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Sample records for patient advocacy movement

  1. Small wins matter in advocacy movements: giving voice to patients.

    PubMed

    Jason, Leonard A

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the various players are delineated in a story of a contested illness and patient advocacy, played out within the corridors of federal power. It is suggested that the mistreatment and negative attitudes that health care providers and others have towards those with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is possibly due to the social construction of this illness as being a "Yuppie flu" disease. Institutional factors are identified that created these norms and attributions, as well as the multiple stakeholders and constituent groups invested in exerting pressure on policy makers to effect systemic change. This article also provides examples of how the field of Community Psychology, which is fundamentally committed to/based on listening to and giving voice to patients, is broadly relevant to patient activism communities. This approach focused, over time, on epidemiological studies, the name, the case definition, and ultimately the change in CFS leadership at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Keys to this "small wins" approach were coalition building, use of "oppositional experts" (professionals in the scientific community who support patient advocacy goals) to challenge federal research, and taking advantage of developing events/shifts in power. Ultimately, this approach can result in significant scientific and policy gains, and changes in medical and public perception of an illness. PMID:21858612

  2. Disability Identity of Leaders in the Self-Advocacy Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Life stories and perspectives of leaders in the self-advocacy movement were explored to enhance knowledge about disability identity formation. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 leaders in the self-advocacy movement. Five major themes emerged: (a) resistance-claiming personhood and voice; (b) connection with disability…

  3. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy. PMID:26058653

  4. Patients' Rights and Advocacy: For Hispanics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Sally J., Ed.

    The monograph outlines key issues in the area of patients' rights and advocacy as they relate to Hispanic mental health clients or patients. Providing background material on patients' rights and advocacy in general, the first section includes a chronological history of major litigation, a discussion of patient advocacy, a discussion of a client's…

  5. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

  6. "Movement as Motive": Self Definition and Social Advocacy in Social Movement Autobiographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Charles J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship advancing the understanding of human communication by elaborating a theoretical framework for understanding the synthesis of self-definition and social advocacy in social movement autobiographies. Uses insights from Kenneth Burke and posits that in a rhetorically effective movement autobiography, form enables the…

  7. Patient advocacy in the USA: key communication role functions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald R; Tipton, Bryan K

    2007-09-01

    Researchers have long documented the importance of patient advocacy programs as a means of providing customer service in health-care organizations. Yet, while effective communication is often acknowledged as key to effective patient advocacy, knowledge of the specific communication role functions enacted by patient advocates remains limited, as does our understanding of the function of patient advocacy at the organizational level. This qualitative investigation not only provides a typology of communication roles enacted by patient advocates while solving problems on behalf of patients and their family members, but also integrates scholarly research on "boundary-spanning" as a means of theoretically contextualizing the advocacy role at the organizational level. PMID:17688476

  8. Iranian Nurses' Attitudes and Perception towards Patient Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Motamed-Jahromi, Mohadeseh; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Borhani, Fariba; Zaher, Homa

    2012-01-01

    Patient advocacy is an inherent component of professional nursing ethics; in other words, nurses' enough knowledge would be essential to gain a positive attitude towards nursing advocacy. Using a descriptive-analytic design, this study aimed to assess the correlation between nurses' perception and attitudes towards patient advocacy, amongst 385 nurses in Kerman, Iran; hence, a three-part questionnaire was applied: part I, a demographic data sheet, part II, attitude measuring instrument, and part III, perception measuring instrument in nursing advocacy. The results implied that fairly positive attitudes and perception were found amongst the participants, and nurses' attitudes, in general, were positively correlated to their perception toward nursing advocacy. This means that with an improvement in perception, the attitude would also improve. In addition to our findings, it seems that these nurses needed more advocacy educational programs and support from responsible employers. PMID:23326680

  9. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes. PMID:27398397

  10. Leadership Development of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities in the Self-Advocacy Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exploring the life stories of leaders in the self-advocacy movement can expand our knowledge about leadership development of individuals with developmental disabilities. A better understanding of this process may assist with supporting the movement and leadership development of youth with disabilities. Methods: In-depth qualitative…

  11. Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarr, Margaret, Ed.; Varro, Tim, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue presents art advocacy as a necessary means of bringing art and art education to an elevated status in the elementary secondary curriculum and educational system. Articles include: (1) "Editor's View" (Margaret Scarr); (2) "Art Education: Why Is It Important" (Arts Education Partnership Working Group); (3) "Why Art in Education and…

  12. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  13. Patient activation and advocacy: which literacy skills matter most?

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurie T; Schonlau, Matthias; Haas, Ann; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rosenfeld, Lindsay; Buka, Stephen L; Rudd, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Attention to the effect of a patient's literacy skills on health care interactions is relatively new. So, too, are studies of either structural or personal factors that inhibit or support a patient's ability to navigate health services and systems and to advocate for their own needs within a service delivery system. Contributions of the structural environment, of interpersonal dynamics, and of a variety of psychological and sociological factors in the relationship between patients and providers have long been under study. Less frequently examined is the advocacy role expected of patients. However, the complex nature of health care in the United States increasingly requires a proactive stance. This study examined whether four literacy skills (reading, numeracy, speaking, and listening) were associated with patient self-advocacy--a component of health literacy itself--when faced with a hypothetical barrier to scheduling a medical appointment. Although all literacy skills were significantly associated with advocacy when examined in isolation, greater speaking and listening skills remained significantly associated with better patient advocacy when all four skills were examined simultaneously. These findings suggest that speaking and listening skills and support for such skills may be important factors to consider when developing patient activation and advocacy skills. PMID:21951251

  14. The internal dynamics of environmental organizations: Movement interest groups, communal advocacy groups, and the policy process

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    How do the diverse qualities that movement organizations bring to the policy process affect the representation of particular interests? This question is explored by analyzing environmental organizations across the national, state, and local levels of the American political system. This article suggests that two types of social movement organizations exist: movement interest groups and communal advocacy groups. While this article does not provide direct evidence of the different policy capabilities of the two types of movement organizations, existing research is drawn upon to consider how each type might fare in the policy process. One approach suggests that centralized organizations with incremental goals are better equipped to attain policy success, while the other stresses the need for active member involvement to engage in disruptive politics. To fully assess these divergent views, this article presents a broad review and analysis of the literature.

  15. Patient advocacy groups: Need and opportunity in India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kunal; Garg, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    With an increasing number of corporate hospitals, healthcare related issues, research trials and undue attention by media in India, there is a need to focus more on patient’s rights and protection. In India, multiple agencies like regulatory bodies, scientific review committees, ethics committees, NGOs, etc. work toward patient rights and protection. However, these agencies are inadequate to cater to the general issues related to patient’s rights. There’s a need to have a separate group of people who provide advocacy to the patient, or simply, a patient advocacy group which will work explicitly in these areas to increase transparency and credibility of healthcare system in India. This group will provide special attention to patient care and protection of rights from the planning stage rather than at the troubleshooting stage. PMID:21584175

  16. Advocacy and hope for the patient with pityriasis rubra pilaris.

    PubMed

    Nunemacher, Kathy J

    2008-10-01

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare skin disease that can cause severe physical and psychological manifestations. A short case study of an adult with PRP who was denied access to medications and his journey towards improved health is discussed. Through advocacy and support, health care providers can make a difference in the care of patients with PRP and improve their quality of life. PMID:19051784

  17. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences. PMID:25846573

  18. Engaging patients in public policy advocacy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Charlotte W; Moore, Nuala S

    2014-02-01

    Health professionals can and should be game-changing influencers of U.S. health policies. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) is enabling its members to advocate on important issues through such initiatives as the Breathing Better Alliance network and the annual ATS Hill Day. Patients are also organizing to make their voices heard by participating in the member organizations of the ATS Public Advisory Roundtable and by accompanying ATS members and staff on visits to legislators and government regulators. If we join together, we can amplify our messages and promote better health policies. Doing so will require us to embrace a partnership steeped in trust and hope. PMID:24575996

  19. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  20. The patient-centered movement.

    PubMed

    Capko, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Patient-centered care has been embraced by government, healthcare leaders, and major insurance plans. This movement began more than 10 years ago, but has expanded considerably in an effort to improve patient outcomes and control healthcare expenses. It is the focus of new payment models that pay physicians and hospitals based on clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. Efforts contributing to this movement place great importance on the patient visit and interaction with the provider and staff. This includes how well they communicate with and engage patients, the choices they give patients, whether they involve patients in decision-making, and how they build a strong clinical partnership between physician and patients. Recognition programs have been created to give physicians the tools needed to accomplish this goal, including The Patient-Centered Medical Home and the Patient-Centered Specialty Practice. The anticipated gain is population health management and reduced capital expense for medical services. The patient-centered movement has gained momentum, will be watched closely, and is expected to revolutionize the healthcare delivery system in America. PMID:24696963

  1. \\Defining Patient Advocacy for the Context of Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Consultants.

    PubMed

    Brazg, Tracy; Lindhorst, Taryn; Dudzinski, Denise; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The idea of patient advocacy as a function of clinical ethics consultation (CEC) has been debated in the bioethics literature. In particular, opinion is divided as to whether patient advocacy inherently is in conflict with the other duties of the ethics consultant, especially that of impartial mediator. The debate is complicated, however, because patient advocacy is not uniformly conceptualized. This article examines two literatures that are crucial to understanding patient advocacy in the context of bioethical deliberations: the CEC literature and the literature on advocacy in the social work profession. A review of this literature identifies four distinct approaches to patient advocacy that are relevant to CEC: (1) the best interest approach, (2) the patient rights approach, (3) the representational approach, and (4) the empowerment approach. After providing a clearer understanding of the varied meanings of patient advocacy in the context of CEC, we assert that patient advocacy is not inherently inconsistent with the function of the ethics consultant and the CEC process. Finally, we provide a framework to help consultants determine if they should adopt an advocacy role. PMID:27333067

  2. Self-Advocacy. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; Ward, Nancy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This feature issue newsletter looks at issues the self-advocacy movement is raising and the contributions it is making to the lives of people with developmental disabilities. Articles by self-advocates and advisors to self-advocacy organizations talk about their self-advocacy experiences, barriers to self-advocacy, and ways to support it. Primary…

  3. Collective AIDS Activism and Individuals' Perceived Self-Advocacy in Physician-Patient Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashers, Dale E.; Haas, Stephen M.; Klingle, Renee S.; Neidig, Judith L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes parallel persuasive processes between social or political activism and personal self-advocacy in a study of AIDS activism and communication patterns between people with HIV or AIDS and health care personnel. Encourages greater patient education about the illness and treatment options. Promotes a more assertive stance toward health care,…

  4. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan...

  5. Psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: role of patient advocacy organisations in the twenty first century

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, G; Savage, L; Chandler, D; Maccarone, B

    2005-01-01

    All the psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis patient advocacy organisations are devoted to promoting public awareness and patient education; supporting access to effective treatments and physicians committed to the welfare of patients; working with physicians and other organisations to facilitate development of new treatments; and supporting research for more effective treatments and a cure for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. They have participated in the remaking of health politics in the late twentieth century. This was an era in which small patient support and advocacy groups were transformed into sophisticated national health organisations integral to the formation of national health policy and research, treatment, and education funding by working with physicians, legislators, pharmaceutical companies, third party payors, and the media. As we enter the twenty first century, some of these groups have done critical surveys of patients and physicians to discern needs that are redirecting their programming and reshaping directions in the field. Many national leagues have united to form international organisations. Although differences in their national healthcare systems, the age of their organisations, and the diseases they cover are reflected in the focus of their individual activities, much unites them. Whatever their size, as their roles have come to be recognised in the healthcare community, the patient advocacy organisations welcome being invited to the decision making table. This report describes a sampling of these organisations. PMID:15708949

  6. Professionalization as an Advocacy Strategy: A Content Analysis of Canadian Child Care Social Movement Organizations' 2008 Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Rachel; Prentice, Susan; Albanese, Patrizia; Summers, Bernadette; Messina-Goertzen, Brianne; Richardson, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    Do early childhood education and care (ECEC) professionals make good advocates? Canadian advocates have fought for better child care policies since the mid-1940s. What has happened to this advocacy with the recent increased professionalization of the ECEC sector? How does increased professionalization limit, innovate or expand advocacy strategies?…

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Patient Self-Advocacy Scale: The Persian Version

    PubMed Central

    Vahdat, Shaghayegh; Hamzehgardeshi, Leila; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Hessam, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in science and technology and the changes in lifestyle have changed the concept of health in terms of etiology and mortality. The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the original Patient Self-Advocacy Scale for use with an Iranian population. Methods In the current study, 50 chronic patients between the ages of 25 and 75 were selected as samples. This study was conducted in May 2013 at Bou Ali Sina Hospital in Sari. The translation process and cultural adaptation of the Patient Self-Advocacy Scale were conducted. The face validity and content validity of the instrument were formally verified by analyzing the feedback of patients and health professionals. In order to evaluate questionnaire’s reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for each item and each domain; and the Cronbach’s alpha was calculated for the entire instruments and each domain. Results Of the 50 patients participating in the study, 36% were male and 64% were female. The mean age of the patients was 42.5. To comply with the Iranian culture and the study target population, slight changes were applied to the process of translation and validation. In the present study, intraclass correlation coefficient for each item was 0.8-1, which demonstrates excellent reliability of the questionnaire. The Cronbach’s alpha value was 0.75 for overall scale. Conclusion The Persian version of Patient Self-Advocacy Scale was valid and reliable. Hence, it can be used by public health researchers and health system policy makers for programming and offering patient-oriented health services based on patients’ comments, needs, and preferences. PMID:26170522

  8. A New Movement in an Old Bureaucracy: The Development of Self-Advocacy in the Czech Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siska, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper I describe how self-advocacy has grown in the Czech Republic. First, I talk about how services for people with learning disabilities have begun to change in the last few years. This is because voluntary groups have lobbied and campaigned for change. I learned about self-advocacy during a visit to the UK in the 1990s. I went back to…

  9. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... Don’t Miss the 2016 BCAN ... Click here for more details Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network 4915 St. Elmo Avenue, Suite 202 Bethesda, Maryland ...

  10. The melanoma research alliance: the power of patient advocacy to accelerate research and novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Black, Debra; Brockway-Lunardi, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Patient advocacy organizations play a major role in accelerating research and are particularly important in a disease like melanoma, for which there is an urgent need for new tools and treatments. Melanoma is a growing public health burden. In the United States alone, the incidence of melanoma has tripled over the past 30 years, and one American dies every hour from the disease. To accelerate the field, the Melanoma Research Alliance (MRA) was founded in 2007 and is now the largest private funder of melanoma research, having invested more than $48 million in innovative and translational research projects worldwide to date. This investment is bearing fruit in the recent transformation of the melanoma clinical landscape, which has brought new hope to patients and their families. Yet, even with new drugs on the market, much more needs to be done until melanoma is effectively addressed. MRA is part of a growing group of nonprofit disease research foundations collectively called "venture philanthropies" that are playing a powerful role in transforming the outlook for their disease by overcoming barriers that bog down progress, targeting key areas, and enhancing collaboration. MRA is leading an innovative agenda to accelerate efforts on behalf of patients. Our goal, while significant, is straightforward: to end suffering and death due to melanoma. PMID:24778128

  11. Library Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Kate

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the issue of advocacy. Standing at the vanguard of literacy, library media specialists have a unique role. However, it is time for media specialists to advocate their services in a proactive way. If library media specialists cannot, both individually and collectively, put advocacy at the forefront, then students will suffer the…

  12. Advocacy Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Karen J.; Curva, Fely

    2008-01-01

    Most state professional associations promote and fund at some level, an advocacy program. These advocacy programs usually aim to support or plead for a program, policy, or proposal. They can range from simple communication to complex strategies, from daily interactions to annual productions, and from position papers to onsite, legislative visits.…

  13. Inadvertent advocacy.

    PubMed

    Wilhere, George F

    2012-02-01

    Policy advocacy is an issue regularly debated among conservation scientists. These debates have focused on intentional policy advocacy by scientists, but advocacy can also be unintentional. I define inadvertent policy advocacy as the act of unintentionally expressing personal policy preferences or ethical judgments in a way that is nearly indistinguishable from scientific judgments. A scientist may be well intentioned and intellectually honest but still inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. There are two ways to inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. First, a scientist expresses an opinion that she or he believes is a scientific judgment but it is actually an ethical judgment or personal policy preference. Second, a scientist expresses an opinion that he or she knows is an ethical judgment or personal policy preference but inadvertently fails to effectively communicate the nature of the opinion to policy makers or the public. I illustrate inadvertent advocacy with three examples: recovery criteria in recovery plans for species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a scientific peer review of a recovery plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's definition of threatened. In each example, scientists expressed ethical judgments or policy preferences, but their value judgments were not identified as such, and, hence, their value judgments were opaque to policy makers and the public. Circumstances suggest their advocacy was inadvertent. I believe conservation scientists must become acutely aware of the line between science and policy and avoid inadvertent policy advocacy because it is professional negligence, erodes trust in scientists and science, and perpetuates an ethical vacuum that undermines the rational political discourse necessary for the evolution of society's values. The principal remedy for inadvertent advocacy is education of conservation scientists in an effort to

  14. IPPF focuses on advocacy. Advocacy for reproductive health: worldwide.

    PubMed

    Puri, S; Ketting, E

    1996-01-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation has been advocating human rights since its establishment in 1952. Since the adoption of its global strategic plan, Vision 2000, it has dealt with advocacy in a more systematic manner. Advocacy aims to gain broader support for a cause. In family planning and reproductive health, advocacy is important in counteracting conservative opposition movements. Its most effective tool is high-quality information and services for meeting people's needs. Its target groups are women's groups, youth organizations, parliamentarians, media representatives, and religious leaders. Information, education, and communication (IEC) campaigns differ from advocacy, because the latter is deliberately persuasive and campaign-oriented. An Advocacy Working Group was convened by IPPF and an Advocacy Guide was produced in 1995. Advocacy is needed for the promotion of sexual and reproductive health in the face of opposition from traditional and cultural forces represented by small, vocal, well-financed and organized groups. In 1984 they succeeded in halting funding for IPPF by the United States. This made IPPF resolute in strategic planning and setting goals as contained in Vision 2000. The goals include advocacy for family planning, the prevention of unsafe abortion, women's empowerment, the involvement of youth, the responsibility of men for family life, and the improvement of the status of the female child. The IPPF's 1985 Central Council discussed new initiatives and an Issues Manual was published. The 1989 Members' Assembly held a seminar on critical issues in advocating family planning. A further 1993 resolution urged support for advocacy initiatives. A Public Response Guide was published in 1991 and Language Guidelines were also produced for correct family planning terminology. In addition, an Interregional Training Workshop was held in London in 1995 on the use of the Advocacy Guide. Recommendations were also submitted by participants for

  15. CAEA Art Education Advocacy in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Dwaine; Tolladay, Kay

    1979-01-01

    The California Art Education Association has developed a statewide advocacy effort to counteract declines in art education brought about by financial pressures and the basic skills movement. This article describes the advocacy program's publicity efforts and commitments to work with the entire arts community in a "comprehensive arts" campaign.…

  16. Rethinking the therapeutic misconception: social justice, patient advocacy, and cancer clinical trial recruitment in the US safety net

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 20% of adult cancer patients are eligible to participate in a clinical trial, but only 2.5-9% do so. Accrual is even less for minority and medically underserved populations. As a result, critical life-saving treatments and quality of life services developed from research studies may not address their needs. This study questions the utility of the bioethical concern with therapeutic misconception (TM), a misconception that occurs when research subjects fail to distinguish between clinical research and ordinary treatment, and therefore attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures in the safety net setting. This paper provides ethnographic insight into the ways in which research is discussed and related to standard treatment. Methods In the course of two years of ethnographic fieldwork in a safety net hospital, I conducted clinic observations (n = 150 clinic days) and in-depth in-person qualitative interviews with patients (n = 37) and providers (n = 15). I used standard qualitative methods to organize and code resulting fieldnote and interview data. Results Findings suggest that TM is limited in relevance for the interdisciplinary context of cancer clinical trial recruitment in the safety net setting. Ethnographic data show the value of the discussions that happen prior to the informed consent, those that introduce the idea of participation in research. These preliminary discussions are elemental especially when recruiting underserved and vulnerable patients for clinical trial participation who are often unfamiliar with medical research and how it relates to medical care. Data also highlight the multiple actors involved in research discussions and the ethics of social justice and patient advocacy they mobilize, suggesting that class, inequality, and dependency influence the forms of ethical engagements in public hospital settings. Conclusion On the ground ethics of social justice and patient advocacy are more relevant than

  17. Effective advocacy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease: communication with insurance companies, school administrators, employers, and other health care overseers.

    PubMed

    Jaff, Jennifer C; Arnold, Janis; Bousvaros, Athos

    2006-08-01

    In addition to their physical challenges, children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) living in the United States face a number of administrative and regulatory hurdles that affect their quality of life. This article, written by a physician, attorney/patient advocate, and social worker, discusses a number of these challenges and describes how the provider can help his or her patient overcome them. Specifically, the article discusses 4 areas in detail: appeals of denials of coverage from insurance companies and third party payors; assisting children with IBD with classroom and school accommodations; assisting uninsured children in obtaining Social Security benefits; and aiding a parent to care for their child using the Family and Medical Leave Act. Although this article has a pediatric focus, adults have similar advocacy needs. Case examples and sample letters to third-party payors, schools, and employers are included in this article. PMID:16917236

  18. Advocacy for Art Education: Beyond Tee-Shirts and Bumper Stickers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobick, Bryna; DiCindio, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    Advocacy is not new to art education. Over the years, Goldfarb (1979), Hodsoll (1985), and Erickson and Young (1996) have written about the importance of arts advocacy, but the concept of advocacy has evolved with the times. For example, in the 1970s, arts advocacy was described as a "movement" and brought together art educators, administrators,…

  19. Multimodal Movement Prediction - Towards an Individual Assistance of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Tabie, Marc; Seeland, Anett

    2014-01-01

    Assistive devices, like exoskeletons or orthoses, often make use of physiological data that allow the detection or prediction of movement onset. Movement onset can be detected at the executing site, the skeletal muscles, as by means of electromyography. Movement intention can be detected by the analysis of brain activity, recorded by, e.g., electroencephalography, or in the behavior of the subject by, e.g., eye movement analysis. These different approaches can be used depending on the kind of neuromuscular disorder, state of therapy or assistive device. In this work we conducted experiments with healthy subjects while performing self-initiated and self-paced arm movements. While other studies showed that multimodal signal analysis can improve the performance of predictions, we show that a sensible combination of electroencephalographic and electromyographic data can potentially improve the adaptability of assistive technical devices with respect to the individual demands of, e.g., early and late stages in rehabilitation therapy. In earlier stages for patients with weak muscle or motor related brain activity it is important to achieve high positive detection rates to support self-initiated movements. To detect most movement intentions from electroencephalographic or electromyographic data motivates a patient and can enhance her/his progress in rehabilitation. In a later stage for patients with stronger muscle or brain activity, reliable movement prediction is more important to encourage patients to behave more accurately and to invest more effort in the task. Further, the false detection rate needs to be reduced. We propose that both types of physiological data can be used in an and combination, where both signals must be detected to drive a movement. By this approach the behavior of the patient during later therapy can be controlled better and false positive detections, which can be very annoying for patients who are further advanced in rehabilitation, can be

  20. Pharmaceuticals and the consumer movement: the ambivalences of 'patient power'.

    PubMed

    Lofgren, Hans

    2004-11-01

    Consumer and patient advocacy groups (PAGs) are important participants in the politics of pharmaceuticals. Yet very little is known about the precise nature and extent of their influence. It is argued in this article that PAGs fulfil a mixed role within the health system at national and transnational levels, and that they are at times fully incorporated into economic and political power structures. Their frequent dependence on pharma industry funding is of particular concern. PAGs provide a means of direct industry interaction with the final customer, thereby partially bypassing and putting additional pressure on doctors and regulators. The article presents the case for research to establish a better empirical base for discussions about the role of PAGs within contemporary neo-liberal governance structures. PMID:15527403

  1. (R)evolution: toward a new paradigm of policy and patient advocacy for expanded access to experimental treatments.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In life-threatening conditions such as cancer and rare diseases, where there is no cure and no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapy, patients sometimes seek access to an unapproved, experimental therapy through expanded access programs as their last, best hope for treatment to save their lives. Since the 1980s, the policies and the practice of expanded access have evolved, but a common challenge remains that there is no obligation, and often little incentive, for manufacturers to offer expanded access programs, especially for individual patients. In recent years, online campaigns seeking access to an experimental therapy have become more common, paralleling growth in and representing an intersection of social media, digital health, and patient advocacy.Mackey and Schoenfeld have examined the evolution of expanded access policy, practice, and trends, as well as case studies of online campaigns to access experimental therapies, to arrive at several recommendations for the future of expanded access. This commentary puts their paper in context, examines their recommendations, and suggests further reforms.Please see related article: https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0568-8. PMID:26926908

  2. Extra patient movement during mammographic imaging: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Brettle, D; Howard, D; Kelly, J; Millington, S; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if movement external to the patient occurring during mammography may be a source of image blur. Methods: Four mammography machines with eight flexible and eight fixed paddles were evaluated. In the first stage, movement at the paddle was measured mechanically using two calibrated linear potentiometers. A deformable breast phantom was used to mimic a female breast. For each paddle, the movement in millimetres and change in compression force in Newton was recorded at 0.5- and 1-s intervals, respectively, for 40 s with the phantom in an initially compressed state under a load of 80 N. In the second stage, clinical audit on 28 females was conducted on one mammography machine with the 18 × 24- and 24 × 29-cm flexible paddles. Results: Movement at the paddle followed an exponential decay with a settling period of approximately 40 s. The compression force readings for both fixed and flexible paddles decreased exponentially with time, while fixed paddles had a larger drop in compression force than did flexible paddles. There is a linear relationship between movement at the paddle and change in compression force. Conclusion: Movement measured at the paddle during an exposure can be represented by a second order system. The amount of extra patient movement during the actual exposure can be estimated using the linear relationship between movement at the paddle and the change in compression force. Advances in knowledge: This research provides a possible explanation to mammography image blurring caused by extra patient movement and proposes a theoretical model to analyse the movement. PMID:25348098

  3. Analysis of patient movement during 3D USCT data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiter, N. V.; Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Gemmeke, H.

