pH recording device. Reflux index (RI) >10% in infants up to 1 year of age and >5% in children more than 1 year of age was taken as pathological. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and oesophageal biopsies were performed in 35 cases, after taking informed consent. A good correlation was seen between the scores evaluated independently by the two workers, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.906. The mean GERD score in infants with GER (as diagnosed by pH-metry) was 4.64 +/- 3.99 compared to 3.54 +/- 3.96 in those with no documented GER (p>0.05). A GERD score of 5 had a sensitivity of 43% and specificity of 79%, compared to 86% and 85% observed by Orenstein et al. in their series. The infant GER Questionnaire is easily adaptable and reproducible in the settings of developing countries. However, its diagnostic validity appears to be much less than that obtained by Orenstein et al. in their study on American infants. PMID:15471328

  2. The Pathology Laboratory Act 2007 explained.

    PubMed

    Looi, Lai-Meng

    2008-06-01

    The past century has seen tremendous changes in the scope and practice of pathology laboratories in tandem with the development of the medical services in Malaysia. Major progress was made in the areas of training and specialization of pathologists and laboratory technical staff. Today the pathology laboratory services have entered the International arena, and are propelled along the wave of globalization. Many new challenges have emerged as have new players in the field. Landmark developments over the past decade include the establishment of national quality assurance programmes, the mushrooming of private pathology laboratories, the establishment of a National Accreditation Standard for medical testing laboratories based on ISO 15189, and the passing of the Pathology Laboratory Act in Parliament in mid-2007. The Pathology Laboratory Act 2007 seeks to ensure that the pathology laboratory is accountable to the public, meets required standards of practice, participates in Quality Assurance programmes, is run by qualified staff, complies with safety requirements and is subject to continuous audit. The Act is applicable to all private laboratories (stand alone or hospital) and laboratories in statutory bodies (Universities, foundations). It is not applicable to public laboratories (established and operated by the government) and side-room laboratories established in clinics of registered medical or dental practitioners for their own patients (tests as in the First and Second Schedules respectively). Tests of the Third Schedule (home test blood glucose, urine glucose, urine pregnancy test) are also exempted. The Act has 13 Parts and provides for control of the pathology laboratory through approval (to establish and maintain) and licensing (to operate or provide). The approval or license may only be issued to a sole proprietor, partnership or body corporate, and then only if the entity includes a registered medical practitioner. Details of personnel qualifications and

  3. Using pathology-specific laboratory profiles in Clinical Pathology to reduce inappropriate test requesting: two completed audit cycles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews have shown that, although well prepared, the Consensus Guidelines have failed to change clinical practice. In the healthcare district of Castelnovo né Monti (Reggio Emilia, Italy), it became necessary for the GPs and Clinical Pathologists to work together to jointly define laboratory profiles. Methods Observational study with two cycles of retrospective audit on test request forms, in a primary care setting. Objectives of the study were to develop pathology-specific laboratory profiles and to increase the number of provisional diagnoses on laboratory test request forms. A Multiprofessional Multidisciplinary Inter-hospital Work Team developed pathology-specific laboratory profiles for more effective test requesting. After 8 training sessions that used a combined strategy with multifaceted interventions, the 23 General Practitioners (GPs) in the trial district (Castelnovo nè Monti) tested the profiles; the 21 GPs in the Puianello district were the control group; all GPs in both districts participated in the trial. All laboratory tests for both healthcare districts are performed at the Laboratory located in the trial district. A baseline and a 1-year audit were performed in both districts on the GPs’ request forms. Results Seven pathology-specific laboratory profiles for outpatients were developed. In the year after the first audit cycle: 1) the number of tests requested in the trial district was distinctly lower than that in the previous year, with a decrease of about 5% (p < 0.001); 2) the provisional diagnosis on the request forms was 52.8% in the trial district and 42% in the control district (P < 0.001); 3) the decrease of the number of tests on each request form was much more marked in the trial district (8.73 vs. 10.77; p < 0.001). Conclusions The first audit cycle showed a significant decrease in the number of tests ordered only in the trial district. The combined strategy used in this study improved the

  4. Duck plague: carrier state and gross pathology in black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ossa, Jorge E.