    2016-04-01

    In our first clinical study with a full 3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) system patient data was acquired in eight minutes for one breast. In this paper the patient movement during the acquisition was analyzed quantitatively and as far as possible corrected in the resulting images. The movement was tracked in ten successive reflectivity reconstructions of full breast volumes acquired during 10 s intervals at different aperture positions, which were separated by 41 s intervals. The mean distance between initial and final position was 2.2 mm (standard deviation (STD) +/- 0.9 mm, max. 4.1 mm, min. 0.8 mm) and the average sum of all moved distances was 4.9 mm (STD +/- 1.9 mm, max. 8.8 mm, min. 2.7 mm). The tracked movement was corrected by summing successive images, which were transformed according to the detected movement. The contrast of these images increased and additional image content became visible.

  4. Voluntary control of arm movement in athetotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Peter D.

    1974-01-01

    Visual tracking tests have been employed to provide a quantitative description of voluntary control of arm movement in a group of patients suffering from athetoid cerebral palsy. Voluntary control was impaired in all patients in a characteristic manner. Maximum velocity and acceleration of arm movement were reduced to about 30-50% of their values in normal subjects and the time lag of the response to a visual stimulus was two or three times greater than in normals. Tracking transmission characteristics indicated a degree of underdamping which was not presnet in normal or spastic patients. This underdamping could be responsible for a low frequency (0·3-0·6 Hz) transient oscillation in elbow-angle movements associated with sudden voluntary movement. The maximum frequency at which patients could produce a coherent tracking response was only 50% of that in normal subjects and the relationship between the electromyogram and muscle contraction indicated that the mechanical load on the biceps muscle was abnormal, possibly due to increased stiffness of joint movement caused by involuntary activity in agonist and antagonist muscles acting across the joint. Images PMID:4362243

  5. Hemiballistic movements in a newly HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Magano, Rita; Jorge, Rita; Prata, Margarida; Ventura, Maria Conceição; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Infections of central nervous system (CNS) include a broad group of conditions and pose a particular challenge to physicians, especially in immunocompromised individuals. This case refers to a 26-year-old male patient with a history of smoked hashish and drug abuse admitted to the infectious disease department with hemiballismus of left hemibody and a positive HIV serologic test. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study showed lesions at lower left and right cerebellar hemisphere, one of them thalamus - mesencephalic suggesting an opportunistic infection or an HIV associated encephalopathy. Lumbar puncture, brain biopsy and successive neuroimaging were not conclusive for one disease and despite the use of directed therapy for cerebral toxoplasmosis, meningeal tuberculosis, anti-retrovirals and sedative medication, after over 6 weeks of hospitalization pallidotomy was performed. After 5 months of oral and surgical treatment the patient showed clinical, immunological and radiological recovery. PMID:27583209

  6. Evaluation of Ocular Movements in Patients with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagge, Aldo; Cavanna, Margherita; Traverso, Carlo Enrico; Iester, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the relationship between dyslexia and eye movements and to assess whether this method can be added to the workup of dyslexic patients. The sample was comprised of 11 children with a diagnosis of dyslexia and 11 normal between 8 and 13 years of age. All subjects underwent orthoptic evaluation, ophthalmological…

  7. [Self-Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue presents personal perspectives and approaches to self-advocacy from individuals who are deaf-blind. Individual articles are: (1) "Self-Advocacy: Attaining Personal Stature" by Michelle J. Smithdas; (2) "The American Association of the Deaf-Blind: A National Consumer Advocacy Organization" by Jeffrey S. Bohrman; (3) a description…

  8. Increased sexual arousal in patients with movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Moro, Adriana; Moscovich, Mariana; Munhoz, Renato P

    2016-04-01

    Increased of sexual arousal (ISA) has been described in different neurological diseases. The purpose of this study was present a case series of ISA in patients with movement disorders. Method Fifteen patients with different forms of movement disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette´s syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3), were evaluated in the Movement Disorders Unit of the Federal University of Paraná. Results Among Parkinson's disease patients there were seven cases with different forms of ISA due to dopaminergic agonist use, levodopa abuse, and deep brain stimulation (DBS). In the group with hyperkinetic disorders, two patients with Huntington's disease, two with Tourette's syndrome, and four with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 presented with ISA. Conclusions ISA in this group of patients had different etiologies, predominantly related to dopaminergic treatment or DBS in Parkinson's disease, part of the background clinical picture in Huntington's disease and Tourette's syndrome, and probably associated with cultural aspects in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. PMID:27097003

  9. Effects of object size on unimanual and bimanual movements in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Mei; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Hsu, Hsiao-Man; Lin, Keh-Chung; Ma, Hui-Ing

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia affects not only mental function but also movement. We compared the movement of patients with mild schizophrenia and healthy control participants during a bimanual assembly task and examined whether changes in object size affected unimanual and bimanual movements. Fifteen patients with schizophrenia and 15 age- and gender-matched control participants were instructed to bimanually reach for and assemble objects. We manipulated the object size for the left hand (large vs. small) and measured movement time, peak velocity, and bimanual synchronization to represent movement speed, forcefulness, and bimanual coordination. Patients with schizophrenia showed slower and less forceful unimanual movements and less coordinated bimanual movements than control participants. Increasing the object size elicited faster and more forceful unimanual movements and more coordinated bimanual movements in patients. The results suggest the need for movement rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia and the possibility of manipulating object size to optimize patients' movements. These results benefit the practice of evidence-based therapy. PMID:24581410

  10. The Big Picture of Advocacy: Counselor, Heal Society and Thyself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roysircar, Gargi

    2009-01-01

    This article, motivational in purpose, encourages counselors to be engaged in the growing movement for social justice advocacy in counseling. Analyses of a macrolevel framework of advocacy extend to microlevel operations of recruitment, sociopolitical education, diversity management, and self-care of counselor-advocates. Case studies and exemplars…

  11. What Is Self-Advocacy? NRC Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mair

    2010-01-01

    Self-advocacy is about independent groups of people with disabilities working together for justice by helping each other take charge of their lives and fight discrimination. The seeds of the self-advocacy movement go back to 1968 when a Swedish parent's organization held a meeting for people with developmental disabilities. Today, the…

  12. Advocacy: exploring the concept.

    PubMed

    Mardell, A

    1996-10-01

    The concept of the nurse as the patient's advocate is one that has become popular in the last fifteen years or so in both North America and the United Kingdom, having its basis in nursing theory. The UKCC first embraced the concept, stating in the Code of Professional Conduct that nurses must; 'act always in such a manner so as to promote and safeguard the interests and well being of patients and clients'. This is a laudable principle and one that nurses cannot dispute as there are many members of our society who are weak and vulnerable and may be unable to speak up for themselves. But are nurses always in a position to be an advocate for their patients? As the nature of nursing is so diverse then the nature of advocacy will be different in the multifarious settings in which nurses practise. Can theatre nurses ever be in a position to act as an advocate for a patient who is often anaesthetised? What precisely is advocacy and is the Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of 'one who pleads for another' appropriate in the nursing context? Then there is the position of nurses in the healthcare organisation in which they practise. In advocating for their patients, nurses may find they are pleading a case for a patient, or a group of patients, that could bring the nurse into conflict with their medical colleagues or with the management of the organisation by whom they are employed. Additionally, they may not posses the skills and knowledge to advocate effectively under such circumstances. Nursing is littered with the casualties of such conflicts over the years, the most publicised of whom, in the UK, was probably Graham Pink who lost his job as a charge nurse after drawing public attention to what he considered to be an unacceptable standard of care in the hospital in which he worked. PMID:8974516

  13. Building Trust: The History and Ongoing Relationships Amongst DSD Clinicians, Researchers, and Patient Advocacy Groups.

    PubMed

    Lossie, A C; Green, J

    2015-05-01

    Individuals born with differences or disorders of sex development (DSD) have been marginalized by society and the health care system. Standards of care in the mid-20(th) century were based on fixing the child with a DSD, using hormonal and surgical interventions; these treatments and the diagnoses were almost never disclosed to the child, and sometimes they were not disclosed to the parents. This led to secrecy, shame, and stigma. When these children became adults and demanded access to their medical records, the realization of the depth of secrecy led to the formation of activism groups that shook the medical community. Despite precarious beginnings, advocates, health care professionals, and researchers were able to elicit changes in the standard of care. The 2006 Consensus Statement on Management of Intersex Disorders called for a multidisciplinary approach to care and questioned the evidence for many of the standard procedures. Standard of care moved from a concealment model to a patient-centered paradigm, and funding agencies put resources into determining the future paths of research on DSD. Recognition of the need to address patient priorities led to changing international standards for including patients in research design. Some challenges that remain include: the findings from the Institute of Medicine that sexual and gender minorities experience poor health outcomes; establishing trust across all parties; developing a common language and creating venues where individuals can participate in dialogue that addresses personal experiences, research design, clinical practices and intervention strategies. PMID:25868122

  14. Attempted rapid elbow flexion movements in patients with athetosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Alvarez, N

    1983-01-01

    Voluntary rapid elbow flexion movements were studied in 14 patients with athetosis on the basis of cerebral palsy. When the movement was attempted with one arm, other muscles inappropriate for the task, such as muscles in the opposite limb, were also activated. EMG activity of the biceps and triceps was analysed in detail, and the patterns seen in the different patients were divided into six groups: (1) The normal "ballistic" triphasic pattern, with bursts of normal duration, alternating in biceps and triceps, but the triceps might be activated first, causing the limb to extend rather than flex, (2) The triphasic pattern, with bursts of long duration, (3) Repetitive cycles of the triphasic pattern with particularly long antagonist bursts, apparently limiting the movement in each cycle, (4) Long bursts synchronous in agonist and antagonist muscles, (5) Continuous activity of the agonist, with reduction in activity of the antagonist, (6) Failure to be able to do the task. The pathophysiology of athetosis is that voluntary movement is characterised by excessive muscular activity, most prominently in inappropriate muscles, both extraneous to the task and directly antagonistic. PMID:6886719

  15. Safe patient handling and movement in a pediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Motacki, Kathleen; Motacki, Lisa Marie

    2009-01-01

    Although evidence-based practice exists to apply the principles of safe patient handling and movement (SPHM) to prevent nursing musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace, nurses and nursing staff continue to use "body mechanics" when moving, lifting, and transferring patients. In this day of a nursing shortage, one that will continue to worsen, valued professionals must remain on the job and free from preventable, work-related injuries. As states enact laws requiring health care facilities to develop and institute SPHM programs, hospitals will be held to task to produce SPHM policies, procedures, plans, and protocols in their institutions. PMID:19785301

  16. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  17. Abnormal head movement in a patient with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Singh, Maneesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The bobble-head doll syndrome is characterised by abnormal head movements. These head movements are usually 'yes-yes' (up and down) type; rarely, head movements are 'no-no' (side-to-side) type. Commonly described causes of the bobble-head doll syndrome include third ventricular tumours, suprasellar arachnoid cysts, aqueductal stenosis and other lesions in the region of the third ventricle of the brain. We report a case of tuberculous meningitis with hydrocephalus; in this patient bobble-head doll syndrome developed following external ventricular drainage. In our patient, placement of intraventricular drain led to massive dilatation of the frontal horn of the left lateral ventricle because of blocked foramina of Monro on the left side. The bobble-head doll syndrome, presumably, developed because of the pressure effect of the dilated third ventricle on the dorsomedial nucleus of the thalamus, red nucleus and dentatorubrothalamic pathways. We think that distortion of the third ventricle was responsible for the impairment of the functions of all these structures. PMID:23035162

  18. A History of Music Education Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a history of advocacy in music education discussing when formal advocacy started as well as advocacy with government agencies, the state level, and other types of advocacy. Includes a bibliography of resources related to music advocacy. (CMK)

  19. Will my job be safe if I defend my patients? When patient advocacy collides with employment law.

    PubMed

    Manthous, Constantine A; Moncrieff, Abigail R

    2013-10-01

    Physicians are moving increasingly from self-employed, private practices to at-will employment relationships. This historic change in the organizational administration of medical services is likely to accelerate as the Affordable Care Act is implemented and as accountable care organizations permeate the medical marketplace. Physicians vow an ascendant oath to safeguard patients' welfare, but as they become employees, they may sign legal contracts that also oblige obedience to the institutions that hire them. What happens when an employer makes a decision that is not in the best interests of patients and the physicians fulfill their Hippocratic obligation to voice dissent on their patients' behalf rather than abiding by their contractual obligation to obey their employer? This article explores the philosophical and legal ramifications of this potential collision of obligations to patients and to employers. PMID:24081344

  20. Evaluation of ocular movements in patients with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Vagge, Aldo; Cavanna, Margherita; Traverso, Carlo Enrico; Iester, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the relationship between dyslexia and eye movements and to assess whether this method can be added to the workup of dyslexic patients. The sample was comprised of 11 children with a diagnosis of dyslexia and 11 normal between 8 and 13 years of age. All subjects underwent orthoptic evaluation, ophthalmological examinations, and eye movement analysis, specifically, stability analysis on fixating a still target, tracking saccades, analysis of fixation pauses, speed reading, saccades, and regressions through the reading of a text. Stability analysis on fixating a still target showed a significant (p < 0.001) difference between the two groups showing an increased amount of loss of fixation among dyslexic subjects (5.36 ± 2.5 s and 0.82 ± 2.1, respectively). Tracking saccades (left and right horizontal axis) did not show a significant difference. When reading parameters were looked into (number of saccades, number of regressions, reading time through the reading of a text), a significant (p < 0.001) difference was found between the groups. This study supports the belief that the alteration of eye movement does not depend on oculo-motor dysfunction but is secondary to a defect in the visual processing of linguistic material. Inclusion of assessment of this defect might prove beneficial in determining the presence of dyslexia in young children at a younger age, and an earlier intervention could be initiated. PMID:25804764

  1. [Mirror movements observed in patients skilled in playing the piano--symptomatological study].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Sugita, K; Kawamura, M; Fukui, T; Shiota, J

    1995-04-01

    We investigated mirror movements observed in two patients skilled in playing the piano and compared these symptoms with those reported in patients associated with frontal lobe, corpus callosum or cervical cord lesion. We found the following common features in our two patients: 1) mirror movements were observed during skilled finger movements such as playing the piano, 2) these were observed in distal parts of the bilateral upper extremities, 3) contralateral imitative associated movements were seen concomitantly, 4) frontal lobe symptoms and callosal disconnection syndrome were not seen, 5) both patients recalled having mirror movements in their infancy, and one had family history. These characteristics of mirror movements in our patients were similar to those in patients associated with cervical cord lesion, but were different from those in patients associated with frontal lobe or corpus callosum lesion. It is suggested that abnormal pathways in the pyramidal tract or cervical cord lesion elicited mirror movements in our patients. PMID:7614761

  2. Community health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Loue, Sana

    2006-01-01

    Competing health needs of diverse populations and ever shrinking resources available to support these needs often serve as the impetus for the initiation of advocacy efforts to improve community health. However, perceptions of what constitutes a community differ, as do approaches to advocacy itself. This glossary addresses five key questions: (1) What is advocacy?; (2) What is meant by community?; (3) What are the different approaches to community health advocacy?; (4) How are priorities established in the face of competing health advocacy goals?; (5) How can community health advocacy efforts be evaluated?; and (6) What challenges may be encountered in advocating for community health? Each of these issues could serve as the basis for a text on that subject alone. Accordingly, this article is not meant to be comprehensive text on these issues but is, instead, intended to highlight key foundational issues. And, although advocacy efforts can be conducted by individuals, this article focuses specifically on advocacy efforts of communities, however they may be defined and characterised. PMID:16698972

  3. Improving Music Education Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Music education has always required advocacy to solidify its place in the school curriculum. Music teachers are increasingly called on to justify their existence and importance in the schools, and yet, are often unprepared to advocate on their own behalf without the use of advocacy materials that are created on the basis of questionable research,…

  4. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  5. Handbook for Rehabilitation Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rehabilitation Association, Alexandria, VA.

    This handbook is intended to help advocates for persons with disabilities organize for advocacy, build effective coalitions, frame key issues, package critical information, and use the media to advance the cause. Individual sections address the following topics: how to change public policy; myths about advocacy; what makes politicians tick;…

  6. Smooth pursuit eye movements in patients with macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shanidze, Natela; Fusco, Giovanni; Potapchuk, Elena; Heinen, Stephen; Verghese, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are no quantitative studies of smooth pursuit, a behavior attributed to the fovea, in individuals with macular degeneration (MD). We hypothesize that pursuit in MD patients depends on the relative positions of the scotoma and target trajectory. We tested this hypothesis with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), which allows for direct visualization of the target on the damaged retina. Monocular microperimetry and eye movements were assessed in eleven individuals with differing degrees of MD. Observers were asked to visually track a 1.7° target that moved in one of eight radial directions at 5°/s–6°/s. Consistent with our hypothesis, pursuit metrics depended on whether the target moved into or out of scotoma. Pursuit gains decreased with increasing scotoma extent in the target's heading direction (p = 0.017). Latencies were higher when the scotoma was present along the target trajectory (in either starting or heading directions, p < 0.001). Furthermore, an analysis of retinal position shows that targets fell on the fixational locus nearly 50% of the time. The results suggest that MD patients are capable of smooth pursuit eye movements, but are limited by target trajectory and scotoma characteristics. PMID:26830707

  7. The voice of Florence Nightingale on advocacy.

    PubMed

    Selanders, Louise C; Crane, Patrick C

    2012-01-01

    Modern nursing is complex, ever changing, and multi focused. Since the time of Florence Nightingale, however, the goal of nursing has remained unchanged, namely to provide a safe and caring environment that promotes patient health and well being. Effective use of an interpersonal tool, such as advocacy, enhances the care-giving environment. Nightingale used advocacy early and often in the development of modern nursing. By reading her many letters and publications that have survived, it is possible to identify her professional goals and techniques. Specifically, Nightingale valued egalitarian human rights and developed leadership principles and practices that provide useful advocacy techniques for nurses practicing in the 21st century. In this article we will review the accomplishments of Florence Nightingale, discuss advocacy in nursing and show how Nightingale used advocacy through promoting both egalitarian human rights and leadership activities. We will conclude by exploring how Nightingale's advocacy is as relevant for the 21st century as it was for the 19th century. PMID:22320877

  8. Going "social" to access experimental and potentially life-saving treatment: an assessment of the policy and online patient advocacy environment for expanded access.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Schoenfeld, Virginia J

    2016-01-01

    Social media is fundamentally altering how we access health information and make decisions about medical treatment, including for terminally ill patients. This specifically includes the growing phenomenon of patients who use online petitions and social media campaigns in an attempt to gain access to experimental drugs through expanded access pathways. Importantly, controversy surrounding expanded access and "compassionate use" involves several disparate stakeholders, including patients, manufacturers, policymakers, and regulatory agencies-all with competing interests and priorities, leading to confusion, frustration, and ultimately advocacy. In order to explore this issue in detail, this correspondence article first conducts a literature review to describe how the expanded access policy and regulatory environment in the United States has evolved over time and how it currently impacts access to experimental drugs. We then conducted structured web searches to identify patient use of online petitions and social media campaigns aimed at compelling access to experimental drugs. This was carried out in order to characterize the types of communication strategies utilized, the diseases and drugs subject to expanded access petitions, and the prevalent themes associated with this form of "digital" patient advocacy. We find that patients and their families experience mixed results, but still gravitate towards the use of online campaigns out of desperation, lack of reliable information about treatment access options, and in direct response to limitations of the current fragmented structure of expanded access regulation and policy currently in place. In response, we discuss potential policy reforms to improve expanded access processes, including advocating greater transparency for expanded access programs, exploring use of targeted economic incentives for manufacturers, and developing systems to facilitate patient information about existing treatment options. This includes

  9. Advocacy and technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  10. Continuous monitoring of turning in patients with movement disability.

    PubMed

    El-Gohary, Mahmoud; Pearson, Sean; McNames, James; Mancini, Martina; Horak, Fay; Mellone, Sabato; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Difficulty with turning is a major contributor to mobility disability and falls in people with movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Turning often results in freezing and/or falling in patients with PD. However, asking a patient to execute a turn in the clinic often does not reveal their impairments. Continuous monitoring of turning with wearable sensors during spontaneous daily activities may help clinicians and patients determine who is at risk of falls and could benefit from preventative interventions. In this study, we show that continuous monitoring of natural turning with wearable sensors during daily activities inside and outside the home is feasible for people with PD and elderly people. We developed an algorithm to detect and characterize turns during gait, using wearable inertial sensors. First, we validate the turning algorithm in the laboratory against a Motion Analysis system and against a video analysis of 21 PD patients and 19 control (CT) subjects wearing an inertial sensor on the pelvis. Compared to Motion Analysis and video, the algorithm maintained a sensitivity of 0.90 and 0.76 and a specificity of 0.75 and 0.65, respectively. Second, we apply the turning algorithm to data collected in the home from 12 PD and 18 CT subjects. The algorithm successfully detects turn characteristics, and the results show that, compared to controls, PD subjects tend to take shorter turns with smaller turn angles and more steps. Furthermore, PD subjects show more variability in all turn metrics throughout the day and the week. PMID:24379043

  11. Event-related beta EEG-changes during passive and attempted foot movements in paraplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Müller-Putz, Gernot R; Zimmermann, Doris; Graimann, Bernhard; Nestinger, Kurt; Korisek, Gerd; Pfurtscheller, Gert

    2007-03-16

    A number of electroencephalographic (EEG) studies report on motor event-related desynchronization and synchronization (ERD/ERS) in the beta band, i.e. a decrease and increase of spectral amplitudes of central beta rhythms in the range from 13 to 35 Hz. Following an ERD that occurs shortly before and during the movement, bursts of beta oscillations (beta ERS) appear within a 1-s interval after movement offset. Such a post-movement beta ERS has been reported after voluntary hand movements, passive movements, movement imagination, and also after movements induced by functional electrical stimulation. The present study compares ERD/ERS patterns in paraplegic patients (suffering from a complete spinal cord injury) and healthy subjects during attempted (active) and passive foot movements. The aim of this work is to address the question, whether patients do have the same focal beta ERD/ERS pattern during attempted foot movement as healthy subjects do. The results showed midcentral-focused beta ERD/ERS patterns during passive, active, and imagined foot movements in healthy subjects. This is in contrast to a diffuse and broad distributed ERD/ERS pattern during attempted foot movements in patients. Only one patient showed a similar ERD/ERS pattern. Furthermore, no significant ERD/ERS patterns during passive foot movement in the group of the paraplegics could be found. PMID:17229403

  12. Ictal SPECT in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Geert; Bitterlich, Marion; Kuwert, Torsten; Ritt, Philipp; Stefan, Hermann

    2015-05-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is a rapid eye movement parasomnia clinically characterized by acting out dreams due to disinhibition of muscle tone in rapid eye movement sleep. Up to 80-90% of the patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder develop neurodegenerative disorders within 10-15 years after symptom onset. The disorder is reported in 45-60% of all narcoleptic patients. Whether rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is also a predictor for neurodegeneration in narcolepsy is not known. Although the pathophysiology causing the disinhibition of muscle tone in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder has been studied extensively in animals, little is known about the mechanisms in humans. Most of the human data are from imaging or post-mortem studies. Recent studies show altered functional connectivity between substantia nigra and striatum in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We were interested to study which regions are activated in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder during actual episodes by performing ictal single photon emission tomography. We studied one patient with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, one with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, and two patients with narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. All patients underwent extended video polysomnography. The tracer was injected after at least 10 s of consecutive rapid eye movement sleep and 10 s of disinhibited muscle tone accompanied by movements registered by an experienced sleep technician. Ictal single photon emission tomography displayed the same activation in the bilateral premotor areas, the interhemispheric cleft, the periaqueductal area, the dorsal and ventral pons and the anterior lobe of the cerebellum in all patients. Our study shows that in patients with Parkinson's disease and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-in contrast to wakefulness

  13. Impact of the increased adoption of prenatal cfDNA screening on non-profit patient advocacy organizations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Stephanie; Kaposy, Christopher; Miller, Victoria J; Allyse, Megan; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Michie, Marsha

    2016-08-01

    The 'Stakeholder Perspectives on Noninvasive Prenatal Genetic Screening' Symposium was held in conjunction with the 2015 annual meeting of the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis. During the day-long meeting, a panel of patient advocacy group (PAG) representatives discussed concerns and challenges raised by prenatal cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening, which has resulted in larger demands upon PAGs from concerned patients receiving prenatal cfDNA screening results. Prominent concerns included confusion about the accuracy of cfDNA screening and a lack of patient education resources about genetic conditions included in cfDNA screens. Some of the challenges faced by PAGs included funding limitations, lack of consistently implemented standards of care and oversight, diverse perspectives among PAGs and questions about neutrality, and lack of access to training and genetic counselors. PAG representatives also put forward suggestions for addressing these challenges, including improving educational and PAG funding and increasing collaboration between PAGs and the medical community. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27244688

  14. Social Justice Advocacy: Community Collaboration and Systems Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.; Paylo, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the community collaboration and systems advocacy domains of the ACA (American Counseling Association) Advocacy Competencies (J. A. Lewis, M. S. Arnold, R. House, & R. L. Toporek, 2002). A case illustration is presented, and the 8 Advocacy Competencies within each domain are applied to the case study.