    1975-01-01

    Duck plague (UP) is a highly fatal disease of ducks, geese, and swans (family Anatidae), produced by a reticulo-endotheliotrophic virus classified as a member of the Herpesvirus group. The disease was recognized in Europe in 1949. On the American continent, the disease was first diagnosed in the United States in 1967. Very little is known of DP virus ecology, particularly of the mechanisms of interepizootic survival and movement. The tendency of the IIerpesviruses to enter into a quiescent state after an overt or inapparent infection is a proven characteristic for most of the members of this group. Herpes simplex, which is the model of the Herpesviruses, is said to be the classical example of a persistent recurrent viral infection. Burnet and Williams (4) were the first to recognize this kind of relationship between herpes simplex and its host in 1939. Later, it was found that the reactivation of the virus can be brought on by a variety of stimuli either physiological (menstruation), pathological (anaphylactic shock), chemical (pesticides) or physical (sunburn). This same latency property has been proved for every member of this group of viruses which has been studied adequately, DP is among the few Herpesviruses for which the carrier state has not been demonstrated, but there is circumstantial evidence suggesting it. The carrier state for DP seems to be a likely explanation for the persistence and the particular pattern of movement of this disease.

  5. Management of Giant Cervical Teratoma with Intracranial Extension Diagnosed in Utero

    PubMed Central

    Thawani, Jayesh P.; Randazzo, Michael J.; Singh, Nickpreet; Pisapia, Jared M.; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Storm, Phillip B.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical teratomas are rare germ cell tumors affecting the fetus that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to an increased risk of airway obstruction at delivery. These tumors can commonly produce polyhydramnios that results from the fetus' impaired ability to swallow amniotic fluid. Improved rates of prenatal diagnosis through comprehensive evaluations and imaging have dramatically impacted the perinatal management of infants with this condition. Here, we report a patient diagnosed with polyhydramnios whose fetus was discovered to have a giant cervical teratoma on imaging studies. The child underwent surgical resection after having the airway secured under the uteroplacental support as part of an ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure performed at 37 weeks. The following gross pathological and magnetic resonance images demonstrate this condition and its currently accepted treatment. PMID:27468407

  6. "Dry" pleural mesothelioma successfully diagnosed on endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS)-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA).

    PubMed

    Lococo, Filippo; Rossi, Giulio; Agostini, Lorenzo; Filice, Angelina; Paci, Massimiliano; Rapicetta, Cristian; Ricchetti, Tommaso; Tenconi, Sara; Piro, Roberto; Sgarbi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of histologic material is obligatory in order to establish the diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In particular, tissue acquisition in cases of "dry" MPM (focal pleural thickening without pleural effusion or mediastinal lymph node involvement) is usually performed via a thoracoscopic pleural biopsy. In contrast, the techniques for performing echoendoscopic (transbronchial or transesophageal) needle aspiration of pleural lesions have only rarely been reported due to the theoretical limitations of tissue acquisition in such cases. We herein report the first case of "dry" MPM successfully diagnosed via endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) in a 73-year-old man presenting with a pleural mass in the right costovertebral recess, adjacent to the carina. The patient underwent radical resection, and a definitive pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of epithelioid MPM. PMID:24583437

  7. Hepatitis C virus positive patient diagnosed after detection of atypical cryoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Ongen, Belkiz; Aksungar, Fehime Benli; Cicek, Bahattin; Akyar, Isin; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Serteser, Mustafa; Unsal, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old male patient presented with jaundice and dark urine for three days, icteric sclerae and skin rash on his legs for six months. Laboratory investigations revealed an atypical cryoglobulinemia with high hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA levels. Imaging studies showed cholestasis was accompanying HCV. Capillary zone electrophoresis using immunosubtraction method revealed a polyclonal immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A (IgA) monoclonal cryoglobulin and that IgA lambda was absent in immunofixation electrophoresis. After a liver biopsy, chronic hepatitis C, HCV related mixed cryoglobulinemia and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis were diagnosed and antiviral therapy was initiated. Our HCV patient presented with cryoglobulinemic symptoms with an atypical cryoglobulinemia that was detected by an alternative method: Immunosubtraction by capillary electrophoresis. Different types of cryoglobulins may therefore have a correlation with clinical symptoms and prognosis. Therefore, the accurate immunotyping of cryoglobulins with alternative methods may provide more information about cryoglobulin-generated pathology. PMID:26989673

  8. Pathological Left-Handedness: An Explanatory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satz, Paul

    Reported was an explanatory conceptual model for pathological left-handedness (PLH) and related hypotheses, some of which could not be tested empirically due to lack of information. The model was reported to provide an explanation for the relationship between handedness and specific learning disability, and handedness and cerebral dominance for…

  9. Voice data mining for laryngeal pathology assessment.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Daria; Skalski, Andrzej; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of different methods of speech signal analysis in the detection of voice pathologies. Firstly, an initial vector was created consisting of 28 parameters extracted from time, frequency and cepstral domain describing the human voice signal based on the analysis of sustained vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/ all at high, low and normal pitch. Afterwards we used a linear feature extraction technique (principal component analysis), which enabled a reduction in the number of parameters and choose the most effective acoustic features describing the speech signal. We have also performed non-linear data transformation which was calculated using kernel principal components. The results of the presented methods for normal and pathological cases will be revealed and discussed in this paper. The initial and extracted feature vectors were classified using the k-means clustering and the random forest classifier. We found that reasonably good classification accuracies could be achieved by selecting appropriate features. We obtained accuracies of up to 100% for classification of healthy versus pathology voice using random forest classification for female and male recordings. These results may assist in the feature development of automated detection systems for diagnosis of patients with symptoms of pathological voice. PMID:26471193

  10. Brain pathologies in extreme old age.

    PubMed

    Neltner, Janna H; Abner, Erin L; Jicha, Gregory A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Patel, Ela; Poon, Leonard W; Marla, Gearing; Green, Robert C; Davey, Adam; Johnson, Mary Ann; Jazwinski, S Michal; Kim, Sangkyu; Davis, Daron; Woodard, John L; Kryscio, Richard J; Van Eldik, Linda J; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    With an emphasis on evolving concepts in the field, we evaluated neuropathologic data from very old research volunteers whose brain autopsies were performed at the University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center, incorporating data from the Georgia Centenarian Study (n = 49 cases included), Nun Study (n = 17), and University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center (n = 11) cohorts. Average age of death was 102.0 (range: 98-107) years overall. Alzheimer's disease pathology was not universal (62% with "moderate" or "frequent" neuritic amyloid plaque densities), whereas frontotemporal lobar degeneration was absent. By contrast, some hippocampal neurofibrillary tangles (including primary age-related tauopathy) were observed in every case. Lewy body pathology was seen in 16.9% of subjects and hippocampal sclerosis of aging in 20.8%. We describe anatomic distributions of pigment-laden macrophages, expanded Virchow-Robin spaces, and arteriolosclerosis among Georgia Centenarians. Moderate or severe arteriolosclerosis pathology, throughout the brain, was associated with both hippocampal sclerosis of aging pathology and an ABCC9 gene variant. These results provide fresh insights into the complex cerebral multimorbidity, and a novel genetic risk factor, at the far end of the human aging spectrum. PMID:26597697

  11. Pathological Gambling and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Justin D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) has been considered as a behavioral addiction having similarities with substance use disorders (SUDs). Shared features exist in diagnostic, clinical, physiological, and behavioral domains. Current conceptualizations of addiction, as well as experimental studies of PG and SUDs, are reviewed in order to provide a perspective on the areas of convergence between addictive behaviors in PG and SUDs. PMID:20575651

  12. The interpersonal core of personality pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Ansell, Emily B.; Pincus, Aaron L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that personality pathology is, at its core, fundamentally interpersonal. We review the proposed DSM-5 Section 3 redefinition of personality pathology involving self and interpersonal dysfunction, which we regard as a substantial improvement over the DSM-IV (and DSM-5 Section 2) definition. We note similarities between the proposed scheme and contemporary interpersonal theory and interpret the DSM-5 Section 3 definition using the underlying assumptions and evidence base of the interpersonal paradigm in clinical psychology. We describe how grounding the proposed DSM-5 Section 3 definition in interpersonal theory, and in particular a focus on the “interpersonal situation”, adds to its theoretical texture, empirical support, and clinical utility. We provide a clinical example that demonstrates the ability of contemporary interpersonal theory to augment the DSM-5 definition of personality pathology. We conclude with directions for further research that could clarify the core of personality pathology, and how interpersonal theory can inform research aimed at enhancing the DSM-5 Section 3 proposal and ultimately justify its migration to DSM-5 Section 2. PMID:23735037