  15. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  16. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  17. Head movements during conversational speech in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bert; Khana, Priya; DiMambro, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Background: Motor abnormalities are frequently described in schizophrenia, and work by Altorfer and colleagues suggests that measuring head movements during conversational speech shows differences at the level of the individual. We wished to see whether their findings, conducted using computer analysis of video obtained in motion capture suites, could be replicated using compact, portable movement sensors, in a case–control study comparing the mean amplitude of head movements during general conversation. Methods: A referred sample of inpatients and outpatients with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia was identified from case note information. Movement sensors, mounted in a baseball cap worn by subjects, transmitted data via Bluetooth to a laptop, which simultaneously captured audio to identify who was speaking. Subjects also completed a series of rating scales. Results: Data from the final 11 cases and 11 controls demonstrated a substantial group difference in mean amplitude of head movement velocity during speech (p < 0.0001), although this was not significant at the level of the individual. Conclusions: Movement sensors proved well suited to capturing head movements, demonstrating a large effect size in subjects with schizophrenia. PMID:23983990

  18. Advocacy communication, vaccines and the role of scientific societies.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Odone, A

    2015-01-01

    In 1986 the Ottawa Charter underlined the importance of advocacy in health. This article analyzes the role of advocacy in Public Health making the case of immunization, whose coverage rates are decreasing in many countries. An effective advocacy action could counteract the growing phenomenon of the vaccine hesitancy within both the general population and an increasing share of healthcare providers as well as contrast antivax movements' action. We identify who are the advocates focusing on Italy and on the crucial role of scientific societies which share the responsibility of making the latest scientific evidence and most effective infectious diseases' control strategies available to health policy makers. The Italian Society of Hygiene (SItI) has been actively engaged for several years in a number of initiatives of advocacy communication and vaccines including research, training, media exposure and a dedicated website portal (vaccinarSì). PMID:26661915

  19. Public health and media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns. PMID:24328989

  20. In-house auto cutoff sensor device for radiotherapy machine to monitor patient movements.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, S; Ramakrishnan, V

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment method for cancers. During radiation treatment, a patient must be in the same position from the start to the end of radiation treatment. Patient movements are usually monitored by the radiation technologists through the closed circuit television (CCTV) during treatment. If the patient makes a small movement, it is difficult to be noticed by them. In the present work, a simple patient movement monitoring device (PMMD) is fabricated to monitor the patient movement. It uses an electronic sensing device. It continuously monitors the patient's position while the radiation treatment is in process. The device has been retrospectively tested on 86 patients whose movement and distance were measured. The results show that 24 patients moved 1 cm to 2.5 cm from their initial position during the external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Hence, the device can potentially be used to control and monitor patient movement during EBRT. In addition, an audible alarm situated at the control panel of the treatment room is provided with this device to alert the radiation technologists. It is an inexpensive, compact device which can be used in any radiotherapy machine. It can prevent patients from being treated in a wrong position and therefore improve the quality of the radiation treatment. PMID:18716594

  1. Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Spinal Cord Stimulation Paralyzed Patients Regain Voluntary Movement Past Issues / ... Groundbreaking NIH study spurs hope for those with spinal cord injury Flex a muscle, any muscle? Certainly, it's ...

  2. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Sean M.; Close, Kelly L.; Liu, Nancy F.; Hood, Korey K.; Anderson, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes. PMID:26194156

  3. Effect of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement technique on gait function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Lim; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effectiveness of Mulligan’s mobilization with movement (MWM) technique on spatiotemporal variables of gait in individuals who had a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: Mulligan’s mobilization with movement group (n=12) and “weight-bearing with placebo” mobilization with movement group (n=12). The subjects in the mobilization with movement group performed 5 sets of 10 glides a day, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The mobilization with movement technique comprised grade III movements that involved gliding and resting. The control group subjects performed lunges in the same conditions as those of the experimental group. Gait function was measured in terms of spatiotemporal parameters to determine the effect of mobilization with movement. [Results] The mobilization with movement group showed significant improvements in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-support time, and step length of the affected side, and step length and stride length of the non-affected side. Overall, the mobilization with movement group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in terms of velocity, cadence, and single-support time of the affected side. [Conclusion] Mobilization with movement can be used to improve the gait function of patients recovering from stroke.

  4. Quantitative measurements of eye movements in a patient with Tullio phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Rottach, K G; von Maydell, R D; DiScenna, A O; Zivotofsky, A Z; Averbuch-Heller, L; Leigh, R J

    1996-01-01

    The Tullio phenomenon consists of vestibular symptoms on exposure to high-intensity acoustic stimuli, reflecting pathological stimulation of semicircular canals or otoliths. We report a patient with posttraumatic Tullio phenomenon to illustrate how precise measurement of eye movements during auditory stimulation, using the magnetic search coil technique, may characterize movements that are not clinically apparent or easily measured by other means. Such measurements in patients with surgically verified lesions may further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:8839822

  5. 360 Degree advocacy: a model for high impact advocacy in a rapidly changing healthcare marketplace.

    PubMed

    Postal, Karen S; Wynkoop, Timothy F; Caillouet, Beth; Most, Randi; Roebuck-Spencer, Tresa; Westerveld, Michael; Puente, Antonio; Pliskin, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    In an era of rapid changes in the healthcare marketplace the specialty of clinical neuropsychology faces a substantial increase in advocacy challenges. These include maintaining both access to services and a favorable practice climate as new healthcare structures and payment models evolve. The issue of regional variability complicates an effective response to these challenges from national professional organizations. One response to the challenge of regional variability is to strengthen our national organizations' capacity to engage in coordinated and effective advocacy, and to partner with state and regional neuro/psychological associations. The Inter-Organizational Practice Committee (IOPC) was formed in 2012 to meet this need. The IOPC has developed a model of 360 Degree Advocacy that coordinates local, regional, and national resources for high-impact, efficient advocacy. This paper describes the 360 Degree Advocacy model, and walks readers through an example of the model in action, successfully responding to a threat to patient access and practice climate with a regional Medicare carrier. PMID:24528167

  6. Information Politics, Transnational Advocacy, and Education for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrath, Bronwen

    2015-01-01

    This article explores transnational activism within Education for All (EFA), looking specifically at the strategic use of information and research by transnational advocacy organizations. Through a comparative case-study examination of two prominent civil society organizations within the EFA movement--the Asia South Pacific Association for Basic…

  7. The Role of Social Networks, Medical-Legal Climate, and Patient Advocacy on Surgical Options: A New Era.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Erin E; Bortoletto, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    The dissemination of information online and resultant public discourse through social media and other online channels has influenced the practice of medicine in dramatic ways. Physicians have historically worked to develop new techniques and devices for the benefit of their patients. It is only a more recent phenomenon, however, that these tools are either removed or their use is curtailed largely driven by anecdotal reports; passionate, vocal, often media-savvy advocates; and plaintiff attorneys. The use of power morcellation, hysteroscopic tubal sterilization, and mesh in urogynecologic procedures all have been victims of these societal pressures. It is important for health care professionals to be involved in the debate to ensure that public outcry does not unduly influence what we, as clinicians, are able to safely offer our patients. By being better advocates for our field, our instruments, and our patients, we can ensure medical decision-making is driven by good science and not public fervor. PMID:26959205

  8. Effectiveness of an Inpatient Movement Disorders Program for Patients with Atypical Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Hohler, Anna D.; Tsao, Jyeming M.; Katz, Douglas I.; DiPiero, T. Joy; Hehl, Christina L.; Leonard, Alissa; Allen, Valerie; Gardner, Maura; Phenix, Heidi; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Ellis, Terry

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism, who typically respond poorly to pharmacologic intervention and are challenging to rehabilitate as outpatients. Ninety-one patients with atypical parkinsonism participated in an inpatient movement disorders program. Patients received physical, occupational, and speech therapy for 3 hours/day, 5 to 7 days/week, and pharmacologic adjustments based on daily observation and data. Differences between admission and discharge scores were analyzed for the functional independence measure (FIM), timed up and go test (TUG), two-minute walk test (TMW), Berg balance scale (BBS) and finger tapping test (FT), and all showed significant improvement on discharge (P > .001). Clinically significant improvements in total FIM score were evident in 74% of the patients. Results were similar for ten patients whose medications were not adjusted. Patients with atypical parkinsonism benefit from an inpatient interdisciplinary movement disorders program to improve functional status. PMID:22135763

  9. Effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Hohler, Anna D; Tsao, Jyeming M; Katz, Douglas I; Dipiero, T Joy; Hehl, Christina L; Leonard, Alissa; Allen, Valerie; Gardner, Maura; Phenix, Heidi; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Ellis, Terry

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with atypical parkinsonism, who typically respond poorly to pharmacologic intervention and are challenging to rehabilitate as outpatients. Ninety-one patients with atypical parkinsonism participated in an inpatient movement disorders program. Patients received physical, occupational, and speech therapy for 3 hours/day, 5 to 7 days/week, and pharmacologic adjustments based on daily observation and data. Differences between admission and discharge scores were analyzed for the functional independence measure (FIM), timed up and go test (TUG), two-minute walk test (TMW), Berg balance scale (BBS) and finger tapping test (FT), and all showed significant improvement on discharge (P > .001). Clinically significant improvements in total FIM score were evident in 74% of the patients. Results were similar for ten patients whose medications were not adjusted. Patients with atypical parkinsonism benefit from an inpatient interdisciplinary movement disorders program to improve functional status. PMID:22135763

  10. Exploring Eye Movements in Patients with Glaucoma When Viewing a Driving Scene

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, David P.; Smith, Nicholas D.; Rauscher, Franziska G.; Chisholm, Catharine M.; Barbur, John L.; Edgar, David F.; Garway-Heath, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and a leading cause of visual disability. Automated assessment of the visual field determines the different stages in the disease process: it would be desirable to link these measurements taken in the clinic with patient's actual function, or establish if patients compensate for their restricted field of view when performing everyday tasks. Hence, this study investigated eye movements in glaucomatous patients when viewing driving scenes in a hazard perception test (HPT). Methodology/Principal Findings The HPT is a component of the UK driving licence test consisting of a series of short film clips of various traffic scenes viewed from the driver's perspective each containing hazardous situations that require the camera car to change direction or slow down. Data from nine glaucomatous patients with binocular visual field defects and ten age-matched control subjects were considered (all experienced drivers). Each subject viewed 26 different films with eye movements simultaneously monitored by an eye tracker. Computer software was purpose written to pre-process the data, co-register it to the film clips and to quantify eye movements and point-of-regard (using a dynamic bivariate contour ellipse analysis). On average, and across all HPT films, patients exhibited different eye movement characteristics to controls making, for example, significantly more saccades (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval for mean increase: 9.2 to 22.4%). Whilst the average region of ‘point-of-regard’ of the patients did not differ significantly from the controls, there were revealing cases where patients failed to see a hazard in relation to their binocular visual field defect. Conclusions/Significance Characteristics of eye movement patterns in patients with bilateral glaucoma can differ significantly from age-matched controls when viewing a traffic scene. Further studies of eye movements made by glaucomatous patients could provide useful

  11. Media Advocacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Media advocacy is an environmental strategy that can be used to support alcohol and other drug prevention and policy development efforts. It helps shift the focus from understanding public health issues as individual problems to understanding them as social conditions that require collective behavior changes. Successful media advocacy uses the…

  12. The effects of eye movement training on gait function in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kwon-Young; Yu, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study examined the effects of eye movement training on gait function in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen patients with stroke were randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group underwent eye movement training while the control group underwent general gait training five times per week for six weeks. [Results] Patient walking speed, cadence, and step length were measured by ink-footprint. The experimental group exhibited significant changes in walking speed, cadence, and step length following training, while the control group exhibited no differences. [Conclusion] Findings indicate that eye movement training should be considered as part of a functional gait training program for patients with stroke. PMID:27390423

  13. Detection of mental imagery and attempted movements in patients with disorders of consciousness using EEG

    PubMed Central

    Horki, Petar; Bauernfeind, Günther; Klobassa, Daniela S.; Pokorny, Christoph; Pichler, Gerald; Schippinger, Walter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2014-01-01

    Further development of an EEG based communication device for patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC) could benefit from addressing the following gaps in knowledge—first, an evaluation of different types of motor imagery; second, an evaluation of passive feet movement as a mean of an initial classifier setup; and third, rapid delivery of biased feedback. To that end we investigated whether complex and/or familiar mental imagery, passive, and attempted feet movement can be reliably detected in patients with DoC using EEG recordings, aiming to provide them with a means of communication. Six patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) took part in this study. The patients were verbally instructed to perform different mental imagery tasks (sport, navigation), as well as attempted feet movements, to induce distinctive event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/S) patterns in the EEG. Offline classification accuracies above chance level were reached in all three tasks (i.e., attempted feet, sport, and navigation), with motor tasks yielding significant (p < 0.05) results more often than navigation (sport: 10 out of 18 sessions; attempted feet: 7 out of 14 sessions; navigation: 4 out of 12 sessions). The passive feet movements, evaluated in one patient, yielded mixed results: whereas time-frequency analysis revealed task-related EEG changes over neurophysiological plausible cortical areas, the classification results were not significant enough (p < 0.05) to setup an initial classifier for the detection of attempted movements. Concluding, the results presented in this study are consistent with the current state of the art in similar studies, to which we contributed by comparing different types of mental tasks, notably complex motor imagery and attempted feet movements, within patients. Furthermore, we explored new venues, such as an evaluation of passive feet movement as a mean of an initial classifier setup, and rapid delivery of biased feedback. PMID:25566029

  14. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury. Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias. A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers

  15. Measurement of mandibular movements in parafunctional patient using occlusal splint with Bragg gratings: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Ana Paula G. O.; Gebert, Andréa. O.; Souza, Mauren A.; Jeranoski, Lorena; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; Abe, Ilda

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the potential of the fibre Braggs grating (FBG) in the measurement of different jaw movements that are performed for patients with occlusal parafunction using occlusal splints. Two silicon plates each 2mm are used, the fibre optic sensor is positioned in the maxillary left first molar region above the point of contact with opposing tooth after pressing the first plate on the model. Then the second silicon plate is pressed. The device has a final thickness of 2 mm. The occlusal splint is installed in the mouth of the patient who underwent different movements on occlusal splint. The maximum frequency bite is monitored. The results demonstrate that the bite shows a difference between grinding and clenching movements. The curves behaviour patterns are presented in order to show these different comparisons. Therefore, it is concluded that the fibre Braggs grating consists in an efficient method for monitoring the mechanical behaviour bite of patients with occlusal splints.

  16. [An electric exercycle for rehabilitation of patients with movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Semenov, A G; Elizov, A D; Sychev, A S

    2006-01-01

    The design, construction, performance, and results of clinical testing of an electric exercycle are described. Medical recommendations for its use are given. The electric exercycle is based on electric motor and mechanical gearbox. It has adjustable velocity and load characteristics and provides monitoring of motion parameters and safety monitoring. The electric exercycle is intended for training, rehabilitation, and maintenance of functional capabilities of lower extremities in patients with complete or partial immobilization of lower extremities. PMID:17290927

  17. The effects of bilateral movement training on upper limb function in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyoung Ju; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the functional and kinematic changes associated with two rehabilitation protocols: bilateral and unilateral movement training. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five patients with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to two training protocols for four weeks of training. Each training session consisted of three tasks. The tasks were performed with either the impaired and unimpaired arms moving synchronously (bilateral training) or with the impaired arm alone (unilateral training). To compare the changes associated with each rehabilitation protocol, functional and kinematic assessments were performed before and after the interventions. The functional state of each patient was measured by the Box and Block Test, and the kinematic variables were assessed by three-dimensional motion analysis. The Box and Block Test was used to assess the functional abilities of the affected upper limb. Kinematic measurements of upper limb movement were measured with a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. [Results] Results showed that the bilateral movement group had significantly improved motion of the shoulder compared to the unilateral movement group. [Conclusion] Bilateral movement training should be used to improve upper limb function in patients with chronic stroke.

  18. Advocacy and AGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In May 1982, the AGU Council approved the following policy on the Union's role in advocacy on public issues.The American Geophysical Union is an association of scientists, scholars, and interested lay public for the purpose of advancing geophysical science. The Union shares a collateral sense of responsibility to assure that the results of geophysical research are made available to benefit all mankind. The Union encourages its members to exercise their individual sense of responsibility in addressing political and social issues. Should they choose to act collectively on such issues, other organizations exist for such purposes. The American Geophysical Union, as a society, should preserve its unique position as an objective source of analysis and commentary for the full spectrum of geophysical science. Accordingly, the following policies should guide the American Geophysical Union's role as an advocate:

  19. Electromyography of symmetrical trunk movements and trunk position sense in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Fen; Liaw, Lih-Jiun; Wang, Ray-Yau; Su, Fong-Chin; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To explore the differences in bilateral trunk muscle activation between chronic stroke patients and healthy controls, this study investigated the symmetry index and cross-correlation of trunk muscles during trunk flexion and extension movements. This study also assessed the differences in trunk reposition error between groups and the association between trunk reposition error and bilateral trunk muscle activation. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen stroke patients and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects participated. Bilateral trunk muscle activations were collected by electromyography during trunk flexion and extension. Trunk reposition errors in trunk flexion and extension directions were recorded by a Qualisys motion capture system. [Results] Compared with the healthy controls, the stroke patients presented lower symmetrical muscle activation of the bilateral internal oblique and lower cross-correlation of abdominal muscles during trunk flexion, and lower symmetry index and cross-correlation of erector spinae in trunk extension. They also showed a larger trunk extension reposition error. A smaller trunk reposition error was associated with higher cross-correlation of bilateral trunk muscles during trunk movements in all subjects. [Conclusion] Trunk muscle function during symmetrical trunk movements and trunk reposition sense were impaired in the chronic stroke patients, and trunk position sense was associated with trunk muscle functions. Future studies should pay attention to symmetrical trunk movements as well as trunk extension position sense for patients with chronic stroke. PMID:26504267

  20. Parliamentary advocacy in Europe.

    PubMed

    Cossey, D

    1996-01-01

    At the European Parliamentary Forum held in Brussels in May 1995 the responsibility of parliamentarians for implementing the Cairo program of action was voiced. The Danish and Finnish family planning associations are raising the awareness of parliamentarians about sexual and reproductive health and drawing attention to the commitments accepted at three international conferences on population, social development, and women's status. The British set up a parliamentary group in 1979 to deal with such issues as did the European Parliament in 1991. In 1994 and 1995 three major UN conferences were the focus of parliamentary debates to formulate national policy. In April 1994 the Danish association launched an advocacy activity in the Parliament followed by a forum on reproductive health with the goal of assisting in the drafting of national policy. In Finland collaborating with professional organizations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in seminars, meetings, and consultations has been in the forefront of the issues of population and development and reproductive health. The briefing materials for parliamentarians include a pack designed by Marie Stopes International referring to development programs. A 1995 survey of parliamentarians assessed their attitudes toward development cooperation. Building links between NGOs and parliamentarians has been another scheme in this effort including the European Parliamentary Forum for Action attended by parliamentarians from 28 European countries. In January 1995 a party of European parliamentarians visited Pakistan to see problems at the grassroots. In February 1996 a meeting was held in Madrid for parliamentarians to follow up on the Beijing and Cairo conferences. Advocacy requires perseverance to create personal contacts and networks to keep the discussion on these crucial issues alive. PMID:12291105

  1. Constraint Induced Movement Techniques To Facilitate Upper Extremity Use in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Taub, E; Wolf, S L

    1997-01-01

    A new therapeutic approach to the rehabilitation of movement after stroke, termed constraint-induced (CI) movement therapy, has been derived from basic research with monkeys given somatosensory deafferentation. CI movement therapy consists of a family of therapies; their common element is that they induce stroke patients to greatly increase the use of an affected upper extremity for many hours a day over a period of 10 to 14 consecutive days. The signature intervention involves motor restriction of the contralateral upper extremity in a sling and training of the affected arm. The therapies result in large changes in amount of use of the affected arm in the activities of daily living outside of the clinic that have persisted for the 2 years measured to date. Patients who will benefit from Cl therapy can be identified before the beginning of treatment. PMID:27620374

  2. The principles and practices of nutrition advocacy: evidence, experience and the way forward for stunting reduction.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David; Haider, Rukhsana; Hajeebhoy, Nemat; Mangasaryan, Nune; Mwadime, Robert; Sarkar, Satyajit

    2013-09-01

    Advocacy represents an intervention into complex, dynamic and highly contextual socio-political systems, in which strategies and tactics must be adjusted on a continual basis in light of rapidly changing conditions, reactions from actors and feedback. For this reason, the practice of advocacy is often considered more art than science. However, capacities and practices for advocacy can be strengthened by sharing and analysing experiences in varying contexts, deriving general principles and learning to adapt these principles to new contexts. Nutrition is a particular context for advocacy, but to date, there has been little systematic analysis of experiences. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and draw lessons from the practice of nutrition advocacy, especially in relation to stunting and complementary feeding, and suggest ways to strengthen capacities and practices in the future. The strategies and tactics, achievements and lessons learnt are described for three case studies: Uganda, Vietnam and Bangladesh. These cases, and experience from elsewhere, demonstrate that concerted, well-planned and well-implemented advocacy can bring significant achievements, even in short period of time. In light of the global and national attention being given to stunting reduction through the SUN (Scaling Up Nutrition) movement and other initiatives, there is now a need for much stronger investments in strategic and operational capacities for advocacy, including the human, organisational and financial resources for the advocacy and strategic communication themselves, as well as for monitoring and evaluation, supportive research and institutional capacity-building. PMID:24074320

  3. Identification of trunk and pelvis movement compensations in patients with transtibial amputation using angular momentum separation.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Murray, Amanda M; Christiansen, Cory L; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-03-01