  13. Skeletal muscle pathology in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Daniel; Piotrowska, Izabela; Marcinkowski, Jerzy T.; Mielcarek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the huntingtin protein (HTT). The neurological symptoms, that involve motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances, are caused by neurodegeneration that is particularly widespread in the basal ganglia and cereberal cortex. HTT is ubiquitously expressed and in recent years it has become apparent that HD patients experience a wide array of peripheral organ dysfunction including severe metabolic phenotype, weight loss, HD-related cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle wasting. Although skeletal muscles pathology became a hallmark of HD, the mechanisms underlying muscular atrophy in this disorder are unknown. Skeletal muscles account for approximately 40% of body mass and are highly adaptive to physiological and pathological conditions that may result in muscle hypertrophy (due to increased mechanical load) or atrophy (inactivity, chronic disease states). The atrophy is caused by degeneration of myofibers and their replacement by fibrotic tissue is the major pathological feature in many genetic muscle disorders. Under normal physiological conditions the muscle function is orchestrated by a network of intrinsic hypertrophic and atrophic signals linked to the functional properties of the motor units that are likely to be imbalanced in HD. In this article, we highlight the emerging field of research with particular focus on the recent studies of the skeletal muscle pathology and the identification of new disease-modifying treatments. PMID:25339908

  14. Preface: Insect Pathology, 2nd ed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect pathology is an essential component of entomology and provides a non-chemical alternative for insect pest management. There are several groups of organisms that can infect and kill insects including viruses, fungi, microsporidia, bacteria, protists, and nematodes. The dilemma in insect patho...

  15. [Pathological hobbies and interests in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Sergeev, I I; Malinochka, S A

    2008-01-01

    Pathological hobbies have been studied in 82 inpatients with schizophrenia, 48 men and 34 women, aged 18-65 years. Inclusion criteria of pathology were (1) overvalued character of a hobby, (2) insufficient criticism towards this hobby, (3) fringe, singularity interests and methods of their realization; (4) inconsistency between the hobby and previous life experience, (5) low efficiency, (6) strong linkage with other psychopathological presentations, (7) chronological coincidence between the onset of pathological hobbies and schizophrenia manifestation or exacerbation, (8) susceptibility to progressive dynamics, (9) distinct social-maladaptive influence. Regarding the content, pathological hobbies are presented by creative art, scientific work, collecting, gambling, sport and health activities, "spiritual" development. Three clinical variants - obsessive-compulsive, overvalued and paranoic can be singled out by clinical presentations. The overvalued variant appears to be more favorable due to the predominantly adaptive social influence and weak relation to the dynamics of schizophrenia. Other variants are less productive exerting mostly decompensation effect with less favorable dynamics. PMID:18427535

  16. Postmenopausal tamoxifen treatment and endometrial pathology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I; Altaras, M M; Shapira, J; Tepper, R; Beyth, Y

    1994-12-01

    Tamoxifen is widely used as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer patients with positive estrogen receptors. Data on a possible association of endometrial pathologies with tamoxifen treatment have been accumulating. In this review, we examine the current literature and include our own experience with this occurrence. We recommend close supervision of these patients. PMID:7885659

  17. Foot pathology in insulin dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, S J; Shield, J P; Potter, M J; Baum, J D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Foot pathology is a major source of morbidity in adults with diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine if children with insulin dependent diabetes have an increased incidence of foot pathology compared with non-diabetic children. DESIGN--Questionnaire, clinical examination, and biomechanical assessment. SUBJECTS--67 diabetic children and a comparison group matched for age, sex, and social class. RESULTS--We found significantly more foot pathology in the children with diabetes (52 children) than the comparison group (28 children); with more biomechanical anomalies (58 children with diabetes, 34 comparison group); and a higher incidence of abnormal skin conditions (53 children with diabetes, 27 comparison group). Forty two children with diabetes had received foot health education compared with 27 in the comparison group, but the study revealed ignorance and misconceptions among the diabetic group, and previous contact with a podiatrist was minimal. CONCLUSIONS--The survey suggests that children with diabetes have an increased incidence of foot pathology justifying greater input of podiatric care in the hope of preventing later problems. PMID:7574860

  18. Speech-Language-Pathology and Audiology Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains State Education Department rules and regulations that govern speech-language pathology and audiology in New York State. The handbook also describes licensure and first registration as a licensed speech-language pathologist or audiologist. The introduction discusses professional regulation in New York State while the second…

  19. Speech-Language Pathology: Preparing Early Interventionists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prelock, Patricia A.; Deppe, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the role of speech-language pathology in early intervention. The expected credentials of professionals in the field are described, and the current numbers of practitioners serving young children are identified. Several resource documents available from the American Speech-­Language Hearing Association are…

  20. Risk Factors and Prodromal Eating Pathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Ng, Janet; Shaw, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Prospective studies have identified factors that increase risk for eating pathology onset, including perceived pressure for thinness, thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, dietary restraint, and negative affect. Research also suggests that body dissatisfaction and dietary restraint may constitute prodromal stages of the development of…