    Patients with unilateral dysvascular transtibial amputation (TTA) have a higher risk of developing low back pain than their healthy counterparts, which may be related to movement compensations used in the absence of ankle function. Assessing components of segmental angular momentum provides a unique framework to identify and interpret these movement compensations alongside traditional observational analyses. Angular momentum separation indicates two components of total angular momentum: (1) transfer momentum and (2) rotational momentum. The objective of this investigation was to assess movement compensations in patients with dysvascular TTA, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and healthy controls (HC) by examining patterns of generating and arresting trunk and pelvis segmental angular momenta during gait. We hypothesized that all groups would demonstrate similar patterns of generating/arresting total momentum and transfer momentum in the trunk and pelvis in reference to the groups (patients with DM and HC). We also hypothesized that patients with amputation would demonstrate different (larger) patterns of generating/arresting rotational angular momentum in the trunk. Patients with amputation demonstrated differences in trunk and pelvis transfer angular momentum in the sagittal and transverse planes in comparison to the reference groups, which indicates postural compensations adopted during walking. However, patients with amputation demonstrated larger patterns of generating and arresting of trunk and pelvis rotational angular momentum in comparison to the reference groups. These segmental rotational angular momentum patterns correspond with high eccentric muscle demands needed to arrest the angular momentum, and may lead to consequential long-term effects such as low back pain. PMID:26979898

  4. The personal challenge of advocacy.

    PubMed

    Rocklage, M R

    1992-04-01

    Advocacy is the embracing of a cause or issue, a conversion to a mission that makes a very real claim on the advocate. It is the activity of altering structures, of changing the status quo. Like prophetic ministry, the task of advocacy is to nurture, nourish, and evoke consciousness of different ways of considering and doing things, to champion new models of organization. Effective advocacy entails three distinct steps: envisioning an alternative, challenging the status quo, and energizing persons and communities. It is characterized by the emergence of an alternative community concerned with different issues and different ways of doing things. It also involves the integration of advocacy into our daily lives and a penetration of the numbness of life. How will we know when we are truly serving as advocates of the Church's healing ministry? We will have an inkling that we are on the right track when we move from charity to justice. PMID:10116739

  5. Reliability of lumbar movement dysfunction tests for chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christoph Michael; Heimgartner, Martin; Rast, Fabian Marcel; Ernst, Markus Josef; Oetiker, Sarah; Kool, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of lumbar movement dysfunction commonly comprises trunk range of motion (ROM), movement or control impairment (MCI), and reposition error (RE). Those assessments are typically based on visual observation. Consequently it is not possible to reliably quantify back movements for intersubject comparisons, or for monitoring changes before and after an intervention. Inertial measurement unit (IMU)-systems could be used to quantify these movement dysfunctions in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of movement dysfunction tests when measured with a novel IMU-system. The reliability of eleven movement dysfunction tests (four ROM, six MCI and one RE tests) were analysed using generalizability-theory and minimal detectable change, measuring 21 chronic low back pain patients in seven trials on two days. Reliability varied across tests and variables. Four ROM and selected MCI tests and variables were identified as reliable. On average, ROM test were more reliable, compared to MCI and RE tests. An attempt should be made to improve the reliability of MCI and RE measures, for example through better standardizations. Subsequently these measures should be studied further for intersubject comparisons and monitoring changes after an intervention. PMID:26980560

  6. New approaches to the rehabilitation of patients with neurological movement defects.

    PubMed

    Shvarkov, S B; Davydov, O S; Kuuz, R A; Aipova, T R; Vein, A M

    1997-01-01

    Results were obtained using a new method, based on the "Adeli-92" therapeutic space suit, for the rehabilitation of patients with movement disorders due to acute lesions of the cerebral circulation, head trauma, and other causes. A variety of methods was used to assess the state of patients before and after treatment, including clinical studies, psychological tests, EEG recordings, evoked potential studies, stabilography, and heart rhythm analysis. The results obtained demonstrate the high efficacy of this new method. PMID:9406214

  7. The patients' library movement: an overview of early efforts in the United States to establish organized libraries for hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Panella, N M

    1996-01-01

    The patients' library movement in the United States, a dynamic, cohesive drive begun and sustained by librarians and physicians, strove to promote placement of organized libraries for patients in hospitals. It took shape in the early years of this century, evolving from its proponents' deeply held conviction that books and reading foster the rehabilitation of sick people. The American Library Association's World War I service to hospitalized military personnel dramatically reinforced the conviction; the post-World War I institution of public library extension services to general hospitals explicitly reflected it. Enormous energy was infused into the patients' library movement. Throughout the first half of this century, there were sustained efforts not only to establish organized libraries for hospitalized people but also to expand and systematically study bibliotherapy and to shape patients' librarianship as a professional specialty. The movement's achievements include the establishment of patients' library committees within national and international associations; impetus for development of academic programs to train patients' librarians; and publication, from 1944 through 1970, of successive sets of standards for hospital patients' libraries. The first of these remain the first standards written and issued by a professional library association for a hospital library. PMID:8938330

  8. Eye movements in patients with glaucoma when viewing images of everyday scenes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas D; Crabb, David P; Glen, Fiona C; Burton, Robyn; Garway-Heath, David F

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that patients with bilateral glaucoma exhibit different eye movements compared to normally-sighted people when viewing computer displayed photographs of everyday scenes. Thirty glaucomatous patients and 30 age-related controls with normal vision viewed images on a computer monitor whilst eye movements were simultaneously recorded using an eye tracking system. The patients demonstrated a significant reduction in the average number of saccades compared to controls (P = 0.02; mean reduction of 7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3-11%)). There was no difference in average saccade amplitude between groups but there was between-person variability in patients. The average elliptical region scanned by the patients by a bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) analysis, was more restricted compared to controls (P = 0.004; mean reduction of 23% (95% (CI): 11-35%)). A novel analysis mapping areas of interest in the images indicated a weak association between severity of functional deficit and a tendency to not view regions typically viewed by the controls. In conclusion, some eye movements in some patients with bilateral glaucomatous defects differ from normal-sighted people of a similar age when viewing images of everyday scenes, providing evidence for a potential new window for looking into the functional consequences of the disease. PMID:23193606

  9. Eye movements as probes of lexico-semantic processing in a patient with primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Seckin, Mustafa; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Rademaker, Alfred W; Voss, Joel L; Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily J; Hurley, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Eye movement trajectories during a verbally cued object search task were used as probes of lexico-semantic associations in an anomic patient with primary progressive aphasia. Visual search was normal on trials where the target object could be named but became lengthy and inefficient on trials where the object failed to be named. The abnormality was most profound if the noun denoting the object could not be recognized. Even trials where the name of the target object was recognized but not retrieved triggered abnormal eye movements, demonstrating that retrieval failures can have underlying associative components despite intact comprehension of the corresponding noun. PMID:25982291

  10. Eye-movement training-induced plasticity in patients with post-stroke hemianopia.

    PubMed

    Nelles, Gereon; Pscherer, Anja; de Greiff, Armin; Forsting, Michael; Gerhard, Horst; Esser, Joachim; Diener, H Christoph

    2009-05-01

    Substantial disability in patients with hemianopia results from reduced visual perception. Previous studies have shown that these patients have impaired saccades. Improving exploratory eye movements with appropriate training of saccades may help to partially compensate for the visuoperceptive impairment during daily life activities. The changes in cortical control of eye movements that may be induced by these training strategies, however, are not known. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the training effects of eye-movement training on cortical control of saccades. Brain activation during visually guided saccades was measured in eight patients with an occipital cortical lesion causing homonymous hemianopia. Starting 8 weeks after the stroke, patients received 4 weeks of visual field training. The fMRI measurements were performed at baseline and after training. In five patients, follow-up fMRI was performed 4 weeks after the end of training. Differences in activation between rest and saccades as well as before and after training were assessed with statistical parametric mapping software (SPM'99). Twelve healthy subjects were scanned twice at a 4-week interval. In patients, significant activation at baseline was found in the frontal and parietal eye fields (FEF and PEF, respectively) bilaterally and in the supplementary eye field (SEF). Immediately after training, an area of increased activation was found in the left extrastriate cortex of the affected hemisphere. At follow-up, relatively more activation was found in the right peristriate cortex and in the SEF of the unaffected side. A relative decrease of activation was found in the left FEF. In this group of patients, eye-movement training induced altered brain activation in the striate and extrastriate cortex as well as in oculomotor areas. PMID:19240963

  11. Finger tapping movements of Parkinson's disease patients automatically rated using nonlinear delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lainscsek, C.; Rowat, P.; Schettino, L.; Lee, D.; Song, D.; Letellier, C.; Poizner, H.

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative condition whose severity is assessed by clinical observations of motor behaviors. These are performed by a neurological specialist through subjective ratings of a variety of movements including 10-s bouts of repetitive finger-tapping movements. We present here an algorithmic rating of these movements which may be beneficial for uniformly assessing the progression of the disease. Finger-tapping movements were digitally recorded from Parkinson's patients and controls, obtaining one time series for every 10 s bout. A nonlinear delay differential equation, whose structure was selected using a genetic algorithm, was fitted to each time series and its coefficients were used as a six-dimensional numerical descriptor. The algorithm was applied to time-series from two different groups of Parkinson's patients and controls. The algorithmic scores compared favorably with the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale scores, at least when the latter adequately matched with ratings from the Hoehn and Yahr scale. Moreover, when the two sets of mean scores for all patients are compared, there is a strong (r = 0.785) and significant (p <0.0015) correlation between them.

  12. How Do Cancer Patients Navigate the Public Information Environment? Understanding Patterns and Motivations for Movement Among Information Sources

    PubMed Central

    Romantan, Anca; Kelly, Bridget J.; Stevens, Robin S.; Gray, Stacy W.; Hull, Shawnika J.; Ramirez, A. Susana; Hornik, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how patients move among information sources to fulfill unmet needs. We interviewed 43 breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer patients. Using a grounded theory approach, we identified patterns and motivations for movement among information sources. Overall, patients reported using one source (e.g., newspaper) followed by the use of another source (e.g., Internet), and five key motivations for such cross-source movement emerged. Patients’ social networks often played a central role in this movement. Understanding how patients navigate an increasingly complex information environment may help clinicians and educators to guide patients to appropriate, high-quality sources. PMID:20204573

  13. Decoding movement intent of patient with multiple sclerosis for the powered lower extremity exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, He

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to recognize movement intent of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) by decoding neuromuscular control signals fused with mechanical measurements as a method of powered lower extremity exoskeleton control. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from the lower extremity muscles, ground reaction forces measured from beneath both feet, and kinematics from both thigh segments of a single MS patient were used to identify three activities (level-ground walking, sitting, and standing). Our study showed that during activity performance clear modulation of muscle activity in the lower extremities was observed for the MS patient, whose Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was 6. The designed intent recognition algorithm can accurately classify the subject's intended movements with 98.73% accuracy in static states and correctly predict the activity transitions about 100 to 130 ms before the actual transitions were made. These promising results indicate the potential of designed intent recognition interface for volitional control of powered lower extremity exoskeletons. PMID:24110847

  14. Topiramate-induced periodic limb movement disorder in a patient affected by focal epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Romigi, Andrea; Vitrani, Giuseppe; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) is characterized by pathological periodic limb movements during sleep, insomnia and/or diurnal sleepiness, and the absence of another primary sleep disorder. We report a patient with complex partial seizures who developed PLMD while taking topiramate (TPM). He had no evidence of metabolic and/or other conditions inducing PLMD. He also had fragmented sleep and disruptive PLMS on polysomnography, and PLMS subsided with change of antiepileptic drug. Topiramate may modulate the dopaminergic pathway by inhibition of glutamate release, thereby inducing PLMD as observed in our patient. Although a single case does not allow any generalization, PLMD should be considered in patients complaining of insomnia and treated with TPM. PMID:25667887

  15. Fear of pain and movement in a patient with musculoskeletal chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Raudenska, Jaroslava; Javurkova, Alena; Kozak, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Pain-related fear may pose a serious barrier in the management of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, resulting in severe functional impairment in many cases. The paper describes the cognitive-behavioural therapy of a patient with a specific phobia (fear of pain and movement). The principal objective of the therapy was to educate the patient in strategies and skills to manage his fear and to verify the effect of the therapy. Both group and individual therapy was used. Group multimodal therapy of pain was provided by an interdisciplinary team of health care providers, specialising in pain management (psychotherapist, doctors and physiotherapists). The programme was based on operant therapy principles and included pacing and graded exercising and walking, relaxation, group education about ergonomics, and fear and pain relapse prevention. Reduction in the fear of pain and movement was achieved, and social bonds and physical and social activities improved after the psychotherapy, while the results were stable for two years. PMID:24378448

  16. What's the role of topiramate in the management of patients with hyperkinetic movement disorders?

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gallelli, Luca; Giofrè, Chiara; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an O-alkyl sulfamate derivative of the naturally occurring monosaccharide D-fructose with an epileptic activity. However, it has been suggested that, in addition to its use in epilepsy, TPM could also be used in the treatment of neurological disorders, psychiatric conditions and hyperkinetic movement disorders. The clinical applications of TPM in hyperkinetic movement disorders is consistent with the multiple pharmacodynamic mechanisms e.g., the modulation of both γ-aminobutyric acidergic or glutamatergic neurotransmission and the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels or intracellular signalling pathways. The purpose of the present review is to describe the mechanisms of action of TPM and its clinical efficacy in patients with hyperkinetic movement disorders. PMID:22580517

  17. Machine learning classification of medication adherence in patients with movement disorders using non-wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Conrad S; Behoora, Ishan; Nembhard, Harriet Black; Lewis, Mechelle; Sterling, Nicholas W; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-11-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major concern in the healthcare industry and has led to increases in health risks and medical costs. For many neurological diseases, adherence to medication regimens can be assessed by observing movement patterns. However, physician observations are typically assessed based on visual inspection of movement and are limited to clinical testing procedures. Consequently, medication adherence is difficult to measure when patients are away from the clinical setting. The authors propose a data mining driven methodology that uses low cost, non-wearable multimodal sensors to model and predict patients' adherence to medication protocols, based on variations in their gait. The authors conduct a study involving Parkinson's disease patients that are "on" and "off" their medication in order to determine the statistical validity of the methodology. The data acquired can then be used to quantify patients' adherence while away from the clinic. Accordingly, this data-driven system may allow for early warnings regarding patient safety. Using whole-body movement data readings from the patients, the authors were able to discriminate between PD patients on and off medication, with accuracies greater than 97% for some patients using an individually customized model and accuracies of 78% for a generalized model containing multiple patient gait data. The proposed methodology and study demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of using low cost, non-wearable hardware and data mining models to monitor medication adherence outside of the traditional healthcare facility. These innovations may allow for cost effective, remote monitoring of treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:26406881

  18. Pregnancy and infant loss support: a new, feminist, American, patient movement?

    PubMed

    Layne, Linda L

    2006-02-01

    Using as examples three of the earliest pregnancy and infant loss organizations and multiple recent initiatives, I argue this is a unique patient movement, in part due to the particularities of pregnant patienthood. Although during the first 20 years of this distinctively US movement, pregnancy and infant loss support was hospital-based, there was remarkably little attention to the "medical" dimensions of these losses, e.g. etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The thrust was instead on changing ideas and feelings. It is only since the turn of the century that bereaved parents have started to forge collaborations with physicians to work toward prevention. During the first phase (mid-1970s to mid-1990s), it was a women's movement, though it did not present itself as such, and although it was indebted to the feminist movement and included some feminist initiatives, the movement was dominated by a traditionally feminine ethos and included pro-life elements. During the second phase, as physicians and researchers have become more involved, leadership has become somewhat less female-centric while at the same time, more initiatives are explicitly feminist. PMID:16194590

  19. Dysfunctional putamen modulation during bimanual finger-to-thumb movement in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li-rong; Wu, Yi-bo; Zeng, Xiao-hua; Gao, Li-chen

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting middle-aged and elderly people. PD can be viewed as “circuit disorder,” indicating that large scale cortico-subcortical pathways were involved in its pathophysiology. The brain network in an experimental context is emerging as an important biomarker in disease diagnosis and prognosis prediction. This context-dependent network for PD and the underling functional mechanism remains unclear. In this paper, the brain network profiles in 11 PD patients without dementia were studied and compared with 12 healthy controls. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired when the subjects were performing a pseudorandomized unimanual or bimanual finger-to-thumb movement task. The activation was detected and the network profiles were analyzed by psychophysiological interaction (PPI) toolbox. For the controls and PD patients, the motor areas including the primary motor and premotor areas, supplementary motor area, the cerebellum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal gyrus were activated. The right putamen exhibited significant control > PD activation and weaker activity during the bimanual movement relative to the unimanual movement in the control group. The decreased putamen modulation on some nucleus in basal ganglia, such as putamen, thalamus and caudate, and some cortical areas, such as cingulate, parietal, angular, frontal, temporal and occipital gyrus was detected in the bimanual movement condition relative to the unimanual movement condition. Between-group PPI difference was detected in cingulate gyrus, angular gyrus and precuneus (control > PD) and inferior frontal gyrus (PD > control). The deficient putamen activation and its enhanced connectivity with the frontal gyrus could be a correlate of impaired basal ganglia inhibition and frontal gyrus compensation to maintain the task performance during the motor programs of PD patients. PMID:26483652

  20. Dysfunctional putamen modulation during bimanual finger-to-thumb movement in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li-Rong; Wu, Yi-Bo; Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Li-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting middle-aged and elderly people. PD can be viewed as "circuit disorder," indicating that large scale cortico-subcortical pathways were involved in its pathophysiology. The brain network in an experimental context is emerging as an important biomarker in disease diagnosis and prognosis prediction. This context-dependent network for PD and the underling functional mechanism remains unclear. In this paper, the brain network profiles in 11 PD patients without dementia were studied and compared with 12 healthy controls. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired when the subjects were performing a pseudorandomized unimanual or bimanual finger-to-thumb movement task. The activation was detected and the network profiles were analyzed by psychophysiological interaction (PPI) toolbox. For the controls and PD patients, the motor areas including the primary motor and premotor areas, supplementary motor area, the cerebellum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal gyrus were activated. The right putamen exhibited significant control > PD activation and weaker activity during the bimanual movement relative to the unimanual movement in the control group. The decreased putamen modulation on some nucleus in basal ganglia, such as putamen, thalamus and caudate, and some cortical areas, such as cingulate, parietal, angular, frontal, temporal and occipital gyrus was detected in the bimanual movement condition relative to the unimanual movement condition. Between-group PPI difference was detected in cingulate gyrus, angular gyrus and precuneus (control > PD) and inferior frontal gyrus (PD > control). The deficient putamen activation and its enhanced connectivity with the frontal gyrus could be a correlate of impaired basal ganglia inhibition and frontal gyrus compensation to maintain the task performance during the motor programs of PD patients. PMID:26483652

  1. Effects of eye movement with functional electrical stimulation on balance in stroke patients with neglect syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether eye movement in conjunction with functional electrical stimulation (FES) could improve balance ability in stroke patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 15 stroke patients with neglect syndrome. The intervention was eye movement in conjunction with FES. The program was conducted 5 times per week, for 6 weeks. Static balance (eyes-open and eyes-closed) and dynamic balance were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurement of static balance, subjects showed significant differences in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not the eyes-closed condition. In measurement of dynamic balance, the subjects showed significant differences in limit of stability (forward/backward and left/right). [Conclusion] These results indicate that eye movement in conjunction with FES had a positive effect on the static and dynamic balance in the eyes-open condition, but not in the eyes-closed condition of stroke patients with neglect syndrome. Further studies should therefore investigate various interventions in stroke patients with neglect syndrome. PMID:27313375

  2. Effects of eye movement with functional electrical stimulation on balance in stroke patients with neglect syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Eun

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether eye movement in conjunction with functional electrical stimulation (FES) could improve balance ability in stroke patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects consisted of 15 stroke patients with neglect syndrome. The intervention was eye movement in conjunction with FES. The program was conducted 5 times per week, for 6 weeks. Static balance (eyes-open and eyes-closed) and dynamic balance were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurement of static balance, subjects showed significant differences in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not the eyes-closed condition. In measurement of dynamic balance, the subjects showed significant differences in limit of stability (forward/backward and left/right). [Conclusion] These results indicate that eye movement in conjunction with FES had a positive effect on the static and dynamic balance in the eyes-open condition, but not in the eyes-closed condition of stroke patients with neglect syndrome. Further studies should therefore investigate various interventions in stroke patients with neglect syndrome. PMID:27313375

  3. The effect of video-guidance on passive movement in patients with cerebral palsy: fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Dinomais, Mickael; Chinier, Eva; Lignon, Gregoire; Richard, Isabelle; Ter Minassian, Aram; Tich, Sylvie Nguyen The

    2013-10-01

    In patients with cerebral palsy (CP), neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that passive movement and action-observation tasks have in common to share neuronal activation in all or part of areas involved in motor system. Action observation with simultaneous congruent passive movements may have additional effects in the recruitment of brain motor areas. The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to examine brain activation in patients with unilateral CP during passive movement with and without simultaneous observation of simple hand movement. Eighteen patients with unilateral CP (fourteen male, mean age 14 years and 2 months) participated in the study. Using fMRI block design, brain activation following passive simple opening-closing hand movement of either the paretic or nonparetic hand with and without simultaneous observation of a similar movement performed by either the left or right hand of an actor was compared. Passive movement of the paretic hand performed simultaneously to the observation of congruent movement activated more "higher motor areas" including contralesional pre-supplementary motor area, superior frontal gyrus (extending to premotor cortex), and superior and inferior parietal regions than nonvideo-guided passive movement of the paretic hand. Passive movement of the paretic hand recruited more ipsilesional sensorimotor areas compared to passive movement of the nonparetic hand. Our study showed that the combination of observation of congruent hand movement simultaneously to passive movement of the paretic hand recruits more motor areas, giving neuronal substrate to propose video-guided passive movement of paretic hand in CP rehabilitation. PMID:23927991

  4. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p < .05). The factors include patient advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p < .001), eagerness (p < .001), skills (p < .01), tangible support (p < .01), perceived effectiveness (p < .05), and organizational receptivity (p < .05) all predicted health professional's policy advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed. PMID:27151835

  5. The Ethics of Evaluation Neutrality and Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datta, Lois-ellin

    1999-01-01

    Examines arguments for and against evaluation advocacy in terms of the American Evaluation Association's "Guiding Principles for Evaluators" and other statements on advocacy and neutrality. Suggests revision of the "Guiding Principles." (Author/SLD)

  6. Correlation between automated writing movements and striatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Wieland; Eggers, Birk; Barthel, Henryk; Clark, Daniel; Villmann, Thomas; Hesse, Swen; Grahmann, Friedrich; Kühn, Hans-Jürgen; Sabri, Osama; Wagner, Armin

    2002-08-01

    Handwriting defects are an early sign of motor impairment in patients with Wilson's disease. The basal ganglia being the primary site of copper accumulation in the brain suggests a correlation with lesions in the nigrostiatal dopaminergic system. We have analysed and correlated striatal dopaminergic innervation using [(123)I]beta-CIT-SPECT and automated handwriting movements in 37 patients with Wilson's disease. There was a significant correlation of putaminal dopaminergic innervation with fine motor ability (p < 0,05 for NIV [number of inversion in velocity], NIA [number of inversion in acceleration], frequency). These data suggest that loss of dorsolateral striatal dopaminergic innervation has a pathophysiological function for decreased automated motor control in Wilson's disease. Furthermore analysis of automated handwriting movements could be useful for therapy monitoring and evaluation of striatal dopaminergic innervation. PMID:12195459

  7. Irregular head movement patterns in whiplash patients during a trajectory task.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Astrid; Stavdahl, Øyvind; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2010-03-01

    Patients with whiplash associated disorders (WAD) have shown less accuracy in trajectory head motion compared to asymptomatic controls, which comply with clinical observations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a trajectory head movement task can differ between WAD patients, chronic non-traumatic neck pain (CNP) patients and asymptomatic controls. Study groups included subjects with WAD (n = 35) with persistent neck pain after a car accident, CNP (n = 45), and asymptomatic controls (n = 48). Head motion was recorded from an unsupported standing position using a 3D Fastrak device. A laser pointer was attached to the head and by moving the head the subjects were asked to trace a figure of eight displayed on the wall at three different paces (slow, moderate and fast). The motion signal was decomposed into 1 Hz frequency bands and angular velocity (deg/s) within each frequency band was calculated. Significantly higher angular RMS velocity was found in the WAD group compared to the two other groups for the slow paced test (3-4 and 4-5 Hz frequency bands) and the moderate paced test (3-4 Hz frequency band) indicating irregular and uncoordinated movements. Angular RMS velocity was associated with pain and dizziness, but only with severe symptom levels. In conclusion, irregular head movements during a complex task were found in the WAD group, indicating altered central sensorimotor processing. The irregularities were found within frequency levels observable to clinicians. PMID:19820919

  8. A Novel Education and Training Program to Enhance Student Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Matzke, Gary R.; McCall, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement a unique student advocacy program to train student pharmacists to be effective advocates for the profession of pharmacy and the patients it serves. Design. The Academy is a 2-day program hosted annually in Washington, DC, that combines didactic presentations on the legislative process, communication with policymakers, current legislation, and active-learning exercises such as mock congressional visits. The Academy culminates with visits to Capitol Hill where students meet with legislators and their staff to discuss pending legislation. Assessment. Nearly 350 students from 43 schools and colleges of pharmacy completed the program in its 4 years. Students are assessed following the active-learning exercises and meetings with legislators. Conclusion. Advocacy has been listed as a competency that requires more attention in pharmacy education. The Academy provides a model that schools may replicate to enhance their advocacy offerings. PMID:27168608

  9. Changes in functional independence measure ratings associated with a safe patient handling and movement program.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Margaret; Radawiec, Stephanie; Campo, Marc; Wright, Laurette R

    2011-01-01

    Safe patient handling and movement (SPHM) programs are effective in reducing healthcare worker injuries. However, the perception among rehabilitation personnel that SPHM equipment promotes patient dependence and adversely affects functional outcomes is one barrier to implementing successful programs. This barrier is particularly evident in acute inpatient rehabilitation facilities, where functional independence is the primary goal. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate this perception. Functional Independence Measure (FIM) ratings were collected from 94 patients with a diagnosis of stroke. Forty-seven patients were admitted 1 year prior to implementation of the SPHM program (Group 1), and 47 were admitted to the facility over a period of 1 year (Group 2) 18 months after program implementation. Group 2 obtained equal or better discharge mobility FIM ratings than Group 1, who received care without the SPHM equipment. This study suggests that SPHM programs do not impede functional outcomes in stroke patients. PMID:21721394

  10. Evaluation of intrafraction patient movement for CNS and head & neck IMRT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siyong; Akpati, Hilary C; Kielbasa, Jerrold E; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Amdur, Robert J; Palta, Jatinder R

    2004-03-01

    Intrafraction patient motion is much more likely in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) than in conventional radiotherapy primarily due to longer beam delivery times in IMRT treatment. In this study, we evaluated the uncertainty of intrafraction patient displacement in CNS and head and neck IMRT patients. Immobilization is performed in three steps: (1) the patient is immobilized with thermoplastic facemask, (2) the patient displacement is monitored using a commercial stereotactic infrared IR camera (ExacTrac, BrainLab) during treatment, and (3) repositioning is carried out as needed. The displacement data were recorded during beam-on time for the entire treatment duration for 5 patients using the camera system. We used the concept of cumulative time versus patient position uncertainty, referred to as an uncertainty time histogram (UTH), to analyze the data. UTH is a plot of the accumulated time during which a patient stays within the corresponding movement uncertainty. The University of Florida immobilization procedure showed an effective immobilization capability for CNS and head and neck IMRT patients by keeping the patient displacement less than 1.5 mm for 95% of treatment time (1.43 mm for 1, and 1.02 mm for 1, and less than 1.0 mm for 3 patients). The maximum displacement was 2.0 mm. PMID:15070246

  11. Every Voice Matters: The Importance of Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royea, Amber J.; Appl, Dolores J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the years parents, professionals, and politicians have come together to advocate on behalf of children's rights. Advocacy can occur individually, collectively, or a combination of both. Although some advocacy efforts are more successful than others, it is the process of the advocacy and voices behind it that matter most. In this guest…

  12. Self-Advocacy, Feature Issue of IMPACT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; Shoultz, Bonnie, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue gives people with disabilities the opportunity to educate others about self-advocacy. Twelve of its 17 articles are by individuals with disabilities who are self-advocates, or by other representatives of self-advocacy organizations. It includes information on self-advocacy strategies and examples of its impact on lives.…

  13. Approaches to Advocacy for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Beverly Saxton, Ed.; Brown, Kelli McCormack, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This monograph provides a collection of articles on health educators' approaches to advocacy: "The Role of Health Education Advocacy in Removing Disparities in Health Care" (John P. Allegrante, Donald E. Morisky, and Behjat A. Sharif); "The Role of Health Education Associations in Advocacy" (M. Elaine Auld and Eleanor Dixon-Terry); "What…

  14. Applying Buddhist Practices to Advocacy: The Advocacy-Serving Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane; Klepper, Konja K.; Lambert, Serena; Nunez, Johnna; Williams, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Creating and retaining empathic connections with the most disenfranchised among us can take a toll on the wellness of counselor advocates. The Advocacy-Serving Model is introduced as a creative approach to strengthening the ability of advocates to serve through enhancing awareness, focusing actions, and connecting to community. The model…

  15. [A complex study of the movement biomechanics in patients with post-stroke hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Skvortsov, D V; Bulatova, M A; Kovrazhkina, E A; Suvorov, A Iu; Ivanova, G E; Skvortsova, V I

    2012-01-01

    The authors present results of a pilot study on biomechanics of non-cyclic movements of the human consequent verticalization in the ontogenesis of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis (10 patients in the acute stage of cerebral stroke) and 10 healthy volunteers without neurologic and orthopedic pathology. Some movements of therapeutic exercises Balance (a model of ontogenetic kinesitherapy) have been selected for the study. Cinematic parameters have been recorded using a system of motion 3D video analysis, a kinematic model was build in accordance to standard protocols. The skin (native and straightened) electromyogram (EMG) was recorded synchronously with kinematic data using 16-channel electromyography from the following pairs of muscles: mm. sternocleido-mastoideus, trapezius (горизонтальная порция), biceps brachii, triceps brachii, rectus femoris, adductor magnus. Major differences in the EMG picture between patients and controls were: 1) the EMG "monotony" with the involvement of multiple additional muscles in locomotions with the prevalence of the peculiar "tonic" muscle activity (low amplitudes without distinct peaks), stretching along the whole cycle of movement. In controls, EMG demonstrated variability and had mostly "phasic" character with distinct 1 or 2 peaks; 2) the asymmetry of EMG profile in symmetric movements. i.e. when performed simultaneously from the right and from the left sides. The latter feature may be considered as predictive because it was never found in healthy people. It allows to identify objectively weak muscles even in the absence of visible parethis during the routine neurological examination. PMID:22983241

  16. Patients suffering from nonspecific work-related upper extremity disorders exhibit insufficient movement strategies.

    PubMed

    Bloemsaat, Jules G; Ruijgrok, Joop M; Van Galen, Gerard P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate whether patients experiencing nonspecific complaints of the forearm caused by sustained use of the personal computer exhibit deviant movement strategies as compared to healthy participants. Patients (N=10) and controls (N=24) performed a graphical aiming task combined with an auditory memory task. Force production (pen pressure), kinematic- and performance variables were recorded. During a trial, the control group gradually increased pen pressure from the stationary phases to the dynamic phase. The patients increased their pen pressure much more abruptly and to such a degree that the final pressure during real-time movement far exceeded that of the controls. Memory load led to a greater increase of pen pressure from the stationary phase to the dynamic phase in the patient group. Patients further displayed longer reaction times. The results are discussed within the framework of our recent theory on the role of neuromotor noise in the regulation of task performance under conditions of stress. PMID:14734239

  17. Advocacy: "On the Cutting Edge..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Nancy B.

    2003-01-01

    This case study details the circumstances that led to a revised policy on gifted education in a large suburban school district. It discusses factors that affected advocacy efforts and emphasizes the importance of key individuals, commitment, tenacity, and the necessity of a system being in place for change to occur. (Contains references.)…

  18. Teacher Advocacy in Bilingual Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubetz, Nancy E.; de Jong, Ester J.

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of changes in federal and state policies in education, educators who believe in the value and importance of bilingualism find themselves in a contested environment where their notions of best practices for emergent bilinguals contradict those espoused in such policies. In this context, acts of advocacy that support bilingual…

  19. Internal Process of Corporate Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    Focuses on the preliminary process of corporate advocacy, which provides direction for issues management. Provides insights into: (1) the degree to which organizational spokespersons are willing to express a position on a variety of issues; (2) how such positions come to be advocated through organizational communication; and (3) how organizational…

  20. CEC Special Education Advocacy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook, for individuals working with people who have disabilities, is designed to empower them to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work. It is designed to help in channeling one's strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The…

  1. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  2. Dams and transnational advocacy: Political opportunities in transnational collective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Teng

    Possible arguments to explain the gradual decline in big dam development and its site transferring from developed to developing countries include technical, economic, and political factors. This study focuses on the political argument---the rise of transnational anti-dam advocacy and its impact on state policy-making. Under what conditions does transnational anti-dam advocacy matter? Under what conditions does transnational advocacy change state dam policies (delay, scale down, or cancel)? It examines the role of transnational anti-dam actors in big dam building in a comparative context in Asia. Applying the social movement theory of political opportunity structure (POS) and using the qualitative case-study method, the study provides both within-case and cross-case analyses. Within-case analysis is utilized to explain the changing dynamics of big dam building in China (Three Gorges Dam and proposed Nu/Salween River dam projects), and to a lesser extent, Sardar Sarovar Project in India and Nam Theun 2 Dam in Laos. Different domestic and international POS (DPOS and IPOS) impact the strategies and outcomes of anti-dam advocacies in these countries. The degree of openness of the POS directly affects the capacity of transnational efforts in influencing state dam policies. The degree of openness or closure is measured by specific laws, institutions, discourse, or elite allies (or the absence of these) for the participation of non-state actors on big dam issues at a particular moment. This degree of openness is relative, varying over time, across countries and regions. This study finds that the impact of transnational anti-dam activism is most effective when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively open. Transnational anti-dam advocacy is least effective in influencing state dam policies when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively closed. Under a relatively open DPOS and closed IPOS, transnational anti-dam advocacy is more likely to successfully change state dam policies and even

  3. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O’Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health. PMID:21867956

  4. Poor performance in smooth pursuit and antisaccadic eye-movement tasks in healthy siblings of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Karoumi, B; Saoud, M; d'Amato, T; Rosenfeld, F; Denise, P; Gutknecht, C; Gaveau, V; Beaulieu, F E; Daléry, J; Rochet, T

    2001-04-15

    This study examines the area of eye movement dysfunctions as an indicator of vulnerability to schizophrenia. Eye movement performance was investigated with three different paradigms: Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements (SPEM); Visually Guided Saccades (VGS); and Antisaccades (AS) in 21 clinically stable patients with schizophrenia, 21 of their healthy, biological full siblings and 21 healthy control subjects. The three groups did not differ on VGS performance, whereas both patients and their siblings showed lower SPEM gain, an increased catch-up Saccades (CUS) rate, reduced AS accuracy and an increased number of AS errors in comparison to control subjects. In addition, patients with schizophrenia exhibited increased AS latency. Among the patients with schizophrenia, eye movement abnormalities did not correlate with age, gender, clinical state or duration of illness. These data suggest that abnormalities of SPEM and AS may represent neurobiological markers of the vulnerability to schizophrenia in individuals at high genetic risk for the disease. PMID:11311924

  5. EEG Event-Related Desynchronization of patients with stroke during motor imagery of hand movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabernig, Carolina B.; Carrere, Lucía C.; Lopez, Camila A.; Ballario, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) can be used for therapeutic purposes to improve voluntary motor control that has been affected post stroke. For this purpose, desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms of the electroencephalographic signal (EEG) can be used. But it is necessary to study what happens in the affected motor cortex of this people. In this article, we analyse EEG recordings of hemiplegic stroke patients to determine if it is possible to detect desynchronization in the affected motor cortex during the imagination of movements of the affected hand. Six patients were included in the study; four evidenced desynchronization in the affected hemisphere, one of them showed no results and the EEG recordings of the last patient presented high noise level. These results suggest that we could use the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythms of the EEG signal as a BCI paradigm in a rehabilitation programme.

  6. [Therapeutic effects of the Feldenkrais method "awareness through movement" in patients with eating disorders].

    PubMed

    Laumer, U; Bauer, M; Fichter, M; Milz, H

    1997-05-01

    Based on the movement-pedagogical concept of Feldenkrais and the findings-of disturbed body perception by eating disordered patients this research aimed at studying the therapeutical effects of the Feldenkrais Method "Awareness through Movement" with eating disorder patients, 15 eating disordered patients treated at the Roseneck hospital for behavioural medicine rated-by means of a questionnaire consisting of scales of the Body Cathexis Scale (BCS), the Body Parts Satisfaction Scale (BPSS), the questionnaire for body perception (Fragebogen zum Körpererleben; FKE), the Emotion inventory (Emotionalitätsinventar; EMI-B), the Anorexia-Nervosa-Inventory for Self-rating (ANIS) and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI)-various aspects of their eating disorder before and after participating in a nine hour course of the Feldenkrais Method. The data of these patients were compared to those of the members of a control group, also consisting of 15 eating disordered patients who did not participate in a Feldenkrais course. The participants of the Feldenkrais-course showed increasing contentment with regard to problematic zones of their body and their own health as well as concerning acceptance and familiarity with their own body. Other results were a more spontaneous, open and self-confident behaviour, the decrease of feelings of helplessness and decrease of the wish to return to the security of the early childhood, which indicates the development of felt sense of self, self-confidence and a general process of maturation of the whole personality. The outcome points to the therapeutical effectiveness of the Feldenkrais Method with eating-disorder patients within a multimodal treatment program. PMID:9265198

  7. How can the response to volume expansion in patients with spontaneous respiratory movements be predicted?

    PubMed Central

    Heenen, Sarah; De Backer, Daniel; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of different static and dynamic measurements of preload to predict fluid responsiveness in patients with spontaneous respiratory movements. Methods The subjects were 21 critically ill patients with spontaneous breathing movements receiving mechanical ventilation with pressure support mode (n = 9) or breathing through a face mask (n = 12), and who required a fluid challenge. Complete hemodynamic measurements, including pulmonary artery occluded pressure (PAOP), right atrial pressure (RAP), pulse pressure variation (ΔPP) and inspiratory variation in RAP were obtained before and after fluid challenge. Fluid challenge consisted of boluses of either crystalloid or colloid until cardiac output reached a plateau. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the predictive value of the indices to the response to fluids, as defined by an increase in cardiac index of 15% or more. Results Cardiac index increased from 3.0 (2.3 to 3.5) to 3.5 (3.0 to 3.9) l minute-1 m-2 (medians and 25th and 75th centiles), p < 0.05. At baseline, ΔPP varied between 0% and 49%. There were no significant differences in ΔPP, PAOP, RAP and inspiratory variation in RAP between fluid responders and non-responders. Fluid responsiveness was predicted better with static indices (ROC curve area ± SD: 0.73 ± 0.13 for PAOP, p < 0.05 vs ΔPP and 0.69 ± 0.12 for RAP, p = 0.054 compared with ΔPP) than with dynamic indices of preload (0.40 ± 0.13 for ΔPP and 0.53 ± 0.13 for inspiratory changes in RAP, p not significant compared with ΔPP). Conclusion In patients with spontaneous respiratory movements, ΔPP and inspiratory changes in RAP failed to predict the response to volume expansion. PMID:16846530

  8. Differences in performance on the functional movement screen between chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Min-Joo; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Differences in scores on the Functional Movement Screen between patients with chronic lower back pain and healthy control subjects were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] In all, 20 chronic lower back pain patients and 20 healthy control subjects were recruited. Chronic lower back pain patients and healthy controls performed the Functional Movement Screen (deep squat, hurdle step, inline lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability pushup, and rotary stability). The Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze differences in Functional Movement Screen scores between the two groups. [Results] Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on the Functional Movement Screen total composite compared with healthy control subjects. Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on Functional Movement Screen subtests including the deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tests. [Conclusion] The deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tasks of the Functional Movement Screen can be recommended as a functional assessment tools to identify functional deficits in chronic lower back pain patients. PMID:27512272

  9. Differences in performance on the functional movement screen between chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Ko, Min-Joo; Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] Differences in scores on the Functional Movement Screen between patients with chronic lower back pain and healthy control subjects were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] In all, 20 chronic lower back pain patients and 20 healthy control subjects were recruited. Chronic lower back pain patients and healthy controls performed the Functional Movement Screen (deep squat, hurdle step, inline lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability pushup, and rotary stability). The Mann-Whitney test was used to analyze differences in Functional Movement Screen scores between the two groups. [Results] Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on the Functional Movement Screen total composite compared with healthy control subjects. Chronic lower back pain patients scored lower on Functional Movement Screen subtests including the deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tests. [Conclusion] The deep squat, hurdle step, active straight leg raise, and rotary stability tasks of the Functional Movement Screen can be recommended as a functional assessment tools to identify functional deficits in chronic lower back pain patients. PMID:27512272

  10. Movement-related cortical potentials in paraplegic patients: abnormal patterns and considerations for BCI-rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren; Jiang, Ning; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Hasan, Muhammad; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Allan, David; Fraser, Matthew; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Conway, Bernie; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) can be promising for the motor neuro-rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. However, this shall require detailed knowledge of the abnormalities in the EEG signatures of paraplegic patients. The association of abnormalities in different subgroups of patients and their relation to the sensorimotor integration are relevant for the design, implementation and use of BCI systems in patient populations. This study explores the patterns of abnormalities of movement related cortical potentials (MRCP) during motor imagery tasks of feet and right hand in patients with paraplegia (including the subgroups with/without central neuropathic pain (CNP) and complete/incomplete injury patients) and the level of distinctiveness of abnormalities in these groups using pattern classification. The most notable observed abnormalities were the amplified execution negativity and its slower rebound in the patient group. The potential underlying mechanisms behind these changes and other minor dissimilarities in patients’ subgroups, as well as the relevance to BCI applications, are discussed. The findings are of interest from a neurological perspective as well as for BCI-assisted neuro-rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:25221505

  11. Thirty years of advocacy in San Francisco: lessons learned and the next generation of leadership.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ntanya

    2008-01-01

    Professional advocacy organizations are often challenged by the question of their authentic community representation and their ability to balance short-term pragmatism with strategic plans for long-term, systemic change. Coleman Advocates, one of the nation's most effective child advocacy organizations, has taken up this challenge under the leadership of a next-generation leader of color who followed a dynamic director of the baby boom generation. In this piece, Coleman's thirty years of social change strategies are analyzed from the perspective of this new executive director, who has facilitated the latest organizational shift that deepens its commitment to building bottom-up grassroots leadership and community power while keeping the best of the professional, staff-led advocacy model. Issues of race, accountability, power, and movement building are addressed through the lens of one organization's evolution, with the goal of building a long-term movement that will achieve racial and economic equity for all children and families. PMID:18384132

  12. Subthalamic Nucleus Discharge Patterns during Movement in the Normal Monkey and Parkinsonian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gale, John T.; Shields, Donald C.; Jain, Felipe A.; Amirnovin, Ramin; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2009-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by derangements in the discharge rates, bursting patterns, and oscillatory activity of basal ganglia (BG) neurons. In this study, subthalamic nucleus (STN) neuronal activity patterns in humans with PD was compared with that in the normal monkey during performance of similar volitional movements. Single-unit STN recordings were collected while PD patients and animals moved a joystick in the direction of targets presented on a monitor. When discharge rates in all PD human and normal monkey neurons were compared, no significant differences were observed. However, when neurons were classified by peri-movement response type (i.e., excited, inhibited, or unresponsive to movement) statistical differences were demonstrated – most significantly among PD excited neurons. Analysis of burst activity demonstrated inter- and intra-burst activities were greater in the PD human compared to the monkey irrespective of neuronal response type. Moreover, simultaneously recorded neurons in the human demonstrated consistent oscillatory synchronization at restricted frequency bands, whereas synchronized oscillatory neurons in the monkey were not restricted to distinct frequencies. During movement, discharge and burst rates were positively correlated, independent of subject or neuronal response type; however, rates and oscillatory activity were more strongly correlated in the PD human than the normal monkey. Interestingly, across all domains of analysis, STN neurons in PD demonstrated reduced response variability when compared to STN neurons in the normal monkey brain. Thus, the net effect of PD may be a reduction in the physiological degrees of freedom of BG neurons with diminished information carrying capacity. PMID:19167367

  13. Analysis of diaphragmatic movement before and after pulmonary rehabilitation using fluoroscopy imaging in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Eun Mi; Han, Soo Jeong; Modi, Hitesh N

    2015-01-01

    Background The diaphragm is the principal inspiratory muscle. The purpose of this study was to assess improvements in diaphragmatic movement before and after pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), using a fluoroscopy-guided chest X-ray. Patients and methods Among 117 patients with COPD receiving pulmonary rehabilitation who underwent the initial fluoroscopy-guided chest X-ray and pulmonary function test, 37 of those patients who underwent both initial and follow-up fluoroscopy and pulmonary function tests were enrolled in this study. After hospital education, participants received pulmonary rehabilitation through regular home-based training for at least 3 months by the same physiatrist. We assessed the changes in diaphragm area with fluoroscopy-guided posteroanterior chest X-rays between pre- and postpulmonary rehabilitation. To minimize radiation hazards for subjects, the exposure time for fluoroscopy to take chest X-rays was limited to less than 5 seconds. Results There were significant improvements (2,022.8±1,548.3 mm2 to 3,010.7±1,495.6 mm2 and 2,382.4±1,475.9 mm2 to 3,315.9±1,883.5 mm2; right side P=0.001 and left side P=0.019, respectively) in diaphragmatic motion area during full inspiration and expiration in both lungs after pulmonary rehabilitation. Pulmonary function tests showed no statistically significant difference between pre- and postpulmonary rehabilitation. Conclusion The study suggests that the strategy to assess diaphragm movement using fluoroscopy is a relatively effective tool for the evaluation of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD patients in terms of cost and time savings compared with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25670895

  14. Effect of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Infusion on Postoperative Bowel Movements in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Sun; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Lee, Ki-Young; An, Ji Yeong; Bai, Sun Joon; Cho, Ju Yeon; Yoo, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sympathetic hyperactivation is one of the causes of postoperative ileus, which occurs frequently after abdominal surgery and adversely influences the patient's prognosis. We aimed to investigate whether dexmedetomidine (DEX) could attenuate postoperative ileus in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy. Ninety-two patients were randomized to the control (n = 46) or DEX group (n = 46). DEX was administered at a loading dose of 0.5 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by an infusion rate of 0.4 μg/kg/h from insufflation of the pneumoperitoneum to the end of surgery. The primary goal was to compare postoperative bowel movements by evaluating the time to first flatus. The balance of the autonomic nervous system, duration of postoperative hospital stay, and pain scores were assessed. The time to first flatus was shorter in the DEX group compared with the control group (67.2 ± 16.8 hours vs 79.9 ± 15.9 hours, P < 0.001). The low-frequency/high-frequency power ratio during pneumoperitoneum increased in the control group, compared with baseline values and the DEX group. The length of postoperative hospital stay was shorter in the DEX group compared with the control group (5.4 ± 0.7 days vs 5.8 ± 1.1 days, P = 0.04). Patients in the DEX group had lower pain scores and required fewer analgesics at 1 hour postoperatively. DEX facilitated bowel movements and reduced the length of hospital stay in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrectomy. This may be attributed to the sympatholytic and opioid-sparing effects of DEX.

  15. Research Advocacy at NCI

    Cancer.gov

    The patient perspective research advocates brings into NCI’s research enterprise helps to inform research focus and support the dissemination of results that lead to new and better cancer prevention, detection, and treatment methods.

  16. Rapid eye movements, muscle twitches and sawtooth waves in the sleep of narcoleptic patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Geisler, P; Meier-Ewert, K; Matsubayshi, K

    1987-12-01

    Seventeen unmedicated patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy and 17 age- and sex-matched controls were recorded polygraphically for 3 consecutive nights. Rapid eye movements (REMs), m. mentalis twitches and sawtooth waves in the EEG were visually scored. REM and twitch densities during REM sleep were significantly higher in the patients than in the controls. The distribution pattern of REMs and twitches was altered in the patients: twitch density peaked in the first REM period and density of REMs showed an even distribution across all the REM periods of the night. In the controls both REM and twitch density increased from the first to the second REM period. We therefore assume that in the narcoleptics phasic activity of REM sleep is disinhibited. Densities of REMs, twitches and sawtooth waves did not correlate with one another in patients and controls. They appear to be independently regulated. The REM periods of the patients contained 3 times as many waking epochs as those of the controls. This suggests that in narcolepsy the transition REM/waking is selectively facilitated. The REM/NREM ratio of twitch and sawtooth wave densities was the same in patients and controls. PMID:2445541

  17. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  18. Stay Focused! The Effects of Internal and External Focus of Attention on Movement Automaticity in Patients with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kal, E. C.; van der Kamp, J.; Houdijk, H.; Groet, E.; van Bennekom, C. A. M.; Scherder, E. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-task performance is often impaired after stroke. This may be resolved by enhancing patients’ automaticity of movement. This study sets out to test the constrained action hypothesis, which holds that automaticity of movement is enhanced by triggering an external focus (on movement effects), rather than an internal focus (on movement execution). Thirty-nine individuals with chronic, unilateral stroke performed a one-leg-stepping task with both legs in single- and dual-task conditions. Attentional focus was manipulated with instructions. Motor performance (movement speed), movement automaticity (fluency of movement), and dual-task performance (dual-task costs) were assessed. The effects of focus on movement speed, single- and dual-task movement fluency, and dual-task costs were analysed with generalized estimating equations. Results showed that, overall, single-task performance was unaffected by focus (p = .341). Regarding movement fluency, no main effects of focus were found in single- or dual-task conditions (p’s ≥ .13). However, focus by leg interactions suggested that an external focus reduced movement fluency of the paretic leg compared to an internal focus (single-task conditions: p = .068; dual-task conditions: p = .084). An external focus also tended to result in inferior dual-task performance (β = -2.38, p = .065). Finally, a near-significant interaction (β = 2.36, p = .055) suggested that dual-task performance was more constrained by patients’ attentional capacity in external focus conditions. We conclude that, compared to an internal focus, an external focus did not result in more automated movements in chronic stroke patients. Contrary to expectations, trends were found for enhanced automaticity with an internal focus. These findings might be due to patients’ strong preference to use an internal focus in daily life. Future work needs to establish the more permanent effects of learning with different attentional foci on re-automating motor

  19. Cherenkoscopy based patient positioning validation and movement tracking during post-lumpectomy whole breast radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Gladstone, David J.; Hitchcock, Whitney L.; Glaser, Adam K.; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Jarvis, Lesley A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Cherenkov imaging (Cherenkoscopy) based patient positioning and movement tracking during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). In a phase 1 clinical trial, including 12 patients undergoing post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation, Cherenkov emission was imaged with a time-gated ICCD camera synchronized to the LINAC pulse output, during different fractions of the treatment. Patients were positioned with the aid of the AlignRT system in the beginning of each treatment session. Inter-fraction setup variation was studied by rigid image registrations between images acquired at individual treatments to the average image from all imaged treatment fractions. The amplitude of respiratory motion was calculated from the registration of each frame of Cherenkov images to the reference. A Canny edge detection algorithm was utilized to highlight the beam field edges and biological features provided by major blood vessels apparent in the images. Real-time Cherenkoscopy can monitor the treatment delivery, patient motion and alignment of the beam edge to the treatment region simultaneously. For all the imaged fractions, the patient positioning discrepancies were within our clinical tolerances (3 mm in shifts and 3 degree in pitch angle rotation), with 4.6% exceeding 3 mm but still within 4 mm in shifts. The average discrepancy of repetitive patient positioning was 1.22 mm in linear shift and 0.34 degrees in rotational pitch, consistent with the accuracy reported by the AlignRT system. The edge detection algorithm enhanced features such as field edges and blood vessels. Patient positioning discrepancies and respiratory motion retrieved from rigid image registration were consistent with the edge enhanced images. Besides positioning discrepancies caused by globally inaccurate setups, edge enhanced blood vessels indicate the existence of deformations within the treatment region, especially for large patients. Real-time Cherenkoscopy imaging during EBRT is a

  20. Cherenkoscopy based patient positioning validation and movement tracking during post-lumpectomy whole breast radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Gladstone, David J; Hitchcock, Whitney L; Glaser, Adam K; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W; Jarvis, Lesley A

    2015-01-01

    To investigate Cherenkov imaging (Cherenkoscopy) based patient positioning and movement tracking during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). In a phase 1 clinical trial, including 12 patients undergoing post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation, Cherenkov emission was imaged with a time-gated ICCD camera synchronized to the LINAC pulse output, during different fractions of the treatment. Patients were positioned with the aid of the AlignRT system in the beginning of each treatment session. Inter-fraction setup variation was studied by rigid image registrations between images acquired at individual treatments to the average image from all imaged treatment fractions. The amplitude of respiratory motion was calculated from the registration of each frame of Cherenkov images to the reference. A Canny edge detection algorithm was utilized to highlight the beam field edges and biological features provided by major blood vessels apparent in the images. Real-time Cherenkoscopy can monitor the treatment delivery, patient motion and alignment of the beam edge to the treatment region simultaneously. For all the imaged fractions, the patient positioning discrepancies were within our clinical tolerances (3 mm in shifts and 3 degree in pitch angle rotation), with 4.6% exceeding 3 mm but still within 4 mm in shifts. The average discrepancy of repetitive patient positioning was 1.22 mm in linear shift and 0.34 degrees in rotational pitch, consistent with the accuracy reported by the AlignRT system. The edge detection algorithm enhanced features such as field edges and blood vessels. Patient positioning discrepancies and respiratory motion retrieved from rigid image registration were consistent with the edge enhanced images. Besides positioning discrepancies caused by globally inaccurate setups, edge enhanced blood vessels indicate the existence of deformations within the treatment region, especially for large patients. Real-time Cherenkoscopy imaging during EBRT is a

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in a patient with brainstem lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jianhua, Chen; Xiuqin, Liu; Quancai, Cui; Heyang, Sun; Yan, Huang

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is common in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. RBD occurring in a patient with brainstem lymphoma has not yet been reported. A 30-year-old man had an eleven-month history of violent motor and vocal behavior during sleep. Brain magnetic resonance imaging disclosed hypointensity T1 and hyperintensity T2 signals in the pontomesencephalic junction and at the upper/mid pons level. A stereotactic biopsy demonstrated the presence of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. On polysomnography, there was enhanced submental and limb electromyographic tone and increased muscular activity during REM sleep. Chemotherapy diminished the dream-enacting behaviors. This case provides evidence that treatment aimed at the primary disease can partially improve the frequency of RBD. PMID:23448775

  2. Condylar movements of temporomandibular disorder patients with intermittent lock: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Taihiko; Komatsu, Kosetsu; Okada, Kazuki; Matsuki, Takamitsu; Gotouda, Akihito

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify which direction of the condylar path is advantageous for releasing TMJ intermittent lock. The subjects were ten patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and intermittent lock caused by anterior displacement of disks without obvious medial or lateral displacement. The patients could not open their mouths fully in habitual opening but could open fully in an intentional winding opening with reduction of the anteriorly displaced disks (winding opening). The two kinds of movement at the kinematic condylar point were measured in each subject and compared. The length of the condylar path in winding opening was significantly larger than that in habitual opening. The affected side condyle of winding opening traced medio-inferior paths in the early part of the condylar translation in comparison with habitual opening. From the viewpoint of the condylar path, the medio-inferior direction of condylar translation is thought to be advantageous for releasing intermittent lock. PMID:17304918

  3. Neuropsychological advocacy and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Loring, David W; Hermann, Bruce P; Cohen, Morris J

    2010-04-01

    Neuropsychologists are in a unique position to be active advocates for patients with epilepsy given their unique understanding of the behavioral and cognitive effects associated the disease, its progression, and its treatment. Neuropsychologists communicate the cognitive and behavioral consequences of epilepsy and its long-term implications to patients, family, school, and employers. In this article we review factors influencing the neuropsychological profile of patients with epilepsy, and discuss common behavioral comorbidities, as well as special issues associated with school placement and long-term planning. We also include a seizure action plan, which is designed to be both an educational tool for individuals with limited epilepsy knowledge, and a way to minimize stigma associated with an event should a seizure occur during school or work. PMID:19214828

  4. Three patients with cancer who developed rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Shinno, Hideto; Kamei, Masahito; Maegawa, Tadahiro; Satake, Akira; Inami, Yasushi; Horiguchi, Jun; Nakamura, Yu

    2010-09-01

    This article discusses the clinical significance of differentiating parasomnia, such as rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD), from delirium in patients with advanced cancer. We describe three patients with advanced cancer who presented with aberrant behavior at night. All three patients developed violent behaviors when they were administered opioids and/or chemotherapy. Polysomnography (PSG) showed REM sleep with tonic electromyography. Previous treatment with neuroleptics had failed to improve their problematic behaviors. Diagnosis was made using criteria for REM behavior disorder of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd edition, and PSG. Clonazepam (0.5 mg/day) was administered orally once at night. After treatment with clonazepam, aberrant and violent behaviors were improved. It should be noted that it is not rare for patients with advanced cancer to present with parasomnia, such as RBD, although organic brain syndrome, such as delirium, is more prevalent. Therefore, it is necessary to provide adequate assessment and treatment of aberrant behaviors in cancer patients. PMID:20541904

  5. Patterns of Culture & Power after "The Great Release": The History of Movements of Subculture & Empowerment among Danish People with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylov, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This article tells us about the history of self-advocacy in Denmark. It also gives some information about how services for people with learning difficulties in Denmark have changed over the past 100 years. In this article, I talk about "movements" of self-advocacy, which means the different types of self-advocacy groups that have grown in Denmark.…

  6. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  7. The ACA Advocacy Competencies: A Social Justice Advocacy Framework for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratts, Manivong J.; DeKruyf, Lorraine; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2007-01-01

    The recent endorsement of the advocacy competencies by the American Counseling Association signals their relevance to the school counseling profession. This article outlines the importance of being a social change agent, the value of advocacy in K-12 schools, and how school counselors can use the advocacy competencies as a framework for promoting…

  8. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  9. 78 FR 73586 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project..., Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  10. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee scheduled for... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  11. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  12. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... cancellation of the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee..., Acting Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  13. A proposal for patient-tailored supervision of movement performance during end-effector-based robot-assisted rehabilitation of the upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Hennes, Michael; Bollue, Kai; Arenbeck, Henry; Disselhorst-Klug, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Millions of people worldwide suffer from stroke each year. One way to assist patients cost-effectively during their rehabilitation process is using end-effector-based robot-assisted rehabilitation. Such systems allow patients to use their own movement strategies to perform a movement task, which encourages them to do self-motivated training but also allow compensation movements if they have problems executing the movement tasks. Therefore, a patient supervision system was developed on the basis of inertial measurement units and a patient-tailored movement interpretation system. Very light and small inertial measurement units were developed to record the patients' movements during a teaching phase in which the desired movement is shown to the patient by a physiotherapist. During a following exercise phase, the patient is training the previously shown movement alone with the help of an end-effector-based robot-assisted rehabilitation system, and the patient's movement is recorded again. The data from the teaching and exercise phases are compared with each other and evaluated by using fuzzy logic tailored to each patient. Experimental tests with one healthy subject and one stroke patient showed the capability of the system to supervise patient movements during the robot-assisted end-effector-based rehabilitation. PMID:25460278

  14. Gamma-Band Modulation and Coherence in the EEG by Involuntary Eye Movements in Patients in Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Balazs, Susanne; Kermanshahi, Kazem; Binder, Heinrich; Rattay, Frank; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Gamma power and coherence in the electroencephalogram increase in healthy individuals in association with voluntary eye movements, saccades. Patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome show repetitive involuntary eye movements that are similar to saccades but progress at a much lower speed. In the present study, we explored the changes in gamma power and coherence related to these eye movements and investigated whether any relationship to the patients' clinical status could be found that would indicate first neurophysiological signs of recovery. To this end, we assessed the clinical status and registered classical scalp electroencephalography with 19 surface electrodes and electro-oculogram of 45 consecutive patients at admission and at 4 weekly intervals. Slow gamma activity (in the frequency range of 37-40 Hz) was analyzed before, during, and after eye movements (pre, -intra and post-eye movement) by means of "continuous wavelet transform." We graded recovery using clinical behavioral scales, taking into account the variables, age, gender, recovery (yes or no), as well as the patients diagnoses (traumatic brain injury, hypoxia, hemorrhage, infection). Statistical evaluation was performed using DataLab, R, and Kruskal-Wallis methods. Based on the clinical status, we distinguished between recovering and chronic groups of patients. In comparison with the chronic group, the recovering group showed significantly higher gamma power over the posterior electrodes and significant higher values of coherence in the gamma-band activity during the presaccadic period of eye movements. We suggest that our findings on the onset of involuntary eye movements in the recovering group of patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome indicates a first neurophysiological sign of favorable prognosis. PMID:26346965

  15. Increased Saccadic Rate during Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in Patients at Ultra High Risk for Developing a Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tricht, M. J.; Nieman, D. H.; Bour, L. J.; Boeree, T.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; de Haan, L.; Linszen, D. H.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in eye tracking are consistently observed in schizophrenia patients and their relatives and have been proposed as an endophenotype of the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of patients at Ultra High Risk (UHR) for developing psychosis on a task of smooth pursuit eye movement (SPEM). Forty-six UHR…

  16. Hardware issues in the movement to computer-based patient records.

    PubMed

    Bunschoten, B; Deming, B

    1995-02-01

    The health care field is making significant progress in shifting to computer-based patient records. Providers are faced with some difficult decisions about what hardware options are most appropriate. Key issues include the choice of clinical workstations vs. portable computers, the use of new client-server architecture or traditional mainframe-based systems and the role of personal computers. This special report offers an indepth assessment of important hardware trends in the records automation movement. The first story offers an analysis of the hardware implications of client-server architecture and an assessment of the long-term role of mainframe computers. The second story sizes up the potential role for mobile computing, including hand-held devices and wireless technology. PMID:10143840

  17. Effects of discontinuing anticholinergic treatment on movement disorders, cognition and psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Beauclair, Linda; Annable, Lawrence; Bélanger, Marie-Claire; Kolivakis, Theodore T.; Margolese, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physicians have prescribed anticholinergic agents such as benztropine, procyclidine, biperiden and trihexyphenidyl for treatment and prophylaxis of antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) for decades. Anticholinergic agents can however worsen tardive dyskinesia and cause many adverse effects, including cognitive impairment. Previous studies of anticholinergic discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotics have yielded a wide range of EPS relapse rates. Improvement in cognition after anticholinergic withdrawal was observed in some studies. Objective: This study evaluated the effect of anticholinergic discontinuation on movement disorders, cognition and general psychopathology after a 4-week taper in 20 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated with antipsychotics. Results: Eighteen of twenty patients successfully discontinued their anticholinergic medication; two did not because of akathisia. Repeated measures analysis of variance did not show a significant effect of anticholinergic discontinuation on total Extrapyramidal Symptoms Rating Scale score or on the Parkinsonism, Akathisia, Dystonia or Tardive Dyskinesia subscales. However, significant improvement was found on the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia composite z score at weeks 6, 8 and 12 compared with baseline. Significant improvements were seen on the motor and the symbol-coding tasks. No significant effects were observed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression – Severity and Clinical Global Impression – Improvement scales. Conclusion: In this 12-week study of anticholinergic discontinuation in 20 outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, gradual decrease and discontinuation of anticholinergics led to a positive effect on cognition. There were no adverse consequences on general psychopathology and no significant differences for 18 of 20 subjects on movement disorders

  18. Effect of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy and Mirror Therapy for Patients With Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin A; Koo, Bon Il; Shin, Myung Jun; Shin, Yong Beom; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and combined mirror therapy for inpatient rehabilitation of the patients with subacute stroke. Methods Twenty-six patients with subacute stroke were enrolled and randomly divided into three groups: CIMT combined with mirror therapy group, CIMT only group, and control group. Two weeks of CIMT for 6 hours a day with or without mirror therapy for 30 minutes a day were performed under supervision. All groups received conventional occupational therapy for 40 minutes a day for the same period. The CIMT only group and control group also received additional self-exercise to substitute for mirror therapy. The box and block test, 9-hole Pegboard test, grip strength, Brunnstrom stage, Wolf motor function test, Fugl-Meyer assessment, and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index were performed prior to and two weeks after the treatment. Results After two weeks of treatment, the CIMT groups with and without mirror therapy showed higher improvement (p<0.05) than the control group, in most of functional assessments for hemiplegic upper extremity. The CIMT combined with mirror therapy group showed higher improvement than CIMT only group in box and block test, 9-hole Pegboard test, and grip strength, which represent fine motor functions of the upper extremity. Conclusion The short-term CIMT combined with mirror therapy group showed more improvement compared to CIMT only group and control group, in the fine motor functions of hemiplegic upper extremity for the patients with subacute stroke. PMID:25229024

  19. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen included the deep squat, the hurdle step (HS) and the in-line lunge (ILL). The symmetry ratios (RS) were accurately measured during the deep squat trial. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in scores on the LE-FMS, HS, ILL, RS, FADI, and FADI-sport. The FADI was strongly correlated with both LE-FMS score (r=0.807) and ILL score (r=0.896). There was a strong relationship (r=0.818) between LE-FMS score and FADI-sport. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the LE-FMS may be used to detect deficits related to CAI. Additionally, this instrument is reliable in detecting functional limitations in patients with CAI. PMID:26180349

  20. University-Based Planning: Faculty Advocacy Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, William M.; Thagard, Aubrey

    2001-01-01

    Supports the involvement of university planning faculty in advocacy roles as change agents in urban inner city communities, discussing several roles for urban design professionals in the academic context as advocates or contractors (i.e., planner advocacy in community development, in environmental affairs, and in urban design). (SM)

  1. School Board Advocacy: Ready, Aim, Inspire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Karen

    2010-01-01

    It is said that "all politics are local," and the same can be said about advocacy and school boards. Advocacy is essential for retaining the progress that's been made in the past, and for building a foundation and network for the future. Advocating for preferred programs, curricula and initiatives has always been important. As a starting point,…

  2. Building Evidence for Music Education Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorner-Johnson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The economic challenges facing public schools and music education are immense. In this context, music teachers and supporters will need to engage in persuasive advocacy to protect resource allocations to music programs. It is worthwhile to consider the model of music education advocacy that allowed music to be adopted into the Boston Public…

  3. Autism Advocacy: A Network Striving for Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itkonen, Tiina; Ream, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we examine the rise of autism on the policy agenda and the new generation of autism advocacy. We focus especially on interconnections between the rhetoric about autism in the media and the emergence and political effectiveness of Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism advocacy group. We portray how…

  4. The Advocate: The Need for Advocacy; Case Advocacy; Issue Advocacy; Legislation and Regulations: Consumer Rights; Where to Find Information and Assistance Related to Child Advocacy and Social Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Advocate, 1977

    1977-01-01

    In this journal issue, the need for child advocacy and the roles of advocates are examined. The Statewide Youth Advocacy Project is explained. Case studies illustrating the role of the advocate as mediator between parent/student and school authorities are presented. The question of how parents and students secure their rights by appeal is…

  5. New Advocacy Groups Shaking up Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of education advocacy groups has emerged to play a formidable political role in states and communities across the country. Those groups are shaping policy through aggressive lobbying and campaign activity--an evolution in advocacy that is primed to continue in the 2012 elections and beyond. Though the record of their electoral…

  6. Advocacy in Counseling: Counselors, Clients, & Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Judy, Ed.; Bradley, Loretta, Ed.

    The sixteen chapters in this volume were selected from advocacy theme papers written by members of the American Counseling Association. They examine the role of the counselor as advocate for different groups of people, as follows: (1) "Developing a Common Language and Framework for Understanding Advocacy in Counseling," (R. L. Toporek); (2)…

  7. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  8. Advocacy: AASL Puts the Puzzle Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Sara Kelly

    2007-01-01

    School librarians work with people of all ages, abilities, and personalities; those people are the puzzle pieces that make advocacy for libraries effective. School librarians contribute to and use the resources of their state and national organizations' advocacy efforts. The completed picture of the puzzle is an excellent program with…

  9. Broadening the Discussion about Evaluator Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This issue of "American Journal of Evaluation" presents commentaries by evaluation leaders, George Grob and Rakesh Mohan, which draw upon their wealth of practical experience to address questions about evaluator advocacy, including What is meant by the word "advocacy"? Should evaluators ever advocate? If so, when and how? What…

  10. Effective Advocacy and Communication with Legislators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Counseling Association, Office of Public Policy and Information, Alexandria, VA.

    This pamphlet attempts to make communicating with legislators easy. Each section includes a brief paragraph and several bullet points that present techniques or advice for simplifying communication. It begins with "Rules for Effective Advocacy," which presents a core set of basic advocacy principles, followed by "What Makes Politicians Tick?" and…

  11. Political Advocacy Handbook: Activating Grassroots Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.; Warger, Cynthia L.

    This handbook is designed to assist special education advocates in developing the capacity to mount an effective advocacy campaign at the state and federal levels. It is divided into the following four separate training modules: (1) "Introduction to Advocacy"; (2) "Understanding the Governmental Process"; (3) "Changing Public Policy"; and (4)…

  12. Pulp-dentine complex changes and root resorption during intrusive orthodontic tooth movement in patients prescribed nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Villa, Paula A; Oberti, Giovanni; Moncada, Cesar A; Vasseur, Olga; Jaramillo, Alejandro; Tobón, Diego; Agudelo, Jaime A

    2005-01-01

    Pulpitis, external root resorption, and pain may be experienced during orthodontic movement. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been suggested to control these changes. The purpose of this study was to observe pulp-dentinal reactions, root resorption, tooth pain, and tooth movement after the application of a 4-ounce intrusive orthodontic force to human maxillary first premolars in patients given the NSAID nabumetone. Thirty-four maxillary first premolars were evaluated. A placebo was prescribed to 17 patients after an intrusive force was activated and reactivated for an 8-week period on the right side. The same procedure was repeated on the left side after patients were given nabumetone. Pulp-dentinal reactions and external root resorption were evaluated by histology. Pain and movement were also evaluated. Nabumetone was found to be useful in reducing pulpitis, external root resorption, and pain caused by intrusive orthodontic movement, without altering tooth movement in response to the application of orthodontic force. PMID:15614010

  13. Rapid eye movement-sleep is reduced in patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis—an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Alamili, Mahdi; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Sleep disturbances are commonly found in patients in the postoperative period. Sleep disturbances may give rise to several complications including cardiopulmonary instability, transient cognitive dysfunction and prolonged convalescence. Many factors including host inflammatory responses are believed to cause postoperative sleep disturbances, as inflammatory responses can alter sleep architecture through cytokine-brain interactions. Our aim was to investigate alteration of sleep architecture during acute infection and its relationships to inflammation and clinical symptoms. Materials & Methods. In this observational study, we included patients with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis as a model to investigate the isolated effects of inflammatory responses on sleep. Eleven patients completed the study. Patients were admitted and treated with antibiotics for two nights, during which study endpoints were measured by polysomnography recordings, self-reported discomfort scores and blood samples of cytokines. One month later, the patients, who now were in complete remission, were readmitted and the endpoints were re-measured (the baseline values). Results. Total sleep time was reduced 4% and 7% the first (p = 0.006) and second (p = 0.014) nights of diverticulitis, compared to baseline, respectively. The rapid eye movement sleep was reduced 33% the first night (p = 0.016), compared to baseline. Moreover, plasma IL-6 levels were correlated to non-rapid eye movement sleep, rapid eye movement sleep and fatigue. Conclusion. Total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep were reduced during nights with active diverticulitis and correlated with markers of inflammation. PMID:26290799

  14. The Effect of the Gelatinous Lactulose for Postoperative Bowel Movement in the Patients Undergoing Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Shigemi, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Miwa; Shibata, Yoshie; Suzuki, Shunji

    2014-01-01

    Lactulose is a non-digestible disaccharide formed from fructose and galactose. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of lactulose on gastrointestinal function after cesarean section. One hundred patients who underwent cesarean section at the Japanese Red Cross Katsushika Maternity Hospital were enrolled in this study. They were divided into 2 groups by randomization: (1) an L group that was treated with gelatinous lactulose (N = 48) and (2) a control group (C group) that did not receive gelatinous lactulose (N = 52). The interval between cesarean section and first postoperative flatus, defecation, and walking; appearance of symptoms of ileus; use of other medicines for stimulating bowel movement; properties and state of feces; and duration of postoperative hospital stay were compared between the two groups. The two groups did not show a significant difference in postoperative outcomes, except for the incidence of loose or watery stools (50% in the L group and 26.9% in the C group, P = 0.03). This study could not demonstrate the apparent effectiveness of lactulose in improving bowel function after cesarean section. Therefore, a routine use of gelatinous lactulose after surgery may negatively impact the patients undergoing cesarean section.

  15. The effect of house design and environment on fungal movement in homes of bronchial asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Takatori, K; Saito, A; Yasueda, H; Akiyama, K

    2001-01-01

    The effect of house building design and environment on the fungal movement in the houses of 41 bronchial asthma (BA) patients has been investigated by examining house dust. The presence and composition of fungi were determined and compared in relation to building structure, house age, size of living room, main flooring material, presence of a living-room rug or air purifier, and frequency of vacuum cleaning. Among these elements, fungal CFU apparently varied only between building structure: wooden-board houses had significantly higher numbers of fungi than reinforced concrete houses (p < 0.01), and wooden mortar or iron-framed prefabricated houses had significantly higher numbers of fungi than reinforced concrete houses (p < 0.05). Classification of the types of fungi present in the house dust of BA patients showed that, regardless of the building designs, there were high levels of osmophilic fungi (group A) and fungi that survive at relatively dry conditions (group B), whereas fungi that survive in very wet conditions (group D) were present at low frequency. PMID:11694095

  16. Impact of perception of socioeconomic burden on advocacy for patient autonomy in end-of-life decision making: a study of societal attitudes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y C; Shin, D W; Lee, J H; Heo, D S; Hong, Y S; Kim, S-Y; Yun, Y H

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the impact of perception of socioeconomic burden on beliefs regarding a patient's autonomy in end-of-life (EOL) decision making. We also sought to identify the characteristics of individuals who advocate patient autonomy and their attitudes toward other EOL issues. A total of 1055 individuals from the Korean general population were interviewed through a telephone survey using a structured questionnaire that was designed to investigate public attitudes toward various EOL issues. Of 1019 individuals included in the analysis, 635 (62.3%) specified the patient and 221 (21.7%) the family, when asked who is the appropriate decision maker in terms of EOL decisions in the absence of perception of socioeconomic burden. In contrast, the numbers were 458 (44.9%) and 500 (49.1%), respectively, if substantial burden was assumed. Respondents who favoured the patient's right to make decisions regardless of perception of socioeconomic burden numbered only 312 (30.6%) and were likely to be younger and have knowledge of hospice than who favoured family decision. Former group also favoured the disclosure of terminal illness to patients, withholding life-sustaining treatment, and preparation of advanced directives. Societal attitudes toward patient autonomy were significantly influenced by perception of socioeconomic burden. Open and balanced discussion about burden to family and adequate welfare support are thus suggested. PMID:18996980

  17. Succeeding in Postsecondary Ed through Self-Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Robin H.; Layton, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of self-advocacy for postsecondary students with learning disabilities considers learning characteristics, self-advocacy as a critical transition skill, identification of intrinsic processing abilities, developing a self-advocacy plan, and the increasing need for postsecondary accommodations. Insets include a sample self-advocacy plan,…

  18. Eye Movement Dysfunction in First-Degree Relatives of Patients with Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analytic Evaluation of Candidate Endophenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Monica E.; Iacono, William G.; Ones, Deniz S.

    2008-01-01

    Several forms of eye movement dysfunction (EMD) are regarded as promising candidate endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Discrepancies in individual study results have led to inconsistent conclusions regarding particular aspects of EMD in relatives of schizophrenia patients. To quantitatively evaluate and compare the candidacy of smooth pursuit,…

  19. Movement and Other Neurodegenerative Syndromes in Patients with Systemic Rheumatic Diseases: A Case Series of 8 Patients and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Rikitha; Pantelyat, Alexander; Izbudak, Izlem; Birnbaum, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases can present with movement and other neurodegenerative disorders. It may be underappreciated that movement and other neurodegenerative disorders can encompass a wide variety of disease entities. Such disorders are strikingly heterogeneous and lead to a wider spectrum of clinical injury than seen in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, we sought to stringently phenotype movement and other neurodegenerative disorders presenting in a case series of rheumatic disease patients. We integrated our findings with a review of the literature to understand mechanisms which may account for such a ubiquitous pattern of clinical injury.Seven rheumatic disease patients (5 Sjögren's syndrome patients, 2 undifferentiated connective tissue disease patients) were referred and could be misdiagnosed as having Parkinson's disease. However, all of these patients were ultimately diagnosed as having other movement or neurodegenerative disorders. Findings inconsistent with and more expansive than Parkinson's disease included cerebellar degeneration, dystonia with an alien-limb phenomenon, and nonfluent aphasias.A notable finding was that individual patients could be affected by cooccurring movement and other neurodegenerative disorders, each of which could be exceptionally rare (ie, prevalence of ∼1:1000), and therefore with the collective probability that such disorders were merely coincidental and causally unrelated being as low as ∼1-per-billion. Whereas our review of the literature revealed that ubiquitous patterns of clinical injury were frequently associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings suggestive of a widespread vasculopathy, our patients did not have such neuroimaging findings. Instead, our patients could have syndromes which phenotypically resembled paraneoplastic and other inflammatory disorders which are known to be associated with antineuronal antibodies. We similarly identified immune-mediated and inflammatory markers of injury

  20. Effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance and head alignment in stroke patients with neglect syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Eun; Min, Kyung-Ok; Lee, Sang-Bin; Choi, Wan-Suk; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups: the eye movements (EM) group; and the PNF with eye movements (PEM) group. The program was conducted five times each week for 6 weeks. Balance (both static and dynamic) and head alignment (craniovertebral angle and cranial rotation angle) were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurements of static balance, the EM group showed significant improvement in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not when examined in the eyes-closed condition. The PEM group showed significant improvement when examined under both conditions. In the assessment of dynamic balance, both groups showed significant improvement in measurements of sway areas. With respect to head alignment, there were no significant differences pre- and post-testing in either the craniovertebral angle or the cranial rotation angle in the EM group, but the PEM group showed significant differences in both measurements. [Conclusion] These results suggest that in stroke patients with neglect syndrome, PNF with eye movements, rather than eye movements alone, has a greater positive effect on balance and head alignment. PMID:27065550

  1. Effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on balance and head alignment in stroke patients with neglect syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Eun; Min, Kyung-Ok; Lee, Sang-Bin; Choi, Wan-Suk; Kim, Soon-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of eye movements and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on patients with neglect syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups: the eye movements (EM) group; and the PNF with eye movements (PEM) group. The program was conducted five times each week for 6 weeks. Balance (both static and dynamic) and head alignment (craniovertebral angle and cranial rotation angle) were measured before and after testing. [Results] In measurements of static balance, the EM group showed significant improvement in sway length and sway area when examined in the eyes-open condition, but not when examined in the eyes-closed condition. The PEM group showed significant improvement when examined under both conditions. In the assessment of dynamic balance, both groups showed significant improvement in measurements of sway areas. With respect to head alignment, there were no significant differences pre- and post-testing in either the craniovertebral angle or the cranial rotation angle in the EM group, but the PEM group showed significant differences in both measurements. [Conclusion] These results suggest that in stroke patients with neglect syndrome, PNF with eye movements, rather than eye movements alone, has a greater positive effect on balance and head alignment. PMID:27065550

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of impulse control disorders in patients with movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Tiago A.; Strafella, Antonio P.; Thomsen, Teri; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Impulse control disorders are a psychiatric condition characterized by the failure to resist an impulsive act or behavior that may be harmful to self or others. In movement disorders, impulse control disorders are associated with dopaminergic treatment, notably dopamine agonists (DAs). Impulse control disorders have been studied extensively in Parkinson’s disease, but are also recognized in restless leg syndrome and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes. Epidemiological studies suggest younger age, male sex, greater novelty seeking, impulsivity, depression and premorbid impulse control disorders as the most consistent risk factors. Such patients may warrant special monitoring after starting treatment with a DA. Various individual screening tools are available for people without Parkinson’s disease. The Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease has been developed specifically for Parkinson’s disease. The best treatment for impulse control disorders is prevention. However, after the development of impulse control disorders, the mainstay intervention is to reduce or discontinue the offending anti-Parkinsonian medication. In refractory cases, other pharmacological interventions are available, including neuroleptics, antiepileptics, amantadine, antiandrogens, lithium and opioid antagonists. Unfortunately, their use is only supported by case reports, small case series or open-label clinical studies. Prospective, controlled studies are warranted. Ongoing investigations include naltrexone and nicotine. PMID:23634190

  3. Assessment of posture and joint movements of the upper limbs of patients after mastectomy and lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Cinira Assad Simão; Saad, Marcelo; Perez, Maria del Carmen Janeiro; Miranda, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate alterations in posture and range of motion of the upper limbs in women after mastectomy and lymphadenectomy, submitted to radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment. Methods: Two groups were evaluated: 16 post-mastectomy women with lymphedema of the upper limb and 14 post-mastectomy women without lymphedema. Patients were submitted to analysis made by software, one for posture and the other to measure ranges of movement of the shoulder, elbow, and wrists. The results obtained were compared between the right and left sides, and operated and non-operated sides, and then were submitted to statistical tests. Results: Both groups presented with anteriorization of the trunk. The women with lymphedema had head rotation to the right, protrusion of the left shoulder, and trunk inclination angle smaller on the operated side, besides bilateral elevation of the scapula when compared to the group with no lymphedema. Changes in range of motion were also smaller on the operated side in terms of flexion, abduction, and external rotation of the shoulder for all women, and for those with lymphedema, elbow extension and wrist flexion had a smaller range of motion. Conclusion: Women submitted to mastectomy presented with asymmetries and modifications in posture, and lymphedema seemed to worsen this condition. Additionally, they had deficits in range of motion in the shoulders on the operated side. Women with lymphedema also showed deficits in the elbows and wrist. PMID:24488379

  4. The movement of patients across borders: challenges and opportunities for public health

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In a globalizing world, public health is no longer confined to national borders. In recent years we have observed an increasing movement of patients across international borders. The full extent of this trend is yet unknown, as data are sparse and anecdotal. If this trend continues, experts are convinced that it will have major implications for public health systems around the globe. Despite the growing importance of medical travel, we still have little empirical evidence on its impact on public health, especially on health systems. This paper summarizes the most recent debates on this topic. It discusses the main forces that drive medical travel and its implications on health systems, in particular the impacts on access to health care, financing and the health workforce. This paper also offers guidance on how to define medical travel and how to improve data collection. It advocates for more scientific research that will enable countries to harness benefits and limit the potential risks to public health arising from medical travel. PMID:21346893

  5. Gait profile score and movement analysis profile in patients with Parkinson's disease during concurrent cognitive load

    PubMed Central

    Speciali, Danielli S.; Oliveira, Elaine M.; Cardoso, Jefferson R.; Correa, João C. F.; Baker, Richard; Lucareli, Paulo R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gait disorders are common in individuals with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and the concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can have marked effects on gait. The Gait Profile Score (GPS) and the Movement Analysis Profile (MAP) were developed in order to summarize the data of kinematics and facilitate understanding of the results of gait analysis. Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of the GPS and MAP in the quantification of changes in gait during a concurrent cognitive load while walking in adults with and without PD. Method: Fourteen patients with idiopathic PD and nine healthy subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed single and dual walking tasks. The GPS/MAP was computed from three-dimensional gait analysis data. Results: Differences were found between tasks for GPS (P<0.05) and Gait Variable Score (GVS) (pelvic rotation, knee flexion-extension and ankle dorsiflexion-plantarflexion) (P<0.05) in the PD group. An interaction between task and group was observed for GPS (P<0.01) for the right side (Cohen's ¯d=0.99), left side (Cohen's ¯d=0.91), and overall (Cohen's ¯d=0.88). No interaction was observed only for hip internal-external rotation and foot internal-external progression GVS variables in the PD group. Conclusions: The results showed gait impairment during the dual task and suggest that GPS/MAP may be used to evaluate the effects of concurrent cognitive load while walking in patients with PD. PMID:25054382

  6. Restoration of Central Programmed Movement Pattern by Temporal Electrical Stimulation-Assisted Training in Patients with Spinal Cerebellar Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Chang, Yao-Shun; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Wong, Alice M. K.; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted triphasic electromyography (EMG) patterns of agonist and antagonist muscle pairs during fast goal-directed movements have been found in patients with hypermetria. Since peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and motor training may modulate motor cortical excitability through plasticity mechanisms, we aimed to investigate whether temporal ES-assisted movement training could influence premovement cortical excitability and alleviate hypermetria in patients with spinal cerebellar ataxia (SCA). The EMG of the agonist extensor carpi radialis muscle and antagonist flexor carpi radialis muscle, premovement motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the flexor carpi radialis muscle, and the constant and variable errors of movements were assessed before and after 4 weeks of ES-assisted fast goal-directed wrist extension training in the training group and of general health education in the control group. After training, the premovement MEPs of the antagonist muscle were facilitated at 50 ms before the onset of movement. In addition, the EMG onset latency of the antagonist muscle shifted earlier and the constant error decreased significantly. In summary, temporal ES-assisted training alleviated hypermetria by restoring antagonist premovement and temporal triphasic EMG patterns in SCA patients. This technique may be applied to treat hypermetria in cerebellar disorders. (This trial is registered with NCT01983670.) PMID:26417459

  7. Restoration of Central Programmed Movement Pattern by Temporal Electrical Stimulation-Assisted Training in Patients with Spinal Cerebellar Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Chang, Yao-Shun; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Wong, Alice M K; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted triphasic electromyography (EMG) patterns of agonist and antagonist muscle pairs during fast goal-directed movements have been found in patients with hypermetria. Since peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and motor training may modulate motor cortical excitability through plasticity mechanisms, we aimed to investigate whether temporal ES-assisted movement training could influence premovement cortical excitability and alleviate hypermetria in patients with spinal cerebellar ataxia (SCA). The EMG of the agonist extensor carpi radialis muscle and antagonist flexor carpi radialis muscle, premovement motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the flexor carpi radialis muscle, and the constant and variable errors of movements were assessed before and after 4 weeks of ES-assisted fast goal-directed wrist extension training in the training group and of general health education in the control group. After training, the premovement MEPs of the antagonist muscle were facilitated at 50 ms before the onset of movement. In addition, the EMG onset latency of the antagonist muscle shifted earlier and the constant error decreased significantly. In summary, temporal ES-assisted training alleviated hypermetria by restoring antagonist premovement and temporal triphasic EMG patterns in SCA patients. This technique may be applied to treat hypermetria in cerebellar disorders. (This trial is registered with NCT01983670.). PMID:26417459

  8. Prehension Movements in a Patient (AC) with Posterior Parietal Cortex Damage and Posterior Callosal Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frak, Victor; Paulignan, Yves; Jeannerod, Marc; Michel, Francois; Cohen, Henri

    2006-01-01

    Prehension movements of the right hand were recorded in a right-handed man (AC), with an injury to the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and with a section of the left half of the splenium. The kinematic analysis of AC's grasping movements in direct and perturbed conditions was compared to that of five control subjects. A novel effect in…

  9. Deficit in late-stage contingent negative variation provides evidence for disrupted movement preparation in patients with conversion paresis.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Rebekah L; Hyland, Brian I; Hammond-Tooke, Graeme D; Anson, J Greg

    2015-07-01

    Conversion paresis is the presence of unexplained weakness without detectable neuropathology that is not feigned. To examine the 'abnormal preparation' and 'disrupted execution' hypotheses proposed to explain the movement deficits in conversion paresis, electroencephalographic, electromyographic and kinematic measures were recorded during motor preparation and execution. Six patients with unilateral upper limb conversion weakness, 24 participants feigning weakness and 12 control participants performed a 2-choice precued reaction time task. Precues provided advance information about the responding hand or finger. Patients and feigners demonstrated similar diminished force, longer movement time and extended duration of muscle activity in their symptomatic limb. Patients showed significantly suppressed contingent negative variation (CNV) amplitudes, but only when the symptomatic limb was precued. Despite the similarity in performance measures, this CNV suppression was not seen in feigners. Diminished CNV for symptomatic hand precues may reflect engagement of an inhibitory mechanism suppressing cortical activity related to preparatory processes. PMID:25951783

  10. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  11. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  12. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  13. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  14. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  15. Synchronous Conferencing by a Community Advocacy Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrni, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    The previous report in this series discussed how collaborative tools can be used in the development of formal and non-formal online communities. The current report describes the specific development of an online community advocacy group.

  16. An Investigation of Horizontal Combined Eye-Head Tracking in Patients with Abnormal Vestibular and Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, William P.; Leigh, R. John; Seidman, Scott H.; Billian, Carl

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of smooth ocular pursuit (SP) and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during horizontal, combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) in patients with abnormalities of either the VOR or SP movements. Our strategy was to apply transient stimuli that capitalized on the different latencies to onset of SP and the VOR. During CEHT of a target moving at 15 deg/sec, normal subjects and patients with VOR deficits all tracked the target with a gain close to 1.O. When the heads of normal subjects were suddenly and unexpectedly braked to a halt during CEHT, the eye promptly began to move in the orbit to track the target, but eye-in-orbit velocity transiently fell to about 60-70% of target velocity. In patients with deficient labyrinthine function, following the onset of the head brake, eye movements to track the target were absent, and SP movements were not generated until about 100 msec later. In patients with deficient SP, CEHT was superior to SP tracking with the head stationary; after the onset of the head brake, tracking eye movements were initiated promptly, but eye velocity was less than 50% of target velocity and increased only slightly thereafter. These results indicate that at least two mechanisms operate to overcome the VOR and allow gaze to track the target during CEHT: (1) the SP system provides a signal to cancel a normally-operating VOR (this cancellation signal is not needed by labyrinthine-deficient patients who have no VOR to cancel), and (2) a reduction of the gain of the VOR is achieved, an ability that is preserved even in patients with cerebral lesions that impair SP.

  17. Movement Disorders in Non-Wilsonian Hepatic Cirrhotic Patients: The Subgroup Analysis of Various Phenotypes and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Methawasin, Kulthida; Chonmaitree, Piyanant; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Rattanamongkolgul, Suthee; Asawavichienjinda, Thanin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this subgroup analysis was to identify the risk factors associated with the development of various movement disorder phenotypes. Methods Eighty-three non-Wilsonian cirrhotic patients with abnormal movements were allocated into the following groups: intention tremor, bradykinesia, Parkinsonism, and abnormal ocular movements. These movement types were considered the primary outcomes as there was a sufficient sample size. Researchers took into consideration the gender, etiologies of cirrhosis, cirrhosis-related complications, hepatic encephalopathy, medical illness, and some neurological deficits as potential factors associated with these movement disorders. Results The male gender (p = 0.002) and alcoholic cirrhosis (p = 0.005) were significant factors for the prevalence of intention tremors. In bradykinesia, hepatic encephalopathy was highly statistically significant (p < 0.001), and females more commonly developed bradykinesia (p = 0.04). The Parkinsonism features in this study were confounded by hyperlipidemia (p = 0.04) and motor or sensory deficits (p = 0.02). Jerky pursuits and a horizontal nystagmus were detected. Jerky pursuits were significantly related to hepatic encephalopathy (p = 0.003) and bradykinesia, but there were no factors associated with the prevalence of nystagmus other than an intention tremor. Conclusions The association of alcoholic cirrhosis with the development of intention tremor indicates that the persistent cerebellar malfunction in cirrhotic patients is due to alcohol toxicity. The slowness of finger tapping and jerky pursuit eye movements are significantly associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Thus, further studies are needed to evaluate the diagnostic value of these two signs for an early detection of mild hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27020458

  18. Factors for success in mental health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Hann, Katrina; Pearson, Heather; Campbell, Doris; Sesay, Daniel; Eaton, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental health advocacy groups are an effective way of pushing the mental health agenda and putting pressure on national governments to observe the right to health; however, there is limited research that highlights best practices for such groups in low-resource settings. In an effort to improve the scaling up of mental health in Sierra Leone, stakeholders came together to form the country's first mental health advocacy group: the Mental Health Coalition – Sierra Leone. Since its inception, the group has worked towards raising the profile of mental health in Sierra Leone and developing as an advocacy organisation. Design The study's aim was to investigate views on enabling factors and barriers associated with mental health advocacy in a low-income country using a community-based participatory approach and qualitative methodology. Focus groups (N=9) were held with mental health stakeholders, and key informant interviews (N=15) were conducted with advocacy targets. Investigators analysed the data collaboratively using coding techniques informed by grounded theory. Results Investigators reveal viewpoints on key factors in networking, interacting with government actors, and awareness raising that enabled mental health advocacy aims of supporting policy, service delivery, service user rights, training for service delivery, and awareness raising. The investigators outline viewpoints on barriers for advocacy aims in framing the issue of mental health, networking, interacting with government actors, resource mobilization, and awareness raising. Conclusions The findings outline enabling factors, such as networking with key stakeholders, and barriers, such as lack of political will, for achieving mental health advocacy aims within a low-resource setting, Sierra Leone. Stakeholder coalitions can further key policy development aims that are essential to strengthen mental health systems in low-resource settings. PMID:26689456

  19. A dance movement therapy group for depressed adult patients in a psychiatric outpatient clinic: effects of the treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pylvänäinen, Päivi M.; Muotka, Joona S.; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-01-01

    We were interested in investigating the effects of dance movement therapy (DMT) in a psychiatric outpatient clinic with patients diagnosed with depression. DMT aims to engage the patients in physical and verbal exploration of their experiences generated in movement based interaction. The assumption was that DMT, which includes both physical engagement as well as emotional and social exploration, would alleviate the mood and psychiatric symptoms. All adult patients (n = 33) included in the study received treatment as usual (TAU). Twenty-one patients participated in a 12-session DMT group intervention, and the remaining 12 patients chose to take TAU only. The majority of the patients suffered from moderate or severe depression, recurrent and/or chronic type. The effects of the interventions were investigated after the intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compared to the TAU, adding DMT seemed to improve the effect of the treatment. The effect of the DMT was observable whether the patient was taking antidepressant medication or not. At follow-up, between group effect sizes (ES) were medium in favor for the DMT group (d = 0.60–0.79). In the DMT group, the within ES at the 3 months follow-up varied from 0.62 to 0.82 as compared to TAU 0.15–0.37. The results indicated that DMT is beneficial in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26217292

  20. Design and study of ultrasound-based automatic patient movement monitoring device for quantifying the intrafraction motion during teletherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, S; Vinothraj, R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to fabricate indigenously ultrasonic-based automatic patient's movement monitoring device (UPMMD) that immediately halts teletherapy treatment if a patient moves, claiming accurate field treatment. The device consists of circuit board, magnetic attachment device, LED indicator, speaker, and ultrasonic emitter and receiver, which are placed on either side of the treatment table. The ultrasonic emitter produces the ultrasound waves and the receiver accepts the signal from the patient. When the patient moves, the receiver activates the circuit, an audible warning sound will be produced in the treatment console room alerting the technologist to stop treatment. Simultaneously, the electrical circuit to the teletherapy machine will be interrupted and radiation will be halted. The device and alarm system can detect patient movements with a sensitivity of about 1 mm. Our results indicate that, in spite of its low-cost, low-power, high-precision, nonintrusive, light weight, reusable and simplicity features, UPMMD is highly sensitive and offers accurate measurements. Furthermore, UPMMD is patient-friendly and requires minimal user training. This study revealed that the device can prevent the patient's normal tissues from unnecessary radiation exposure, and also it is helpful to deliver the radiation to the correct tumor location. Using this alarming system the patient can be repositioned after interrupting the treatment machine manually. It also enables the technologists to do their work more efficiently. PMID:23149769

  1. Advocacy evaluation: challenges and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Devlin-Foltz, David; Fagen, Michael C; Reed, Ehren; Medina, Robert; Neiger, Brad L

    2012-09-01

    Devising, promoting, and implementing changes in policies and regulations are important components of population-level health promotion. Whether advocating for changes in school meal nutrition standards or restrictions on secondhand smoke, policy change can create environments conducive to healthier choices. Such policy changes often result from complex advocacy efforts that do not lend themselves to traditional evaluation approaches. In a challenging fiscal environment, allocating scarce resources to policy advocacy may be particularly difficult. A well-designed evaluation that moves beyond inventorying advocacy activities can help make the case for funding advocacy and policy change efforts. Although it is one thing to catalog meetings held, position papers drafted, and pamphlets distributed, it is quite another to demonstrate that these outputs resulted in useful policy change outcomes. This is where the emerging field of advocacy evaluation fits in by assessing (among other things) strategic learning, capacity building, and community organizing. Based on recent developments, this article highlights several challenges advocacy evaluators are currently facing and provides new resources for addressing them. PMID:22773623

  2. Assessment of Mandibular Movements in 10 to 15 Year-old Patients With and Without Temporomandibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Silvina G; Biondi, Ana M; Fridman, Diana E; Guitelman, Ingrid; Farah, Catalina L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference values for mandibular movements in 10- to 15-year-olds without dysfunction and compare these values to those in patients of the same age with tempromandibular disorders (TMD) and those found previously in a group of children younger than 11 years old without TMD. Children of both genders who visited the Department of Comprehensive Pediatric Dentistry at Buenos Aires University in 2013 and whose parents or guardians provided consent were evaluated using TMD/RDC by standardized pediatric dentists (Kappa 0.88). Three groups were formed according to diagnostic summary: Group C, without TMD; Group Ia, with myofascial pain, and Group Ib, pain with limited mouth opening. The following variables were analyzed: age, gender and mandibular movements. The sample included 169 patients aged 12.5±1.76 years, of whom 62.36% did not have TMD (C) while 37.27% were diagnosed with muscle disorder (29.58% Ia and 7.69% Ib). For Group C, the following values (in mm) were recorded: maximal unassisted opening: 48.28±6.14; right lateral movement 8.78±2.50; left lateral movement: 9.60±2.64; protrusion: 4.94±2.58 and overbite: 2.98 ± 2.5, with no variation associated to sex, but with differences in the values recorded for all movements compared to those obtained for mixed dentition (p=0.0001). Analysis of mean values for mandibular movements in all 3 groups only revealed differences for maximal unassisted opening (p= 0.0317). With relation to gender, TMD was more frequent in females, with significant differences between Groups C and Ia (p=0.019). In males without dysfunction, average maximal opening was 48.28±6.14mm, with lower values in patients with TMD. Mandibular movements in pediatric patients without TMD showed significant differences according to dentition type and age. PMID:27095624

  3. Improvement of mood and sleep alterations in posttraumatic stress disorder patients by eye movement desensitization and reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Raboni, Mara R.; Alonso, Fabiana F. D.; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients exhibit depressive and anxiety symptoms, in addition to nightmares, which interfere with sleep continuity. Pharmacologic treatment of these sleep problems improves PTSD symptoms, but very few studies have used psychotherapeutic interventions to treat PTSD and examined their effects on sleep quality. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy on indices of mood, anxiety, subjective, and objective sleep. The sample was composed of 11 healthy controls and 13 PTSD patients that were victims of assault and/or kidnapping. All participants were assessed before, and 1 day after, the end of treatment for depressive and anxiety profile, general well-being and subjective sleep by filling out specific questionnaires. In addition, objective sleep patterns were evaluated by polysomnographic recording. Healthy volunteers were submitted to the therapy for three weekly sessions, whereas PTSD patients underwent five sessions, on average. Before treatment, PTSD patients exhibited high levels of anxiety and depression, poor quality of life and poor sleep, assessed both subjectively and objectively; the latter was reflected by increased time of waking after sleep onset. After completion of treatment, patients exhibited improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms, and in quality of life; with indices that were no longer different from control volunteers. Moreover, these patients showed more consolidated sleep, with reduction of time spent awake after sleep onset. In conclusion, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing was an effective treatment of PTSD patients and improved the associated sleep and psychological symptoms. PMID:24959123

  4. Efficacy of Eye Movements Desensitization and Reprocessing on the Quality of Life of the Patients with Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Salehian, Tahmineh; Saeedinejad, Saidzaker; Behnammoghadam, Mohammad; Shafiee, Mohsen; Mohammadhossini, Sima; Behnammoghadam, Zargham; Behnammoghadam, Aziz; Ebrahimpour, Soheil; Paymard, Akvan

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction causes limitations in the physical activity and perturbation of quality of life.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of eye movements desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on the quality of life of these patients. This study was conducted in two groups as the before and after while the effect of eye movements desensitization and reprocessing on the quality of life of the patients with Myocardial infarction. Sampling was done based on the purposive sampling. Patients were randomly divided into two experimental and control groups (30 patients in each group). Samples were assigned through randomized allocation. In the experimental group, the EMDR method was carried out on the patients in five 90-minute sessions over a two week period. In the control group no intervention was received. Data of Quality of life, pre-treatment, post-treatment were analyzed using SPSS. The results showed that the quality of life increase in all its dimensions of the experimental group, after performing the EMDR therapy significantly (P=0.001). Treatment what has already been stated, was effective on the quality of life in patients. Treatment team members can use this method as an effective intervention in order to improve the quality of life of their patients. PMID:27302452

  5. Improvement of mood and sleep alterations in posttraumatic stress disorder patients by eye movement desensitization and reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Mara R; Alonso, Fabiana F D; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients exhibit depressive and anxiety symptoms, in addition to nightmares, which interfere with sleep continuity. Pharmacologic treatment of these sleep problems improves PTSD symptoms, but very few studies have used psychotherapeutic interventions to treat PTSD and examined their effects on sleep quality. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy on indices of mood, anxiety, subjective, and objective sleep. The sample was composed of 11 healthy controls and 13 PTSD patients that were victims of assault and/or kidnapping. All participants were assessed before, and 1 day after, the end of treatment for depressive and anxiety profile, general well-being and subjective sleep by filling out specific questionnaires. In addition, objective sleep patterns were evaluated by polysomnographic recording. Healthy volunteers were submitted to the therapy for three weekly sessions, whereas PTSD patients underwent five sessions, on average. Before treatment, PTSD patients exhibited high levels of anxiety and depression, poor quality of life and poor sleep, assessed both subjectively and objectively; the latter was reflected by increased time of waking after sleep onset. After completion of treatment, patients exhibited improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms, and in quality of life; with indices that were no longer different from control volunteers. Moreover, these patients showed more consolidated sleep, with reduction of time spent awake after sleep onset. In conclusion, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing was an effective treatment of PTSD patients and improved the associated sleep and psychological symptoms. PMID:24959123

  6. The American Middle School Movement: Taking the Long View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    The author contrasts conservative and progressive worldviews and discusses the development of the middle school movement as a major success of progressive education reform. The future of the middle school movement is considered and an agenda for continued advocacy and research is recommended.

  7. Advocacy for Health Equity: A Synthesis Review

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Linden; Marinetti, Claudia; Cavaco, Yoline Kuipers; Costongs, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Context Health inequalities are systematic differences in health among social groups that are caused by unequal exposure to—and distributions of—the social determinants of health (SDH). They are persistent between and within countries despite action to reduce them. Advocacy is a means of promoting policies that improve health equity, but the literature on how to do so effectively is dispersed. The aim of this review is to synthesize the evidence in the academic and gray literature and to provide a body of knowledge for advocates to draw on to inform their efforts. Methods This article is a systematic review of the academic literature and a fixed-length systematic search of the gray literature. After applying our inclusion criteria, we analyzed our findings according to our predefined dimensions of advocacy for health equity. Last, we synthesized our findings and made a critical appraisal of the literature. Findings The policy world is complex, and scientific evidence is unlikely to be conclusive in making decisions. Timely qualitative, interdisciplinary, and mixed-methods research may be valuable in advocacy efforts. The potential impact of evidence can be increased by “packaging” it as part of knowledge transfer and translation. Increased contact between researchers and policymakers could improve the uptake of research in policy processes. Researchers can play a role in advocacy efforts, although health professionals and disadvantaged people, who have direct contact with or experience of hardship, can be particularly persuasive in advocacy efforts. Different types of advocacy messages can accompany evidence, but messages should be tailored to advocacy target. Several barriers hamper advocacy efforts. The most frequently cited in the academic literature are the current political and economic zeitgeist and related public opinion, which tend to blame disadvantaged people for their ill health, even though biomedical approaches to health and political short

  8. Health advocacy training: why are physicians withholding life-saving care?

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter J; Gill, Harbir S

    2011-01-01

    The societal responsibility of physicians to be health advocates, both at the population and patient level is necessary to positively influence public health and policy. Physicians must commit to learn about policy reform and the legislative process. Several regulatory physician organizations emphasize the importance of health. In addition, the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) Medical Schools Objectives Project, the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination objectives and several Canadian medical schools outline advocacy as an objective. As a result, several US medical schools have designed and incorporated health advocacy into their curricula. Canadian medical schools, however, have been lagging behind. To address this deficiency, the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary hosted the 1st Annual Alberta Political Action Day (PAD) to engage medical students in advocacy and the policy making process. The two-day time requirement of PAD makes it an efficient model to incorporate health advocacy into the already demanding undergraduate medical curriculum. Canadian medical schools must follow the American example and further integrate initiatives such as PAD to teach health advocacy. The skills developed will enhance student's comprehension of how they can shape health policy and truly advocate for optimal patient care. PMID:21070115

  9. [Predominant occlusal function during lateral mandibular movements in the black African patient].

    PubMed

    Djeredou, K B; Kamagate, F S; Thiam, A; Pesson, D M; Bamba, I

    2002-12-01

    The research of the predominant occlusal function during mandibular movements of laterality at the topic African melanoderme, drove authors of this survey to: select 52 healthy topics (11 women and 41 men), aged of 22 to 33 years old observe and note at every topic the presence and the nature of contacts or their possible absence of the working side during the movement of deduction. Observations done as well directly in mouth, that on models put in semi-adaptable articulators, permitted to note that the function of posterior group is more the recovered so much at women that at men, at the young adults and at adults. PMID:12680132

  10. Elevated PEM (Phasic Electromyographic Metric) Rates Identify Rapid Eye Movement Behavior Disorder Patients on Nights Without Behavioral Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Bliwise, Donald L.; Rye, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the validity of the phasic electromyographic metric (PEM) to differentiate patients with a history suggestive of rapid eye movement behavior disorder (REMBD) on laboratory nights without overt dream-enactment behavior. Methods: PEM was quantified as the % of 2.5-sec intervals with phasic muscle activity of 100-msec duration with an amplitude of at least 4 times background activity in 11 patients and 31 elderly controls. Data were derived from both REM and NREM sleep from 5 muscle groups (mentalis, left/right anterior tibialis, left/right brachioradialis). Results: Relative to controls, REMBD patients had significantly higher levels of PEM activity in all recordings. The largest differences occurred during REM sleep for the mentalis and brachioradialis channels. Similar results were obtained by limiting quantification of PEM to the final REM period of the night and could be accomplished by individuals with no previous familiarity with polysomnography. Discussion: PEM may be a useful metric to characterize the REM related phasic muscle activity on patients with a history of REMBD, even when no overt dream-enactment behaviors are detected on a laboratory night. Citation: Bliwise DL; Rye DB. Elevated PEM (phasic electromyographic metric) rates identify rapid eye movement behavior disorder patients on nights without behavioral abnormalities. SLEEP 2008;31(6):853–857. PMID:18548830

  11. The Northland fluoridation advocacy programme: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Sunitha; Thomas, David R

    2008-12-01

    On 20 July 2006, the Far North District Council resolved to fluoridate Kaitaia and Kaikohe. This was the first such initiative by any Territorial Local Authority (TLA) in New Zealand for 23 years, and resulted from a fluoridation advocacy programme. This paper describes the programme implementation, assesses its consistency with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and critically examines the collaboration between the fluoride advocate and the key stakeholders. Process evaluation identified three main categories of programme implementation: policy advocacy, community action projects, and media advocacy. The collaboration of iwi, Maori health providers and the community suggests that the programme was consistent with the principles (partnership, participation and protection) ofthe Treaty ofWaitangi. Media advocacy played an important role in reflecting and engaging community views on fluoridation, and it influenced decision-making by the Far North District Council. The simultaneous, combined 'top-down and bottom-up' approach was an effective and successful strategy for fluoridation advocacy in the community. Less integrated approaches implemented on their own (such as the 'top down' approach in Whangarei and the 'bottom-up' approach in Dargaville) were not effective. PMID:19180864

  12. Science, policy advocacy, and marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Gray, Noella J; Campbell, Lisa M

    2009-04-01

    Much has been written in recent years regarding whether and to what extent scientists should engage in the policy process, and the focus has been primarily on the issue of advocacy. Despite extensive theoretical discussions, little has been done to study attitudes toward and consequences of such advocacy in particular cases. We assessed attitudes toward science and policy advocacy in the case of marine protected areas (MPAs) on the basis of a survey of delegates at the First International Marine Protected Areas Congress. Delegates were all members of the international marine conservation community and represented academic, government, and nongovernmental organizations. A majority of respondents believed science is objective but only a minority believed that values can be eliminated from science. Respondents showed only partial support of positivist principles of science. Almost all respondents supported scientists being integrated into MPA policy making, whereas half of the respondents agreed that scientists should actively advocate for particular MPA policies. Scientists with a positivist view of science supported a minimal role for scientists in policy, whereas government staff with positivist beliefs supported an advocacy or decision-making role for scientists. Policy-making processes for MPAs need to account for these divergent attitudes toward science and advocacy if science-driven and participatory approaches are to be reconciled. PMID:19016824

  13. Gender and advocacy in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ray-ross, S

    1997-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) and the Indonesian Midwives Association (IBI) have developed a two-phase training program regarding gender issues for the association's midwives. The first phase focuses on the leadership, management, and advocacy skills necessary to articulate program needs and to take part in making decisions regarding family planning and reproductive health. The second phase concerns the integration of gender into project design. Proposals developed by the midwives include the following: 1) to improve counseling services for women in a district where 70% of the women using contraception do not decide for themselves which methods to use; 2) to reduce maternal mortality in a district where it has increased by 20% and where women have died while waiting for husbands or fathers-in-law to make the decision to bring them to hospitals; 3) to develop gender-sensitive materials concerning HIV/AIDS; and 4) to expand gender training to all levels of IBI, to provide follow-up technical support, and to integrate gender into the mission statement of the organization. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi (member of Parliament and vice chair of the Global Commission on Women's Health), Dr. Widyastuti Wibisana (director of community participation in the Ministry of Health), Dr. Kokila Vaidya (WHO Medical Officer), Carla Bianpoen (gender specialist with the World Bank), and Titi Sumbung (director of the Melati Foundation) helped to develop and to conduct the program. IBI, which has 65,000 members, provides family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health services throughout Indonesia. PMID:12292791

  14. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  15. Are movements necessary for the sense of body ownership? Evidence from the rubber hand illusion in pure hemiplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Burin, Dalila; Livelli, Alessandro; Garbarini, Francesca; Fossataro, Carlotta; Folegatti, Alessia; Gindri, Patrizia; Pia, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    A question still debated within cognitive neuroscience is whether signals present during actions significantly contribute to the emergence of human's body ownership. In the present study, we aimed at answer this question by means of a neuropsychological approach. We administered the classical rubber hand illusion paradigm to a group of healthy participants and to a group of neurological patients affected by a complete left upper limb hemiplegia, but without any propriceptive/tactile deficits. The illusion strength was measured both subjectively (i.e., by a self-report questionnaire) and behaviorally (i.e., the location of one's own hand is shifted towards the rubber hand). We aimed at examining whether, and to which extent, an enduring absence of movements related signals affects body ownership. Our results showed that patients displayed, respect to healthy participants, stronger illusory effects when the left (affected) hand was stimulated and no effects when the right (unaffected) hand was stimulated. In other words, hemiplegics had a weaker/more flexible sense of body ownership for the affected hand, but an enhanced/more rigid one for the healthy hand. Possible interpretations of such asymmetrical distribution of body ownership, as well as limits of our results, are discussed. Broadly speaking, our findings suggest that the alteration of the normal flow of signals present during movements impacts on human's body ownership. This in turn, means that movements have a role per se in developing and maintaining a coherent body ownership. PMID:25775041

  16. Case report. Recovery of shoulder movement in patients with complete axillary nerve palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, S. H.; Ross, A. C.

    1998-01-01

    Classical anatomical teaching suggests that the deltoid muscle is the main abductor of the shoulder. We present three cases of proven complete paralysis of the deltoid with an almost full range of movement of the shoulder owing to the compensatory action of accessory muscles. The mechanisms by which this occurs are described. PMID:10209411

  17. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J.

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  18. Late-Onset Mania in a Patient with Movement Disorder and Basal Ganglia Calcifications: A Challenge for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roiter, Beatrice; Pigato, Giorgio; Perugi, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Age of onset can have a significant impact on clinical course and pathophysiological mechanism of bipolar disorder. Late-onset bipolar episodes are more likely linked to medical illnesses and so are frequently classified as “secondary” forms of mood disorder. We discuss the case of a patient who at the age of 58 presented his first delusional-manic episode. He also had mild frontal and occipital cortical atrophy, white matter posterior ischemic lesions, and small basal ganglia calcifications. Seven years later, he presented a second manic episode with new emergent hyperkinetic choreiform symptoms. Taking into account movement disturbances, the presence of basal ganglia calcification, and worsening of cortical atrophy, we performed a differential diagnosis between Fahr disease, Fahr's syndrome, calcifications due to ageing, supersensitivity psychosis, and dementia. Valproate, quetiapine, and tetrabenazine were sequentially administered and yielded a good therapeutic response as regards manic and movement symptoms. Relationship between medications and course of specific symptoms was observed. PMID:27213069

  19. Automatic detection of CT perfusion datasets unsuitable for analysis due to head movement of acute ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Fahmi; Marquering, Henk A; Streekstra, Geert J; Beenen, Ludo F M; Janssen, Natasja N Y; Majoie, Charles B L; van Bavel, Ed

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during brain Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) can deteriorate perfusion analysis quality in acute ischemic stroke patients. We developed a method for automatic detection of CTP datasets with excessive head movement, based on 3D image-registration of CTP, with non-contrast CT providing transformation parameters. For parameter values exceeding predefined thresholds, the dataset was classified as 'severely moved'. Threshold values were determined by digital CTP phantom experiments. The automated selection was compared to manual screening by 2 experienced radiologists for 114 brain CTP datasets. Based on receiver operator characteristics, optimal thresholds were found of respectively 1.0°, 2.8° and 6.9° for pitch, roll and yaw, and 2.8 mm for z-axis translation. The proposed method had a sensitivity of 91.4% and a specificity of 82.3%. This method allows accurate automated detection of brain CTP datasets that are unsuitable for perfusion analysis. PMID:24691387

  20. No Cases of PANDAS on Follow-Up of Patients Referred to a Pediatric Movement Disorders Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Kilbertus, Sarah; Brannan, Renee; Sell, Erick; Doja, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) remains a controversial diagnosis and it is unclear how frequently it is encountered in clinical practice. Our study aimed to determine how many children with acute-onset tics and/or Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder (OCD) met criteria for PANDAS. Materials and methods: A retrospective review was performed on 39 children who presented to a movement disorders clinic with acute-onset tics or OCD from 2005 to 2012. Results: Out of 284 patients seen over the course of 7 years, only 39 had acute-onset tics and/or OCD symptoms. None of the 39 children who presented to us acutely met full criteria for PANDAS. Thirty-eight percent had no association between their symptoms and group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection, while 54% had prior inconclusive laboratory testing done and no exacerbations during the course of the study. Only 8% of patients had an acute exacerbation after their initial visit; however, testing for GAHBS in these patients was negative Discussion: Our results support the notion that PANDAS, if it exists, is an exceedingly rare diagnosis encountered in a pediatric movement disorder clinic. While none of our patients met criteria for PANDAS, two with acute-onset OCD would have met criteria for pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) indicating that PANS may be a more appropriate diagnosis. PMID:25309889

  1. Communication breakdown or ideal speech situation: the problem of nurse advocacy.

    PubMed

    Martin, G W

    1998-03-01

    The issue of advocacy has dominated discussion of the ethical dilemmas facing nurses. However, despite this, nurses seem to be no further towards a solution of how they can be effective advocates for patients without compromising their working identity or facing conflicts of loyalty. This article considers some of the problems around advocacy and, by the use of critical incidents written by nurses involved in a diploma module, attempts to highlight where the problem could lie. A communications model is outlined, using a theoretical framework taken from the work of Jürgen Habermas, and applied to nursing practice. Finally, two examples are given from the research, which illustrate how the model could be used, highlighting the problems and pitfalls that still have to be overcome. The conclusion is a positive one, in that it suggests that advocacy is possible if nurses re-examine their practice in the light of the model proposed. PMID:9616612

  2. Occipital gamma-oscillations modulated during eye movement tasks: simultaneous eye tracking and electrocorticography recording in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Tetsuro; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Hanazawa, Akitoshi; Shah, Aashit; Mittal, Sandeep; Sood, Sandeep; Asano, Eishi

    2011-10-15

    We determined the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical gamma-oscillations modulated during eye movement tasks, using simultaneous eye tracking and intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) recording. Patients with focal epilepsy were instructed to follow a target moving intermittently and unpredictably from one place to another either in an instantaneous or smooth fashion during extraoperative ECoG recording. Target motion elicited augmentation of gamma-oscillations in the lateral, inferior and polar occipital regions in addition to portions of parietal and frontal regions; subsequent voluntary eye movements elicited gamma-augmentation in the medial occipital region. Such occipital gamma-augmentations could not be explained by contaminations of ocular or myogenic artifacts. The degree of gamma-augmentation was generally larger during saccade compared to pursuit trials, while a portion of the polar occipital region showed pursuit-preferential gamma-augmentations. In addition to the aforementioned eye movement task, patients were asked to read a single word popping up on the screen. Gamma-augmentation was elicited in widespread occipital regions following word presentation, while gamma-augmentation in the anterior portion of the medial occipital region was elicited by an involuntary saccade following word presentation rather than word presentation itself. Gamma-augmentation in the lateral, inferior and polar occipital regions can be explained by increased attention to a moving target, whereas gamma-augmentation in the anterior-medial occipital region may be elicited by images in the peripheral field realigned following saccades. In functional studies comparing brain activation between two tasks, eye movement patterns during tasks may need to be considered as confounding factors. PMID:21816225

  3. Development and Assessment of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Linnemeyer, Rachel M.; Bahner, Angela D.; Misialek, Leah Hanson

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and the initial psychometric evaluation of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale in two studies. In the first study, an exploratory factor analysis (n = 278) revealed a four-factor scale, accounting for 71.4% of the variance, measuring different aspects of social issue advocacy: Political and Social Advocacy,…

  4. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  5. 76 FR 75951 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and Wednesday.... ] Dated: November 30, 2011. Shawn Collins, Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  6. Promoting Self-Advocacy among Minority Students in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astramovich, Randall L.; Harris, Katrina R.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents self-advocacy competencies developed to promote the academic, career, and personal/social success of minority students. The authors discuss challenges faced by minority students in today's educational environment and review principles of self advocacy. Competencies for developing self-advocacy awareness, knowledge, and skills…

  7. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self-Employed Decreasing Non-Filers Project... meeting is cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER...

  8. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Burden Reduction Project Committee scheduled... cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Audrey...

  9. Sit-to-walk Task in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients: Relationship between Movement Fluidity and the Motor Strategy in Initial Contact

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Sumiko; Fuchi, Masako; Ibayashi, Setsuro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Generally, stroke patients can walk and stand up fluidly but fulfill the sit-to-walk (STW) task with difficulty. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between movement fluidity and motor strategy in the initial contact of the STW task. Method: Thirty stroke patients and ten healthy subjects performed the STW task from a sitting position, and their movement was measured by a motion analysis system. The differences in data between patients and healthy subjects were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. The relationship between fluidity index (FI) and other indices (kinetic and kinematic data in STW, functional independence measure [FIM], and Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA]) were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: The stroke patients had lower FI values than the healthy subjects and exhibited shortened step length and prolonged duration from onset to the first stance leg off. FI values correlated with trunk flexure angle at initial contact, first step length, and maximum vertical floor reaction force. The independent level of the FIM of stair climbing and walking ability and the FMA of balance also correlated with FI. Conclusion: There is a possibility that poor balance is one of the reasons why stroke patients are unable to start walking fluently from the sitting position. To perform the STW fluidly, patients must start walking before the trunk extension is fully completed. The relationship between FI and indices of physical ability, namely stair climbing and balance, may have therapeutic benefits for coaching the STW task to stroke patients. PMID:26733761

  10. Scientific basis for learning transfer from movements to urinary bladder functions for bladder repair in human patients with CNS injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    Coordination Dynamics Therapy (CDT) has been shown to be able to partly repair CNS injury. The repair is based on a movement-based re-learning theory which requires at least three levels of description: the movement or pattern (and anamnesis) level, the collective variable level, and the neuron level. Upon CDT not only the actually performed movement pattern itself is repaired, but the entire dynamics of CNS organization is improved, which is the theoretical basis for (re-) learning transfer. The transfer of learning for repair from jumping on springboard and exercising on a special CDT and recording device to urinary bladder functions is investigated at the neuron level. At the movement or pattern level, the improvement of central nervous system (CNS) functioning in human patients can be seen (or partly measured) by the improvement of the performance of the pattern. At the collective variable level, coordination tendencies can be measured by the so-called 'coordination dynamics' before, during and after treatment. At the neuron level, re-learning can additionally be assessed by surface electromyography (sEMG) as alterations of single motor unit firings and motor programs. But to express the ongoing interaction between the numerous neural, muscular, and metabolic elements involved in perception and action, it is relevant to inquire how the individual afferent and efferent neurons adjust their phase and frequency coordination to other neurons to satisfy learning task requirements. With the single-nerve fibre action potential recording method it was possible to measure that distributed single neurons communicate by phase and frequency coordination. It is shown that this timed firing of neurons is getting impaired upon injury and has to be improved by learning The stability of phase and frequency coordination among afferent and efferent neuron firings can be related to pattern stability. The stability of phase and frequency coordination at the neuron level can